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Sample records for x-ray diffraction line

  1. Grain orientation mapping of passivated aluminum interconnect lines by x-ray micro-diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; MacDowell, A.A.; Padmore, H.A.; Patel, J.R.; Patel, J.R. Thompson, A.C.

    1998-11-01

    A micro x-ray diffraction facility is under development at the Advanced Light Source. Spot sizes are typically about 1-{mu}m size generated by means of grazing incidence Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing mirrors. Photon energy is either white of energy range 6{endash}14 keV or monochromatic generated from a pair of channel cut crystals. Laue diffraction pattern from a single grain in a passivated 2-{mu}m wide bamboo structured Aluminum interconnect line has been recorded. Acquisition times are of the order of seconds. The Laue pattern has allowed the determination of the crystallographic orientation of individual grains along the line length. The experimental and analysis procedure used is described, as is the latest grain orientation result. The impact of x-ray micro-diffraction and its possible future direction are discussed in the context of other developments in the area of electromigration, and other technological problems. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Grain orientation mapping of passivated aluminum interconnect lines with X-ray micro-diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Patel, J.R. |; MacDowell, A.A.; Padmore, H.A.; Thompson, A.C.

    1998-09-01

    A micro x-ray diffraction facility is under development at the Advanced Light Source. Spot sizes are typically about 1-{micro}m size generated by means of grazing incidence Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing mirrors. Photon energy is either white of energy range 6--14 keV or monochromatic generated from a pair of channel cut crystals. Laue diffraction pattern from a single grain in a passivated 2-{micro}m wide bamboo structured Aluminum interconnect line has been recorded. Acquisition times are of the order of seconds. The Laue pattern has allowed the determination of the crystallographic orientation of individual grains along the line length. The experimental and analysis procedure used is described, as is the latest grain orientation result. The impact of x-ray micro-diffraction and its possible future direction are discussed in the context of other developments in the area of electromigration, and other technological problems.

  3. Grain orientation mapping of passivated aluminum interconnect lines by x-ray micro-diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C. H.; Patel, J. R.; Thompson, A. C.

    1998-11-24

    A micro x-ray diffraction facility is under development at the Advanced Light Source. Spot sizes are typically about 1-{mu}m size generated by means of grazing incidence Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing mirrors. Photon energy is either white of energy range 6-14 keV or monochromatic generated from a pair of channel cut crystals. Laue diffraction pattern from a single grain in a passivated 2-{mu}m wide bamboo structured Aluminum interconnect line has been recorded. Acquisition times are of the order of seconds. The Laue pattern has allowed the determination of the crystallographic orientation of individual grains along the line length. The experimental and analysis procedure used is described, as is the latest grain orientation result. The impact of x-ray micro-diffraction and its possible future direction are discussed in the context of other developments in the area of electromigration, and other technological problems.

  4. THE EFFECT OF SATELLITE LINES FROM THE X-RAY SOURCE ON X-RAY DIFFRACTION PEAKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses the development of a method for relating reactivity to crystallite size and strain parameters obtained by the Warren-Averbach technique. EPA has been using crystallite size and strain data obtained from x-ray diffraction (XRD) peak profile analysis to predic...

  5. Line x-ray source for diffraction enhanced imaging in clinical and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoqin

    Mammography is one type of imaging modalities that uses a low-dose x-ray or other radiation sources for examination of breasts. It plays a central role in early detection of breast cancers. The material similarity of tumor-cell and health cell, breast implants surgery and other factors, make the breast cancers hard to visualize and detect. Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), first proposed and investigated by D. Chapman is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using monochromatic x-rays from a synchrotron source, which produced images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. It shows dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging when applied to the same phantom. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also on the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. This imaging method may improve image quality of mammography, other medical applications, industrial radiography for non-destructive testing and x-ray computed tomography. However, the size, and cost, of a synchrotron source limits the application of the new modality to be applicable at clinical levels. This research investigates the feasibility of a designed line x-ray source to produce intensity compatible to synchrotron sources. It is composed of a 2-cm in length tungsten filament, installed on a carbon steel filament cup (backing plate), as the cathode and a stationary oxygen-free copper anode with molybdenum coating on the front surface serves as the target. Characteristic properties of the line x-ray source were computationally studied and the prototype was experimentally investigated. SIMIION code was used to computationally study the electron trajectories emanating from the filament towards the molybdenum target. A Faraday cup on the prototype device, proof-of-principle, was used to measure the distribution of electrons on the target, which compares favorably to computational results. The intensities of characteristic x-ray for molybdenum

  6. X-ray diffraction line profile analysis of KBr thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, R.; Triloki, Triloki; Singh, B. K.

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, the microcrystalline characteristics of KBr thin films have been investigated by evaluating the breadth of diffraction peak. The Williamson-Hall, the Size-Strain plot and the single-line Voigt methods are employed to deconvolute the finite crystallite size and microstrain contribution from the broaden X-ray profile. The texture coefficient and dislocation density have been determined along each diffraction peak. Other relevant physical parameters such as stress, Young's modulus and energy density are also estimated using uniform stress deformation and uniform deformation energy density approximation of Williamson-Hall method.

  7. In-line holography and coherent diffractive imaging with x-ray waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    De Caro, L.; Giannini, C.; Guagliardi, A.; Mocuta, C.; Metzger, T. H.; Cedola, A.; Burkeeva, I.; Lagomarsino, S.

    2008-02-15

    A Fresnel coherent diffraction imaging experiment with hard x rays is here presented, using two planar crossed waveguides as optical elements, leading to a virtual pointlike source. The coherent wave field obtained with this setup is used to illuminate a micrometric single object having the shape of a butterfly. A digital two-dimensional in-line holographic reconstruction of the unknown object at low resolution (200 nm) has been obtained directly via fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the raw data. The object and its twin image are well separated because suitable geometrical conditions are satisfied. A good estimate of the incident wave field phase has been extracted directly from the FFT of the raw data. A partial object reconstruction with 50 nm spatial resolution was achieved by fast iterative phase retrieval, the major limitation for a full reconstruction being the nonideal structure of the guided beam. The method offers a route for fast and reliable phase retrieval in x-ray coherent diffraction.

  8. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  9. Coherent x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitney, John Allen

    Conventional x-ray diffraction has historically been done under conditions such that the measured signal consists of an incoherent addition of scattering which is coherent only on a length scale determined by the properties of the beam. The result of the incoherent summation is a statistical averaging over the whole illuminated volume of the sample, which yields certain kinds of information with a high degree of precision and has been key to the success of x-ray diffraction in a variety of applications. Coherent x-ray scattering techniques, such as coherent x-ray diffraction (CXD) and x-ray intensity fluctuation spectroscopy (XIFS), attempt to reduce or eliminate any incoherent averaging so that specific, local structures couple to the measurement without being averaged out. In the case of XIFS, the result is analogous to dynamical light scattering, but with sensitivity to length scales less than 200 nm and time scales from 10-3 s to 103 s. When combined with phase retrieval, CXD represents an imaging technique with the penetration, in situ capabilities, and contrast mechanisms associated with x-rays and with a spatial resolution ultimately limited by the x-ray wavelength. In practice, however, the spatial resolution of CXD imaging is limited by exposure to about 100 A. This thesis describes CXD measurements of the binary alloy Cu3Au and the adaptation of phase retrieval methods for the reconstruction of real-space images of Cu3Au antiphase domains. The theoretical foundations of CXD are described in Chapter 1 as derived from the kinematical formulation for x-ray diffraction and from the temporal and spatial coherence of radiation. The antiphase domain structure of Cu 3Au is described, along with the associated reciprocal-space structure which is measured by CXD. CXD measurements place relatively stringent requirements on the coherence properties of the beam and on the detection mechanism of the experiment; these requirements and the means by which they have been

  10. A line-broadening analysis model for the microstructural characterization of nanocrystalline materials from asymmetric x-ray diffraction peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantoja-Cortés, Juan; Sánchez-Bajo, Florentino; Ortiz, Angel L.

    2012-05-01

    Nanograin sizes and crystal lattice microstrains in nanocrystalline materials are typically evaluated from the broadening of their x-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks under the assumption of symmetrical diffraction profiles. Since this assumption is not entirely satisfactory, we formulate a line-broadening analysis model of a single peak that considers explicitly the XRD peak asymmetry. The model is a generalization of the variance method in which the shape of the XRD peaks is idealized through asymmetrical split pseudo-Voigt functions. The model is validated on two nanocrystalline powders.

  11. A line-broadening analysis model for the microstructural characterization of nanocrystalline materials from asymmetric x-ray diffraction peaks.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Cortés, Juan; Sánchez-Bajo, Florentino; Ortiz, Angel L

    2012-05-30

    Nanograin sizes and crystal lattice microstrains in nanocrystalline materials are typically evaluated from the broadening of their x-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks under the assumption of symmetrical diffraction profiles. Since this assumption is not entirely satisfactory, we formulate a line-broadening analysis model of a single peak that considers explicitly the XRD peak asymmetry. The model is a generalization of the variance method in which the shape of the XRD peaks is idealized through asymmetrical split pseudo-Voigt functions. The model is validated on two nanocrystalline powders.

  12. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes, using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution many orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies. What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  13. Phase-targeted X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Hansford, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    A powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) method to enhance the signal of a specific crystalline phase within a mixture is presented for the first time. Specificity to the targeted phase relies on finding coincidences in the ratios of crystal d spacings and the ratios of elemental characteristic X-ray energies. Such coincidences can be exploited so that the two crystal planes diffract through the same scattering angle at two different X-ray energies. An energy-resolving detector placed at the appropriate scattering angle will detect a significantly enhanced signal at these energies if the target mineral or phase is present in the sample. When implemented using high scattering angles, for example 2θ > 150°, the method is tolerant to sample morphology and distance on the scale of ∼2 mm. The principle of the method is demonstrated experimentally using Pd Lα1 and Pd Lβ1 emission lines to enhance the diffraction signal of quartz. Both a pure quartz powder pellet and an unprepared mudstone rock specimen are used to test and develop the phase-targeted method. The technique is further demonstrated in the sensitive detection of retained austenite in steel samples using a combination of In Lβ1 and Ti Kβ emission lines. For both these examples it is also shown how the use of an attenuating foil, with an absorption edge close to and above the higher-energy characteristic X-ray line, can serve to isolate to some degree the coincidence signals from other fluorescence and diffraction peaks in the detected spectrum. The phase-targeted XRD technique is suitable for implementation using low-cost off-the-shelf components in a handheld or in-line instrument format. PMID:27738415

  14. X-Ray Diffraction Line Broadening: Modeling and Applications to High-Tc Superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Balzar, Davor

    1993-01-01

    A method to analyze powder-diffraction line broadening is proposed and applied to some novel high-Tc superconductors. Assuming that both size-broadened and strain-broadened profiles of the pure-specimen profile are described with a Voigt function, it is shown that the analysis of Fourier coefficients leads to the Warren-Averbach method of separation of size and strain contributions. The analysis of size coefficients shows that the “hook” effect occurs when the Cauchy content of the size-broadened profile is underestimated. The ratio of volume-weighted and surface-weighted domain sizes can change from ~1.31 for the minimum allowed Cauchy content to 2 when the size-broadened profile is given solely by a Cauchy function. If the distortion co-efficient is approximated by a harmonic term, mean-square strains decrease linearly with the increase of the averaging distance. The local strain is finite only in the case of pure-Gauss strain broadening because strains are then independent of averaging distance. Errors of root-mean-square strains as well as domain sizes were evaluated. The method was applied to two cubic structures with average volume-weighted domain sizes up to 3600 Å, as well as to tetragonal and orthorhombic (La-Sr)2CuO4, which exhibit weak line broadenings and highly overlapping reflections. Comparison with the integral-breadth methods is given. Reliability of the method is discussed in the case of a cluster of the overlapping peaks. The analysis of La2CuO4 and La1.85M0.15CuO4(M = Ca, Ba, Sr) high-Tc superconductors showed that microstrains and incoherently diffracting domain sizes are highly anisotropic. In the superconductors, stacking-fault probability increases with increasing Tc; microstrain decreases. In La2CuO4, different broadening of (h00) and (0k0) reflections is not caused by stacking faults; it might arise from lower crystallographic symmetiy. The analysis of Bi-Cu-O superconductors showed much higher strains in the [001] direction than in

  15. Diffractive Imaging Using Partially Coherent X Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, L. W.; Williams, G. J.; Quiney, H. M.; Vine, D. J.; Dilanian, R. A.; Flewett, S.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Balaur, E.; McNulty, I.

    2009-12-11

    The measured spatial coherence characteristics of the illumination used in a diffractive imaging experiment are incorporated in an algorithm that reconstructs the complex transmission function of an object from experimental x-ray diffraction data using 1.4 keV x rays. Conventional coherent diffractive imaging, which assumes full spatial coherence, is a limiting case of our approach. Even in cases in which the deviation from full spatial coherence is small, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the quality of wave field reconstructions. Our formulation is applicable to x-ray and electron diffraction imaging techniques provided that the spatial coherence properties of the illumination are known or can be measured.

  16. X-ray diffraction: instrumentation and applications.

    PubMed

    Bunaciu, Andrei A; Udriştioiu, Elena Gabriela; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a powerful nondestructive technique for characterizing crystalline materials. It provides information on structures, phases, preferred crystal orientations (texture), and other structural parameters, such as average grain size, crystallinity, strain, and crystal defects. X-ray diffraction peaks are produced by constructive interference of a monochromatic beam of X-rays scattered at specific angles from each set of lattice planes in a sample. The peak intensities are determined by the distribution of atoms within the lattice. Consequently, the X-ray diffraction pattern is the fingerprint of periodic atomic arrangements in a given material. This review summarizes the scientific trends associated with the rapid development of the technique of X-ray diffraction over the past five years pertaining to the fields of pharmaceuticals, forensic science, geological applications, microelectronics, and glass manufacturing, as well as in corrosion analysis.

  17. An Implementation of the Fundamental Parameters Approach for Analysis of X-ray Powder Diffraction Line Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Mullen, Katharine; Cline, James P.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an open implementation of the Fundamental Parameters Approach (FPA) models for analysis of X-ray powder diffraction line profiles. The original literature describing these models was examined and code was developed to allow for their use within a Python based least squares refinement algorithm. The NIST interest in the FPA method is specific to its ability to account for the optical aberrations of the powder diffraction experiment allowing for an accurate assessment of lattice parameter values. Lattice parameters are one of the primary certified measurands of NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) for powder diffraction. Lattice parameter values obtained from analysis of data from SRMs 640e and 660c using both the NIST FPA Python code and the proprietary, commercial code Topas, that constitutes the only other actively supported, complete implementation of FPA models within a least-squares data analysis environment, agreed to within 2 fm. This level of agreement demonstrates that both the NIST code and Topas constitute an accurate implementation of published FPA models. PMID:26958448

  18. X-ray dynamical diffraction Fraunhofer holography.

    PubMed

    Balyan, Minas

    2013-09-01

    An X-ray dynamical diffraction Fraunhofer holographic scheme is proposed. Theoretically it is shown that the reconstruction of the object image by visible light is possible. The spatial and temporal coherence requirements of the incident X-ray beam are considered. As an example, the hologram recording as well as the reconstruction by visible light of an absolutely absorbing wire are discussed.

  19. Two-Photon X-Ray Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, J

    2017-01-13

    The interference pattern of a circular photon source has long been used to define the optical diffraction limit. Here we show the breakdown of conventional x-ray diffraction theory for the fundamental case of a "source," consisting of a back-illuminated thin film in a circular aperture. When the conventional spontaneous x-ray scattering by atoms in the film is replaced at high incident intensity by stimulated resonant scattering, the film becomes the source of cloned photon twins and the diffraction pattern becomes self-focussed beyond the diffraction limit. The case of cloned x-ray biphotons is compared to and distinguished from the much studied case of entangled optical biphotons.

  20. Two-Photon X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöhr, J.

    2017-01-01

    The interference pattern of a circular photon source has long been used to define the optical diffraction limit. Here we show the breakdown of conventional x-ray diffraction theory for the fundamental case of a "source," consisting of a back-illuminated thin film in a circular aperture. When the conventional spontaneous x-ray scattering by atoms in the film is replaced at high incident intensity by stimulated resonant scattering, the film becomes the source of cloned photon twins and the diffraction pattern becomes self-focussed beyond the diffraction limit. The case of cloned x-ray biphotons is compared to and distinguished from the much studied case of entangled optical biphotons.

  1. Diffraction enhanced x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.; Zhong, Z.; Chapman, D.; Johnston, R.E.; Sayers, D.

    1997-09-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using synchrotron x-rays which produces images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. They show dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging applied to the same phantoms. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. The diffraction component and the apparent absorption component (absorption plus extinction contrast) can each be determined independently. This imaging method may improve the image quality for medical applications such as mammography.

  2. X-Ray Diffraction Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Unnam, J.; Naidu, S. V. N.; Houska, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    SOPAD separates overlapping peaks and analyzes derivatives of X-ray diffraction data. SOPAD helps analyst get most information out of available diffraction data. SOPAD uses Marquardt-type nonlinear regression routine to refine initial estimates of individual peak positions, intensities, shapes, and half-widths.

  3. Beyond hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Simultaneous combination with x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Castro, German R.

    2013-05-15

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a powerful and novel emerging technique for the nondestructive determination of electronic properties and chemical composition of bulk, buried interfaces and surfaces. It benefits from the exceptionally large escape depth of high kinetic energy photoelectrons, increasing the information depth up to several tens of nanometers. Complementing HAXPES with an atomic structure sensitive technique (such as x-ray diffraction) opens a new research field with major applications for materials science. At SpLine, the Spanish CRG beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, we have developed a novel experimental set-up that combines HAXPES and x-ray diffraction (x-ray reflectivity, surface x-ray diffraction, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and reciprocal space maps). Both techniques can be operated simultaneously on the same sample and using the same excitation source. The set-up includes a robust 2S + 3D diffractometer hosting a ultrahigh vacuum chamber equipped with a unique photoelectron spectrometer (few eV < electron kinetic energy < 15 keV), x-ray tube (Mg/Ti), 15 keV electron gun, and auxiliary standard surface facilities (molecular beam epitaxy evaporator, ion gun, low energy electron diffraction, sample heating/cooling system, leak valves, load-lock sample transfer, etc.). This end-station offers the unique possibility of performing simultaneous HAXPES + x-ray diffraction studies. In the present work, we describe the experimental set-up together with two experimental examples that emphasize its outstanding capabilities: (i) nondestructive characterization of the Si/Ge and HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interfaces on Ge-based CMOS devices, and (ii) strain study on La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} ultrathin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrate.

  4. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J.; Beale, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn–Na–W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. PMID:27047305

  5. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D M; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J; Beale, Andrew M

    2016-04-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn-Na-W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy.

  6. Single Particle X-ray Diffractive Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bogan, M J; Benner, W H; Boutet, S; Rohner, U; Frank, M; Seibert, M; Maia, F; Barty, A; Bajt, S; Riot, V; Woods, B; Marchesini, S; Hau-Riege, S P; Svenda, M; Marklund, E; Spiller, E; Hajdu, J; Chapman, H N

    2007-10-01

    In nanotechnology, strategies for the creation and manipulation of nanoparticles in the gas phase are critically important for surface modification and substrate-free characterization. Recent coherent diffractive imaging with intense femtosecond X-ray pulses has verified the capability of single-shot imaging of nanoscale objects at sub-optical resolutions beyond the radiation-induced damage threshold. By intercepting electrospray-generated particles with a single 15 femtosecond soft-X-ray pulse, we demonstrate diffractive imaging of a nanoscale specimen in free flight for the first time, an important step toward imaging uncrystallized biomolecules.

  7. Two-photon x-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Stohr, J.

    2017-01-11

    The interference pattern of a circular photon source has long been used to define the optical diffraction limit. Here we show the breakdown of conventional x-ray diffraction theory for the fundamental case of a “source”, consisting of a back-illuminated thin film in a circular aperture. When the conventional spontaneous x-ray scattering by atoms in the film is replaced at high incident intensity by stimulated resonant scattering, the film becomes the source of cloned photon twins and the diffraction pattern becomes self-focused beyond the diffraction limit. Furthermore, the case of cloned photon pairs is compared to and distinguished from entangled photonmore » pairs or biphotons.« less

  8. [X-ray diffraction spectrum of heroin].

    PubMed

    Hu, X; Kan, J; Yuan, B

    1999-06-01

    In this paper, practical measured X-ray diffraction spectra of heroin and opium are given and the parameters of each diffraction peak of the heroin are listed. The heroin belongs to orthorhombic crystal system; the basic vectors of the primitive cell are: a = 8.003, b = 14.373, c = 16.092 x 10(-10) m. As compared with the standard spectra of pure heroin and sucrose, the main doped additive checked by us, is sugar affirmatively.

  9. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    DOEpatents

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  10. Basics of X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanjek, H.; Häusler, W.

    2004-06-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is the most comprehensive tool to identify minerals in complex mineral assemblages. The method is briefly described with special emphasis on clay and ceramics. As an example, an investigation of graphite-containing pottery sherds by XRD is presented. By comparing the measured XRD data with the patterns simulated by the Rietveld method, the graphite content of such samples could be determined.

  11. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Fabrication of 11-nm-Wide Silica-Like Lines Using X-Ray Diffraction Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiao-Li; Xie, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Man-Hong; Liu, Ming; Chen, Bao-Qin; Pan, Feng

    2009-08-01

    Fine silica-like lines with 11 nm width are successfully fabricated using x-ray Fresnel diffraction exposure. X-rays pass a mask of 175-nm-wide lines and 125-nm-wide spaces and form sharp peaks on a wafer coated with a layer of hydrogen silsesquioxane resist (HSQ). By precisely controlling the mask-wafer gap at 10 μm using the laser interferogram method, the fine structures are defined on HSQ. Experimental images are reproduced by a simulation using the one-dimensional beam propagation method. This lithographic technique presents a novel and convenient way to fabricate fine silica-like structures and devices in nano-optical and nanoelectronic applications.

  12. X-ray diffraction from rectangular slits.

    PubMed

    Le Bolloc'h, D; Livet, F; Bley, F; Schulli, T; Veron, M; Metzger, T H

    2002-07-01

    It is shown that for micrometre-sized beams the X-ray diffraction from slits is a source of strong parasitic background, even for slits of high quality. In order to illustrate this effect, the coherent diffraction from rectangular slits has been studied in detail. A large number of interference fringes with strong visibility have been observed using a single set of slits made of polished cylinders. For very small apertures, asymmetrical slits generate asymmetrical patterns. This pattern is calculated from the theory of electromagnetic field propagation and compared with experiment in the far-field regime. The use of guard slits to remove Fraunhofer diffraction from the beam-defining slits is treated theoretically. Numerical simulations yield the optimum aperture of the guard slits with respect to the distance to the primary slits. Diffraction theory is shown to be essential to understand how to reduce the background-to-signal ratio in high-resolution experiments.

  13. Building X-ray Diffraction Calibration Software

    SciTech Connect

    Lande, Joshua; /Marlboro Coll.

    2007-10-31

    X-ray diffraction is a technique used to analyze the structure of crystals. It records the interference pattern created when x-rays travel through a crystal. Three dimensional structure can be inferred from these two dimensional diffraction patterns. Before the patterns can be analyzed, diffraction data must be precisely calibrated. Calibration is used to determine the experimental parameters of the particular experiment. This is done by fitting the experimental parameters to the diffraction pattern of a well understood crystal. Fit2D is a software package commonly used to do this calibration but it leaves much to be desired. In particular, it does not give very much control over the calibration of the data, requires a significant amount of manual input, does not allow for the calibration of highly tilted geometries, does not properly explain the assumptions that it is making, and cannot be modified. We build code to do this calibration while at the same time overcoming the limitations of Fit2D. This paper describes the development of the calibration software and the assumptions that are made in doing the calibration.

  14. X-ray microimaging by diffractive techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kirz, Janos; Jacobsen, Chris

    2001-07-31

    The report summarizes the development of soft x-ray microscopes at the National Synchrotron Light Source X-1A beamline. We have developed a soft x-ray microscopy beamline (X-1A) at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This beamline has been upgraded recently to provide two endstations dedicated to microscopy experiments. One endstation hosts a brand new copy of the redesigned room temperature scanning x-ray microscope (STXM), and the other end station hosts a cryo STXM and the original redesigned room temperature microscope, which has been commissioned and has started operation. Cryo STXM and the new microscope use the same new software package, running under the LINUX operating system. The new microscope is showing improved image resolution and extends spectromicroscopy to the nitrogen, oxygen and iron edges. These microscopes are used by us, and by users of the facility, to image hydrated specimens at 50 nm or better spatial resolution and with 0.1-0.5 eV energy resolution. This allows us to carry out chemical state mapping in biological, materials science, and environmental and colloidal science specimens. In the cryo microscope, we are able to do chemical state mapping and tomography of frozen hydrated specimens, and this is of special importance for radiation-sensitive biological specimens. for spectromicroscopic analysis, and methods for obtaining real-space images from the soft x-ray diffraction patterns of non-crystalline specimens. The user program provides opportunities for collaborators and other groups to exploit the techniques available and to develop them further. We have also developed new techniques such as an automated method for acquiring ''stacks'' of images.

  15. Transient x-ray diffraction and its application to materials science and x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Hauer, A.A.; Kopp, R.; Cobble, J.; Kyrala, G.; Springer, R.

    1997-12-01

    Time resolved x-ray diffraction and scattering have been applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physical phenomena from chemical reactions to shock wave physics. Interest in this method has heightened in recent years with the advent of versatile, high power, pulsed x-ray sources utilizing laser plasmas, electron beams and other methods. In this article, we will describe some of the fundamentals involved in time resolved x-ray diffraction, review some of the history of its development, and describe some recent progress in the field. In this article we will emphasize the use of laser-plasmas as the x-ray source for transient diffraction.

  16. X-ray diffraction line profile analysis of nanostructured nickel oxide: Shape factor and convolution of crystallite size and microstrain contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniammal, K.; Madhu, G.; Biju, V.

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructured nickel oxide is synthesized through a chemical route and annealed at different temperatures. Contribution of crystallite size and microstrain to X-ray diffraction line broadening are analyzed by Williamson-Hall analysis using isotropic and anisotropic models. None of the models perform well in the case of samples with smaller average crystallite sizes. For sample with crystallite size 3 nm all models show negative slope which is physically meaningless. Analysis of shape factor shows that the line profiles are more Gaussian like. Size-strain plot method, which assumes a different convolution of the crystallite size and microstrain contributions, is found to be most suitable. The study highlights the fact that the convolution of crystallite size and microstrain contributions may differ for samples and should be taken into account while analyzing the observed line broadening. Microstrain values show a regular decrease with increase in the annealing temperature.

  17. Elimination of X-Ray Diffraction through Stimulated X-Ray Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, B.; Wang, T.; Graves, C. E.; Zhu, D.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Hellwig, O.; Chen, Z.; Dürr, H. A.; Scherz, A.; Stöhr, J.

    2016-07-01

    X-ray diffractive imaging with laterally coherent x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses is increasingly utilized to obtain ultrafast snapshots of matter. Here we report the amazing disappearance of single-shot charge and magnetic diffraction patterns recorded with resonantly tuned, narrow bandwidth XFEL pulses. Our experimental results reveal the exquisite sensitivity of single-shot charge and magnetic diffraction patterns of a magnetic film to the onset of field-induced stimulated elastic x-ray forward scattering. The loss in diffraction contrast, measured over 3 orders of magnitude in intensity, is in remarkable quantitative agreement with a recent theory that is extended to include diffraction.

  18. X-RAY DIFFRACTION STUDIES ON FROG MUSCLES.

    PubMed

    Spiegel-Adolf, M; Henny, G C; Ashkenaz, E W

    1944-11-20

    1. X-ray diffraction studies of sartorius muscles of Rana pipiens were made in a new x-ray diffraction camera which permits exposures of 3 to 6 minutes. The object-film distance can be varied from 20 to 80 mm; the muscle inside the camera can be electrically stimulated while contracting isotonically or isometrically, and can be observed by a special device. After exposures up to 30 minutes (approximately 40,830 r) muscles are still alive and responsive. 2. Contrary to the x-ray diffraction pattern of powdered dry muscle, which pattern consists of two rings corresponding to spacings of 4.46 A.u. and 9.66 A.u., both moist and dried whole sartorius muscle show signs of orientation in both rings, consisting of two equatorial streaks (wet) or points (dry) and meridional sickles. The moist muscle shows in addition a diffuse water ring. The spacings corresponding to the orientation points and elliptical structure show only slight differences in moist and dried samples. Through statistical computations based on two different series consisting of thirteen moist and twenty-eight dried samples, and nine muscles before and after drying, it was shown that only the divergence in the smaller spacing has some real significance, which indicates that most water of the moist muscle is bound intermolecularly. Upon resoaking of dried muscle the x-ray diffraction pattern of the moist muscle is restored. 3. Stretching of muscle by weights below the breaking point produces an additional well defined diffraction line, corresponding to a spacing of 4.32 A.u. A similar diffraction line can be produced in frog tendon upon stretching. 4. The influence of heat on the x-ray diffraction pattern of muscle depends upon the maximum temperature and the length of action; 5 minutes at 50 degrees C. markedly reduces the orientation of the sample; 5 minutes' immersion in boiling Ringer's solution destroys the orientation and produces a ring corresponding to a spacing of 5.3 to 5.5 A.u. in the moist and

  19. Phase retrieval in x-ray coherent Fresnel projection-geometry diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    De Caro, Liberato; Giannini, Cinzia; Cedola, Alessia; Pelliccia, Daniele; Lagomarsino, Stefano; Jark, Werner

    2007-01-22

    Coherent x-ray diffraction experiments were performed in Fresnel regime, within a line-projection geometry. A planar x-ray waveguide was used to focus coherent cylindrical waves onto a 7.2 {mu}m Kevlar fiber, which acts as a phase object for hard x rays. The phase was retrieved, by using a Fourier-based iterative phasing algorithm, consistent with measured diffraction data and known constraints in real space, with a submicrometer spatial resolution.

  20. X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, David C.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Barnes, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes research on use of x-ray diffraction to measure stresses in metal conductors of complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits exposed to ionizing radiation. Expanding upon report summarized in "X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: I" (NPO-18803), presenting data further suggesting relationship between electrical performances of circuits and stresses and strains in metal conductors.

  1. Neutron and X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Advanced Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Tiley, Jaimie; Wang, Yandong; Liaw, Peter K

    2010-01-01

    is predicted that the application of these techniques, in combination with theoretical simulations and numerical modeling, will lead to major breakthroughs in materials science in the foreseeable future, which will contribute to the development of materials technology and industrial innovation. Specifically, the use of these techniques provides bulk material properties that further augment new characterization tools including the increased use of atom probe tomography and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy systems. The combination of these techniques greatly assists the material property models that address multi-length-scale mechanisms. Different applications of diffuse scattering for understanding the fundamental materials properties are illustrated in the articles of Welberry et al., Goossens and Welberry, Campbell, Abe et al., Gilles et al., and Zhang et al. Analysis of thin films and two-dimensional structures is described in the articles of Gramlich et al., Brock et al., Vigliante et al., Kuzel et al., and Davydok et al. Recent advances in the line profile analysis are represented by the the articles of Scardi et al., Ungar et al., and Woo et al. Characterization of modern alloys is presented by the articles of Wollmershauser et al., Eidenberger et al., Garlea et al., Jia et al., Soulami et al., Wilson et al., and Wang et al. The collected articles are written by different scientific X-ray and neutron research groups. They represent a general trend in the development and application of diffraction techniques all over the world.

  2. High-Energy X-Ray Diffraction Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-29

    The functionality of heRXD includes the following: distance and angular calibration and viewing flat-panel detector images used for X-ray diffraction; image (polar) rebinning or "caking"; line position fitting in powder diffraction images; image segmentation or "blob finding"; crystal orentation indesing; and lattice vector refinement. These functionalities encompass a critical set analyzing teh data for high-energy diffraction measurements that are currently performed at synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The software design modular and open source under LGPL. The intent is to provide a common framework and graphical user interface that has the ability to utillize internal as well as external subroutines to provide various optins for performing the fuctionalities listed above. The software will initially be deployed at several national user facilities--including APS, ALS, and CHESS--and then made available for download using a hosting service such as sourceforge.

  3. Fractal analysis of powder X-ray diffraction patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Cruz, A.; Santolalla, C.; Moreno, E.; de los Reyes-Heredia, J. A.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2012-02-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with broad background are commonly found in the characterization of materials with a certain degree of amorphicity, so the sharp intensity peaks associated with material phases are not well defined. This work used rescaled range (denoted by R/S) analysis, a method intended for fractal analysis of noisy signals, to characterize XRD patterns with broad background. It is found that XRD patterns with broad background are not random at all, but contain information on regularities expressed as autocorrelations of the intensity signal. Sol-gel alumina fired at different temperatures was used as an example to illustrate the applicability of the method. It is shown that fractal R/S analysis is able to locate angular regions that can be associated to ideal International Centre for Diffraction Data Powder Diffraction File (ICDD PDF) lines of diverse alumina phases.

  4. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction at high x-ray intensity.

    PubMed

    Son, Sang-Kil; Chapman, Henry N; Santra, Robin

    2011-11-18

    The multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method is used to determine phase information in x-ray crystallography by employing anomalous scattering from heavy atoms. X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) show promise for revealing the structure of single molecules or nanocrystals, but the phase problem remains largely unsolved. Because of the ultrabrightness of x-ray FEL, samples experience severe electronic radiation damage, especially to heavy atoms, which hinders direct implementation of MAD with x-ray FELs. Here, we propose a generalized version of MAD phasing at high x-ray intensity. We demonstrate the existence of a Karle-Hendrickson-type equation in the high-intensity regime and calculate relevant coefficients with detailed electronic damage dynamics of heavy atoms. The present method offers a potential for ab initio structural determination in femtosecond x-ray nanocrystallography.

  5. An X-ray diffraction study of titanium oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Unnam, J.

    1984-01-01

    Titanium specimens of commercial purity were exposed at 1100 to 1400 F to laboratory air for times up to 100 hours. The extent of substrate contamination by interstitial oxygen was was determined by a new X-ray diffraction analysis involving transformation of X-ray diffraction intensity bands. The oxygen solid-solubility at the oxide-metal interfaces and its variation with time at temperature were also determined. Diffusion coefficients are deduced from the oxygen depth profiles.

  6. In-situ mechanical testing during X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Van Swygenhoven, Helena Van Petegem, Steven

    2013-04-15

    Deforming metals during recording X-ray diffraction patterns is a useful tool to get a deeper understanding of the coupling between microstructure and mechanical behaviour. With the advances in flux, detector speed and focussing techniques at synchrotron facilities, in-situ mechanical testing is now possible during powder diffraction and Laue diffraction. The basic principle is explained together with illustrative examples.

  7. X-ray diffraction comparator - new possibilities.

    PubMed

    Brytov, I A; Dmitriev, G D; Ivanov, V N; Klevtsov, S A

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the possibilities to determine precisely the lattice constants of quartz using an X-ray diffractometer-comparator. This device has double-crystal optical scheme, continuously swinging crystal-monochromator and an original angular reference system. The measurement strategy uses the difference in angular positions of two different Bragg planes relative the third one. On assumption that the wavelength of the used radiation is known with accuracy of ± 1.2,ppm, the accuracy of determined lattice constants is estimated in ± 5×10-5Å. The described measurement strategy proves to be efficient in measuring the changes of the lattice constants with temperature and in precision testing of a quartz single-crystal homogeneity. We discuss also the features of other instruments for the automatic sorting of quartz blanks in groups by the cut angle, which use the same monochromator pendulum system.

  8. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.; Lima, E.; Huang, X.; Krupin, O.; Seu, K.; Parks, D.; Kevan, S.; Kisslinger, K.; McNulty, I.; Gambino, R.; Mangin, S.; Roy, S. and Fischer, P.

    2011-07-14

    We report the first proof-of-principle experiment of iterative phase retrieval from magnetic x-ray diffraction. By using the resonant x-ray excitation process and coherent x-ray scattering, we show that linearly polarized soft x rays can be used to image both the amplitude and the phase of magnetic domain structures. We recovered the magnetic structure of an amorphous terbium-cobalt thin film with a spatial resolution of about 75 nm at the Co L{sub 3} edge at 778 eV. In comparison with soft x-ray microscopy images recorded with Fresnel zone plate optics at better than 25 nm spatial resolution, we find qualitative agreement in the observed magnetic structure.

  9. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons.

  10. Cryogenic X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy for Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Enju; Wiegart, Lutz; Pernot, Petra; Howells, Malcolm; Timmins, Joanna; Zontone, Federico; Madsen, Anders

    2009-11-06

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is well suited for nondestructive, high-resolution biological imaging, especially for thick samples, with the high penetration power of x rays and without limitations imposed by a lens. We developed nonvacuum, cryogenic (cryo-) XDM with hard x rays at 8 keV and report the first frozen-hydrated imaging by XDM. By preserving samples in amorphous ice, the risk of artifacts associated with dehydration or chemical fixation is avoided, ensuring the imaging condition closest to their natural state. The reconstruction shows internal structures of intact D. radiodurans bacteria in their natural contrast.

  11. Coherent grating x-ray diffraction (CGXD) and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Q.

    1996-09-01

    We show that an x-ray interference phenomenon, coherent grating x-ray diffraction (CGXD), can be used to study lateral nanostructure arrays on crystal surfaces and interfaces. Compared to Fraunhofer grating diffraction of visible light, x-ray grating diffraction contains information not only about geometric profiles of the surface but also about the internal crystalline structures and lattice strain distributions in the grating features. The grating diffraction pattern can also be measured in a white-beam Laue method using highly collimated polychromatic synchrotron radiation, which provides a parallel data collection scheme and may be useful in {ital in} {ital situ} studies on evolution of nanostructure arrays. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. X-ray diffraction investigation of ultrafine boron nitride powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gurov, S.V.; Chukalin, V.I.; Rezchikova, T.V.; Torbov, V.J.; Troitskii, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an x-ray diffraction analysis of ultrafine boron nitride powders of different mean particle sizes. Diffraction spectra of the ultrafine boron nitride powders were obtained using a DRON-1 apparatus. The experimental facts are indicative of a turbostratic character of deformation of the hexagonal lattice of ultrafinely divided boron nitride.

  13. Coherent Diffraction Imaging with Hard X-Ray Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caro, Liberato De; Giannini, Cinzia; Pelliccia, Daniele; Cedola, Alessia; Lagomarsino, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) has been widely applied in the nanoscopic world, offering nanometric-scale imaging of noncrystallographic samples, and permitting the next-generation structural studies on living cells, single virus particles and biomolecules. The use of curved wavefronts in CXDI has caused a tidal wave in the already promising application of this emergent technique. The non-planarity of the wavefront allows to accelerate any iterative phase-retrieval process and to guarantee a reliable and unique solution. Nowadays, successful experiments have been performed with Fresnel zone plates and planar waveguides as optical elements. Here we describe the use of a single planar waveguide as well as two crossed waveguides in the experiments which first showed this optical element a promising tool for producing a line- or point-like coherent source, respectively.

  14. An X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy joint study of neuroglobin.

    PubMed

    Arcovito, Alessandro; Moschetti, Tommaso; D'Angelo, Paola; Mancini, Giordano; Vallone, Beatrice; Brunori, Maurizio; Della Longa, Stefano

    2008-07-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a member of the globin family expressed in the vertebrate brain, involved in neuroprotection. A combined approach of X-ray diffraction (XRD) on single crystal and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in solution, allows to determine the oxidation state and the structure of the Fe-heme both in the bis-histidine and the CO-bound (NgbCO) states. The overall data demonstrate that under X-ray the iron is photoreduced fairly rapidly, and that the previously reported X-ray structure of ferric Ngb [B. Vallone, K. Nienhaus, M. Brunori, G.U. Nienhaus, Proteins 56 (2004) 85-92] very likely refers to a photoreduced species indistinguishable from the dithionite reduced protein. Results from the XAS analysis of NgbCO in solution are in good agreement with XRD data on the crystal. However prolonged X-ray exposure at 15K determines CO release. This preliminary result paves the way to experiments aimed at the characterization of pentacoordinate ferrous Ngb, the only species competent in binding external ligands such as O2, CO or NO.

  15. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment.

    PubMed

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; Xu, Ruqing; Fuoss, Paul H; Hruszkewycz, Stephan O

    2016-09-01

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible with in situ sample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifying in situ chamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable, for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.

  16. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; Xu, Ruqing; Fuoss, Paul H.; Hruszkewycz, Stephan O.

    2016-07-26

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible within situsample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifyingin situchamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable, for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.

  17. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Miao, H.; Neiman, A. M.; Sayre, D.

    2005-10-25

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffraction microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.

  18. X-Ray Diffraction Wafer Mapping Method for Rhombohedral Super-Hetero-Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yoonjoon; Choi, Sang Hyouk; King, Glen C.; Elliott, James R.; Dimarcantonio, Albert L.

    2010-01-01

    A new X-ray diffraction (XRD) method is provided to acquire XY mapping of the distribution of single crystals, poly-crystals, and twin defects across an entire wafer of rhombohedral super-hetero-epitaxial semiconductor material. In one embodiment, the method is performed with a point or line X-ray source with an X-ray incidence angle approximating a normal angle close to 90 deg, and in which the beam mask is preferably replaced with a crossed slit. While the wafer moves in the X and Y direction, a narrowly defined X-ray source illuminates the sample and the diffracted X-ray beam is monitored by the detector at a predefined angle. Preferably, the untilted, asymmetric scans are of {440} peaks, for twin defect characterization.

  19. Towards high-resolution ptychographic x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yukio; Suzuki, Akihiro; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko

    2011-06-01

    Ptychographic x-ray diffraction microscopy is a lensless imaging technique with a large field of view and high spatial resolution, which is also useful for characterizing the wavefront of an x-ray probe. The performance of this technique is degraded by positioning errors due to the drift between the sample and illumination optics. We propose an experimental approach for correcting the positioning errors and demonstrate success by two-dimensionally reconstructing both the wavefront of the focused x-ray beam and the complex transmissivity of the weakly scattering objects at the pixel resolution of better than 10 nm in the field of view larger than 5 {mu}m. This method is applicable to not only the observation of organelles inside cells or nano-mesoscale structures buried within bulk materials but also the characterization of probe for single-shot imaging with x-ray free electron lasers.

  20. Remote X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis on Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The legacy of planetary X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) began in 1960 when W. Parish proposed an XRD instrument for deployment on the moon. The instrument was built and flight qualified, but the Lunar XRD program was cancelled shortly before the first human landing in 1969. XRF chemical data have been collected in situ by surface landers on Mars (Viking 1 & 2, Pathfinder) and Venus (Venera 13 & 14). These highly successful experiments provide critical constraints on our current understanding of surface processes and planetary evolution. However, the mineralogy, which is more critical to planetary surface science than simple chemical analysis, will remain unknown or will at best be imprecisely constrained until X-ray diffraction (XRD) data are collected. Recent progress in X-ray detector technology allows the consideration of simultaneous XRD (mineralogic analysis) and high-precision XRF (elemental analysis) in systems miniaturized to the point where they can be mounted on fixed landers or small robotic rovers. There is a variety of potential targets for XRD/XRF equipped landers within the solar system, the most compelling of which are the poles of the moon, the southern highlands of Mars and Europa.

  1. Dynamical diffraction imaging (topography) with X-ray synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriyama, M.; Steiner, B. W.; Dobbyn, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    By contrast to electron microscopy, which yields information on the location of features in small regions of materials, X-ray diffraction imaging can portray minute deviations from perfect crystalline order over larger areas. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray optics technology uses a highly parallel incident beam to eliminate ambiguities in the interpretation of image details; scattering phenomena previously unobserved are now readily detected. Synchrotron diffraction imaging renders high-resolution, real-time, in situ observations of materials under pertinent environmental conditions possible.

  2. X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, David C.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Barnes, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    X-ray-diffraction tests performed on aluminum conductors in commercial HI1-507A complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit analog multiplexers, both before and after circuits exposed to ionizing radiation from Co(60) source, and after postirradiation annealing at ambient and elevated temperatures. Tests in addition to electrical tests performed to determine effects of irradiation and of postirradiation annealing on electrical operating characteristics of circuits. Investigators sought to determine whether relationship between effects of irradiation on devices and physical stresses within devices. X-ray diffraction potentially useful for nondestructive measurement of stresses.

  3. Modern X-ray Diffraction Methods in Mineralogy and Geosciences

    SciTech Connect

    Lavina, Barbara; Dera, Przemyslaw; Downs, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    This section is not intended to be comprehensive or detailed, because diffraction is such a vast subject. The principles of diffraction theory, however, are summarized under the assumption that the reader is familiar with basic concepts of the crystalline state. We will briefly review the basics of diffraction techniques, using laboratory and synchrotron X-ray sources and highlight some of their applications in geoscience.

  4. Ultrafast x-ray diffraction of laser-irradiated crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, P. A.; Larsson, J.; Chang, Z.; Lindenberg, A.; Schuck, P. J.; Judd, E.; Padmore, H. A.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Lee, R. W.; Murnane, M.; Kapteyn, H.; Wark, J. S.; Falcone, R. W.

    1997-07-01

    An apparatus has been developed for measuring time-dependent x-ray diffraction. X-ray pulses from an Advanced Light Source bend magnet are diffracted by a sagittally-focusing Si (111) crystal and then by a sample crystal, presently InSb (111). Laser pulses with 100 fs duration and a repetition rate of 1 KHz irradiate the sample inducing a phase transition. Two types of detectors are being employed: an x-ray streak camera and an avalanche photodiode. The streak camera is driven by a photoconductive switch and has a 2 ps temporal resolution determined by trigger jitter. The avalanche photodiode has high quantum efficiency and sufficient time resolution to detect single x-ray pulses in ALS two bunch or `camshaft' operation. A beamline is under construction dedicated for time resolved and micro-diffraction experiments. In the new beamline a toroidal mirror collects 3 mrad horizontally and makes a 1:1 image of the bend magnet source in the x-ray hutch. A laser induced phase transition has been observed in InSb occurring within 70 ps.

  5. Ultrafast x-ray diffraction of laser-irradiated crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, P.A.; Padmore, H.A.; Lindenberg, A.; Schuck, P.J.; Judd, E.; Falcone, R.W.; Bucksbaum, P.H.; Murnane, M.; Kapteyn, H. Lee, R.W. Wark, J.S.

    1997-07-01

    An apparatus has been developed for measuring time-dependent x-ray diffraction. X-ray pulses from an Advanced Light Source bend magnet are diffracted by a sagittally-focusing Si (111) crystal and then by a sample crystal, presently InSb (111). Laser pulses with 100 fs duration and a repetition rate of 1 KHz irradiate the sample inducing a phase transition. Two types of detectors are being employed: an x-ray streak camera and an avalanche photodiode. The streak camera is driven by a photoconductive switch and has a 2 ps temporal resolution determined by trigger jitter. The avalanche photodiode has high quantum efficiency and sufficient time resolution to detect single x-ray pulses in ALS two bunch or {open_quote}camshaft{close_quote} operation. A beamline is under construction dedicated for time resolved and micro-diffraction experiments. In the new beamline a toroidal mirror collects 3 mrad horizontally and makes a 1:1 image of the bend magnet source in the x-ray hutch. A laser induced phase transition has been observed in InSb occurring within 70 ps. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Ultrafast x-ray diffraction of laser-irradiated crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, P.A.; Larsson, J.; Chang, Z.

    1997-09-01

    An apparatus has been developed for measuring time-dependent x-ray diffraction. X-ray pulses from an Advanced Light Source bend magnet are diffracted by a sagittally-focusing Si(111) crystal and then by a sample crystal, presently InSb(111). Laser pulses with 100 fs duration and a repetition rate of 1 KHz irradiate the sample inducing a phase transition. Two types of detectors are being employed: an x-ray streak camera and an avalanche photodiode. The streak camera is driven by a photoconductive switch and has a 2 ps temporal resolution determined by trigger jitter. The avalanche photodiode has high quantum efficiency and sufficient time resolution to detect single x-ray pulses in ALS two bunch or camshaft operation. A beamline is under construction dedicated for time resolved and micro-diffraction experiments. In the new beamline a toroidal mirror collects 3 mrad horizontally and makes a 1:1 image of the bend magnet source in the x-ray hutch. A laser induced phase transition has been observed in InSb occurring within 70 ps.

  7. Ultrafast x-ray diffraction of laser-irradiated crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, P. A.; Padmore, H. A.; Larsson, J.; Lindenberg, A.; Schuck, P. J.; Judd, E.; Falcone, R. W.; Chang, Z.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Murnane, M.; Kapteyn, H.; Lee, R. W.; Wark, J. S.

    1997-07-01

    An apparatus has been developed for measuring time-dependent x-ray diffraction. X-ray pulses from an Advanced Light Source bend magnet are diffracted by a sagittally-focusing Si (111) crystal and then by a sample crystal, presently InSb (111). Laser pulses with 100 fs duration and a repetition rate of 1 KHz irradiate the sample inducing a phase transition. Two types of detectors are being employed: an x-ray streak camera and an avalanche photodiode. The streak camera is driven by a photoconductive switch and has a 2 ps temporal resolution determined by trigger jitter. The avalanche photodiode has high quantum efficiency and sufficient time resolution to detect single x-ray pulses in ALS two bunch or 'camshaft' operation. A beamline is under construction dedicated for time resolved and micro-diffraction experiments. In the new beamline a toroidal mirror collects 3 mrad horizontally and makes a 1:1 image of the bend magnet source in the x-ray hutch. A laser induced phase transition has been observed in InSb occurring within 70 ps.

  8. X-Ray Diffraction Project Final Report, Fiscal Year 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Dane V. Morgan

    2006-10-01

    An x-ray diffraction diagnostic system was developed for determining real-time shock-driven lattice parameter shifts in single crystals at the gas gun at TA-IV at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The signal-to-noise ratio and resolution of the system were measured using imaging plates as the detector and by varying the slit width. This report includes tests of the x-ray diffraction system using a phosphor coupled to a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera by a coherent fiber-optic bundle. The system timing delay was measured with a newly installed transistor-transistor logic (TTL) bypass designed to reduce the x-ray delay time. The axial misalignment of the Bragg planes was determined with respect to the optical axis for a set of eight LiF [lithium fluoride] crystals provided by SNL to determine their suitability for gas gun experiments.

  9. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Shapiro, D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; ...

    2005-10-25

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffractionmore » microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.« less

  10. Coherent diffraction imaging using focused hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunam; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Su Yong; Kim, Chan; Kim, Yoonhee; Noh, Do Young; Marathe, Shashidhara; Song, Changyong; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Kang, Hyon Chol

    2016-05-01

    A quantitative height profile image of a silicon nano-trench structure was obtained via coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) utilizing focused X-rays at a photon energy of 5.5 keV. The ability to optimize the spatial coherence and the photon flux density of a focused X-ray beam was the key technique for achieving such technical progress at a given X-ray photon flux. This was achieved by investigating the tunability of the focused beam's optical properties and performing a CDI experiment with the focused X-rays. The relationship between the focused X-rays' optical properties ( e.g., photon flux density and spatial coherence length) and the incident beam's size, which can be tuned by adjusting the slits in front of the Fresnel zone plate (FZP) was elucidated. We also obtained a quantitative image of a nano-trench sample produced via the reconstruction process of CDI, which utilizes carefully tuned, focused X-rays.

  11. Dynamic X-ray diffraction sampling for protein crystal positioning.

    PubMed

    Scarborough, Nicole M; Godaliyadda, G M Dilshan P; Ye, Dong Hye; Kissick, David J; Zhang, Shijie; Newman, Justin A; Sheedlo, Michael J; Chowdhury, Azhad U; Fischetti, Robert F; Das, Chittaranjan; Buzzard, Gregery T; Bouman, Charles A; Simpson, Garth J

    2017-01-01

    A sparse supervised learning approach for dynamic sampling (SLADS) is described for dose reduction in diffraction-based protein crystal positioning. Crystal centering is typically a prerequisite for macromolecular diffraction at synchrotron facilities, with X-ray diffraction mapping growing in popularity as a mechanism for localization. In X-ray raster scanning, diffraction is used to identify the crystal positions based on the detection of Bragg-like peaks in the scattering patterns; however, this additional X-ray exposure may result in detectable damage to the crystal prior to data collection. Dynamic sampling, in which preceding measurements inform the next most information-rich location to probe for image reconstruction, significantly reduced the X-ray dose experienced by protein crystals during positioning by diffraction raster scanning. The SLADS algorithm implemented herein is designed for single-pixel measurements and can select a new location to measure. In each step of SLADS, the algorithm selects the pixel, which, when measured, maximizes the expected reduction in distortion given previous measurements. Ground-truth diffraction data were obtained for a 5 µm-diameter beam and SLADS reconstructed the image sampling 31% of the total volume and only 9% of the interior of the crystal greatly reducing the X-ray dosage on the crystal. Using in situ two-photon-excited fluorescence microscopy measurements as a surrogate for diffraction imaging with a 1 µm-diameter beam, the SLADS algorithm enabled image reconstruction from a 7% sampling of the total volume and 12% sampling of the interior of the crystal. When implemented into the beamline at Argonne National Laboratory, without ground-truth images, an acceptable reconstruction was obtained with 3% of the image sampled and approximately 5% of the crystal. The incorporation of SLADS into X-ray diffraction acquisitions has the potential to significantly minimize the impact of X-ray exposure on the crystal by

  12. X-Ray Diffraction Simulation Using Laser Pointers and Printers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil E.

    2001-01-01

    Uses a laser pointer to demonstrate the analogy between optical and X-ray diffraction and a laser printer with 600 or 1200 dot resolution to create and modify arrays, print them on transparencies, and illuminate them with laser pointers. Includes 14 references. (Author/YDS)

  13. Assessment of quartz materials crystallinity by x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovkin, M.; AnanIeva, L.; Nebera, T.; Antsiferova, A.

    2016-02-01

    The estimated degree of crystallinity of natural and synthetic grown quartz and quartzite by calculating the x-ray diffraction patterns. It is shown that the index of crystallinity of natural quartzite varies widely, reflecting the different degree of their transformation. The highest values of the index of crystallinity are characterized natural and synthetic single crystals of quartz.

  14. A Practical Method of Simulating X-Ray Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisse, F.; Sundararajan, P. R.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the beam of X-rays is simulated through the use of a laser as a monochromatic light source and the crystal is replaced by photographically prepared masks. A strong diffraction pattern as large as 20 cm. can be obtained. (GS)

  15. Coherent X-ray diffraction from collagenous soft tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Berenguer de la Cuesta, Felisa; Wenger, Marco P.E.; Bean, Richard J.; Bozec, Laurent; Horton, Michael A.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2009-09-11

    Coherent X-ray diffraction has been applied in the imaging of inorganic materials with great success. However, its application to biological specimens has been limited to some notable exceptions, due to the induced radiation damage and the extended nature of biological samples, the last limiting the application of most part of the phasing algorithms. X-ray ptychography, still under development, is a good candidate to overcome such difficulties and become a powerful imaging method for biology. We describe herein the feasibility of applying ptychography to the imaging of biological specimens, in particular collagen rich samples. We report here speckles in diffraction patterns from soft animal tissue, obtained with an optimized small angle X-ray setup that exploits the natural coherence of the beam. By phasing these patterns, dark field images of collagen within tendon, skin, bone, or cornea will eventually be obtained with a resolution of 60-70 nm. We present simulations of the contrast mechanism in collagen based on atomic force microscope images of the samples. Simulations confirmed the 'speckled' nature of the obtained diffraction patterns. Once inverted, the patterns will show the disposition and orientation of the fibers within the tissue, by enhancing the phase contrast between protein and no protein regions of the sample. Our work affords the application of the most innovative coherent X-ray diffraction tools to the study of biological specimens, and this approach will have a significant impact in biology and medicine because it overcomes many of the limits of current microscopy techniques.

  16. Resonant soft X-ray diffraction - in extremis.

    PubMed

    Hatton, P D; Wilkins, S B; Beale, T A W; Johal, T K; Prabhakaran, D; Boothroyd, A T

    2005-07-01

    The use of softer-energy X-rays produced by synchrotron radiation for diffraction is an area of current interest. In this paper, experiments exploiting resonant scattering at the L absorption edges of 3d transition metal elements are reported. Such energies, typically 500-1000 eV, are at the extreme limit of soft X-ray diffraction where absorption effects are so severe that the sample and diffractometer must be placed in a windowless high-vacuum vessel. In addition, the Ewald sphere is so small as to likely contain, at most, only a single Bragg reflection. Advantages of using such radiation for the study of weak diffraction effects such as anomalous scattering, charge ordering, magnetic diffraction and orbital ordering are reported.

  17. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Hawreliak, James A.; Ciricosta, Orlando; Collins, Gilbert W.; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H.; Suggit, Matthew J.; Tang, Henry; Wark, Justin S.

    2014-03-01

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signal from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored.

  18. Computing Composition/Depth Profiles From X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Unnam, J.

    1986-01-01

    Diffraction-intensity bands deconvolved relatively quickly. TIBAC constructs composition/depth profiles from X-ray diffraction-intensity bands. Intensity band extremely sensitive to shape of composition/depth profile. TIBAC incorporates straightforward transformation of intensity band that retains accuracy of earlier simulation models, but is several orders of magnitude faster in total computational time. TIBAC written in FORTRAN 77 for batch execution.

  19. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of enveloped virus microcrystals

    DOE PAGES

    Lawrence, Robert M.; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; ...

    2015-08-20

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron lasers has produced high-resolution, room temperature, time-resolved protein structures. We report preliminary SFX of Sindbis virus, an enveloped icosahedral RNA virus with ~700 Å diameter. Microcrystals delivered in viscous agarose medium diffracted to ~40 Å resolution. Small-angle diffuse X-ray scattering overlaid Bragg peaks and analysis suggests this results from molecular transforms of individual particles. Viral proteins undergo structural changes during entry and infection, which could, in principle, be studied with SFX. This is a pertinent step toward determining room temperature structures from virus microcrystals that may enable time-resolved studies of enveloped viruses.

  20. Detecting rare, abnormally large grains by x-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Boyce, Brad L.; Furnish, Timothy Allen; Padilla, H. A.; ...

    2015-07-16

    Bimodal grain structures are common in many alloys, arising from a number of different causes including incomplete recrystallization and abnormal grain growth. These bimodal grain structures have important technological implications, such as the well-known Goss texture which is now a cornerstone for electrical steels. Yet our ability to detect bimodal grain distributions is largely confined to brute force cross-sectional metallography. The present study presents a new method for rapid detection of unusually large grains embedded in a sea of much finer grains. Traditional X-ray diffraction-based grain size measurement techniques such as Scherrer, Williamson–Hall, or Warren–Averbach rely on peak breadth andmore » shape to extract information regarding the average crystallite size. However, these line broadening techniques are not well suited to identify a very small fraction of abnormally large grains. The present method utilizes statistically anomalous intensity spikes in the Bragg peak to identify regions where abnormally large grains are contributing to diffraction. This needle-in-a-haystack technique is demonstrated on a nanocrystalline Ni–Fe alloy which has undergone fatigue-induced abnormal grain growth. In this demonstration, the technique readily identifies a few large grains that occupy <0.00001 % of the interrogation volume. Finally, while the technique is demonstrated in the current study on nanocrystalline metal, it would likely apply to any bimodal polycrystal including ultrafine grained and fine microcrystalline materials with sufficiently distinct bimodal grain statistics.« less

  1. Detecting rare, abnormally large grains by x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, Brad L.; Furnish, Timothy Allen; Padilla, H. A.; Van Campen, Douglas; Mehta, Apurva

    2015-07-16

    Bimodal grain structures are common in many alloys, arising from a number of different causes including incomplete recrystallization and abnormal grain growth. These bimodal grain structures have important technological implications, such as the well-known Goss texture which is now a cornerstone for electrical steels. Yet our ability to detect bimodal grain distributions is largely confined to brute force cross-sectional metallography. The present study presents a new method for rapid detection of unusually large grains embedded in a sea of much finer grains. Traditional X-ray diffraction-based grain size measurement techniques such as Scherrer, Williamson–Hall, or Warren–Averbach rely on peak breadth and shape to extract information regarding the average crystallite size. However, these line broadening techniques are not well suited to identify a very small fraction of abnormally large grains. The present method utilizes statistically anomalous intensity spikes in the Bragg peak to identify regions where abnormally large grains are contributing to diffraction. This needle-in-a-haystack technique is demonstrated on a nanocrystalline Ni–Fe alloy which has undergone fatigue-induced abnormal grain growth. In this demonstration, the technique readily identifies a few large grains that occupy <0.00001 % of the interrogation volume. Finally, while the technique is demonstrated in the current study on nanocrystalline metal, it would likely apply to any bimodal polycrystal including ultrafine grained and fine microcrystalline materials with sufficiently distinct bimodal grain statistics.

  2. X-Ray Diffraction from Live Muscle Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, A.; Bordas, J.; de La Cuesta, F. B.

    The previous chapter shows how small-angle X-ray Diffraction can be used to study the organization of collagen fibres in tissue, proposing this technique as a diagnosis tool. In this chapter, synchrotron small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD) by using high-angle and temporal resolution is presented as an essential tool in structural functional studies of skeletal muscle tissues. SAXD studies of muscle fibres involve the combination of mechanical and diffraction methods and provide insights into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the generation of force and motion in active muscle. These studies are made possible because of the highly ordered arrangement of the contractile proteins, myosin and actin, in the sarcomere, the smallest functional repeating unit of the muscle cell. The possibility to collect diffraction diagrams with high angular and temporal resolutions at modern third-generation synchrotron radiation sources together with new data processing algorithms together and two-dimensional photon counting detectors allow structural and functional studies of live muscle tissues. The review covers the basics of X-ray small-angle diffraction, instrumentation and mathematical methods used in data analysis. A general description of each of these points has been presented in Chap.1 and 2. It provides new results on the axial disposition of the myosin heads and their interpretation from analysing the interference fringes that carve the diffraction orders into clusters of peaks.

  3. Diffraction and Imaging Study of Imperfections of Protein Crystals with Coherent X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.

    2004-01-01

    High angular-resolution x-ray diffraction and phase contrast x-ray imaging were combined to study defects and perfection of protein crystals. Imperfections including line defects, inclusions and other microdefects were observed in the diffraction images of a uniformly grown lysozyme crystal. The observed line defects carry distinct dislocation features running approximately along the <110> growth front and have been found to originate mostly in a central growth area and occasionally in outer growth regions. Slow dehydration led to the broadening of a fairly symmetric 4 4 0 rocking curve by a factor of approximately 2.6, which was primarily attributed to the dehydration-induced microscopic effects that are clearly shown in diffraction images. X-ray imaging and diffraction characterization of the quality of apoferritin crystals will also be discussed in the presentation.

  4. In Operando X-ray diffraction and transmission X-ray microscopy of lithium sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Johanna; Misra, Sumohan; Yang, Yuan; Jackson, Ariel; Liu, Yijin; Wang, Hailiang; Dai, Hongjie; Andrews, Joy C; Cui, Yi; Toney, Michael F

    2012-04-11

    Rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries hold great potential for high-performance energy storage systems because they have a high theoretical specific energy, low cost, and are eco-friendly. However, the structural and morphological changes during electrochemical reactions are still not well understood. In this Article, these changes in Li-S batteries are studied in operando by X-ray diffraction and transmission X-ray microscopy. We show recrystallization of sulfur by the end of the charge cycle is dependent on the preparation technique of the sulfur cathode. On the other hand, it was found that crystalline Li(2)S does not form at the end of discharge for all sulfur cathodes studied. Furthermore, during cycling the bulk of soluble polysulfides remains trapped within the cathode matrix. Our results differ from previous ex situ results. This highlights the importance of in operando studies and suggests possible strategies to improve cycle life.

  5. MSL Chemistry and Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction X-Ray Fluorescence (CheMin) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Wayne; Blake, Dave; Harris, William; Morookian, John Michael; Randall, Dave; Reder, Leonard J.; Sarrazin, Phillipe

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Chemistry and Mineralogy Xray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) (CheMin) Instrument, an element of the landed Curiosity rover payload, which landed on Mars in August of 2012. The scientific goal of the MSL mission is to explore and quantitatively assess regions in Gale Crater as a potential habitat for life - past or present. The CheMin instrument will receive Martian rock and soil samples from the MSL Sample Acquisition/Sample Processing and Handling (SA/SPaH) system, and process it utilizing X-Ray spectroscopy methods to determine mineral composition. The Chemin instrument will analyze Martian soil and rocks to enable scientists to investigate geophysical processes occurring on Mars. The CheMin science objectives and proposed surface operations are described along with the CheMin hardware with an emphasis on the system engineering challenges associated with developing such a complex instrument.

  6. Enhancing resolution in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Do Young; Kim, Chan; Kim, Yoonhee; Song, Changyong

    2016-12-01

    Achieving a resolution near 1 nm is a critical issue in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CDI) for applications in materials and biology. Albeit with various advantages of CDI based on synchrotrons and newly developed x-ray free electron lasers, its applications would be limited without improving resolution well below 10 nm. Here, we review the issues and efforts in improving CDI resolution including various methods for resolution determination. Enhancing diffraction signal at large diffraction angles, with the aid of interference between neighboring strong scatterers or templates, is reviewed and discussed in terms of increasing signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, we discuss errors in image reconstruction algorithms—caused by the discreteness of the Fourier transformations involved—which degrade the spatial resolution, and suggest ways to correct them. We expect this review to be useful for applications of CDI in imaging weakly scattering soft matters using coherent x-ray sources including x-ray free electron lasers.

  7. Single-pulse x-ray diffraction using polycapillary optics for in situ dynamic diffraction.

    PubMed

    Maddox, B R; Akin, M C; Teruya, A; Hunt, D; Hahn, D; Cradick, J; Morgan, D V

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic use of single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) at pulsed power facilities can be challenging due to factors such as the high flux and brightness requirements for diffraction and the geometric constraints of experimental platforms. By necessity, the x-ray source is usually positioned very close, within a few inches of the sample. On dynamic compression platforms, this puts the x-ray source in the debris field. We coupled x-ray polycapillary optics to a single-shot needle-and-washer x-ray diode source using a laser-based alignment scheme to obtain high-quality x-ray diffraction using a single 16 ns x-ray pulse with the source >1 m from the sample. The system was tested on a Mo sample in reflection geometry using 17 keV x-rays from a Mo anode. We also identified an anode conditioning effect that increased the x-ray intensity by 180%. Quantitative measurements of the x-ray focal spot produced by the polycapillary yielded a total x-ray flux on the sample of 3.3 ± 0.5 × 10(7) molybdenum Kα photons.

  8. Instrument and method for X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and crystal texture analysis without sample preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith (Inventor); Martins, Jose Vanderlei (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence instrument for analyzing samples having no sample preparation includes a X-ray source configured to output a collimated X-ray beam comprising a continuum spectrum of X-rays to a predetermined coordinate and a photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer disposed to receive X-rays output from an unprepared sample disposed at the predetermined coordinate upon exposure of the unprepared sample to the collimated X-ray beam. The X-ray source and the photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer are arranged in a reflection geometry relative to the predetermined coordinate.

  9. Discovery and development of x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Yeuncheol; Yin, Ming; Datta, Timir

    2013-03-01

    In 1912 Max Laue at University of Munich reasoned x-rays to be short wavelength electromagnetic waves and figured interference would occur when scattered off crystals. Arnold Sommerfeld, W. Wien, Ewald and others, raised objections to Laue's idea, but soon Walter Friedrich succeeded in recording x-ray interference patterns off copper sulfate crystals. But the Laue-Ewald's 3-dimensional formula predicted excess spots. Fewer spots were observed. William Lawrence Bragg then 22 year old studying at Cambridge University heard the Munich results from father William Henry Brag, physics professor at Univ of Leeds. Lawrence figured the spots are 2-d interference of x-ray wavelets reflecting off successive atomic planes and derived a simple eponymous equation, the Bragg equation d*sin(theta) = n*lamda. 1913 onward the Braggs dominated the crystallography. Max Laue was awarded the physics Nobel in 1914 and the Braggs shared the same in 1915. Starting with Rontgen's first ever prize in 1901, the importance of x-ray techniques is evident from the four out of a total 16 physics Nobels between 1901-1917. We will outline the historical back ground and importance of x-ray diffraction giving rise to techniques that even in 2013, remain work horses in laboratories all over the globe.

  10. Wavefront aberrations of x-ray dynamical diffraction beams.

    PubMed

    Liao, Keliang; Hong, Youli; Sheng, Weifan

    2014-10-01

    The effects of dynamical diffraction in x-ray diffractive optics with large numerical aperture render the wavefront aberrations difficult to describe using the aberration polynomials, yet knowledge of them plays an important role in a vast variety of scientific problems ranging from optical testing to adaptive optics. Although the diffraction theory of optical aberrations was established decades ago, its application in the area of x-ray dynamical diffraction theory (DDT) is still lacking. Here, we conduct a theoretical study on the aberration properties of x-ray dynamical diffraction beams. By treating the modulus of the complex envelope as the amplitude weight function in the orthogonalization procedure, we generalize the nonrecursive matrix method for the determination of orthonormal aberration polynomials, wherein Zernike DDT and Legendre DDT polynomials are proposed. As an example, we investigate the aberration evolution inside a tilted multilayer Laue lens. The corresponding Legendre DDT polynomials are obtained numerically, which represent balanced aberrations yielding minimum variance of the classical aberrations of an anamorphic optical system. The balancing of classical aberrations and their standard deviations are discussed. We also present the Strehl ratio of the primary and secondary balanced aberrations.

  11. Spatiotemporal response of crystals in x-ray Bragg diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Lindberg, Ryan

    2012-10-01

    The spatiotemporal response of crystals in x-ray Bragg diffraction resulting from excitation by an ultrashort, laterally confined x-ray pulse is studied theoretically. The theory presents an extension of the analysis in symmetric reflection geometry [R. R. Lindberg and Y. V. Shvyd’ko, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 15, 050706 (2012)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.15.050706] to the generic case, which includes Bragg diffraction both in reflection (Bragg) and transmission (Laue) asymmetric scattering geometries. The spatiotemporal response is presented as a product of a crystal-intrinsic plane-wave spatiotemporal response function and an envelope function defined by the crystal-independent transverse profile of the incident beam and the scattering geometry. The diffracted wave fields exhibit amplitude modulation perpendicular to the propagation direction due to both angular dispersion and the dispersion due to Bragg’s law. The characteristic measure of the spatiotemporal response is expressed in terms of a few parameters: the extinction length, crystal thickness, Bragg angle, asymmetry angle, and the speed of light. Applications to self-seeding of hard x-ray free-electron lasers are discussed, with particular emphasis on the relative advantages of using either the Bragg or Laue scattering geometries. Intensity front inclination in asymmetric diffraction can be used to make snapshots of ultrafast processes with femtosecond resolution.

  12. X-ray diffraction from intact tau aggregates in human brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Landahl, Eric C.; Antipova, Olga; Bongaarts, Angela; Barrea, Raul; Berry, Robert; Binder, Lester I.; Irving, Thomas; Orgel, Joseph; Vana, Laurel; Rice, Sarah E.

    2011-09-15

    We describe an instrument to record X-ray diffraction patterns from diseased regions of human brain tissue by combining an in-line visible light fluorescence microscope with an X-ray diffraction microprobe. We use thiazine red fluorescence to specifically label and detect the filamentous tau protein pathology associated with Pick's disease, as several laboratories have done previously. We demonstrate that thiazine red-enhanced regions within the tissue show periodic structure in X-ray diffraction, which is not observed in healthy tissue. One observed periodicity (4.2 {angstrom}) is characteristic of cross-beta sheet structure, consistent with previous results from powder diffraction studies performed on purified, dried tau protein.

  13. Impulsive solvent heating probed by picosecond x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammarata, M.; Lorenc, M.; Kim, T. K.; Lee, J. H.; Kong, Q. Y.; Pontecorvo, E.; Lo Russo, M.; Schiró, G.; Cupane, A.; Wulff, M.; Ihee, H.

    2006-03-01

    The time-resolved diffraction signal from a laser-excited solution has three principal components: the solute-only term, the solute-solvent cross term, and the solvent-only term. The last term is very sensitive to the thermodynamic state of the bulk solvent, which may change during a chemical reaction due to energy transfer from light-absorbing solute molecules to the surrounding solvent molecules and the following relaxation to equilibrium with the environment around the scattering volume. The volume expansion coefficient α for a liquid is typically ˜1×10-3K-1, which is about 1000 times greater than for a solid. Hence solvent scattering is a very sensitive on-line thermometer. The decomposition of the scattered x-ray signal has so far been aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, a method capable of simulating the solvent response as well as the solute term and solute/solvent cross terms for the data analysis. Here we present an experimental procedure, applicable to most hydrogen containing solvents, that directly measures the solvent response to a transient temperature rise. The overtone modes of OH stretching and CH3 asymmetric stretching in liquid methanol were excited by near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses at 1.5 and 1.7μm and the ensuing hydrodynamics, induced by the transfer of heat from a subset of excited CH3OH* to the bulk and the subsequent thermal expansion, were probed by 100ps x-ray pulses from a synchrotron. The time-resolved data allowed us to extract two key differentials: the change in the solvent diffraction from a temperature change at constant density, seen at a very short time delay ˜100ps, and a term from a change in density at constant temperature. The latter term becomes relevant at later times ˜1μs when the bulk of liquid expands to accommodate its new temperature at ambient pressure. These two terms are the principal building blocks in the hydrodynamic equation of state, and they are needed in a self

  14. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-01

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  15. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-14

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  16. Fabrication of x-ray diffractive optical elements for laser fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changqing; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Hailiang; Niu, Jiebin; Hua, Yilei; Shi, Lina

    2013-03-01

    We review our recent progress on the fabrication of x-ray diffractive optical elements (DOEs) by combining complementary advantages of electron beam, x-ray, and proximity optical lithography. First, an electron beam lithography tool with an accelerating voltage of 100 kV is used to expose initial x-ray mask based on SiC membrane with a low aspect ratio. Second, x-ray lithography is used to replicate x-ray DOEs and amplify the aspect ratio up to 14:1. Third, proximity optical lithography is used to fabricate a large-scale gold mesh as the supporting structures. We demonstrate that this method can achieve high aspect ratio metal nanometer structures without the need of a complicated multilayer resist process. A large number of x-ray DOEs have been fabricated with feature sizes down to 100 nm for the purpose of laser plasma fusion applications. Among them, the ninth-order diffraction peak on the positive side of the zeroth order can be observed for both 3333 and 5000 lines/mm x-ray gold transmission gratings.

  17. Liquid detection trial with x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, G.; Fleckenstein, H.; Olesinski, S.; Zienert, G.

    2010-08-01

    SALOME (an acronym for Small Angle Lab Operation Measuring Equipment) is a versatile, energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction imaging (XDi) test-bed facility commissioned and supported by the Transportation Security Laboratory, Atlantic City, USA. In work presented here, the Inverse Fan-beam (IFB) topology has been realized on SALOME and used to investigate the liquids identification capability of x-ray diffraction (XRD). Liquids were investigated from four classes of materials of relevance to security screening of aircraft passenger luggage; namely: dilute aqueous liquids; concentrated aqueous liquids; hydrocarbon fuels; and oxidizers. A set of features associated with the Molecular Interference Function (MIF) were used to classify the liquids. Within the limited scope of this investigation, XRD proved to have excellent capability for discriminating liquids from one another; in particular, for isolating the threat materials without raising false alarms from either household or innocuous substances. Consequences for XRD-based screening of air passenger luggage are summarized.

  18. Structured illumination for tomographic X-ray diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Joel A; Hassan, Mehadi; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Brady, David

    2014-02-21

    Tomographic imaging of the molecular structure of an object is important for a variety of applications, ranging from medical and industrial radiography to security screening. X-ray diffraction imaging is the preeminent technique for performing molecular analysis of large volumes. Here we propose and demonstrate a new measurement architecture to improve the source and detector efficiency for diffraction imaging. In comparison with previous techniques, our approach reduces the required overall scan time by 1-2 orders of magnitude, which makes possible real-time scanning of a broad range of materials over a large volume using a table-top setup. This method, which relies on structuring spatially the illumination incident on an object moving relative to the X-ray source, is compatible with existing systems and has the potential to significantly enhance performance in an array of areas, such as medical diagnostic imaging and explosives detection.

  19. Parallel readout multiwire proportional chambers for time resolved X-ray diffraction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruqi, A. R.; Bond, C. C.

    1980-10-01

    Linear position sensitive detectors have been used for a number of years in X-ray diffraction studies from various types of muscle under different physiological conditions. Such detectors are mainly based on either an internal (RC) delay line or an external (LC) delay line for decoding positional information; the counting speed of the detectors is optimally matched to the available photon flux from laboratory based X-ray cameras. However, X-ray cameras based on synchrotron radiation provide photon fluxes which are greater by about three orders of magnitude. We describe in this paper an X-ray detection system based on parallel readout from a multiwire proportional chamber which offers high counting speeds and is designed to perform time slicing experiments with time resolutions down to 1 ms.

  20. A new approach to synchrotron energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lazzari, Olivier; Egan, Christopher K; Jacques, Simon D M; Sochi, Taha; Di Michiel, Marco; Cernik, Robert J; Barnes, Paul

    2012-07-01

    A new data collection strategy for performing synchrotron energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction computed tomography has been devised. This method is analogous to angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction whose diffraction signal originates from a line formed by intersection of the incident X-ray beam and the sample. Energy resolution is preserved by using a collimator which defines a small sampling voxel. This voxel is translated in a series of parallel straight lines covering the whole sample and the operation is repeated at different rotation angles, thus generating one diffraction pattern per translation and rotation step. The method has been tested by imaging a specially designed phantom object, devised to be a demanding validator for X-ray diffraction imaging. The relative strengths and weaknesses of the method have been analysed with respect to the classic angle-dispersive technique. The reconstruction accuracy of the method is good, although an absorption correction is required for lower energy diffraction because of the large path lengths involved. The spatial resolution is only limited to the width of the scanning beam owing to the novel collection strategy. The current temporal resolution is poor, with a scan taking several hours. The method is best suited to studying large objects (e.g. for engineering and materials science applications) because it does not suffer from diffraction peak broadening effects irrespective of the sample size, in contrast to the angle-dispersive case.

  1. Unified Theory for Decoding the Signals from X-Ray Florescence and X-Ray Diffraction of Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chung, Frank H

    2016-08-23

    For research and development or for solving technical problems, we often need to know the chemical composition of an unknown mixture, which is coded and stored in the signals of its X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray fluorescence gives chemical elements, whereas XRD gives chemical compounds. The major problem in XRF and XRD analyses is the complex matrix effect. The conventional technique to deal with the matrix effect is to construct empirical calibration lines with standards for each element or compound sought, which is tedious and time-consuming. A unified theory of quantitative XRF analysis is presented here. The idea is to cancel the matrix effect mathematically. It turns out that the decoding equation for quantitative XRF analysis is identical to that for quantitative XRD analysis although the physics of XRD and XRF are fundamentally different. The XRD work has been published and practiced worldwide. The unified theory derives a new intensity-concentration equation of XRF, which is free from the matrix effect and valid for a wide range of concentrations. The linear decoding equation establishes a constant slope for each element sought, hence eliminating the work on calibration lines. The simple linear decoding equation has been verified by 18 experiments.

  2. Fabricating Blazed Diffraction Gratings by X-Ray Lithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis; Hartley, Frank; Wilson, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Gray-scale x-ray lithography is undergoing development as a technique for fabricating blazed diffraction gratings. As such, gray-scale x-ray lithography now complements such other grating-fabrication techniques as mechanical ruling, holography, ion etching, laser ablation, laser writing, and electron-beam lithography. Each of these techniques offers advantages and disadvantages for implementing specific grating designs; no single one of these techniques can satisfy the design requirements for all applications. Gray-scale x-ray lithography is expected to be advantageous for making gratings on steeper substrates than those that can be made by electron-beam lithography. This technique is not limited to sawtooth groove profiles and flat substrates: various groove profiles can be generated on arbitrarily shaped (including highly curved) substrates with the same ease as sawtooth profiles can be generated on flat substrates. Moreover, the gratings fabricated by this technique can be made free of ghosts (spurious diffraction components attributable to small spurious periodicities in the locations of grooves). The first step in gray-scale x-ray lithography is to conformally coat a substrate with a suitable photoresist. An x-ray mask (see Figure 1) is generated, placed between the substrate and a source of collimated x-rays, and scanned over the substrate so as to create a spatial modulation in the exposure of the photoresist. Development of the exposed photoresist results in a surface corrugation that corresponds to the spatial modulation and that defines the grating surface. The grating pattern is generated by scanning an appropriately shaped x-ray area mask along the substrate. The mask example of Figure 1 would generate a blazed grating profile when scanned in the perpendicular direction at constant speed, assuming the photoresist responds linearly to incident radiation. If the resist response is nonlinear, then the mask shape can be modified to account for the

  3. Coherent x-ray diffraction from quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Vartanyants, I.A.; Robinson, I. K.; Onken, J.D.; Pfeifer, M.A.; Williams, G.J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Metzger, H.; Zhong, Z.; Bauer, G.

    2005-06-15

    Coherent x-ray diffraction is a new experimental method for studying perfect and imperfect crystals. Instead of incoherent averaging, a coherent sum of amplitudes produces a coherent diffraction pattern originating from the real space arrangement of the sample. We applied this method for studying quantum dot samples that were specially fabricated GeSi islands of nanometer size and in a regular array embedded into a Si substrate. A coherent beam was focused by special Kirkpatric-Baez optics to a micrometer size. In the experiment it was observed that such a microfocused coherent beam produced coherent diffraction pattern with Bragg spots and broad diffuse maxima. The diffuse peak breaks up into a fine speckle pattern. The grazing incidence diffraction pattern has a typical shape resulting from the periodic array of identical islands. We used this diffraction pattern to reconstruct the average shape of the islands using a model independent approach.

  4. Diffraction effects on angular response of X-ray collimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.; Barrus, D. M.; Fenimore, E.

    1976-01-01

    Angular responses have been measured for X-ray collimators with half-widths ranging from minutes of arc down to 10 arcsec. In the seconds-of-arc range, diffraction peaks at off-axis angles can masquerade as side lobes of the collimator angular response. Measurements and qualitative physical arguments lead to a rule of thumb for collimator design; namely, the angle of first minimum in the Fraunhofer single-slit diffraction pattern should be less than one-fourth of the collimator geometrical full-width at half-maximum intensity.

  5. Synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction studies in pulsed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frings, P.; Vanacken, J.; Detlefs, C.; Duc, F.; Lorenzo, J. E.; Nardone, M.; Billette, J.; Zitouni, A.; Bras, W.; Rikken, G. L. J. A.

    2006-06-01

    X-ray powder diffraction experiments under pulsed magnetic fields were carried out at the DUBBLE beamline (BM26B) at the ESRF. A mobile generator delivered 110kJ to the magnet coil, which was sufficient to generate peak fields of 30T. A liquid He flow cryostat allowed us to vary the sample temperature accurately between 8 and 300K. Powder diffraction patterns of several samples were recorded using 21keV monochromatic x-rays and an on-line image plate detector. Here we present the first results on the suppression of the Jahn-Teller structural distortion in TbVO4 by magnetic field. These data clearly demonstrate the feasibility of x-ray powder diffraction experiments under pulsed magnetic fields with relatively inexpensive instrumentation.

  6. Diffraction enhanced kinetic depth X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicken, A.

    An increasing number of fields would benefit from a single analytical probe that can characterise bulk objects that vary in morphology and/or material composition. These fields include security screening, medicine and material science. In this study the X-ray region is shown to be an effective probe for the characterisation of materials. The most prominent analytical techniques that utilise X-radiation are reviewed. The study then focuses on methods of amalgamating the three dimensional power of kinetic depth X-ray (KDFX) imaging with the materials discrimination of angular dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), thus providing KDEX with a much needed material specific counterpart. A knowledge of the sample position is essential for the correct interpretation of diffraction signatures. Two different sensor geometries (i.e. circumferential and linear) that are able to collect end interpret multiple unknown material diffraction patterns and attribute them to their respective loci within an inspection volume are investigated. The circumferential and linear detector geometries are hypothesised, simulated and then tested in an experimental setting with the later demonstrating a greater ability at discerning between mixed diffraction patterns produced by differing materials. Factors known to confound the linear diffraction method such as sample thickness and radiation energy have been explored and quantified with a possible means of mitigation being identified (i.e. via increasing the sample to detector distance). A series of diffraction patterns (following the linear diffraction approach) were obtained from a single phantom object that was simultaneously interrogated via KDEX imaging. Areas containing diffraction signatures matched from a threat library have been highlighted in the KDEX imagery via colour encoding and match index is inferred by intensity. This union is the first example of its kind and is called diffraction enhanced KDEX imagery. Finally an additional

  7. Identifications studies of Lauha Bhasma by X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, S C; Reddy, K R C; Sastry, G V S

    2012-01-01

    Procedures for preparation of Lauha Bhasma are described in ancient texts of Ayurveda. These procedures also begin with different source material for iron such as Teekshna Lauha and Kanta Lauha etc. In the present study, we have selected different source materials viz. magnetite iron ore for Kanta Lauha and pure (Armco grade) iron turnings for Teekshna Lauha. The standard procedures of preparation of Lauha Bhasma are carried out in identical conditions for these two raw materials. The final product from the Puta are characterized by using X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to understanding the crystallographic form or forms of iron oxides and their composition at the end of each Puta. The iron content at the end of repeated Putas (18 for Kanta Lauha and 20 for Teekshna Lauha) have shown a decrease in case of Teekshna Lauha since the starting material is pure iron while it showed only marginal decreases in the case of Kanta Lauha because the Fe(3)O(4) of magnetite is undergoing oxidation to Fe(2)O(3). The trace elements remain within the Bhasma in the form of various oxides of Si, Al, Ca, etc.

  8. X-ray diffraction from nonuniformly stretched helical molecules.

    PubMed

    Prodanovic, Momcilo; Irving, Thomas C; Mijailovich, Srboljub M

    2016-06-01

    The fibrous proteins in living cells are exposed to mechanical forces interacting with other subcellular structures. X-ray fiber diffraction is often used to assess deformation and movement of these proteins, but the analysis has been limited to the theory for fibrous molecular systems that exhibit helical symmetry. However, this approach cannot adequately interpret X-ray data from fibrous protein assemblies where the local strain varies along the fiber length owing to interactions of its molecular constituents with their binding partners. To resolve this problem a theoretical formulism has been developed for predicting the diffraction from individual helical molecular structures nonuniformly strained along their lengths. This represents a critical first step towards modeling complex dynamical systems consisting of multiple helical structures using spatially explicit, multi-scale Monte Carlo simulations where predictions are compared with experimental data in a 'forward' process to iteratively generate ever more realistic models. Here the effects of nonuniform strains and the helix length on the resulting magnitude and phase of diffraction patterns are quantitatively assessed. Examples of the predicted diffraction patterns of nonuniformly deformed double-stranded DNA and actin filaments in contracting muscle are presented to demonstrate the feasibly of this theoretical approach.

  9. X-ray topography using the forward transmitted beam under multiple-beam diffraction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsusaka, Y. Takano, H.; Takeda, S.; Yokoyama, K.; Matsui, J.; Kagoshima, Y.

    2016-02-15

    X-ray topographs are taken for a sapphire wafer with the [0001] surface normal, as an example, by forward transmitted synchrotron x-ray beams combined with two-dimensional electronic arrays in the x-ray detector having a spatial resolution of 1 μm. They exhibit no shape deformation and no position shift of the dislocation lines on the topographs. Since the topography is performed under multiple-beam diffraction conditions, the topographic images of a single diffraction (two-wave approximation condition) or plural diffractions (six-wave approximation condition) can be recorded without large specimen position changes. As usual Lang topographs, it is possible to determine the Burgers vector of each dislocation line. Because of high parallelism of the incoming x-rays and linear sensitivity of the electronic arrays to the incident x-rays, the present technique can be used to visualize individual dislocations in single crystals of the dislocation density as high as 1 × 10{sup 5} cm{sup −2}.

  10. High pressure x-ray diffraction techniques with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Liu

    2016-07-01

    This article summarizes the developments of experimental techniques for high pressure x-ray diffraction (XRD) in diamond anvil cells (DACs) using synchrotron radiation. Basic principles and experimental methods for various diffraction geometry are described, including powder diffraction, single crystal diffraction, radial diffraction, as well as coupling with laser heating system. Resolution in d-spacing of different diffraction modes is discussed. More recent progress, such as extended application of single crystal diffraction for measurements of multigrain and electron density distribution, time-resolved diffraction with dynamic DAC and development of modulated heating techniques are briefly introduced. The current status of the high pressure beamline at BSRF (Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility) and some results are also presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10875142, 11079040, and 11075175). The 4W2 beamline of BSRF was supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. KJCX2-SW-N20, KJCX2-SW-N03, and SYGNS04).

  11. Soft x-ray coherent diffraction imaging on magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaowen; Lee, James; Mishra, Shrawan; Parks, Daniel; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Shapiro, David; Roy, Sujoy; Kevan, Steve; Stxm Team At Als Collaboration; Soft X-Ray Microscopy Group At Als Collaboration; Soft X-ray scattering at ALS, LBL Team

    2014-03-01

    Coherent soft X-rays diffraction imaging enable coherent magnetic resonance scattering at transition metal L-edge to be probed so that magnetic domains could be imaged with very high spatial resolution with phase contrast, reaching sub-10nm. One of the overwhelming advantages of using coherent X-rays is the ability to resolve phase contrast images with linearly polarized light with both phase and absorption contrast comparing to real-space imaging, which can only be studied with circularly polarized light with absorption contrast only. Here we report our first results on high-resolution of magnetic domains imaging of CoPd multilayer thin film with coherent soft X-ray ptychography method. We are aiming to resolve and understand magnetic domain wall structures with the highest obtainable resolution here at Advanced Light Source. In principle types of magnetic domain walls could be studied so that Neel or Bloch walls can be distinguished by imaging. This work at LBNL was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the US Department of Energy (contract no. DE-AC02- 05CH11231).

  12. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction for pyrolytic magnetic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamishima, K.; Noda, T.; Kadonome, F.; Kakizaki, K.; Hiratsuka, N.

    We have prepared pyrolytic carbon samples from triethylamine and investigated their magnetic and crystallographic properties. The magnetic property depends on pyrolysis temperatures. A ferromagnetic sample with M=5×10-1 emu/g was obtained from the pyrolysis products even at room temperature. The synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments were performed for the pyrolytic carbon samples in order to see the crystal structure of ferromagnetic samples. Diffraction peaks of iron or iron oxides were not observed for the ferromagnetic samples, whereas the major diffraction peak of the intermediate graphite-diamond (IGD) structure was clearly observed for ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic samples. Therefore, the IGD structure is not the direct cause of ferromagnetism. The ferromagnetism may be related to the graphite-like structure.

  13. Ultrafast X-Ray Diffraction of Heterogeneous Solid Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Levitan, Abraham

    2015-08-19

    Angularly resolved x-ray diffraction at 5.5 keV establishes the structure of a 5 µm diameter solid hydrogen jet, providing a foundation for analysis of hydrogen in a warm dense matter state. The jet was composed of approximately 65 % ± 5% HCP and 35 % ± 5% FCC by volume with an average crystallite size on the order of hundreds of nanometers. Broadening in the angularly resolved spectrum provided strong evidence for anisotropic strain up to approximately 3 % in the HCP lattice. Finally, we found no evidence for orientational ordering of the crystal domains.

  14. X-ray diffraction analysis of modulated crystals: Review

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotina, N. B.

    2007-07-15

    The state of the art of X-ray diffraction analysis of modulated crystals is reviewed. The review begins with a brief historical overview followed by the consideration of the main concepts and notations used in this field. Then, methods of structural analysis of modulated crystals are considered with emphasis on recent achievements. The most interesting objects are listed, and the directions of investigation are outlined. Examples of analysis of both individual structures and families of modulated and incommensurate composite structures are given in terms of superspace symmetry.

  15. X-ray diffraction studies of shocked lunar analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanss, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction experiments on shocked rock and mineral analogs of particular significance to lunar geology are described. Materials naturally shocked by meteorite impact, nuclear-shocked, or artificially shocked in a flat plate accelerator were utilized. Four areas were outlined for investigation: powder diffractometer studies of shocked single crystal silicate minerals (quartz, orthoclase, oligoclase, pyroxene), powder diffractometer studies of shocked polycrystalline monomineralic samples (dunite), Debye-Scherrer studies of single grains of shocked granodiorite, and powder diffractometer studies of shocked whole rock samples. Quantitative interpretation of peak shock pressures experienced by materials found in lunar or terrestrial impact structures is presented.

  16. Automation of a Guinier camera for X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duijn, Jozef Henricus

    A Guinie camera was equipped with a curved proportional counter to allow fast recording of diffraction patterns. The focusing principles are discussed and the optimum dimensions of the proportional counter are determined. Measurements on a counter prototype are discussed. A simplified readout method is introduced. In order to reconstruct the position of absorption of an incident X-ray, the charge distribution on the cathode strips of the counter is measured. The results are compared with computed charge distributions. A protocol which corrects the systematic errors introduced by the charge ratio reconstruction method is presented.

  17. High Pressure X-ray Diffraction Study of Potassium Azide

    SciTech Connect

    C Ji; F Zhang; D Hong; H Zhu; J Wu; M Chyu; V Levitas; Y Ma

    2011-12-31

    Crystal structure and compressibility of potassium azide was investigated by in-situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature up to 37.7 GPa. In the body-centered tetragonal (bct) phase, an anisotropic compressibility was observed with greater compressibility in the direction perpendicular to the plane containing N{sub 3}{sup -} ions than directions within that plane. The bulk modulus of the bct phase was determined to be 18.6(7) GPa. A pressure-induced phase transition may occur at 15.5 GPa.

  18. X-Ray Diffraction of Heterogeneous Solid Hydrogen - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Levitan, Abraham

    2015-08-24

    Angularly resolved x-ray diffraction at 5.5 keV establishes the structure of a 5 μm diameter solid hydrogen jet, providing a foundation for analysis of hydrogen in a warm dense matter state. The jet was composed of approximately 65% ± 5% HCP and 35% ± 5% FCC by volume with an average crystallite size on the order of hundreds of nanometers. Broadening in the angularly resolved spectrum provided strong evidence for anisotropic strain up to approximately 3 % in the HCP lattice. Finally, we found no evidence for orientational ordering of the crystal domains.

  19. Anomalous X-ray Diffraction Studies for Photovoltaic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-22

    Anomalous X-ray Diffraction (AXRD) has become a useful technique in characterizing bulk and nanomaterials as it provides specific information about the crystal structure of materials. In this project we present the results of AXRD applied to materials for photovoltaic applications: ZnO loaded with Ga and ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel. The X-ray diffraction data collected for various energies were plotted in Origin software. The peaks were fitted using different functions including Pseudo Voigt, Gaussian, and Lorentzian. This fitting provided the integrated intensity data (peaks area values), which when plotted as a function of X-ray energies determined the material structure. For the first analyzed sample, Ga was not incorporated into the ZnO crystal structure. For the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel Co was found in one or both tetrahedral and octahedral sites. The use of anomalous X-ray diffraction (AXRD) provides element and site specific information for the crystal structure of a material. This technique lets us correlate the structure to the electronic properties of the materials as it allows us to probe precise locations of cations in the spinel structure. What makes it possible is that in AXRD the diffraction pattern is measured at a number of energies near an X-ray absorption edge of an element of interest. The atomic scattering strength of an element varies near its absorption edge and hence the total intensity of the diffraction peak changes by changing the X-ray energy. Thus AXRD provides element specific structural information. This method can be applied to both crystalline and liquid materials. One of the advantages of AXRD in crystallography experiments is its sensitivity to neighboring elements in the periodic tables. This method is also sensitive to specific crystallographic phases and to a specific site in a phase. The main use of AXRD in this study is for transparent conductors (TCs) analysis. TCs are considered to be important materials because of their

  20. X-ray spectroscopy to determine line coincidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhalter, P. G.; Charatis, G.; Rockett, P.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy in the 12-15 A region of L-shell lines from selected transition elements was performed in a joint Naval Research Laboratory - KMS Fusion, Inc. experiment. The accurate wavelengths determined in this work will be utilized in selecting potential pumping candidates in future X-ray lasing schemes. Specifically, high-resolution X-ray spectra were collected under controlled geometric and target conditions using both red and green light laser excitation in the KMS Chroma laser. Three groups of X-ray spectra were collected with highly-dispersive X-ray crystals at wavelengths centered at 12.543, 13.781 and 14.458 A corresponding to He- and H-like lines from fluorine. Two specially-designed flat crystal spectrographs employing film shutters were used with pairs of beryl and TAP crystals. The spectra from potential lasant and pump candidates could be recorded on the same spectrogram to aid in identifying X-ray line coincidences. In cases where wavelengths were measured in both the red and green laser work, agreement within 1-3 mA was obtained for the L-series X-ray lines. Within this accuracy range, five L series X-ray lines, mostly 2p-3d transitions from the metals Cr, Mn, and Ni, had wavelength values coincident to K-series lines in fluorine.

  1. The Measurement of Crack Tip Stresses by X-Ray Diffraction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    steel using a semi-automatic x-ray diffraction technique. Crack tip residual stresses were measured in the unloaded condition and crack tip "applied...36 10 X-Ray Diffraction Peak for 1020 Steel ....... .. 38 11 Constant Amplitude Crack Growth Rate Behavior . . . 39 12 X-Ray...investigation, crack tip stresses were measured in specimens of 1020 and 1045 steel using a semi- automatic x-ray diffraction technique. Crack tip residual

  2. DiffractX: A Simulation Toolbox for Diffractive X-ray Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selin, M.; Bertilson, M.; Nilsson, D.; von Hofsten, O.; Hertz, H. M.; Vogt, U.

    2011-09-01

    X-ray wavefront propagation is a powerful technique when simulating the performance of x-ray optical components. Using various numerical methods, interesting parameters such as focusing capability and efficiency can be investigated. Here we present the toolbox DiffractX, implemented in MATLAB. It contains many different wave propagation methods for the simulation of diffractive x-ray optics, including Fresnel propagation, the finite difference method (FDM), the thin object approximation, the rigorous coupled wave theory (RCWT), and the finite element method (FEM). All tools are accessed through a graphical interface, making the design of simulations fast and intuitive, even for users with little or no programming experience. The tools have been utilized to characterize realistic as well as idealized optical components. This will aid further developments of diffractive x-ray optics.

  3. X-ray diffraction of III-nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moram, M A; Vickers, M E

    2009-03-01

    The III-nitrides include the semiconductors AlN, GaN and InN, which have band gaps spanning the entire UV and visible ranges. Thin films of III-nitrides are used to make UV, violet, blue and green light-emitting diodes and lasers, as well as solar cells, high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) and other devices. However, the film growth process gives rise to unusually high strain and high defect densities, which can affect the device performance. X-ray diffraction is a popular, non-destructive technique used to characterize films and device structures, allowing improvements in device efficiencies to be made. It provides information on crystalline lattice parameters (from which strain and composition are determined), misorientation (from which defect types and densities may be deduced), crystallite size and microstrain, wafer bowing, residual stress, alloy ordering, phase separation (if present) along with film thicknesses and superlattice (quantum well) thicknesses, compositions and non-uniformities. These topics are reviewed, along with the basic principles of x-ray diffraction of thin films and areas of special current interest, such as analysis of non-polar, semipolar and cubic III-nitrides. A summary of useful values needed in calculations, including elastic constants and lattice parameters, is also given. Such topics are also likely to be relevant to other highly lattice-mismatched wurtzite-structure materials such as heteroepitaxial ZnO and ZnSe.

  4. X-ray Diffraction Studies of Striated Muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.M.; Knupp, C.; Roessle, M.; Al-Khayat, H.A.; Irving, T.C.; Eakins, F.; Mok, N.-S.; Harford, J.J.; Reedy, M.K.

    2006-04-24

    In this short review a number of recent X-ray diffraction results on the highly ordered striated muscles in insects and in bony fish have been briefly described. What is clear is that this technique applied to muscles which are amenable to rigorous analysis, taken together with related data from other sources (e.g. protein crystallography, biochemistry, mechanics, computer modelling) can provide not only the best descriptions yet available on the myosin head organisations on different myosin filaments in the relaxed state, but can also show the sequence of molecular events that occurs in the contractile cycle, and may also help to explain such phenomena as stretch-activation. X-ray diffraction is clearly an enormously powerful tool in studies of muscle. It has already provided a wealth of detail on muscle ultrastructure; it is providing ever more fascinating insights into molecular events in the 50-year old sliding filament mechanism, and there remains a great deal more potential that is as yet untapped.

  5. CADEM: calculate X-ray diffraction of epitaxial multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Komar, Paulina; Jakob, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    Epitaxial multilayers and superlattice (SL) structures are gaining increasing importance as they offer the opportunity to create artificial crystals with new functionalities. These crystals deviate from the parent bulk compounds not only in terms of the lattice constants but also in the symmetry classification, which renders calculation of their X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns tedious. Nevertheless, XRD is essential to get information on the multilayer/SL structure such as, for example, out-of-plane lattice constants, strain relaxation and period length of the crystalline SL. This article presents a powerful yet simple program, based on the general one-dimensional kinematic X-ray diffraction theory, which calculates the XRD patterns of tailor-made multilayers and thus enables quantitative comparison of measured and calculated XRD data. As the multilayers are constructed layer by layer, the final material stack can be entirely arbitrary. Moreover, CADEM is very flexible and can be straightforwardly adapted to any material system. The source code of CADEM is available as supporting material for this article. PMID:28190993

  6. Fabrication of large area X-ray diffraction grating for X-ray phase imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Daiji; Tokuoka, Atsushi; Katori, Megumi; Minamiyama, Yasuto; Yamashita, Kenji; Nishida, Satoshi; Hattori, Tadashi

    2012-07-31

    X-ray lithography, which uses highly directional synchrotron radiation, is one of the technologies that can be used for fabricating micrometer-sized structures. In X-ray lithography, the accuracy of the fabricated structure depends largely on the accuracy of the X-ray mask. Since X-ray radiation is highly directional, a micro-fabrication technology that produces un-tapered and high aspect ratio highly absorbent structures on a low absorbent membrane is required. Conventionally, a resin material is used as the support membrane for large area X-ray masks. However, resin membranes have the disadvantage that they can sag after several cycles of X-ray exposure due to the heat generated by the X-rays. Therefore, we proposed and used thin carbon wafers for the membrane material because carbon has an extremely small thermal expansion coefficient. We fabricated new carbon membrane X-ray masks, and these results of X-ray lithography demonstrate the superior performance.

  7. A new theory for X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Fewster, Paul F

    2014-05-01

    This article proposes a new theory of X-ray scattering that has particular relevance to powder diffraction. The underlying concept of this theory is that the scattering from a crystal or crystallite is distributed throughout space: this leads to the effect that enhanced scatter can be observed at the `Bragg position' even if the `Bragg condition' is not satisfied. The scatter from a single crystal or crystallite, in any fixed orientation, has the fascinating property of contributing simultaneously to many `Bragg positions'. It also explains why diffraction peaks are obtained from samples with very few crystallites, which cannot be explained with the conventional theory. The intensity ratios for an Si powder sample are predicted with greater accuracy and the temperature factors are more realistic. Another consequence is that this new theory predicts a reliability in the intensity measurements which agrees much more closely with experimental observations compared to conventional theory that is based on `Bragg-type' scatter. The role of dynamical effects (extinction etc.) is discussed and how they are suppressed with diffuse scattering. An alternative explanation for the Lorentz factor is presented that is more general and based on the capture volume in diffraction space. This theory, when applied to the scattering from powders, will evaluate the full scattering profile, including peak widths and the `background'. The theory should provide an increased understanding of the reliability of powder diffraction measurements, and may also have wider implications for the analysis of powder diffraction data, by increasing the accuracy of intensities predicted from structural models.

  8. An image focusing means by using an opaque object to diffract x-rays

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.; Weaver, H. Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for focusing and imaging x-rays. An opaque sphere is used as a diffractive imaging element to diffract x-rays from an object so that the divergent x-ray wavefronts are transformed into convergent wavefronts and are brought to focus to form an image of the object with a large depth of field.

  9. Simultaneous X-ray fluorescence and scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy at the Australian Synchrotron XFM beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Michael W. M.; Phillips, Nicholas W.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Abbey, Brian; Vine, David J.; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Mudie, Stephen T.; Afshar, Nader; Kirkham, Robin; Chen, Bo; Balaur, Eugeniu; de Jonge, Martin D.

    2016-08-11

    Owing to its extreme sensitivity, quantitative mapping of elemental distributionsviaX-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) has become a key microanalytical technique. The recent realisation of scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy (SXDM) meanwhile provides an avenue for quantitative super-resolved ultra-structural visualization. The similarity of their experimental geometries indicates excellent prospects for simultaneous acquisition. Here, in both step- and fly-scanning modes, robust, simultaneous XFM-SXDM is demonstrated.

  10. The first X-ray diffraction measurements on Mars.

    PubMed

    Bish, David; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Sarrazin, Philippe; Bristow, Thomas; Achilles, Cherie; Dera, Przemyslaw; Chipera, Steve; Crisp, Joy; Downs, R T; Farmer, Jack; Gailhanou, Marc; Ming, Doug; Morookian, John Michael; Morris, Richard; Morrison, Shaunna; Rampe, Elizabeth; Treiman, Allan; Yen, Albert

    2014-11-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory landed in Gale crater on Mars in August 2012, and the Curiosity rover then began field studies on its drive toward Mount Sharp, a central peak made of ancient sediments. CheMin is one of ten instruments on or inside the rover, all designed to provide detailed information on the rocks, soils and atmosphere in this region. CheMin is a miniaturized X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence (XRD/XRF) instrument that uses transmission geometry with an energy-discriminating CCD detector. CheMin uses onboard standards for XRD and XRF calibration, and beryl:quartz mixtures constitute the primary XRD standards. Four samples have been analysed by CheMin, namely a soil sample, two samples drilled from mudstones and a sample drilled from a sandstone. Rietveld and full-pattern analysis of the XRD data reveal a complex mineralogy, with contributions from parent igneous rocks, amorphous components and several minerals relating to aqueous alteration. In particular, the mudstone samples all contain one or more phyllosilicates consistent with alteration in liquid water. In addition to quantitative mineralogy, Rietveld refinements also provide unit-cell parameters for the major phases, which can be used to infer the chemical compositions of individual minerals and, by difference, the composition of the amorphous component.

  11. The first X-ray diffraction measurements on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Bish, David; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Sarrazin, Philippe; Bristow, Thomas; Achilles, Cherie; Dera, Przemyslaw; Chipera, Steve; Crisp, Joy; Downs, R. T.; Farmer, Jack; Gailhanou, Marc; Ming, Doug; Morookian, John Michael; Morris, Richard; Morrison, Shaunna; Rampe, Elizabeth; Treiman, Allan; Yen, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory landed in Gale crater on Mars in August 2012, and the Curiosity rover then began field studies on its drive toward Mount Sharp, a central peak made of ancient sediments. CheMin is one of ten instruments on or inside the rover, all designed to provide detailed information on the rocks, soils and atmosphere in this region. CheMin is a miniaturized X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence (XRD/XRF) instrument that uses transmission geometry with an energy-discriminating CCD detector. CheMin uses onboard standards for XRD and XRF calibration, and beryl:quartz mixtures constitute the primary XRD standards. Four samples have been analysed by CheMin, namely a soil sample, two samples drilled from mudstones and a sample drilled from a sandstone. Rietveld and full-pattern analysis of the XRD data reveal a complex mineralogy, with contributions from parent igneous rocks, amorphous components and several minerals relating to aqueous alteration. In particular, the mudstone samples all contain one or more phyllosilicates consistent with alteration in liquid water. In addition to quantitative mineralogy, Rietveld refinements also provide unit-cell parameters for the major phases, which can be used to infer the chemical compositions of individual minerals and, by difference, the composition of the amorphous component. PMID:25485131

  12. X-ray wavefront modeling of Bragg diffraction from crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, John P.

    2011-09-01

    The diffraction of an X-ray wavefront from a slightly distorted crystal can be modeled by the Takagi-Taupin theory, an extension of the well-known dynamical diffraction theory for perfect crystals. Maxwell's equations applied to a perturbed periodic medium yield two coupled differential equations in the incident and diffracted amplitude. These equations are discretized for numerical calculation into the determination of the two amplitudes on the points of an integration mesh, beginning with the incident amplitudes at the crystal's top surface. The result is a set of diffracted amplitudes on the top surface (in the Bragg geometry) or the bottom surface (in the Laue geometry), forming a wavefront that in turn can be propagated through free space using the Fresnel- Huygens equations. The performance of the Diamond Light Source I20 dispersive spectrometer has here been simulated using this method. Methods are shown for transforming displacements calculated by finite element analysis into local lattice distortions, and for efficiently performing 3-D linear interpolations from these onto the Takagi-Taupin integration mesh, allowing this method to be extended to crystals under thermal load or novel mechanical bender designs.

  13. Synchrotron X-ray Powder Diffraction and Absorption Spectroscopy in Pulsed Magnetic Fields with Milliseconds Duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanacken, J.; Detlefs, C.; Mathon, O.; Frings, P.; Duc, F.; Lorenzo, J. E.; Nardone, M.; Billette, J.; Zitouni, A.; Dominguez, M.-C.; Herczeg, J.; Bras, W.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Rikken, G.

    2007-03-01

    X-ray Powder Diffraction and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy experiments (WAS) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) experiments were carried out at the ESRF DUBBLE beam line (BM26) and at the energy dispersive beam line (ID24), respectively. A mobile pulse generator, developed at the LNCMP, delivered 110kJ to the load coil, which was sufficient to generate peak fields of 30T with a rise time of about 5 ms. A liquid He flow cryostat allowed us to vary the sample temperature accurately between 4.2K and 300K. Powder diffraction patterns of TbVO4 were recorded in a broad temperature range using 21 keV monochromatic X-rays and using an on-line image plate detector. We observed the suppression of the Jahn-Teller structural distortion in TbVO4 due to the high magnetic pulsed field. XAS spectra could be measured and finite XMCD signals, directly proportional to the magnetic moment on the Gd absorber atom, were measured in thin Gd foils. Thanks to its element and orbital selectivity, XMCD proofs to be very useful in probing the magnetic properties and due to the strong brilliance of the synchrotron beam, the signals can be measured even in the ms range.

  14. Measuring Doppler Shifts of X-Ray Lines to Determine the Stellar Wind X-Ray Locations in OB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, Wayne

    1999-09-01

    For almost 20 years we have been trying to determine the source of the X-ray emission in OB stars. It is generally believed that this emission is caused by a distribution of stellar wind shocks. The AXAF grating spectrometers will provide the ultimate test of X-ray models. The shock model predicts that X-ray lines must be Doppler blue-shifted, hence, our primary objective is to measure these blue-shifts. MARX simulations show that the expected X-ray line shifts will be at least 4 times the MEG1 energy resolution limit. ASCA observations have provided stronger constraints on X-ray models, but they have also raised additional questions (e.g., X-ray abundance anomalies). The large number of X-ray lines predicted by MARX simulations will allow us to probe X-ray densities and abundances.

  15. X-Ray Diffraction and Imaging Study of Imperfections of Crystallized Lysozyme with Coherent X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Zheng-Wei; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    Phase-sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging and high angular-resolution diffraction combined with phase contrast radiographic imaging are employed to characterize defects and perfection of a uniformly grown tetragonal lysozyme crystal in symmetric Laue case. The fill width at half-maximum (FWHM) of a 4 4 0 rocking curve measured from the original crystal is approximately 16.7 arcseconds, and defects, which include point defects, line defects, and microscopic domains, have been clearly observed in the diffraction images of the crystal. The observed line defects carry distinct dislocation features running approximately along the <110> growth front, and they have been found to originate mostly at a central growth area and occasionally at outer growth regions. Individual point defects trapped at a crystal nucleus are resolved in the images of high sensitivity to defects. Slow dehydration has led to the broadening of the 4 4 0 rocking curve by a factor of approximately 2.4. A significant change of the defect structure and configuration with drying has been revealed, which suggests the dehydration induced migration and evolution of dislocations and lattice rearrangements to reduce overall strain energy. The sufficient details of the observed defects shed light upon perfection, nucleation and growth, and properties of protein crystals.

  16. Special properties of X-ray diffraction on carbon onions

    SciTech Connect

    Yastrebov, S. G. Ivanov-Omskii, V. I.

    2007-12-15

    The kinematic theory of X-ray diffraction was applied to the study of the most intense Bragg's reflection observed for carbon onions. It was shown that the agreement with experimental data was attained using a convolution of a Lorentzian contour with regard to the distribution of onion sizes and of an asymmetric contour taking into account the fluctuations of intershell distances inside the particle. It can be assumed that the observed scatter in intershell distances indicates a nonequilibrium state of the internal configuration of onion shells. It appeared to be possible to estimate not only the average onion size, which exceeds the average size of pristine nanodiamonds that are used for onion preparation by annealing, but their size distribution function as well.

  17. Parts per Million Powder X-ray Diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Newman, Justin A.; Schmitt, Paul D.; Toth, Scott J.; ...

    2015-10-14

    Here in this paper we demonstrate the use of second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy-guided synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) for the detection of trace crystalline active pharmaceutical ingredients in a common polymer blend. The combined instrument is capable of detecting 100 ppm crystalline ritonavir in an amorphous hydroxypropyl methylcellulose matrix with a high signal-to-noise ratio (>5000). The high spatial resolution afforded by SHG microscopy allows for the use of a minibeam collimator to reduce the total volume of material probed by synchrotron PXRD. The reduction in probed volume results in reduced background from amorphous material. The ability to detect lowmore » crystalline loading has the potential to improve measurements in the formulation pipeline for pharmaceutical solid dispersions, for which even trace quantities of crystalline active ingredients can negatively impact the stability and bioavailability of the final drug product.« less

  18. Parts per Million Powder X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Justin A.; Schmitt, Paul D.; Toth, Scott J.; Deng, Fengyuan; Zhang, Shijie; Simpson, Garth J.

    2015-10-14

    Here in this paper we demonstrate the use of second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy-guided synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) for the detection of trace crystalline active pharmaceutical ingredients in a common polymer blend. The combined instrument is capable of detecting 100 ppm crystalline ritonavir in an amorphous hydroxypropyl methylcellulose matrix with a high signal-to-noise ratio (>5000). The high spatial resolution afforded by SHG microscopy allows for the use of a minibeam collimator to reduce the total volume of material probed by synchrotron PXRD. The reduction in probed volume results in reduced background from amorphous material. The ability to detect low crystalline loading has the potential to improve measurements in the formulation pipeline for pharmaceutical solid dispersions, for which even trace quantities of crystalline active ingredients can negatively impact the stability and bioavailability of the final drug product.

  19. Powder X-ray diffraction laboratory, Reston, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatak, Nadine M.; Dulong, Frank T.; Jackson, John C.; Folger, Helen W.

    2014-01-01

    The powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) laboratory is managed jointly by the Eastern Mineral and Environmental Resources and Eastern Energy Resources Science Centers. Laboratory scientists collaborate on a wide variety of research problems involving other U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science centers and government agencies, universities, and industry. Capabilities include identification and quantification of crystalline and amorphous phases, and crystallographic and atomic structure analysis for a wide variety of sample media. Customized laboratory procedures and analyses commonly are used to characterize non-routine samples including, but not limited to, organic and inorganic components in petroleum source rocks, ore and mine waste, clay minerals, and glassy phases. Procedures can be adapted to meet a variety of research objectives.

  20. X-ray diffraction diagnostic design for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Maryum F.; House, Allen; Smith, R. F.; Ayers, Jay; Lamb, Zachary S.; Swift, David W.

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the design considerations for Target Diffraction In-Situ (TARDIS), an x-ray diffraction diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility. A crystal sample is ramp-compressed to peak pressures between 10 and 30 Mbar and, during a pressure hold period, is probed with quasi-monochromatic x-rays emanating from a backlighter source foil. The crystal spectrography diffraction lines are recorded onto image plates. The crystal sample, filter, and image plates are packaged into one assembly, allowing for accurate and repeatable target to image plate registration. Unconverted laser light impinges upon the device, generating debris, the effects of which have been mitigated. Dimpled blast shields, high strength steel alloy, and high-z tungsten are used to shield and protect the image plates. A tapered opening was designed to provide adequate thickness of shielding materials without blocking the drive beams or x-ray source from reaching the crystal target. The high strength steel unit serves as a mount for the crystal target and x-ray source foil. A tungsten body contains the imaging components. Inside this sub-assembly, there are three image plates: a 160 degree field of view curved plate directly opposite the target opening and two flat plates for the top and bottom. A polycarbonate frame, coated with the appropriate filter material and embedded with registration features for image plate location, is inserted into the diagnostic body. The target assembly is metrologized and then the diagnostic assembly is attached.

  1. Diffracted X-ray tracking for monitoring intramolecular motion in individual protein molecules using broad band X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Masato; Kajiwara, Kentaro; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ohta, Noboru; Hoshisashi, Kentaro; Jae-won, Chang; Tokue, Maki; Matsushita, Yufuku; Nishijima, Masaki; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Yagi, Naoto

    2013-10-15

    Diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT) enables the tilting and twisting motions of single protein molecules to be monitored with micro- to milliradian resolution using a highly brilliant X-ray source with a wide energy bandwidth. We have developed a technique to monitor single molecules using gold nanocrystals attached to individual protein molecules using the BL28B2 beamline at SPring-8. In this paper we present the installation of a single toroidal X-ray mirror at BL28B2 to focus X-rays in an energy range of 10–20 keV (△E/E = 82% for an X-ray with a wide energy bandwidth). With this beamline we tracked diffraction spots from gold nanocrystals over a wide angle range than that using quasi-monochromatic X-rays. Application of the wide angle DXT technique to biological systems enabled us to observe the on-site motions of single protein molecules that have been functionalized in vivo. We further extend the capability of DXT by observing the fractional tilting and twisting motions of inner proteins under various conditions. As a proof of this methodology and to determine instrumental performance the intramolecular motions of a human serum albumin complex with 2-anthracenecarboxylic acid was investigated using the BL28B2 beamline. The random tilting and twisting intramolecular motions are shown to be directly linked to the movement of individual protein molecules in the buffer solution.

  2. Diffracted X-ray tracking for monitoring intramolecular motion in individual protein molecules using broad band X-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Masato; Kajiwara, Kentaro; Hoshisashi, Kentaro; Jae-won, Chang; Tokue, Maki; Matsushita, Yufuku; Nishijima, Masaki; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ohta, Noboru; Yagi, Naoto; Sasaki, Yuji C.

    2013-10-01

    Diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT) enables the tilting and twisting motions of single protein molecules to be monitored with micro- to milliradian resolution using a highly brilliant X-ray source with a wide energy bandwidth. We have developed a technique to monitor single molecules using gold nanocrystals attached to individual protein molecules using the BL28B2 beamline at SPring-8. In this paper we present the installation of a single toroidal X-ray mirror at BL28B2 to focus X-rays in an energy range of 10-20 keV (△E/E = 82% for an X-ray with a wide energy bandwidth). With this beamline we tracked diffraction spots from gold nanocrystals over a wide angle range than that using quasi-monochromatic X-rays. Application of the wide angle DXT technique to biological systems enabled us to observe the on-site motions of single protein molecules that have been functionalized in vivo. We further extend the capability of DXT by observing the fractional tilting and twisting motions of inner proteins under various conditions. As a proof of this methodology and to determine instrumental performance the intramolecular motions of a human serum albumin complex with 2-anthracenecarboxylic acid was investigated using the BL28B2 beamline. The random tilting and twisting intramolecular motions are shown to be directly linked to the movement of individual protein molecules in the buffer solution.

  3. A novel and simple x-ray slit for diamond anvil cell based x-ray diffraction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshad, K. A.; Kumar, N. R. Sanjay; Shekar, N. V. Chandra

    2017-04-01

    We report here a novel internal x-ray slit assembly to carry out laboratory based high pressure x-ray diffraction (HPXRD) experiments in a Mao Bell type diamond anvil cell. In this assembly a tiny sheet of lead with a 100 micron hole immediately below the diamond table acts as an x-ray slit. Data resolution and statistics were compared with the older slit. This novel slit assembly has two major advantages (i) eliminates cumbersome and lengthy procedure usually adopted for alignment of x-ray slit (ii) provides high flux and improved resolution due to the comparatively low beam divergence and effective utilization of the maxima of the beam profile.

  4. Contrast and resolution in direct Fresnel diffraction phase-contrast imaging with partially coherent x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Han Shensheng; Yu Hong; Cheng Jing; Gao Chen; Luo Zhenlin

    2004-10-01

    A general treatment of x-ray image formation by direct Fresnel diffraction with partially coherent hard x rays is presented. Contrast and resolution are the criteria used to specify the visibility of an image, which depend primarily on the spatial coherence of the illumination and the distance from object to the image, with chromatic coherence of lesser importance. The dependence of the quality of phase-contrast images on the parameters of in-line imaging configuration is described quantitatively. The influence of spatial coherence of hard x-ray source on the imaging quality is also discussed based on the partially coherent direct Fresnel diffraction phase-contrast imaging theory. Experimental results are also presented for phase-contrast x-ray images with partially coherent hard x rays.

  5. A new theory for X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Fewster, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a new theory of X-ray scattering that has particular relevance to powder diffraction. The underlying concept of this theory is that the scattering from a crystal or crystallite is distributed throughout space: this leads to the effect that enhanced scatter can be observed at the ‘Bragg position’ even if the ‘Bragg condition’ is not satisfied. The scatter from a single crystal or crystallite, in any fixed orientation, has the fascinating property of contributing simultaneously to many ‘Bragg positions’. It also explains why diffraction peaks are obtained from samples with very few crystallites, which cannot be explained with the conventional theory. The intensity ratios for an Si powder sample are predicted with greater accuracy and the temperature factors are more realistic. Another consequence is that this new theory predicts a reliability in the intensity measurements which agrees much more closely with experimental observations compared to conventional theory that is based on ‘Bragg-type’ scatter. The role of dynamical effects (extinction etc.) is discussed and how they are suppressed with diffuse scattering. An alternative explanation for the Lorentz factor is presented that is more general and based on the capture volume in diffraction space. This theory, when applied to the scattering from powders, will evaluate the full scattering profile, including peak widths and the ‘background’. The theory should provide an increased understanding of the reliability of powder diffraction measurements, and may also have wider implications for the analysis of powder diffraction data, by increasing the accuracy of intensities predicted from structural models. PMID:24815975

  6. D-25 OBSERVATIONS OF SHOCKED METALLIC SURFACES WITH SINGLE-PULSE X-RAY DIFFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D. V.; Grover, M.; Macy, D.; Madlener, M.; Stevens, G.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L.

    2009-01-01

    A single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) diagnostic has been developed for the investigation of shocked material properties on a very short time scale. The diagnostic, which consists of a 37-stage Marx bank high-voltage pulse generator coupled to a needle-and-washer electron beam diode via coaxial cable, produces line and bremsstrahlung x-ray emission in a 40-ns pulse. A selected anode of either silver or molybdenum produces characteristic K lines used for diffraction. The x-ray beam passes through a pinhole collimator and is incident on the sample with an approximately 2-mm by 5-mm spot and 1° full-width-half-maximum angular divergence. Coherent scattering from the sample produces a Debye-Scherrer diffraction pattern on an image plate 75 mm from the polycrystalline sample surface. An experimental study of the polycrystalline structures of zirconium and tin under high-pressure shock loading has been conducted with single-pulse XRD. The experimental targets were 0.1-mm-thick foils of zirconium and tin using 0.4-mm-thick vitreous carbon back windows for shock-loading, and the shocks were produced by either Detasheet or PBX-9501 high explosives buffered by 1-mm-thick 6061-T6 aluminum. The diffraction patterns from both shocked zirconium and tin indicated a phase transition into a polymorphic mix of amorphous and new solid phases.

  7. X-ray Weak Broad-line Qquasars: Absorption or Intrinsic X-ray Weakness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Risaliti, Guida

    2005-01-01

    XMM observations of X-ray weak quasars have been performed during 2003 and 2004. The data for all the observations have become available in 2004 (there has been a delay of several months on the initial schedule, due to high background flares which contaminated the observations: as a consequence, most of them had to be rescheduled). We have reduced and analyzed all the data, and obtained interesting scientific results. Out of the eight sources, 4 are confirmed to be extremely X-ray weak, in agreement with the results of previous Chandra observations. 3 sources are confined to be highly variable both in flux (by factor 20-50) and in spectral properties (dramatic changes in spectral index). For both these groups of objects we are completing a publication: 1) For the X-ray weak sources, a paper is submitted with a complete analysis of the X-ray spectra both from Chandra and XMM-Newton, and a comparison with optical and near-IR photometry obtained from all-sky surveys. Possible models for the unusual spectral energy distribution of these sources are also presented. 2) For the variable sources, a paper is being finalized where the X-ray spectra obtained with XMM-Newton are compared with previous X-ray observations and with observations at other wavelengths. It is shown that these sources are high luminosity and extreme cases of the highly variable class of narrow-line Seyfert Is. In order to further understand the nature of these X-ray weak quasars, we submitted proposals for spectroscopy at optical and infrared telescopes. We obtained time at the TNG 4 meter telescope for near-IR observations and at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope for optical high-resolution spectroscopy. These observations have been performed in early 2004. They will complement the XMM data and will lead to understanding of whether the X-ray weakness of these sources is an intrinsic property or is due to absorption by circum-nuclear material. The infrared spectra of the variable sources have been already

  8. X-ray Line Formation by Charge Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter

    Existing X-ray telescopes have revealed charge exchange to be a key astrophysical process leading to X-ray emission when highly charged ions from such diverse sources as stellar winds, supernova remnants, or galactic super-winds interact with comets, planetary atmospheres, or the interstellar neutral gas. Charge exchange with bare sulfur ions, for example, was proposed as an alternative explanation of the 3.5 keV X-ray feature in the emission of galactic clusters that had been associated with the possible decay of sterile neutrinos. Fe XVII dominates the spectral emission of a large number of astrophysical X-ray sources and, thus, is of prime diagnostic importance, as illustrated in numerous measurements by Chandra and XMM-Newton. Although immense progress has been made in laboratory measurements and spectral calculations of collisional plasmas since the launch of these X-ray observatories, model calculations of the Fe XVII X-ray spectrum still do not yield agreement with astrophysical observations that is completely satisfactory. As a result, charge exchange has been invoked as an alternative explanation for the poor agreement between models and observations. Theoretically, line formation by charge exchange, however, is still only poorly understood both in the case of the rather 'simple'K-shell spectra of hydrogenlike or heliumlike ions, such as Fe XXV and Fe XXVI, and the more complex L-shell spectra of neonlike ions such as Fe XVII. Experimentally, there is only a small set of laboratory measurements involving X-rays from K-shell ions, and almost no measurements of the charge exchange produced X-ray emission involving L-shell ions. Moreover, the existing laboratory measurements have focused mostly on charge exchange processes pertaining to the solar wind interacting with complex (molecular) gases in cometary and planetary atmospheres. By contrast, we propose here to perform X-ray measurements pertaining to astrophysical exchange processes dominated by atomic

  9. X-Ray Absorbed, Broad-Lined, Red AGN and the Cosmic X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Wilkes, Belinda

    2005-01-01

    We have obtained XMM spectra for five red, 2MASS AGN, selected from a sample observed by Chandra to be X-ray bright and to cover a range of hardness ratios. Our results confirm the presence of substantial absorbing material in three sources which have optical classifications ranging from Type 1 to Type 2, with an intrinsically flat (hard) power law continuum indicated in the other two. The presence of both X-ray absorption and broad optical emission lines with the usual strength suggests either a small (nuclear) absorber or a favored viewing angle so as to cover the X-ray source but not the broad emission line region (BELR). A soft excess is detected in all three Type 1 sources. We speculate that this soft X-ray emission may arise in an extended region of ionized gas, perhaps linked with the polarized (scattered) light which is a feature of these sources. The spectral complexity revealed by XMM emphasizes the limitations of the low S/N Chandra data. Overall, the new XMM results strengthen our conclusions (Wilkes et al. 2002) that the observed X-ray continua of red AGN are unusually hard at energies greater than 2 keV. Whether due to substantial line-of-sight absorption or to an intrinsically hard or reflection-dominated spectrum, these 'red' AGN have an observed spectral form consistent with contributing significantly to the missing had absorbed population of the Cosmic X-ray Background (CXRB). When absorption and or reflection is taken into account, all these AGN have power law slopes typical of broad-line (Type 1) AGN (Gamma approximately 1.9). This appears to resolve the spectral paradox which for so long has existed between the CXRB and the AGN thought to be the dominant contributors. It also suggests two scenarios whereby Type 1 AGN/QSOs may be responsible for a significant fraction of the CXRB at energies above 2 keV: 1) X-ray absorbed AGN/QSOs with visible broad emission lines; 2) AGN/QSOs with complex spectra whose hardness greater than 2 keV is not

  10. Ultrafast Time Resolved X-ray Diffraction Studies of Laser Heated Metals and Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peilin; Tomov, I. V.; Rentzepis, P. M.

    1998-03-01

    Time resolved hard x-ray diffraction has been employed to study the dynamics of lattice structure deformation. When laser pulse energy is deposited in a material it generates a non uniform transient temperature distribution, which alters the lattice structure of the crystal. The deformed crystal lattice will change the angle of diffraction for a monochromatic x-ray beam. We report picosecond and nanosecond time resolved x-ray diffraction measurements of the lattice temperature distribution, transient structure and stress, in Pt (111) and GaAs (111) crystals, caused by pulsed UV laser irradiation. An ArF excimer laser operated at 300 Hz was used, both, to drive an x-ray diode with copper anode and heat the crystal. Bragg diffracted x-ray radiation was recorded by a direct imaging x-ray CCD. Changes in the diffraction patterns induced by a few millijouls pulse energy were observed at different time delays between the laser heating pulse and the x-ray probing pulse. A kinematical model for time resolved x-ray diffraction was used to analyze the experimental data. Good agreement between the measured and calculated scattered x-ray intensities profiles was achieved, indicating that detailed time resolved x-ray diffraction measurements can be made with nanosecond and picosecond resolution for small temperature changes. Our system can detect changes in the lattice spacing of about 10-3 A.

  11. X-ray Diffraction Study of Molybdenum to 900 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Coppari, F.; Smith, R.; Eggert, J.; Boehly, T.; Collins, G. W.; Duffy, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a transition metal that is important as a high-pressure standard. Its equation of state, structure, and melting behavior have been explored extensively in both experimental and theoretical studies. Melting data up to the Mbar pressure region from static compression experiments in the diamond anvil cell [Errandonea et al. 2004] are inconsistent with shock wave sound velocity measurements [Hixson et al., 1989]. There are also conflicting reports as to whether body-centered cubic (BCC) Mo transforms to a face-centered cubic (FCC), hexagonal close packed (HCP) or double hexagonal close packed (DHCP) structure at either high pressure or high pressure and temperature conditions [Belonoshko et al. 2008, Mikhaylushkin et al., 2008 and Cazorla et al., 2008]. Recently, a phase transition from BCC to the DHCP phase at 660 GPa and 0 K was predicted using the particle swam optimization (PSO) method (Wang et al, 2013). Here we report an x-ray diffraction study of dynamically compressed molybdenum. Experiments were conducted using the Omega laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Mo targets were either ramp or shock compressed using a laser drive. In ramp loading, the sample is compressed sufficiently slowly that a shock wave does not form. This results in lower temperatures, keeping the sample in the solid state to higher pressures. X-ray diffraction measurements were performed using quasi-monochromatic x-rays from a highly ionized He-α Cu source and image plate detectors. Upon ramp compression, we found no evidence of phase transition in solid Mo up to 900 GPa. The observed peaks can be assigned to the (110) and (200) or (220) reflections of BCC Mo up to the highest pressure, indicating that Mo does not melt under ramp loading to maximum pressure reached. Under shock loading, we did not observe any evidence for the solid-solid phase transformation around 210 GPa as reported in previous work (Hixson et al, 1989). The BCC

  12. A study of monochromatic x-ray area beam for application in diffraction enhanced imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Hyeuk

    Synchrotron-based Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) system has shown improved contrast images on low attenuation material. In a previous DEI study great potential to detect earlier stage breast cancer was reported. However, to apply DEI technique at the clinical level, a synchrotron source is not feasible for clinically-approved systems due to the size of the accelerator, and hence a compact x-ray source that can replace synchrotron is desirable. Development of an x-ray source compatible to synchrotron radiation is an essential part for a clinical DEI system. Some important features for the design of an x-ray source, based on synchrotron radiation, are the photon flux and beam collimation. The NCSU research group suggested a wide-beam x-ray source, which consists of concentric circular filaments producing electron flux onto a cylindrically-shaped oxygen-free copper stationary target with a thin layer of Molybdenum for x-ray production. This source design emphasizes large field of view, which can eliminate the line by line scanning process experienced in a DEI experimental setup. In this study, the proof of principle model of a wide beam x-ray source was used to study for control electron trajectory of the concentric filaments design, calculations of the produced x-ray flux, simulation of the DEI imaging, and estimation of the operation time with target's active cooling system. The DEI images from the electron distribution were computationally generated by adopting a monochromator and an analyzer with a computationally generated dual cylindrical object. The image simulation showed that the wide-beam x-ray source based DEI images are highly dependent on the electron distribution at the target. Uniform electron distribution by electron trajectory optimization is carried out through independent powering of the filaments inside the focusing cup. For higher electron beam current the x-ray flux satisfies obtaining a successful DEI image scan, but such high current

  13. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  14. Nondestructive X-ray diffraction measurement of warpage in silicon dies embedded in integrated circuit packages.

    PubMed

    Tanner, B K; Danilewsky, A N; Vijayaraghavan, R K; Cowley, A; McNally, P J

    2017-04-01

    Transmission X-ray diffraction imaging in both monochromatic and white beam section mode has been used to measure quantitatively the displacement and warpage stress in encapsulated silicon devices. The displacement dependence with position on the die was found to agree well with that predicted from a simple model of warpage stress. For uQFN microcontrollers, glued only at the corners, the measured misorientation contours are consistent with those predicted using finite element analysis. The absolute displacement, measured along a line through the die centre, was comparable to that reported independently by high-resolution X-ray diffraction and optical interferometry of similar samples. It is demonstrated that the precision is greater than the spread of values found in randomly selected batches of commercial devices, making the techniques viable for industrial inspection purposes.

  15. Measuring the X-ray Resolving Power of Bent Potassium Acid Phthalate Diffraction Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J.; Wu, M.; Jacoby, K. D.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-11-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a dual goniometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  16. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J. Jacoby, K. D.; Wu, M.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-11-15

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  17. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystals.

    PubMed

    Haugh, M J; Wu, M; Jacoby, K D; Loisel, G P

    2014-11-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  18. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystalsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugh, M. J.; Wu, M.; Jacoby, K. D.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-11-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  19. X-ray diffraction study of crystalline barium titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zali, Nurazila Mat; Mahmood, Che Seman; Mohamad, Siti Mariam; Foo, Choo Thye; Murshidi, Julie Adrianny

    2014-02-12

    In this study, BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics have been prepared via solid-state reaction method. The powders were calcined for 2 hours at different temperatures ranging from 600°C to 1200°C. Using X-ray diffraction with a Rietveld analysis, the phase formation and crystal structure of the BaTiO{sub 3} powders were studied. Change in crystallite size and tetragonality as a function of calcination temperature were also discussed. It has been found that the formation of pure perovskite phase of BaTiO{sub 3} began at calcination condition of 1000 °C for 2 hours. The crystal structure of BaTiO{sub 3} formed is in the tetragonal structure. The second phases of BaCO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} existed with calcination temperature below 1000 °C. Purity, crystallite size and tetragonality of BaTiO{sub 3} powders were found to increase with increasing calcination temperature.

  20. X-ray diffraction data-assisted structure searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Pengyue; Tong, Qunchao; Lv, Jian; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2017-04-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is an important technique for structure determination. However, in traditional methods, estimated structural information (e.g., unit cell parameters and space group) is required to determine the precise structure from XRD data. We propose a versatile global search method for determining crystal structures from experimental powder XRD data without guessed structural information. Unlike in traditional structure prediction, which uses total energy as the fitness function, the fitness in our method is the degree of dissimilarity between the simulated and the experimental XRD patterns. To improve the efficiency of structure searching using powder XRD data, several techniques are implemented, including background subtraction, profile parameter optimization by simulated annealing, and structure evolution using CALYPSO. The efficiency and robustness of our method is demonstrated here using predictions of previous known structures (hexagonal ZnO and anatase TiO2). The method is also used to explore the high-pressure phases of binary compounds CaLi2 and Ca3C2; it uncovers candidate structures (C2221 for CaLi2 at 54 GPa and Cm 2 m for Ca3C2 at 12.5 GPa) whose simulated XRD patterns agree with their experimental patterns.

  1. Dynamical Diffraction Simulation of Transmission X-ray Phase Retarders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrander, A. T.; Lang, J. C.; Srajer, G.

    1996-03-01

    Circularly polarized photons couple with magnetic moments which makes them a useful probe of the magnetic properties of condensed matter. Circularly polarized photon beams can be created from linearly polarized undulator beams at the Advanced Photon Source using thin single-crystal transmission phase retarders. Tests of such phase retarders have been made and have been compared to dynamical diffraction calculations. (J.C. Lang and G. Srajer, Rev. Sci. Instrumen. 66,1540(1995).) In addition, a phase retarder was successfully used in a circular magnetic x-ray dichroism experiment. (J.C. Lang, G. Srajer, C. Detliefs, A.I. Goldman, H. Konig, X. Wang, B.N. Harmon, and R.W. McCallum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74,4935(1995).) The focus of this talk is on the calculations that were made using matrix techniques. ( D.W. Berreman and A.T. Macrander, Phys. Rev. B 37,6030(1988).) Such calculations are possible because not only the amplitude but also the phase of the fields are calculated. This work supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, BES-Materials Sciences, under contract no. W-31-109-ENG-38.

  2. Spectral feature variations in x-ray diffraction imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, Scott D.; Greenberg, Joel A.

    2016-05-01

    Materials with different atomic or molecular structures give rise to unique scatter spectra when measured by X-ray diffraction. The details of these spectra, though, can vary based on both intrinsic (e.g., degree of crystallinity or doping) and extrinsic (e.g., pressure or temperature) conditions. While this sensitivity is useful for detailed characterizations of the material properties, these dependences make it difficult to perform more general classification tasks, such as explosives threat detection in aviation security. A number of challenges, therefore, currently exist for reliable substance detection including the similarity in spectral features among some categories of materials combined with spectral feature variations from materials processing and environmental factors. These factors complicate the creation of a material dictionary and the implementation of conventional classification and detection algorithms. Herein, we report on two prominent factors that lead to variations in spectral features: crystalline texture and temperature variations. Spectral feature comparisons between materials categories will be described for solid metallic sheet, aqueous liquids, polymer sheet, and metallic, organic, and inorganic powder specimens. While liquids are largely immune to texture effects, they are susceptible to temperature changes that can modify their density or produce phase changes. We will describe in situ temperature-dependent measurement of aqueous-based commercial goods in the temperature range of -20°C to 35°C.

  3. Influence of temperature gradient on diffracted X-ray spectrum in quartz crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkrtchyan, A. R.; Potylitsyn, A. P.; Vukolov, A. V.; Novokshonov, A. I.; Gogolev, A. S.; Amiragyan, R. V.; Movsisyan, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    In this work characteristics of hard X-ray (with energy higher than 30 keV) were investigated. In the experiment we measured spectra of X-ray reflected by a quartz monocrystal in Laue geometry under influence of the temperature gradient. The measurements were made by the spectrometer BDER-KI-11K with 300 eV resolution on the 17.74 keV spectral line of Am241 and the spectrometer XR-100CR with 270 eV resolution on the same spectral line. An existence of temperature gradient leads to increasing of the diffracted beam intensity. The intensity was measured dependently on the temperature of one of the edge of the crystal.

  4. Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of a Frozen Hydrated Yeast Cell

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xiaojing; Nelson, Johanna; Kirz, Janos; ...

    2009-11-01

    We report the first image of an intact, frozen hydrated eukaryotic cell using x-ray diffraction microscopy, or coherent x-ray diffraction imaging. By plunge freezing the specimen in liquid ethane and maintaining it below -170 °C, artifacts due to dehydration, ice crystallization, and radiation damage are greatly reduced. In this example, coherent diffraction data using 520 eV x rays were recorded and reconstructed to reveal a budding yeast cell at a resolution better than 25 nm. This demonstration represents an important step towards high resolution imaging of cells in their natural, hydrated state, without limitations imposed by x-ray optics.

  5. Combined synchrotron X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction using a fluorescing metal foil.

    PubMed

    Kappen, P; Arhatari, B D; Luu, M B; Balaur, E; Caradoc-Davies, T

    2013-06-01

    This study realizes the concept of simultaneous micro-X-ray computed tomography and X-ray powder diffraction using a synchrotron beamline. A thin zinc metal foil was placed in the primary, monochromatic synchrotron beam to generate a divergent wave to propagate through the samples of interest onto a CCD detector for tomographic imaging, thus removing the need for large beam illumination and high spatial resolution detection. Both low density materials (kapton tubing and a piece of plant) and higher density materials (Egyptian faience) were investigated, and elemental contrast was explored for the example of Cu and Ni meshes. The viability of parallel powder diffraction using the direct beam transmitted through the foil was demonstrated. The outcomes of this study enable further development of the technique towards in situ tomography∕diffraction studies combining micrometer and crystallographic length scales, and towards elemental contrast imaging and reconstruction methods using well defined fluorescence outputs from combinations of known fluorescence targets (elements).

  6. Combined synchrotron X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction using a fluorescing metal foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappen, P.; Arhatari, B. D.; Luu, M. B.; Balaur, E.; Caradoc-Davies, T.

    2013-06-01

    This study realizes the concept of simultaneous micro-X-ray computed tomography and X-ray powder diffraction using a synchrotron beamline. A thin zinc metal foil was placed in the primary, monochromatic synchrotron beam to generate a divergent wave to propagate through the samples of interest onto a CCD detector for tomographic imaging, thus removing the need for large beam illumination and high spatial resolution detection. Both low density materials (kapton tubing and a piece of plant) and higher density materials (Egyptian faience) were investigated, and elemental contrast was explored for the example of Cu and Ni meshes. The viability of parallel powder diffraction using the direct beam transmitted through the foil was demonstrated. The outcomes of this study enable further development of the technique towards in situ tomography/diffraction studies combining micrometer and crystallographic length scales, and towards elemental contrast imaging and reconstruction methods using well defined fluorescence outputs from combinations of known fluorescence targets (elements).

  7. Taking X-ray Diffraction to the Limit: Macromolecular Structures from Femtosecond X-ray Pulses and Diffraction Microscopy of Cells with Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Miao, J; Kirz, J; Sayre, D; Hodgson, K O

    2003-10-01

    The methodology of X-ray crystallography has recently been successfully extended to the structure determination of non-crystalline specimens. The phase problem was solved by using the oversampling method, which takes advantage of ''continuous'' diffraction pattern from non-crystalline specimens. Here we review the principle of this newly developed technique and discuss the ongoing experiments of imaging non-periodic objects, like cells and cellular structures using coherent and bright X-rays from the 3rd generation synchrotron radiation. In the longer run, the technique may be applied to image single biomolecules by using the anticipated X-ray free electron lasers. Computer simulations have so far demonstrated two important steps: (1) by using an extremely intense femtosecond X-ray pulse, a diffraction pattern can be recorded from a macromolecule before radiation damage manifests itself, and (2) the phase information can be ab initio retrieved from a set of calculated noisy diffraction patterns of single protein molecules.

  8. X-Ray Diffraction Contrast Tomography in micro-CT Lab Source Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-16

    DCT is a truly three-dimensional tomographic imaging approach, sharing a common experimental setup with conventional X - ray microtomography. After...interaction with the material, both the transmitted and diffracted beams are recorded on a high-resolution X - ray imaging detector positioned close to the...grain microstructures in a wide range of polycrystalline materials. The combination of three-dimensional X - ray imaging and diffraction techniques on the

  9. X-Ray Diffraction and the Discovery of the Structure of DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouse, David T.

    2007-01-01

    A method is described for teaching the analysis of X-ray diffraction of DNA through a series of steps utilizing the original methods used by James Watson, Francis Crick, Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin. The X-ray diffraction pattern led to the conclusion of the basic helical structure of DNA and its dimensions while basic chemical principles…

  10. Strain measurement of pure titanium covered with soft tissue using X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Kazuhiro; Tadano, Shigeru

    2010-03-01

    Measurement of the stress and strain applied to implants and bone tissue in the human body are important for fracture prediction and evaluations of implant adaptation. The strain of titanium (Ti) materials can be measuring by X-ray diffraction techniques. This study applied X-ray diffraction to the skin tissue-covered Ti. Characteristic X-rays of Mo Kalpha were used and the X-rays diffracted from the Ti were detected through the covering skin tissue. The X-ray absorption by skin tissue is large under the diffracted X-rays detected in low angles because the length of penetration depends on the angle of inclination, equal to the Bragg angle. The effects of skin tissue to detect the diffracted X-rays were investigated in the experiments. And the strain measurements were conducted under bending loads applied to the Ti specimen. The effect of skin tissue was absorption of X-rays as well as the X-rays scattered from the physiological saline contained in the tissue. The X-rays scattered by the physiological saline creates a specific background pattern near the peaks from the (002) and (011) lattice planes of Ti in the X-ray diffraction profile. Diffracted X-rays from the Ti were detected after being transmitted through 1 mm thick skin tissue by Mo Kalpha. Individual peaks such as (010), (002), (011), and (110) were clearly established by using a parallel beam arrangement. The strains of (110) lattice planes were measured with or without the tissue cover were very similar. The strain of the (110) lattice planes of Ti could be measured by Mo Kalpha when the Ti specimen was located under the skin tissue.

  11. The rotating-crystal method in femtosecond X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Freyer, B; Stingl, J; Zamponi, F; Woerner, M; Elsaesser, T

    2011-08-01

    We report the first implementation of the rotating-crystal method in femtosecond X-ray diffraction. Applying a pump-probe scheme with 100 fs hard X-ray probe pulses from a laser-driven plasma source, the novel technique is demonstrated by mapping structural dynamics of a photoexcited bismuth crystal via changes of the diffracted intensity on a multitude of Bragg reflections. The method is compared to femtosecond powder diffraction and to Bragg diffraction from a crystal with stationary orientation.

  12. Note: Electrochemical cell for in operando X-ray diffraction measurements on a conventional X-ray diffractometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hartung, Steffen; Bucher, Nicolas; Bucher, Ramona; Srinivasan, Madhavi

    2015-08-15

    Electrochemical in operando X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a powerful method to analyze structural changes of energy storage materials while inserting/de-inserting charge carriers, such as Li- or Na-ions, into/from a host structure. The design of an XRD in operando cell is presented, which enables the use of thin (6 μm) aluminum foil as X-ray window as a non-toxic alternative to conventional beryllium windows. Owing to the reduced thickness, diffraction patterns and their changes during cycling can be observed with excellent quality, which was demonstrated for two cathode materials for sodium-ion batteries in a half-cell set-up, P2-Na{sub 0.7}MnO{sub 2} and Na{sub 2.55}V{sub 6}O{sub 16} ⋅ 0.6H{sub 2}O.

  13. Diffraction grating transmission efficiencies for XUV and soft X rays. [for HEAO-B extrasolar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnopper, H. W.; Van Speybroeck, L. P.; Delvaille, J. P.; Epstein, A.; Kaellne, E.; Bachrach, R. Z.; Dijkstra, J.; Lantward, L.

    1977-01-01

    The manufacture and properties of a grating intended for extrasolar X-ray studies are described. The manufacturing process uses a split laser beam exposing an interference pattern on the photoresist-coated glass plated with a nickel parting layer. The grating, supporting structure, and mounting frame are electrodeposited on the nickel parting layer, and the final product is lifted from the glass substrate by selective etching of the nickel. A model was derived which relates the number of counts received in a given order m as a function of photon wavenumber. A 4-deg beam line was used to measure the efficiencies of gold transmission gratings for diffraction of X-rays in the range of 45 to 275 eV. The experimental results are in good agreement with model calculations.

  14. Three Dimensional Variable-Wavelength X-Ray Bragg Coherent Diffraction Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, W.; Ulvestad, A.; Allain, M.; Chamard, V.; Harder, R.; Leake, S. J.; Maser, J.; Fuoss, P. H.; Hruszkewycz, S. O.

    2016-11-01

    We present and demonstrate a formalism by which three-dimensional (3D) Bragg x-ray coherent diffraction imaging (BCDI) can be implemented without moving the sample by scanning the energy of the incident x-ray beam. This capability is made possible by introducing a 3D Fourier transform that accounts for x-ray wavelength variability. We demonstrate the approach by inverting coherent Bragg diffraction patterns from a gold nanocrystal measured with an x-ray energy scan. Variable-wavelength BCDI will expand the breadth of feasible in situ 3D strain imaging experiments towards more diverse materials environments, especially where sample manipulation is difficult.

  15. Diffraction and imaging study of imperfections of crystallized lysozyme with coherent X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray diffraction imaging and high-angular-resolution diffraction combined with phase-contrast radiographic imaging were employed to characterize defects and perfection of a uniformly grown tetragonal lysozyme crystal in the symmetric Laue case. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of a 4 4 0 rocking curve measured from the original crystal was approximately 16.7 arcsec and imperfections including line defects, inclusions and other microdefects were observed in the diffraction images of the crystal. The observed line defects carry distinct dislocation features running approximately along the <1 1 0> growth front and have been found to originate mostly in a central growth area and occasionally in outer growth regions. Inclusions of impurities or formations of foreign particles in the central growth region are resolved in the images with high sensitivity to defects. Slow dehydration led to the broadening of a fairly symmetric 4 4 0 rocking curve by a factor of approximately 2.6, which was primarily attributed to the dehydration-induced microscopic effects that are clearly shown in X-ray diffraction images. The details of the observed defects and the significant change in the revealed microstructures with drying provide insight into the nature of imperfections, nucleation and growth, and the properties of protein crystals.

  16. Argon X-ray line imaging - A compression diagnostic for inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, L.N.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes argon X-ray line imaging which measures the compressed fuel volume directly by forming one-dimensional images of X-rays from argon gas seeded into the D-T fuel. The photon energies of the X-rays are recorded on the film of a diffraction-crystal spectrograph. Neutron activation, which detects activated nuclei produced by the interaction of 14-MeV neutrons with the selected materials of the target, allows to calculate the final compressed fuel density using a hydrodynamics simulation code and the knowledge of the total number of activated nuclei and the neutron yield. Argon X-ray appears to be a valid fuel-compression diagnostic for final fuel densities in the range of 10 to 50 times liquid D-T density.

  17. Coherent X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Chloroplasts from Cyanidioschyzon merolae by Using X-Ray Free Electron Laser.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuki; Inui, Yayoi; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Amane; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Yamamoto, Masaki; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is a lens-less technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with the dimensions of submicrometer to micrometer at a resolution of several tens of nanometers. We conducted cryogenic CXDI experiments at 66 K to visualize the internal structures of frozen-hydrated chloroplasts of Cyanidioschyzon merolae using X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) as a coherent X-ray source. Chloroplast dispersed specimen disks at a number density of 7/(10×10 µm(2)) were flash-cooled with liquid ethane without staining, sectioning or chemical labeling. Chloroplasts are destroyed at atomic level immediately after the diffraction by XFEL pulses. Thus, diffraction patterns with a good signal-to-noise ratio from single chloroplasts were selected from many diffraction patterns collected through scanning specimen disks to provide fresh specimens into the irradiation area. The electron density maps of single chloroplasts projected along the direction of the incident X-ray beam were reconstructed by using the iterative phase-retrieval method and multivariate analyses. The electron density map at a resolution of 70 nm appeared as a C-shape. In addition, the fluorescence image of proteins stained with Flamingo™ dye also appeared as a C-shape as did the autofluorescence from Chl. The similar images suggest that the thylakoid membranes with an abundance of proteins distribute along the outer membranes of chloroplasts. To confirm the present results statistically, a number of projection structures must be accumulated through high-throughput data collection in the near future. Based on the results, we discuss the feasibility of XFEL-CXDI experiments in the structural analyses of cellular organelles.

  18. Lensless diffractive imaging using tabletop coherent high-harmonic soft-X-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Richard L; Paul, Ariel; Raymondson, Daisy A; Hädrich, Steffen; Gaudiosi, David M; Holtsnider, Jim; Tobey, Ra'anan I; Cohen, Oren; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Song, Changyong; Miao, Jianwei; Liu, Yanwei; Salmassi, Farhad

    2007-08-31

    We present the first experimental demonstration of lensless diffractive imaging using coherent soft x rays generated by a tabletop soft-x-ray source. A 29 nm high harmonic beam illuminates an object, and the subsequent diffraction is collected on an x-ray CCD camera. High dynamic range diffraction patterns are obtained by taking multiple exposures while blocking small-angle diffraction using beam blocks of varying size. These patterns reconstruct to images with 214 nm resolution. This work demonstrates a practical tabletop lensless microscope that promises to find applications in materials science, nanoscience, and biology.

  19. A method for implementing the diffraction of a widely divergent X-ray beam

    SciTech Connect

    Avetyan, K. T.; Arakelyan, M. M.

    2008-11-15

    A method for implementing the diffraction of a widely divergent characteristic X-ray beam from a standard X-ray tube with a linear focal spot was improved. X rays, passing through a diaphragm 30 {mu}m in diameter, diffract from a crystal adjacent to the diaphragm. The crystal, together with a photographic plate, rotates around the axis perpendicular to the plate. It is shown that the diffraction image is a set of hyperbolas in this case. The equations of the hyperbolas are obtained and investigated. A method for interpreting the diffraction images in the case of small crystal asymmetry is proposed.

  20. Real-time X-ray Diffraction Measurements of Shocked Polycrystalline Tin and Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Dane V. Morgan, Don Macy, Gerald Stevens

    2008-11-22

    A new, fast, single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) diagnostic for determining phase transitions in shocked polycrystalline materials has been developed. The diagnostic consists of a 37-stage Marx bank high-voltage pulse generator coupled to a needle-and-washer electron beam diode via coaxial cable, producing line and bremsstrahlung x-ray emission in a 35-ns pulse. The characteristic Kα lines from the selected anodes of silver and molybdenum are used to produce the diffraction patterns, with thin foil filters employed to remove the characteristic Kβ line emission. The x-ray beam passes through a pinhole collimator and is incident on the sample with an approximately 3-mm by 6-mm spot and 1° full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) angular divergence in a Bragg-reflecting geometry. For the experiments described in this report, the angle between the incident beam and the sample surface was 8.5°. A Debye-Scherrer diffraction image was produced on a phosphor located 76 mm from the polycrystalline sample surface. The phosphor image was coupled to a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera through a coherent fiberoptic bundle. Dynamic single-pulse XRD experiments were conducted with thin foil samples of tin, shock loaded with a 1-mm vitreous carbon back window. Detasheet high explosive with a 2-mm-thick aluminum buffer was used to shock the sample. Analysis of the dynamic shock-loaded tin XRD images revealed a phase transformation of the tin beta phase into an amorphous or liquid state. Identical experiments with shock-loaded aluminum indicated compression of the face-centered-cubic (fcc) aluminum lattice with no phase transformation.

  1. Coherent x-ray transition and diffraction radiation of microbunched beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ispirian, K. A.; Ispiryan, M.

    2013-02-01

    Theoretical and numerical results on angular and spectral distributions and total number of photons of several types of coherent radiation produced by microbunched beams passing through radiators are presented: coherent x-ray bremsstrahlung, x-ray transition, resonance transition, and diffraction radiations. The possibility of observation and application of these new types of radiation for the study of parameters of electron beam microbunching, which is important for the effectiveness of x-ray free electron lasers, is discussed.

  2. Transmission X-ray diffraction grating alignment using a photoelastic modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Erik H.; Levine, Alan M.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    1988-01-01

    A high-resolution alignment technique which utilizes the partial polarization property of fine period transmission gratings has been developed. It is especially useful when the grating period is sufficiently small so that there are no visible diffracted orders. This technique uses a photoelastic modulator (PEM) to produce an intensity signal that is proportional to the sine of twice the angle between the grating lines and the PEM crystal axis. The experimentally demonstrated resolution of this technique on 200-nm period gold transmission gratings is better than 1 arc sec. This technique was developed to align X-ray transmission gratings for spectroscopy and interferometry applications.

  3. X-ray powder diffraction patterns for certain beta-lactam, tetracycline and macrolide antibiotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Thangadurai, S; Abraham, J T; Srivastava, A K; Moorthy, M Nataraja; Shukla, S K; Anjaneyulu, Y

    2005-07-01

    X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) data for eight beta-lactam viz., ampicillin sodium, ampicillin trihydrate, penicillin G procaine, benzathine penicillin, benzyl penicillin sodium, cefalexin, cefotaxime sodium and ceftriaxone sodium; three tetracyclines viz., doxycycline hydrochloride, oxytetracycline dihydrate and tetracycline hydrochloride; and two macrolide viz., azithromycin and erythromycin estolate antibiotic drugs were obtained using a powder diffractometer. The drugs were scanned from Bragg angles (2theta) of 10 degrees to 70 degrees. The obtained data were tabulated in terms of the lattice spacing (A) and relative line intensities (I/I(I)). This new information may be useful for identifying these drugs from confiscated materials, which has been frequently encountered in forensic laboratories.

  4. X-ray Diffraction Crystal Calibration and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Haugh; Richard Stewart; Nathan Kugland

    2009-06-05

    National Security Technologies’ X-ray Laboratory is comprised of a multi-anode Manson type source and a Henke type source that incorporates a dual goniometer and XYZ translation stage. The first goniometer is used to isolate a particular spectral band. The Manson operates up to 10 kV and the Henke up to 20 kV. The Henke rotation stages and translation stages are automated. Procedures have been developed to characterize and calibrate various NIF diagnostics and their components. The diagnostics include X-ray cameras, gated imagers, streak cameras, and other X-ray imaging systems. Components that have been analyzed include filters, filter arrays, grazing incidence mirrors, and various crystals, both flat and curved. Recent efforts on the Henke system are aimed at characterizing and calibrating imaging crystals and curved crystals used as the major component of an X-ray spectrometer. The presentation will concentrate on these results. The work has been done at energies ranging from 3 keV to 16 keV. The major goal was to evaluate the performance quality of the crystal for its intended application. For the imaging crystals we measured the laser beam reflection offset from the X-ray beam and the reflectivity curves. For the curved spectrometer crystal, which was a natural crystal, resolving power was critical. It was first necessary to find sources of crystals that had sufficiently narrow reflectivity curves. It was then necessary to determine which crystals retained their resolving power after being thinned and glued to a curved substrate.

  5. X-ray Spectroscopy and Diffraction at HPCAT - An Integrated High Pressure Synchrotron Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H.; Hemley, R. J.; Hausermann, D.; Hu, M.; Meng, Y.; Somayazulu, M.

    2002-05-01

    High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) is a new facility dedicated for high-pressure research using the high-energy synchrotron beams at the Advanced Photon Source for in-situ investigations of crystallographic, elastic, rheologic, electronic, and magnetic properties of solids, liquids, and amorphous materials at high P and simultaneous high T or cryogenic T. The HPCAT high-brilliance undulator beamline is optimized for a full range of high-pressure x-ray spectroscopy. For instance, nuclear resonant inelastic scattering measures phonon densities of state of Fe-containing samples that yield valuable information on acoustic wave velocity, elasticity, elastic anisotropy, and thermodynamic quantities (vibrational energy, heat capacity, entropy, Debye temperature, and Gr\\x81neisen parameter) of materials at high pressures. Nuclear resonant x-ray forward scattering measures M”ssbauer spectra in the time domain that yield information on magnetism, site occupancy, oxidation states, and the Lamb-M”ssbauer coefficient of Fe. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measures element-specific electronic transitions. The medium-resolution (10-100 meV) non-resonant x-ray inelastic scattering measures electronic energies and dispersions that yield information on plasmons, excitons, electronic band structures, and chemical bondings, and high-resolution (<10 meV) inelastic scattering measures phonon dispersions that yield information on acoustic wave velocity and elasticity as a function of crystallographic orientation. X-ray emission spectroscopy yields information on valence electrons and spin states of d-electrons. A diamond branch monochromator diverts a full-intensity undulator monochromatic beam at energies up to 35 keV for full-time x-ray diffraction studies of crystallography, phase transitions, and equations of state in a side station without affecting the simultaneous operation of the main undualtor beamline. The HPCAT bending-magnet beamline is divided into two

  6. Hard X-ray imaging of bacterial cells: nano-diffraction and ptychographic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wilke, R N; Priebe, M; Bartels, M; Giewekemeyer, K; Diaz, A; Karvinen, P; Salditt, T

    2012-08-13

    Ptychographic coherent X-ray diffractive imaging (PCDI) has been combined with nano-focus X-ray diffraction to study the structure and density distribution of unstained and unsliced bacterial cells, using a hard X-ray beam of 6.2keV photon energy, focused to about 90nm by a Fresnel zone plate lens. While PCDI provides images of the bacteria with quantitative contrast in real space with a resolution well below the beam size at the sample, spatially resolved small angle X-ray scattering using the same Fresnel zone plate (cellular nano-diffraction) provides structural information at highest resolution in reciprocal space up to 2nm(-1). We show how the real and reciprocal space approach can be used synergistically on the same sample and with the same setup. In addition, we present 3D hard X-ray imaging of unstained bacterial cells by a combination of ptychography and tomography.

  7. Electrochemical discharge of nanocrystalline magnetite: structure analysis using X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Menard, Melissa C; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Esther S

    2013-11-14

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is an abundant, low cost, environmentally benign material with potential application in batteries. Recently, low temperature coprecipitation methods have enabled preparation of a series of nanocrystalline magnetite samples with a range of crystallite sizes. Electrochemical cells based on Li/Fe3O4 show a linear increase in capacity with decreasing crystallite size at voltages ≥1.2 V where a 2× capacity improvement relative to commercial (26.2 nm) magnetite is observed. In this report, a combination of X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is used to measure magnetite structural changes occurring upon electrochemical reduction, with parent Fe3O4 crystallite size as a variable. Notably, XAS provides evidence of metallic iron formation at high levels of electrochemical reduction.

  8. X-Ray Spectrum of a Narrow-Line QSO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1998-01-01

    During the reporting period, seven papers using ASCA data, supported in whole or in part by this grant, were published or submitted to refereed journals. Their abstracts are given in this report, and the complete bibliographic references are listed in the Appendix. Titles include (1) A Broad-Band X-ray Study of the Geminga Pulsar; (2) ASCA Observations of PSR 1920+10 and PSR 0950+08; (3) X-ray and Optical Spectroscopy of IRAS 20181-2244: Not a Type 2 QSO, but a I Zw I Object; (4) Models for X-ray Emission from Isolated Pulsars; (5) Optical and X-ray Spectroscopy of 1E 0449.4-1823: Demise of the Original Type 2 QSO; (6) The ASCA Spectrum of the Broad-Line Radio Galaxy Pictor A: A Simple Power Law with No Fe Ka Line; and (7) ASCA Spectra of NGC 4388 and ESO 103-G35: Absorption, Reflection, and Variability in Intermediate Type Seyfert Galaxies.

  9. Observing soft X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium with X-ray calorimeter on a sounding rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, J.; Edwards, B.; Juda, M.; Mccammon, D.; Skinner, M.; Kelley, R.; Moseley, H.; Schoelkopf, R.; Szymkowiak, A.

    1990-01-01

    For an X-ray calorimeter working at 0.1 K, the energy resolution ideally can be as good as one eV for a practical detector. A detector with a resolution of 17 eV FWHM at 6 keV has been constructed. It is expected that this can be improved by a factor of two or more. With X-ray calorimeters flown on a sounding rocket, it should be possible to observe soft X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium over the energy range 0.07 to 1 keV. Here, a preliminary design for an X-ray calorimeter rocket experiment and the spectrum which might be observed from an equilibrium plasma are presented. For later X-ray calorimeter sounding rocket experiments, it is planned to add an aluminum foil mirror with collecting area of about 400 sq cm to observe line features from bright supernova remnants.

  10. X-Ray Diffraction From Shocked Crystals: Experiments and Predications of Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rosolankova, K; Kalantar, D H; Belak, J F; Bringa, E M; Caturla, M J; Hawreliak, J; Holian, B L; Kadau, K; Lomdahl, P S; Germann, T C; Ravelo, R; Sheppard, J; Wark, J S

    2003-09-24

    When a crystal is subjected to shock compression beyond its Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), the deformation it undergoes is composed of elastic and plastic strain components. In situ time-dependent X-ray diffraction, which allows direct measurement of lattice spacings, can be used to investigate such phenomena. This paper presents recent experimental results of X-ray diffraction from shocked fcc crystals. Comparison is made between experimental data and simulated X-ray diffraction using a post-processor to Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of shocked fcc crystals.

  11. X-ray diffraction measurements in high magnetic fields and at high temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Yoshifuru; Koyama, Keiichi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    A system was developed measuring x-ray powder diffraction in high magnetic fields up to 5 T and at temperatures from 283 to 473 K. The stability of the temperature is within 1 K over 6 h. In order to examine the ability of the system, the high-field x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for Si and a Ni-based ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy. The results show that the x-ray powder diffraction measurements in high magnetic fields and at high temperatures are useful for materials research. PMID:27877263

  12. Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; ...

    2011-05-01

    Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens.

  13. High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction of Macromolecules with Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stojanoff, Vivian; Boggon, Titus; Helliwell, John R.; Judge, Russell; Olczak, Alex; Snell, Edward H.; Siddons, D. Peter; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We recently combined synchrotron-based monochromatic X-ray diffraction topography methods with triple axis diffractometry and rocking curve measurements: high resolution X-ray diffraction imaging techniques, to better understand the quality of protein crystals. We discuss these methods in the light of results obtained on crystals grown under different conditions. These non destructive techniques are powerful tools in the characterization of the protein crystals and ultimately will allow to improve, develop, and understand protein crystal growth. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging methods will be discussed in detail in light of recent results obtained on Hen Egg White Lysozyme crystals and other proteins.

  14. Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; Turner, Joshua; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens. PMID:21547016

  15. An X-Ray Diffraction Study of Chromium-Gold Thin Films.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The chromium-gold thin films system was studied using direct recording X-ray diffraction. Chromium and/or gold thin films were deposited, in vacuum...onto glass substrates at ambient and elevated temperatures. Those thin films deposited at ambient temperatures were later annealed. The resultant X-ray

  16. Photoelectron dynamics in x-ray free-electron-laser diffractive imaging of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P

    2012-06-08

    X-ray free electron lasers hold the promise of enabling atomic-resolution diffractive imaging of single biological molecules. We develop a hybrid continuum-particle model to describe the x-ray induced damage and find that the photoelectron dynamics and electrostatic confinement strongly affect the time scale of the damage processes. These phenomena are not fully captured in hydrodynamic modeling approaches.

  17. Fitting dynamical x-ray diffraction data over the World Wide Web.

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, S.; Forrest, R.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Houston

    2008-01-01

    The first implementation of fitting X-ray Bragg diffraction profiles from strained multilayer crystals at a remote web-based X-ray software server is presented. The algorithms and the software solutions involved in the process are described. The suggested technology can be applied to a wide range of scientific research and has the potential to promote remote collaborations across scientific communities.

  18. Resolution enhancement in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging by overcoming instrumental noise.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan; Kim, Yoonhee; Song, Changyong; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Sunam; Kang, Hyon Chol; Hwu, Yeukuang; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Liang, Keng San; Noh, Do Young

    2014-11-17

    We report that reference objects, strong scatterers neighboring weak phase objects, enhance the phase retrieval and spatial resolution in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CDI). A CDI experiment with Au nano-particles exhibited that the reference objects amplified the signal-to-noise ratio in the diffraction intensity at large diffraction angles, which significantly enhanced the image resolution. The interference between the diffracted x-ray from reference objects and a specimen also improved the retrieval of the phase of the diffraction signal. The enhancement was applied to image NiO nano-particles and a mitochondrion and confirmed in a simulation with a bacteria phantom. We expect that the proposed method will be of great help in imaging weakly scattering soft matters using coherent x-ray sources including x-ray free electron lasers.

  19. Grain orientation mapping of passivated aluminum interconnect wires with X-ray micro-diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, A.A.; Padmore, H.A.; Thompson, A.C.; Chang, C.H.; Patel, J.R. |

    1998-06-01

    A micro x-ray diffraction facility is under development at the Advanced Light source. Spot sizes are typically about 1-{micro}m size generated by means of grazing incidence Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing mirrors. Photon energy is either white of energy range 6--14 keV or monochromatic generated from a pair of channel cut crystals. A Laue diffraction pattern from a single grain in passivated 2-{micro}m wide bamboo structured Aluminum interconnect line has been recorded. Acquisition times are of the order of a few seconds. The Laue pattern has allowed the determination of the crystallographic orientation of individual grains along the line length. The experimental and analysis procedures used are described, as is a grain orientation result. The future direction of this program is discussed in the context of strain measurements in the area of electromigration.

  20. Generation of apodized X-ray illumination and its application to scanning and diffraction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Khakurel, Krishna P; Kimura, Takashi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Sasaki, Tomoya; Takei, Masashi; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Nishino, Yoshinori

    2017-01-01

    X-ray science has greatly benefited from the progress in X-ray optics. Advances in the design and the manufacturing techniques of X-ray optics are key to the success of various microscopic and spectroscopic techniques practiced today. Here the generation of apodized X-ray illumination using a two-stage deformable Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror system is presented. Such apodized illumination is marked by the suppression of the side-lobe intensities of the focused beam. Thus generated apodized illumination was employed to improve the image quality in scanning X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Imaging of a non-isolated object by coherent X-ray diffractive imaging with apodized illumination in a non-scanning mode is also presented.

  1. K alpha line emission during solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Neupert, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The expected flux of K alpha line emission from sulfur, argon, calcium, and iron is calculated during both thermal and nonthermal solar X-ray events. Such emission is shown to be weak during the course of most of the nonthermal hard X-ray bursts that Kane and Anderson (1970) have observed. If Compton backscattering is significant at high energies, the flux is reduced still further for disk flares, but it is noted that the strong, near-limb burst of June 26 would have produced about 100 photons /sq cm/sec of sulfur and iron K alpha emission. The impulsive hard X-ray bursts may in general be too short-lived for much K alpha emission. It may be noted that sulfur K alpha emission in particular depends sensitively on the lower-energy limit of the nonthermal electron spectrum, assuming such a sharply defined boundary exists. During soft X-ray bursts, when temperatures of a few 10 to the 7th power K are obtained, K alpha emission from certain iron ions, specifically Fe XVIII-XXIII, may be important.

  2. Real-time X-ray Diffraction: Applications to Materials Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosemeier, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    With the high speed growth of materials it becomes necessary to develop measuring systems which also have the capabilities of characterizing these materials at high speeds. One of the conventional techniques of characterizing materials was X-ray diffraction. Film, which is the oldest method of recording the X-ray diffraction phenomenon, is not quite adequate in most circumstances to record fast changing events. Even though conventional proportional counters and scintillation counters can provide the speed necessary to record these changing events, they lack the ability to provide image information which may be important in some types of experiment or production arrangements. A selected number of novel applications of using X-ray diffraction to characterize materials in real-time are discussed. Also, device characteristics of some X-ray intensifiers useful in instantaneous X-ray diffraction applications briefly presented. Real-time X-ray diffraction experiments with the incorporation of image X-ray intensification add a new dimension in the characterization of materials. The uses of real-time image intensification in laboratory and production arrangements are quite unlimited and their application depends more upon the ingenuity of the scientist or engineer.

  3. Method for improve x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Robert M.; Cohen, Isadore

    1990-01-01

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys which comprises covering part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy with a dispersion, exposing the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample.

  4. Method for improving x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Berman, R.M.; Cohen, I.

    1988-04-26

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys is discussed. Part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy is covered with a dispersion. This exposes the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose, since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample. 2 figs.

  5. [Research on the silk aging with x-ray diffraction spectra].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-mei; Yuan, Si-xun

    2010-01-01

    The present paper did some researches on the deterioration mechanism and the changes in crystallinity of silk fabrics by means of the X-ray diffraction analysis. The samples artificially aged and excavated from Hubei, Innermongolia, Shaanxi and Qinghai provinces were analyzed. The artificial aging was done by simulating three main natural aging factors: light, heat and hydrolysis. The analytical results show that X-ray diffraction analysis could reveal the aging process and characteristic of silk, as well as the changes in crystallinity during silk aging. The X-ray diffraction analysis is of practical value for the conservation state and aging mechanism studies of ancient silk. In addition, X-ray diffraction analysis could also provide important information on ancient technology of textile and apparel.

  6. State-of-the-art and problems of X-ray diffraction analysis of biomacromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, N. S.

    2006-12-15

    The state-of-the-art of X-ray diffraction studies of biomacromolecules is briefly characterized, and the challenge imposed by science is discussed. These studies are characterized by a wide scope and extensive use. This field of science is of great interest and is developed in many countries. The main purpose is to solve practical problems in medicine consisting in the design of drugs against various diseases. X-ray diffraction analysis of enzymes brought the pharmaceutical industry to a new level, thus allowing the rational design of drugs against formerly untreatable diseases. Modern X-ray diffraction studies of biomacromolecules laid the basis for a new science called structural biology. This method allows one to solve fundamental problems of physical chemistry for a new state of matter existing in living systems. Here, science poses numerous problems in analysis of X-ray diffraction data on biological macromolecules. Many of theses problems are in their infancy.

  7. Measurement of piezoelectric constants of lanthanum-gallium tantalate crystal by X-ray diffraction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Blagov, A. E.; Marchenkov, N. V. Pisarevsky, Yu. V.; Prosekov, P. A.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2013-01-15

    A method for measuring piezoelectric constants of crystals of intermediate systems by X-ray quasi-multiple-wave diffraction is proposed and implemented. This technique makes it possible to determine the piezoelectric coefficient by measuring variations in the lattice parameter under an external electric field. This method has been approved, its potential is evaluated, and a comparison with high-resolution X-ray diffraction data is performed.

  8. Three-dimensional visualization of a human chromosome using coherent X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Yukio; Imamoto, Naoko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2009-01-09

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a lensless phase-contrast imaging technique with high image contrast. Although electron tomography allows intensive study of the three-dimensional structure of cellular organelles, it has inherent difficulty with thick objects. X rays have the unique benefit of allowing noninvasive analysis of thicker objects and high spatial resolution. We observed an unstained human chromosome using coherent x-ray diffraction. The reconstructed images in two or three dimensions show an axial structure, which has not been observed under unstained conditions.

  9. Three-Dimensional Visualization of a Human Chromosome Using Coherent X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Nishino, Yoshinori; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yukio; Imamoto, Naoko; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2009-01-09

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a lensless phase-contrast imaging technique with high image contrast. Although electron tomography allows intensive study of the three-dimensional structure of cellular organelles, it has inherent difficulty with thick objects. X rays have the unique benefit of allowing noninvasive analysis of thicker objects and high spatial resolution. We observed an unstained human chromosome using coherent x-ray diffraction. The reconstructed images in two or three dimensions show an axial structure, which has not been observed under unstained conditions.

  10. A portable X-ray diffraction apparatus for in situ analyses of masters' paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eveno, Myriam; Duran, Adrian; Castaing, Jacques

    2010-09-01

    It is rare that the analyses of materials in paintings can be carried out by taking micro-samples. Valuable works of art are best studied in situ by non-invasive techniques. For that purpose, a portable X-ray diffraction and fluorescence apparatus has been designed and constructed at the C2RMF. This apparatus has been used for paintings of Rembrandt, Leonardo da Vinci, Van Gogh, Mantegna, etc. Results are given to illustrate the performance of X-ray diffraction, especially when X-ray fluorescence does not bring sufficient information to conclude.

  11. X-Ray Fiber Diffraction Recordings from Oriented Demembranated Chlamydomonas Flagellar Axonemes

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Shiori; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Kamimura, Shinji; Oiwa, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The high homology of its axonemal components with humans and a large repertoire of axonemal mutants make Chlamydomonas a useful model system for experiments on the structure and function of eukaryotic cilia and flagella. Using this organism, we explored the spatial arrangement of axonemal components under physiological conditions by small-angle x-ray fiber diffraction. Axonemes were oriented in physiological solution by continuous shear flow and exposed to intense and stable x rays generated in the synchrotron radiation facility SPring-8, BL45XU. We compared diffraction patterns from axonemes isolated from wild-type and mutant strains lacking the whole outer arm (oda1), radial spoke (pf14), central apparatus (pf18), or the α-chain of the outer arm dynein (oda11). Diffraction of the axonemes showed a series of well-defined meridional/layer-line and equatorial reflections. Diffraction patterns from mutant axonemes exhibited a systematic loss/attenuation of meridional/layer-line reflections, making it possible to determine the origin of various reflections. The 1/24 and 1/12 nm−1 meridional reflections of oda1 and oda11 were much weaker than those of the wild-type, suggesting that the outer dynein arms are the main contributor to these reflections. The weaker 1/32 and 1/13.7 nm−1 meridional reflections from pf14 compared with the wild-type suggest that these reflections come mainly from the radial spokes. The limited contribution of the central pair apparatus to the diffraction patterns was confirmed by the similarity between the patterns of the wild-type and pf18. The equatorial reflections were complex, but a comparison with electron micrograph-based models allowed the density of each axonemal component to be estimated. Addition of ATP to rigor-state axonemes also resulted in subtle changes in equatorial intensity profiles, which could report nucleotide-dependent structural changes of the dynein arms. The first detailed description of axonemal reflections

  12. X-Ray Fiber Diffraction Recordings from Oriented Demembranated Chlamydomonas Flagellar Axonemes.

    PubMed

    Toba, Shiori; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Kamimura, Shinji; Oiwa, Kazuhiro

    2015-06-16

    The high homology of its axonemal components with humans and a large repertoire of axonemal mutants make Chlamydomonas a useful model system for experiments on the structure and function of eukaryotic cilia and flagella. Using this organism, we explored the spatial arrangement of axonemal components under physiological conditions by small-angle x-ray fiber diffraction. Axonemes were oriented in physiological solution by continuous shear flow and exposed to intense and stable x rays generated in the synchrotron radiation facility SPring-8, BL45XU. We compared diffraction patterns from axonemes isolated from wild-type and mutant strains lacking the whole outer arm (oda1), radial spoke (pf14), central apparatus (pf18), or the α-chain of the outer arm dynein (oda11). Diffraction of the axonemes showed a series of well-defined meridional/layer-line and equatorial reflections. Diffraction patterns from mutant axonemes exhibited a systematic loss/attenuation of meridional/layer-line reflections, making it possible to determine the origin of various reflections. The 1/24 and 1/12 nm(-1) meridional reflections of oda1 and oda11 were much weaker than those of the wild-type, suggesting that the outer dynein arms are the main contributor to these reflections. The weaker 1/32 and 1/13.7 nm(-1) meridional reflections from pf14 compared with the wild-type suggest that these reflections come mainly from the radial spokes. The limited contribution of the central pair apparatus to the diffraction patterns was confirmed by the similarity between the patterns of the wild-type and pf18. The equatorial reflections were complex, but a comparison with electron micrograph-based models allowed the density of each axonemal component to be estimated. Addition of ATP to rigor-state axonemes also resulted in subtle changes in equatorial intensity profiles, which could report nucleotide-dependent structural changes of the dynein arms. The first detailed description of axonemal reflections

  13. Reactive sputter magnetron reactor for preparation of thin films and simultaneous in situ structural study by X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Bürgi, J; Neuenschwander, R; Kellermann, G; García Molleja, J; Craievich, A F; Feugeas, J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the designed reactor is (i) to obtain polycrystalline and∕or amorphous thin films by controlled deposition induced by a reactive sputtering magnetron and (ii) to perform a parallel in situ structural study of the deposited thin films by X-ray diffraction, in real time, during the whole growth process. The designed reactor allows for the control and precise variation of the relevant processing parameters, namely, magnetron target-to-sample distance, dc magnetron voltage, and nature of the gas mixture, gas pressure and temperature of the substrate. On the other hand, the chamber can be used in different X-ray diffraction scanning modes, namely, θ-2θ scanning, fixed α-2θ scanning, and also low angle techniques such as grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray reflectivity. The chamber was mounted on a standard four-circle diffractometer located in a synchrotron beam line and first used for a preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of AlN thin films during their growth on the surface of a (100) silicon wafer.

  14. High resolution x-ray scattering and diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Moncton, D.

    1983-01-01

    In the general class of high resolution x-ray scattering studies experiments one analyzes the distribution of photon energies and wave vectors resulting from illumination of a sample with collimated monochromatic radiation. Applications abound in the field of structural physics, which may be described as the study of structures for their intrinsic physical interest. This includes studies of novel states of matter, phase transitions, and dynamics. As both the wave vector and the energy of scattered photons are of interest, one may conceptually divide high resolution experimental setups for this work into two classes: those with high Q-resolution (momemtum transfer analysis) and those with high E-resolution (energy transfer analysis). The former class is exemplified by the existing experimental station on SSRL wiggler experimental station VII-2 and the proposed high Q-resolution wiggler station for NSLS Phase II. The latter class is dependent on extremely high flux, as discussed more fully below, and the possibility of constructing a high E-resolution scattering station fed by an x-ray undulator is one of the exciting opportunities presented by the proposed construction of a 6 GeV storage ring.

  15. In-situ X-ray diffraction system using sources and detectors at fixed angular positions

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, David M.; Gibson, Walter M.; Huang, Huapeng

    2007-06-26

    An x-ray diffraction technique for measuring a known characteristic of a sample of a material in an in-situ state. The technique includes using an x-ray source for emitting substantially divergent x-ray radiation--with a collimating optic disposed with respect to the fixed source for producing a substantially parallel beam of x-ray radiation by receiving and redirecting the divergent paths of the divergent x-ray radiation. A first x-ray detector collects radiation diffracted from the sample; wherein the source and detector are fixed, during operation thereof, in position relative to each other and in at least one dimension relative to the sample according to a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample. A second x-ray detector may be fixed relative to the first x-ray detector according to the a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample, especially in a phase monitoring embodiment of the present invention.

  16. Bragg diffraction using a 100ps 17.5 keV x-ray backlighter and the Bragg Diffraction Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Maddox, B R; Park, H; Hawreliak, J; Comley, A; Elsholz, A; Van Maren, R; Remington, B A; Wark, J

    2010-05-13

    A new diagnostic for measuring Bragg diffraction from a laser-driven crystal using a 100ps 17.5 kV x-ray backlighter source is designed and tested successfully at the Omega EP laser facility on static Mo and Ta single crystal samples using a Mo Ka backlighter. The Bragg Diffraction Imager (BDI) consists of a heavily shielded enclosure and a precisely positioned beam block, attached to the main enclosure by an Aluminum arm. Image plate is used as the x-ray detector. The diffraction lines from Mo and Ta <222> planes are clearly detected with a high signal-to-noise using the 17.5 keV and 19.6 keV characteristic lines generated by a petawatt-driven Mo foil. This technique will be applied to shock and ramp-loaded single crystals on the Omega EP laser. Pulsed x-ray diffraction of shock- and ramp-compressed materials is an exciting new technique that can give insight into the dynamic behavior of materials at ultra-high pressure not achievable by any other means to date. X-ray diffraction can be used to determine not only the phase and compression of the lattice at high pressure, but by probing the lattice compression on a timescale equal to the 3D relaxation time of the material, information about dislocation mechanics, including dislocation multiplication rate and velocity, can also be derived. Both Bragg, or reflection, and Laue, or transmission, diffraction have been developed for shock-loaded low-Z crystalline structures such as Cu, Fe, and Si using nano-second scale low-energy implosion and He-{alpha} x-ray backlighters. However, higher-Z materials require higher x-ray probe energies to penetrate the samples, such as in Laue, or probe deep enough into the target, as in the case of Bragg diffraction. Petawatt laser-generated K{alpha} x-ray backlighters have been developed for use in high-energy radiography of dense targets and other HED applications requiring picosecond-scale burst of hard x-rays. While short pulse lasers are very efficient at producing high-energy x-rays

  17. K alpha line emission during solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Neupert, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Calculations of K alpha line emission from S, Ar, Ca and Fe are presented. It is reported that on the basis of data for hard X-ray bursts, the flux during most impulsive, non-thermal events is likely to be weak, though for a few strong bursts, a flux of approximately 100 photons/cm/s may be expected. The amount of S K alpha emission particularly is sensitively dependent on the value of the lower energy bound of the non-thermal electron distribution, offering a possible means of determining this. Thermal K alpha emission is only significant for Fe ions. The calculated thermal K alpha radiation is much less than that observed during an intense soft X-ray burst. It is concluded that a detailed temperature structure for the emission source is required in order to explain the discrepancy.

  18. Combining operando synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy and scanning X-ray diffraction to study lithium ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Patrick; Hess, Michael; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Eller, Jens; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    We present an operando study of a lithium ion battery combining scanning X-ray diffraction (SXRD) and synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) simultaneously for the first time. This combination of techniques facilitates the investigation of dynamic processes in lithium ion batteries containing amorphous and/or weakly attenuating active materials. While amorphous materials pose a challenge for diffraction techniques, weakly attenuating material systems pose a challenge for attenuation-contrast tomography. Furthermore, combining SXRD and SRXTM can be used to correlate processes occurring at the atomic level in the crystal lattices of the active materials with those at the scale of electrode microstructure. To demonstrate the benefits of this approach, we investigate a silicon powder electrode in lithium metal half-cell configuration. Combining SXRD and SRXTM, we are able to (i) quantify the dissolution of the metallic lithium electrode and the expansion of the silicon electrode, (ii) better understand the formation of the Li15Si4 phase, and (iii) non-invasively probe kinetic limitations within the silicon electrode. A simple model based on the 1D diffusion equation allows us to qualitatively understand the observed kinetics and demonstrates why high-capacity electrodes are more prone to inhomogeneous lithiation reactions. PMID:27324109

  19. In Situ Mineralogical Analysis of Planetary Materials Using X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarrazin, P.; Blake, D.; Vaniman, D.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Remote observations of Mars have led scientists to believe that its early climate was similar to that of the early Earth, having had abundant liquid water and a dense atmosphere. One of the most fascinating questions of recent times is whether simple bacterial life developed on Mars (as it did on the Earth) during this early element period. Analyses of SNC meteorites have broadened considerably our knowledge of the chemistry of certain types of Martian rocks, underscoring the tantalizing possibility of early hydrothermal systems and even of ancient bacterial life. Detailed analyses of SNC meteorites in Terrestrial laboratories utilize the most sophisticated organic, isotopic and microscopic techniques in existence. Indeed; it is unlikely that the key biogenic indicators used in McKay et al (ibid) could be identified by a remote instrument on the surface of Mars. As a result, it is probable that any robotic search for evidence of an ancient Martian biosphere will have as its focus the identification of key minerals in likely host rocks rather than the direct detection of organic or isotopic biomarkers. Even on a sample return mission, mineralogical screening will be utilized to choose the most likely candidate rocks. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is the only technique that can provide a direct determination of the crystal structures of the phases present within a sample. When many different crystalline phases are present, quantitative analysis is better constrained if used in conjunction with a determination of elemental composition, obtainable by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using the same X-ray source as for XRD. For planetary surface analysis, a remote instrument combining XRD and XRF could be used for mineralogical characterization of both soils and rocks. We are designing a remote XRD/XRF instrument with this objective in mind. The instrument concept pays specific attention to constraints in sample preparation, weight, volume, power, etc. Based on the geometry of a

  20. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; ...

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane andmore » freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.« less

  1. High-resolution ab initio Three-dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Rosen, R; He, H; Spence, J H; Weierstall, U; Beetz, T; Jacobsen, C; Shapiro, D

    2005-08-19

    Coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging non-periodic isolated objects at resolutions only limited, in principle, by the largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate X-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the 3D diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a non-periodic object. We also construct 2D images of thick objects with infinite depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution using X-ray undulator radiation, and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

  2. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Beetz, Tobias; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.

  3. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.

  4. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; ...

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore » resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  5. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy of galvannealed coatings on steel.

    PubMed

    Schmid, P; Uran, K; Macherey, F; Ebert, M; Ullrich, H-J; Sommer, D; Friedel, F

    2009-04-01

    The formation of Fe-Zn intermetallic compounds, as relevant in the commercial product galvannealed steel sheet, was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and different methods of X-ray diffraction. A scanning electron microscope with high resolution was applied to investigate the layers of the galvannealed coating and its topography. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GID) was preferred over conventional Bragg-Brentano geometry for analysing thin crystalline layers because of its lower incidence angle alpha and its lower depth of information. Furthermore, in situ experiments at an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) with an internal heating plate and at an X-ray diffractometer equipped with a high-temperature chamber were carried out. Thus, it was possible to investigate the phase evolution during heat treatment by X-ray diffraction and to display the growth of the zeta crystals in the ESEM.

  6. Direct measurement of the x-ray refractive index by Fresnel diffraction at a transparent edge.

    PubMed

    Gayer, C W; Hemmers, D; Stelzmann, C; Pretzler, G

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of measuring x-ray refractive indices by transparent edge diffraction without recourse to the Kramers-Kronig relations. The method requires a coherent x-ray source, a transparent sample with a straight edge, and a high resolution x-ray detector. Here, we use the aluminum Kα radiation originating from a laser-produced plasma to coherently illuminate the edge of thin aluminum and beryllium foils. The resulting diffraction patterns are recorded with an x-ray CCD camera. From least-squares fits of Fresnel diffraction modeling to the measured data we determine the refractive index of Al and Be at the wavelength of the Al Kα radiation (0.834 nm, 1.49 keV).

  7. Second order x-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2014-09-01

    X-ray phase imaging is sensitive to structural variation of soft tissue, and offers excellent contrast resolution for characterization of cancerous tissues. Also, the cross-section of x-ray phase shift is a thousand times greater than that of x-ray attenuation in soft tissue over the diagnostic energy range, allowing a much higher signal-to-noise ratio at a substantially lower radiation dose than attenuation-based x-ray imaging. In this paper, we present a second order approximation model with respect to phase shift based on the paraxial Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory, and also discuss in-line dark-field imaging based on the second order model. This proposed model accurately establishes a quantitative correspondence between phases and recorded intensity images, outperforming the linear phase approximation model widely used in the conventional methods of x-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging. This new model can be iteratively solved using the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART). The state of the art compressive sensing ingredients can be incorporated to achieve high quality image reconstruction. Our numerical simulation studies demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach that is more accurate and stable, and more robust against noise than the conventional approach.

  8. Phase Sensitive X-Ray Diffraction Imaging Study of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.

    2003-01-01

    The study of defects and growth of protein crystals is of importance in providing a fundamental understanding of this important category of systems and the rationale for crystallization of better ordered crystals for structural determination and drug design. Yet, as a result of the extremely weak scattering power of x-rays in protein and other biological macromolecular crystals, the extinction lengths for those crystals are extremely large and, roughly speaking, of the order of millimeters on average compared to the scale of micrometers for most small molecular crystals. This has significant implication for x-ray diffraction and imaging study of protein crystals, and presents an interesting challenge to currently available x-ray analytical techniques. We proposed that coherence-based phase sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging could provide a way to augment defect contrast in x-ray diffraction images of weakly diffracting biological macromolecular crystals. I shall examine the principles and ideas behind this approach and compare it to other available x-ray topography and diffraction methods. I shall then present some recent experimental results in two model protein systems-cubic apofemtin and tetragonal lysozyme crystals to demonstrate the capability of the coherence-based imaging method in mapping point defects, dislocations, and the degree of perfection of biological macromolecular crystals with extreme sensitivity. While further work is under way, it is intended to show that the observed new features have yielded important information on protein crystal perfection and nucleation and growth mechanism otherwise unobtainable.

  9. Diamond anvil cell radial x-ray diffraction program at the National Synchrotron Light Source.

    PubMed

    Hu, J Z; Mao, H K; Shu, J F; Guo, Q Z; Liu, H Z

    2006-06-28

    During the past decade, the radial x-ray diffraction method using a diamond anvil cell (DAC) has been developed at the X17C beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The detailed experimental procedure used with energy dispersive x-ray diffraction is described. The advantages and limitations of using the energy dispersive method for DAC radial diffraction studies are also discussed. The results for FeO at 135 GPa and other radial diffraction experiments performed at X17C are discussed in this report.

  10. Dynamical x-ray diffraction from an icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kycia, S.

    1996-04-23

    Primary extinction effects in diffraction from single grains of Al-Pd- Mn, and presumably many other FCI alloys, may be significant and should be corrected for prior to use of diffraction data in structural determinations. Probes based on dynamical diffraction effects, such as x-ray standing wave fluorescence, multiple beam interference, and x-ray transmission topographs, may now be used to study the bulk and surface structure of some quasicrystals. The observation of dynamical diffraction from icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn is a striking confirmation of the fact that quasicrystals can present a degree of structural perfection comparable to that found in the best periodic intermetallic crystals.

  11. Preparing well-oriented sols of straight bacterial flagellar filaments for X-ray fiber diffraction.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, I; Vonderviszt, F; Noguchi, T; Namba, K

    1991-01-20

    Well-oriented sols of straight bacterial flagellar filaments have been obtained by preparing reconstituted flagellar filaments with an appropriate length distribution and choosing appropriate solvent conditions. An average filament length of 300 to 500 nm and the use of solvents with very low concentrations of salt has allowed us to prepare highly fluid sols that make flow orientation possible. X-ray fiber diffraction from these sols has shown distinct layer-line reflections to 3.5 A resolution in the meridional direction. Layer-line intensities have been collected by the angular deconvolution method up to 5 A resolution. The possibility of using a magnetic field to further improve the orientation has been explored and a solvent condition that makes flagellar sols sensitive to the magnetic field has been found. General applicability of the method to other systems is also discussed.

  12. Comparison of a CCD and an APS for soft X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Graeme; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Clark, A.; Dhesi, S. S.; Maneuski, D.; Marchal, J.; Steadman, P.; Tartoni, N.; Turchetta, R.

    2011-12-01

    We compare a new CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) to a Princeton Instruments PIXIS-XO: 2048B Charge Coupled Device (CCD) with soft X-rays tested in a synchrotron beam line at the Diamond Light Source (DLS). Despite CCDs being established in the field of scientific imaging, APS are an innovative technology that offers advantages over CCDs. These include faster readout, higher operational temperature, in-pixel electronics for advanced image processing and reduced manufacturing cost. The APS employed was the Vanilla sensor designed by the MI3 collaboration and funded by an RCUK Basic technology grant. This sensor has 520 x 520 square pixels, of size 25 μm on each side. The sensor can operate at a full frame readout of up to 20 Hz. The sensor had been back-thinned, to the epitaxial layer. This was the first time that a back-thinned APS had been demonstrated at a beam line at DLS. In the synchrotron experiment soft X-rays with an energy of approximately 708 eV were used to produce a diffraction pattern from a permalloy sample. The pattern was imaged at a range of integration times with both sensors. The CCD had to be operated at a temperature of -55°C whereas the Vanilla was operated over a temperature range from 20°C to -10°C. We show that the APS detector can operate with frame rates up to two hundred times faster than the CCD, without excessive degradation of image quality. The signal to noise of the APS is shown to be the same as that of the CCD at identical integration times and the response is shown to be linear, with no charge blooming effects. The experiment has allowed a direct comparison of back thinned APS and CCDs in a real soft x-ray synchrotron experiment.

  13. Real-time observation of coherent acoustic phonons generated by an acoustically mismatched optoacoustic transducer using x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, A. I. H.; Andreasson, B. P.; Enquist, H.; Jurgilaitis, A.; Larsson, J.

    2015-11-14

    The spectrum of laser-generated acoustic phonons in indium antimonide coated with a thin nickel film has been studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction. Strain pulses that can be considered to be built up from coherent phonons were generated in the nickel film by absorption of short laser pulses. Acoustic reflections at the Ni–InSb interface leads to interference that strongly modifies the resulting phonon spectrum. The study was performed with high momentum transfer resolution together with high time resolution. This was achieved by using a third-generation synchrotron radiation source that provided a high-brightness beam and an ultrafast x-ray streak camera to obtain a temporal resolution of 10 ps. We also carried out simulations, using commercial finite element software packages and on-line dynamic diffraction tools. Using these tools, it is possible to calculate the time-resolved x-ray reflectivity from these complicated strain shapes. The acoustic pulses have a peak strain amplitude close to 1%, and we investigated the possibility to use this device as an x-ray switch. At a bright source optimized for hard x-ray generation, the low reflectivity may be an acceptable trade-off to obtain a pulse duration that is more than an order of magnitude shorter.

  14. In situ laser heating and radial synchrotron x-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Martin; Caldwell, Wendel A; Miyagi, Lowell; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2007-06-01

    We report a first combination of diamond anvil cell radial x-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating. The laser-heating setup of ALS beamline 12.2.2 was modified to allow one-sided heating of a sample in a diamond anvil cell with an 80 W yttrium lithium fluoride laser while probing the sample with radial x-ray diffraction. The diamond anvil cell is placed with its compressional axis vertical, and perpendicular to the beam. The laser beam is focused onto the sample from the top while the sample is probed with hard x-rays through an x-ray transparent boron-epoxy gasket. The temperature response of preferred orientation of (Fe,Mg)O is probed as a test experiment. Recrystallization was observed above 1500 K, accompanied by a decrease in stress.

  15. In situ laser heating and radial synchrotron x-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Miyagi, Lowell; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2007-06-15

    We report a first combination of diamond anvil cell radial x-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating. The laser-heating setup of ALS beamline 12.2.2 was modified to allow one-sided heating of a sample in a diamond anvil cell with an 80 W yttrium lithium fluoride laser while probing the sample with radial x-ray diffraction. The diamond anvil cell is placed with its compressional axis vertical, and perpendicular to the beam. The laser beam is focused onto the sample from the top while the sample is probed with hard x-rays through an x-ray transparent boron-epoxy gasket. The temperature response of preferred orientation of (Fe,Mg)O is probed as a test experiment. Recrystallization was observed above 1500 K, accompanied by a decrease in stress.

  16. Crystalline lipid domains: characterization by X-ray diffraction and their relation to biology.

    PubMed

    Ziblat, Roy; Leiserowitz, Leslie; Addadi, Lia

    2011-04-11

    Biological membranes comprise thousands of different lipids, differing in their alkyl chains, headgroups, and degree of saturation. It is estimated that 5% of the genes in the human genome are responsible for regulating the lipid composition of cell membranes. Conceivably, the functional explanation for this diversity is found, at least in part, in the propensity of lipids to segregate into distinct domains, which are important for cell function. X-ray diffraction has been used increasingly to characterize the packing and phase behavior of lipids in membranes. Crystalline domains have been studied in synthetic membranes using wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering, and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Herein we summarize recent results obtained using the various X-ray methods, discuss the correlation between crystalline domains and liquid ordered domains studied with other techniques, and the relevance of crystalline domains to functional lipid domains in biological membranes.

  17. X-ray diffraction experiments on the Materials in Extreme Conditions (MEC) LCLS x-ray FEL beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Raymond; Fratanduono, Dayne; Wicks, June; Duffy, Tom; Lee, Hae Ja; Granados, Eduardo; Heimann, Philip; Gleason, Arianna; Bolme, Cynthia; Swift, Damian; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon; Collins, Rip

    2015-06-01

    The experiments described here were conducted on the MEC beamline hutch at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source. A 10 ns 527 nm laser pulse was used to shock compress 60-100 μm thick NaCl and Graphite samples. LCLS x-rays (40 fs, 8 keV), scattered off the shocked sample, were recorded on several pixel array detectors positioned downstream. The diffracted x-ray pattern allows us to determine changes in crystal structure at Mbar pressures and over nanosecond timescales. In this talk we detail the experimental setup, the current capabilities of the MEC laser and the considerations for optimizing the target design. We will describe the wave interactions within the shock-compressed target and the use of a 1D hydrocode to describe the pressure, temperature and density conditions within the target assembly as a function of time and Lagrangian position. We present observations of the B1-B2 phase transition in NaCl and subsequent back transformation during release to ambient pressure, and compare these findings to gas gun and static data. We also present results from a preliminary study of the shock-induced graphite to diamond transformation.

  18. Apparatus for use in examining the lattice of a semiconductor wafer by X-ray diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. L.; Porter, W. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved apparatus for examining the crystal lattice of a semiconductor wafer utilizing X-ray diffraction techniques was presented. The apparatus is employed in a method which includes the step of recording the image of a wafer supported in a bent configuration conforming to a compound curve, produced through the use of a vacuum chuck provided for an X-ray camera. The entire surface thereof is illuminated simultaneously by a beam of incident X-rays which are projected from a distant point-source and satisfy conditions of the Bragg Law for all points on the surface of the water.

  19. X-ray diffraction study of gold nitride films: Observation of a solid solution phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, L.; Hase, T. P. A.; Hunt, M. R. C.; Brieva, A. C.; Šiller, L.

    2008-12-01

    The structure of nitride containing gold films produced by reactive ion sputtering and nitrogen plasma etching is investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. It is found that gold nitride is a solid solution of nitrogen atoms dissolved in a fcc gold matrix. Differences between the strain and lattice parameters of gold and gold nitride films were observed and are explained by interstitial nitrogen present in the latter.

  20. Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder x-ray diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Pawloski, G.A.

    1984-08-10

    An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

  1. Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder X-ray diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Pawloski, Gayle A.

    1986-01-01

    An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

  2. Thermal expansion in UO2 determined by high-energy X-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Guthrie, M.; Benmore, C. J.; Skinner, L. B.; ...

    2016-06-24

    In this study, we present crystallographic analyses of high-energy X-ray diffraction data on polycrystalline UO2 up to the melting temperature. The Rietveld refinements of our X-ray data are in agreement with previous measurements, but are systematically located around the upper bound of their uncertainty, indicating a slightly steeper trend of thermal expansion compared to established values. This observation is consistent with recent first principles calculations.

  3. Materials identification using a small-scale pixellated x-ray diffraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flynn, D.; Crews, C.; Drakos, I.; Christodoulou, C.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Speller, R. D.

    2016-05-01

    A transmission x-ray diffraction system has been developed using a pixellated, energy-resolving detector (HEXITEC) and a small-scale, mains operated x-ray source (Amptek Mini-X). HEXITEC enables diffraction to be measured without the requirement of incident spectrum filtration, or collimation of the scatter from the sample, preserving a large proportion of the useful signal compared with other diffraction techniques. Due to this efficiency, sufficient molecular information for material identification can be obtained within 5 s despite the relatively low x-ray source power. Diffraction data are presented from caffeine, hexamine, paracetamol, plastic explosives and narcotics. The capability to determine molecular information from aspirin tablets inside their packaging is demonstrated. Material selectivity and the potential for a sample classification model is shown with principal component analysis, through which each different material can be clearly resolved.

  4. Nanosecond x-ray Laue diffraction apparatus suitable for laser shock compression experiments.

    PubMed

    Suggit, Matthew; Kimminau, Giles; Hawreliak, James; Remington, Bruce; Park, Nigel; Wark, Justin

    2010-08-01

    We have used nanosecond bursts of x-rays emitted from a laser-produced plasma, comprised of a mixture of mid-Z elements, to produce a quasiwhite-light spectrum suitable for performing Laue diffraction from single crystals. The laser-produced plasma emits x-rays ranging in energy from 3 to in excess of 10 keV, and is sufficiently bright for single shot nanosecond diffraction patterns to be recorded. The geometry is suitable for the study of laser-shocked crystals, and single-shot diffraction patterns from both unshocked and shocked silicon crystals are presented.

  5. Phase sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging of defects in biological macromolecular crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Lai, B.; Chu, Y. S.; Cai, Z.; Mancini, D. C.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    Conventional x-ray diffraction topography is currently used to map defects in the bulk of protein crystals, but the lack of sufficient contrast is frequently a limiting factor. We experimentally demonstrate that this barrier can be circumvented using a method that combines phase sensitive and diffraction imaging principles. Details of defects revealed in tetragonal lysozyme and cubic ferritin crystals are presented and discussed. The approach enabling the detection of the phase changes of diffracted x rays should prove to be useful in the study of defect structures in a broad range of biological macromolecular crystals.

  6. Breast tissue contrast-simulating materials using energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Shyma M; Abdelkader, Mohamed H; Bradley, David A; Pani, Silvia

    2012-07-01

    Breast lesions and normal tissues have different molecular arrangements that affect their diffraction patterns. Different mouldable and non-mouldable materials were analysed using an energy dispersive X-ray diffraction system based on a conventional X-ray source (operated at 70 kVp) and a CdTe detector (Amptek XT-100), including a conventional spectroscopic chain. Combinations of materials were identified to have a contrast comparable to that achieved in diffraction imaging for different breast tissues at the momentum transfer values carrying the greatest amount of information (1.1 nm(-1) and 1.6 nm(-1)).

  7. Study on quasiperiodic Ta/Al multilayer films by x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, R.W.; Hu, A.; Jiang, S.S. )

    1991-11-11

    Quasiperiodic (Fibonacci) Ta/Al multilayer films with Ta(110) and Al(111) textures were fabricated by magnetron sputtering. The structure of the multilayers was characterized in detail by x-ray diffraction. The diffraction peaks at low and high angles can be indexed by the projection method from the high-dimension periodic structure. The experimental results were in good agreement with the numerical calculation using the model for the compositionally modulated multilayers. The diffraction spectrum of the quasiperiodic Ta/Al multilayers is totally different from that of periodic structure, and the possible application of Fibonacci films as optical elements in a soft x-ray region is discussed.

  8. Optomechanical design of a high-precision detector robot arm system for x-ray nano-diffraction with x-ray nanoprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, D.; Kalbfleisch, S.; Kearney, S.; Anton, J.; Chu, Y. S.

    2014-03-01

    Collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory has created a design for the high-precision detector robot arm system that will be used in the x-ray nano-diffraction experimental station at the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) beamline for the NSLS-II project. The robot arm system is designed for positioning and manipulating an x-ray detector in three-dimensional space for nano-diffraction data acquisition with the HXN x-ray microscope. It consists of the following major component groups: a granite base with air-bearing support, a 2-D horizontal base stage, a vertical axis goniometer, a 2-D vertical plane robot arm, a 3-D fast scanning stages group, and a 2-D x-ray pixel detector. The design specifications and unique optomechanical structure of this novel high-precision detector robot arm system will be presented in this paper.

  9. X-ray line formation in radiation dominated astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, G.; Bailey, J. E.; Hansen, S. B.; Nagayama, T.; Rochau, G. A.; Liedahl, D.; Mancini, R.; Koepke, M.

    2014-10-01

    A remarkable opportunity to observe matter in a regime where the effects of General Relativity are significant has arisen through measurements of strongly red-shifted iron x-ray lines emitted from black hole accretion disks. A major uncertainty in the spectral formation models is the efficiency of Resonant Auger Destruction (RAD), in which fluorescent Ka photons are resonantly absorbed by neighbor ions. The absorbing ion preferentially decays by Auger ionization, thus reducing the emerging Ka intensity. If Ka lines from L-shell ions are not observed in iron spectral emission, why are such lines observed from silicon plasma surrounding other accretion powered objects? To help answer this question, we are investigating photoionized silicon plasmas produced using intense x-rays from the Z facility. For the first time in a terrestrial lab, we measured simultaneous absorption and emission spectra from these plasmas at high resolution. The charge state distribution, electron temperature, and electron density are determined through space-resolved absorption spectra. The emission spectra have been recorded at different column densities thus testing different radiative transport regime. These should allow us to answer quantitatively the original RAD hypothesis. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Monitoring model drug microencapsulation in PLGA scaffolds using X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Aina, Adeyinka; Gupta, Manish; Boukari, Yamina; Morris, Andrew; Billa, Nashiru; Doughty, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    The microencapsulation of three model drugs; metronidazole, paracetamol and sulphapyridine into Poly (dl-Lactide-Co-Glycolide) (PLGA) scaffolds were probed using X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD). Changes in the diffraction patterns of the PLGA scaffolds after encapsulation was suggestive of a chemical interaction between the pure drugs and the scaffolds and not a physical intermixture.

  11. Titration of a Solid Acid Monitored by X-Ray Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dungey, Keenan E.; Epstein, Paul

    2007-01-01

    An experiment is described to introduce students to an important class of solid-state reactions while reinforcing concepts of titration by using a pH meter and a powder X-ray diffractometer. The experiment was successful in teaching students the abstract concepts of solid-state structure and diffraction by applying the diffraction concepts learned…

  12. Monitoring model drug microencapsulation in PLGA scaffolds using X-ray powder diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Aina, Adeyinka; Gupta, Manish; Boukari, Yamina; Morris, Andrew; Billa, Nashiru; Doughty, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The microencapsulation of three model drugs; metronidazole, paracetamol and sulphapyridine into Poly (dl-Lactide-Co-Glycolide) (PLGA) scaffolds were probed using X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD). Changes in the diffraction patterns of the PLGA scaffolds after encapsulation was suggestive of a chemical interaction between the pure drugs and the scaffolds and not a physical intermixture. PMID:27013917

  13. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Nanocrystalline Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stel'makh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Palosz, W.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental evidence obtained for a variety of nanocrystalline materials suggest that the crystallographic structure of a very small size particle deviates from that in the bulk crystals. In this paper we show the effect of the surface of nanocrystals on their structure by the analysis of generation and distribution of macro- and micro-strains at high pressures and their dependence on the grain size in nanocrystalline powders of Sic. We studied the structure of Sic nanocrystals by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique using synchrotron and neutron sources and hydrostatic or isostatic pressure conditions. The diffraction measurements were done in HASYLAB at DESY using a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) in the energy dispersive geometry in the diffraction vector range up to 3.5 - 4/A and under pressures up to 50 GPa at room temperature. In-situ high pressure neutron diffraction measurements were done at LANSCE in Los Alamos National Laboratory using the HIPD and HIPPO diffractometers with the Paris-Edinburgh and TAP-98 cells, respectively, in the diffraction vector range up to 26 Examination of the response of the material to external stresses requires nonstandard methodology of the materials characterization and description. Although every diffraction pattern contains a complete information on macro- and micro-strains, a high pressure experiment can reveal only those factors which contribute to the characteristic diffraction patterns of the crystalline phases present in the sample. The elastic properties of powders with the grain size from several nm to micrometers were examined using three methodologies: (l), the analysis of positions and widths of individual Bragg reflections (used for calculating macro- and micro-strains generated during densification) [I], (2). the analysis of the dependence of the experimental apparent lattice parameter, alp, on the diffraction vector Q [2], and (3), the atomic Pair Distribution Function (PDF) technique [3]. The results

  14. X-Ray Diffraction Study on the Strain Anisotropy and Dislocation Structure of Deformed Lath Martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein Nedjad, S.; Hosseini Nasab, F.; Movaghar Garabagh, M. R.; Damadi, S. R.; Nili Ahmadabadi, M.

    2011-08-01

    18Ni (300) maraging steel possessing lath martensite structure was deformed by four passes of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) at ambient temperature. Line profile analysis (LPA) of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns identified strong strain anisotropy and remarkable increases in the relative fraction of screw dislocations after ECAP. The strain anisotropy was reasonably accounted for by the anisotropy of elastic constants. Domination of screw dislocations in the deformed structure was attributed to the preferred annihilation of edge dislocations in the early stages of deformation along with the difficulties for annihilation of screw dislocations by cross slipping. Cobalt addition was mainly assumed to make cross slipping difficult by reducing stacking-fault energy and favoring short-range ordering.

  15. X-ray diffraction of slag-based sodium salt waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C. A.; Missimer, D. M.

    2014-09-30

    The attached report documents sample preparation and x-ray diffraction results for a series of cement and blended cement matrices prepared with either water or a 4.4 M Na salt solution. The objective of the study was to provide initial phase characterization for the Cementitious Barriers Partnership reference case cementitious salt waste form. This information can be used to: 1) generate a base line for the evolution of the waste form as a function of time and conditions, 2) potentially to design new binders based on mineralogy of the binder, 3) understand and predict anion and cation leaching behavior of contaminants of concern, and 4) predict performance of the waste forms for which phase solubility and thermodynamic data are available.

  16. Rapid, low dose X-ray diffractive imaging of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael W M; Dearnley, Megan K; van Riessen, Grant A; Abbey, Brian; Putkunz, Corey T; Junker, Mark D; Vine, David J; McNulty, Ian; Nugent, Keith A; Peele, Andrew G; Tilley, Leann

    2014-08-01

    Phase-diverse X-ray coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) provides a route to high sensitivity and spatial resolution with moderate radiation dose. It also provides a robust solution to the well-known phase-problem, making on-line image reconstruction feasible. Here we apply phase-diverse CDI to a cellular sample, obtaining images of an erythrocyte infected by the sexual stage of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, with a radiation dose significantly lower than the lowest dose previously reported for cellular imaging using CDI. The high sensitivity and resolution allow key biological features to be identified within intact cells, providing complementary information to optical and electron microscopy. This high throughput method could be used for fast tomographic imaging, or to generate multiple replicates in two-dimensions of hydrated biological systems without freezing or fixing. This work demonstrates that phase-diverse CDI is a valuable complementary imaging method for the biological sciences and ready for immediate application.

  17. Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Olivine from Comet Wild 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    We have analyzed a collection of the Comet Wild 2 coma grains returned by the NASA Stardust Mission, using micro-area Laue diffraction equipment. The purpose of the diffraction experiment is to permit the structure refinement of olivine including site occupancies. In addition to the intrinsic importance of the olivine structures for revealing the thermal history of Wild 2 materials, we wish to test reports that olivine recovered after hypervelocity capture in silica aerogel has undergone a basic structural change due to capture heating [1]. The diffraction equipment placed at beam line BL- 4B1 of PF, KEK was developed with a micropinhole and an imaging plate (Fuji Co. Ltd.) using the Laue method combined with polychromatic X-ray of synchrotron radiation operated at energy of 2.5 GeV. The incident beam is limited to 1.6 m in diameter by a micropinhole set just upstream of the sample [2, 3]. It is essential to apply a microbeam to obtain diffracted intensities with high signal to noise ratios. This equipment has been successfully applied to various extraterrestrial materials, including meteorites and interplanetary dust particles [4]. The Laue pattern of the sample C2067,1,111,4 (Fig. 1) was successfully taken on an imaging plate after a 120 minute exposure (Fig. 2).

  18. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies on Nanocrystalline Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Werner, S.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Application of in situ high pressure powder diffraction technique for examination of specific structural properties of nanocrystals based on the experimental data of SiC nanocrystalline powders of 2 to 30 nrn diameter in diameter is presented. Limitations and capabilities of the experimental techniques themselves and methods of diffraction data elaboration applied to nanocrystals with very small dimensions (< 30 nm) are discussed. It is shown that due to the complex structure, constituting a two-phase, core/surface shell system, no unique lattice parameter value and, consequently, no unique compressibility coefficient can satisfactorily describe the behavior of nanocrystalline powders under pressure. We offer a tentative interpretation of the distribution of macro- and micro-strains in nanoparticles of different grain size.

  19. Note: application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng-Jun; Zhang, Bangmin; Brewe, Dale L; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G M; Venkatesan, T; Heald, Steve M

    2014-04-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3 film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

  20. Note: Application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Cheng-Jun Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M.; Zhang, Bangmin; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G. M.; Venkatesan, T.

    2014-04-15

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

  1. Combined X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies of biological and synthetic polymers.

    SciTech Connect

    Parrot, I. M.; Urban, Volker S; Gardner, K. H.; Forsyth, V. T.

    2005-04-01

    The fibrous state is a natural one for polymer molecules which tend to assume regular helical conformations rather than the globular structures characteristic of many proteins. Fibre diffraction therefore has broad application to the study of a wide range of biological and synthetic polymers. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the general scope of the method and in particular to demonstrate the impact of a combined approach involving both X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. While the flux of modern X-ray synchrotron radiation sources allows high quality datasets to be recorded with good resolution within a very short space of time, neutron studies can provide unique information through the ability to locate hydrogen or deuterium atoms that are often difficult or impossible to locate using X-ray methods. Furthermore, neutron fibre diffraction methods can, through the ability to selectively label specific parts of a structure, be used to highlight novel aspects of polymer structure that can not be studied using X-rays. Two examples are given. The first describes X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of conformational transitions in DNA. The second describes structural studies of the synthetic high-performance polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA), known commercially as Kevlar{reg_sign} or Twaron{reg_sign}.

  2. Firing of Clays Studied by X-ray Diffraction and Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häusler, W.

    2004-06-01

    Three bentonites of varying purity were fired in air under controlled conditions up to 1300°C in an attempt to provide data for the assessment of firing techniques used in prehistoric pottery making. X-ray diffraction of samples heated at increasing temperatures allows to study the mineral transformations, the breakdown of the clay structure and the formation of new minerals in the high-temperature region. Mössbauer spectroscopy reveals the change of valence state and of the environment of the iron atoms on heating. Non iron-bearing minerals are only accessible by X-ray diffraction, while iron-containing oxidic and amorphous phases may be difficult to detect, due to poor crystallinity and small particle size. The combination of X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy therefore has a considerable potential in the study of the chemical and physical transformations occurring in pottery clays during firing.

  3. Structural states of myelin observed by x-ray diffraction and freeze- fracture electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Coordinated freeze-fracture electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to visualize the morphological relation between compacted and native period membrane arrays in myelinated nerves treated with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Comparison of x-ray diffraction at room temperature and at low temperature was used as a critical measure of the extent of structural preservation. Our x-ray diffraction patterns show that in the presence of cryoprotective agents, it is possible to preserve with only small changes the myelin structure which exists at room temperature. These changes include a slight increase in packing disorder of the membrane, a small, negative thermal expansion of the membrane unit, and some reorganization in the cytoplasmic half of the bilayer. The freeze-fracture electron microscopy clearly demonstrates continuity of compact and native period phases in DMSO-treated myelin. Finally, the use of freezing to trap the transient, intermediate structure during a structural transition in glycerol is demonstrated. PMID:479295

  4. Strain propagation in nanolayered perovskites probed by ultrafast x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Korff Schmising, C. v.; Bargheer, M.; Kiel, M.; Zhavoronkov, N.; Woerner, M.; Elsaesser, T.; Vrejoiu, I.; Hesse, D.; Alexe, M.

    2006-06-01

    Strain propagation in a perovskite heterostructure grown on a SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) substrate is studied by ultrafast x-ray diffraction. Femtosecond displacive phonon excitation in a PbZr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}O{sub 3}/SrRuO{sub 3} (PZT/SRO) film launches acoustic strain waves propagating into the STO substrate. We demonstrate a two-step time evolution of diffracted x-ray intensity which originates from different interfering contributions to the (004) Bragg peak of the STO substrate. Analysis by dynamical x-ray diffraction theory gives the absolute strain {delta}a/a{sub 0} in a wide range of optical pump fluences. Ultrafast transient strain as small as {delta}a/a{sub 0}=2x10{sup -5} is determined in this way.

  5. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. As a result, this can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.

  6. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; ...

    2009-01-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution imagesmore » using fewer photons. As a result, this can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.« less

  7. Influence of neutron irradiation on the microstructure of nuclear graphite: An X-ray diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z.; Bouwman, W. G.; Schut, H.; van Staveren, T. O.; Heijna, M. C. R.; Pappas, C.

    2017-04-01

    Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructure of nuclear graphite have been investigated by X-ray diffraction on virgin and low doses (∼ 1.3 and ∼ 2.2 dpa), high temperature (750° C) irradiated samples. The diffraction patterns were interpreted using a model, which takes into account the turbostratic disorder. Besides the lattice constants, the model introduces two distinct coherent lengths in the c-axis and the basal plane, that characterise the volumes from which X-rays are scattered coherently. The methodology used in this work allows to quantify the effect of irradiation damage on the microstructure of nuclear graphite seen by X-ray diffraction. The results show that the changes of the deduced structural parameters are in agreement with previous observations from electron microscopy, but not directly related to macroscopic changes.

  8. On the origin of sharp peaks in the X-ray diffraction patterns of xanthan powders.

    PubMed

    Lad, M; Todd, T; Morris, G A; MacNaughtan, W; Sworn, G; Foster, T J

    2013-08-15

    A series of xanthans containing different levels of the charged group pyruvate has been examined. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the powders of these materials had different levels of a sharp pattern superimposed on an amorphous background. As the moisture content increased so the intensity of the sharp pattern increased up to a level between 20% and 40% moisture content where the sharp pattern disappeared. X-ray diffraction pattern identification software and an inorganic X-ray diffraction database showed the origin of the sharp peaks to be due to sodium sulphate polymorphs. The behaviour of the xanthans was thought to be due to the differences in charge on the molecule; however, the increase in the crystalline component observed with increased amounts of water was unexpected. The possibility of the drying of samples was considered but the interplay between ions, the charged polymer and the water present was considered necessary to more closely describe the results.

  9. Imaging nanoscale lattice variations by machine learning of x-ray diffraction microscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laanait, Nouamane; Zhang, Zhan; Schlepütz, Christian M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a novel methodology based on machine learning to extract lattice variations in crystalline materials, at the nanoscale, from an x-ray Bragg diffraction-based imaging technique. By employing a full-field microscopy setup, we capture real space images of materials, with imaging contrast determined solely by the x-ray diffracted signal. The data sets that emanate from this imaging technique are a hybrid of real space information (image spatial support) and reciprocal lattice space information (image contrast), and are intrinsically multidimensional (5D). By a judicious application of established unsupervised machine learning techniques and multivariate analysis to this multidimensional data cube, we show how to extract features that can be ascribed physical interpretations in terms of common structural distortions, such as lattice tilts and dislocation arrays. We demonstrate this ‘big data’ approach to x-ray diffraction microscopy by identifying structural defects present in an epitaxial ferroelectric thin-film of lead zirconate titanate.

  10. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens. PMID:19654762

  11. Coherent x-ray zoom condenser lens for diffractive and scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takashi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Nishino, Yoshinori

    2013-04-22

    We propose a coherent x-ray zoom condenser lens composed of two-stage deformable Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. The lens delivers coherent x-rays with a controllable beam size, from one micrometer to a few tens of nanometers, at a fixed focal position. The lens is suitable for diffractive and scanning microscopy. We also propose non-scanning coherent diffraction microscopy for extended objects by using an apodized focused beam produced by the lens with a spatial filter. The proposed apodized-illumination method will be useful in highly efficient imaging with ultimate storage ring sources, and will also open the way to single-shot coherent diffraction microscopy of extended objects with x-ray free-electron lasers.

  12. A platform for detecting material melting from shock compression using the NIF x-ray diffraction diagnostic TARDIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrenberg, Christopher; Kraus, Richard; Braun, Dave; Rygg, Ryan; Coppari, Federica; Lazicki, Amy; McNaney, James; Eggert, Jon

    2016-10-01

    A series of experiments were performed on NIF to develop a platform to detect material melting during shock compression using x-ray diffraction. The unique pulse shaping on NIF can be utilized to directly-drive a steady shock into an ablator and material sample while simultaneously creating an x-ray source to probe the material state. Sharp diffraction lines are observed when the material is in the solid state, while broad diffuse lines are seen when in the liquid state, providing an unambiguous signal for shock driven melting. Several shots were performed in which a shock of 50-80 GPa was driven into a Pb sample while a Ge foil was used as an x-ray source probe. Laser conditions were varied to create a suitable x-ray source that provides a short, bright burst of He-alpha emission from the Ge while maintaining a low background level on the image plates contained in the TARDIS diagnostic. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Pulsed magnetic field synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction of the Jahn-Teller distortion in TbVO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanacken, J.; Frings, P.; Detlefs, C.; Duc, F.; Lorenzo, J. E.; Nardone, M.; Billette, J.; Zitouni, A.; Bras, W.; Rikken, G.

    2006-11-01

    X-ray powder diffraction experiments under pulsed magnetic fields were carried out at the DUBBLE beam line at the ESRF. A mobile generator delivered 110 kJ to the load coil, which was sufficient to generate peak fields of 30 T. A liquid He flow cryostat allowed us to vary the sample temperature accurately between 8 K and 300 K. Powder diffraction patterns of TbVO4 were recorded in a broad temperature range using 21 keV monochromatic X-rays and an on-line image plate detector. We present results on the suppression of the Jahn-Teller structural distortion in TbVO4by to the magnetic field.

  14. X-Ray Weak Broad-Line Quasars: Absorption or Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risaliti, Guido; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    XMM observations of X-ray weak quasars have been performed during 2003. The data for all but the last observation are now available (there has been a delay of several months on the initial schedule, due to high background flares which contaminated the observations: as a consequence, most of them had to be rescheduled). We have reduced and analyzed these data, and obtained interesting preliminary scientific results. Out of the eight sources, 4 are confirmed to be extrimely X-ray weak, in agreement with the results of previous Chandra observations. 3 sources are confirmed to be highly variable both in flux (by factors 20-50) and in spectral properties (dramatic changes in spectral index). For both these groups of objects, an article is in preparation. Preliminary results have been presented at an international workshop on AGN surveys in December 2003, in Cozumel (Mexico). In order to further understand the nature of these X-ray weak quasars, we submitted proposals for spectroscopy at optical and infrared telescopes. We obtained time at the TNG 4 meter telescope for near-IR observations, and at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope for optical high-resolution spectroscopy. These observations will be performed in early 2004, and will complement the XMM data, in order to understand whether the X-ray weakness of these sources is an intrinsic property or is due to absorption by circumnuclear material.

  15. Pump-probe X-ray Diffraction Technique for Irreversible Phase Change Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuyama, Yoshimitsu; Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Kimura, Shigeru; Osawa, Hitoshi; Kim, Jungeun; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Takata, Masaki; Murayama, Haruno; Moritomo, Yutaka; Toriumi, Koshiro; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    2010-06-23

    We have developed a pump-probe X-ray diffraction measurement system for a sample with irreversible reaction at BL40XU in the SPring-8. The system mainly consists of a time-resolved measurement system, a sample disk rotation system, and an X-ray microbeam system. The time-resolved measurement system gives time resolution of 50 ps in laser-pump and X-ray probe method. A sample disk rotation system for repetitive measurements was made to give a virgin sample for every measurement. The number of repetitions for one sample disk was increased by using the X-ray microbeam technique. To keep the overlap of the X-ray microbeam and the laser beam on the sample surface during the disk rotation, the sample disk rotation system was constructed by a low-eccentric spindle motor. By using this system, the pump-probe X-ray diffraction measurement was demonstrated for a crystallization process of a DVD material.

  16. In-laboratory diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging for articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Muehleman, Carol; Fogarty, Daniel; Reinhart, Benjamin; Tzvetkov, Tochko; Li, Jun; Nesch, Ivan

    2010-07-01

    The loss of articular cartilage characteristic of osteoarthritis can only be diagnosed by joint space narrowing when conventional radiography is used. This is due to the lack of X-ray contrast of soft tissues. Whereas conventional radiography harnesses the X-ray attenuation properties of tissues, Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI), a novel radiographic technique, allows the visualization of soft tissues simultaneous with calcified tissues by virtue of its ability to not only harness X-ray attenuation but also the X-ray refraction from tissue boundaries. Previously, DEI was dependent upon synchrotron X-rays, but more recently, the development of nonsynchrotron DEI units has been explored. These developments serve to elaborate the full potential of radiography. Here, we tested the potential of an in-laboratory DEI system, called Diffraction-Enhanced X-ray Imaging (DEXI), to render images of articular cartilage displaying varying degrees of degradation, ex vivo. DEXI allowed visualization of even early stages of cartilage degeneration such as surface fibrillation. This may be of eventual clinical significance for the diagnosis of early stages of degeneration, or at the very least, to visualize soft tissue degeneration simultaneous with bone changes.

  17. Diffraction crystals for sagittally focusing x-rays

    DOEpatents

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J. Jr.

    1982-06-07

    The invention is a new type of diffraction crystal designed for sagittally focusing photons of various energies. The invention is based on the discovery that such focusing is not obtainable with conventional crystals because of distortion resulting from anticlastic curvature. The new crystal comprises a monocrystalline base having a front face contoured for sagittally focusing photons and a back face provided with rigid, upstanding, stiffening ribs restricting anticlastic curvature. When mounted in a suitable bending device, the reflecting face of the crystal can be adjusted to focus photons having any one of a range of energies.

  18. Diffraction crystal for sagittally focusing x-rays

    DOEpatents

    Ice, Gene E.; Sparks, Jr., Cullie J.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a new type of diffraction crystal designed for sagittally focusing photons of various energies. The invention is based on the discovery that such focusing is not obtainable with conventional crystals because of distortion resulting from anticlastic curvature. The new crystal comprises a monocrystalline base having a front face contoured for sagittally focusing photons and a back face provided with rigid, upstanding, stiffening ribs restricting anticlastic curvature. When mounted in a suitable bending device, the reflecting face of the crystal can be adjusted to focus photons having any one of a range of energies.

  19. An X-ray diffractometer using mirage diffraction.

    PubMed

    Fukamachi, Tomoe; Jongsukswat, Sukswat; Ju, Dongying; Negishi, Riichirou; Hirano, Keiichi; Kawamura, Takaaki

    2014-08-01

    Some characteristics are reported of a triple-crystal diffractometer with a (+, -, +) setting of Si(220) using mirage diffraction. The first crystal is flat, while the second and third crystals are bent. Basically, the first crystal is used as a collimator, the second as a monochromator and the third as the sample. The third crystal also works as an analyzer. The advantages of this diffractometer are that its setup is easy, its structure is simple, the divergence angle from the second crystal is small and the energy resolution of the third crystal is high, of the order of sub-meV.

  20. Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of paint pigmentparticles by scanning a phase plate modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Y. S.; Chen B.; Zhang F.; Berenguer F.; Bean R.; Kewish C.; Vila-Comamala J.; Rodenburg J.; Robinson I.

    2011-10-19

    We have implemented a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging technique that scans a phase plate to modulate wave-fronts of the x-ray beam transmitted by samples. The method was applied to measure a decorative alkyd paint containing iron oxide red pigment particles. By employing an iterative algorithm for wave-front modulation phase retrieval, we obtained an image of the paint sample that shows the distribution of the pigment particles and is consistent with the result obtained from a transmission x-ray microscope. The technique has been experimentally proven to be a feasible coherent x-ray imaging method with about 120 nm spatial resolution and was shown to work well with industrially relevant specimens.

  1. Diffraction-Enhanced Imaging of Musculoskeletal Tissues Using a Conventional X-Ray Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Muehleman, C.; Li, J; Connor, D; Parham, C; Pisano, E; Zhong, Z

    2009-01-01

    DEI based on a conventional x-ray tube allows the visualization of skeletal and soft tissues simultaneously. Although more in-depth testing and optimization of the DEI setup must be carried out, these data demonstrate a proof of principle for further development of the technology for future clinical imaging. In conventional projection radiography, cartilage and other soft tissues do not produce enough radiographic contrast to be distinguishable from each other. Diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) uses a monochromatic x-ray beam and a silicon crystal analyzer to produce images in which attenuation contrast is greatly enhanced and x-ray refraction at tissue boundaries can be detected. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of conventional x-ray tube-based DEI for the detection of soft tissues in experimental samples.

  2. In-plate protein crystallization, in situ ligand soaking and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    le Maire, Albane; Gelin, Muriel; Pochet, Sylvie; Hoh, François; Pirocchi, Michel; Guichou, Jean François; Ferrer, Jean Luc; Labesse, Gilles

    2011-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is now a recognized technique for ligand screening, especially for fragment-based drug design. However, protein crystal handling is still tedious and limits further automation. An alternative method for the solution of crystal structures of proteins in complex with small ligands is proposed. Crystallization drops are directly exposed to an X-ray beam after cocrystallization or soaking with the desired ligands. The use of dedicated plates in connection with an optimal parametrization of the G-rob robot allows efficient data collection. Three proteins currently under study in our laboratory for ligand screening by X-ray crystallography were used as validation test cases. The protein crystals belonged to different space groups, including a challenging monoclinic case. The resulting diffraction data can lead to clear ligand recognition, including indication of alternating conformations. These results demonstrate a possible method for automation of ligand screening by X-ray crystallography.

  3. X-Ray Diffraction Techniques for a Field Instrument: Patterns of Lithologic Provences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Keaten, R.

    1999-01-01

    Future exploration of Mars will attempt to shed light on the mineralogy of surface materials. Instruments deployed from remote platforms should have the capability to conduct both intensive analyses as well as rapid, reconnaissance surveys while they function in the martian environment as surrogate geologists. In order to accommodate the reconnaissance mode of analysis and to compensate for analytical limitations imposed by the space-flight conditions, data analysis methods are being developed that will permit interpretation of data by recognition of signatures or "fingerprints". Specifically, we are developing a technique which will allow interpretation of diffraction patterns by recognition of characteristic signatures of different lithologic provences. This technique allows a remote vehicle to function in a rapid-scan mode using the lithologic signature to determine where a more thorough analysis is needed. An x-ray diffraction pattern is characterized by the angular positions of diffracted x-rays, x-ray intensity levels and background radiation levels. These elements may be used to identify a generalized x-ray signature. Lithologic signatures are being developed in two ways. A signature is composed using the ideal powder diffraction indices from the mineral assembledge common to a specific lithologic provence. This is then confirmed using a laboratory diffraction pattern of a whole rock powder. Preliminary results comparing the diffraction signatures of the major mineral assembledges common to basalt, carbonate, and evaporite basin deposits indicate that lithologies are differentiable as a "fingerprint". Statistical analyses are being performed to establish the confidence levels of this technique.

  4. X-ray fluorescence and energy dispersive x-ray diffraction for the quantification of elemental concentrations in breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Geraki, K; Farquharson, M J; Bradley, D A

    2004-01-07

    This paper presents improvements on a previously reported method for the measurement of elements in breast tissue specimens (Geraki et al 2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 2327-39). A synchrotron-based system was used for the detection of the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) emitted from iron, copper, zinc and potassium in breast tissue specimens, healthy and cancerous. Calibration models resulting from the irradiation of standard aqueous solutions were used for the quantification of the elements. The present developments concentrate on increasing the convergence between the tissue samples and the calibration models, therefore improving accuracy. For this purpose the composition of the samples in terms of adipose and fibrous tissue was evaluated, using an energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) system. The relationships between the attenuation and scatter properties of the two tissue components and water were determined through Monte Carlo simulations. The results from the simulations and the EDXRD measurements allowed the XRF data from each specimen to be corrected according to its composition. The statistical analysis of the elemental concentrations of the different groups of specimens reveals that all four elements are found in elevated levels in the tumour specimens. The increase is less pronounced for iron and copper and most for potassium and zinc. Other observed features include the substantial degree of inhomogeneity of elemental distributions within the volume of the specimens, varying between 4% and 36% of the mean, depending on the element and the type of the sample. The accuracy of the technique, based on the measurement of a standard reference material, proved to be between 3% and 22% depending on the element, which presents only a marginal improvement (1%-3%) compared to the accuracy of the previously reported results. The measurement precision was between 1% and 9% while the calculated uncertainties on the final elemental concentrations ranged between 10% and 16%.

  5. Observations of Shock-Loaded Tin and Zirconium Surfaces with Single-Pulse X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Dane V. Morgan, Mike Grover, Don Macy, Mike Madlener, Gerald Stevens, and William D. Turley

    2010-06-01

    A single-pulse X-ray diffraction (XRD) diagnostic has been developed for the investigation of shocked material properties on a very short time scale. The diagnostic, which consists of a 37-stage Marx bank high-voltage pulse generator coupled to a needle-and-washer electron beam diode via coaxial cable, produces line-and-bremsstrahlung X-ray emission in a 40 ns pulse. The molybdenum anode produces 0.71 Å characteristic K lines used for diffraction. The X-ray beam passes through a pinhole collimator and is incident on the sample with an approximately 2 mm×5 mm spot and 1° full width at half maximum angular divergence. Coherent scattering from the sample produces a Debye-Scherrer diffraction pattern on an image plate located at 75 mm from the polycrystalline sample surface. An experimental study of the polycrystalline structures of zirconium and tin under high-pressure shock loading has been conducted with single-pulse XRD. The experimental targets were 0.1-mm-thick foils of zirconium and tin using 0.4-mm-thick vitreous carbon back windows for shock loading, and the shocks were produced by either Detasheet or PBX-9501 high explosives buffered by 1-mm-thick 6061-T6 aluminum. The diffraction patterns from both shocked zirconium and tin indicated a phase transition into a polymorphic mix of amorphous and new solid phases.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of porcine carboxypeptidase B

    SciTech Connect

    Akparov, V. Kh.; Timofeev, V. I. Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-05-15

    Crystals of porcine pancreatic carboxypeptidase B have been grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction study showed that the crystals belong to sp. gr. P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 79.58 Å, c = 100.51 Å; α = β = γ = 90.00°. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one of the grown crystals at the SPring 8 synchrotron facility to 0.98 Å resolution.

  7. Mössbauer, magnetization and X-ray diffraction characterization methods for iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbasov, Raul; Polikarpov, Michael; Cherepanov, Valery; Chuev, Michael; Mischenko, Iliya; Lomov, Andrey; Wang, Andrew; Panchenko, Vladislav

    2015-04-01

    Water soluble magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles with oleic polymer coating and average diameters in the range of 5-25 nm, previously determined by TEM, were characterized using Mössbauer, magnetization and X-ray diffraction measurements. Comparative analysis of the results demonstrated a large diversity of magnetic relaxation regimes. Analysis showed the presence of an additional impurity component in the 25 nm nanoparticles, with principally different magnetic nature at the magnetite core. In some cases, X-ray diffraction measurements were unable to estimate the size of the magnetic core and Mössbauer data were necessary for the correct interpretation of the experimental results.

  8. Simulating Picosecond X-ray Diffraction from shocked crystals by Post-processing Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kimminau, G; Nagler, B; Higginbotham, A; Murphy, W; Park, N; Hawreliak, J; Kadau, K; Germann, T C; Bringa, E M; Kalantar, D; Lorenzana, H; Remington, B; Wark, J

    2008-06-19

    Calculations of the x-ray diffraction patterns from shocked crystals derived from the results of Non-Equilibrium-Molecular-Dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented. The atomic coordinates predicted by the NEMD simulations combined with atomic form factors are used to generate a discrete distribution of electron density. A Fast-Fourier-Transform (FFT) of this distribution provides an image of the crystal in reciprocal space, which can be further processed to produce quantitative simulated data for direct comparison with experiments that employ picosecond x-ray diffraction from laser-irradiated crystalline targets.

  9. Phase Sensitive X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Defects in Biological Macromolecular Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Lai, B.; Chu, Y. S.; Cai, Z.; Mancini, D. C.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Characterization of defects and/or disorder in biological macromolecular crystals presents much greater challenges than in conventional small-molecule crystals. The lack of sufficient contrast of defects is often a limiting factor in x-ray diffraction topography of protein crystals. This has seriously hampered efforts to understand mechanisms and origins of formation of imperfections, and the role of defects as essential entities in the bulk of macromolecular crystals. In this report, we employ a phase sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging approach for augmenting the contrast of defects in protein crystals.

  10. Transmission diffraction-tomography system using a high-energy X-ray tube.

    PubMed

    Garrity, D J; Jenneson, P M; Crook, R; Vincent, S M

    2010-01-01

    A high-energy bench-top energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) system for 3-dimensional mapping of the crystalline structure and phase transformations in steel is described, for which preliminary data and system development are presented here. The use of precision tungsten slit screens with up to 225 keV X-rays allows for diffraction through samples of 304 L austenitic stainless steel of thickness 3-10 mm, while sample positioning is carried out with a precision goniometer and translation stage system.

  11. Toward the diffraction limit with transmissive x-ray lenses in astronomy.

    PubMed

    Braig, Christoph; Predehl, Peter

    2012-07-10

    We develop an analytical approach to refractive, blazed diffractive, and achromatic x-ray lenses of scalable dimensions for energies from 1 to 20 keV. Based on the parabolic wave equation, their wideband imaging properties are compared and optimized for a given spectral range. Low-Z lens materials for massive cores and rugged alternatives, such as polycarbonate or Si for flat Fresnel components, are investigated with respect to their suitability for diffraction-limited high-energy astronomy. Properly designed "hybrid" combinations can serve as an approach to x-ray telescopes with an enhanced efficiency throughout the whole considered band, nearly regardless of their inherent absorption.

  12. X-ray diffraction in temporally and spatially resolved biomolecular science.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, John R; Brink, Alice; Kaenket, Surasak; Starkey, Victoria Laurina; Tanley, Simon W M

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved Laue protein crystallography at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) opened up the field of sub-nanosecond protein crystal structure analyses. There are a limited number of such time-resolved studies in the literature. Why is this? The X-ray laser now gives us femtosecond (fs) duration pulses, typically 10 fs up to ∼50 fs. Their use is attractive for the fastest time-resolved protein crystallography studies. It has been proposed that single molecules could even be studied with the advantage of being able to measure X-ray diffraction from a 'crystal lattice free' single molecule, with or without temporal resolved structural changes. This is altogether very challenging R&D. So as to assist this effort we have undertaken studies of metal clusters that bind to proteins, both 'fresh' and after repeated X-ray irradiation to assess their X-ray-photo-dynamics, namely Ta6Br12, K2PtI6 and K2PtBr6 bound to a test protein, hen egg white lysozyme. These metal complexes have the major advantage of being very recognisable shapes (pseudo spherical or octahedral) and thereby offer a start to (probably very difficult) single molecule electron density map interpretations, both static and dynamic. A further approach is to investigate the X-ray laser beam diffraction strength of a well scattering nano-cluster; an example from nature being the iron containing ferritin. Electron crystallography and single particle electron microscopy imaging offers alternatives to X-ray structural studies; our structural studies of crustacyanin, a 320 kDa protein carotenoid complex, can be extended either by electron based techniques or with the X-ray laser representing a fascinating range of options. General outlook remarks concerning X-ray, electron and neutron macromolecular crystallography as well as 'NMR crystallography' conclude the article.

  13. Structural Studies of Matrix Metalloproteinase by X-Ray Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Decaneto, Elena; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Ogata, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of proteolytic enzymes whose endopeptidase activity is dependent on the presence of specific metal ions. MT1-MMP (or MMP-14), which has been implicated in tumor progression and cellular invasion, contains a membrane-spanning region located C-terminal to a hemopexin-like domain and an N-terminal catalytic domain. We recombinantly expressed the catalytic domain of human MT1-MMP in E. coli and purified it from inclusion bodies using a refolding protocol that yielded significant quantities of active protein. Crystals of MT1-MMP were obtained using the vapour diffusion method. Here, we describe the protocols used for crystallization and the data analysis together with the resulting diffraction pattern.

  14. XDS: a flexible beamline for X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy at the Brazilian synchrotron.

    PubMed

    Lima, F A; Saleta, M E; Pagliuca, R J S; Eleotério, M A; Reis, R D; Fonseca Júnior, J; Meyer, B; Bittar, E M; Souza-Neto, N M; Granado, E

    2016-11-01

    The majority of the beamlines at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source Laboratory (LNLS) use radiation produced in the storage-ring bending magnets and are therefore currently limited in the flux that can be used in the harder part of the X-ray spectrum (above ∼10 keV). A 4 T superconducting multipolar wiggler (SCW) was recently installed at LNLS in order to improve the photon flux above 10 keV and fulfill the demands set by the materials science community. A new multi-purpose beamline was then installed at the LNLS using the SCW as a photon source. The XDS is a flexible beamline operating in the energy range between 5 and 30 keV, designed to perform experiments using absorption, diffraction and scattering techniques. Most of the work performed at the XDS beamline concentrates on X-ray absorption spectroscopy at energies above 18 keV and high-resolution diffraction experiments. More recently, new setups and photon-hungry experiments such as total X-ray scattering, X-ray diffraction under high pressures, resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy, among others, have started to become routine at XDS. Here, the XDS beamline characteristics, performance and a few new experimental possibilities are described.

  15. X-ray laser–induced electron dynamics observed by femtosecond diffraction from nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene

    PubMed Central

    Abbey, Brian; Dilanian, Ruben A.; Darmanin, Connie; Ryan, Rebecca A.; Putkunz, Corey T.; Martin, Andrew V.; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor; Jones, Michael W. M.; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Williams, Sophie; Curwood, Evan; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.; Quiney, Harry M.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) deliver x-ray pulses with a coherent flux that is approximately eight orders of magnitude greater than that available from a modern third-generation synchrotron source. The power density of an XFEL pulse may be so high that it can modify the electronic properties of a sample on a femtosecond time scale. Exploration of the interaction of intense coherent x-ray pulses and matter is both of intrinsic scientific interest and of critical importance to the interpretation of experiments that probe the structures of materials using high-brightness femtosecond XFEL pulses. We report observations of the diffraction of extremely intense 32-fs nanofocused x-ray pulses by a powder sample of crystalline C60. We find that the diffraction pattern at the highest available incident power significantly differs from the one obtained using either third-generation synchrotron sources or XFEL sources operating at low output power and does not correspond to the diffraction pattern expected from any known phase of crystalline C60. We interpret these data as evidence of a long-range, coherent dynamic electronic distortion that is driven by the interaction of the periodic array of C60 molecular targets with intense x-ray pulses of femtosecond duration. PMID:27626076

  16. Compact ultrahigh vacuum sample environments for x-ray nanobeam diffraction and imaging.

    PubMed

    Evans, P G; Chahine, G; Grifone, R; Jacques, V L R; Spalenka, J W; Schülli, T U

    2013-11-01

    X-ray nanobeams present the opportunity to obtain structural insight in materials with small volumes or nanoscale heterogeneity. The effective spatial resolution of the information derived from nanobeam techniques depends on the stability and precision with which the relative position of the x-ray optics and sample can be controlled. Nanobeam techniques include diffraction, imaging, and coherent scattering, with applications throughout materials science and condensed matter physics. Sample positioning is a significant mechanical challenge for x-ray instrumentation providing vacuum or controlled gas environments at elevated temperatures. Such environments often have masses that are too large for nanopositioners capable of the required positional accuracy of the order of a small fraction of the x-ray spot size. Similarly, the need to place x-ray optics as close as 1 cm to the sample places a constraint on the overall size of the sample environment. We illustrate a solution to the mechanical challenge in which compact ion-pumped ultrahigh vacuum chambers with masses of 1-2 kg are integrated with nanopositioners. The overall size of the environment is sufficiently small to allow their use with zone-plate focusing optics. We describe the design of sample environments for elevated-temperature nanobeam diffraction experiments demonstrate in situ diffraction, reflectivity, and scanning nanobeam imaging of the ripening of Au crystallites on Si substrates.

  17. High Resolution Triple Axis X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of II-VI Semiconductor Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, H. M.; Matyi, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research program is to develop methods of structural analysis based on high resolution triple axis X-ray diffractometry (HRTXD) and to carry out detailed studies of defect distributions in crystals grown in both microgravity and ground-based environments. HRTXD represents a modification of the widely used double axis X-ray rocking curve method for the characterization of grown-in defects in nearly perfect crystals. In a double axis rocking curve experiment, the sample is illuminated by a monochromatic X-ray beam and the diffracted intensity is recorded by a fixed, wide-open detector. The intensity diffracted by the sample is then monitored as the sample is rotated through the Bragg reflection condition. The breadth of the peak, which is often reported as the full angular width at half the maximum intensity (FWHM), is used as an indicator of the amount of defects in the sample. This work has shown that high resolution triple axis X-ray diffraction is an effective tool for characterizing the defect structure in semiconductor crystals, particularly at high defect densities. Additionally, the technique is complimentary to X-ray topography for defect characterization in crystals.

  18. Real-time direct and diffraction X-ray imaging of irregular silicon wafer breakage

    PubMed Central

    Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Danilewsky, Andreas N.

    2016-01-01

    Fracture and breakage of single crystals, particularly of silicon wafers, are multi-scale problems: the crack tip starts propagating on an atomic scale with the breaking of chemical bonds, forms crack fronts through the crystal on the micrometre scale and ends macroscopically in catastrophic wafer shattering. Total wafer breakage is a severe problem for the semiconductor industry, not only during handling but also during temperature treatments, leading to million-dollar costs per annum in a device production line. Knowledge of the relevant dynamics governing perfect cleavage along the {111} or {110} faces, and of the deflection into higher indexed {hkl} faces of higher energy, is scarce due to the high velocity of the process. Imaging techniques are commonly limited to depicting only the state of a wafer before the crack and in the final state. This paper presents, for the first time, in situ high-speed crack propagation under thermal stress, imaged simultaneously in direct transmission and diffraction X-ray imaging. It shows how the propagating crack tip and the related strain field can be tracked in the phase-contrast and diffracted images, respectively. Movies with a time resolution of microseconds per frame reveal that the strain and crack tip do not propagate continuously or at a constant speed. Jumps in the crack tip position indicate pinning of the crack tip for about 1–2 ms followed by jumps faster than 2–6 m s−1, leading to a macroscopically observed average velocity of 0.028–0.055 m s−1. The presented results also give a proof of concept that the described X-ray technique is compatible with studying ultra-fast cracks up to the speed of sound. PMID:27006774

  19. X-ray line from exciting dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Weiner, Neal

    2016-10-01

    The exciting dark matter (XDM) model was proposed as a mechanism to efficiently convert the kinetic energy (in sufficiently hot environments) of dark matter into e +e - pairs. The standard scenario invokes a doublet of nearly degenerate dark matter (DM) states and a dark force to mediate a large upscattering cross section between the two. For heavy (˜TeV ) DM, the kinetic energy of weakly interacting massive particles in large (galaxy-sized or larger) halos is capable of producing low-energy positrons. For lighter dark matter, this is kinematically impossible, and the unique observable signature becomes an x-ray line, arising from χ χ →χ*χ*, followed by χ*→χ γ . This variant of XDM is distinctive from other DM x-ray scenarios in that its signatures tend to be most present in more massive, hotter environments, such as clusters, rather than nearby dwarfs, and has different dependencies from decaying models. We find that it is capable of explaining the recently reported s-ray line at 3.56 keV. For very long lifetimes of the excited state, primordial decays can explain the signal without the presence of upscattering. Thermal models freeze out as in the normal XDM setup, via annihilations to the light boson ϕ . For suitable masses, the annihilation χ χ →ϕ ϕ followed by ϕ →SM can explain the reported gamma-ray signature from the Galactic center. Direct detection is discussed, including the possibility of explaining DAMA via the "luminous" dark matter approach. Quite generally, the proximity of the 3.56 keV line to the energy scale of DAMA motivates a reexamination of electromagnetic explanations. Other signals, including lepton jets and the modification of cores of dwarf galaxies are also considered.

  20. Neutron and X-ray powder diffraction study of skutterudite thermoelectrics

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, H.; Kirkham, M. J.; Watkins, T. R.; ...

    2016-02-17

    N- and p-type filled-skutterudite materials prepared for thermoelectric power generation modules were analyzed by neutron diffraction at the POWGEN beam line of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The skutterudite powders were processed by melt spinning, followed by ball milling and annealing. The n-type material consists of Ba–Yb–Co–Sb and the p-type material consists of Di–Fe–Ni–Sb or Di–Fe–Co–Sb (Di = didymium, an alloy of Pr and Nd). Powders for prototype module fabrication from General Motors and Marlow Industries were analyzed in this study. XRD and neutron diffraction studies confirm that both the n- and p-type materials have cubicmore » symmetry. Structural Rietveld refinements determined the lattice parameters and atomic parameters of the framework and filler atoms. The cage filling fraction was found to depend linearly on the lattice parameter, which in turn depends on the average framework atom size. Ultimately, this knowledge may allow the filling fraction of these skutterudite materials to be purposefully adjusted, thereby tuning the thermoelectric properties.« less

  1. Neutron and X-ray powder diffraction study of skutterudite thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Kirkham, M. J.; Watkins, T. R.; Payzant, E. A.; Salvador, J. R.; Thompson, A. J.; Sharp, J.; Brown, D.; Miller, D.

    2016-02-17

    N- and p-type filled-skutterudite materials prepared for thermoelectric power generation modules were analyzed by neutron diffraction at the POWGEN beam line of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The skutterudite powders were processed by melt spinning, followed by ball milling and annealing. The n-type material consists of Ba–Yb–Co–Sb and the p-type material consists of Di–Fe–Ni–Sb or Di–Fe–Co–Sb (Di = didymium, an alloy of Pr and Nd). Powders for prototype module fabrication from General Motors and Marlow Industries were analyzed in this study. XRD and neutron diffraction studies confirm that both the n- and p-type materials have cubic symmetry. Structural Rietveld refinements determined the lattice parameters and atomic parameters of the framework and filler atoms. The cage filling fraction was found to depend linearly on the lattice parameter, which in turn depends on the average framework atom size. Ultimately, this knowledge may allow the filling fraction of these skutterudite materials to be purposefully adjusted, thereby tuning the thermoelectric properties.

  2. A Numerical Study on X-Ray Diffraction Effects within Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K

    2005-09-29

    X-rays, being waves, always undergo the propagation effects of reflection, refraction, diffraction, geometric attenuation and absorption. In most circumstances the first four effects are considered negligible given the resolution sizes demanded of the measurement systems, x-ray energies involved, and physical properties of the materials under evaluation. We have reached the point, however, in some x-ray non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and imaging where we wish to resolve features of micrometer size in millimeter size objects to less than micrometer resolution. Given this resolution and the sizes of the measurement systems, diffraction effects within the object may become observable. We studied the extent to which diffraction is observable numerically using a two-dimensional paraxial approximation wave propagation code using a multislice method. We modeled realistic parts of interest at worst-case x-ray energies, comparing wave propagation and straight-ray simulated results. In two cases, we compare the numerical results to experimental measurements. The conclusion, based upon the results of the simulation code, is that diffraction effects on the measured data will be insignificant. However, we demonstrate by a single example, that in certain cases diffraction effects may be significant.

  3. Single-Shot Femtosecond X-ray Diffraction from Randomly Oriented Ellipsoidal Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bogan, M.J.; Boutet, S.; Barty, A.; Benner, W.H.; Frank, M.; Lomb, L.; Shoeman, R.; Starodub, D.; Seibert, M.M.; Hau-Riege, S.P.; Woods, B.; Decorwin-Martin, P.; Bajt, S.; Schulz, J.; Rohner, U.; Iwan, B.; Timneanu, N.; Marchesini, S.; Schlichting, I.; Hajdu, J.; Chapman, H.N.; /DESY /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II

    2012-04-18

    Coherent diffractive imaging of single particles using the single-shot 'diffract and destroy' approach with an x-ray free electron laser (FEL) was recently demonstrated. A high-resolution low-noise coherent diffraction pattern, representative of the object before it turns into a plasma and explodes, results from the interaction of the FEL with the particle. Iterative phase retrieval algorithms are used to reconstruct two-dimensional projection images of the object from the recorded intensities alone. Here we describe the first single-shot diffraction data set that mimics the data proposed for obtaining 3D structure from identical particles. Ellipsoidal iron oxide nanoparticles (250 nm x 50 nm) were aerosolized and injected through an aerodynamic lens stack into a soft x-ray FEL. Particle orientation was not controlled with this injection method. We observed that, at the instant the x-ray pulse interacts with the particle, a snapshot of the particle's orientation is encoded in the diffraction pattern. The results give credence to one of the technical concepts of imaging individual nanometer and subnanometer-sized objects such as single molecules or larger clusters of molecules using hard x-ray FELs and will be used to help develop robust algorithms for determining particle orientations and 3D structure.

  4. Phase retrieval from coherent x-ray diffraction data utilizing pre-determined partial information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Soo; Chol Kang, Hyon; Marathe, Shashi; Kim, Su Nam; Noh, Do Young; Sandy, Alec R.; Narayan, Suresh

    2007-03-01

    We developed a phase retrieval algorithm that utilizes pre-determined partial phase information to overcome insufficient oversampling ratio in diffraction data. Implementing the Fourier modulus projection and the modified support projection manifesting the pre-determined information, a generalized difference map and HIO (Hybrid Input-Output) algorithms are developed. Optical laser diffraction data as well as simulated x-ray diffraction data are used to illustrate the validity of the proposed algorithm, which revealed the strength and the limitations of the algorithm. Finally, the proposed algorithm is applied to reconstruct images from coherent x-ray diffraction data of Au patterns. The proposed algorithm can expand the applicability of the diffraction based image reconstruction.

  5. In situ laser heating and radial synchrotron X-ray diffraction ina diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Miyagi, Lowell; Wenk,Hans-Rudolf

    2007-06-29

    We report a first combination of diamond anvil cell radialx-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating. The laser-heating setup ofALS beamline 12.2.2 was modified to allow one-sided heating of a samplein a diamond anvil cell with an 80 W yttrium lithium fluoride laser whileprobing the sample with radial x-ray diffraction. The diamond anvil cellis placed with its compressional axis vertical, and perpendicular to thebeam. The laser beam is focused onto the sample from the top while thesample is probed with hard x-rays through an x-ray transparentboron-epoxy gasket. The temperature response of preferred orientation of(Fe,Mg)O is probed as a test experiment. Recrystallization was observedabove 1500 K, accompanied by a decrease in stress.

  6. Cryogenic x-ray diffraction microscopy utilizing high-pressure cryopreservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Enju; Chushkin, Yuriy; van der Linden, Peter; Kim, Chae Un; Zontone, Federico; Carpentier, Philippe; Gruner, Sol M.; Pernot, Petra

    2014-10-01

    We present cryo x-ray diffraction microscopy of high-pressure-cryofixed bacteria and report high-convergence imaging with multiple image reconstructions. Hydrated D. radiodurans cells were cryofixed at 200 MPa pressure into ˜10-μm-thick water layers and their unstained, hydrated cellular environments were imaged by phasing diffraction patterns, reaching sub-30-nm resolutions with hard x-rays. Comparisons were made with conventional ambient-pressure-cryofixed samples, with respect to both coherent small-angle x-ray scattering and the image reconstruction. The results show a correlation between the level of background ice signal and phasing convergence, suggesting that phasing difficulties with frozen-hydrated specimens may be caused by high-background ice scattering.

  7. X-ray diffraction of indirect flight muscle from Drosohila in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, T.

    2007-02-09

    The indirect flight muscle (IFM) of the fruit fly, Drosophila, represents a powerful model system for integrated structure and function studies because of the ease of genetically manipulating this organism. Recent advances in synchrotron technology have allowed collection of high quality two dimensional x-ray fiber diffraction patterns from the IFM of living fruit flies both at rest and during tethered flight. Based on many decades of x-ray and electron microscopic studies of vertebrate muscle and IFM from the waterbug, Lethocerus, there now exists a framework for interpreting changes in the x-ray diffraction patterns in terms of structural changes at the myofilament level. These developments allow testing of hypotheses concerning muscle function in a truly in vivo system.

  8. Spectrometer for hard X-ray free-electron laser based on diffraction focusing.

    PubMed

    Kohn, V G; Gorobtsov, O Y; Vartanyants, I A

    2013-03-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) generate sequences of ultra-short spatially coherent pulses of X-ray radiation. A diffraction focusing spectrometer (DFS), which is able to measure the whole energy spectrum of the radiation of a single XFEL pulse with an energy resolution of ΔE/E 2 × 10(-6), is proposed. This is much better than for most modern X-ray spectrometers. Such resolution allows one to resolve the fine spectral structure of the XFEL pulse. The effect of diffraction focusing occurs in a single-crystal plate due to dynamical scattering, and is similar to focusing in a Pendry lens made from a metamaterial with a negative refraction index. Such a spectrometer is easier to operate than those based on bent crystals. It is shown that the DFS can be used in a wide energy range from 5 keV to 20 keV.

  9. Cryogenic x-ray diffraction microscopy utilizing high-pressure cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Lima, Enju; Chushkin, Yuriy; van der Linden, Peter; Kim, Chae Un; Zontone, Federico; Carpentier, Philippe; Gruner, Sol M; Pernot, Petra

    2014-10-01

    We present cryo x-ray diffraction microscopy of high-pressure-cryofixed bacteria and report high-convergence imaging with multiple image reconstructions. Hydrated D. radiodurans cells were cryofixed at 200 MPa pressure into ∼10-μm-thick water layers and their unstained, hydrated cellular environments were imaged by phasing diffraction patterns, reaching sub-30-nm resolutions with hard x-rays. Comparisons were made with conventional ambient-pressure-cryofixed samples, with respect to both coherent small-angle x-ray scattering and the image reconstruction. The results show a correlation between the level of background ice signal and phasing convergence, suggesting that phasing difficulties with frozen-hydrated specimens may be caused by high-background ice scattering.

  10. Coherent X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Morphology and Strain in Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian K.

    2013-09-01

    The last decade has seen a remarkable surge in x-ray characterization methods (Willmott, An Introduction to Synchrotron Radiation, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 2011). Imaging with x-rays has evolved from simple radiography, to image internal structure and diagnose injury, to a full-fledged tool for nanoscale characterization (Holt et al., Annu Rev Mater Res 43:1, 2013). Central to this development has been the advent of high-brilliance synchrotron and free electron laser sources of x-rays. The high degree of spacial coherence of the resulting beams has enabled novel imaging methods. Of these, coherent diffraction imaging has proven highly successful at imaging the structure in nano materials (Miao et al., Nature 400:342, 1999). In addition, this imaging method can be combined with Bragg diffraction to image strain with high sensitivity (Pfeifer et al., Nature 442:63, 2006; Robinson and Harder, Nat Mater 8:291, 2009).

  11. X-ray lines and self-interacting dark matter.

    PubMed

    Mambrini, Yann; Toma, Takashi

    We study the correlation between a monochromatic signal from annihilating dark matter and its self-interacting cross section. We apply our argument to a complex scalar dark sector, where the pseudo-scalar plays the role of a warm dark matter candidate while the scalar mediates its interaction with the Standard Model. We combine the recent observation of the cluster Abell 3827 for self-interacting dark matter and the constraints on the annihilation cross section for monochromatic X-ray lines. We also confront our model to a set of recent experimental analyses and find that such an extension can naturally produce a monochromatic keV signal corresponding to recent observations of Perseus or Andromeda, while in the meantime it predicts a self-interacting cross section of the order of [Formula: see text], as recently claimed in the observation of the cluster Abell 3827. We also propose a way to distinguish such models by future direct detection techniques.

  12. Ultrafast structural dynamics studied by kilohertz time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xin; Jiang, Zhou-Ya; Chen, Long; Chen, Li-Ming; Xin, Jian-Guo; Peter, M. Rentzepis; Chen, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Ultrashort multi-keV x-ray pulses are generated by electron plasma produced by the irradiation of femtosecond pulses on metals. These sub-picosecond x-ray pulses have extended the field of x-ray spectroscopy into the femtosecond time domain. However, pulse-to-pulse instability and long data acquisition time restrict the application of ultrashort x-ray systems operating at low repetition rates. Here we report on the performance of a femtosecond laser plasma-induced hard x-ray source that operates at 1-kHz repetition rate, and provides a flux of 2.0 × 1010 photons/s of Cu Kα radiation. Using this system for time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments, we record in real time, the transient processes and structural changes induced by the interaction of 400-nm femtosecond pulse with the surface of a 200-nm thick Au (111) single crystal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61222509 and 11421064) and the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  13. Weak hard X-ray emission from broad absorption line quasars: evidence for intrinsic X-ray weakness

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Scott, A. E.; Alexander, D. M.; Gandhi, P.; Stern, D.; Teng, S. H.; Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Farrah, D.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Koss, M.; Ogle, P.; Puccetti, S.; Saez, C.; and others

    2014-10-10

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z < 1.3. However, their rest-frame ≈2 keV luminosities are 14 to >330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with ≲ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three are not detected. The hard X-ray (8-24 keV) weakness observed by NuSTAR requires Compton-thick absorption if these objects have nominal underlying X-ray emission. However, a soft stacked effective photon index (Γ{sub eff} ≈ 1.8) for this sample disfavors Compton-thick absorption in general. The uniform hard X-ray weakness observed by NuSTAR for this and the pilot samples selected with <10 keV weakness also suggests that the X-ray weakness is intrinsic in at least some of the targets. We conclude that the NuSTAR observations have likely discovered a significant population (≳ 33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

  14. X-ray bumps, iron K-alpha lines, and X-ray suppression by obscuring tori in Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.; Madau, Piero; Zycki, Piotr T.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the X-ray spectral properties of unobscured type 1 and obscured type 2 Seyferts as predicted by the unified Seyfert scheme. We consider the reprocessing of X-ray photons by photoelectric absorption, iron fluorescence, and Compton downscattering in the obscuring tori surrounding these active nuclei, and compute by Monte Carlo methods the reprocessed spectra as a function of the viewing angle. Depending on the optical depth and shape of the torus, and on the viewing angle, the X-ray flux can be suppressed by substantial factors when our line of sight is obscured. We show that an immediate consequence of the existence of an obscuring thick torus is the production in the spectra of type 1 Seyfert galaxies of a bump in the continuum above 10-20 keV and an Fe K-alpha line with significant equivalent width. In those type 2 Seyferts for which the hard X-ray spectrum has been substantially suppressed, the equivalent width of the Fe K-alpha line in the transmitted spectrum can be very large.

  15. Nondestructive X-ray diffraction measurement of warpage in silicon dies embedded in integrated circuit packages1

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, B. K.; Danilewsky, A. N.; Vijayaraghavan, R. K.; Cowley, A.; McNally, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Transmission X-ray diffraction imaging in both monochromatic and white beam section mode has been used to measure quantitatively the displacement and warpage stress in encapsulated silicon devices. The displacement dependence with position on the die was found to agree well with that predicted from a simple model of warpage stress. For uQFN microcontrollers, glued only at the corners, the measured misorientation contours are consistent with those predicted using finite element analysis. The absolute displacement, measured along a line through the die centre, was comparable to that reported independently by high-resolution X-ray diffraction and optical interferometry of similar samples. It is demonstrated that the precision is greater than the spread of values found in randomly selected batches of commercial devices, making the techniques viable for industrial inspection purposes. PMID:28381979

  16. A wide-beam X-ray source suitable for diffraction enhanced imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang H.; Bourham, Mohamed A.; Michael Doster, J.

    2006-10-01

    Research in diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI), using a synchrotron source with an X-ray flux of 1.4×10 12 ph/mm 2/s, has shown strong potential in obtaining high-resolution images as compared to conventional radiographs. This research investigates the feasibility of developing a large area circular X-ray source with fluxes comparable to a synchrotron source. The source should be capable of integration into a compact system with peak powers not to exceed 200 kW to be feasible for use in a major medical facility, industrial complex or screening facility (such as cargo or airport). A computational study of a circular concentric filament wide-beam area X-ray source has been investigated in this research. The design features are based on generating electrons from three concentric circular filaments to provide an area electron flux, with a 60 kV accelerating potential and a beam current of up to 3 A. The X-ray target is a grounded stationary oxygen-free copper target with a layer of molybdenum. This target feature differs from standard rotating X-ray targets in conventional X-ray systems. Studies of electron trajectories and their distribution on the target were conducted using the SIMION 3D code. Heat loading and thermal management were studied using heat transfer modules from the coupled FEMLAB multi-physics and MATLAB codes. The Monte Carlo code MCNP 5 was used to obtain the X-ray flux and energy distribution for aluminum and beryllium windows. This computational study shows that this target configuration generates X-rays with photon flux comparable to synchrotron source and sufficient for DEI applications. The maximum target temperature rise is 1357 K after 70 s when cooling the back of the target to liquid nitrogen temperature using cold finger contact, and 325 K for an invaded target, in which liquid nitrogen circulates inside the target.

  17. Development of an x-ray diffraction camera used in magnetic fields up to 10 T.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Yoshifuru; Koyama, Keiichi; Takahashi, Kohki; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2011-12-01

    A high-field x-ray diffraction (HF-XRD) camera was developed to observe structural changes of magnetic materials in magnetic fields up to 10 T. The instrument mainly consists of a Debye-Scherrer-type camera with a diameter of 80.1 mm, a 10-T cryocooled superconducting magnet with a 100-mm room-temperature bore, an x-ray source, a power supply, and a chiller for the x-ray source. An x-ray detector (image plate) in the HF-XRD camera can be taken out and inserted into the magnet without changing the sample position. The performance of the instrument was tested by measuring the HF-XRD for silicon and ferromagnetic MnBi powders. A change of x-ray diffraction pattern was observed due to the magnetic orientation of MnBi, showing that the instrument is useful for studying field-induced orientation processes and structural properties of field-controlled materials.

  18. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction characterization of healthy and fluorotic human dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaço, M. V.; Barroso, R. C.; Porto, I. M.; Gerlach, R. F.; Costa, F. N.; Braz, D.; Droppa, R.; de Sousa, F. B.

    2012-10-01

    With the introduction of fluoride as the main anticaries agent used in preventive dentistry, and perhaps an increase in fluoride in our food chain, dental fluorosis has become an increasing world-wide problem. Visible signs of fluorosis begin to become obvious on the enamel surface as opacities, implying some porosity in the tissue. The mechanisms that conduct the formation of fluorotic enamel are unknown, but should involve modifications in the basic physical-chemistry reactions of demineralization and remineralisation of the enamel of the teeth, which is the same reaction of formation of the enamel's hydroxyapatite (HAp) in the maturation phase. The increase of the amount of fluoride inside of the apatite will result in gradual increase of the lattice parameters. The aim of this work is to characterize the healthy and fluorotic enamel in human tooth using Synchrotron X-ray diffraction. All the scattering profile measurements were carried out at the X-ray diffraction beamline (XRD1) at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory—LNLS, Campinas, Brazil. X-ray diffraction experiments were performed both in powder samples and polished surfaces. The powder samples were analyzed to obtain the characterization of a typical healthy enamel pattern. The polished surfaces were analyzed in specific areas that have been identified as fluorotic ones. X-ray diffraction data were obtained for all samples and these data were compared with the control samples and also with the literature data.

  19. Synchrotron X-ray Powder Diffraction Studies in Pulsed Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detlefs, C.; Frings, P.; Vanacken, J.; Duc, F.; Lorenzo, J. E.; Nardone, M.; Billette, J.; Zitouni, A.; Bras, W.; Rikken, G. L. J. A.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction experiments under pulsed magnetic fields were carried out at the DUBBLE beamline (BM26B) at the ESRF. A mobile generator delivered 110kJ to the magnet coil, which was sufficient to generate peak fields of 30T. A liquid He flow cryostat allowed us to vary the sample temperature accurately between 8K and 300K.

  20. Mineralogy by X-ray Diffraction on Mars: The Chemin Instrument on Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Bristow, T. F.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Blake, D. F.; Morris, R. V.; Rampe, E. B.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Achilles, C. N.; Downs, R. T.; Farmer, J. D.; Crisp, J. A.; Morookian, J. M.; Des Marais, D. J.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Sarrazin, P.; Yen, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain detailed mineralogy information, the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity carries CheMin, the first X-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument used on a planet other than Earth. CheMin has provided the first in situ XRD analyses of full phase assemblages on another planet.

  1. Characterization of calcium crystals in Abelia using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Localization, chemical composition, and morphology of calcium crystals in leaves and stems of Abelia mosanensis and A. ×grandiflora were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM) equipped with an X-ray diffraction system, low temperature SEM (LT-SEM) and a transmission ...

  2. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  3. Structural investigation of porcine stomach mucin by X-ray fiber diffraction and homology modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Veluraja, K.; Vennila, K.N.; Umamakeshvari, K.; Jasmine, A.; Velmurugan, D.

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Techniques to get oriented mucin fibre. {yields} X-ray fibre diffraction pattern for mucin. {yields} Molecular modeling of mucin based on X-ray fibre diffraction pattern. -- Abstract: The basic understanding of the three dimensional structure of mucin is essential to understand its physiological function. Technology has been developed to achieve orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules. X-ray fiber diffraction of partially orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules show d-spacing signals at 2.99, 4.06, 4.22, 4.7, 5.37 and 6.5 A. The high intense d-spacing signal at 4.22 A is attributed to the antiparallel {beta}-sheet structure identified in the fraction of the homology modeled mucin molecule (amino acid residues 800-980) using Nidogen-Laminin complex structure as a template. The X-ray fiber diffraction signal at 6.5 A reveals partial organization of oligosaccharides in porcine stomach mucin. This partial structure of mucin will be helpful in establishing a three dimensional structure for the whole mucin molecule.

  4. An Inquiry Based Exercise Using X-ray Diffraction Data to Incite Student Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogow, D. L.; McDonald, W.; Bresler, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    An inquiry based learning exercise was designed for an upper division advanced inorganic laboratory course that meets one of the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California, Santa Cruz. The content goals of this exercise were evaluation of whether a given solid state structure was previously known by using powder X-ray diffraction data, and understanding how the diffraction pattern relates to the crystal structure of the compound in question. The scientific process goals included searching a database to match the patterns and preparing data for oral presentations. The goals of the exercise were addressed via an activity allowing students to utilize real X-ray powder diffraction data to search and match with known structures in a database (International Crystal Structure Database) and to give an oral presentation. After students found their structures in the database, they prepared oral presentations justifying their choice for the match and their reasoning through structural analysis of the X-ray data. Students learned about X-ray diffraction theory in an inquiry type environment and gained valuable experience and confidence in presenting their findings using strong reasoning and communication skills. Assessment was implemented during active facilitation throughout the activity and during the final oral presentations.

  5. Structural Order-Disorder Transformations Monitored by X-Ray Diffraction and Photoluminescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lima, R. C.; Paris, E. C.; Leite, E. R.; Espinosa, J. W. M.; Souza, A. G.; Longo, E.

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the structural order-disorder transformation promoted by controlled heat treatment using X-ray diffraction technique (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) techniques as tools to monitor the degree of structural order. The experiment was observed to be versatile and easily achieved with low cost which allowed producing…

  6. Growth of Strained Epitaxial Cu Films on Ru(0001) Monitored by Surface X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Baddord, A.P.; Gibbs, D.; Zajonz, H.; Zehner, D.M.

    1998-10-19

    The growth of Cu Layers deposited on Ru(0001) substrates at temperatures between 500 K and 850 K was studied using surface x-ray diffraction. Results are consistent with a Stransky-Krastanov growth mode with a two layer critical thickness.

  7. A-DNA and B-DNA: Comparing Their Historical X-Ray Fiber Diffraction Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Amand A.

    2008-01-01

    A-DNA and B-DNA are two secondary molecular conformations (among other allomorphs) that double-stranded DNA drawn into a fiber can assume, depending on the relative water content and other chemical parameters of the fiber. They were the first two forms to be observed by X-ray fiber diffraction in the early 1950s, respectively by Wilkins and…

  8. Nanosecond X-ray diffraction from biological samples with a laser-produced plasma source.

    PubMed

    Frankel, R D; Forsyth, J M

    1979-05-11

    By using 4.45-angstrom radiation generated by Cl+15 ions in a laser plasma and nanosecond exposures, low-angle x-ray diffraction patterns were obtained from dried rat spinal nerves and a powder of cholesterol. Three to four 400-picosecond, 45-joule pulses were required for the exposure. This new technique should have wide application in structural kinetic studies.

  9. Computer simulations of the X-ray diffraction patterns of imperfect Al/Nb superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, J. R.; Liebemann, E.; Simon, M.; Bucher, E.

    In order to obtain more structural details from X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of metallic multilayers we developed a simulation program for XRD patterns of Al/Nb multilayers. We followed the theory of an imperfect one-dimensional superlattice described by Z. Mitura and P. Mikolajczak. Computer simulated patterns are compared with experimentally obtained XRD spectra.

  10. Energy-tunable x-ray diffraction: A tool for depth profiling in polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotoyabko, E.; Quintana, J. P.

    2002-03-01

    We have developed a new variant of depth-sensitive x-ray diffraction technique to study structural parameters in inhomogeneous polycrystalline materials. In this method, diffraction patterns are measured at different x-ray energies which are varied by small steps, and then the depth-resolved structural characteristics are retrieved from the energy-dependent x-ray diffraction data. In the current articles, this approach is applied to extract preferred orientation with depth resolution. In the case of uniaxial preferred orientation, the analytical algorithm has been developed based on March functions. Application of this technique to seashells allowed us to characterize the microstructure evolution in the nacre layer. Near the inner surface, adjacent to the mollusk mantle, the nacre consists of well-defined lamellas which reveal a high degree of the (001)-preferred orientation. This preferred orientation deteriorates in depth due to the accumulation of cracks and other imperfections. The texture distribution is characterized quantitatively by depth-dependent March parameters, which allows us to compare samples taken from different shells. In a similar way, energy-variable x-ray diffraction can be used for nondestructive characterization of a very broad spectrum of laminated structures and composite materials and systems.

  11. Diffuse scattering from interface roughness in grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, S. A.; Kondrashkina, E. A.; Schmidbauer, M.; Köhler, R.; Pfeiffer, J.-U.; Jach, T.; Souvorov, A. Yu.

    1996-09-01

    A theory of x-ray diffuse scattering from interface roughness in grazing-incidence diffraction (GID) is presented. The theory assumes dynamical diffraction of x rays from perfect multilayers with the diffuse scattering from roughness calculated in the distorted-wave Born approximation. This permits the calculation of scattering due to roughness at all points on the diffraction curves, including the vicinity of the Bragg peaks. It is shown that the measurements of diffuse scattering in GID can provide information on atomic ordering at crystal interfaces which is not accessible by usual x-ray specular reflection and nonspecular x-ray scattering. The theory is found to be in good agreement to the two GID experiments carried out with an etched Ge surface and an AlAs/GaAs superlattice at the Cornell High-Energy Synchrotron Source and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, respectively. In the case of the etched Ge surface, an anti-Yoneda dip in the diffuse scattering pattern at the Bragg peak and two symmetrical shoulders on the Bragg curve wings have been found and explained. In the case of the AlAs/GaAs superlattice, the diffuse scattering has been separated from GID by means of high-resolution measurements. A comparison between diffuse scattering in GID and diffuse scattering in grazing incidence far from the diffraction conditions has shown that the atomic ordering was preserved in the interface roughness, while it was partially destroyed in the surface roughness.

  12. X-Ray Diffraction Study of L2005 AG17 (IDPs) by Using SR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsumi, K. O.; Hagiya, K. H.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2002-01-01

    X-ray diffraction study revealed the existence of magnetite and new type of pyrrhotite with the chemical formula of Fe0.56S in L2005 AG17. Considering the total chemical formula of Fe0.83S, residual iron in amorphous state might exist in this sample. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Simultaneous, single-pulse, synchrotron x-ray imaging and diffraction under gas gun loading

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, D.; Huang, J. W.; Zeng, X. L.; Li, Y.; E, J. C.; Huang, J. Y.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Wang, Z.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-05-23

    We develop a mini gas gun system for simultaneous, single-pulse, x-ray diffraction and imaging under high strain-rate loading at the beamline 32-ID of the Advanced Photon Source. In order to increase the reciprocal space covered by a small-area detector, a conventional target chamber is split into two chambers: a narrowed measurement chamber and a relief chamber. The gas gun impact is synchronized with synchrotron x-ray pulses and high-speed cameras. Depending on a camera’s capability, multiframe imaging and diffraction can be achieved. The proof-of-principle experiments are performed on single-crystal sapphire. The diffraction spots and images during impact are analyzed to quantify lattice deformation and fracture; diffraction peak broadening is largely caused by fracture-induced strain inhomogeneity. Finally, our results demonstrate the potential of such multiscale measurements for revealing and understanding high strain-rate phenomena at dynamic extremes.

  14. Observation of parametric X-ray radiation in an anomalous diffraction region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeyev, V. I.; Eliseyev, A. N.; Irribarra, E.; Kishin, I. A.; Kubankin, A. S.; Nazhmudinov, R. M.

    2016-08-01

    A new possibility to expand the energy region of diffraction processes based on the interaction of relativistic charged particles with crystalline structures is presented. Diffracted photons related to parametric X-ray radiation produced by relativistic electrons are detected below the low energy threshold for the X-ray diffraction mechanism in crystalline structures for the first time. The measurements were performed during the interaction of 7 MeV electrons with a textured polycrystalline tungsten foil and a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystal. The experiment results are in good agreement with a developed model based on the PXR kinematical theory. The developed experimental approach can be applied to separate the contributions of real and virtual photons to the total diffracted radiation generated during the interaction of relativistic charged particles with crystalline targets.

  15. Observation of sagittal X-ray diffraction by surface acoustic waves in Bragg geometry.

    PubMed

    Vadilonga, Simone; Zizak, Ivo; Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Evgenii, Emelin; Petsiuk, Andrei; Leitenberger, Wolfram; Erko, Alexei

    2017-04-01

    X-ray Bragg diffraction in sagittal geometry on a Y-cut langasite crystal (La3Ga5SiO14) modulated by Λ = 3 µm Rayleigh surface acoustic waves was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation facility. Owing to the crystal lattice modulation by the surface acoustic wave diffraction, satellites appear. Their intensity and angular separation depend on the amplitude and wavelength of the ultrasonic superlattice. Experimental results are compared with the corresponding theoretical model that exploits the kinematical diffraction theory. This experiment shows that the propagation of the surface acoustic waves creates a dynamical diffraction grating on the crystal surface, and this can be used for space-time modulation of an X-ray beam.

  16. Observation of sagittal X-ray diffraction by surface acoustic waves in Bragg geometry1

    PubMed Central

    Vadilonga, Simone; Zizak, Ivo; Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Evgenii, Emelin; Petsiuk, Andrei; Leitenberger, Wolfram; Erko, Alexei

    2017-01-01

    X-ray Bragg diffraction in sagittal geometry on a Y-cut langasite crystal (La3Ga5SiO14) modulated by Λ = 3 µm Rayleigh surface acoustic waves was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation facility. Owing to the crystal lattice modulation by the surface acoustic wave diffraction, satellites appear. Their intensity and angular separation depend on the amplitude and wavelength of the ultrasonic superlattice. Experimental results are compared with the corresponding theoretical model that exploits the kinematical diffraction theory. This experiment shows that the propagation of the surface acoustic waves creates a dynamical diffraction grating on the crystal surface, and this can be used for space–time modulation of an X-ray beam. PMID:28381976

  17. Femtosecond powder diffraction with a laser-driven hard X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Zamponi, F; Ansari, Z; Woerner, M; Elsaesser, T

    2010-01-18

    X-ray powder diffraction with a femtosecond time resolution is introduced to map ultrafast structural dynamics of polycrystalline condensed matter. Our pump-probe approach is based on photoexcitation of a powder sample with a femtosecond optical pulse and probing changes of its structure by diffracting a hard X-ray pulse generated in a laser-driven plasma source. We discuss the key aspects of this scheme including an analysis of detection sensitivity and angular resolution. Applying this technique to the prototype molecular material ammonium sulfate, up to 20 powder diffraction rings are recorded simultaneously with a time resolution of 100 fs. We describe how to derive transient charge density maps of the material from the extensive set of diffraction data in a quantitative way.

  18. Investigation of Renal Stones by X-ray and Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Baeva, M.; Boianova, A.; Beskrovnyi, A. I.; Shelkova, I.

    2007-04-23

    Renal stones were investigated by X-ray diffraction. The obtained results showed only one crystal phase in every sample. With the aim to verify eventual availability of second phase (under 3 volume %) the same renal stones were investigated by neutron diffraction. The neutron spectra proved that additional crystal phase was absent in the renal stones. The obtained results are scientific-practical, in aid of the medicine, especially in the case of renal stone disease.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of dihydrodipicolinate synthase 2 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michael D. W.; Billakanti, Jagan M.; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Pearce, F. Grant

    2011-01-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS; EC 4.2.1.52) catalyzes the first committed step of the lysine-biosynthetic pathway in plants and bacteria. Since (S)-lysine biosynthesis does not occur in animals, DHDPS is an attractive target for rational antibiotic and herbicide design. Here, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of DHDPS2 from Arabidopsis thaliana are reported. Diffraction-quality protein crystals belonged to space group P21212. PMID:22102238

  20. X-ray diffraction and X-ray K-absorption near edge studies of Copper (II) Micro cyclic Carbamide complexes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malviya, P. K.; Sharma, P.; Mishra, A.; Bhalse, D.

    2016-10-01

    Synthesis of metal complexes [Cu (Carbamide)] (X = Br, Cl, NO3, SO4,CH3COO) by the chemical root method. The XRD data have been recorded at DAE, IUC Indore.XANES spectra have been recorded at the K-edge of Cu using the dispersive beam line at 2.5GeV Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source RRCAT (Raja Ramanna Center for Advance Technology), Indore, India. XRD and XANES data have been analysed using the computer software Origin 8.0 professional and Athena. X-ray diffraction studies of all the complexes are indicative of their crystalline nature. The crystalline size of the samples is estimated using the Scherer's formula. The values of the chemical shifts suggest that copper is in oxidation state +2 in all of the complexes.

  1. Quantitative x-ray diffraction phase analysis of coarse airborne particulate collected by cascade impactor sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteve, V.; Rius, J.; Ochando, L. E.; Amigó, J. M.

    Mineralogical composition of Castellon (Spanish Mediterranean coast) atmospheric aerosol was studied by X-ray diffraction by sampling with a cascade impactor without filters. Quantitative phase analysis of natural phases present in the atmospheric coarse aerosol was performed using a modified version of the computer program MENGE, that uses the standardless X-ray method developed by Rius for the quantitative analysis of multiphase mixtures, adapted for PC running. Presence of quartz, calcite and gypsum was identified in the atmospheric aerosol and we have quantified their amounts using the standardless method.

  2. Linear dimerized Se chains in cancrinite nanochannels: X-ray diffraction and photoelectron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poborchii, V. V.; Sato, M.; Shchukarev, A. V.

    1997-09-01

    Cancrinite crystals containing adsorbed selenium in 1-dimensional nanochannels (Can-Se) have been examined by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and polarized infrared spectroscopy. It is found that adsorbed selenium forms Se 22- anions substituting OH - groups inside channels. Se 22- dimers are located in the center of the cancrinite channel and oriented along the channel. They interact with Na + cations located in the channels and with each other giving rise to a linear chain incommensurate to the cancrinite matrix. The arrangement of the dimers in the chain has been found to be dependent on the temperature.

  3. High-resolution X-ray diffraction in crystalline structures with quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punegov, V. I.

    2015-05-01

    We review the current status of nondestructive high-resolution X-ray diffractometry research on semiconductor structures with quantum dots (QDs). The formalism of the statistical theory of diffraction is used to consider the coherent and diffuse X-ray scattering in crystalline systems with nanoinclusions. Effects of the shape, elastic strain, and lateral and vertical QD correlation on the diffuse scattering angular distribution near the reciprocal lattice nodes are considered. Using short-period and multicomponent superlattices as an example, we demonstrate the efficiency of data-assisted simulations in the quantitative analysis of nanostructured materials.

  4. X-ray powder diffraction study of poly/carbon monofluoride/, CF/1.12/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, V. K.; Badachhape, R. B.; Margrave, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Data from X-ray diffraction studies of the poly(carbon monofluoride) with empirical formula CF(1.09-1.15) are reported, and possible intercalation arrangements for the substance are discussed. The data do not conform to true hexagonal symmetry, indicating that the carbon atoms are not coplanar. Each bond angle of carbon is 118.8 deg, and the carbon-carbon distance is 1.47 A. The interlayer distance is 5.76 A. A total absence of (hkl) reflections in the X-ray pattern shows that the separate CF layers are not regularly arranged with respect to one another.

  5. High-pressure structural studies of dysprosium using angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yongrong; Kumar, Ravhi S.; Cornelius, Andrew L.; Nicol, Malcolm F.

    2007-02-01

    We present structural results under pressure for elemental dysprosium (Dy) up to 87 GPa using in situ angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements with synchrotron x rays and a diamond-anvil cell. Dy exhibits the structural transition sequence, hP2{yields}hR9{yields}hP4{yields}distorted cF4, from Rietveld full-profile refinements. Clear evidence is documented for the high-pressure distorted cF4 phase observed above 45 GPa to be an orthorhombic oS8 (Cmmm) structure for Dy in the lanthanide phase diagram.

  6. High-pressure structural studies of dysprosium using angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yong Rong; Kumar, Ravhi S.; Cornelius, Andrew L.; Nicol, Malcolm F.

    2007-02-01

    We present structural results under pressure for elemental dysprosium (Dy) up to 87GPa using in situ angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements with synchrotron x rays and a diamond-anvil cell. Dy exhibits the structural transition sequence, hP2→hR9→hP4→distorted cF4, from Rietveld full-profile refinements. Clear evidence is documented for the high-pressure distorted cF4 phase observed above 45GPa to be an orthorhombic oS8 (Cmmm) structure for Dy in the lanthanide phase diagram.

  7. Specific features of two diffraction schemes for a widely divergent X-ray beam

    SciTech Connect

    Avetyan, K. T.; Levonyan, L. V.; Semerjian, H. S.; Arakelyan, M. M. Badalyan, O. M.

    2015-03-15

    We investigated the specific features of two diffraction schemes for a widely divergent X-ray beam that use a circular diaphragm 30–50 μm in diameter as a point source of characteristic radiation. In one of the schemes, the diaphragm was set in front of the crystal (the diaphragm-crystal (d-c) scheme); in the other, it was installed behind the crystal (the crystal-diaphragm (c-d) scheme). It was established that the diffraction image in the c-d scheme is a topographic map of the investigated crystal area. In the d-c scheme at L = 2l (l and L are the distances between the crystal and the diaphragm and between the photographic plate and the diaphragm, respectively), the branches of hyperbolas formed in this family of planes (hkl) by the characteristic K{sub α} and K{sub β} radiations, including higher order reflections, converge into one straight line. It is experimentally demonstrated that this convergence is very sensitive to structural inhomogeneities in the crystal under study.

  8. Explosion dynamics of sucrose nanospheres monitored by time of flight spectrometry and coherent diffractive imaging at the split-and-delay beam line of the FLASH soft X-ray laser.

    PubMed

    Rath, Asawari D; Timneanu, Nicusor; Maia, Filipe R N C; Bielecki, Johan; Fleckenstein, Holger; Iwan, Bianca; Svenda, Martin; Hasse, Dirk; Carlsson, Gunilla; Westphal, Daniel; Mühlig, Kerstin; Hantke, Max; Ekeberg, Tomas; Seibert, M Marvin; Zani, Alessandro; Liang, Mengning; Stellato, Francesco; Kirian, Richard; Bean, Richard; Barty, Anton; Galli, Lorenzo; Nass, Karol; Barthelmess, Miriam; Aquila, Andrew; Toleikis, Sven; Treusch, Rolf; Roling, Sebastian; Wöstmann, Michael; Zacharias, Helmut; Chapman, Henry N; Bajt, Saša; DePonte, Daniel; Hajdu, Janos; Andreasson, Jakob

    2014-11-17

    We use a Mach-Zehnder type autocorrelator to split and delay XUV pulses from the FLASH soft X-ray laser for triggering and subsequently probing the explosion of aerosolised sugar balls. FLASH was running at 182 eV photon energy with pulses of 70 fs duration. The delay between the pump-probe pulses was varied between zero and 5 ps, and the pulses were focused to reach peak intensities above 10¹⁶W/cm² with an off-axis parabola. The direct pulse triggered the explosion of single aerosolised sucrose nano-particles, while the delayed pulse probed the exploding structure. The ejected ions were measured by ion time of flight spectrometry, and the particle sizes were measured by coherent diffractive imaging. The results show that sucrose particles of 560-1000 nm diameter retain their size for about 500 fs following the first exposure. Significant sample expansion happens between 500 fs and 1 ps. We present simulations to support these observations.

  9. The energy calibration of x-ray absorption spectra using multiple-beam diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hagelstein, M.; Cunis, S. ); Frahm, R. ); Rabe, P. )

    1992-01-01

    A new method for calibrating the energy scale of x-ray absorption spectra from an energy dispersive spectrometer has been developed. Distinct features in the diffracted intensity of the curved silicon crystal monochromator have been assigned to multiple-beam diffraction. The photon energies of these structures can be calculated if the precise spacing of the diffracting planes and the orientation of the crystal relative to the incident synchrotron radiation are known. The evaluation of Miller indices of operative reflections and the calculation of the corresponding photon energy is presented. The assignment of operative reflexes is simplified if the monochromator crystal can be rotated around the main diffracting vector {bold H}.

  10. A novel setup for time-resolved X-ray diffraction on gas gun experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchini, Frédéric; Chauvin, Camille; Loyen, Arnaud; Combes, Philippe; Petit, Jacques; Bland, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphic phase transitions in metals have been investigated for a long time under dynamic loadings through usual dynamic compression diagnostics such as velocity and temperature measurements. Such measurements were valuable for revealing the key role of kinetic effects in most phase transition mechanisms. However, the information extracted was mostly macroscopic. Obtaining direct insight about the crystallographic structure under dynamic loadings is critical for understanding mechanisms governing shock-induced structural changes. For example, in order to evidence a mixture phase or to determine the time scale of a transition, structural information may be extremely valuable. Over the last 20 years a significant number of X-ray diffraction experiments were carried under dynamic loading, either using laboratory X-ray sources or synchrotron radiation. We are developing a novel experimental setup based on a compact High Pulsed Power generator capable of producing intense X radiation through an X-pinch X-ray source. This source is specifically designed for time-resolved X-ray diffraction in Bragg geometry on gas gun experiments. Promising preliminary diffraction data obtained under static conditions are presented.

  11. Thermal transport in thin films measured by time-resolved, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Walko, D. A.; Sheu, Y.-M.; Trigo, M.; Reis, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    We use depth- and time-resolved x-ray diffraction to study thermal transport across single crystal Bi films grown on sapphire in order to determine the thermal conductivity of the film and the Kapitza conductance of the interface. Ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser pulses were used to heat the films; x-ray diffraction then measured the film's lattice expansion. Use of grazing incidence diffraction geometry provided depth sensitivity, as the x-ray angle of incidence was varied near the critical angle. The shift of the film's Bragg peak position with time was used to determine the film temperature averaged over an x-ray penetration depth that could be selected by choice of the angle of incidence. For films that were thick compared to the laser penetration depth, we observed a large temperature gradient at early times. In this case, measurements with the incident angle near or well above the critical angle were more sensitive to the film conductivity or Kapitza conductance, respectively. For thinner films, however, cooling was dominated by the Kapitza conductance at all accessible time scales.

  12. Protein crystallography: From X-ray diffraction spots to a three dimensional image

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, T.C.; Berendzen, J.

    1998-02-25

    Proteins are remarkable molecular machines that are essential for life. They can do many things ranging from the precise control of blood clotting to synthesizing complex organic compounds. Pictures of protein molecules are in high demand in biotechnology because they are important for applications such as drug discovery and for engineering enzymes for commercial use. X-ray crystallography is the most common method for determining the three-dimensional structures of protein molecules. When a crystal of a protein is placed in an X-ray beam, scattering of X-rays off the ordered molecules produces a diffraction pattern that can be measured on a position-sensitive CCD or image-plate detector. Protein crystals typically contain thousands of atoms and the diffraction data are generally measured to relatively low resolution. Consequently the direct methods approaches generally cannot be applied. Instead, if the crystal is modified by adding metal atoms at specific sites or by tuning the wavelength of the X-rays to cross an absorption edge of a metal atom in the crystal, then the information from these additional measurements is sufficient to first identify the /locations of the metal atoms. This information is then used along with the diffraction data to make a three-dimensional picture of electron densities. This picture can be used to determine the position of most or all of the atoms in the protein.

  13. A laboratory based system for Laue micro x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Light Source; Tamura, Nobumichi; Lynch, P.A.; Stevenson, A.W.; Liang, D.; Parry, D.; Wilkins, S.; Tamura, N.

    2007-02-28

    A laboratory diffraction system capable of illuminating individual grains in a polycrystalline matrix is described. Using a microfocus x-ray source equipped with a tungsten anode and prefigured monocapillary optic, a micro-x-ray diffraction system with a 10 mum beam was developed. The beam profile generated by the ellipsoidal capillary was determined using the"knife edge" approach. Measurement of the capillary performance, indicated a beam divergence of 14 mrad and a useable energy bandpass from 5.5 to 19 keV. Utilizing the polychromatic nature of the incident x-ray beam and application of the Laue indexing software package X-Ray Micro-Diffraction Analysis Software, the orientation and deviatoric strain of single grains in a polycrystalline material can be studied. To highlight the system potential the grain orientation and strain distribution of individual grains in a polycrystalline magnesium alloy (Mg 0.2 wt percent Nd) was mapped before and after tensile loading. A basal (0002) orientation was identified in the as-rolled annealed alloy; after tensile loading some grains were observed to undergo an orientation change of 30 degrees with respect to (0002). The applied uniaxial load was measured as an increase in the deviatoric tensile strain parallel to the load axis (37 References).

  14. Vibrational spectra, powder X-ray diffractions and physical properties of cyanide complexes with 1-ethylimidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla; Kiraz, Fulya Çetinkaya; Sayın, Elvan

    2015-10-01

    The heteronuclear tetracyanonickelate(II) complexes of the type [M(etim)Ni(CN)4]n (hereafter, abbreviated as M-Ni-etim, M = Mn(II), Fe(II) or Co(II); etim = 1-ethylimidazole, C5H8N2) were prepared in powder form and characterized by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermal (TG; DTG and DTA), and elemental analysis techniques. The structures of these complexes were elucidated using vibrational spectra and powder X-ray diffraction patterns with the peak assignment to provide a better understanding of the structures. It is shown that the spectra are consistent with a proposed crystal structure for these compounds derived from powder X-ray diffraction measurements. Vibrational spectra of the complexes were presented and discussed with respect to the internal modes of both the etim and the cyanide ligands. The C, H and N analyses were carried out for all the complexes. Thermal behaviors of these complexes were followed using TG, DTG and DTA curves in the temperature range 30-700 °C in the static air atmosphere. The FT-IR, Raman spectra, thermal and powder X-ray analyses revealed no significant differences between the single crystal and powder forms. Additionally, electrical and magnetic properties of the complexes were investigated. The FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, PXRD, thermal and elemental analyses results propose that these complexes are similar in structure to the Hofmann-type complexes.

  15. Vibrational spectra, powder X-ray diffractions and physical properties of cyanide complexes with 1-ethylimidazole.

    PubMed

    Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla; Kiraz, Fulya Çetinkaya; Sayın, Elvan

    2015-10-05

    The heteronuclear tetracyanonickelate(II) complexes of the type [M(etim)Ni(CN)4]n (hereafter, abbreviated as M-Ni-etim, M=Mn(II), Fe(II) or Co(II); etim=1-ethylimidazole, C5H8N2) were prepared in powder form and characterized by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermal (TG; DTG and DTA), and elemental analysis techniques. The structures of these complexes were elucidated using vibrational spectra and powder X-ray diffraction patterns with the peak assignment to provide a better understanding of the structures. It is shown that the spectra are consistent with a proposed crystal structure for these compounds derived from powder X-ray diffraction measurements. Vibrational spectra of the complexes were presented and discussed with respect to the internal modes of both the etim and the cyanide ligands. The C, H and N analyses were carried out for all the complexes. Thermal behaviors of these complexes were followed using TG, DTG and DTA curves in the temperature range 30-700 °C in the static air atmosphere. The FT-IR, Raman spectra, thermal and powder X-ray analyses revealed no significant differences between the single crystal and powder forms. Additionally, electrical and magnetic properties of the complexes were investigated. The FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, PXRD, thermal and elemental analyses results propose that these complexes are similar in structure to the Hofmann-type complexes.

  16. Ultra-high aspect ratio high-resolution nanofabrication for hard X-ray diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chieh; Sakdinawat, Anne

    2014-06-27

    Although diffractive optics have played a major role in nanoscale soft X-ray imaging, high-resolution and high-efficiency diffractive optics have largely been unavailable for hard X-rays where many scientific, technological and biomedical applications exist. This is owing to the long-standing challenge of fabricating ultra-high aspect ratio high-resolution dense nanostructures. Here we report significant progress in ultra-high aspect ratio nanofabrication of high-resolution, dense silicon nanostructures using vertical directionality controlled metal-assisted chemical etching. The resulting structures have very smooth sidewalls and can be used to pattern arbitrary features, not limited to linear or circular. We focus on the application of X-ray zone plate fabrication for high-efficiency, high-resolution diffractive optics, and demonstrate the process with linear, circular, and spiral zone plates. X-ray measurements demonstrate high efficiency in the critical outer layers. This method has broad applications including patterning for thermoelectric materials, battery anodes and sensors among others.

  17. Energy-windowed, pixellated X-ray diffraction using the Pixirad CdTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flynn, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Minuti, M.; Brez, A.; Pinchera, M.; Spandre, G.; Moss, R.; Speller, R. D.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a powerful tool for material identification. In order to interpret XRD data, knowledge is required of the scattering angles and energies of X-rays which interact with the sample. By using a pixellated, energy-resolving detector, this knowledge can be gained when using a spectrum of unfiltered X-rays, and without the need to collimate the scattered radiation. Here we present results of XRD measurements taken with the Pixirad detector and a laboratory-based X-ray source. The cadmium telluride sensor allows energy windows to be selected, and the 62 μm pixel pitch enables accurate spatial information to be preserved for XRD measurements, in addition to the ability to take high resolution radiographic images. Diffraction data are presented for a variety of samples to demonstrate the capability of the technique for materials discrimination in laboratory, security and pharmaceutical environments. Distinct diffraction patterns were obtained, from which details on the molecular structures of the items under study were determined.

  18. Cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Emamzadah, Soheila; Petty, Tom J; De Almeida, Victor; Nishimura, Taisuke; Joly, Jacques; Ferrer, Jean Luc; Halazonetis, Thanos D

    2009-09-01

    Microfluidics is a promising technology for the rapid identification of protein crystallization conditions. However, most of the existing systems utilize silicone elastomers as the chip material which, despite its many benefits, is highly permeable to water vapour. This limits the time available for protein crystallization to less than a week. Here, the use of a cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction is described. Liquid handling in this system is performed in 2 mm thin transparent cards which contain 500 chambers, each with a volume of 320 nl. Microbatch, vapour-diffusion and free-interface diffusion protocols for protein crystallization were implemented and crystals were obtained of a number of proteins, including chicken lysozyme, bovine trypsin, a human p53 protein containing both the DNA-binding and oligomerization domains bound to DNA and a functionally important domain of Arabidopsis Morpheus' molecule 1 (MOM1). The latter two polypeptides have not been crystallized previously. For X-ray diffraction analysis, either the cards were opened to allow mounting of the crystals on loops or the crystals were exposed to X-rays in situ. For lysozyme, an entire X-ray diffraction data set at 1.5 A resolution was collected without removing the crystal from the card. Thus, cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics systems have the potential to further automate protein crystallization and structural genomics efforts.

  19. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature using an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Botha, Sabine; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R. Bruce; Gati, Cornelius; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Jogl, Gerwald; Dahlberg, Albert E.; Gregory, Steven T.; Bogan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution ribosome structures determined by X-ray crystallography have provided important insights into the mechanism of translation. Such studies have thus far relied on large ribosome crystals kept at cryogenic temperatures to reduce radiation damage. Here, the application of serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain diffraction data from ribosome microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature is described. 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals diffracted to beyond 6 Å resolution, demonstrating the feasibility of using SFX for ribosome structural studies. The ability to collect diffraction data at near-physiological temperatures promises to provide fundamental insights into the structural dynamics of the ribosome and its functional complexes. PMID:23989164

  20. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature using an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G; Laksmono, Hartawan; Shoeman, Robert L; Botha, Sabine; Barends, Thomas R M; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R Bruce; Gati, Cornelius; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Jogl, Gerwald; Dahlberg, Albert E; Gregory, Steven T; Bogan, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    High-resolution ribosome structures determined by X-ray crystallography have provided important insights into the mechanism of translation. Such studies have thus far relied on large ribosome crystals kept at cryogenic temperatures to reduce radiation damage. Here, the application of serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain diffraction data from ribosome microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature is described. 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals diffracted to beyond 6 Å resolution, demonstrating the feasibility of using SFX for ribosome structural studies. The ability to collect diffraction data at near-physiological temperatures promises to provide fundamental insights into the structural dynamics of the ribosome and its functional complexes.

  1. Coherent hard x-ray diffractive imaging of nonisolated objects confined by an aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sunam; Kim, Chan; Lee, Suyong; Marathe, Shashidhara; Noh, D. Y.; Kang, H. C.; Kim, S. S.; Sandy, A.; Narayanan, S.

    2010-04-15

    Coherent hard x-ray imaging of nonisolated weak phase objects is demonstrated by confining x-ray beam in a region of a few micrometers in cross section using a micrometer-sized aperture. Two major obstacles in the hard x-ray coherent diffraction imaging, isolating samples and obtaining central speckles, are addressed by using the aperture. The usefulness of the proposed method is illustrated by reconstructing the exit wave field of a nanoscale trench structure fabricated on silicon which serves as a weak phase object. The quantitative phase information of the exit wave field was used to reconstruct the depth profile of the trench structure. The scanning capability of this method was also briefly discussed.

  2. Investigation of a semiconductor superlattice by use of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, U.; Seifert, W.; Fornell, J.-O.; Rhan, H.; Metzger, H.; Rugel, S.; Peisl, J.

    1992-01-01

    A GaInAs/InP superlattice with 10 periods grown by a MOCVD technique on [001] InP was measured by X-ray diffraction under grazing incidence. The details of the GID technique are explained and the results on the superlattice real structure are interpreted in terms of a kinematical scattering approach. Because the depth probed by the X-rays is extremely reduced to a near-surface region both the thickness of the supercell (44 ± 1 monolayers) and of the (GaIn)As quantum wells (2 ± 1 monolayers) can be determined with monolayer accuracy. By successively increasing the penetration depth of the X-rays, the vertical density profile is probed in different regions below the sample surface. The measurements indicate that the thickness of the solid solution layer varies by about 1-2 monolayers laterally and in depth. The composition of the layers is different from that expected from the growth conditions.

  3. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W.; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2016-04-12

    Here, serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes.

  4. Simultaneous femtosecond X-ray spectroscopy and diffraction of photosystem II at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Gildea, Richard J; Echols, Nathaniel; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Koroidov, Sergey; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; Difiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M Marvin; Koglin, Jason E; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Zwart, Petrus H; White, William E; Glatzel, Pieter; Adams, Paul D; Bogan, Michael J; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Sauter, Nicholas K; Yachandra, Vittal K; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko

    2013-04-26

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses produced at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) were used for simultaneous x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of microcrystals of photosystem II (PS II) at room temperature. This method probes the overall protein structure and the electronic structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of PS II. XRD data are presented from both the dark state (S1) and the first illuminated state (S2) of PS II. Our simultaneous XRD-XES study shows that the PS II crystals are intact during our measurements at the LCLS, not only with respect to the structure of PS II, but also with regard to the electronic structure of the highly radiation-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster, opening new directions for future dynamics studies.

  5. X-ray Fraunhofer diffraction patterns from a thin-film waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Y.P.; Sinha, S.K.; Fullerton, E.E.; Gruebel, G.; Abernathy, D.; Siddons, D.P.; Hastings, J.B.

    1995-12-11

    We have observed the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of x-rays exiting from the end face of a SiO{sub 2}/polyimide/Si thin-film waveguide. The measured angular intensity distributions are in excellent agreement with those calculated based on the dimensions and the refractive index profile of the guide. Our measurement confirms that, at the end face of the guide, the wavefront of a single guided mode is fully coherent in the direction normal to the guiding plane. This focused and transversely coherent x-ray beam may be used as a source for coherence-based experiments, such as x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  6. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W.; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C.H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes. PMID:27070998

  7. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W.; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2016-04-01

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes.

  8. High-precision laser-assisted absolute determination of x-ray diffraction angles

    SciTech Connect

    Kubicek, K.; Braun, J.; Bruhns, H.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Mokler, P. H.; Ullrich, J.

    2012-01-15

    A novel technique for absolute wavelength determination in high-precision crystal x-ray spectroscopy recently introduced has been upgraded reaching unprecedented accuracies. The method combines visible laser beams with the Bond method, where Bragg angles ({theta} and -{theta}) are determined without any x-ray reference lines. Using flat crystals this technique makes absolute x-ray wavelength measurements feasible even at low x-ray fluxes. The upgraded spectrometer has been used in combination with first experiments on the 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1}{yields} 1s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} w-line in He-like argon. By resolving a minute curvature of the x-ray lines the accuracy reaches there the best ever reported value of 1.5 ppm. The result is sensitive to predicted second-order QED contributions at the level of two-electron screening and two-photon radiative diagrams and will allow for the first time to benchmark predicted binding energies for He-like ions at this level of precision.

  9. Studies of electron diffusion in photo-excited Ni using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, A. I. H.; Jarnac, A.; Wang, Xiaocui; Enquist, H.; Jurgilaitis, A.; Larsson, J.

    2016-11-01

    We show that the heat deposition profile in a laser-excited metal can be determined by time-resolved X-ray diffraction. In this study, we investigated the electron diffusion in a 150 nm thick nickel film deposited on an indium antimonide substrate. A strain wave that mimics the heat deposition profile is generated in the metal and propagates into the InSb, where it influences the temporal profile of X-rays diffracted from InSb. We found that the strain pulse significantly deviated from a simple exponential profile, and that the two-temperature model was needed to reproduce the measured heat deposition profile. Experimental results were compared to simulations based on the two-temperature model carried out using commercial finite-element software packages and on-line dynamical diffraction tools. To reproduce the experimental data, the electron-phonon coupling factor was lowered compared to previously measured values. The experiment was carried out at a third-generation synchrotron radiation source using a high-brightness beam and an ultrafast X-ray streak camera with a temporal resolution of 3 ps.

  10. Cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Emamzadah, Soheila; Petty, Tom J.; De Almeida, Victor; Nishimura, Taisuke; Joly, Jacques; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Halazonetis, Thanos D.

    2009-09-01

    A cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system has been established for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction. Microfluidics is a promising technology for the rapid identification of protein crystallization conditions. However, most of the existing systems utilize silicone elastomers as the chip material which, despite its many benefits, is highly permeable to water vapour. This limits the time available for protein crystallization to less than a week. Here, the use of a cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction is described. Liquid handling in this system is performed in 2 mm thin transparent cards which contain 500 chambers, each with a volume of 320 nl. Microbatch, vapour-diffusion and free-interface diffusion protocols for protein crystallization were implemented and crystals were obtained of a number of proteins, including chicken lysozyme, bovine trypsin, a human p53 protein containing both the DNA-binding and oligomerization domains bound to DNA and a functionally important domain of Arabidopsis Morpheus’ molecule 1 (MOM1). The latter two polypeptides have not been crystallized previously. For X-ray diffraction analysis, either the cards were opened to allow mounting of the crystals on loops or the crystals were exposed to X-rays in situ. For lysozyme, an entire X-ray diffraction data set at 1.5 Å resolution was collected without removing the crystal from the card. Thus, cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics systems have the potential to further automate protein crystallization and structural genomics efforts.

  11. Signatures of DNA flexibility, interactions and sequence-related structural variations in classical X-ray diffraction patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kornyshev, A. A.; Lee, D. J.; Wynveen, A.; Leikin, S.

    2011-01-01

    The theory of X-ray diffraction from ideal, rigid helices allowed Watson and Crick to unravel the DNA structure, thereby elucidating functions encoded in it. Yet, as we know now, the DNA double helix is neither ideal nor rigid. Its structure varies with the base pair sequence. Its flexibility leads to thermal fluctuations and allows molecules to adapt their structure to optimize their intermolecular interactions. In addition to the double helix symmetry revealed by Watson and Crick, classical X-ray diffraction patterns of DNA contain information about the flexibility, interactions and sequence-related variations encoded within the helical structure. To extract this information, we have developed a new diffraction theory that accounts for these effects. We show how double helix non-ideality and fluctuations broaden the diffraction peaks. Meridional intensity profiles of the peaks at the first three helical layer lines reveal information about structural adaptation and intermolecular interactions. The meridional width of the fifth layer line peaks is inversely proportional to the helical coherence length that characterizes sequence-related and thermal variations in the double helix structure. Analysis of measured fiber diffraction patterns based on this theory yields important parameters that control DNA structure, packing and function. PMID:21593127

  12. Signatures of DNA flexibility, interactions and sequence-related structural variations in classical X-ray diffraction patterns.

    PubMed

    Kornyshev, A A; Lee, D J; Wynveen, A; Leikin, S

    2011-09-01

    The theory of X-ray diffraction from ideal, rigid helices allowed Watson and Crick to unravel the DNA structure, thereby elucidating functions encoded in it. Yet, as we know now, the DNA double helix is neither ideal nor rigid. Its structure varies with the base pair sequence. Its flexibility leads to thermal fluctuations and allows molecules to adapt their structure to optimize their intermolecular interactions. In addition to the double helix symmetry revealed by Watson and Crick, classical X-ray diffraction patterns of DNA contain information about the flexibility, interactions and sequence-related variations encoded within the helical structure. To extract this information, we have developed a new diffraction theory that accounts for these effects. We show how double helix non-ideality and fluctuations broaden the diffraction peaks. Meridional intensity profiles of the peaks at the first three helical layer lines reveal information about structural adaptation and intermolecular interactions. The meridional width of the fifth layer line peaks is inversely proportional to the helical coherence length that characterizes sequence-related and thermal variations in the double helix structure. Analysis of measured fiber diffraction patterns based on this theory yields important parameters that control DNA structure, packing and function.

  13. High-pressure X-ray diffraction studies of potassium chlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Bai, Ligang; Bhattacharya, Neelanjan

    2012-03-15

    Two static high-pressure X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of potassium chlorate have been performed at pressures of up to {approx}14.3 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at ambient temperature using the 16 ID-B undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source for the X-ray source. The first experiment was conducted to ascertain decomposition rates of potassium chlorate as a function of pressure. Below 2 GPa, the sample was observed to decompose rapidly in the presence of the X-ray beam and release oxygen. Above 2 GPa (near the phase I phase II transition), the decomposition rate dramatically slowed so that good quality XRD patterns could be acquired. This suggests a phase-dependent decomposition rate. In the second study, X-ray diffraction spectra were collected at pressures from 2 to 14.3 GPa by aligning virgin portions of the sample into the focused X-ray beam at each pressure. The results suggest the co-existence of mixed monoclinic (I) and rhombohedral (II) phases of potassium chlorate near 2 GPa. At pressures beyond 4 GPa, the XRD patterns show a very good fit to KClO{sub 3} in the rhombohedral phase with space group R3m, in agreement with earlier studies. No further phase transitions were observed with pressure. Decompression of the sample to ambient pressure indicated mixed phases I and II coupled with a small amount of synchrotron X-ray-induced decomposition product. The equation of state within this pressure regime has been determined.

  14. A geometry for sub-nanosecond X-ray diffraction from laser-shocked polycrystalline foils

    SciTech Connect

    Wark, Justin; Higginbotham, Andrew; Kimminau, Giles; Murphy, William; Nagler, Bob; Whitcher, Thomas; Hawreliak, James; Kalantar, Dan; Butterfield, Martin; El-Dasher, Bassem; McNaney, James; Milathianaki, Despina; Lorenzana, Hector; Remington, Bruce; Davies, Huw; Thornton, Lee; Park, Nigel; Lukezic, Stan

    2007-12-12

    In situ picosecond X-ray diffraction has proved to be a useful tool in furthering our understanding of the response of shocked crystals at the lattice level. To date the vast majority of this work has used single crystals as the shocked samples, owing to their diffraction efficiency, although the study of the response of polycrystalline samples is clearly of interest for many applications. We present here the results of experiments to develop sub-nanosecond powder/polycrystalline diffraction using a cylindrical pinhole camera. By allowing the incident X-ray beam to impinge on the sample at non-normal angles, the response of grains making a variety of angles to the shock propagation direction can potentially be interrogated.

  15. Apparatus for X-ray diffraction microscopy and tomography of cryo specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Beetz, T.; Howells, M. R.; Jacobsen, C.; Kao, C. -C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Mentes, T. O.; Miao, H.; Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Sayre, D.; Shapiro, D.

    2005-03-14

    An apparatus for diffraction microscopy of biological and materials science specimens is described. In this system, a coherent soft X-ray beam is selected with a pinhole, and the illuminated specimen is followed by an adjustable beamstop and CCD camera to record diffraction data from non-crystalline specimens. In addition, a Fresnel zone plate can be inserted to allow for direct imaging. The system makes use of a cryogenic specimen holder with cryotransfer capabilities to allow frozen hydrated specimens to be loaded. The specimen can be tilted over a range of ± 80 ° degrees for three-dimensional imaging; this is done by computer-controlled motors, enabling automated alignment of the specimen through a tilt series. The system is now in use for experiments in soft X-ray diffraction microscopy.

  16. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiment of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Yasuhide; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Chiba-Kamoshida, Kaori; Naito, Sawa; Ohsugi, Tadanori; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Ichiro; Morimoto, Yukio

    2010-12-01

    Nattokinase is a single polypeptide chain composed of 275 amino acids (molecular weight 27,724) which displays strong fibrinolytic activity. Moreover, it can activate other fibrinolytic enzymes such as pro-urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator. In the present study, native nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto was purified using gel-filtration chromatography and crystallized to give needle-like crystals which could be used for X-ray diffraction experiments. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a=74.3, b=49.9, c=56.3 Å, β=95.2°. Diffraction images were processed to a resolution of 1.74 Å with an Rmerge of 5.2% (15.3% in the highest resolution shell) and a completeness of 69.8% (30.0% in the highest resolution shell). This study reports the first X-ray diffraction analysis of nattokinase.

  17. Apparatus for X-ray diffraction microscopy and tomography of cryo specimens

    DOE PAGES

    Beetz, T.; Howells, M. R.; Jacobsen, C.; ...

    2005-03-14

    An apparatus for diffraction microscopy of biological and materials science specimens is described. In this system, a coherent soft X-ray beam is selected with a pinhole, and the illuminated specimen is followed by an adjustable beamstop and CCD camera to record diffraction data from non-crystalline specimens. In addition, a Fresnel zone plate can be inserted to allow for direct imaging. The system makes use of a cryogenic specimen holder with cryotransfer capabilities to allow frozen hydrated specimens to be loaded. The specimen can be tilted over a range of ± 80 ° degrees for three-dimensional imaging; this is done bymore » computer-controlled motors, enabling automated alignment of the specimen through a tilt series. The system is now in use for experiments in soft X-ray diffraction microscopy.« less

  18. Synchrotron X-Ray Reciprocal Space Mapping, Topography and Diffraction Resolution Studies of Macromolecular Crystal Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggon, T. J.; Helliwell, J. R.; Judge, Russell A.; Siddons, D. P.; Snell, Edward H.; Stojanoff, V.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive study of microgravity and ground grown chicken egg white lysozyme crystals is presented using synchrotron X-ray reciprocal space mapping, topography techniques and diffraction resolution. Microgravity crystals displayed, on average, reduced intrinsic mosaicities but no differences in terms of stress over their earth grown counterparts. Topographic analysis revealed that in the microgravity case the majority of the crystal was contributing to the peak of the reflection at the appropriate Bragg angle. In the earth case at the diffraction peak only a small volume of the crystal contributed to the intensity. The techniques prove to be highly complementary with the reciprocal space mapping providing a quantitative measure of the crystal mosaicity and stress (or variation in lattice spacing) and topography providing a qualitative overall assessment of the crystal in terms of its X-ray diffraction properties. Structural data collection was also carried out both at the synchrotron and in the laboratory.

  19. Triple-axis x-ray diffraction analyses of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyi, R. J.; Volz, H. M.

    2001-05-01

    We have used high-resolution triple-axis x-ray diffraction analyses to monitor the defect structure in tetragonal crystals of hen egg-white lysozyme as a function of x-ray irradiation time. At long irradiation times we observed the expected decrease in peak intensity and increase in the angular extent of the peak breadth. In contrast, the initial stages of irradiation showed relatively complex changes in both the peak breadth and the intensity; in fact, during the period from 25 to 45 h of irradiation the angular breadth of the intensity (both the full-width at half-maximum and the full-width at 1% of the maximum intensity) decreased to a minimum value. We have found that the unambiguous analysis of defects at high angular resolution is complicated by the fact that the diffraction characteristics of protein crystals apparently lie at the confluence of the kinematic (ideally imperfect) and dynamic (ideally perfect) treatments of diffraction.

  20. Analytical characterization of a new mobile X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction instrument combined with a pigment identification case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Voorde, Lien; Vekemans, Bart; Verhaeven, Eddy; Tack, Pieter; De Wolf, Robin; Garrevoet, Jan; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vincze, Laszlo

    2015-08-01

    A new, commercially available, mobile system combining X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence has been evaluated which enables both elemental analysis and phase identification simultaneously. The instrument makes use of a copper or molybdenum based miniature X-ray tube and a silicon-Pin diode energy-dispersive detector to count the photons originating from the samples. The X-ray tube and detector are both mounted on an X-ray diffraction protractor in a Bragg-Brentano θ:θ geometry. The mobile instrument is one of the lightest and most compact instruments of its kind (3.5 kg) and it is thus very useful for in situ purposes such as the direct (non-destructive) analysis of cultural heritage objects which need to be analyzed on site without any displacement. The supplied software allows both the operation of the instrument for data collection and in-depth data analysis using the International Centre for Diffraction Data database. This paper focuses on the characterization of the instrument, combined with a case study on pigment identification and an illustrative example for the analysis of lead alloyed printing letters. The results show that this commercially available light-weight instrument is able to identify the main crystalline phases non-destructively, present in a variety of samples, with a high degree of flexibility regarding sample size and position.

  1. A Curved Image-Plate Detector System for High-Resolution Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, P.; Haggerty, R; Yoon, W; Knapp, M; Berghaeuser, A; Zschack, P; Karapetrova, E; Yang, N; Kriven, W

    2009-01-01

    The developed curved image plate (CIP) is a one-dimensional detector which simultaneously records high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns over a 38.7 2{theta} range. In addition, an on-site reader enables rapid extraction, transfer and storage of X-ray intensity information in {le}30 s, and further qualifies this detector to study kinetic processes in materials science. The CIP detector can detect and store X-ray intensity information linearly proportional to the incident photon flux over a dynamical range of about five orders of magnitude. The linearity and uniformity of the CIP detector response is not compromised in the unsaturated regions of the image plate, regardless of saturation in another region. The speed of XRD data acquisition together with excellent resolution afforded by the CIP detector is unique and opens up wide possibilities in materials research accessible through X-ray diffraction. This article presents details of the basic features, operation and performance of the CIP detector along with some examples of applications, including high-temperature XRD.

  2. Dynamic crystal rotation resolved by high-speed synchrotron X-ray Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J. W.; E, J. C.; Huang, J. Y.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-03-30

    Dynamic compression experiments are performed on single-crystal Si under split Hopkinson pressure bar loading, together with simultaneous high-speed (250–350 ns resolution) synchrotron X-ray Laue diffraction and phase-contrast imaging. A methodology is presented which determines crystal rotation parameters,i.e.instantaneous rotation axes and angles, from two unindexed Laue diffraction spots. Two-dimensional translation is obtained from dynamic imaging by a single camera. High-speed motion of crystals, including translation and rotation, can be tracked in real timeviasimultaneous imaging and diffraction.

  3. X-ray plane-wave diffraction effects in a crystal with third-order nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balyan, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    The two-wave dynamical diffraction in the Laue geometry has been theoretically considered for a plane X-ray wave in a crystal with a third-order nonlinear response to the external field. An analytical solution to the problem stated is found for certain diffraction conditions. A nonlinear pendulum effect is analyzed. The nonlinear extinction length is found to depend on the incident-wave intensity. A pendulum effect of a new type is revealed: the intensities of the transmitted and diffracted waves periodically depend on the incidentwave intensity at a fixed crystal thickness. The rocking curves and Borrmann nonlinear effect are numerically calculated.

  4. Dynamic crystal rotation resolved by high-speed synchrotron X-ray Laue diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J. W.; E, J. C.; Huang, J. Y.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic compression experiments are performed on single-crystal Si under split Hopkinson pressure bar loading, together with simultaneous high-speed (250–350 ns resolution) synchrotron X-ray Laue diffraction and phase-contrast imaging. A methodology is presented which determines crystal rotation parameters, i.e. instantaneous rotation axes and angles, from two unindexed Laue diffraction spots. Two-dimensional translation is obtained from dynamic imaging by a single camera. High-speed motion of crystals, including translation and rotation, can be tracked in real time via simultaneous imaging and diffraction. PMID:27140150

  5. Optimal mapping of x-ray laser diffraction patterns into three dimensions using routing algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassemeyer, Stephan; Jafarpour, Aliakbar; Lomb, Lukas; Steinbrener, Jan; Martin, Andrew V.; Schlichting, Ilme

    2013-10-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging with x-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) promises high-resolution structure determination of noncrystalline objects. Randomly oriented particles are exposed to XFEL pulses for acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) diffraction snapshots. The knowledge of their orientations enables 3D imaging by multiview reconstruction, combining 2D diffraction snapshots in different orientations. Here we introduce a globally optimal algorithm that can infer these orientations. We apply it to experimental XFEL data of nanoparticles and so determine their 3D electron density.

  6. X-Ray Diffraction Study of the Internal Structure of Supercooled Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, Robert G.; Boyd, Bemrose

    1951-01-01

    A Bragg X-ray spectrometer equipped with a volume-sensitive Geiger counter and Soller slits and employing filtered molybdenum Ka radiation was used to obtain a set of diffracted intensity curves as a Punction of angle for supercooled water. Diffracted intensity curves in the temperature region of 21 to -16 C were obtained. The minimum between the two main diffraction peaks deepened continuously with lowering temperature, indicating a gradual change in the internal structure of the water. No discontinuity in this trend was noted at the melting point. The internal structure of supercooled water was concluded to become progressively more ice-like as the temperature is lowered.

  7. Simulations of in situ x-ray diffraction from uniaxially compressed highly textured polycrystalline targets

    SciTech Connect

    McGonegle, David Wark, Justin S.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Milathianaki, Despina; Remington, Bruce A.

    2015-08-14

    A growing number of shock compression experiments, especially those involving laser compression, are taking advantage of in situ x-ray diffraction as a tool to interrogate structure and microstructure evolution. Although these experiments are becoming increasingly sophisticated, there has been little work on exploiting the textured nature of polycrystalline targets to gain information on sample response. Here, we describe how to generate simulated x-ray diffraction patterns from materials with an arbitrary texture function subject to a general deformation gradient. We will present simulations of Debye-Scherrer x-ray diffraction from highly textured polycrystalline targets that have been subjected to uniaxial compression, as may occur under planar shock conditions. In particular, we study samples with a fibre texture, and find that the azimuthal dependence of the diffraction patterns contains information that, in principle, affords discrimination between a number of similar shock-deformation mechanisms. For certain cases, we compare our method with results obtained by taking the Fourier transform of the atomic positions calculated by classical molecular dynamics simulations. Illustrative results are presented for the shock-induced α–ϵ phase transition in iron, the α–ω transition in titanium and deformation due to twinning in tantalum that is initially preferentially textured along [001] and [011]. The simulations are relevant to experiments that can now be performed using 4th generation light sources, where single-shot x-ray diffraction patterns from crystals compressed via laser-ablation can be obtained on timescales shorter than a phonon period.

  8. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, E. Han; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Lemke, Henrik T.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Coey, Aaron; Larsen, Kevin; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; DeMirci, Hasan

    2015-04-30

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.

  9. Identification of inversion domains in KTiOPO{sub 4}via resonant X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrizi, Federica; Thomas, Pamela A.; Nisbet, Gareth; Collins, Stephen P.

    2015-05-14

    The identification and high-resolution mapping of the absolute crystallographic structure in multi-domain ferroelectric KTiOPO{sub 4} is achieved through a novel synchrotron X-ray diffraction method. On a single Bragg reflection, the intensity ratio in resonant diffraction below and above the Ti absorption K edge demonstrates a domain contrast up to a factor of ∼270, thus implementing a non-contact, non-destructive imaging technique with micrometre spatial resolution, applicable to samples of arbitrarily large dimensions. A novel method is presented for the identification of the absolute crystallographic structure in multi-domain polar materials such as ferroelectric KTiOPO{sub 4}. Resonant (or ‘anomalous’) X-ray diffraction spectra collected across the absorption K edge of Ti (4.966 keV) on a single Bragg reflection demonstrate a huge intensity ratio above and below the edge, providing a polar domain contrast of ∼270. This allows one to map the spatial domain distribution in a periodically inverted sample, with a resolution of ∼1 µm achieved with a microfocused beam. This non-contact, non-destructive technique is well suited for samples of large dimensions (in contrast with traditional resonant X-ray methods based on diffraction from Friedel pairs), and its potential is particularly relevant in the context of physical phenomena connected with an absence of inversion symmetry, which require characterization of the underlying absolute atomic structure (such as in the case of magnetoelectric coupling and multiferroics)

  10. The Scherrer equation and the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Muniz, Francisco Tiago Leitão; Miranda, Marcus Aurélio Ribeiro; Morilla Dos Santos, Cássio; Sasaki, José Marcos

    2016-05-01

    The Scherrer equation is a widely used tool to determine the crystallite size of polycrystalline samples. However, it is not clear if one can apply it to large crystallite sizes because its derivation is based on the kinematical theory of X-ray diffraction. For large and perfect crystals, it is more appropriate to use the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction. Because of the appearance of polycrystalline materials with a high degree of crystalline perfection and large sizes, it is the authors' belief that it is important to establish the crystallite size limit for which the Scherrer equation can be applied. In this work, the diffraction peak profiles are calculated using the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction for several Bragg reflections and crystallite sizes for Si, LaB6 and CeO2. The full width at half-maximum is then extracted and the crystallite size is computed using the Scherrer equation. It is shown that for crystals with linear absorption coefficients below 2117.3 cm(-1) the Scherrer equation is valid for crystallites with sizes up to 600 nm. It is also shown that as the size increases only the peaks at higher 2θ angles give good results, and if one uses peaks with 2θ > 60° the limit for use of the Scherrer equation would go up to 1 µm.

  11. Quantitative Imaging of Single Unstained Magnetotactic Bacteria by Coherent X-ray Diffraction Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiadong; Sun, Zhibin; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Qingjie; Yao, Shengkun; Zong, Yunbing; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Huaidong

    2015-06-16

    Novel coherent diffraction microscopy provides a powerful lensless imaging method to obtain a better understanding of the microorganism at the nanoscale. Here we demonstrated quantitative imaging of intact unstained magnetotactic bacteria using coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy combined with an iterative phase retrieval algorithm. Although the signal-to-noise ratio of the X-ray diffraction pattern from single magnetotactic bacterium is weak due to low-scattering ability of biomaterials, an 18.6 nm half-period resolution of reconstructed image was achieved by using a hybrid input-output phase retrieval algorithm. On the basis of the quantitative reconstructed images, the morphology and some intracellular structures, such as nucleoid, polyβ-hydroxybutyrate granules, and magnetosomes, were identified, which were also confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. With the benefit from the quantifiability of coherent diffraction imaging, for the first time to our knowledge, an average density of magnetotactic bacteria was calculated to be ∼1.19 g/cm(3). This technique has a wide range of applications, especially in quantitative imaging of low-scattering biomaterials and multicomponent materials at nanoscale resolution. Combined with the cryogenic technique or X-ray free electron lasers, the method could image cells in a hydrated condition, which helps to maintain their natural structure.

  12. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Dao, E. Han; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; ...

    2015-04-30

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecondmore » X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.« less

  13. Imaging outside the box: Resolution enhancement in X-ray coherent diffraction imaging by extrapolation of diffraction patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana Fink, Hans-Werner; Chushkin, Yuriy; Zontone, Federico

    2015-11-02

    Coherent diffraction imaging is a high-resolution imaging technique whose potential can be greatly enhanced by applying the extrapolation method presented here. We demonstrate the enhancement in resolution of a non-periodical object reconstructed from an experimental X-ray diffraction record which contains about 10% missing information, including the pixels in the center of the diffraction pattern. A diffraction pattern is extrapolated beyond the detector area and as a result, the object is reconstructed at an enhanced resolution and better agreement with experimental amplitudes is achieved. The optimal parameters for the iterative routine and the limits of the extrapolation procedure are discussed.

  14. X-ray diffraction imaging of metal-oxide epitaxial tunnel junctions made by optical lithography: use of focused and unfocused X-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Mocuta, Cristian; Barbier, Antoine; Stanescu, Stefan; Matzen, Sylvia; Moussy, Jean Baptiste; Ziegler, Eric

    2013-03-01

    X-ray diffraction techniques are used in imaging mode in order to characterize micrometre-sized objects. The samples used as models are metal-oxide tunnel junctions made by optical lithography, with lateral sizes ranging from 150 µm down to 10 µm and various shapes: discs, squares and rectangles. Two approaches are described and compared, both using diffraction contrast: full-field imaging (topography) and raster imaging (scanning probe) using a micrometre-sized focused X-ray beam. It is shown that the full-field image gives access to macroscopic distortions (e.g. sample bending), while the local distortions, at the micrometre scale (e.g. tilts of the crystalline planes in the vicinity of the junction edges), can be accurately characterized only using focused X-ray beams. These local defects are dependent on the junction shape and larger by one order of magnitude than the macroscopic curvature of the sample.

  15. X-ray diffraction imaging of metal–oxide epitaxial tunnel junctions made by optical lithography: use of focused and unfocused X-ray beams

    PubMed Central

    Mocuta, Cristian; Barbier, Antoine; Stanescu, Stefan; Matzen, Sylvia; Moussy, Jean-Baptiste; Ziegler, Eric

    2013-01-01

    X-ray diffraction techniques are used in imaging mode in order to characterize micrometre-sized objects. The samples used as models are metal–oxide tunnel junctions made by optical lithography, with lateral sizes ranging from 150 µm down to 10 µm and various shapes: discs, squares and rectangles. Two approaches are described and compared, both using diffraction contrast: full-field imaging (topography) and raster imaging (scanning probe) using a micrometre-sized focused X-ray beam. It is shown that the full-field image gives access to macroscopic distortions (e.g. sample bending), while the local distortions, at the micrometre scale (e.g. tilts of the crystalline planes in the vicinity of the junction edges), can be accurately characterized only using focused X-ray beams. These local defects are dependent on the junction shape and larger by one order of magnitude than the macroscopic curvature of the sample. PMID:23412494

  16. Study of X-ray diffraction from a surface acoustic wave in the grazing geometry with allowance for the curvature of the unperturbed crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Mkrtchyan, A. R. Kocharyan, V. R.; Levonyan, L. V.; Khachaturyan, G. K.

    2006-12-15

    Fresnel X-ray diffraction from a concave crystal surface in the presence of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) has been considered for grazing angles of incidence in noncoplanar symmetric Laue geometry. It is shown that the main peak and diffraction satellites are focused at different distances from a crystal. The effect of deviation from the Bragg angle, the spectral line width, and the SAW amplitude on the X-ray diffraction pattern has been analyzed. It is established that the contrast of an X-ray diffraction pattern of an SAW in Bragg-Laue grazing geometry is related to the character of irregularities of the crystal surface, and the pattern details depend on the measurement mode. The sensitivity of the method is about a nanometer. The focal image of the SAW serves as a scale landmark for determining the crystal surface characteristics.

  17. Bayesian orientation estimate and structure information from sparse single-molecule x-ray diffraction images.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Michał; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2014-08-01

    We developed a Bayesian method to extract macromolecular structure information from sparse single-molecule x-ray free-electron laser diffraction images. The method addresses two possible scenarios. First, using a "seed" structural model, the molecular orientation is determined for each of the provided diffraction images, which are then averaged in three-dimensional reciprocal space. Subsequently, the real space electron density is determined using a relaxed averaged alternating reflections algorithm. In the second approach, the probability that the "seed" model fits to the given set of diffraction images as a whole is determined and used to distinguish between proposed structures. We show that for a given x-ray intensity, unexpectedly, the achievable resolution increases with molecular mass such that structure determination should be more challenging for small molecules than for larger ones. For a sufficiently large number of recorded photons (>200) per diffraction image an M^{1/6} scaling is seen. Using synthetic diffraction data for a small glutathione molecule as a challenging test case, successful determination of electron density was demonstrated for 20000 diffraction patterns with random orientations and an average of 82 elastically scattered and recorded photons per image, also in the presence of up to 50% background noise. The second scenario is exemplified and assessed for three biomolecules of different sizes. In all cases, determining the probability of a structure given set of diffraction patterns allowed successful discrimination between different conformations of the test molecules. A structure model of the glutathione tripeptide was refined in a Monte Carlo simulation from a random starting conformation. Further, effective distinguishing between three differently arranged immunoglobulin domains of a titin molecule and also different states of a ribosome in a tRNA translocation process was demonstrated. These results show that the proposed method is

  18. Bayesian orientation estimate and structure information from sparse single-molecule x-ray diffraction images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Michał; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2014-08-01

    We developed a Bayesian method to extract macromolecular structure information from sparse single-molecule x-ray free-electron laser diffraction images. The method addresses two possible scenarios. First, using a "seed" structural model, the molecular orientation is determined for each of the provided diffraction images, which are then averaged in three-dimensional reciprocal space. Subsequently, the real space electron density is determined using a relaxed averaged alternating reflections algorithm. In the second approach, the probability that the "seed" model fits to the given set of diffraction images as a whole is determined and used to distinguish between proposed structures. We show that for a given x-ray intensity, unexpectedly, the achievable resolution increases with molecular mass such that structure determination should be more challenging for small molecules than for larger ones. For a sufficiently large number of recorded photons (>200) per diffraction image an M1/6 scaling is seen. Using synthetic diffraction data for a small glutathione molecule as a challenging test case, successful determination of electron density was demonstrated for 20000 diffraction patterns with random orientations and an average of 82 elastically scattered and recorded photons per image, also in the presence of up to 50% background noise. The second scenario is exemplified and assessed for three biomolecules of different sizes. In all cases, determining the probability of a structure given set of diffraction patterns allowed successful discrimination between different conformations of the test molecules. A structure model of the glutathione tripeptide was refined in a Monte Carlo simulation from a random starting conformation. Further, effective distinguishing between three differently arranged immunoglobulin domains of a titin molecule and also different states of a ribosome in a tRNA translocation process was demonstrated. These results show that the proposed method is

  19. X-ray Diffraction Studies of the Thick Filament in Permeabilized Myocardium from Rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,S.; Martyn, D.; Zaman, J.; Yu, L.

    2007-01-01

    Low angle x-ray diffraction patterns from relaxed permeabilized rabbit cardiac trabeculae and psoas muscle fibers were compared. Temperature was varied from 25{sup o}C to 5{sup o}C at 200 mM and 50 mM ionic strengths ({mu}), respectively. Effects of temperature and {mu} on the intensities of the myosin layer lines (MLL), the equatorial intensity ratio I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, and the spacing of the filament lattice are similar in both muscles. At 25{sup o}C, particularly at {mu} = 50 mM, the x-ray patterns exhibited up to six orders of MLL and sharp meridional reflections, signifying that myosin heads (cross-bridges) are distributed in a well-ordered helical array. Decreasing temperature reduced MLL intensities but increased I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}. Decreases in the MLL intensities indicate increasing disorder in the distribution of cross-bridges on the thick filaments surface. In the skeletal muscle, order/disorder is directly correlated with the hydrolysis equilibrium of ATP by myosin, [M.ADP.P{sub i}]/[M.ATP]. Similar effects of temperature on MLL and similar biochemical ATP hydrolysis pathway found in both types of muscles suggest that the order/disorder states of cardiac cross-bridges may well be correlated with the same biochemical and structural states. This implies that in relaxed cardiac muscle under physiological conditions, the unattached cross-bridges are largely in the M.ADP.P{sub i} state and with the lowering of the temperature, the equilibrium is increasingly in favor of [M.ATP] and [A.M.ATP]. There appear to be some differences in the diffraction patterns from the two muscles, however. Mainly, in the cardiac muscle, the MLL are weaker, the I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0} ratio tends to be higher, and the lattice spacing D{sub 10}, larger. These differences are consistent with the idea that under a wide range of conditions, a greater fraction of cross-bridges is weakly bound to actin in the myocardium.

  20. Grain orientation measurement of passivated aluminum interconnectsby x-ray micro diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chang-Hwan; Valek, B.C.; Padmore,H.A.; MacDowell, A.A.; Celestre, R.; Marieb, T.; Bravman, J.C.; Koo, Y.M.; Patel, J.R.

    1999-07-01

    The crystallographic orientations of individual grains in apassivated aluminum interconnect line of 0.7-mu m width were investigatedby using an incidentwhite x-ray microbeam at the Advanced Light Source,Berkeley National Laboratory. Intergrain orientation mapping was obtainedwith about 0.05o sensitivity by the micro Laue diffractiontechnique.

  1. X-ray diffraction enhanced imaging as a novel method to visualize low-density scaffolds in soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ning; Chapman, Dean; Cooper, David; Schreyer, David J; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2011-11-01

    Scaffold visualization is challenging yet essential to the success of various tissue engineering applications. The aim of this study was to explore the potential of X-ray diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) as a novel method for the visualization of low density engineered scaffolds in soft tissue. Imaging of the scaffolds made from poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) and chitosan was conducted using synchrotron radiation-based radiography, in-line phase-contrast imaging (in-line PCI), and DEI techniques as well as laboratory-based radiography. Scaffolds were visualized in air, water, and rat muscle tissue. Compared with the images from X-ray radiography and in-line PCI techniques, DEI images more clearly show the structure of the low density scaffold in air and have enhanced image contrast. DEI was the only technique able to visualize scaffolds embedded in unstained muscle tissue; this method could also define the microstructure of muscle tissue in the boundary areas. At a photon energy of 20 KeV, DEI had the capacity to image PLLA/chitosan scaffolds in soft tissue with a sample thickness of up to 4 cm. The DEI technique can be applied at high X-ray energies, thus facilitating lower in vivo radiation doses to tissues during imaging as compared to conventional radiography.

  2. X-ray-selected broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. J.; Carrera, F. J.; Ceballos, M.; Corral, A.; Ebrero, J.; Esquej, P.; Krumpe, M.; Mateos, S.; Rosen, S.; Schwope, A.; Streblyanska, A.; Symeonidis, M.; Tedds, J. A.; Watson, M. G.

    2017-02-01

    We study a sample of six X-ray-selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from the XMM-Newton Wide Angle Survey. All six objects are classified as BALQSOs using the classic balnicity index, and together they form the largest sample of X-ray-selected BALQSOs. We find evidence for absorption in the X-ray spectra of all six objects. An ionized absorption model applied to an X-ray spectral shape that would be typical for non-BAL QSOs (a power law with energy index α = 0.98) provides acceptable fits to the X-ray spectra of all six objects. The optical to X-ray spectral indices, αOX, of the X-ray-selected BALQSOs, have a mean value of <αOX> = 1.69 ± 0.05, which is similar to that found for X-ray-selected and optically selected non-BAL QSOs of a similar ultraviolet luminosity. In contrast, optically selected BALQSOs typically have much larger αOX and so are characterized as being X-ray weak. The results imply that X-ray selection yields intrinsically X-ray bright BALQSOs, but their X-ray spectra are absorbed by a similar degree to that seen in optically selected BALQSO samples; X-ray absorption appears to be ubiquitous in BALQSOs, but X-ray weakness is not. We argue that BALQSOs sit at one end of a spectrum of X-ray absorption properties in QSOs related to the degree of ultraviolet absorption in C IV 1550 Å.

  3. A nearly on-axis spectroscopic system for simultaneously measuring UV-visible absorption and X-ray diffraction in the SPring-8 structural genomics beamline.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Miyuki; Kimura, Tetsunari; Nishida, Takuma; Tosha, Takehiko; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Ueno, Go; Murakami, Hironori; Ago, Hideo; Yamamoto, Masaki; Ogura, Takashi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Kubo, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    UV-visible absorption spectroscopy is useful for probing the electronic and structural changes of protein active sites, and thus the on-line combination of X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic analysis is increasingly being applied. Herein, a novel absorption spectrometer was developed at SPring-8 BL26B2 with a nearly on-axis geometry between the X-ray and optical axes. A small prism mirror was placed near the X-ray beamstop to pass the light only 2° off the X-ray beam, enabling spectroscopic analysis of the X-ray-exposed volume of a crystal during X-ray diffraction data collection. The spectrometer was applied to NO reductase, a heme enzyme that catalyzes NO reduction to N2O. Radiation damage to the heme was monitored in real time during X-ray irradiation by evaluating the absorption spectral changes. Moreover, NO binding to the heme was probed via caged NO photolysis with UV light, demonstrating the extended capability of the spectrometer for intermediate analysis.

  4. Method for characterizing mask defects using image reconstruction from X-ray diffraction patterns

    DOEpatents

    Hau-Riege, Stefan Peter

    2007-05-01

    The invention applies techniques for image reconstruction from X-ray diffraction patterns on the three-dimensional imaging of defects in EUVL multilayer films. The reconstructed image gives information about the out-of-plane position and the diffraction strength of the defect. The positional information can be used to select the correct defect repair technique. This invention enables the fabrication of defect-free (since repaired) X-ray Mo--Si multilayer mirrors. Repairing Mo--Si multilayer-film defects on mask blanks is a key for the commercial success of EUVL. It is known that particles are added to the Mo--Si multilayer film during the fabrication process. There is a large effort to reduce this contamination, but results are not sufficient, and defects continue to be a major mask yield limiter. All suggested repair strategies need to know the out-of-plane position of the defects in the multilayer.

  5. Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction of Reactive Solids Under Dynamic Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2015-06-01

    We present novel time-resolved (TR) x-ray diffraction and TR Raman spectroscopy capable of probing structural and chemical evolutions of solids undergoing chemical and phase transformations. These methods are applicable to a wide range of dynamic experiments to study both single event phenomena of solids under thermal, electric or mechanical impact conditions and non-single event phenomena under dynamic-diamond anvil cell (d-DAC) and high frequency pulse (or ramp) laser-heated DAC. In this talk, relevant technology developments are described with several examples of our recent studies on reactive metals and dense molecular systems, which are synergistic to many proposed activities to develop dynamic synchrotron x-ray diffraction capabilities centered at advanced third and fourth generation light sources.

  6. Ultrafast lattice response of photoexcited thin films studied by X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Marc; Bojahr, André; Leitenberger, Wolfram; Hertwig, Andreas; Bargheer, Matias

    2014-01-01

    Using ultrafast X-ray diffraction, we study the coherent picosecond lattice dynamics of photoexcited thin films in the two limiting cases, where the photoinduced stress profile decays on a length scale larger and smaller than the film thickness. We solve a unifying analytical model of the strain propagation for acoustic impedance-matched opaque films on a semi-infinite transparent substrate, showing that the lattice dynamics essentially depend on two parameters: One for the spatial profile and one for the amplitude of the strain. We illustrate the results by comparison with high-quality ultrafast X-ray diffraction data of SrRuO3 films on SrTiO3 substrates. PMID:26798784

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of maize aldose reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyota, Eduardo; Sousa, Sylvia Morais de; Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Costa Lima, Aline da; Menossi, Marcelo; Yunes, José Andrés; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2007-11-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of apo maize aldose reductase at 2.0 Å resolution are reported. Maize aldose reductase (AR) is a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. In contrast to human AR, maize AR seems to prefer the conversion of sorbitol into glucose. The apoenzyme was crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.2, b = 54.5, c = 100.6 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data were collected and a final resolution limit of 2.0 Å was obtained after data reduction. Phasing was carried out by an automated molecular-replacement procedure and structural refinement is currently in progress. The refined structure is expected to shed light on the functional/enzymatic mechanism and the unusual activities of maize AR.

  8. Crystallographic Characterization of Extraterrestrial Materials by Energy-Scanning X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagiya, Kenji; Mikouchi, Takashi; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Terada, Yasuko; Yagi, Naoto; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Hirata, Arashi; Kurokawa, Ayaka; Zolensky, Michael E. (Principal Investigator)

    2016-01-01

    We have continued our long-term project using X-ray diffraction to characterize a wide range of extraterrestrial samples. The stationary sample method with polychromatic X-rays is advantageous because the irradiated area of the sample is always same and fixed, meaning that all diffraction spots occur from the same area of the sample, however, unit cell parameters cannot be directly obtained by this method though they are very important for identification of mineral and for determination of crystal structures. In order to obtain the cell parameters even in the case of the sample stationary method, we apply energy scanning of a micro-beam of monochromatic SR at SPring-8.

  9. X-ray diffraction as a promising tool to characterize bone nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Tadano, Shigeru; Giri, Bijay

    2011-01-01

    To understand the characteristics of bone at the tissue level, the structure, organization and mechanical properties of the underlying levels down to the nanoscale as well as their mutual interactions need to be investigated. Such information would help understand changes in the bone properties including stiffness, strength and toughness and provide ways to assess the aged and diseased bones and the development of next generation of bio-inspired materials. X-ray diffraction techniques have gained increased interest in recent years as useful non-destructive tools for investigating the nanostructure of bone. This review provides an overview on the recent progress in this field and briefly introduces the related experimental approach. The application of x-ray diffraction to elucidating the structural and mechanical properties of mineral crystals in bone is reviewed in terms of characterization of in situ strain, residual stress–strain and crystal orientation. PMID:27877458

  10. Structural investigation of GaInP nanowires using X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Kriegner, D.; Persson, J.M.; Etzelstorfer, T.; Jacobsson, D.; Wallentin, J.; Wagner, J.B.; Deppert, K.; Borgström, M.T.; Stangl, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this work the structure of ternary GaxIn1 − xP nanowires is investigated with respect to the chemical composition and homogeneity. The nanowires were grown by metal–organic vapor-phase epitaxy. For the investigation of ensemble fluctuations on several lateral length scales, X-ray diffraction reciprocal space maps have been analyzed. The data reveal a complicated varying materials composition across the sample and in the nanowires on the order of 20%. The use of modern synchrotron sources, where beam-sizes in the order of several 10 μm are available, enables us to investigate compositional gradients along the sample by recording diffraction patterns at different positions. In addition, compositional variations were found also within single nanowires in X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy measurements. PMID:24089580

  11. X-ray diffraction as a promising tool to characterize bone nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Tadano, Shigeru; Giri, Bijay

    2011-12-01

    To understand the characteristics of bone at the tissue level, the structure, organization and mechanical properties of the underlying levels down to the nanoscale as well as their mutual interactions need to be investigated. Such information would help understand changes in the bone properties including stiffness, strength and toughness and provide ways to assess the aged and diseased bones and the development of next generation of bio-inspired materials. X-ray diffraction techniques have gained increased interest in recent years as useful non-destructive tools for investigating the nanostructure of bone. This review provides an overview on the recent progress in this field and briefly introduces the related experimental approach. The application of x-ray diffraction to elucidating the structural and mechanical properties of mineral crystals in bone is reviewed in terms of characterization of in situ strain, residual stress-strain and crystal orientation.

  12. Structural investigation of GaInP nanowires using X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kriegner, D; Persson, J M; Etzelstorfer, T; Jacobsson, D; Wallentin, J; Wagner, J B; Deppert, K; Borgström, M T; Stangl, J

    2013-09-30

    In this work the structure of ternary Ga x In1 - x P nanowires is investigated with respect to the chemical composition and homogeneity. The nanowires were grown by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy. For the investigation of ensemble fluctuations on several lateral length scales, X-ray diffraction reciprocal space maps have been analyzed. The data reveal a complicated varying materials composition across the sample and in the nanowires on the order of 20%. The use of modern synchrotron sources, where beam-sizes in the order of several 10 μm are available, enables us to investigate compositional gradients along the sample by recording diffraction patterns at different positions. In addition, compositional variations were found also within single nanowires in X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy measurements.

  13. In situ X-ray diffraction study on the growth kinetics of NiO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Meneses, C T; Almeida, J M A; Sasaki, J M

    2010-05-01

    The growth kinetics of NiO nanoparticles have been studied by in situ X-ray diffraction using two detection systems (conventional and imaging plate). NiO nanoparticles were formed by thermal decomposition after heating of an amorphous compound formed by the coprecipitation method. It was found that the detection method using an imaging plate is more efficient than the conventional detection mode for observing changes in the crystallite growth of nanocrystalline materials. Studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of the heating rates on the particles growth. The results suggest that the growth process of the particles is accelerated when the samples are treated at low heating rates. The evolution of particles size and the diffusion coefficient obtained from X-ray powder diffraction patterns are discussed in terms of the thermal conditions for the two types of detection.

  14. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yohko F.; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20mol% ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  15. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yohko F; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-07

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20 mol % ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  16. Determination of volume fraction in multiphase systems using incomplete pole figures. [X ray diffraction metallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houska, C. R.; Rao, V.

    1978-01-01

    The determination of the volume fraction of a second phase in a multiphase sample by X-ray diffraction becomes more difficult if the diffracting planes have a preferred orientation. Lopata and Kula have described a method of treating this problem using complete pole figures for each of the phases. With some samples, it is not always possible or convenient to obtain data over the full hemisphere. Equations and an example are given which require X-ray data over a limited range of approximately 0 to 75 deg. This can be obtained by reflection without a specially cut sample or transmission data. A series of Legendre polynomials are fitted to data collected while spinning the sample about its normal. An extrapolation is made possible by introducing two conditions on the end points which must be satisfied if the extrapolation functions are to be valid.

  17. Circularly polarized soft x-ray diffraction study of helical magnetism in hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, A. M.; Lawrence, S. M.; Princep, A. J.; Staub, U.; Bodenthin, Y.; García-Fernández, M.; Garganourakis, M.; Hester, J.; Macquart, R.; Ling, C. D.

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic spiral structures can exhibit ferroelectric moments as recently demonstrated in various multiferroic materials. In such cases the helicity of the magnetic spiral is directly correlated with the direction of the ferroelectric moment and measurement of the helicity of magnetic structures is of current interest. Soft x-ray resonant diffraction is particularly advantageous because it combines element selectivity with a large magnetic cross-section. We calculate the polarization dependence of the resonant magnetic x-ray cross-section (electric dipole transition) for the basal plane magnetic spiral in hexaferrite Ba0.8Sr1.2Zn2Fe12O22 and deduce its domain population using circular polarized incident radiation. We demonstrate there is a direct correlation between the diffracted radiation and the helicity of the magnetic spiral.

  18. Equation of state for technetium from X-ray diffraction and first-principle calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, Daniel S.; Kim, Eunja; Siska, Emily M.; Poineau, Frederic; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.; Lavina, Barbara; Forster, Paul M.

    2016-08-01

    The ambient temperature equation of state (EoS) of technetium metal has been measured by X-ray diffraction. The metal was compressed using a diamond anvil cell and using a 4:1 methanol-ethanol pressure transmitting medium. The maximum pressure achieved, as determined from the gold pressureEquation of state for technetium from X-ray diffraction and first-principle calculations scale, was 67 GPa. The compression data shows that the HCP phase of technetium is stable up to 67 GPa. The compression curve of technetium was also calculated using first-principles total-energy calculations. Utilizing a number of fitting strategies to compare the experimental and theoretical data it is determined that the Vinet equation of state with an ambient isothermal bulk modulus of B0T=288 GPa and a first pressure derivative of B‧=5.9(2) best represent the compression behavior of technetium metal.

  19. X-ray diffraction and Raman studies on Ho: Eu2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshad, K. A.; Chandra Shekar, N. V.; Ravindran, T. R.; Srihari, V.; Pandey, K. K.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the structural parameters of mixed rare earth sesquioxides (Eu1-xHox)2O3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) is reported for the first time. The oxide samples are characterized by angle dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD) and Raman scattering techniques. ADXRD measurements confirmed the formation of single phase in the cubic bixbyite structure with space group Ia-3. Complete miscibility of the two components is confirmed by the Vegard's law. A random distribution of the two cations in the two rare earth (RE) ion sites is observed. Symmetry modes are assigned for the observed 13 out of 22 expected Raman bands and the dependency of average cationic radii, RRE, is discussed. A low frequency band shows an anomalous mode softening with decrease in Eu content. This mode disappears above x = 0.8, which coincides with a distinct slope change observed in the RE(24d) positional coordinate estimated from refined x-ray diffraction data.

  20. Theoretical study of the properties of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes. I

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Jun-ichi

    2015-05-14

    A detailed and comprehensive theoretical description of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes for a bicrystal specimen is given on the basis of a calculation by plane-wave dynamical diffraction theory, where the effect of the Pendellösung intensity oscillation on the moiré pattern is explained in detail. A detailed and comprehensive theoretical description of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes for a bicrystal specimen is given on the basis of a calculation by plane-wave dynamical diffraction theory. Firstly, prior to discussing the main subject of the paper, a previous article [Yoshimura (1997 ▸). Acta Cryst. A53, 810–812] on the two-dimensionality of diffraction moiré patterns is restated on a thorough calculation of the moiré interference phase. Then, the properties of moiré fringes derived from the above theory are explained for the case of a plane-wave diffraction image, where the significant effect of Pendellösung intensity oscillation on the moiré pattern when the crystal is strained is described in detail with theoretically simulated moiré images. Although such plane-wave moiré images are not widely observed in a nearly pure form, knowledge of their properties is essential for the understanding of diffraction moiré fringes in general.

  1. Real-time Studies of Shocked Polycrystalline Materials with Single-Pulse X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Dane V. Morgan

    2011-05-25

    Characteristic K-α x-rays used for single-pulse XRD are conventionally produced by a 37-stage high-voltage Marx pulse generator coupled to a vacuum needle-and-washer x-ray diode via coaxial transmission line. A large field-of-view x-ray image plate detection system typically enables observation of several Debye-Scherrer rings. Recently, we have developed a fiber-optic reducer, coupled to a CCD camera, to obtain low-noise, large field-of-view images. The direct beam spot is produced by bremsstrahlung radiation attenuated by a twomillimeter tungsten beam stop. Determination of the direct beam position is necessary to perform the ring integration.

  2. X-ray diffraction of periclase in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiquet, G.; Andrault, D.; Itié, J. P.; Gillet, P.; Richet, P.

    1996-05-01

    Periclase (MgO) has been studied up to 16 GPa and temperatures in excess of 3000 K by X-ray diffraction in an energy-dispersive configuration at the DCI storage ring of LURE (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation du Royonnement Electromagnétique, Orsay, France). The experiments were conducted in a diamond-anvil cell heated with a CO 2 laser with argon as a pressure transmitting medium. With this newly developed experimental set-up, the molar volume of periclase was measured as a function of pressure and temperature, which were both measured on-line. The thermal expansion coefficient (α) determined in these preliminary experiments has apparently too strong a pressure dependence, decreasing for instance from 4.9 10 -5 K -1 at room pressure to 7.5 10 -6 K -1 at 13.0 GPa. These results would yield a very high Anderson-Grüneisen parameter ( δT = 25-30), in disagreement with the expected δT = 6.5-4.3, as calculated for MgO or obtained by Fei et al. (1992a) on magnesiowüstite from room temperature to 900 K. This difference indicates that thermal pressure in the laser-heated spot can be significant and should be addressed in laser-heated diamond-anvil cell experiments.

  3. Mercuric iodide detector systems for identifying substances by x-ray energy dispersive diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Patt, B.E.; Wang, Y.J.; Croft, M.; Kalman, Z.; Mayo, W.

    1995-08-01

    The use of mercuric iodide arrays for energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) spectroscopy is now being investigated by the authors for inspection of specific crystalline powders in substances ranging from explosives to illicit drugs. Mercuric iodide has been identified as the leading candidate for replacing the Ge detectors previously employed in the development of this technique because HgI{sub 2} detectors: operate at or near room temperature; without the bulky apparatus associated with cryogenic cooling; and offer excellent spectroscopy performance with extremely high efficiency. Furthermore, they provide the practicality of constructing optimal array geometries necessary for these measurements. Proof of principle experiments have been performed using a single-HgI{sub 2} detector spectrometer. An energy resolution of 655 eV (FWHM) has been obtained for 60 keV gamma line from an {sup 241}Am source. The EDXRD signatures of various crystalline powdered compounds have been measured and the spectra obtained show the excellent potential of mercuric iodide for this application.

  4. X-ray induced chemical reaction revealed by in-situ X-ray diffraction and scanning X-ray microscopy in 15 nm resolution (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Mingyuan; Liu, Wenjun; Bock, David; De Andrade, Vincent; Yan, Hanfei; Huang, Xiaojing; Marschilok, Amy; Takeuchi, Esther; Xin, Huolin; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-09-01

    The detection sensitivity of synchrotron-based X-ray techniques has been largely improved due to the ever increasing source brightness, which have significantly advanced ex-situ and in-situ research for energy materials, such as lithium-ion batteries. However, the strong beam-matter interaction arisen from the high beam flux can significantly modify the material structure. The parasitic beam-induced effect inevitably interferes with the intrinsic material property, which brings difficulties in interpreting experimental results, and therefore requires comprehensive evaluation. Here we present a quantitative in-situ study of the beam-effect on one electrode material Ag2VO2PO4 using four different X-ray probes with different radiation dose rate. The material system we reported exhibits interesting and reversible radiation-induced thermal and chemical reactions, which was further evaluated under electron microscopy to illustrate the underlying mechanism. The work we presented here will provide a guideline in using synchrotron X-rays to distinguish the materials' intrinsic behavior from extrinsic structure changed induced by X-rays, especially in the case of in-situ and operando study where the materials are under external field of either temperature or electric field.

  5. X-ray diffraction studies of phase transformations in heavy-metal fluoride glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, N. P.; Doremus, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry studies of the crystallization properties of five ZrF4-based glass compositions have indicated that the crystalline phase in Zr-Ba-La-Pb fluoride glass is beta-BaZrF6; no such identification of crystal phases was obtainable, however, for the other glasses. Reversible polymorphic phase transformations occur in Zr-Ba-La-Li and Zr-Ba-La-Na fluoride glasses, upon heating to higher temperatures.

  6. A scheme for lensless X-ray microscopy combining coherent diffraction imaging and differential corner holography.

    PubMed

    Capotondi, F; Pedersoli, E; Kiskinova, M; Martin, A V; Barthelmess, M; Chapman, H N

    2012-10-22

    We successfully use the corners of a common silicon nitride supporting window in lensless X-ray microscopy as extended references in differential holography to obtain a real space hologram of the illuminated object. Moreover, we combine this method with the iterative phasing techniques of coherent diffraction imaging to enhance the spatial resolution on the reconstructed object, and overcome the problem of missing areas in the collected data due to the presence of a beam stop, achieving a resolution close to 85 nm.

  7. Imaging fully hydrated whole cells by coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Daewoong; Park, Jaehyun; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Sunam; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Naitow, Hisashi; Kunishima, Naoki; Yoshida, Takashi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong

    2013-03-01

    Nanoscale imaging of biological specimens in their native condition is of long-standing interest, in particular with direct, high resolution views of internal structures of intact specimens, though as yet progress has been limited. Here we introduce wet coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy capable of imaging fully hydrated and unstained biological specimens. Whole cell morphologies and internal structures better than 25 nm can be clearly visualized without contrast degradation.

  8. Discrimination of liquids by a focal construct X-ray diffraction geometry.

    PubMed

    Prokopiou, Danae; Rogers, Keith; Evans, Paul; Godber, Simon; Dicken, Anthony

    2013-07-01

    A novel technique for the discrimination of liquids based upon X-ray diffraction and focal construct technology (FCT) is presented. FCT is a new, high efficiency coherent scatter harvesting technique. In this work, the competence of FCT to discriminate liquids was explored. A variety of liquids relevant to security inspection was analysed by FCT for application to liquid security inspection. Discrimination of potential threat liquids was successfully and reliably achieved even for limited data sets.

  9. Planar techniques for fabricating X-ray diffraction gratings and zone plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. I.; Anderson, E. H.; Hawryluk, A. M.; Schattenburg, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The state of current planar techniques in the fabrication of Fresnel zone plates and diffraction gratings is reviewed. Among the fabrication techniques described are multilayer resist techniques; scanning electron beam lithography; and holographic lithography. Consideration is also given to: X-ray lithography; ion beam lithography; and electroplating. SEM photographs of the undercut profiles obtained in a type AZ 135OB photoresistor by holographic lithography are provided.

  10. Analysis of diatomite sediments from a paleolake in central Mexico using PIXE, X-ray tomography and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, J.; Oliver, A.; Vilaclara, G.; Rico-Montiel, R.; Macías, V. M.; Ruvalcaba, J. L.; Zenteno, M. A.

    1994-03-01

    Diatomite samples from paleolake Tlaxcala, in Central Mexico, have been analyzed using proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE), X-ray tomography and X-ray diffraction. Chiseled blocks were scanned with a 0.7 MeV proton beam, 0.1 mm in diameter, in 0.25 mm steps across the sediments. X-ray tomography with the same step sizes was then applied, in order to compare the concentrations obtained with PIXE and the material density in the sediment layers. Three different kinds of layers were found, related to their colors: dark, white and gray. The composition of the layers is fairly uniform. The dark zone is enriched in Al, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe. This dark layer may be associated with eruptions of the Malitzin volcano. The white zone is found to contain diatomite of a high purity, with traces of K, Ca, and Fe, while the gray zones are also Al enriched, suggesting a clay contamination of the diatomite. X-ray diffraction of materials obtained from each main layer showed that the white and gray phases are highly amorphous, with a small component of cristobalite, as expected from the diatom sediment diagenesis, while the dark layer contains also important amounts of anorthite and orthoclase, supporting the volcanic origin of this layer.

  11. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Vecchio, K. S.; Huskins, E. L.; Casem, D. T.; Gruner, S. M.; Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Woll, A. R.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T.; Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T.; Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼103–104 s−1 in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation. PMID:25273733

  12. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C.; Vecchio, K. S.; Huskins, E. L.; Casem, D. T.; Gruner, S. M.; Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T.; Woll, A. R.; Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T.; Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J.

    2014-09-15

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup −1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  13. ELECTRON MICROSCOPE AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION STUDIES ON A HOMOLOGOUS SERIES OF SATURATED PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINES.

    PubMed

    ELBERS, P F; VERVERGAERT, P H

    1965-05-01

    Three homologous saturated phosphatidylcholines were studied by electron microscopy after tricomplex fixation. The results are compared with those obtained by x-ray diffraction analysis of the same and some other homologous compounds, in the dry crystalline state and after tricomplex fixation. By electron microscopy alternating dark and light bands are observed which are likely to correspond to phosphatide double layers. X-Ray diffraction reveals the presence of lamellar structures of regular spacing. The layer spacings obtained by both methods are in good agreement. From the electron micrographs the width of the polar parts of the double layers can be derived directly. The width of the carboxylglycerylphosphorylcholine moiety of the layers is found by extrapolating the x-ray diffraction data to zero chain length of the fatty acids. When from this width the contribution of the carboxylglyceryl part of the molecules is subtracted, again we find good agreement with the electron microscope measurements. An attempt has been made to account for the different layer spacings measured in terms of orientation of the molecules within the double layers.

  14. Femtosecond Diffractive Imaging with a Soft-X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Bogan, M; Boutet, S; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S P; Marchesini, S; Woods, B; Bajt, S; Benner, W H; London, R; Ploenjes-Palm, E; Kuhlmann, M; Treusch, R; Dusterer, S; Tschentscher, T; Schneider, J; Spiller, E; Moller, T; Bostedt, C; Hoener, M; Shapiro, D; Hodgson, K O; der Spoel, D v; Burmeister, F; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Seibert, M; Maia, F; Lee, R; Szoke, A; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J

    2006-03-13

    Theory predicts that with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus, or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} pulse, containing 10{sup 12} photons at 32 nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nano-structured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000 K. A novel X-ray camera assured single photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling, shows no measurable damage, and extends to diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one.

  15. Femtosecond Diffractive Imaging with a Soft-X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton: AUTHOR = Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sebastian; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Marchesini, Stefano; Woods, Bruce W.; Bajt, Sasa; Benner, W.Henry; London, Richard A.; Plonjes, Elke; Kuhlmann, Marion; Treusch, Rolf; Dusterer, Stefan; Tschentscher, Thomas; Schneider, Jochen R.; Spiller, Eberhard; Moller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph; Hoener, Matthias; Shapiro, David A.; /UC, Davis /SLAC /Uppsala U. /LLNL, Livermore /Uppsala U. /Uppsala U. /SLAC /Uppsala U.

    2010-10-07

    Theory predicts that with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus, or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} pulse, containing 10{sup 12} photons at 32 nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nano-structured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000 K. A novel X-ray camera assured single photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling, shows no measurable damage, and extends to diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one.

  16. Imaging nanoscale lattice variations by machine learning of x-ray diffraction microscopy data

    DOE PAGES

    Laanait, Nouamane; Zhang, Zhan; Schlepütz, Christian M.

    2016-08-09

    In this paper, we present a novel methodology based on machine learning to extract lattice variations in crystalline materials, at the nanoscale, from an x-ray Bragg diffraction-based imaging technique. By employing a full-field microscopy setup, we capture real space images of materials, with imaging contrast determined solely by the x-ray diffracted signal. The data sets that emanate from this imaging technique are a hybrid of real space information (image spatial support) and reciprocal lattice space information (image contrast), and are intrinsically multidimensional (5D). By a judicious application of established unsupervised machine learning techniques and multivariate analysis to this multidimensional datamore » cube, we show how to extract features that can be ascribed physical interpretations in terms of common structural distortions, such as lattice tilts and dislocation arrays. Finally, we demonstrate this 'big data' approach to x-ray diffraction microscopy by identifying structural defects present in an epitaxial ferroelectric thin-film of lead zirconate titanate.« less

  17. Imaging nanoscale lattice variations by machine learning of x-ray diffraction microscopy data

    SciTech Connect

    Laanait, Nouamane; Zhang, Zhan; Schlepütz, Christian M.

    2016-08-09

    In this paper, we present a novel methodology based on machine learning to extract lattice variations in crystalline materials, at the nanoscale, from an x-ray Bragg diffraction-based imaging technique. By employing a full-field microscopy setup, we capture real space images of materials, with imaging contrast determined solely by the x-ray diffracted signal. The data sets that emanate from this imaging technique are a hybrid of real space information (image spatial support) and reciprocal lattice space information (image contrast), and are intrinsically multidimensional (5D). By a judicious application of established unsupervised machine learning techniques and multivariate analysis to this multidimensional data cube, we show how to extract features that can be ascribed physical interpretations in terms of common structural distortions, such as lattice tilts and dislocation arrays. Finally, we demonstrate this 'big data' approach to x-ray diffraction microscopy by identifying structural defects present in an epitaxial ferroelectric thin-film of lead zirconate titanate.

  18. Recombination of photodissociated iodine: A time-resolved x-ray-diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, M.; Bratos, S.; Plech, A.; Vuilleumier, R.; Mirloup, F.; Lorenc, M.; Kong, Q.; Ihee, H.

    2006-01-21

    A time-resolved x-ray-diffraction experiment is presented that aims to study the recombination of laser-dissociated iodine molecules dissolved in CCl{sub 4}. This process is monitored over an extended time interval from pico- to microseconds. The variations of atom-atom distances are probed with a milliangstrom resolution. A recent theory of time-resolved x-ray diffraction is used to analyze the experimental data; it employs the correlation function approach of statistical mechanics. The most striking outcome of this study is the experimental determination of time-dependent I-I atom-atom distribution functions. The structure of the CCl{sub 4} solvent changes simultaneously; the solvent thus appears as a reaction partner rather than an inert medium hosting it. Thermal expansion of the system is nonuniform in time, an effect due to the presence of the acoustic horizon. One concludes that a time-resolved x-ray diffraction permits real-time visualization of solvent and solute motions during a chemical reaction.

  19. X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of NLO Crystals: Traditional Applications and More New Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antipin, Mikhail Yu.; Clark, Ronald D.; Nesterov, Vladimir N.

    1998-01-01

    Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis is one of the more important methods for the molecular and crystal structure determination of matter and therefore it has a great importance in material science including design and engineering of different compounds with non-linear optical (NLO) properties. It was shown in our previous publications that this method provides unique information about molecular structure of NLO compounds, their crystal symmetry and crystal packing arrays, molecular conformation and geometries and many other structural and electronic characteristics that are important for understanding the nature of NLO properties of solids. A very new application of the X-ray diffraction method is related to analysis of the electron density distribution p(r) in crystals and some of its characteristics (atomic and group charges, dipole and higher multipole moments, etc.), that may be obtained directly form the diffraction measurements. In the present work, we will discuss our preliminary low temperature high-resolution X-ray data for the m-nitroaniline (mNA) single crystal (VI). This is one of the "classical" organic NLO materials and electron density distribution analysis in this simple compound has a great scientific interest.

  20. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Lambert, P K; Hustedt, C J; Vecchio, K S; Huskins, E L; Casem, D T; Gruner, S M; Tate, M W; Philipp, H T; Woll, A R; Purohit, P; Weiss, J T; Kannan, V; Ramesh, K T; Kenesei, P; Okasinski, J S; Almer, J; Zhao, M; Ananiadis, A G; Hufnagel, T C

    2014-09-01

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ~10(3)-10(4) s(-1) in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10-20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (~40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  1. Quantitative energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction for identification of counterfeit medicines: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Chiaki C. E.; O'Flynn, Daniel; Sidebottom, Aiden; Speller, Robert D.

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of counterfeit and substandard medicines has been growing rapidly over the past decade, and fast, nondestructive techniques for their detection are urgently needed to counter this trend. In this study, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) combined with chemometrics was assessed for its effectiveness in quantitative analysis of compressed powder mixtures. Although EDXRD produces lower-resolution diffraction patterns than angular-dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), it is of interest for this application as it carries the advantage of allowing the analysis of tablets within their packaging, due to the higher energy X-rays used. A series of caffeine, paracetamol and microcrystalline cellulose mixtures were prepared with compositions between 0 - 100 weight% in 20 weight% steps (22 samples in total, including a centroid mixture), and were pressed into tablets. EDXRD spectra were collected in triplicate, and a principal component analysis (PCA) separated these into their correct positions in the ternary mixture design. A partial least-squares (PLS) regression model calibrated using this training set was validated using both segmented cross-validation, and with a test set of six samples (mixtures in 8:1:1 and 5⅓:2⅓:2⅓ ratios) - the latter giving a root-mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.30, 2.25 and 2.03 weight% for caffeine, paracetamol and cellulose respectively. These initial results are promising, with RMSEP values on a par with those reported in the ADXRD literature.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of cyanuric acid hydrolase from Azorhizobium caulinodans.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seunghee; Shi, Ke; Wackett, Lawrence P; Aihara, Hideki

    2013-08-01

    Cyanuric acid is synthesized industrially and forms during the microbial metabolism of s-triazine herbicides. Cyanuric acid is metabolized by some microorganisms via cyanuric acid hydrolase (CAH), which opens the s-triazine ring as a prelude to further metabolism. CAH is a member of the rare cyanuric acid hydrolase/barbiturase family. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CAH from Azorhizobium caulinodans are reported. CAH was cocrystallized with barbituric acid, a close analog of cyanuric acid that is a tight-binding competitive inhibitor. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction experiments were grown in conditions containing PEG 8K or magnesium sulfate as precipitants. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected from CAH-barbituric acid crystals to 2.7 Å resolution. The crystals were found to belong to space group I4₁22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 237.9, c = 105.3 Å, α = β = γ = 90°.

  3. Magnetic symmetries in neutron and resonant x-ray Bragg diffraction patterns of four iridium oxides.

    PubMed

    Lovesey, S W; Khalyavin, D D; Manuel, P; Chapon, L C; Cao, G; Qi, T F

    2012-12-12

    The magnetic properties of Sr(2)IrO(4), Na(2)IrO(3), Sr(3)Ir(2)O(7) and CaIrO(3) are discussed, principally in the light of experimental data in recent literature for Bragg intensities measured in x-ray diffraction with enhancement at iridium L-absorption edges. The electronic structure factors we report, which incorporate parity-even and acentric entities, serve the immediate purpose of making full use of crystal and magnetic symmetry to refine our knowledge of the magnetic properties of the four iridates from resonant x-ray diffraction data. They also offer a platform on which to interpret future investigations, using dichroic signals, resonant x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction, for example, as well as ab initio calculations of electronic structure. Unit-cell structure factors, suitable for x-ray Bragg diffraction enhanced by an electric dipole-electric dipole (E1-E1) event, reveal exactly which iridium multipoles are visible, e.g., a magnetic dipole parallel to the crystal c-axis (z-axis) and an electric quadrupole with yz-like symmetry in the specific case of CaIrO(3). Magnetic space-groups are assigned to Sr(2)IrO(4), Sr(3)Ir(2)O(7) and CaIrO(3), namely, P(I)cca, P(A)ban and Cm'cm', respectively, in the Belov-Neronova-Smirnova notation. The assignment for Sr(2)IrO(4) is possible because of our new high-resolution neutron diffraction data, gathered on a powder sample. In addition, the new data are used to show that the ordered magnetic moment of an Ir(4+) ion in Sr(2)IrO(4) does not exceed 0.29(4) μ(B). Na(2)IrO(3) has two candidate magnetic space-groups that are not resolved with currently available resonant x-ray data.

  4. Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xian-Rong Gog, Thomas; Assoufid, Lahsen; Peng, Ru-Wen; Siddons, D. P.

    2014-11-03

    Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.

  5. Portable apparatus for in situ x-ray diffraction and fluorescence analyses of artworks.

    PubMed

    Eveno, Myriam; Moignard, Brice; Castaing, Jacques

    2011-10-01

    A portable X-ray fluorescence/X-ray diffraction (XRF/XRD) system for artwork studies has been designed constructed and tested. It is based on Debye Scherrer XRD in reflection that takes advantage of many recent improvements in the handling of X-rays (polycapillary optics; advanced two-dimensional detection). The apparatus is based on a copper anode air cooled X-ray source, and the XRD analysis is performed on a 5-20 μm thick layer from the object surface. Energy dispersive XRF elemental analysis can be performed at the same point as XRD, giving elemental compositions that support the interpretation of XRD diagrams. XRF and XRD analyses were tested to explore the quality and the limits of the analytical technique. The XRD diagrams are comparable in quality with diagrams obtained with conventional laboratory equipment. The mineral identification of materials in artwork is routinely performed with the portable XRF-XRD system. Examples are given for ceramic glazes containing crystals and for paintings where the determination of pigments is still a challenge for nondestructive analysis. For instance, lead compounds that provide a variety of color pigments can be easily identified as well as a pigment such as lapis lazuli that is difficult to identify by XRF alone. More than 70 works of art have been studied in situ in museums, monuments, etc. In addition to ceramics and paintings, these works include bronzes, manuscripts, etc., which permit improvement in the comprehension of ancient artistic techniques.

  6. Multilayer graphene stacks grown by different methods-thickness measurements by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and optical transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarczyk, M. Kowalski, G.; Kępa, H.; Grodecki, K.; Drabińska, A.; Strupiński, W.

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Optical absorption estimates of the thickness of graphene multi layer stacks (number of graphene layers) are presented for three different growth techniques. The objective of this work was focused on comparison and reconciliation of the two already widely used methods for thickness estimates (Raman and Absorption) with the calibration of the X-ray method as far as Scherer constant K is concerned and X-ray based Wagner-Aqua extrapolation method.

  7. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction from a crystal with subsurface defects

    SciTech Connect

    Gaevskii, A. Yu. Golentus, I. E.

    2015-03-15

    The diffraction of X rays incident on a crystal surface under grazing angles under conditions of total external reflection has been investigated. An approach is proposed in which exact solutions to the dynamic problem of grazing-incidence diffraction in an ideal crystal are used as initial functions to calculate the diffuse component of diffraction in a crystal with defects. The diffuse component of diffraction is calculated for a crystal with surface defects of a dilatation-center type. Exact formulas of the continuum theory which take into account the mirror-image forces are used for defect-induced atomic displacements. Scattering intensity maps near Bragg peaks are constructed for different scan modes, and the conditions for detecting primarily the diffuse component are determined. The results of dynamic calculations of grazing-incidence diffraction in defect-containing crystals are compared with calculations in the kinematic approximation.

  8. The effect of specimen surface curvature on x-ray diffraction peak profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhigachev, Andrey O

    2013-09-01

    The effect of specimen surface curvature on profiles of asymmetric X-ray diffraction peaks obtained using the Bragg-Brentano geometry with a position sensitive detector (PSD) was studied. Asymmetric diffraction peaks were experimentally obtained from cylindrical surfaces with controlled curvature. Peaks were collected for a set of curvature radii, diffraction angles, and materials. A mathematical approach and a computer model for calculations of peak profiles were developed: a general method for computation of peak profiles is consideration of diffraction cones intersection with the PSD surface. Effects of axial and radial divergence, finite sample size, and local surface tilt were included in the model. Calculated peak profiles agree with reflections obtained experimentally at a wide range of curvature radii and diffraction angle values. Computation of important characteristics such as the peak centroid and change in position of the maximum and full-width-half-maximum is provided.

  9. Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil, high-pressure apparatus - Comparison of synchrotron and conventional X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spain, I. L.; Black, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The use of both conventional fixed-anode X-ray sources and synchrotron radiation to carry out energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell, is discussed. The photon flux at the sample and at the detector for the two cases are compared and the results are presented in graphs. It is shown that synchrotron radiation experiments can be performed with nearly two orders of magnitude increase in data rate if superior detectors and detector electronics are available.

  10. PREFACE: XTOP 2004 -- 7th Biennial Conference on High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holý, Vaclav

    2005-05-01

    The 7th Biennial Conference on High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction and Imaging (XTOP 2004) was held in the Prague suburb of Pruhonice, Czech Republic, during 7-10 September 2004. It was organized by the Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Association in cooperation with the Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Masaryk University, Brno, and Charles University, Prague. XTOP 2004 took place just after EPDIC IX (European Powder Diffraction Conference) organised in Prague by the same Association during 2-5 September 2004. The Organizing Committee was supported by an International Programme Committee including about 20 prominent scientists from several European and overseas countries, whose helpful suggestions for speakers are acknowledged. The conference was sponsored by the International Union of Crystallography and by several industrial sponsors; this sponsorship allowed us to support about 20 students and young scientists. In total, 147 official delegates and 8 accompanying persons from 16 countries of three continents attended our conference. The scientific programme of the conference was divided into 11 half-day sessions and 2 poster sessions. The participants presented 147 accepted contributions; of these 9 were 45-minute long invited talks, 34 were 20-minute oral presentations and 104 were posters. All posters were displayed for the whole meeting to ensure maximum exposure and interaction between delegates. We followed the very good experience from the previous conference, XTOP 2002, and also organized pre-conference tutorial lectures presented by experts in the field: `Imaging with hard synchrotron radiation' (J Härtwig, Grenoble), `High-resolution x-ray diffractometry: determination of strain and composition' (J Stangl, Linz), `X-ray grazing-incidence scattering from surfaces and nanostructures' (U Pietsch, Potsdam) and `Hard x-ray optics' (J Hrdý, Prague). According to the recommendation of the International Program Committee

  11. Diffractive imaging at large Fresnel number: Challenge of dynamic mesoscale imaging with hard x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, John L.; Barnes, Cris W.; Sandberg, Richard L.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    2014-05-01

    Real materials have structure at both the atomic or crystalline scale as well as at interfaces and defects at the larger scale of grains. There is a need for the study of materials at the "mesoscale," the scale at which subgranular physical processes and intergranular organization couple to determine microstructure, crucially impacting constitutive response at the engineering macroscale. Diffractive imaging using photons that can penetrate multiple grains of material would be a transformative technique for the study of the performance of materials in dynamic extremes. Thicker samples imply higher energy photons of shorter wavelength, and imaging of multiple grains implies bigger spot sizes. Such imaging requires the use of future planned and proposed hard x-ray free electron lasers (such as the European XFEL) to provide both the spatial coherence transverse to the large spots and the peak brilliance to provide the short illumination times. The result is that the Fresnel number of the system becomes large and is no longer in the Fraunhofer far-field limit. The interrelated issues of diffractive imaging at large Fresnel number are analyzed, including proof that diffractive imaging is possible in this limit and estimates of the signal-to-noise possible. In addition, derivation of the heating rates for brilliant pulses of x rays are presented. The potential and limitations on multiple dynamic images are derived. This paper will present a study of x-ray interactions with materials in this new regime of spatially coherent but relatively large mesoscale spots at very hard energies. It should provide the theory and design background for the experiments and facilities required to control materials in extreme environments, in particular for the next generation of very-hard-x-ray free electron lasers.

  12. Time-Domain X-ray Diffraction in the Pulsed Laser Heated Diamond Anvil Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakapenka, V.; Goncharov, A. F.; Struzhkin, V.; Kantor, I.; Rivers, M. L.; Dalton, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed in situ x-ray synchrotron diffraction measurements of samples heated by a pulsed laser in the diamond anvil cell (DAC) at pressure up to 100 GPa and 3500 K. We used an electronically modulated 2-10 kHz repetition rate, 1064-1075 nm fiber laser with 1-100 microseconds pulse width synchronized with a gated x-ray detector (Pilatus) and time resolved radiometric temperature measurements. For the special APS hybrid mode, the measurements were also synchronized with a 500 ns long bunch carrying 88% of the ring current. This setup enables time domain measurements as a function of temperature in a micrometers time scale (averaged over many events, typically more than 10,000). X-ray diffraction data, temperature measurements, and finite element calculations with realistic geometric and thermochemical parameters show that in the present experimental configuration samples 4 micrometers thick can be continuously temperature monitored (up to 3000 K in our experiments) with the same level of axial and radial temperature uniformity as with continuous heating. We find that this novel technique offers a new and convenient way of fine tuning the maximum sample temperature by changing the pulse width of the laser. We will show examples of studies of the melting, thermal equation of state, and chemical reactivity. We acknowledge support from NSF EAR-0842057, DOE/ NNSA (CDAC), and EFree, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award No. DESC0001057. X-ray diffraction measurements were performed at GSECARS (APS) supported by DOE Contract No.W-31-109- Eng-38.

  13. X-ray third-order nonlinear dynamical diffraction in a crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Balyan, M. K.

    2015-12-15

    The dynamic diffraction of an X-ray wave in a crystal with a third-order nonlinear response to external field strength has been theoretically investigated. General equations for the wave propagation in crystal and nonlinear Takagi equations for both ideal and deformed crystals are derived. Integrals of motion are determined for the nonlinear problem of dynamic diffraction. The results of the numerical calculations of reflectivity in the symmetric Laue geometry for an incident plane wave and the intensity distributions on the output crystal surface for a point source are reported as an example.

  14. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging of lead tin telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Black, David; Burdette, Harold; Kuriyama, Masao; Spal, Richard; Simchick, Richard; Fripp, Archibald

    1991-01-01

    High resolution X-ray diffraction images of two directly comparable crystals of lead tin telluride, one Bridgman-grown on Space Shuttle STS 61A and the other terrestrially Bridgman-grown under similar conditions from identical material, present different subgrain structure. In the terrestrial, sample 1 the appearance of an elaborate array of subgrains is closely associated with the intrusion of regions that are out of diffraction in all of the various images. The formation of this elaborate subgrain structure is inhibited by growth in microgravity.

  15. Simulating picosecond X-ray diffraction from crystals using FFT methods on MD output

    SciTech Connect

    Kimminau, Giles; Nagler, Bob; Higginbotham, Andrew; Murphy, William; Wark, Justin; Park, Nigel; Hawreliak, James; Kalantar, Dan; Lorenzana, Hector; Remington, Bruce

    2007-12-12

    Multi-million atom non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations give significant insight into the transient processes that occur under shock compression. Picosecond X-ray diffraction enables the probing of materials on a timescale fast enough to test such effects. In order to simulate diffraction patterns, Fourier methods are required to gain a picture of reciprocal lattice space. We present here results of fast Fourier transforms of atomic coordinates of shocked crystals simulated by MD, and comment on the computing power required as a function of problem size. The relationship between reciprocal space and particular experimental geometries is discussed.

  16. Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Jan-David; Reusch, Tobias; Osterhoff, Markus; Sprung, Michael; Schülein, Florian J R; Krenner, Hubert J; Wixforth, Achim; Salditt, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction experiments of standing surface acoustic waves, illuminated under grazing incidence by a nanofocused synchrotron beam, are reported. The data have been recorded in stroboscopic mode at controlled and varied phase between the acoustic frequency generator and the synchrotron bunch train. At each time delay (phase angle), the coherent far-field diffraction pattern in the small-angle regime is inverted by an iterative algorithm to yield the local instantaneous surface height profile along the optical axis. The results show that periodic nanoscale dynamics can be imaged at high temporal resolution in the range of 50 ps (pulse length).

  17. Disentangling atomic-layer-specific x-ray absorption spectra by Auger electron diffraction spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Kato, Yukako; Hashimoto, Mie; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    In order to investigate the electronic and magnetic structures of each atomic layer at subsurface, we have proposed a new method, Auger electron diffraction spectroscopy, which is the combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and Auger electron diffraction (AED) techniques. We have measured a series of Ni LMM AED patterns of the Ni film grown on Cu(001) surface for various thicknesses. Then we deduced a set of atomic-layer-specific AED patterns in a numerical way. Furthermore, we developed an algorithm to disentangle XANES spectra from different atomic layers using these atomic-layer-specific AED patterns. Surface and subsurface core level shift were determined for each atomic layer.

  18. Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Jan-David; Reusch, Tobias; Osterhoff, Markus; Sprung, Michael; Schülein, Florian J. R.; Krenner, Hubert J.; Wixforth, Achim; Salditt, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction experiments of standing surface acoustic waves, illuminated under grazing incidence by a nanofocused synchrotron beam, are reported. The data have been recorded in stroboscopic mode at controlled and varied phase between the acoustic frequency generator and the synchrotron bunch train. At each time delay (phase angle), the coherent far-field diffraction pattern in the small-angle regime is inverted by an iterative algorithm to yield the local instantaneous surface height profile along the optical axis. The results show that periodic nanoscale dynamics can be imaged at high temporal resolution in the range of 50 ps (pulse length). PMID:25294979

  19. Synchrotron Powder X-ray Diffraction Study of the Structure and Dehydration Behavior of Sepiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, J. E.; Bish, D. L.; Heaney, P. J.

    2006-05-01

    Sepiolite is a hydrous Mg-silicate clay mineral with fibrous morphology that typically occurs as fine-grained, poorly crystalline masses. It occurs in a wide variety of geological environments and has been mined for centuries because of its many uses, e.g. in the pharmaceutical, fertilizer, and pesticide industries. Its versatile functionality derives from the large surface area and microporosity that are characteristic of the material. In recent years, sepiolite has received considerable attention with regard to the adsorption of organics, for use as a support for catalysts, as a molecular sieve, and as an inorganic membrane for ultrafiltration. Because of its fine-grained and poorly crystalline nature, it has not been possible to study sepiolite's crystal structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods, and consequently many details of the structure are still not well known. In this study, Rietveld refinements using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data were used to investigate the crystal structure and dehydration behavior of sepiolite from Durango, Mexico. The room- temperature (RT) sepiolite structure in air compares well with previous models but reveals an additional zeolitic water site. The RT structure under vacuum retained only ~1/8 of the zeolitic water and the volume decreased 1.3%. Real-time, temperature-resolved synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data and Rietveld refinements were used to investigate the behavior of the sepiolite structure from 300 to 925 K. Rietveld refinements revealed that most of the zeolitic water is lost by ~390 K, accompanied by a decrease in the a and c unit-cell parameters. Above ~600 K the sepiolite structure folds as one-half of the crystallographically bound water is lost. Rietveld refinements of the "anhydrous" sepiolite structure reveal that, in general, unit-cell parameters a, b, â and volume steadily decrease with increasing temperature; there is an obvious change in slope at ~820 K suggesting a phase

  20. X-ray and neutron diffraction measurements of dislocation density and subgrain size in a friction stir welded aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Claussen, Bjorn; Woo, Wanchuck; Zhili, Feng; Edward, Kenik; Ungar, Tamas

    2009-01-01

    The dislocation density and subgrain size were determined in the base material and friction-stir welds of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction measurement was performed in the base material. The result of the line profile analysis of the X-ray diffraction peak shows that the dislocation density is about 4.5 x 10{sup 14} m{sup 02} and the subgrain size is about 200 nm. Meanwhile, neutron diffraction measurements have been performed to observe the diffraction peaks during friction-stir welding (FSW). The deep penetration capability of the neutron enables us to measure the peaks from the midplane of the Al plate underneath the tool shoulder of the friction-stir welds. The peak broadening analysis result using the Williamson-Hall method shows the dislocation density of about 3.2 x 10{sup 15} m{sup -2} and subgrain size of about 160 nm. The significant increase of the dislocation density is likely due to the severe plastic deformation during FSW. This study provides an insight into understanding the transient behavior of the microstructure under severe thermomechanical deformation.

  1. Near Edge X-Ray Absorption and X-Ray Photoelectron Diffraction Studies of the Structural Environment of Ge-Si Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrucci, P.; Gunnella, R.; Pinto, N.; Bernardini, R.; de Crescenzi, M.; Sacchi, M.

    Near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) and Auger electron diffraction (AED) are powerful techniques for the qualitative study of the structural and electronic properties of several systems. The recent development of a multiple scattering approach to simulating experimental spectra opened a friendly way to the study of structural environments of solids and surfaces. This article reviews recent X-ray absorption experiments using synchrotron radiation which were performed at Ge L edges and core level electron diffraction measurements obtained using a traditional X-ray source from Ge core levels for ultrathin Ge films deposited on silicon substrates. Thermodynamics and surface reconstruction have been found to play a crucial role in the first stages of Ge growth on Si(001) and Si(111) surfaces. Both techniques show the occurrence of intermixing processes even for room-temperature-grown Ge/Si(001) samples and give a straightforward measurement of the overlayer tetragonal distortion. The effects of Sb as a surfactant on the Ge/Si(001) interface have also been investigated. In this case, evidence of layer-by-layer growth of the fully strained Ge overlayer with a reduced intermixing is obtained when one monolayer of Sb is predeposited on the surface.

  2. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Y M; Turneaure, Stefan J; Perkins, K; Zimmerman, K; Arganbright, N; Shen, G; Chow, P

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (<100 ps duration) out of the periodic x-ray pulses emitted by the synchrotron were used for the diffraction measurements. A synchronization and x-ray detection technique was developed to ensure that the measured signal was obtained unambiguously from the desired x-ray pulse incident on the sample while the sample was in a constant uniaxial strain state. The synchronization and x-ray detection techniques described can be used for a variety of x-ray measurements on shock compressed solids and liquids at the APS. Detailed procedures for applying the Bragg-Brentano parafocusing approach to single crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization∕x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  3. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y. M.; Turneaure, Stefan J.; Perkins, K.; Zimmerman, K.; Arganbright, N.; Shen, G.; Chow, P.

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (<100 ps duration) out of the periodic x-ray pulses emitted by the synchrotron were used for the diffraction measurements. A synchronization and x-ray detection technique was developed to ensure that the measured signal was obtained unambiguously from the desired x-ray pulse incident on the sample while the sample was in a constant uniaxial strain state. The synchronization and x-ray detection techniques described can be used for a variety of x-ray measurements on shock compressed solids and liquids at the APS. Detailed procedures for applying the Bragg-Brentano parafocusing approach to single crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization/x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  4. Data processing software suite SITENNO for coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using the X-ray free-electron laser SACLA

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is a promising technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of micrometers to sub-micrometers. Recently, X-ray free-electron laser sources have enabled efficient experiments in the ‘diffraction before destruction’ scheme. Diffraction experiments have been conducted at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) using the custom-made diffraction apparatus KOTOBUKI-1 and two multiport CCD detectors. In the experiments, ten thousands of single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected within several hours. Then, diffraction patterns with significant levels of intensity suitable for structural analysis must be found, direct-beam positions in diffraction patterns determined, diffraction patterns from the two CCD detectors merged, and phase-retrieval calculations for structural analyses performed. A software suite named SITENNO has been developed to semi-automatically apply the four-step processing to a huge number of diffraction data. Here, details of the algorithm used in the suite are described and the performance for approximately 9000 diffraction patterns collected from cuboid-shaped copper oxide particles reported. Using the SITENNO suite, it is possible to conduct experiments with data processing immediately after the data collection, and to characterize the size distribution and internal structures of the non-crystalline particles. PMID:24763651

  5. Data processing software suite SITENNO for coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using the X-ray free-electron laser SACLA.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is a promising technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of micrometers to sub-micrometers. Recently, X-ray free-electron laser sources have enabled efficient experiments in the `diffraction before destruction' scheme. Diffraction experiments have been conducted at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) using the custom-made diffraction apparatus KOTOBUKI-1 and two multiport CCD detectors. In the experiments, ten thousands of single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected within several hours. Then, diffraction patterns with significant levels of intensity suitable for structural analysis must be found, direct-beam positions in diffraction patterns determined, diffraction patterns from the two CCD detectors merged, and phase-retrieval calculations for structural analyses performed. A software suite named SITENNO has been developed to semi-automatically apply the four-step processing to a huge number of diffraction data. Here, details of the algorithm used in the suite are described and the performance for approximately 9000 diffraction patterns collected from cuboid-shaped copper oxide particles reported. Using the SITENNO suite, it is possible to conduct experiments with data processing immediately after the data collection, and to characterize the size distribution and internal structures of the non-crystalline particles.

  6. A study of X-ray multiple diffraction by means of section topography.

    PubMed

    Kohn, V G; Smirnova, I A

    2015-09-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental study are presented for the question of how the X-ray multiple diffraction in a silicon single crystal influences the interference fringes of section topography for the 400 reflection in the Laue case. Two different cases of multiple diffraction are discovered for zero and very small values of the azimuthal angle for the sample in the form of a plate with the surface normal to the 001 direction. The cases are seen on the same topogram without rotation of the crystal. Accurate computer simulations of the section topogram for the case of X-ray multiple diffraction are performed for the first time. It is shown that the structure of interference fringes on the section topogram in the region of multiple diffraction becomes more complicated. It has a very sharp dependence on the azimuthal angle. The experiment is carried out using a laboratory source under conditions of low resolution over the azimuthal angle. Nevertheless, the characteristic inclination of the interference fringes on the tails of the multiple diffraction region is easily seen. This phenomenon corresponds completely to the computer simulations.

  7. Imaging whole Escherichia coli bacteria by using single-particle x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jianwei; Hodgson, Keith O; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Larabell, Carolyn A; LeGros, Mark A; Nishino, Yoshinori

    2003-01-07

    We report the first experimental recording, to our knowledge, of the diffraction pattern from intact Escherichia coli bacteria using coherent x-rays with a wavelength of 2 A. By using the oversampling phasing method, a real space image at a resolution of 30 nm was directly reconstructed from the diffraction pattern. An R factor used for characterizing the quality of the reconstruction was in the range of 5%, which demonstrated the reliability of the reconstruction process. The distribution of proteins inside the bacteria labeled with manganese oxide has been identified and this distribution confirmed by fluorescence microscopy images. Compared with lens-based microscopy, this diffraction-based imaging approach can examine thicker samples, such as whole cultured cells, in three dimensions with resolution limited only by radiation damage. Looking forward, the successful recording and reconstruction of diffraction patterns from biological samples reported here represent an important step toward the potential of imaging single biomolecules at near-atomic resolution by combining single-particle diffraction with x-ray free electron lasers.

  8. Toward ultrafast time-resolved Debye-Scherrer x-ray diffraction using a laser-plasma source.

    PubMed

    Shymanovich, U; Nicoul, M; Lu, W; Kähle, S; Tarasevitch, A; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; von der Linde, D

    2009-08-01

    An elliptical glass capillary has been used to focus ultrashort Cu K alpha x-ray pulses emitted from a femtosecond laser-produced plasma. Due to its high magnification (7x), the optic transforms the divergent x-ray emission of the plasma into a quasicollimated x-ray beam with a divergence of only 0.18 degrees. As an application we demonstrate the possibility to perform Debye-Scherrer diffraction experiments with the simultaneous detection of several diffraction orders. This will allow one to extend time-resolved x-ray diffraction with femtosecond laser-plasma x-ray sources to a much wider range of materials, which are not easily available as single crystals.

  9. Tomography of a Cryo-immobilized Yeast Cell Using Ptychographic Coherent X-Ray Diffractive Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Giewekemeyer, K.; Hackenberg, C.; Aquila, A.; Wilke, R.N.; Groves, M.R.; Jordanova, R.; Lamzin, V.S.; Borchers, G.; Saksl, K.; Zozulya, A.V.; Sprung, M.; Mancuso, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    The structural investigation of noncrystalline, soft biological matter using x-rays is of rapidly increasing interest. Large-scale x-ray sources, such as synchrotrons and x-ray free electron lasers, are becoming ever brighter and make the study of such weakly scattering materials more feasible. Variants of coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) are particularly attractive, as the absence of an objective lens between sample and detector ensures that no x-ray photons scattered by a sample are lost in a limited-efficiency imaging system. Furthermore, the reconstructed complex image contains quantitative density information, most directly accessible through its phase, which is proportional to the projected electron density of the sample. If applied in three dimensions, CDI can thus recover the sample's electron density distribution. As the extension to three dimensions is accompanied by a considerable dose applied to the sample, cryogenic cooling is necessary to optimize the structural preservation of a unique sample in the beam. This, however, imposes considerable technical challenges on the experimental realization. Here, we show a route toward the solution of these challenges using ptychographic CDI (PCDI), a scanning variant of coherent imaging. We present an experimental demonstration of the combination of three-dimensional structure determination through PCDI with a cryogenically cooled biological sample—a budding yeast cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)—using hard (7.9 keV) synchrotron x-rays. This proof-of-principle demonstration in particular illustrates the potential of PCDI for highly sensitive, quantitative three-dimensional density determination of cryogenically cooled, hydrated, and unstained biological matter and paves the way to future studies of unique, nonreproducible biological cells at higher resolution. PMID:26536275

  10. Tomography of a Cryo-immobilized Yeast Cell Using Ptychographic Coherent X-Ray Diffractive Imaging.

    PubMed

    Giewekemeyer, K; Hackenberg, C; Aquila, A; Wilke, R N; Groves, M R; Jordanova, R; Lamzin, V S; Borchers, G; Saksl, K; Zozulya, A V; Sprung, M; Mancuso, A P

    2015-11-03

    The structural investigation of noncrystalline, soft biological matter using x-rays is of rapidly increasing interest. Large-scale x-ray sources, such as synchrotrons and x-ray free electron lasers, are becoming ever brighter and make the study of such weakly scattering materials more feasible. Variants of coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) are particularly attractive, as the absence of an objective lens between sample and detector ensures that no x-ray photons scattered by a sample are lost in a limited-efficiency imaging system. Furthermore, the reconstructed complex image contains quantitative density information, most directly accessible through its phase, which is proportional to the projected electron density of the sample. If applied in three dimensions, CDI can thus recover the sample's electron density distribution. As the extension to three dimensions is accompanied by a considerable dose applied to the sample, cryogenic cooling is necessary to optimize the structural preservation of a unique sample in the beam. This, however, imposes considerable technical challenges on the experimental realization. Here, we show a route toward the solution of these challenges using ptychographic CDI (PCDI), a scanning variant of coherent imaging. We present an experimental demonstration of the combination of three-dimensional structure determination through PCDI with a cryogenically cooled biological sample--a budding yeast cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)--using hard (7.9 keV) synchrotron x-rays. This proof-of-principle demonstration in particular illustrates the potential of PCDI for highly sensitive, quantitative three-dimensional density determination of cryogenically cooled, hydrated, and unstained biological matter and paves the way to future studies of unique, nonreproducible biological cells at higher resolution.

  11. Room temperature femtosecond X-ray diffraction of photosystem II microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Hellmich, Julia; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G; Sellberg, Jonas; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gildea, Richard J; Glatzel, Pieter; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Latimer, Matthew J; McQueen, Trevor A; DiFiore, Dörte; Fry, Alan R; Messerschmidt, Marc; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W; Seibert, M Marvin; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H; White, William E; Adams, Paul D; Bogan, Michael J; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Messinger, Johannes; Sauter, Nicholas K; Zouni, Athina; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K

    2012-06-19

    Most of the dioxygen on earth is generated by the oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) using light from the sun. This light-driven, four-photon reaction is catalyzed by the Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster located at the lumenal side of PS II. Various X-ray studies have been carried out at cryogenic temperatures to understand the intermediate steps involved in the water oxidation mechanism. However, the necessity for collecting data at room temperature, especially for studying the transient steps during the O-O bond formation, requires the development of new methodologies. In this paper we report room temperature X-ray diffraction data of PS II microcrystals obtained using ultrashort (< 50 fs) 9 keV X-ray pulses from a hard X-ray free electron laser, namely the Linac Coherent Light Source. The results presented here demonstrate that the "probe before destroy" approach using an X-ray free electron laser works even for the highly-sensitive Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster in PS II at room temperature. We show that these data are comparable to those obtained in synchrotron radiation studies as seen by the similarities in the overall structure of the helices, the protein subunits and the location of the various cofactors. This work is, therefore, an important step toward future studies for resolving the structure of the Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster without any damage at room temperature, and of the reaction intermediates of PS II during O-O bond formation.

  12. Nondestructive evaluation of residual stress in short-fiber reinforced plastics by x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Tokoro, Syouhei; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki; Egami, Noboru

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray diffraction method is used to measure the residual stress in injection-molded plates of short-fiber reinforced plastics (SFRP) made of crystalline thermoplastics, polyphenylene sulphide (PPS), reinforced by carbon fibers with 30 mass%. Based on the orientation of carbon fibers, injection molded plates can be modeled as three-layered lamella where the core layer is sandwiched by skin layers. The stress in the matrix in the skin layer was measured using Cr-Kα radiation with the sin2Ψ method. Since the X-ray penetration depth is shallow, the state of stresses measured by X-rays in FRP can be assumed to be plane stress. The X-ray measurement of stress in carbon fibers was not possible because of high texture. A new method was proposed to evaluate the macrostress in SFRP from the measurement of the matrix stress. According to micromechanics analysis of SFRP, the matrix stresses in the fiber direction, σ1m, and perpendicular to the fiber direction, σ2m, and shear stress τ12m can be expressed as the functions of the applied (macro-) stresses, σ1A, σ2A , τ12A as follows: σ1m = α11σ1A +α12σ2A, σ2m = α21σ1A + α22σ2A, τ12m = α66τ12A, where α11 ,α12, α21, α22, α66 are stress-partitioning coefficients. Using skin-layer strips cut parallel, perpendicular and 45° to the molding direction, the stress in the matrix was measured under the uniaxial applied stress and the stress-partitioning coefficients of the above equations were determined. Once these relations are established, the macrostress in SFRP can be determined from the measurements of the matrix stresses by X-rays.

  13. Risk and benefit of diffraction in Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonow, Wilhelm; Rammlmair, Dieter

    2016-11-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence mapping (μ-EDXRF) is a fast and non-destructive method for chemical quantification and therefore used in many scientific fields. The combination of spatial and chemical information is highly valuable for understanding geological processes. Problems occur with crystalline samples due to diffraction, which appears according to Bragg's law, depending on the energy of the X-ray beam, the incident angle and the crystal parameters. In the spectra these peaks can overlap with element peaks suggesting higher element concentrations. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of diffraction, the possibility of diffraction removal and potential geoscientific applications for X-ray mapping. In this work the μ-EDXRF M4 Tornado from Bruker was operated with a Rh-tube and polychromatic beam with two SDD detectors mounted each at ± 90° to the tube. Due to the polychromatic beam the Bragg condition fits for several mineral lattice planes. Since diffraction depends on the angle, it is shown that a novel correction approach can be applied by measuring from two different angles and calculating the minimum spectrum of both detectors gaining a better limit of quantification for this method. Furthermore, it is possible to use the diffraction information for separation of differently oriented crystallites within a monomineralic aggregate and obtain parameters like particle size distribution for the sample, as it is done by thin section image analysis in cross-polarized light. Only with μ-EDXRF this can be made on larger samples without preparation of thin sections.

  14. Performance calculations of the X-ray powder diffraction beamline at NSLS-II.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbo; Ghose, Sanjit; Dooryhee, Eric

    2013-03-01

    The X-ray Powder Diffraction (XPD) beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II is a multi-purpose high-energy X-ray diffraction beamline with high throughput and high resolution. The beamline uses a sagittally bent double-Laue crystal monochromator to provide X-rays over a large energy range (30-70 keV). In this paper the optical design and the calculated performance of the XPD beamline are presented. The damping wiggler source is simulated by the SRW code and a filter system is designed to optimize the photon flux as well as to reduce the heat load on the first optics. The final beamline performance under two operation modes is simulated using the SHADOW program. For the first time a multi-lamellar model is introduced and implemented in the ray tracing of the bent Laue crystal monochromator. The optimization and the optical properties of the vertical focusing mirror are also discussed. Finally, the instrumental resolution function of the XPD beamline is described in an analytical method.

  15. A novel wafer-scale CMOS APS X-ray detector for breast cancer diagnosis using X-ray diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinidis, A.; Zheng, Y.; Philip, D.; Vinnicombe, S.; Speller, R.

    2012-12-01

    The current study uses a novel large area (12.8 cm × 13.1 cm) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) X-ray detector, named Dynamic range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology (DynAMITe), for breast cancer diagnosis. The detector consists of two geometrically superimposed grids: a) 2560 × 2624 fine-pitch grid of pixels (50 μm pitch), named Sub-Pixels (SP camera), for low intrinsic noise and high spatial resolution and b) 1280 × 1312 large-pitch grid of pixels (100 μm pitch), named Pixels (P camera), for high dynamic range. X-ray performance characterization measurements show that the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the SP camera is in the range 0.7-0.75 at low spatial frequencies using a tungsten (W) anode X-ray source at 28 kV. Hence, the detector is suitable for mammography. Furthermore, we used the SP camera to combine mammograms with angle dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD) measurements in order to apply the X-ray biopsy concept in one examination. The results show that ADXRD technique indicates the presence of cancer in suspicious areas on the mammogram. Hence, it could be used to determine the region affected by cancer and assist in planning surgery. This study is the proof of concept that mammography and ADXRD can be combined in one examination.

  16. Imaging of complex density in silver nanocubes by coherent x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, R.; Liang, M.; Sun, Y.; Xia, Y.; Robinson, I. K.

    2010-03-01

    When using coherent x-rays to perform lensless imaging, it is the complex wave field exiting the sample or, in the case of the Bragg geometry, the deformed electron density distribution of a crystal, that is being sought. For most samples, to some extent, the image will be complex, containing both an amplitude and phase variation across the sample. We have developed versions of the hybrid input-output (HIO) and error reduction (ER) algorithms that are very robust for the inversion to complex objects from three-dimensional (3D) coherent x-ray diffraction (CXD) data measured around a Bragg spot of a small crystal. The development and behavior of these algorithms will be discussed in the context of inverting a 3D CXD pattern measured around a (111) Bragg spot of a silver nanocube.

  17. RASOR: an advanced instrument for soft x-ray reflectivity and diffraction.

    PubMed

    Beale, T A W; Hase, T P A; Iida, T; Endo, K; Steadman, P; Marshall, A R; Dhesi, S S; van der Laan, G; Hatton, P D

    2010-07-01

    We report the design and construction of a novel soft x-ray diffractometer installed at Diamond Light Source. The beamline endstation RASOR is constructed for general users and designed primarily for the study of single crystal diffraction and thin film reflectivity. The instrument is comprised of a limited three circle (theta, 2theta, and chi) diffractometer with an additional removable rotation (phi) stage. It is equipped with a liquid helium cryostat, and post-scatter polarization analysis. Motorized motions are provided for the precise positioning of the sample onto the diffractometer center of rotation, and for positioning the center of rotation onto the x-ray beam. The functions of the instrument have been tested at Diamond Light Source, and initial test measurements are provided, demonstrating the potential of the instrument.

  18. Automated high pressure cell for pressure jump x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Nicholas J; Gauthe, Beatrice L L E; Terrill, Nick J; Rogers, Sarah E; Templer, Richard H; Ces, Oscar; Seddon, John M

    2010-06-01

    A high pressure cell for small and wide-angle x-ray diffraction measurements of soft condensed matter samples has been developed, incorporating a fully automated pressure generating network. The system allows both static and pressure jump measurements in the range of 0.1-500 MPa. Pressure jumps can be performed as quickly as 5 ms, both with increasing and decreasing pressures. Pressure is generated by a motorized high pressure pump, and the system is controlled remotely via a graphical user interface to allow operation by a broad user base, many of whom may have little previous experience of high pressure technology. Samples are loaded through a dedicated port allowing the x-ray windows to remain in place throughout an experiment; this facilitates accurate subtraction of background scattering. The system has been designed specifically for use at beamline I22 at the Diamond Light Source, United Kingdom, and has been fully integrated with the I22 beamline control systems.

  19. Fresnel diffraction correction by phase-considered iteration procedure in soft X-ray projection microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiina, Tatsuo; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Honda, Toshio; Ito, Atsushi; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Yoshimura, Hideyuki; Yada, Keiji; Shinohara, Kunio

    2009-09-01

    In soft X-ray projection microscopy, it is easy to alter the magnification by changing the distance between the pinhole and the specimen, while the image is blurred because the soft X-rays are diffracted through the propagation from specimen to CCD detector. We corrected the blurred image by the iteration procedure of Fresnel to inverse Fresnel transformation taking phase distribution of the specimen into account. The experiments were conducted at the BL-11A of the Photon Factory, KEK, Japan for the specimens such as glass-capillaries, latex-particles, dried mammalian cells and human chromosomes. Many of those blurred images were corrected adequately by the iteration procedure, though some images such as those which have high-contrast or are overlapped by small cells still remain to be improved.

  20. High-resolution x-ray diffraction of epitaxial bismuth chalcogenide topological insulator layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holý, V.; Kriegner, D.; Steiner, H.; Stangl, J.; Bauer, G.; Springholz, G.

    2017-03-01

    Stoichiometry and lattice structure of epitaxial layers of topological insulators Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 grown by molecular-beam epitaxy is studied by high-resolution x-ray diffraction. We show that the stoichiometry of Bi2X3 – δ (X  =  Te, Se) epitaxial layers depends on the additional flux of the chalcogens Te or Se during growth. If no excess flux is employed, the resulting structure is very close to Bi1X1 (δ  =  1), whereas with a high excess flux the stoichiometric Bi2X3 phase is obtained. From the x-ray data we determined the lattice parameters of the layers and their dependence on composition δ, as well as the degree of crystal quality of the layers. Invited talk at 8th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology (IWAMSN2016), 8–12 November 2016, Ha Long City, Vietnam.

  1. Determination of the absolute chirality of tellurium using resonant diffraction with circularly polarized x-rays.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Collins, S P; Lovesey, S W; Matsumami, M; Moriwaki, T; Shin, S

    2010-03-31

    Many proteins, sugars and pharmaceuticals crystallize into two forms that are mirror images of each other (enantiomers) like our right and left hands. Tellurium is one enantiomer having a space group pair, P3(1)21 (right-handed screw) and P3(2)21 (left-handed screw). X-ray diffraction with dispersion correction terms has been playing an important role in determining the handedness of enantiomers for a long time. However, this approach is not applicable for an elemental crystal such as tellurium or selenium. We have demonstrated that positive and negative circularly polarized x-rays at the resonant energy of tellurium can be used to absolutely distinguish right from left tellurium. This method is applicable to chiral motifs that occur in biomolecules, liquid crystals, ferroelectrics and antiferroelectrics, multiferroics, etc.

  2. Time-, frequency-, and wavevector-resolved x-ray diffraction from single molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kochise; Biggs, Jason D.; Zhang, Yu; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-01-01

    Using a quantum electrodynamic framework, we calculate the off-resonant scattering of a broadband X-ray pulse from a sample initially prepared in an arbitrary superposition of electronic states. The signal consists of single-particle (incoherent) and two-particle (coherent) contributions that carry different particle form factors that involve different material transitions. Single-molecule experiments involving incoherent scattering are more influenced by inelastic processes compared to bulk measurements. The conditions under which the technique directly measures charge densities (and can be considered as diffraction) as opposed to correlation functions of the charge-density are specified. The results are illustrated with time- and wavevector-resolved signals from a single amino acid molecule (cysteine) following an impulsive excitation by a stimulated X-ray Raman process resonant with the sulfur K-edge. Our theory and simulations can guide future experimental studies on the structures of nano-particles and proteins. PMID:24880284

  3. X-ray diffraction results from Mars Science Laboratory: mineralogy of Rocknest at Gale crater.

    PubMed

    Bish, D L; Blake, D F; Vaniman, D T; Chipera, S J; Morris, R V; Ming, D W; Treiman, A H; Sarrazin, P; Morrison, S M; Downs, R T; Achilles, C N; Yen, A S; Bristow, T F; Crisp, J A; Morookian, J M; Farmer, J D; Rampe, E B; Stolper, E M; Spanovich, N

    2013-09-27

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity scooped samples of soil from the Rocknest aeolian bedform in Gale crater. Analysis of the soil with the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) x-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument revealed plagioclase (~An57), forsteritic olivine (~Fo62), augite, and pigeonite, with minor K-feldspar, magnetite, quartz, anhydrite, hematite, and ilmenite. The minor phases are present at, or near, detection limits. The soil also contains 27 ± 14 weight percent x-ray amorphous material, likely containing multiple Fe(3+)- and volatile-bearing phases, including possibly a substance resembling hisingerite. The crystalline component is similar to the normative mineralogy of certain basaltic rocks from Gusev crater on Mars and of martian basaltic meteorites. The amorphous component is similar to that found on Earth in places such as soils on the Mauna Kea volcano, Hawaii.

  4. A Mössbauer and X-ray powder diffraction study of some ferrous hematinics.

    PubMed

    Coe, E M; Bowen, L H; Bereman, R D

    1995-06-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a relatively common illness that can arise from a number of different causes. Three ferrous salts are usually used in its treatment: ferrous fumarate, gluconate, and sulfate. They are administered orally and are relatively well tolerated. These hematinics have been studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction, and can easily be distinguished by both techniques. It was found that the two ferrous sulfates studied (Eckerd and SmithKline Beckman Co.) most closely resemble the monohydrate by comparison of the X-ray powder pattern with those of the JCPDS. Both the ferrous fumarate (Femiron) and gluconate (Spring Valley) had approximately 10% ferric iron present. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported Mössbauer spectrum for ferrous fumarate.

  5. X-ray Diffraction Results from Mars Science Laboratory: Mineralogy of Rocknest at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Chipera, S. J.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Treiman, A. H.; Sarrazin, P.; Morrison, S. M.; Downs, R. T.; Achilles, C. N.; Yen, A. S.; Bristow, T. F.; Crisp, J. A.; Morookian, J. M.; Farmer, J. D.; Rampe, E. B.; Stolper, E. M.; Spanovich, N.; Achilles, Cherie; Agard, Christophe; Verdasca, José Alexandre Alves; Anderson, Robert; Anderson, Ryan; Archer, Doug; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Arvidson, Ray; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Atreya, Sushil; Aubrey, Andrew; Baker, Burt; Baker, Michael; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Baratoux, David; Baroukh, Julien; Barraclough, Bruce; Bean, Keri; Beegle, Luther; Behar, Alberto; Bell, James; Bender, Steve; Benna, Mehdi; Bentz, Jennifer; Berger, Gilles; Berger, Jeff; Berman, Daniel; Bish, David; Blake, David F.; Avalos, Juan J. Blanco; Blaney, Diana; Blank, Jen; Blau, Hannah; Bleacher, Lora; Boehm, Eckart; Botta, Oliver; Böttcher, Stephan; Boucher, Thomas; Bower, Hannah; Boyd, Nick; Boynton, Bill; Breves, Elly; Bridges, John; Bridges, Nathan; Brinckerhoff, William; Brinza, David; Bristow, Thomas; Brunet, Claude; Brunner, Anna; Brunner, Will; Buch, Arnaud; Bullock, Mark; Burmeister, Sönke; Cabane, Michel; Calef, Fred; Cameron, James; Campbell, John "Iain"; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Carmosino, Marco; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Charpentier, Antoine; Chipera, Steve; Choi, David; Clark, Benton; Clegg, Sam; Cleghorn, Timothy; Cloutis, Ed; Cody, George; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela; Coscia, David; Cousin, Agnès; Cremers, David; Crisp, Joy; Cros, Alain; Cucinotta, Frank; d'Uston, Claude; Davis, Scott; Day, Mackenzie "Kenzie"; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; DeFlores, Lauren; DeLapp, Dorothea; DeMarines, Julia; DesMarais, David; Dietrich, William; Dingler, Robert; Donny, Christophe; Downs, Bob; Drake, Darrell; Dromart, Gilles; Dupont, Audrey; Duston, Brian; Dworkin, Jason; Dyar, M. Darby; Edgar, Lauren; Edgett, Kenneth; Edwards, Christopher; Edwards, Laurence; Ehlmann, Bethany; Ehresmann, Bent; Eigenbrode, Jen; Elliott, Beverley; Elliott, Harvey; Ewing, Ryan; Fabre, Cécile; Fairén, Alberto; Farley, Ken; Farmer, Jack; Fassett, Caleb; Favot, Laurent; Fay, Donald; Fedosov, Fedor; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Fisk, Marty; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Flesch, Greg; Floyd, Melissa; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Forni, Olivier; Fraeman, Abby; Francis, Raymond; François, Pascaline; Franz, Heather; Freissinet, Caroline; French, Katherine Louise; Frydenvang, Jens; Gaboriaud, Alain; Gailhanou, Marc; Garvin, James; Gasnault, Olivier; Geffroy, Claude; Gellert, Ralf; Genzer, Maria; Glavin, Daniel; Godber, Austin; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Golovin, Dmitry; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Gondet, Brigitte; Gordon, Suzanne; Gorevan, Stephen; Grant, John; Griffes, Jennifer; Grinspoon, David; Grotzinger, John; Guillemot, Philippe; Guo, Jingnan; Gupta, Sanjeev; Guzewich, Scott; Haberle, Robert; Halleaux, Douglas; Hallet, Bernard; Hamilton, Vicky; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Harpold, Daniel; Harri, Ari-Matti; Harshman, Karl; Hassler, Donald; Haukka, Harri; Hayes, Alex; Herkenhoff, Ken; Herrera, Paul; Hettrich, Sebastian; Heydari, Ezat; Hipkin, Victoria; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Hudgins, Judy; Huntress, Wesley; Hurowitz, Joel; Hviid, Stubbe; Iagnemma, Karl; Indyk, Steve; Israël, Guy; Jackson, Ryan; Jacob, Samantha; Jakosky, Bruce; Jensen, Elsa; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Johnson, Jeffrey; Johnson, Micah; Johnstone, Steve; Jones, Andrea; Jones, John; Joseph, Jonathan; Jun, Insoo; Kah, Linda; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kahre, Melinda; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kasprzak, Wayne; Kauhanen, Janne; Keely, Leslie; Kemppinen, Osku; Keymeulen, Didier; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kinch, Kjartan; King, Penny; Kirkland, Laurel; Kocurek, Gary; Koefoed, Asmus; Köhler, Jan; Kortmann, Onno; Kozyrev, Alexander; Krezoski, Jill; Krysak, Daniel; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Lacour, Jean Luc; Lafaille, Vivian; Langevin, Yves; Lanza, Nina; Lasue, Jeremie; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Lee, Ella Mae; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Lees, David; Lefavor, Matthew; Lemmon, Mark; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Leshin, Laurie; Léveillé, Richard; Lewin-Carpintier, Éric; Lewis, Kevin; Li, Shuai; Lipkaman, Leslie; Little, Cynthia; Litvak, Maxim; Lorigny, Eric; Lugmair, Guenter; Lundberg, Angela; Lyness, Eric; Madsen, Morten; Mahaffy, Paul; Maki, Justin; Malakhov, Alexey; Malespin, Charles; Malin, Michael; Mangold, Nicolas; Manhes, Gérard; Manning, Heidi; Marchand, Geneviève; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; García, César Martín; Martin, Dave; Martin, Mildred; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Mauchien, Patrick; Maurice, Sylvestre; McAdam, Amy; McCartney, Elaina; McConnochie, Timothy; McCullough, Emily; McEwan, Ian; McKay, Christopher; McLennan, Scott; McNair, Sean; Melikechi, Noureddine; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Meyer, Michael; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Miller, Hayden; Miller, Kristen; Milliken, Ralph; Ming, Douglas; Minitti, Michelle; Mischna, Michael; Mitrofanov, Igor; Moersch, Jeff; Mokrousov, Maxim; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Moores, John; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Morookian, John Michael; Morris, Richard; Morrison, Shaunna; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Muller, Jan-Peter; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; Nachon, Marion; López, Sara Navarro; Navarro-González, Rafael; Nealson, Kenneth; Nefian, Ara; Nelson, Tony; Newcombe, Megan; Newman, Claire; Newsom, Horton; Nikiforov, Sergey; Niles, Paul; Nixon, Brian; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Nolan, Thomas; Oehler, Dorothy; Ollila, Ann; Olson, Timothy; Owen, Tobias; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Paillet, Alexis; Pallier, Etienne; Palucis, Marisa; Parker, Timothy; Parot, Yann; Patel, Kiran; Paton, Mark; Paulsen, Gale; Pavlov, Alex; Pavri, Betina; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pepin, Robert; Peret, Laurent; Perez, Rene; Perrett, Glynis; Peterson, Joe; Pilorget, Cedric; Pinet, Patrick; Pla-García, Jorge; Plante, Ianik; Poitrasson, Franck; Polkko, Jouni; Popa, Radu; Posiolova, Liliya; Posner, Arik; Pradler, Irina; Prats, Benito; Prokhorov, Vasily; Purdy, Sharon Wilson; Raaen, Eric; Radziemski, Leon; Rafkin, Scot; Ramos, Miguel; Rampe, Elizabeth; Raulin, François; Ravine, Michael; Reitz, Günther; Rennó, Nilton; Rice, Melissa; Richardson, Mark; Robert, François; Robertson, Kevin; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio J.; Rowland, Scott; Rubin, David; Saccoccio, Muriel; Salamon, Andrew; Sandoval, Jennifer; Sanin, Anton; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Saper, Lee; Sarrazin, Philippe; Sautter, Violaine; Savijärvi, Hannu; Schieber, Juergen; Schmidt, Mariek; Schmidt, Walter; Scholes, Daniel "Dan"; Schoppers, Marcel; Schröder, Susanne; Schwenzer, Susanne; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Sengstacken, Aaron; Shterts, Ruslan; Siebach, Kirsten; Siili, Tero; Simmonds, Jeff; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Slavney, Susie; Sletten, Ronald; Smith, Michael; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Spanovich, Nicole; Spray, John; Squyres, Steven; Stack, Katie; Stalport, Fabien; Steele, Andrew; Stein, Thomas; Stern, Jennifer; Stewart, Noel; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Stoiber, Kevin; Stolper, Ed; Sucharski, Bob; Sullivan, Rob; Summons, Roger; Sumner, Dawn; Sun, Vivian; Supulver, Kimberley; Sutter, Brad; Szopa, Cyril; Tan, Florence; Tate, Christopher; Teinturier, Samuel; ten Kate, Inge; Thomas, Peter; Thompson, Lucy; Tokar, Robert; Toplis, Mike; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Trainer, Melissa; Treiman, Allan; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; VanBommel, Scott; Vaniman, David; Varenikov, Alexey; Vasavada, Ashwin; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Vicenzi, Edward; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Voytek, Mary; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Ward, Jennifer; Webster, Chris; Weigle, Eddie; Wellington, Danika; Westall, Frances; Wiens, Roger Craig; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Williams, Amy; Williams, Joshua; Williams, Rebecca; Williams, Richard B. "Mouser"; Wilson, Mike; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Wolff, Mike; Wong, Mike; Wray, James; Wu, Megan; Yana, Charles; Yen, Albert; Yingst, Aileen; Zeitlin, Cary; Zimdar, Robert; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano

    2013-09-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity scooped samples of soil from the Rocknest aeolian bedform in Gale crater. Analysis of the soil with the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) x-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument revealed plagioclase (~An57), forsteritic olivine (~Fo62), augite, and pigeonite, with minor K-feldspar, magnetite, quartz, anhydrite, hematite, and ilmenite. The minor phases are present at, or near, detection limits. The soil also contains 27 ± 14 weight percent x-ray amorphous material, likely containing multiple Fe3+- and volatile-bearing phases, including possibly a substance resembling hisingerite. The crystalline component is similar to the normative mineralogy of certain basaltic rocks from Gusev crater on Mars and of martian basaltic meteorites. The amorphous component is similar to that found on Earth in places such as soils on the Mauna Kea volcano, Hawaii.

  6. Automated high pressure cell for pressure jump x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Nicholas J.; Gauthe, Beatrice L. L. E.; Templer, Richard H.; Ces, Oscar; Seddon, John M.; Terrill, Nick J.; Rogers, Sarah E.

    2010-06-15

    A high pressure cell for small and wide-angle x-ray diffraction measurements of soft condensed matter samples has been developed, incorporating a fully automated pressure generating network. The system allows both static and pressure jump measurements in the range of 0.1-500 MPa. Pressure jumps can be performed as quickly as 5 ms, both with increasing and decreasing pressures. Pressure is generated by a motorized high pressure pump, and the system is controlled remotely via a graphical user interface to allow operation by a broad user base, many of whom may have little previous experience of high pressure technology. Samples are loaded through a dedicated port allowing the x-ray windows to remain in place throughout an experiment; this facilitates accurate subtraction of background scattering. The system has been designed specifically for use at beamline I22 at the Diamond Light Source, United Kingdom, and has been fully integrated with the I22 beamline control systems.

  7. Source assemblage types for cratonic diamonds from X-ray synchrotron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestola, F.; Alvaro, M.; Casati, M. N.; Wilhelm, H.; Kleppe, A. K.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Domeneghetti, M. C.; Harris, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    Three single crystals of clinopyroxene trapped within three different gem-quality diamonds from the Udachnaya kimberlite (Siberia, Russia) were analysed in situ by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction in order to obtain information on their chemical composition and infer source assemblage type. A non-destructive approach was used with high-energy (≈ 60 keV; λ ≈ 0.206 Å) at I15, the extreme-conditions beamline at Diamond Light Source. A dedicated protocol was used to center the mineral inclusions located deep inside the diamonds in the X-ray beam. Our results reveal that two of the inclusions can be associated with peridotitic paragenesis whereas the third is eclogitic. This study also demonstrates that this non-destructive experimental approach is extremely efficient in evaluating the origin of minerals trapped in their diamond hosts.

  8. Structure determination of thin CoFe films by anomalous x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gloskovskii, Andrei; Stryganyuk, Gregory; Ouardi, Siham; Fecher, Gerhard H.; Felser, Claudia; Hamrle, Jaroslav; Pistora, Jaromir; Bosu, Subrojati; Saito, Kesami; Sakuraba, Yuya; Takanashi, Koki

    2012-10-01

    This work reports on the investigation of structure-property relationships in thin CoFe films grown on MgO. Because of the very similar scattering factors of Fe and Co, it is not possible to distinguish the random A2 (W-type) structure from the ordered B2 (CsCl-type) structure with commonly used x-ray sources. Synchrotron radiation based anomalous x-ray diffraction overcomes this problem. It is shown that as grown thin films and 300 K post annealed films exhibit the A2 structure with a random distribution of Co and Fe. In contrast, films annealed at 400 K adopt the ordered B2 structure.

  9. Object image correction using an X-ray dynamical diffraction Fraunhofer hologram.

    PubMed

    Balyan, Minas K

    2014-03-01

    Taking into account background correction and using Fourier analysis, a numerical method of an object image correction using an X-ray dynamical diffraction Fraunhofer hologram is presented. An example of the image correction of a cylindrical beryllium wire is considered. A background correction of second-order iteration leads to an almost precise reconstruction of the real part of the amplitude transmission coefficient and improves the imaginary part compared with that without a background correction. Using Fourier analysis of the reconstructed transmission coefficient, non-physical oscillations can be avoided. This method can be applied for the determination of the complex amplitude transmission coefficient of amplitude as well as phase objects, and can be used in X-ray microscopy.

  10. Evaluation of x-ray diffraction enhanced imaging in the diagnosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenglin; Yan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xinyi; Yang, Wentao; Peng, Weijun; Shi, Daren; Zhu, Peiping; Huang, Wanxia; Yuan, Qingxi

    2007-01-21

    The significance of the x-ray diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) technique in the diagnosis of breast cancer and its feasibility in clinical medical imaging are evaluated. Different massive specimens including normal breast tissues, benign breast tumour tissues and malignant breast tumour tissues are imaged with the DEI method. The images are recorded respectively by CCD or x-ray film at different positions of the rocking curve and processed with a pixel-by-pixel algorithm. The characteristics of the DEI images about the normal and diseased tissues are compared. The rocking curves of a double-crystal diffractometer with various tissues are also studied. The differences in DEI images and their rocking curves are evaluated for early diagnosis of breast cancers.

  11. Pseudomonoenergetic x-ray diffraction measurements using balanced filters for coherent-scatter computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Beath, S. R.; Cunningham, I. A.

    2009-05-15

    Coherent-scatter computed tomography (CSCT) is a method of ''composition'' imaging based on measurements of diffraction patterns from tissues. Use of an x-ray tube degrades scatter pattern angular resolution due to the x-ray spectral width, making it difficult to uniquely identify some materials. The use of two transmission filters with similar atomic numbers (balanced ''Ross filters'') to generate pseudomonoenergetic scatter patterns is described as it applies to CSCT. An analysis of angular-blur mechanisms reveals that focal spot size and beam width are the most important factors determining Bragg-peak width when Er-Tm filters are used. A relative RMS spectral width of 1% can be achieved in the difference spectrum and a Bragg-peak RMS angular width of approximately 0.14 deg. (relative width of 3% at 5 deg. scatter angle) can be achieved with an effective energy of 58 keV.

  12. Silicon loss metrology using synchrotron x-ray reflectance and Bragg diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, Mansi; Wolfe, John C.; Donner, Wolfgang; Srivastava, Aseem

    2007-09-26

    We use synchrotron x-ray reflectometry and Bragg diffraction to study silicon loss in the low temperature plasma oxidation of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. We show that Laue oscillations associated with the Si (004) Bragg peak give the number of Si (004) planes in the device layer to within an experimental error of 0.07 nm and that X-ray reflectometry gives the total thickness of the device layer and the surface oxide to within 0.05 nm. We find that silicon loss in samples processed in two different plasma systems correspond to an increase in total thickness that is consistent with the formation of SiO{sub 2}.

  13. Pathway of a damaging mechanism - Analyzing chloride attack by synchrotron based X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, M. C.; Stroh, J.; Malaga, K.; Meng, B.; Panne, U.; Emmerling, F.

    2015-06-01

    Typically, the changes of the phase compositions due to the chemical attack are studied in-situ only by chemical analysis or microscopy. In this study, the chloride transport and binding in the cement matrix in different cementitious materials was analyzed by synchrotron based X-ray diffraction (SyXRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Sample materials consisting of cement paste were embedded in high concentrated sodium chloride solution over different time spans. Afterwards, the phase and chemical compositions were determined. The high spatial resolution and the information about the chloride distribution offer a detailed view of chloride binding in the cement matrix and allow the conclusions about the degradation mechanisms. The results are discussed related to the influence of different supplementary cementitious materials on the damaging mechanism.

  14. Structural studies of PCU-hydrazones: NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractions, and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veljković, Jelena; Šekutor, Marina; Molčanov, Krešimir; Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata

    2011-06-01

    In this article we present a detailed structural investigation for the configurational isomers of PCU-hydrazones. The structural characterization of these hydrazones was performed using NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and theoretical calculations. The single crystal X-ray structures of PCU-hydrazones 6B and 6C have been solved and used to conclusively confirm the characterization obtained via NMR spectra of a particular isomer. Nuclear magnetic shielding values calculated for 6A-C using DFT calculations were correlated with the experimentally determined chemical shifts. The computed results were found to be in good agreement with the observed 13C NMR values. The computed NMR results helped to ascertain the isomers of PCU-hydrazones 4A-C.

  15. Use of x-ray fluorescence and diffraction techniques in studying ancient ceramics of Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunaratne, B. S. B.

    2012-07-01

    Ceramics were produced for centuries in Sri Lanka for various purposes. Ancient ceramic articles such as pottery, bricks, tiles, sewer pipes, etc, were made from naturally occurring raw materials. Use of X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in characterizing of two ancient ceramic samples from two different archaeological sites in Sri Lanka is presented. The information obtained in this manner is used to figure out the ancient ceramic technology, particularly to learn about the raw materials used, the source of raw materials, processing parameters such as firing temperature or binders used in ceramic production. This information then can be used to explore the archaeometric background such as the nature and extent of cultural and technological interaction between different periods of history in Sri Lanka.

  16. Reconstruction of an astigmatic hard X-ray beam and alignment of K-B mirrors from ptychographic coherent diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Kewish, Cameron M; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Liu, Chian; Qian, Jun; Shi, Bing; Benson, Christa; Khounsary, Ali M; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Bunk, Oliver; Fienup, James R; Macrander, Albert T; Assoufid, Lahsen

    2010-10-25

    We have used coherent X-ray diffraction experiments to characterize both the 1-D and 2-D foci produced by nanofocusing Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) mirrors, and we find agreement. Algorithms related to ptychography were used to obtain a 3-D reconstruction of a focused hard X-ray beam waist, using data measured when the mirrors were not optimally aligned. Considerable astigmatism was evident in the reconstructed complex wavefield. Comparing the reconstructed wavefield for a single mirror with a geometrical projection of the wavefront errors expected from optical metrology data allowed us to diagnose a 40 μrad misalignment in the incident angle of the first mirror, which had occurred during the experiment. Good agreement between the reconstructed wavefront obtained from the X-ray data and off-line metrology data obtained with visible light demonstrates the usefulness of the technique as a metrology and alignment tool for nanofocusing X-ray optics.

  17. Data preparation and evaluation techniques for x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Marchesini, Stefano; Shapiro, David; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The post-experiment processing of X-ray Diffraction Microscopy data is often time-consuming and difficult. This is mostly due to the fact that even if a preliminary result has been reconstructed, there is no definitive answer as to whether or not a better result with more consistently retrieved phases can still be obtained. In addition, we show here that the first step in data analysis, the assembly of two-dimensional diffraction patterns from a large set of raw diffraction data, is crucial to obtaining reconstructions of highest possible consistency. We have developed software that automates this process and results in consistently accurate diffraction patterns. We have furthermore derived some criteria of validity for a tool commonly used to assess the consistency of reconstructions, the phase retrieval transfer function, and suggest a modified version that has improved utility for judging reconstruction quality.

  18. Imaging at the X-ray Frontier: Coherent Diffraction Imaging (CDI) for Nano and Bioscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Jianwei (John)

    2013-03-01

    For centuries, lens-based microscopy, such as light, phase-contrast, fluorescence, confocal and electron microscopy, has played an important role in the evolution of modern sciences and technologies. In 1999, a novel form of microscopy, i.e. coherent diffraction imaging (also termed coherent diffraction microscopy or lensless imaging) was developed and transformed our traditional view of microscopy, in which the diffraction pattern of a noncrystalline object or a nanocrystal is first measured and then directly phased to obtain a high resolution image. The well-known phase problem is solved by the oversampling method in combination with iterative algorithms whose principle can be traced back to the Shannon sampling theorem. In this talk, I will briefly discuss the principle of coherent diffraction imaging and illustrate its broad application in nano and bioscience by using synchrotron radiation, high harmonic generation and X-ray free electron lasers.

  19. Extremum seeking x-ray position feedback using power line harmonic leakage as the perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, S.; Kissick, D. J.; Venugopalan, N.; Ogata, C. M.; Makarov, O.; Stepanov, S.; Fischetti, R. F.

    2016-09-01

    Small x-ray beam sizes necessary for probing nanoscale phenomena require exquisite stability to prevent data corruption by noise. One source of instability at synchrotron radiation x-ray beamlines is the slow detuning of x-ray optics to marginal alignment where the onset of clipping increases the beam's susceptibility to higher frequency position oscillations. In this article, we show that a 1 μ m amplitude horizontal x-ray beam oscillation driven by power line harmonic leakage into the electron storage ring can be used as perturbation for horizontal position extremum seeking feedback. Feedback performance is characterized by convergence to 1.5% away from maximum intensity at optimal alignment.

  20. X-ray dynamical diffraction from multilayer Laue lenses with rough interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Hanfei

    2009-04-15

    A modeling approach for x-ray dynamical diffraction from multilayer Laue lenses (MLLs) with rough interfaces is developed. Although still based on the principle of the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA), this model is formulated from the perspective of the physical scattering process, very different from the conventional DWBA formalism. Using this model, one can study x-ray scattering from rough interfaces in the regime of Fresnel diffraction and in the case of absorptive samples, for example, x-ray dynamical diffraction from MLLs with rough interfaces, which is hard to handle in the framework of the conventional DWBA. Theoretical simulations for various MLLs with rough interfaces are conducted. It is found that interfacial roughness results in a decrease in the local diffraction intensity, where the attenuation factor is a function of the root-mean-square (rms) roughness versus the local zone width ratio. This study shows that if all zones possess an identical rms roughness value that is less than half of the outmost MLL zone width, the focal broadening effect due to roughness is almost unnoticeable, provided that the mean position of the interface does not deviate from the required zone plate law. A further study shows that uncorrelated interfacial roughness can be treated the same as interfacial diffusion, in which case a roughness factor similar to the ''Debye-Waller factor'' can be used, and the pseudo-Fourier coefficients of the susceptibility function for an MLL [H. F. Yan et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 115438 (2007)] have to be multiplied by this factor.