Science.gov

Sample records for x-ray spectral range

  1. Grazing-incidence cylindric mirror with multiple reflection for the soft X-ray spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Yu. M.; Fedin, D. A.; Fedorchuk, R. V.; Koshevoi, M. O.; Kozhevnikov, I. V.; Murashova, V. A.; Pisarzyk, T.; Rupasov, A. A.; Shikanov, A. S.; Yakimenko, M. N.; Vinogradov, A. V.

    1991-10-01

    New possibilities of the SR beam control are opened with the use of grazing incidence elements based on the "whispering gallery" effect. Experimental investigations of such an X-ray optical element have been performed on the S-60 synchrotron at the Lebedev Institute. By using the absolute spectral characteristics of the X-ray photofilm RAR 2497 (Kodak) and the SR spectral shape we have determined the output-angle integral spectral coefficient of reflection of the studied mirror. A high value of the reflection coefficient makes it possible to use such an X-ray optical element as the effective reflector for soft X-ray beams.

  2. Response of diamond photoconductors to soft x-ray in the spectral range 125 {angstrom} to 240 {angstrom}

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.; Wagner, R.S.; Gullikson, E.

    1995-12-01

    Due to the large bandgap of diamond, it is transparent to the visible spectrum, making it an attractive material for soft x-ray detection. Response of diamond photoconductors fabricated using Polycrystalline chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond to soft x-rays has been measured using x-rays emitted from a laser-produced plasma source in the spectral range 125 {Angstrom} to 240 {Angstrom}. These photoconductors have interdigitated electrode structure in order to increase the active area as well as detector sensitivity. Contributions to the detector sensitivity by the photoelectrons is discussed.

  3. Investigation of sensitometric characteristics of X-ray photoemulsions in the spectral range of 15-80 Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Yu. M.; Eidmann, K.; Fedin, D. A.; Fedorchuk, R. V.; Koshevoi, M. O.; Murashova, V. A.; Rupasov, A. A.; Shikanov, A. S.; Shpol'sky, M. R.; Yakimenko, M. N.

    1991-10-01

    An investigation of the sensitometric characteristics of X-ray films RAR 2497, SB-2, 101-01 (Kodak), D-7 (Agfa-Gevaert) and UFSh-0 (GNIIKhFP) has been carried out. These films are widely used in scientific research with different types of X-ray sources. The investigation was realized with the aid of a transmission grating spectrograph. An S-60 electron accelerator (P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute) was used as the source of X-ray radiation. The characteristic curves for different wavelengths (within the mentioned range) are presented, as well as the spectral dependences of absolute sensitivity and contrast for the tested films.

  4. An in-vacuum wiggler for SOLEIL Hard X-rays spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Marcouille, O.; Chapuis, L.; Brunelle, P.; Berteaud, P.; Couprie, M.-E.; Filhol, J.-M.; Herbeaux, C.; Marlats, J.-L.; Massal, M.; Mary, A.; Tavakoli, K.; Valleau, M.; Veteran, J.

    2010-06-23

    The production of Hard X-rays has become a tricky problem on medium energy storage rings. It requires Insertion Devices (IDs) with high magnetic field and a large number of periods. To cover the 20-50 keV photon energy range at SOLEIL (2.75 GeV), an in-vacuum wiggler (WSV50) has been preferred to a superconducting ID. The wiggler is composed of 38 periods of 50 mm producing a 2.1 T field at a minimum magnetic gap of 5.5 mm. To minimize the magnetic forces acting between magnet arrays (8.5 tons), a compensation system composed of non magnetic springs has been mounted apart from the magnet system to reduce the mechanical deformations. The wiggler has been assembled step by step by means of a genetic algorithm which minimizes the magnetic errors measured with a flipping coil. This paper presents the mechanical and magnetic design of the wiggler as well as the construction and the magnetic measurements.

  5. X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reverdin, Charles; Caillaud, T.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Silvert, V.; Soullie, G.; Villette, B.; Thais, Frederic; Loisel, Guillaume; Blenski, T.; Poirier, M.; Busquet, M.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Serres, F.; Ducret, J. E.; Foelsner, W.; Gilles, D.; Turck-Chieze, S.

    2012-10-15

    An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution {approx} 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at Ecole Polytechnique (France) to measure the {Delta}n = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirror and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented.

  6. X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facility.

    PubMed

    Reverdin, Charles; Thais, Frédéric; Loisel, Guillaume; Busquet, M; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S; Blenski, T; Caillaud, T; Ducret, J E; Foelsner, W; Gilles, D; Gilleron, F; Pain, J C; Poirier, M; Serres, F; Silvert, V; Soullie, G; Turck-Chieze, S; Villette, B

    2012-10-01

    An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution ∼ 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at École Polytechnique (France) to measure the Δn = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirror and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented. PMID:23126955

  7. X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverdin, Charles; Thais, Frédéric; Loisel, Guillaume; Busquet, M.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Blenski, T.; Caillaud, T.; Ducret, J. E.; Foelsner, W.; Gilles, D.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Poirier, M.; Serres, F.; Silvert, V.; Soullie, G.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Villette, B.

    2012-10-01

    An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution ⟨E/δE⟩ ˜ 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at École Polytechnique (France) to measure the Δn = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirror and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented.

  8. The X-Ray Spectral Evolution of Galactic Black Hole X-Ray Binaries toward Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, Richard. M.; Gallo, Elena; Jonker, Peter G.

    2013-08-01

    Most transient black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) spend the bulk of their time in a quiescent state, where they accrete matter from their companion star at highly sub-Eddington luminosities (we define quiescence here as a normalized Eddington ratio lx = L 0.5-10 keV/L Edd < 10-5). Here, we present Chandra X-ray imaging spectroscopy for three BHXB systems (H 1743-322, MAXI J1659-152, and XTE J1752-223) as they fade into quiescence following an outburst. Multiple X-ray observations were taken within one month of each other, allowing us to track each individual system's X-ray spectral evolution during its decay. We compare these three systems to other BHXB systems. We confirm that quiescent BHXBs have softer X-ray spectra than low-hard-state BHXBs, and that quiescent BHXB spectral properties show no dependence on the binary system's orbital parameters. However, the observed anti-correlation between X-ray photon index (Γ) and lx in the low-hard state does not continue once a BHXB enters quiescence. Instead, Γ plateaus to an average langΓrang = 2.08 ± 0.07 by the time lx reaches ~10-5. lx ~ 10-5 is thus an observationally motivated upper limit for the beginning of the quiescent spectral state. Our results are discussed in the context of different accretion flow models and across the black hole mass scale.

  9. X-ray crystal spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 8-18 A spectral range at the LULI laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reverdin, C.; Thais, F.; Loisel, G.; Bougeard, M.

    2010-10-15

    An x-ray crystal spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 8-18 A spectral range with an average spectral resolution of <{lambda}/{delta}{lambda}>{approx}400. It has been successfully used at the LULI-2000 laser facility (See C. Sauteret, rapport LULI 2001, 88 (2002) at Ecole Polytechnique (France) to measure in the same experimental conditions the 2p-3d transitions of several elements with the neighboring atomic number Z: Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ge [G. Loisel et al., High Energy Density Phys. 5, 173 (2009)]. Hence, a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is needed. This spectrometer features two lines of sight. In this example, one line of sight looks through the sample and the other one is looking directly at the backlighter emission. Both are outfitted with a spherical condensing mirror. A TlAP crystal is used for spectral dispersion. Detection is made with an image plate Fuji BAS TR2025, which is sensitive to x rays. We present some experimental results showing the performances of this spectrometer.

  10. X-ray crystal spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 8-18 Å spectral range at the LULI laser facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverdin, C.; Thais, F.; Loisel, G.; Bougeard, M.

    2010-10-01

    An x-ray crystal spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 8-18 Å spectral range with an average spectral resolution of ⟨λ /δλ⟩˜400. It has been successfully used at the LULI-2000 laser facility (See C. Sauteret, rapport LULI 2001, 88 (2002) at École Polytechnique (France) to measure in the same experimental conditions the 2p-3d transitions of several elements with the neighboring atomic number Z: Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ge [G. Loisel et al., High Energy Density Phys. 5, 173 (2009)]. Hence, a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is needed. This spectrometer features two lines of sight. In this example, one line of sight looks through the sample and the other one is looking directly at the backlighter emission. Both are outfitted with a spherical condensing mirror. A TlAP crystal is used for spectral dispersion. Detection is made with an image plate Fuji BAS TR2025, which is sensitive to x rays. We present some experimental results showing the performances of this spectrometer.

  11. X-ray crystal spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 8-18 Å spectral range at the LULI laser facility.

    PubMed

    Reverdin, C; Thais, F; Loisel, G; Bougeard, M

    2010-10-01

    An x-ray crystal spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 8-18 Å spectral range with an average spectral resolution of <λ/δλ> ∼ 400. It has been successfully used at the LULI-2000 laser facility (See C. Sauteret, rapport LULI 2001, 88 (2002) at École Polytechnique (France) to measure in the same experimental conditions the 2p-3d transitions of several elements with the neighboring atomic number Z: Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ge [G. Loisel et al., High Energy Density Phys. 5, 173 (2009)]. Hence, a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is needed. This spectrometer features two lines of sight. In this example, one line of sight looks through the sample and the other one is looking directly at the backlighter emission. Both are outfitted with a spherical condensing mirror. A TlAP crystal is used for spectral dispersion. Detection is made with an image plate Fuji BAS TR2025, which is sensitive to x rays. We present some experimental results showing the performances of this spectrometer. PMID:21034025

  12. THE SECOND STAGE OF FERMI@ELETTRA: A SEEDED FEL IN THE SOFT X-RAY SPECTRAL RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Allaria, E.; DeNinno, G.; Fawley, W. M.

    2009-08-14

    The second stage of the FERMI FEL, named FEL-2, is based on the principle of high-gain harmonic generation and relies on a double-seeded cascade. Recent developments stimulated a revision of the original setup, which was designed to cover the spectral range between 40 and 10 nm. The numerical simulations we present here show that the nominal (expected) electron-beam performance allows extension of the FEL spectral range down to 4 nm. A significant amount of third harmonic power can be also expected. We also show that the proposed setup is flexible enough for exploiting future developments of new seed sources, e.g., high harmonic generation in gases.

  13. Soft X-ray spectral observations of quasars and high X-ray luminosity Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, R.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Krolik, J. H.; Holt, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    Results of the analysis of 28 Einstein SSS observations of 15 high X-ray luminosity (L(x) 10 to the 435 power erg/s) quasars and Seyfert type 1 nuclei are presented. The 0.75-4.5 keV spectra are in general well fit by a simple model consisting of a power law plus absorption by cold gas. The averager spectral index alpha is 0.66 + or - .36, consistent with alpha for the spectrum of these objects above 2 keV. In all but one case, no evidence was found for intrinsic absorption, with an upper limit of 2 x 10 to the 21st power/sq cm. Neither was evidence found for partial covering of the active nucleus by dense, cold matter (N(H) 10 to the 22nd power/sq cm; the average upper limit on the partial covering fraction is 0.5. There is no obvious correlation between spectral index and 0175-4.5 keV X-ray luminosity (which ranges from 3 x 10 to the 43rd to 47th powers erg/s or with other source properties. The lack of intrinsic X-ray absorption allows us to place constraints on the density and temperature of the broad-line emission region, and narrow line emission region, and the intergalactic medium.

  14. Extended range X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R. B. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An X-ray telescope system is described which is comprised of a tubular mount having a collecting region remote from the one axial end. A soft X-ray/XUV subsystem associated with the collecting region directs only relatively soft, near on-axis X-rays/XUV radiation incident on a first portion of the collecting region into a first detector sensitive to relatively soft X-rays/XUV radiation. A hard X-ray subsystem associated with the collecting region directs only relatively hard near on-axis X-rays incident on a second portion of the collecting region into a second detector sensitive to relatively hard X-rays.

  15. Phase-resolved X-ray spectroscopy and spectral energy distribution of the X-ray soft polar RS Caeli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traulsen, I.; Reinsch, K.; Schwope, A. D.; Schwarz, R.; Walter, F. M.; Burwitz, V.

    2014-02-01

    Context. RS Cae is the third target in our series of XMM-Newton observations of soft X-ray-dominated polars. Aims: Our observational campaign aims to better understand and describe the multiwavelength data, the physical properties of the system components, and the short- and long-term behavior of the component fluxes in RS Cae. Methods: We employ stellar atmosphere, stratified accretion-column, and widely used X-ray spectral models. We fit the XMM-Newton spectra, model the multiband light curves, and opt for a mostly consistent description of the spectral energy distribution. Results: Our XMM-Newton data of RS Cae are clearly dominated by soft X-ray emission. The X-ray light curves are shaped by emission from the main accretion region, which is visible over the whole orbital cycle, interrupted only by a stream eclipse. The optical light curves are formed by cyclotron and stream emission. The XMM-Newton X-ray spectra comprise a black-body-like and a plasma component at mean temperatures of 36 eV and 7 keV. The spectral fits give evidence of a partially absorbing and a reflection component. Multitemperature models, covering a broader temperature range in the X-ray emitting accretion regions, reproduce the spectra appropriately well. Including archival data, we describe the spectral energy distribution with a combination of models based on a consistent set of parameters and derive a lower limit estimate of the distance d ≳ 750 pc. Conclusions: The high bolometric soft-to-hard flux ratios and short-term variability of the (X-ray) light curves are characteristic of inhomogeneous accretion. RS Cae clearly belongs in the group of polars that show a very strong soft X-ray flux compared to their hard X-ray flux. The different black-body fluxes and similar hard X-ray and optical fluxes during the XMM-Newton and ROSAT observations show that soft and hard X-ray emission are not directly correlated. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with

  16. A new X-ray spectral observation of NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. E.; Netzer, H.; Arnaud, K. A.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Jahoda, K. M.; Kelley, R.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Petre, R.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1993-01-01

    A new X-ray observation of NGC 1068, in which improved spectral resolution (R is approximately equal to 40) and broad energy range provide important new constraints on models for this galaxy, is reported. The observed X-ray continuum of NGC 1068 from 0.3 to 10 keV is well fitted as the sum of two power-law spectra with no evidence for absorption intrinsic to the source. Strong Fe K emission lines with a total equivalent width of 2700 eV were detected due to iron less ionized than Fe XX and to iron more ionized than Fe XXIII. No evidence was seen for lines due to the recombination of highly ionized oxygen with an upper limit for the O Ly-alpha emission line of 40 eV. The discovery of multiple Fe K and Fe L emission lines indicates a broad range of ionization states for this gas. The X-ray emission from the two components is modeled for various geometries using a photoionization code that calculates the temperature and ionization state of the gas. Typical model parameters are a total Compton depth of a few percent, an inner boundary of the hot component of about 1 pc, and an inner boundary of the warm component of about 20 pc.

  17. Spectral evolution of a long X-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, J. H.; Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Pravdo, S. H.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    An X-ray burst-like event with a peak intensity 1 1/2 times that of the Crab and a decay time of approximately 100s was observed. Significant spectral changes occurred during the burst. The spectra were best fit by the black form with kT ranging from .87 keV to 2.3 keV. They suggest a source with smaller dimensions than a massive black hole. A weak source was observed after the burst with a 10 keV thermal spectrum and an indication of iron line emission.

  18. X-ray time and spectral variability as probes of ultraluminous x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj Ranga Reddy

    A long-standing debate in the field of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs: luminosities > 3x1039 ergs s-1) is whether these objects are powered by stellar-mass black holes (mass range of 3-25 solar masses) undergoing hyper-accretion/emission or if they host the long-sought after class of intermediate-mass black holes (mass range of a few 100-1000 solar masses) accreting material at sub-Eddington rates. We present X-ray time and energy spectral variability studies of ULXs in order to understand their physical environments and accurately weigh their compact objects. A sample of ULXs exhibit quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) with centroid frequencies in the range of 10-200 mHz. The nature of the power density spectra (PDS) of these sources is qualitatively similar to stellar-mass black holes when they exhibit the so-called type-C low-frequency QPOs (frequency range of 0.2-15 Hz). However, the crucial difference is that the characteristic frequencies within the PDS of ULXs, viz., the break frequencies and the centroid frequencies of the QPOs, are scaled down by a factor of approximately 10-100 compared to stellar-mass black holes. It has thus been argued that the ULX mHz QPOs are the type-C low-frequency QPO analogs of stellar-mass black holes and that the observed difference in the frequencies (a fewx0.01 Hz compared with a few Hz) is due to the presence of intermediate-mass black holes ( MULX = (QPOstellar-mass black hole }/QPOULX)xM stellar-mass black hole, where M and QPO are the mass and the QPO frequency, respectively) within these ULXs. We analyzed all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray data of ULXs NGC 5408 X-1 and M82 X-1 in order to test the hypothesis that the ULX mHz QPOs are the type-C analogs by searching for a correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the energy spectral power-law index as type-C QPOs show such a dependence. From our multi-epoch timing and spectral analysis of ULXs NGC 5408 X-1 and M82 X-1, we found that the mHz QPOs of these sources vary

  19. The X-ray spectra of galaxies. I - Spectral fits of individual galaxies and X-ray colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, D.-W.; Fabbiano, G.; Trinchieri, G.

    1992-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of normal galaxies is investigated systematically by using the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) data in the Einstein data bank. In addition to the standard model fitting technique, X-ray colors are introduced in order to extract spectral information from the fainter X-ray sources. Spectral parameters for 43 galaxies and X-ray colors for 127 galaxies are presented.

  20. Spectral unfolds of PITHON Flash X-ray source.

    SciTech Connect

    Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Riordan, John C.

    2007-11-01

    Using a differential absorption spectrometer we obtained experimental spectral information for the PITHON Flash X-ray Machine located in San Leandro, California at L-3 Communications. Spectral information we obtained pertained to the 200 keV to 800 keV endpoint operation of PITHON. We also obtained data on the temporal behavior of high energy and low energy spectral content.

  1. Phase Resolved X-ray Spectral Analysis of Soft IPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekon, Yakup

    2016-07-01

    As a subclass of Cataclysmic Variables, Intermediate Polars (IPs) are magnetic systems which mainly show hard X-ray emission. However, there have been an increasing number of systems that also show a soft emission component arising from reprocessed X-rays from the white dwarf limbs. Due to their relatively short periods, they pose as good canditates to perform phase resolved analysis. In this work, X-ray phase resolved spectral analysis of selected IPs with soft X-ray emission components (such as PQ Gem, V2069 Cyg etc.) over the orbital and/or spin periods will be presented. The analyses will help a better understanding of the complex absorption mechanisms and the nature of the soft X-ray emissions in soft IPs.

  2. THE X-RAY SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF GALACTIC BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES TOWARD QUIESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, Richard M.; Gallo, Elena; Jonker, Peter G.

    2013-08-10

    Most transient black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) spend the bulk of their time in a quiescent state, where they accrete matter from their companion star at highly sub-Eddington luminosities (we define quiescence here as a normalized Eddington ratio l{sub x} = L{sub 0.5-10{sub keV}}/L{sub Edd} < 10{sup -5}). Here, we present Chandra X-ray imaging spectroscopy for three BHXB systems (H 1743-322, MAXI J1659-152, and XTE J1752-223) as they fade into quiescence following an outburst. Multiple X-ray observations were taken within one month of each other, allowing us to track each individual system's X-ray spectral evolution during its decay. We compare these three systems to other BHXB systems. We confirm that quiescent BHXBs have softer X-ray spectra than low-hard-state BHXBs, and that quiescent BHXB spectral properties show no dependence on the binary system's orbital parameters. However, the observed anti-correlation between X-ray photon index ({Gamma}) and l{sub x} in the low-hard state does not continue once a BHXB enters quiescence. Instead, {Gamma} plateaus to an average ({Gamma}) = 2.08 {+-} 0.07 by the time l{sub x} reaches {approx}10{sup -5}. l{sub x} {approx} 10{sup -5} is thus an observationally motivated upper limit for the beginning of the quiescent spectral state. Our results are discussed in the context of different accretion flow models and across the black hole mass scale.

  3. EXSAA: Environmentally-Induced X-ray Spectral Analysis Automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, F. W.; Clark, P. E.; Rilee, M. L.; Truszkowski, W.

    2005-05-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry is one of the principal means of compositional analysis in the lab and in the field: it will be a central tool in NASA's Exploration Initiative (EI) missions. No currently available XRF software has the generic functionality to provide the basis for XRF experiment design, instrument development, and data interpretation for the suite of prospective EI missions. In response to this need, we have developed EXSAA (Environmentally-induced X-ray Spectral Analysis Automation), a generic, fast, interactive spectral simulation tool which can be used in assessing broadband continuous spectra being generated and detected during reconnaissance missions and field campaigns involving planetary surfaces. The software produces model spectra of detectable environmentally-induced X-ray spectra from fundamental principles for target characteristics and conditions likely to be experienced in remote or in situ planetary missions. Fluorescence is modeled following Jenkins and DeVries (1967); coherent and Compton scattering following Hubbell (1969). The modeling provided is extensible, and a user interface provides for selection of source, detector characteristics, compositional components, and geometry for known targets. An immediate application of the tool is the prediction for mission planning purposes of X-ray flux to be expected for a range of targets and instrumentation. A longer-term application is the model basis for the recovery of surface composition from actual missions, where some parameters (e.g. source flux) will be known, and others obtained from a Bayesian analysis of the observations. Ultimately, EXSAA could function as part of the agent-based SAA Toolkit being developed by a group of physical scientists, systems engineers, and AI practitioners to automate portions of the spectral analysis process. EXSAA could be called on by human or machine agents to provide an understanding of XRF phenomena for tasks including specifically (1

  4. X-ray spectral and optical properties of an ultraluminous X-ray source in NGC 4258 (M106)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdan, Hasan; Balman, Solen; Akyuz, Aysun; Avdan, Senay; Aksaker, Nazim; Akkaya Oralhan, İnci

    2016-07-01

    We report the X-ray and optical properties of an ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in the nearby galaxy NGC 4258 (M106). The XMM-Newton and Chandra archival observations were used to examine the X-ray spectral properties of the source. Throughout the X-ray observations, we discuss that the source appears to exhibit possible spectral changes by considering the hardness ratios and the spectral model parameters. The luminosity of the source varies a factor of two during the observations and has a peak value of ˜2x10^{39} erg s^{-1}. In the optical band, the source seems to belong to a star cluster. The archival HST images were used to search the optical counterpart of the ULX and three possible candidates were found within the 1σ error radius of 0.3". Also the mass for the compact object is estimated in the range of 10-15 M _{sun} which indicates a stellar-mass black hole.

  5. Spectral feature variations in x-ray diffraction imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, Scott D.; Greenberg, Joel A.

    2016-05-01

    Materials with different atomic or molecular structures give rise to unique scatter spectra when measured by X-ray diffraction. The details of these spectra, though, can vary based on both intrinsic (e.g., degree of crystallinity or doping) and extrinsic (e.g., pressure or temperature) conditions. While this sensitivity is useful for detailed characterizations of the material properties, these dependences make it difficult to perform more general classification tasks, such as explosives threat detection in aviation security. A number of challenges, therefore, currently exist for reliable substance detection including the similarity in spectral features among some categories of materials combined with spectral feature variations from materials processing and environmental factors. These factors complicate the creation of a material dictionary and the implementation of conventional classification and detection algorithms. Herein, we report on two prominent factors that lead to variations in spectral features: crystalline texture and temperature variations. Spectral feature comparisons between materials categories will be described for solid metallic sheet, aqueous liquids, polymer sheet, and metallic, organic, and inorganic powder specimens. While liquids are largely immune to texture effects, they are susceptible to temperature changes that can modify their density or produce phase changes. We will describe in situ temperature-dependent measurement of aqueous-based commercial goods in the temperature range of -20°C to 35°C.

  6. Super-soft X-ray Spectral Evolution in Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, K. L.; Osborne, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Swift has performed intensive monitoring of a number of novae as they pass through their super-soft X-ray phase. While Chandra and XMM-Newton can provide high-resolution grating spectra, important for identifying individual emission and absorption features and placing constraints on abundances, few observations are obtained with these instruments, thus providing only rare snapshots of the super-soft spectral evolution. With Swift, however, we can perform daily (if not hourly) monitoring, allowing us to follow the entirety of the super-soft phase in great detail. Spectral evolution is clear, often even when simply comparing the unfitted spectra. Here, we fit stellar atmosphere models to the X-ray spectra of some of the densely-observed Swift novae, investigating the evolution of temperature, emitting radius and X-ray luminosity throughout their super-soft phases.

  7. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J.; Desco, M.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in

  8. X-ray Spectral Measurements of the JMAR High-Power Laser-plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, Robert R.; Dozier, Charles M.; Newman, Daniel A.; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Gaeta, Celestino J.; Cassidy, Kelly L.; Powers, Michael F.; Kleindolph, Thomas; Morris, James H.; Forber, Richard A.

    2002-10-01

    X-ray spectra of Cu plasmas at the focus of a four-beam, solid-state diode-pumped laser have been recorded. This laser-plasma X-ray source is being developed for JMAR's lithography systems aimed at high- performance semiconductor integrated circuits. The unique simultaneous overlay of the four sub-nanosecond laser beams at 300 Hertz produces a bright, point-plasma X-ray source. PIN diode measurements of the X-ray output indicate that the conversion efficiency (ratio of X-ray emission energy into 2π steradians to incident laser energy) was approximately 9 percent with average X-ray power yields of greater than 10 Watts. Spectra were recorded on calibrated Kodak DEF film in a curved-crystal spectrograph. A KAP crystal (2d = 26.6 Angstroms) was used to disperse the 900 eV to 3000 eV spectral energies onto the film. Preliminary examination of the films indicated the existence of Cu and Cu XX ionization states. Additional spectra as a function of laser input power were also recorded to investigate potential changes in X-ray yields. These films are currently being analyzed. The analysis of the spectra provide absolute line and continuum intensities, and total X-ray output in the measured spectral range.

  9. X-ray Spectral Measurements of a Dense Plasma Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, Robert R.; Dozier, Charles M.; Newman, Daniel A.; Petr, Rodney A.; Freshman, Jay; Hoey, David W.; Heaton, John

    2002-10-01

    Absolute intensities of spectra in a dense-plasma-focus (DPF) source have been recorded and analyzed. This DPF source has been identified as one of the more promising sources for X-ray lithography. The source, developed by Science Research Laboratory, Inc., is currently undergoing testing and further development at BAE Systems, Inc. The DPF operates at 60 Hz and produces an average output pulse of ~5 J of X rays into 4π steradians in a continuous operation mode. In all runs, there was an initial number of pulses, typically between 30 to 40, during which the X-ray output increased and the DPF appeared to be undergoing a conditioning process, and after which a "steady-state" mode was achieved where the average X-ray power was relatively constant. Each spectral run was exposed to ~600 J of output, as measured by the PIN. The X-ray spectral region between 0.8 and 3 keV was recorded on Kodak DEF film in a potassium acid phthalate (KAP) convex curved-crystal spectrograph. The source emits neon line radiation from Ne IX and Ne X ionization stages in the 900 to 1300 eV region, suitable for lithographic exposures of photoresist. Two helium-like neon lines contribute more than 50% of the total energy. From continuum shape, plasma temperatures were found to be approximately 170-200 eV. The absolute, integrated spectral outputs were verified to within 30% by comparison with measurements by a PIN detector and a radiachromic X-ray dosimeter.

  10. Spectral Analysis of Cometary X-Rays Emission Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snios, B. T.; Kharchenko, V. A.; Lewkow, N.

    2014-12-01

    To establish contributions from different emission mechanisms within a cometary atmosphere, we perform a theoretical analysis of cometary X-ray emission spectra. We develop a model that generates updated spectra of solar wind charge-exchange emissions together with accurate scattering and fluorescence spectra of solar X-rays by atoms, molecules, and ice/dust particles. Our model also explores scattering and fluorescence spectra for different solar conditions, including spectra induced by solar X-ray flares of different classes and durations. Utilizing our results, the major emission mechanism is determined for both the 0.3-1.0 keV and 1.0-3.0 keV photon energy ranges. Additionally, we compare the modeled spectra of cometary X-rays with cometary observations from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. These comparisons establish upper limits on ice/dust mass production rates, with an emphasis on nanoparticles, for several comets. We conclude with a discussion of the impact of of ice/dust particles in the formation of cometary X-ray emission spectra.

  11. ON NEUTRAL ABSORPTION AND SPECTRAL EVOLUTION IN X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.; Cackett, E. M.; Reis, R. C.

    2009-12-10

    Current X-ray observatories make it possible to follow the evolution of transient and variable X-ray binaries across a broad range in luminosity and source behavior. In such studies, it can be unclear whether evolution in the low-energy portion of the spectrum should be attributed to evolution in the source, or instead to evolution in neutral photoelectric absorption. Dispersive spectrometers make it possible to address this problem. We have analyzed a small but diverse set of X-ray binaries observed with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer across a range in luminosity and different spectral states. The column density in individual photoelectric absorption edges remains constant with luminosity, both within and across source spectral states. This finding suggests that absorption in the interstellar medium strongly dominates the neutral column density observed in spectra of X-ray binaries. Consequently, evolution in the low-energy spectrum of X-ray binaries should properly be attributed to evolution in the source spectrum. We discuss our results in the context of X-ray binary spectroscopy with current and future X-ray missions.

  12. Tunable thin film polarizer for the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray spectral regions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Minghong; Cobet, Christoph; Esser, Norbert

    2007-03-01

    A low pass polarizer that suppresses higher-order diffraction light from vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray monochromators is presented in this paper. This vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray polarizer is based on a concept of sandwiched metal-dielectric-metal triple reflection configuration. By appropriate optimization of material and angle of incidence, the proposed Au-SiC-Au polarizer demonstrates the capability of matching to desired cutoff edge of photon energy. Furthermore, the optimized soft x-ray polarizer shows the possibility to tune cutoff photon energy in a broadband spectral region ranging from 80 down to down to 20 eV.

  13. Spectral Properties of X-ray-Emitting Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, W. A., Jr.

    1996-12-01

    I present spectral indices obtained from 112 X-ray-selected and fully optically-identified quasars in four sky fields in the southern hemisphere, detected by the Rosat Position Sensitive Proportional Counters. These fields were originally studied by Boyle et al. (1990) for the ultraviolet-excess properties of objects in the fields; only 47 of the quasars in the field were listed in Boyle et al. I determine the quasars' power-law spectral index alpha_E with three different methods: spectral ``stacking'', hardness ratios, and direct fitting. Both spectral stacking and the hardness ratio methods are used because several of the quasars were too dim to reliably calculate spectral indices individually. The spectral stacking method, which involves co-adding quasar spectra energy bins, shows a definite change in quasar spectral index with redshift.

  14. Different X-ray spectral evolution for black hole X-ray binaries in dual tracks of radio-X-ray correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Xiao-Feng; Wu, Qingwen; Dong, Ai-Jun

    2014-06-10

    Recently, an 'outlier' track of radio-X-ray correlation was found, which is much steeper than the former universal correlation, where dual tracks were speculated to be triggered by different accretion processes. In this work, we test this issue by exploring hard X-ray spectral evolution in four black-hole X-ray binaries with multiple, quasi-simultaneous radio and X-ray observations. First, we find that hard X-ray photon indices, Γ, are negatively and positively correlated with X-ray fluxes when the X-ray flux, F{sub 3-9} {sub keV}, is below and above a critical flux, F{sub X,} {sub crit}, which are consistent with predictions of the advection-dominated accretion flow and the disk-corona model, respectively. Second, and most importantly, we find that the radio-X-ray correlations are also clearly different when the X-ray fluxes are higher and lower than the critical flux as defined by X-ray spectral evolution. The data points with F{sub 3-9} {sub keV} ≳ F{sub X,} {sub crit} have a steeper radio-X-ray correlation (F{sub X}∝F{sub R}{sup b} and b ∼ 1.1-1.4), which roughly forms the ''outlier'' track. However, the data points with anti-correlation of Γ – F{sub 3-9} {sub keV} either stay in the universal track with b ∼ 0.61 or stay in the transition track (from the universal to 'outlier' tracks or vice versa). Therefore, our results support that the universal and ''outlier'' tracks of radio-X-ray correlations are regulated by radiatively inefficient and radiatively efficient accretion model, respectively.

  15. Magnetic circular dichroism in the hard X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalev, A.; Wilhelm, F.

    2015-12-01

    An overview of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectroscopy in the hard X-ray range is presented. A short historical overview shows how this technique has evolved from the early days of X-ray physics to become a workhorse technique in the modern magnetism research As with all X-ray spectroscopies, XMCD has the advantage of being element specific. Interpretation of the spectra based on magneto-optical sum rules can provide unique information about spin and orbital moment carried by absorbing atom in both amplitude and direction, can infer magnetic interactions from element selective magnetization curves, can allow separation of magnetic and non-magnetic components in heterogeneous systems. The review details the technology currently available for XMCD measurements in the hard X-ray range referring to the ESRF beamline ID12 as an example. The strengths of hard X-ray magnetic circular dichroism technique are illustrated with a wide variety of representative examples, such as actinide based ferromagnets, paramagnetism in metals, pure metallic nanoparticles, exchange spring magnets, half metallic ferromagnets, magnetism at interfaces, and dilute magnetic semiconductors. In this way, we aim to encourage researchers from various scientific communities to consider XMCD as a tool to understanding the electronic and magnetic properties of their samples.

  16. Advances toward high spectral resolution quantum X-ray calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Kelley, R. L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Mccammon, D.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal detectors for X-ray spectroscopy combining high spectral resolution and quantum efficiency have been developed. These microcalorimeters measure the energy released in the absorption of a single photon by sensing the rise in temperature of a small absorbing structure. The ultimate energy resolution of such a device is limited by the thermodynamic power fluctuations in the thermal link between the calorimeter and isothermal bath and can in principle be made as low as 1 eV. The performance of a real device is degraded due to noise contributions such as excess 1/f noise in the thermistor and incomplete conversion of energy into phonons. The authors report some recent advances in thermometry, X-ray absorption and thermalization, fabrication techniques, and detector optimization in the presence of noise. These improvements have resulted in a device with a spectral resolution of 17 eV FWHM, measured at 6 keV.

  17. [Research on spectral characteristic of miniature X-ray tube and determination of beryllium window thickness].

    PubMed

    Gu, Yi; Xiong, Sheng-Qing; Ge, Liang-Quan; Fan, Zheng-Guo; Zhang, Qing-Xian; Zhu, Zhen-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Applying Monte Carlo method, the present paper simulates the emitted X-ray spectrum of miniature X-ray tube with thirteen thickness of beryllium window in the range from 50 to 500 microm. By analyzing the characteristic of the spectrums, the reasonable choice of thickness of beryllium window relies on the application and for the beryllium window it is not the thinner the better. Taking in-situ EDXRF as an example, though the emission X-ray intensity is higher as the thickness of the beryllium window becomes thinner, the proportion of useless low-energy X-ray (<5 keV) intensity to all energy X-ray intensity also is higher (>20%). The accuracy of in-situ EDXRF will be reduced when the high-throughput low-energy X-ray enters the detector. Therefore, this paper puts forward several parameters as judgment index for beryllium window thickness, which is described as follows: 1)The intensity ratios of the K-series X-ray to middle-energy (5-25 keV) bremsstrahlung and middle-high-energy (5-50 keV) bremsstrahlung (F1 and F3); 2)The intensity ratios of useless low-energy X-ray (<5 keV) to middle-energy (5-25 keV) X-ray and middle-high-energy (5-50 keV) X-ray (F2 and F4), it can reflect the relative intensity of useless low-energy X-ray. The simulation results demonstrate that with the increase in the beryllium window thickness, the value of F1 (F3) improves slowly, and the value of F2 (F4) decreases rapidly. In addition to the judgment index discussed above, and considering the X-ray shielded by beryllium window, the beryllium window of miniature X-ray tube can be determined. Based on simulation analysis, the thickness of around 250 microm is appropriate to miniature X-ray tube applied in the in-situ EDXRF. Comparing the emitted spectrum with 50 microm-thick beryllium window, 71.66% of low-energy X-rays are shielded, only 21.31% of X-rays with energy from 5 to 50 keV is shielded, the intensity ratio of low-energy X-ray to total energy X-ray is less than 10%, and the intensity

  18. White dwarf mass estimation with a new comprehensive X-ray spectral model of intermediate polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takayuki; Ishida, Manabu

    A white dwarf (WD) mass is important astrophysical quantity because the WD explodes as a type Ia supernova when its mass reaches the Chandrasekhar mass limit of 1.4 solar mass. Many WD masses in intermediate polars (IPs) were measured with their X-ray spectra emitted from plasma flows channeled by strong magnetic fields of the WDs. For the WD mass estimation, multi-temperature X-ray spectral models have been used which made by summing up X-ray spectra emitted from the top to the bottom of the plasma flow. However, in previous studies, distributions of physical quantities such as temperature and density etc., which are base of the X-ray spectral model, were calculated with assumptions of accretion rate per unit area (call "specific accretion rate") a = 1 g cm(-2) s(-1) and cylindrical geometry for the plasma flows. In fact, a part of the WD masses estimated with the X-ray spectral model is not consistent with that dynamically measured. Therefore, we calculated the physical quantity distributions with the dipolar geometry and the wide range of the specific accretion rate a = 0.0001 - 100 g cm(-2) s(-1) . The calculations showed that the geometrical difference changes the physical quantity distributions and the lower specific accretion rate leads softer X-ray spectrum under a critical specific accretion rate. These results clearly indicate that the previous assumptions are not good approximation for low accretion IPs. We made a new spectral model of the plasma flow with our physical quantity distributions and applied that to Suzaku observations of high and low accretion rate IPs V1223 Sagittarii and EX Hydrae. As a results, our WD masses are almost consistent with the those dynamically measured. We will present the summary of our theoretical calculation and X-ray spectral model, and application to the {¥it Suzaku} observations.

  19. SPECTRAL STATES AND EVOLUTION OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Hua; Kaaret, Philip

    2009-05-10

    We examined spectral evolution in ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with apparent luminosities of about 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}. Based on new results in this paper, and those reported in the literature, two common spectral behaviors were found. Some ULXs in starburst galaxies have varying luminosity (L) but remain in the hard state with power-law spectra and a constant, hard photon index ({gamma}). Other ULXs, such as NGC 5204 X-1, show a correlation between L and {gamma}. We interpret this L-{gamma} correlated phase as an intermediate state with hybrid properties from the thermal dominant and steep power-law states. When the spectra of NGC 5204 X-1 are fitted with a multicolor disk blackbody plus power-law model, the X-ray luminosity increases with the effective temperature of the accretion disk in a manner similar to that found in stellar-mass black hole X-ray binaries, suggesting that the emission arises from an accretion disk. The luminosity, disk size, and temperature suggest that NGC 5204 X-1 harbors a compact object more massive than stellar-mass black holes. In contrast, the disk model in IC 342 X-1 is ruled out because the luminosity decreases as the temperature increases; sources with such behavior may represent a class of objects with super-Eddington accretion. Also, we report a peculiar soft spectral feature from IC 342 X-2 and variability on a timescale of 20 ks from Holmberg II X-1. More observations are needed to test these results.

  20. Spectral slicing X-ray telescope with variable magnification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R. B.; Hildner, E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A telescope for viewing high frequency radiation (soft X-ray, extreme ultraviolet) is described. This telescope has a long focal length with a selection of magnifications despite a short housing. Light enters the telescope and is reflected by the telescope's primary optical system to one of several secondary mirrors at different locations on a movable frame. The secondary mirrors have varying degrees of magnification and select narrow spectral slices of the incident radiation. Thus, both the magnification and effective focal length field of view and wavelength can be altered by repositioning the moving frame. Configurations for spaceborne applications are discussed.

  1. Experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in heated Al and Ge on the Iskra-5 laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, S. V.; Garanin, Sergey G.; Zhidkov, N. V.; Pinegin, A. V.; Suslov, N. A.

    2012-01-01

    We set forth the data of experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in the 1.1 — 1.6 keV photon energy range for Al and Ge specimens bulk heated by soft X-ray radiation. Two experimental techniques are described: with the use of one facility channel and the heating of specimens by the X-ray radiation from a plane burnthrough target, as well as with the use of four channels and the heating by the radiation from two cylindrical targets with internal input of laser radiation. The X-ray radiation absorption coefficients were studied by way of transmission absorption spectroscopy using backlighting X-ray radiation from a point source. The results of investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients on the 1s — 2p transitions in Al atoms and the 2p — 3d transitions in Ge atoms are presented.

  2. SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF X-RAY BINARIES IN CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Mark J.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Kraft, Ralph P.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Evans, Daniel A.; Jordan, Andres; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Croston, Judith H.; Brassington, Nicola J.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Goodger, Joanna L.; Kainulainen, Jouni; Woodley, Kristin A.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Gilfanov, Marat; Sarazin, Craig L.; Voss, Rasmus [Department of Astrophysics and others

    2013-04-01

    We present a spectral investigation of X-ray binaries (XBs) in NGC 5128 (Cen A), using six 100 ks Chandra observations taken over two months in 2007. We divide our sample into thermally and non-thermally dominated states based on the behavior of the fitted absorption column N{sub H}, and present the spectral parameters of sources with L{sub x} {approx}> 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}. The majority of sources are consistent with being neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS LMXBs) and we identify three transient black hole (BH) LMXB candidates coincident with the dust lane, which is the remnant of a small late-type galaxy. Our results also provide tentative support for the apparent 'gap' in the mass distribution of compact objects between {approx}2-5 M{sub Sun }. We propose that BH LMXBs are preferentially found in the dust lane, and suggest this is because of the younger stellar population. The majority ({approx}70%-80%) of potential Roche lobe filling donors in the Cen A halo are {approx}> 12 Gyr old, while BH LMXBs require donors {approx}> 1 M{sub Sun} to produce the observed peak luminosities. This requirement for more massive donors may also explain recent results that claim a steepening of the X-ray luminosity function with age at L{sub x} {>=} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} for the XB population of early-type galaxies; for older stellar populations, there are fewer stars {approx}> 1 M{sub Sun }, which are required to form the more luminous sources.

  3. Investigation of pulsed X-ray radiation of a plasma focus in a broad energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Savelov, A. S. Salakhutdinov, G. Kh.; Koltunov, M. V.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Yurkov, D. I.; Sidorov, P. P.

    2011-12-15

    The results of the experimental investigations of the spectral composition of plasma focus X-ray radiation in the photon energy range of 1.5 keV-400 keV are presented. Three regions in the radiation spectrum where the latter is of a quasi-thermal nature with a corresponding effective temperature are distinguished.

  4. X-ray spectral evolution of X-ray binaries from outburst to quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, Nathalie

    2016-07-01

    In transient X-ray binaries a black hole or a neutron star accretes matter from a companion star at a rate that can vary by ~8 orders of magnitude. These large changes in the mass-accretion rate are associated with large changes in the accretion flow morphology and related outflows. I will discuss how the X-ray spectra of X-ray binaries evolve when transitioning from outburst to quiescence, how this may reflect changes in the accretion morphology, and what role the nature of the compact primary (i.e., neutron star versus black hole) plays in all this.

  5. X-ray Spectral and Optical Properties of a ULX in NGC 4258 (M106)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdan, H.; Avdan, S.; Akyuz, A.; Balman, S.; Aksaker, N.; Akkaya Oralhan, I.

    2016-09-01

    We study the X-ray and optical properties of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) X-6 in the nearby galaxy NGC 4258 (M106) based on the archival XMM-Newton, Chandra, Swift, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. The source has a peak luminosity of L X ˜ 2 × 1039 erg s-1 in the XMM-Newton observation of 2004 June. Consideration of the hardness ratios and the spectral model parameters shows that the source seems to exhibit possible spectral variations throughout the X-ray observations. In the images from the HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys, three optical sources have been identified as counterpart candidates within the 1σ error radius of 0.″3. The brightest one has an absolute magnitude of M V ≈ -7.0 and shows extended structure. The remaining two sources have absolute magnitudes of M V ≈ -5.8 and -5.3. The possible spectral types of the candidates from brightest to dimmest were determined as B6-A5, B0-A7, and B2-A3. The counterparts of the X-ray source possibly belong to a young star cluster. Neither the standard disk model nor the slim disk model provides firm evidence to determine the spectral characteristics of ULX X-6. We argue that the mass of the compact object lies in the range 10-15 M ⊙, indicating that the compact source is most likely a stellar-mass black hole.

  6. Picosecond X-ray streak camera dynamic range measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, C.; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Fronty, J.-P.; Gontier, D.; Goulmy, C.; Raimbourg, J.; Rubbelynck, C.; Trosseille, C.

    2016-09-01

    Streak cameras are widely used to record the spatio-temporal evolution of laser-induced plasma. A prototype of picosecond X-ray streak camera has been developed and tested by Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives to answer the Laser MegaJoule specific needs. The dynamic range of this instrument is measured with picosecond X-ray pulses generated by the interaction of a laser beam and a copper target. The required value of 100 is reached only in the configurations combining the slowest sweeping speed and optimization of the streak tube electron throughput by an appropriate choice of high voltages applied to its electrodes.

  7. X-ray signatures: New time scales and spectral features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldt, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    The millisecond bursts from Cyg X-1 are investigated and the overall chaotic variability for the bulk of the Cyg X-1 emission is compared to that of Sco X-1, showing that the essential character is remarkably similar (i.e. shot noise) although the fundamental time scales involved differ widely, from a fraction of a second (for Cyg X-1) to a fraction of a day (for Sco X-1). Recent OSO-8 observations of spectra features attributable to iron are reviewed. In particular, line emission is discussed within the context of a model for thermal radiation by a hot evolved gas in systems as different as supernova remnants and clusters of galaxies. Newly observed spectral structure in the emission from the X-ray pulsar Her X-1 is reported.

  8. A novel x-ray circularly polarized ranging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shi-Bin; Xu, Lu-Ping; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Na; Shen, Yang-He

    2015-05-01

    Range measurement has found multiple applications in deep space missions. With more and further deep space exploration activities happening now and in the future, the requirement for range measurement has risen. In view of the future ranging requirement, a novel x-ray polarized ranging method based on the circular polarization modulation is proposed, termed as x-ray circularly polarized ranging (XCPolR). XCPolR utilizes the circular polarization modulation to process x-ray signals and the ranging information is conveyed by the circular polarization states. As the circular polarization states present good stability in space propagation and x-ray detectors have light weight and low power consumption, XCPolR shows great potential in the long-distance range measurement and provides an option for future deep space ranging. In this paper, we present a detailed illustration of XCPolR. Firstly, the structure of the polarized ranging system is described and the signal models in the ranging process are established mathematically. Then, the main factors that affect the ranging accuracy, including the Doppler effect, the differential demodulation, and the correlation error, are analyzed theoretically. Finally, numerical simulation is carried out to evaluate the performance of XCPolR. Projects supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61172138 and 61401340), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province of China (Grant No. 2013JQ8040), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20130203120004), the Open Research Fund of the Academy of Satellite Application, China (Grant No. 2014 CXJJ-DH 12), the Xi’an Science and Technology Plan, China (Grant No. CXY1350(4)), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 201413B, 201412B, and JB141303), and the Open Fund of Key Laboratory of Precision Navigation and Timing Technology, National Time Service Center, Chinese

  9. Spectral reconstruction of dental X-ray tubes using laplace inverse transform of the attenuation curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malezan, A.; Tomal, A.; Antoniassi, M.; Watanabe, P. C. A.; Albino, L. D.; Poletti, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a spectral reconstruction methodology for diagnostic X-ray, using Laplace inverse transform of the attenuation, was successfully applied to dental X-ray equipments. The attenuation curves of 8 commercially available dental X-ray equipment, from 3 different manufactures (Siemens, Gnatus and Dabi Atlante), were obtained by using an ionization chamber and high purity aluminium filters, while the kVp was obtained with a specific meter. A computational routine was implemented in order to adjust a model function, whose inverse Laplace transform is analytically known, to the attenuation curve. This methodology was validated by comparing the reconstructed and the measured (using semiconductor detector of cadmium telluride) spectra of a given dental X-ray unit. The spectral reconstruction showed the Dabi Atlante equipments generating similar shape spectra. This is a desirable feature from clinic standpoint because it produces similar levels of image quality and dose. We observed that equipments from Siemens and Gnatus generate significantly different spectra, suggesting that, for a given operating protocol, these units will present different levels of image quality and dose. This fact claims for the necessity of individualized operating protocols that maximize image quality and dose. The proposed methodology is suitable to perform a spectral reconstruction of dental X-ray equipments from the simple measurements of attenuation curve and kVp. The simplified experimental apparatus and the low level of technical difficulty make this methodology accessible to a broad range of users. The knowledge of the spectral distribution can help in the development of operating protocols that maximize image quality and dose.

  10. Measurement of breast-tissue x-ray attenuation by spectral mammography: solid lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Willsher, Paula; Moa, Elin; Danielsson, Mats; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wallis, Matthew G.

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of x-ray attenuation is essential for developing and evaluating x-ray imaging technologies. For instance, techniques to distinguish between cysts and solid tumours at mammography screening would be highly desirable to reduce recalls, but the development requires knowledge of the x-ray attenuation for cysts and tumours. We have previously measured the attenuation of cyst fluid using photon-counting spectral mammography. Data on x-ray attenuation for solid breast lesions are available in the literature, but cover a relatively wide range, likely caused by natural spread between samples, random measurement errors, and different experimental conditions. In this study, we have adapted a previously developed spectral method to measure the linear attenuation of solid breast lesions. A total of 56 malignant and 5 benign lesions were included in the study. The samples were placed in a holder that allowed for thickness measurement. Spectral (energy-resolved) images of the samples were acquired and the image signal was mapped to equivalent thicknesses of two known reference materials, which can be used to derive the x-ray attenuation as a function of energy. The spread in equivalent material thicknesses was relatively large between samples, which is likely to be caused mainly by natural variation and only to a minor extent by random measurement errors and sample inhomogeneity. No significant difference in attenuation was found between benign and malignant solid lesions. The separation between cyst-fluid and tumour attenuation was, however, significant, which suggests it may be possible to distinguish cystic from solid breast lesions, and the results lay the groundwork for a clinical trial. In addition, the study adds a relatively large sample set to the published data and may contribute to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in the literature.

  11. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

    1998-07-07

    A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

  12. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Silver, Eric H.; Legros, Mark; Madden, Norm W.; Goulding, Fred; Landis, Don

    1998-01-01

    A broad bandwidth high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces x-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available x-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for x-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical x-ray and particle spectroscopy.

  13. A newly developed multilayer semiconductor x-ray detector for the observations of wide energy-range x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, M.; Cho, T.; Kohagura, J.; Yatsu, K.; Tamano, T.; Miyoshi, S.; Kondoh, T.; Saitoh, Y.; Sato, K.; Miyahara, S.; Hirano, K.; Maezawa, H.

    1995-02-01

    For the purpose of the developments of wide-energy-range-sensitive x-ray detectors, we have designed and fabricated a new-type multilayer semiconductor x-ray detector. This new-type detector has been characterized using synchrotron radiation from a 2.5-GeV positron storage ring at the Photon Factory of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK). This new detector is essentially composed of four layers of commercially available photodiodes. Each photodiode is made from a 300-μm thick, and a 10×10-mm square-shaped wafer. For the common affiliation of these individual photodiodes, the quantum efficiency normalized by the photon energy η/E begins to decrease at 8 keV, and then η/E decreases down to 26% at 20 keV. On the other hand, for our newly designed detector a flat response even in the 10-20-keV energy regime (beam line 15C at the Photon Factory) is observed, and even at 100 keV η/E<30% is still anticipated. This new x-ray detector has various advantages: (i) A compact, and (ii) outgas-free detector for a high-vacuum use, along with (iii) a high degree of immunity to ambient magnetic fields. Furthermore, (iv) the combination of the x-ray signal outputs from each detector layer provides information on the x-ray emitting electron energies. These properties are quite suitable for the use of the fusion-oriented plasma x-ray diagnostics under intense-magnetic field and high-vacuum conditions so as to interpret wide-band x-ray emitting electron-velocity distribution functions from the x-ray data.

  14. Domain and range decomposition methods for coded aperture x-ray coherent scatter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odinaka, Ikenna; Kaganovsky, Yan; O'Sullivan, Joseph A.; Politte, David G.; Holmgren, Andrew D.; Greenberg, Joel A.; Carin, Lawrence; Brady, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Coded aperture X-ray coherent scatter imaging is a novel modality for ascertaining the molecular structure of an object. Measurements from different spatial locations and spectral channels in the object are multiplexed through a radiopaque material (coded aperture) onto the detectors. Iterative algorithms such as penalized expectation maximization (EM) and fully separable spectrally-grouped edge-preserving reconstruction have been proposed to recover the spatially-dependent coherent scatter spectral image from the multiplexed measurements. Such image recovery methods fall into the category of domain decomposition methods since they recover independent pieces of the image at a time. Ordered subsets has also been utilized in conjunction with penalized EM to accelerate its convergence. Ordered subsets is a range decomposition method because it uses parts of the measurements at a time to recover the image. In this paper, we analyze domain and range decomposition methods as they apply to coded aperture X-ray coherent scatter imaging using a spectrally-grouped edge-preserving regularizer and discuss the implications of the increased availability of parallel computational architecture on the choice of decomposition methods. We present results of applying the decomposition methods on experimental coded aperture X-ray coherent scatter measurements. Based on the results, an underlying observation is that updating different parts of the image or using different parts of the measurements in parallel, decreases the rate of convergence, whereas using the parts sequentially can accelerate the rate of convergence.

  15. SPECTRAL SURVEY OF X-RAY BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FROM THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Rothschild, Richard

    2011-03-15

    Using long-term monitoring data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we have selected 23 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with sufficient brightness and overall observation time to derive broadband X-ray spectra from 3 to {approx}>100 keV. Our sample includes mainly radio-quiet Seyferts, as well as seven radio-loud sources. Given the longevity of the RXTE mission, the greater part of our data is spread out over more than a decade, providing truly long-term average spectra and eliminating inconsistencies arising from variability. We present long-term average values of absorption, Fe line parameters, Compton reflection strengths, and photon indices, as well as fluxes and luminosities for the hard and very hard energy bands, 2-10 keV and 20-100 keV, respectively. We find tentative evidence for high-energy rollovers in three of our objects. We improve upon previous surveys of the very hard X-ray energy band in terms of accuracy and sensitivity, particularly with respect to confirming and quantifying the Compton reflection component. This survey is meant to provide a baseline for future analysis with respect to the long-term averages for these sources and to cement the legacy of RXTE, and especially its High Energy X-ray Timing Experiment, as a contributor to AGN spectral science.

  16. Spectral and imaging characterization of tabletop x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, T A; Osterheld, A; Moon, S J; Fournier, K B; Nilsen, J; Skobelev, I Yu; Magunov, A I; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2000-12-01

    We have performed L-shell spectroscopy and one-dimensional (1-D) imaging of a line focus plasma from a laser-heated Fe polished slab using the tabletop COMET laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These plasmas are used to generate a Ne-like Fe transient gain x-ray laser that is recorded simultaneously. A spherically-curved crystal spectrometer gives high resolution x-ray spectra of the n = 3-2 and n = 4-2 resonance lines with 1-D spatial resolution along the line focus. Spectra are presented for different laser pulse conditions. In addition, a variety of x-ray imaging techniques are described. We discuss imaging results from a double-slit x-ray camera with a spherically-curved crystal spectrometer. We show a high resolution Fe K-{alpha} spectrum from the x-ray laser target that indicates the presence of hot electrons in the x-ray laser plasma.

  17. X-Ray Spectral Study of the Photoionized Stellar Wind in Vela X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Shin; Sako, Masao; Ishida, Manabu; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kahn, Steven M.; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Nagase, Fumiaki; Paerels, Frederik; Takahashi, Tadayuki; /JAXA, Sagamihara /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Tokyo Metropolitan U. /Kogakuin U. /Columbia U., Astron. Astrophys.

    2006-07-10

    We present results from quantitative modeling and spectral analysis of the high mass X-ray binary system Vela X-1 obtained with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. The observations cover three orbital phase ranges within a single binary orbit. The spectra exhibit emission lines from H-like and He-like ions driven by photoionization, as well as fluorescent emission lines from several elements in lower charge states. The properties of these X-ray lines are measured with the highest accuracy to date. In order to interpret and make full use of the high-quality data, we have developed a simulator, which calculates the ionization and thermal structure of a stellar wind photoionized by an X-ray source, and performs Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray photons propagating through the wind. The emergent spectra are then computed as a function of the viewing angle accurately accounting for photon transport in three dimensions including dynamics. From comparisons of the observed spectra with results from the simulator, we are able to find the ionization structure and the geometrical distribution of material in the stellar wind of Vela X-1 that can reproduce the observed spectral line intensities and continuum shapes at different orbital phases remarkably well. We find that the stellar wind profile can be represented by a CAK-model with a star mass loss rate of (1.5-2.0) x 10{sup -6} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1}, assuming a terminal velocity of 1100 km s{sup -1}. It is found that a large fraction of X-ray emission lines from highly ionized ions are formed in the region between the neutron star and the companion star. We also find that the fluorescent X-ray lines must be produced in at least three distinct regions: (1) the extended stellar wind, (2) reflection off the stellar photosphere, and (3) in a distribution of dense material partially covering and possibly trailing the neutron star, which may be associated with an accretion wake. Finally, from

  18. X-ray communication based simultaneous communication and ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shi-Bin; Xu, Lu-Ping; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Na

    2015-09-01

    To improve the link efficiency and decrease the payloads in space explorations, a novel simultaneous communication and ranging method based on x-ray communication (XCOM) is proposed in this paper. A delicate signal symbol structure is utilized to achieve simultaneous data transmission and range measurement. With the designed symbol structure, the ranging information is imbedded into the communication signal and transmitted with it simultaneously. The range measurement is realized by the two-way transmission of the range information. To illustrate the proposed method, firstly, the principle of the method is introduced and the signal processing procedure is presented. Then, the performance of the proposed method is analyzed theoretically in various aspects, including the acquisition probability, the bit error rate, the ranging jitter, etc. Besides, numerical experiments are conducted to verify the proposed method and evaluate the system performance. The simulation results show that the proposed method is feasible and that the system performance is influenced by the parameters concerning the signal symbol structure. Compared with the previous methods, the proposed method improves the link efficiency and is beneficial for system miniaturization and integration, which could provide a potential option for future deep space explorations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61172138 and 61401340), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20130203120004), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 201413B, 201412B, and JB141303).

  19. Spectral and Temporal Characteristics of X-Ray-Bright Stars in the Pleiades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagne, Marc; Caillault, Jean-Pierre; Stauffer, John R.

    1995-01-01

    We follow up our deep ROSAT imaging survey of the Pleiades (Stauffer et al. 1994) with an analysis of the spectral and temporal characteristics of the X-ray-bright stars in the Pleiades. Raymond & Smith (1977) one and two-temperature models have been used to fit the position-sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) pulse-height spectra of the dozen or so brightest sources associated with late-type Pleiades members. The best-fit temperatures suggest hot coronal temperatures for K, M, and rapidly rotating G stars, and cooler temperatures for F and slowly rotating G stars. In order to probe the many less X-ray-luminous stars, we have generated composite spectra by combining net counts from all Pleiades members according to spectral type and rotational velocity. Model fits to the composite spectra confirm the trend seen in the individual spectral fits. Particularly interesting is the apparent dependence of coronal temperature on L(sub x)/L(sub bol). A hardness-ratio analysis also confirms some of these trends. The PSPC data have also revealed a dozen or so strong X-ray flares with peak X-ray luminosities in excess of approx. 10(exp 30) ergs/sec. We have modeled the brightest of these flares with a simple quasi-static cooling loop model. The peak temperature and emission measure and the inferred electron density and plasma volume suggest a very large scale flaring event. The PSPC data were collected over a period of approx. 18 months, allowing us to search for source variability on timescales ranging from less than a day (in the case of flares) to more than a year between individual exposures. On approximately year-long timescales, roughly 25% of the late-type stars are variable. Since the Pleiades was also intensively monitored by the imaging instruments on the Einstein Observatory, we have examined X-ray luminosity variations on the 10 yr timescale between Einstein and ROSAT and find that up to 40% of the late-type stars are X-ray variable. Since there is only marginal

  20. Small, Fast TES Microcalorimeters with Unprecedented X-ray Spectral Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckart, M. E.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Vale, L. R.

    2011-01-01

    Driven initially by the desire for X-ray microcalorimeter arrays suitable for imaging the dynamic solar corona, we have developed a transition-edge-sensor (TES) microcalorimeter optimization that exhibits a unique combination of high spectral resolving power and a wide X-ray bandpass. These devices have achieved spectral performance of dE approximately 1.3 eV FWHM at 1.5 keV, 1.6 eV at 6 keV, and 2.0 eV at 8 keV, using small TESs (e.g., approximately 35 micron x 35 micron) that operate in a regime in which the superconducting transition is highly current dependent. In order to accommodate high X-ray count rates, the devices sit directly on a solid substrate instead of on membranes, and we use an embedded heatsinking layer to reduce pixel-to-pixel crosstalk. We will present results from devices with a range of TES and absorber sizes, and from device wafers with varied embedded heatsink materials. This contribution will focus on count-rate capabilities, including a discussion of the trade-off between count rate and energy resolution, and the heatsinking design. We will also present preliminary tests of array readout using a code-division multiplexed SQUID readout scheme, which may be necessary to enable large arrays of these fast devices.

  1. Diagnosing x-ray power and energy of tungsten wire array z-pinch with a flat spectral response x-ray diode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun-lun; Ren, Xiao-dong; Huang, Xian-bin; Zhang, Si-qun; Zhou, Shao-tong; Dan, Jia-kun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Ouyang, Kai; Cai, Hong-chun; Wei, Bing; Ji, Ce; Feng, Shu-ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-ping; Deng, Jian-jun

    2015-11-01

    Fast z-pinch is a very efficient way of converting electromagnetic energy to radiation. With an 8-10 MA current on primary test stand facility, about 1 MJ electromagnetic energy is delivered to vacuum chamber, which heats z-pinch plasma to radiate soft x-ray. To develop a pulsed high power x-ray source, we studied the applicability of diagnosing x-ray power from tungsten wire array z-pinch with a flat spectral response x-ray diode (FSR-XRD). The detector was originally developed to diagnose radiation of a hohlraum in SG-III prototype laser facility. It utilized a gold cathode XRD and a specially configured compound gold filter to yield a nearly flat spectral response in photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV. In practice, it was critical to avoid surface contamination of gold cathode. It is illustrated that an exposure of an XRD to multiple shots caused a significant change of response. Thus, in diagnosing x-ray power and energy, we used each XRD in only one shot after calibration. In a shot serial, output of FSR-XRD was compared with output of a nickel bolometer. In these shots, the outputs agreed with each other within their uncertainties which were about 12% for FSR-XRD and about 15% for bolometer. Moreover, the ratios between the FSR-XRD and the bolometer among different shots were explored. In 8 shots, the standard deviation of the ratio was 6%. It is comparable to XRD response change of 7%. PMID:26628136

  2. Diagnosing x-ray power and energy of tungsten wire array z-pinch with a flat spectral response x-ray diode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kun-lun; Ren, Xiao-dong; Huang, Xian-bin Zhang, Si-qun; Zhou, Shao-tong; Dan, Jia-kun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Ouyang, Kai; Cai, Hong-chun; Wei, Bing; Ji, Ce; Feng, Shu-ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-ping; Deng, Jian-jun

    2015-11-15

    Fast z-pinch is a very efficient way of converting electromagnetic energy to radiation. With an 8-10 MA current on primary test stand facility, about 1 MJ electromagnetic energy is delivered to vacuum chamber, which heats z-pinch plasma to radiate soft x-ray. To develop a pulsed high power x-ray source, we studied the applicability of diagnosing x-ray power from tungsten wire array z-pinch with a flat spectral response x-ray diode (FSR-XRD). The detector was originally developed to diagnose radiation of a hohlraum in SG-III prototype laser facility. It utilized a gold cathode XRD and a specially configured compound gold filter to yield a nearly flat spectral response in photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV. In practice, it was critical to avoid surface contamination of gold cathode. It is illustrated that an exposure of an XRD to multiple shots caused a significant change of response. Thus, in diagnosing x-ray power and energy, we used each XRD in only one shot after calibration. In a shot serial, output of FSR-XRD was compared with output of a nickel bolometer. In these shots, the outputs agreed with each other within their uncertainties which were about 12% for FSR-XRD and about 15% for bolometer. Moreover, the ratios between the FSR-XRD and the bolometer among different shots were explored. In 8 shots, the standard deviation of the ratio was 6%. It is comparable to XRD response change of 7%.

  3. Spectral brilliance of parametric X-rays at the FAST facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Tanaji; Seiss, Todd

    2015-06-22

    We discuss the generation of parametric X-rays in the new photoinjector at the FAST (Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology) facility in Fermilab. These experiments will be conducted in addition to channeling X-ray radiation experiments. The low emittance electron beam makes this facility a promising source for creating brilliant X-rays. We discuss the theoretical model and present detailed calculations of the intensity spectrum, energy and angular widths and spectral brilliance under different conditions. Furthermore, we report on expected results with parametric X-rays generated while under channeling conditions.

  4. Nonthermal X-ray Spectral Flattening toward Low Energies in Early Impulsive Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2007-01-01

    The determination of the low-energy cutoff to nonthermal electron distributions is critical to the calculation of the nonthermal energy in solar flares. The most direct evidence for low-energy cutoffs is flattening of the power-law, nontherma1 X-ray spectra at low energies. However, because of the plasma preheating often seen in flares, the thermal emissions at low energies may hide such spectral flattening of the nonthermal component. We select a category of flares, which we call "early impulsive flares", in which the > 25 keV hard X-ray (HXR) flux increase is delayed by less than 30 s after the flux increase at lower energies. Thus, the plasma preheating in these flares is minimal, so the nonthermal spectrum can be determined to lower energies than in flares with significant preheating. Out of a sample of 33 early impulsive flares observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopy Imager (RHESSI), 9 showed spectral flattening toward low energies. In these events, the break energy of the double power-law fit to the HXR spectra lies in the range of 10-50 keV, significantly lower than the value we have seen for other flares that do not show such early impulsive emissions. In particular, it correlates with the HXR flux. After correcting the spatially-integrated spectra for albedo from isotropically emitted X-rays and using RHESSI imaging spectroscopy to exclude the extended albedo halo, we find that albedo associated with isotropic or nearly isotropic electrons can only account for the spectral flattening in 3 flares near Sun center. The spectral flattening in the remaining 6 flares is found to be consistent with the existence of a low-energy cutoff in the electron spectrum, falling in the range of 15-50 keV, which also correlates with the HXR flux.

  5. Possible application of X-ray optical elements for reducing the spectral bandwidth of an X-ray SASE FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldhaus, J.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneider, J. R.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    1997-08-01

    A new design for a single pass X-ray Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) FEL is proposed. The scheme consists of two undulators and an X-ray monochromator located between them. The first stage of the FEL amplifier operates in the SASE linear regime. After the exit of the first undulator the electron bunch is guided through a non-isochronous bypass and the X-ray beam enters the monochromator. The main function of the bypass is to suppress the modulation of the electron beam induced in the first undulator. This is possible because of the finite value of the natural energy spread in the beam. At the entrance to the second undulator the radiation power from the monochromator dominates significantly over the shot noise and the residual electron bunching. As a result the second stage of the FEL amplifier operates in the steady-state regime when the input signal bandwidth is small with respect to that of the FEL amplifier. Integral losses of the radiation power in the monochromator are relatively small because grazing incidence optics can be used. The proposed scheme is illustrated for the example of the 6 nm option SASE FEL at the TESLA Test Facility under construction at DESY. As shown in this paper the spectral bandwidth of such a two-stage SASE FEL (Δλ/λ⋍ 5 × 10-5) is close to the limit defined by the finite duration of the radiation pulse. The average brilliance is equal to 7 × 1024photons/(s × mrad2 × mm2 × 0.1% bandw.) which is by two orders of magnitude higher than the value which could be reached by the conventional SASE FEL. The monochromatization of the radiation is performed at a low level of radiation power (about 500 times less than the saturation level) which allows one to use conventional X-ray optical elements (grazing incidence grating and mirrors) for the monochromator design.

  6. HARD X-RAY IMAGING OF INDIVIDUAL SPECTRAL COMPONENTS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; Shih, Albert Y.; McTiernan, James M.; Krucker, Säm

    2015-09-20

    We present a new analytical technique, combining Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations, to visualize solar flare emission as a function of spectral component (e.g., isothermal temperature) rather than energy. This computationally inexpensive technique is applicable to all spatially invariant spectral forms and is useful for visualizing spectroscopically determined individual sources and placing them in context, e.g., comparing multiple isothermal sources with nonthermal emission locations. For example, while extreme ultraviolet images can usually be closely identified with narrow temperature ranges, due to the emission being primarily from spectral lines of specific ion species, X-ray images are dominated by continuum emission and therefore have a broad temperature response, making it difficult to identify sources of specific temperatures regardless of the energy band of the image. We combine RHESSI calibrated X-ray visibilities with spatially integrated spectral models including multiple isothermal components to effectively isolate the individual thermal sources from the combined emission and image them separately. We apply this technique to the 2002 July 23 X4.8 event studied in prior works, and image for the first time the super-hot and cooler thermal sources independently. The super-hot source is farther from the footpoints and more elongated throughout the impulsive phase, consistent with an in situ heating mechanism for the super-hot plasma.

  7. Photon counting spectral CT: improved material decomposition with K-edge-filtered x-rays.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2012-03-21

    Photon counting spectral computed tomography (PCSCT) provides material selective CT imaging at a single CT scan and fixed tube voltage. The PCSCT data are acquired in several energy ranges (bins) arranged over the x-ray spectrum. The quasi-monoenergetic CT images are acquired in these energy bins and are used for material decomposition. The PCSCT exhibits inherent limitations when material decomposition is performed using energy bins. For effective material decomposition, the energy bins used for material decomposition should be sufficiently narrow and well separated. However, when narrow bins are used, a large fraction of the detected x-ray counts is lost and statistical noise is increased. Alternatively, the x-ray spectrum can be split into a few larger bins with no gap in between and all detected x-ray photons can be used for material decomposition. However, in this case the energy bins are too wide and not well separated, which results in suboptimal material decomposition. The above contradictory requirements can be resolved if the x-ray photons are physically removed from the regions of the energy spectrum between the energy bins. Such a selective removal can be performed using filtration of the x-ray beam by high-Z filter materials with appropriate positions of K-edge energies. The K-edge filtration of x-rays can, therefore, provide necessary gaps between the energy bins with no dose penalty to the patient. In the current work, we proposed using selective K-edge filtration of x-rays in PCSCT and performed the first experimental investigation of this approach. The PCSCT system included a cadmium zinc telluride semiconductor detector with 2 × 256 pixels and 1 × 1 mm(2) pixel size, and five energy bins. The CT phantom had 14 cm diameter and included contrast elements of iodine, gold and calcifications with clinically relevant concentrations. The tube voltages of 60, 90 and 120 kVp were used. K-edge filters based on Ba (E(k) = 37.44 keV) were used for a 60 k

  8. AGN spectral states from simultaneous UV and X-ray observations by XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, J.; Guainazzi, M.; Merloni, A.

    2016-06-01

    The accretion on super-massive black holes is believed to be similar to the accretion on stellar-mass black holes. It has been suggested by Koerding et al. (2006) and Sobolewska et al. (2008) that different types of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) correspond to different spectral states of X-Ray Binaries. We extend previous works by comparing strictly simultaneous UV and X-ray measurements of AGN obtained by the XMM-Newton satellite. The thermal disc component is estimated from the UV flux while the non-thermal flux is constrained from the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity. For sources with available radio-flux measurements, we investigate how the spectral hardness is related to their radio power, radio spectral slope and morphology. Our results suggest that the AGN may spectrally evolve in a similar way as X-ray binaries, however, several problems still remain unclear.

  9. Software for X-Ray Images Calculation of Hydrogen Compression Device in Megabar Pressure Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Nikolay; Bykov, Alexander; Pavlov, Valery

    2007-06-01

    Software for x-ray images simulation is described. The software is a part of x-ray method used for investigation of an equation of state of hydrogen in a megabar pressure range. A graphical interface that clearly and simply allows users to input data for x-ray image calculation: properties of the studied device, parameters of the x-ray radiation source, parameters of the x-ray radiation recorder, the experiment geometry; to represent the calculation results and efficiently transmit them to other software for processing. The calculation time is minimized. This makes it possible to perform calculations in a dialogue regime. The software is written in ``MATLAB'' system.

  10. Evaluation of a photon counting Medipix3RX CZT spectral x-ray detector

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Steven M.; Vercnocke, Andrew J.; Rundle, David S.; Butler, Philip H.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the performance of a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based Medipix3RX x-ray detector as a candidate for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging. This technology was developed at CERN for the Large Hadron Collider. It features an array of 128 by 128, 110 micrometer square pixels, each with eight simultaneous threshold counters, five of which utilize real-time charge summing, significantly reducing the charge sharing between contiguous pixels. Pixel response curves were created by imaging a range of x-ray intensities by varying x-ray tube current and by varying the exposure time with fixed x-ray current. Photon energy-related assessments were made by flooding the detector with the tin foil filtered emission of an I-125 radioisotope brachytherapy seed and sweeping the energy threshold of each of the four charge-summed counters of each pixel in 1 keV steps. Long term stability assessments were made by repeating exposures over the course of one hour. The high properly-functioning pixel yield (99%), long term stability (linear regression of whole-chip response over one hour of acquisitions: y = −0.0038x + 2284; standard deviation: 3.7 counts) and energy resolution (2.5 keV FWHM (single pixel), 3.7 keV FWHM across the full image) make this device suitable for spectral micro-CT. The charge summing performance effectively reduced the measurement corruption caused by charge sharing which, when unaccounted for, shifts the photon energy assignment to lower energies, degrading both count and energy accuracy. Effective charge summing greatly improves the potential for calibrated, energy-specific material decomposition and K edge difference imaging approaches. PMID:27795606

  11. The X-ray spectral evolution of the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luangtip, Wasutep; Roberts, Timothy P.; Done, Chris

    2016-08-01

    We present a new analysis of X-ray spectra of the archetypal ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) Holmberg IX X-1 obtained by the Swift, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observatories. This ULX is a persistent source, with a typical luminosity of ˜1040 erg s-1, that varied by a factor of 4-5 over eight years. We find that its spectra tend to evolve from relatively flat or two-component spectra in the medium energy band (1-6 keV), at lower luminosities, to a spectrum that is distinctly curved and disc-like at the highest luminosities, with the peak energy in the curved spectrum tending to decrease with increased luminosity. We argue that the spectral evolution of the ULX can be explained by super-Eddington accretion models, where in this case we view the ULX down the evacuated funnel along its rotation axis, bounded by its massive radiatively driven wind. The spectral changes then originate in enhanced geometric beaming as the accretion rate increases and wind funnel narrows, causing the scattered flux from the central regions of the supercritical flow to brighten faster than the isotropic thermal emission from the wind, and so the curved hard spectral component to dominate at the highest luminosities. The wind also Compton down-scatters photons at the edge of the funnel, resulting in the peak energy of the spectrum decreasing. We also confirm that Holmberg IX X-1 displays spectral degeneracy with luminosity, and suggest that the observed differences are naturally explained by precession of the black hole rotation axis for the suggested wind geometry.

  12. TW Hya: SPECTRAL VARIABILITY, X-RAYS, AND ACCRETION DIAGNOSTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Dupree, A. K.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Cranmer, S. R.; Luna, G. J. M.; Schneider, E. E.; Bessell, M. S.; Bonanos, A.; Crause, L. A.; Lawson, W. A.; Mallik, S. V.; Schuler, S. C.

    2012-05-01

    The nearest accreting T Tauri star, TW Hya was intensively and continuously observed over {approx}17 days with spectroscopic and photometric measurements from four continents simultaneous with a long segmented exposure using the Chandra satellite. Contemporaneous optical photometry from WASP-S indicates a 4.74 day period was present during this time. The absence of a similar periodicity in the H{alpha} flux and the total X-ray flux which are dominated by accretion processes and the stellar corona, respectively, points to a different source of photometric variations. The H{alpha} emission line appears intrinsically broad and symmetric, and both the profile and its variability suggest an origin in the post-shock cooling region. An accretion event, signaled by soft X-rays, is traced spectroscopically for the first time through the optical emission line profiles. After the accretion event, downflowing turbulent material observed in the H{alpha} and H{beta} lines is followed by He I ({lambda}5876) broadening near the photosphere. Optical veiling resulting from the heated photosphere increases with a delay of {approx}2 hr after the X-ray accretion event. The response of the stellar coronal emission to an increase in the veiling follows {approx}2.4 hr later, giving direct evidence that the stellar corona is heated in part by accretion. Subsequently, the stellar wind becomes re-established. We suggest a model that incorporates the dynamics of this sequential series of events: an accretion shock, a cooling downflow in a supersonically turbulent region, followed by photospheric and later, coronal heating. This model naturally explains the presence of broad optical and ultraviolet lines, and affects the mass accretion rates determined from emission line profiles.

  13. The spectral archive of cosmic X-ray sources observed by the Einstein Observatory Focal Plane Crystal Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, Kenneth S. K.; Canizares, Claude R.; Clark, George W.; Coyne, Joan M.; Markert, Thomas H.; Saez, Pablo J.; Schattenburg, Mark L.; Winkler, P. F.

    1992-01-01

    The Einstein Observatory Focal Plane Crystal Spectrometer (FPCS) used the technique of Bragg spectroscopy to study cosmic X-ray sources in the 0.2-3 keV energy range. The high spectral resolving power (E/Delta-E is approximately equal to 100-1000) of this instrument allowed it to resolve closely spaced lines and study the structure of individual features in the spectra of 41 cosmic X-ray sources. An archival summary of the results is presented as a concise record the FPCS observations and a source of information for future analysis by the general astrophysics community. For each observation, the instrument configuration, background rate, X-ray flux or upper limit within the energy band observed, and spectral histograms are given. Examples of the contributions the FPCS observations have made to the understanding of the objects observed are discussed.

  14. X-ray spectral diagnostics of synthetic lanthanide silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsova, A. N.; Guda, A. A.; Soldatov, A. V.; Goettlicher, J.; Taroev, V. K.; Kashaev, A. A.; Suvorova, L. F.; Tauson, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    Potassium and rare-earth (Eu, Sm, Yb, Ce) silicate and aluminosilicate crystals are hydrothermally synthesized under isothermal conditions at 500°C and a pressure of 100 MPa. The chemical and structural formulas of the synthesized compounds HK6Eu[Si10O25], K7Sm3[Si12O32], K2Sm[AlSi4O12] · 0.375H2O, K4Yb2[Si8O21], and K4Ce2[Al2Si8O24] are determined. In addition, a synthesis product with Eu, in which the dominant phase is assumed to be K3Eu3+[Si6O15] · 2H2O, is studied. The oxidation state of lanthanides in the silicates under study is determined based on X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. The Eu L 3-, Sm L 3-, Yb L 3-, and Ce L 3-edge X-ray absorption spectra of the studied silicates and reference samples are recorded using a Rigaku R-XAS laboratory spectrometer. As reference samples, Eu2+S, Eu3+F3, Eu 2 3+ O3, Sm 2 3+ O3, Yb 2 3+ O3, Yb3+F3, Yb3+Cl3, Ce 2 3+ O3, and Ce4+O2 are used. Comparison of the absorption edge energies of lanthanide silicates and reference samples shows that Eu, Sm, Yb, and Ce in all the samples studied are in the oxidation state 3+. The synthesized silicates will supplement our knowledge of possible rare-earth minerals existing in hydrothermal systems, which is important for analyzing the distribution spectra of rare elements, which are widely used for diagnostics of geochemical processes and determination of sources of ore materials.

  15. Development of Multilayer Optics in EUV, Soft X-Ray and X-Ray Range at IPOE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhanshan; Zhu, Jingtao; Zhang, Zhong; Cheng, Xinbin; Xu, Jing; Wang, Fengli; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Lingyan

    Multilayer coatings are key optical components in the EUV, soft X-ray and X-ray range. At Institute of Precision Optical Engineering (IPOE), the development of multilayer optics has been impelled for their wide applications in X-ray laser, plasma diagnostics, astronomical observation and synchrotron radiation. The paper presents our recent results of periodic multilayers of Mo/Si, Cr/C, Cr/Sc, La/B4C, Mo/B4C, Si/C, Si/SiC, Mg/SiC Mo/Y and Ru/Y. To improve the reflectivity of Ru/Y multilayer mirrors, Mo layers were inserted between Ru and Y layer. The Mo barrier layers suppress intermixing between Ru and Y, thereby increasing the reflectivity of Ru/Y multilayer. We also discuss the application of Mo/Si, Mo/Y, Mo/B4C, La/B4C non-periodic multilayers in EUV broadband polarization measurement.

  16. Measurement of breast-tissue x-ray attenuation by spectral mammography: first results on cyst fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Dance, David R.; Willsher, Paula; Moa, Elin; von Tiedemann, Miriam; Young, Kenneth C.; Wallis, Matthew G.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of x-ray attenuation is essential for developing and evaluating x-ray imaging technologies. For instance, techniques to better characterize cysts at mammography screening would be highly desirable to reduce recalls, but the development is hampered by the lack of attenuation data for cysts. We have developed a method to measure x-ray attenuation of tissue samples using a prototype photon-counting spectral mammography unit. The method was applied to measure the attenuation of 50 samples of breast cyst fluid and 50 samples of water. Spectral (energy-resolved) images of the samples were acquired and the image signal was mapped to equivalent thicknesses of two known reference materials, which can be used to derive the x-ray attenuation as a function of energy. The attenuation of cyst fluid was found to be significantly different from water. There was a relatively large natural spread between different samples of cyst fluid, whereas the homogeneity of each individual sample was found to be good; the variation within samples did not reach above the quantum noise floor. The spectral method proved stable between several measurements on the same sample. Further, chemical analysis and elemental attenuation calculation were used to validate the spectral measurement on a subset of the samples. The two methods agreed within the precision of the elemental attenuation calculation over the mammographic energy range.

  17. Dual-exposure technique for extending the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors.

    PubMed

    Sisniega, A; Abella, M; Desco, M; Vaquero, J J

    2014-01-20

    This work presents an approach to extend the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors by combining two acquisitions of the same sample taken with two different x-ray photon flux levels and the same beam spectral configuration. In order to combine both datasets, the response of detector pixels was modelled in terms of mean and variance using a linear model. The model was extended to take into account the effect of pixel saturation. We estimated a joint probability density function (j-pdf) of the pixel values by assuming that each dataset follows an independent Gaussian distribution. This j-pdf was used for estimating the final pixel value of the high-dynamic-range dataset using a maximum likelihood method. The suitability of the pixel model for the representation of the detector signal was assessed using experimental data from a small-animal cone-beam micro-CT scanner equipped with a flat panel detector. The potential extension in dynamic range offered by our method was investigated for generic flat panel detectors using analytical expressions and simulations. The performance of the proposed dual-exposure approach in realistic imaging environments was compared with that of a regular single-exposure technique using experimental data from two different phantoms. Image quality was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, and analysis of profiles drawn on the images. The dynamic range, measured as the ratio between the exposure for saturation and the exposure equivalent to instrumentation noise, was increased from 76.9 to 166.7 when using our method. Dual-exposure results showed higher contrast-to-noise ratio and contrast resolution than the single-exposure acquisitions for the same x-ray dose. In addition, image artifacts were reduced in the combined dataset. This technique to extend the dynamic range of the detector without increasing the dose is particularly suited to image samples that contain both low and high attenuation regions.

  18. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN X-RAY LINE IONIZATION AND OPTICAL SPECTRAL TYPES OF THE OB STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Walborn, Nolan R.; Nichols, Joy S.; Waldron, Wayne L. E-mail: jnichols@cfa.harvard.ed

    2009-09-20

    Marked correlations are reported between the ionization of the X-ray line spectra of normal OB stars, as observed by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and their optical spectral types. These correlations include the progressive weakening of the higher ionization relative to the lower ionization X-ray lines with advancing spectral type, and the similarly decreasing intensity ratios of the H-like to He-like lines of the alpha ions. These relationships were not predicted by models, nor have they been clearly evident in astrophysical studies of a few objects; rather, they have emerged from morphological analysis of an adequate (albeit still small) sample, from which known peculiar objects such as magnetic stars and very rapid rotators have been isolated to reveal the normal trends. This process is analogous to that which first demonstrated the strong relationships between the UV wind profiles and the optical spectral types of normal OB stars, which likely bear a physical as well as a historical connection to the present X-ray results. Since the optical spectral types are calibrated in terms of fundamental stellar parameters, it follows that the winds and X-ray spectra are determined by the latter. These observations provide strong guidance for further astrophysical modeling of these phenomena.

  19. Robust x-ray image segmentation by spectral clustering and active shape model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Mahfouz, Mohamed R

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of bone contours from x-ray radiographs plays an important role in joint space width assessment, preoperative planning, and kinematics analysis. We present a robust segmentation method to accurately extract the distal femur and proximal tibia in knee radiographs of varying image quality. A spectral clustering method based on the eigensolution of an affinity matrix is utilized for x-ray image denoising. An active shape model-based segmentation method is employed for robust and accurate segmentation of the denoised x-ray images. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated with x-ray images from the public-use dataset(s), the osteoarthritis initiative, achieving a root mean square error of [Formula: see text] for femur and [Formula: see text] for tibia. The results demonstrate that this method outperforms previous segmentation methods in capturing anatomical shape variations, accounting for image quality differences and guiding accurate segmentation. PMID:27660806

  20. Compton scattering for spectroscopic detection of ultra-fast, high flux, broad energy range X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiccia, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Brunetti, E.; Vieux, G.; Yang, X.; Welsh, G. H.; Anania, M.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Maneuski, D.; Montgomery, R.; Smith, G.; Hoek, M.; Hamilton, D. J.; Shea, V. O.; Issac, R. C.; Lemos, N. R. C.; Dias, J. M.; and others

    2013-11-15

    Compton side-scattering has been used to simultaneously downshift the energy of keV to MeV energy range photons while attenuating their flux to enable single-shot, spectrally resolved, measurements of high flux X-ray sources to be undertaken. To demonstrate the technique a 1 mm thick pixelated cadmium telluride detector has been used to measure spectra of Compton side-scattered radiation from a Cobalt-60 laboratory source and a high flux, high peak brilliance X-ray source of betatron radiation from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator.

  1. Spectral response calibrations of x-ray diode photocathodes in the 50-5900 eV photon energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, C. D.; Simmons, A. C.

    2001-01-01

    X-ray diode photocathodes are employed in diagnostic instruments on the Helen laser at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) Aldermaston, UK. The photocathodes are mainly used in the Dante fast diode array and flat response diodes. These diagnostics enable the soft x-ray spectral emissions of laser irradiated targets to be determined. To derive quantitative spectral information, the quantum efficiency of the photocathodes must be known over the range of x-ray energies of interest. The photocathodes were manufactured in 1982, and were initially calibrated at that time. Since then further measurements have been performed in 1988 and 1999. The photocathodes have been exposed to a wide range of conditions during their lives, ranging from use in experiments to storage in a dry nitrogen environment. Reported here are the results of calibrations performed in 1999 at the soft x-ray calibration facility EXCALIBUR at AWE, Aldermaston, and at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Brookhaven NY. An assessment of their current condition and an evaluation of the change in their response over time, and the possible reasons for these changes, are made.

  2. The X-ray Spectral Evolution of eta Carinae as Seen by ASCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Fredericks, A. C.; Petre, R.; Swank, J. H.; Drake, S. A.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Using data from the ASCA X-ray observatory, we examine the variations in the X-ray spectrum of the supermassive star nu Carinae with an unprecedented combination of spatial and spectral resolution. We include data taken during the recent X-ray eclipse in 1997-1998, after recovery from the eclipse, and during and after an X-ray flare. We show that the eclipse variation in the X-ray spectrum is apparently confined to a decrease in the emission measure of the source. We compare our results with a simple colliding wind binary model and find that the observed spectral variations are only consistent, with the binary model if there is significant high-temperature emission far from the star and/or a substantial change in the temperature distribution of the hot plasma. If contamination in the 2-10 keV band is important, the observed eclipse spectrum requires an absorbing column in excess of 10(exp 24)/sq cm for consistency with the binary model, which may indicate an increase in the first derivative of M from nu Carinae near the time of periastron passage. The flare spectra are consistent with the variability seen in nearly simultaneous RXTE observations and thus confirm that nu Carinae itself is the source of the flare emission. The variation in the spectrum during the flare seems confined to a change in the source emission measure. By comparing 2 observations obtained at the same phase in different X-ray cycles, we find that the current, X-ray brightness of the source is slightly higher than the brightness of the source during the last cycle perhaps indicative of a long-term increase in the first derivative of M, not associated with the X-ray cycle.

  3. X-ray-pulse characterization by spectral shearing interferometry using three-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovich, S.; Shwartz, S.

    2014-09-01

    We describe a method for measuring the field profile of x-ray ultrashort pulses including phase information. The scheme is based on spectrally interfering two replicas of the same pulse, which are spectrally shifted via three-wave mixing with IR or visible beams. Using a single-shot spectrometer the scheme can be used for the inspection of individual ultrashort x-ray pulses with random amplitudes and phases. Examples for characterization of stochastic pulses with a bandwidth of 1 eV are given, including criteria for a successful measurement.

  4. Spectral Atlas of X-ray Lines Emitted During Solar Flares Based on CHIANTI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landi, E.; Phillips, K. J. H.

    2005-01-01

    A spectral atlas of X-ray lines in the wavelength range 7.47-18.97 Angstroms is presented, based on high-resolution spectra obtained during two M-class solar flares (on 1980 August 25 and 1985 July 2) with the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on board the Solar Maximum Mission. The physical properties of the flaring plasmas are derived as a function of time using strong, isolated lines. From these properties predicted spectra using the CHIANTI database have been obtained which were then compared with wavelengths and fluxes of lines in the observed spectra to establish line identifications. identifications for nearly all the observed lines in the resulting atlas are given, with some significant corrections to previous analysis of these flare spectra.

  5. Spectral variability of Cyg X-3. [X ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, P. J.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Rothschild, R. E.; Saba, J. L. R.

    1975-01-01

    The 1.7-40 keV spectra of Cyg X-3 obtained about a year apart, using the same rocket payload, show large spectral differences. The two observations suggest that while the luminosity of this source remains roughly the same, its spectrum can vary from a featureless blackbody distribution to a flat spectrum which includes strong iron line emission at approximately 6.7 keV. The flux in the line corresponds to an equivalent continuum width of 1.2 keV.

  6. Spectral encoding method for measuring the relative arrival time between x-ray/optical pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bionta, M. R.; Hartmann, N.; Weaver, M.; French, D.; Glownia, J. M.; Bostedt, C.; Chollet, M.; Ding, Y.; Fritz, D. M.; Fry, A. R.; Krzywinski, J.; Lemke, H. T.; Messerschmidt, M.; Schorb, S.; Zhu, D.; White, W. E.; Nicholson, D. J.; Cryan, J. P.; Baker, K.; Kane, D. J.; and others

    2014-08-15

    The advent of few femtosecond x-ray light sources brings promise of x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments that can measure chemical and structural changes in the 10–100 fs time regime. Widely distributed timing systems used at x-ray Free-Electron Laser facilities are typically limited to above 50 fs fwhm jitter in active x-ray/optical synchronization. The approach of single-shot timing measurements is used to sort results in the event processing stage. This has seen wide use to accommodate the insufficient precision of active stabilization schemes. In this article, we review the current technique for “measure-and-sort” at the Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The relative arrival time between an x-ray pulse and an optical pulse is measured near the experimental interaction region as a spectrally encoded cross-correlation signal. The cross-correlation provides a time-stamp for filter-and-sort algorithms used for real-time sorting. Sub-10 fs rms resolution is common in this technique, placing timing precision at the same scale as the duration of the shortest achievable x-ray pulses.

  7. Analysis of X-ray Spectra of High-Z Elements obtained on Nike with high spectral and spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Yefim; Weaver, J. L.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.; Ralchenko, Yu.

    2014-10-01

    The spectra of multi-charged ions of Hf, Ta, W, Pt, Au and Bi have been studied on Nike krypton-fluoride laser facility with the help of two kinds of X-ray spectrometers. First, survey instrument covering a spectral range from 0.5 to 19.5 angstroms which allows simultaneous observation of both M- and N- spectra of above mentioned elements with high spectral resolution. Second, an imaging spectrometer with interchangeable spherically bent Quartz crystals that added higher efficiency, higher spectral resolution and high spatial resolution to the qualities of the former one. Multiple spectral lines with X-ray energies as high as 4 keV that belong to the isoelectronic sequences of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn were identified with the help of NOMAD package developed by Dr. Yu. Ralchenko and colleagues. In our continuous effort to support DOE-NNSA's inertial fusion program, this campaign covered a wide range of plasma conditions that result in production of relatively energetic X-rays. Work supported by the US DOE/NNSA.

  8. An X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator for Record High Spectral Purity and Average Brightness (Progress and Prospects for X-ray Free Electron Lasers)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwang-Je

    2009-06-24

    With the success of the LCLS at SLAC, synchrotron radiation community is entering the era of x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) with an enormous jump in brightness and coherence over that possible with third-generation x-ray sources. The LCLS is a single-pass, high-gain device producing quasi-coherent x-rays known as self-amplified spontaneous emission. Hard x-ray FELs are also feasible in an oscillator (XFELO) configuration, in which an x-ray pulse is trapped a low-loss optical cavity consisting of diamond crystals, permitting build-up in the intensity and coherence over several hundred passes. An XFELO produces ultrahigh spectral purity and brightness-average brightness several orders of magnitude higher than, and peak brightness comparable to, self-amplified spontaneous emission devices; opening up new scientific opportunities as well as drastically improving and complementing experimental techniques developed at third-generation x-ray facilities. We discuss unique R&D issues in accelerator and x-ray optics and encouraging progress to date.

  9. New consistency tests for high-accuracy measurements of X-ray mass attenuation coefficients by the X-ray extended-range technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chantler, C.T.; Islam, M.T.; Rae, N.A.; Tran, C.Q.; Glover, J.L.; Barnea, Z.

    2012-09-25

    An extension of the X-ray extended-range technique is described for measuring X-ray mass attenuation coefficients by introducing absolute measurement of a number of foils - the multiple independent foil technique. Illustrating the technique with the results of measurements for gold in the 38-50 keV energy range, it is shown that its use enables selection of the most uniform and well defined of available foils, leading to more accurate measurements; it allows one to test the consistency of independently measured absolute values of the mass attenuation coefficient with those obtained by the thickness transfer method; and it tests the linearity of the response of the counter and counting chain throughout the range of X-ray intensities encountered in a given experiment. In light of the results for gold, the strategy to be ideally employed in measuring absolute X-ray mass attenuation coefficients, X-ray absorption fine structure and related quantities is discussed.

  10. A search for X-ray reprocessing echoes in the power spectral density functions of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Papadakis, I. E.; Epitropakis, A.; Pecháček, T.; Dovčiak, M.; McHardy, I. M.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of a detailed study of the X-ray power spectral density (PSD) functions of 12 X-ray bright AGN, using almost all the archival XMM-Newton data. The total net exposure of the EPIC-pn light curves is larger than 350 ks in all cases (and exceeds 1 Ms in the case of 1H 0707-497). In a physical scenario in which X-ray reflection occurs in the inner part of the accretion disc of AGN, the X-ray reflection component should be a filtered echo of the X-ray continuum signal and should be equal to the convolution of the primary emission with the response function of the disc. Our primary objective is to search for these reflection features in the 5-7 keV (iron line) and 0.5-1 keV (soft) bands, where the X-ray reflection fraction is expected to be dominant. We fit to the observed periodograms two models: a simple bending power-law model (BPL) and a BPL model convolved with the transfer function of the accretion disc assuming the lamp-post geometry and X-ray reflection from a homogeneous disc. We do not find any significant features in the best-fitting BPL model residuals either in individual PSDs in the iron band, soft and full band (0.3-10 keV) or in the average PSD residuals of the brightest and more variable sources (with similar black hole mass estimates). The typical amplitude of the soft and full-band residuals is around 3-5 per cent. It is possible that the expected general relativistic effects are not detected because they are intrinsically lower than the uncertainty of the current PSDs, even in the strong relativistic case in which X-ray reflection occurs on a disc around a fast rotating black hole having an X-ray source very close above it. However, we could place strong constrains to the X-ray reflection geometry with the current data sets if we knew in advance the intrinsic shape of the X-ray PSDs, particularly its high-frequency slope.

  11. Testing the Pairs-Reflection Model with X-Ray Spectral Variability and X-Ray Properties of Complete Samples of Radio-Selected BL Lacertae Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. Megan

    1997-01-01

    This grant was awarded to Dr. C. Megan Urry of the Space Telescope Science Institute in response to two successful ADP proposals to use archival Ginga and Rosat X-ray data for 'Testing the Pairs-Reflection model with X-Ray Spectral Variability' (in collaboration with Paola Grandi, now at the University of Rome) and 'X-Ray Properties of Complete Samples of Radio-Selected BL Lacertae Objects' (in collaboration with then-graduate student Rita Sambruna, now a post-doc at Goddard Space Flight Center). In addition, post-docs Joseph Pesce and Elena Pian, and graduate student Matthew O'Dowd, have worked on several aspects of these projects. The grant was originally awarded on 3/01/94; this report covers the full period, through May 1997. We have completed our project on the X-ray properties of radio-selected BL Lacs.

  12. New Instruments for Spectrally-Resolved Solar Soft X-ray Observations from CubeSats, and Larger Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Shih, A.; Warren, H. P.; DeForest, C. E.; Woods, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    Solar soft X-ray (SXR) observations provide important diagnostics of plasma heating, during solar flares and quiescent times. Spectrally- and temporally-resolved measurements are crucial for understanding the dynamics and evolution of these energetic processes; spatially-resolved measurements are critical for understanding energy transport. A better understanding of the thermal plasma informs our interpretation of hard X-ray (HXR) observations of nonthermal particles, improving our understanding of the relationships between particle acceleration, plasma heating, and the underlying release of magnetic energy during reconnection. We introduce a new proposed mission, the CubeSat Imaging X-ray Solar Spectrometer (CubIXSS), to measure spectrally- and spatially-resolved SXRs from the quiescent and flaring Sun from a 6U CubeSat platform in low-Earth orbit during a nominal 1-year mission. CubIXSS includes the Amptek X123-SDD silicon drift detector, a low-noise, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) instrument enabling solar SXR spectroscopy from ~0.5 to ~30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM spectral resolution with low power, mass, and volume requirements. An X123-CdTe cadmium-telluride detector is also included for ~5-100 keV HXR spectroscopy with ~0.5-1 keV FWHM resolution. CubIXSS also includes a novel spectro-spatial imager -- the first ever solar imager on a CubeSat -- utilizing a pinhole aperture and X-ray transmission diffraction grating to provide full-Sun imaging from ~0.1 to ~10 keV, with ~25 arcsec and ~0.1 Å FWHM spatial and spectral resolutions, respectively. We discuss scaled versions of these instruments, with greater sensitivity and dynamic range, and significantly improved spectral and spatial resolutions for the imager, for deployment on larger platforms such as Small Explorer missions.

  13. X-Ray Spectral and Temporal Studies of the Ultra-Compact System X1916-05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1998-01-01

    Rossi x-ray timing Explorer (RXTE) Cycle 1 data on the ultra-compact low mass x- ray binary (LMXB) X1916-05 is analyzed. In this current report, the scientific objectives of this investigation of hard x-ray studies of bursters and the results achieved are summarized. The scientific objectives are: (1) Period of the x-ray dips in X1916-05; (2) Phase stability of the x-ray dip period; (3) Spectral break energy and its dependence on mass transfer rate; and (4) Qpos detected from this LMXB. A list of published papers resulted from this project is also included.

  14. Platform for spectrally resolved x-ray scattering from imploding capsules at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, D.; Döppner, T.; Kritcher, A. L.; Yi, A.; Boehm, K.; Bachmann, B.; Divol, L.; Fletcher, L. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O. L.; Masters, N.; Saunders, A. M.; Weber, C.; Falcone, R. W.; Neumayer, P.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new experimental platform to perform spectrally resolved x-ray scattering measurements of ionization, density and temperature in imploding CH or beryllium capsules at the National Ignition Facility. Scattered x-rays at 9 keV from a zinc He-alpha plasma source at a scattering angle of 120 degrees are highly sensitive to K-shell ionization, while at the same time constraining density and temperature. This platform will allow for x-ray scattering studies of dense plasmas with free electron densities up to 1025 cm-3 giving the possibility to investigate effects of pressure ionization and Pauli blocking on the ablator ionization state right before or shortly after stagnation of the implosion.

  15. Spatial and spectral features of soft diffuse X ray background seen by the Einstein observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micela, G.; Harnden, F. R.; Rosner, R., Jr.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of the diffuse soft X-ray background as seen directly by the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) is presented. A source free region of the detector 1 by 1 degree field is used. The background in the 0.16 to 3.5 keV spectral region is viewed. The data covers roughly 5 percent of the sky, with some bias in coverage towards the galactic plane. The moderate energy resolution of the IPC enables the characterization and the production of maps of the background as a function of energy within the Einstein passband. The results are compared with previous observations of the diffuse X-ray background. The implications for galactic structure and for the soft component of the extragalactic X-ray background are discussed.

  16. A Hard X-Ray Power-law Spectral Cutoff in Centaurus X-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Tomsick, John A.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fürst, Felix; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Miller, Jon M.; Nowak, Michael A.; Rana, Vikram; Stern, Daniel; Wik, Daniel R.; Wilms, Jörn; Zhang, William W.

    2014-12-01

    The low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Cen X-4 is the brightest and closest (<1.2 kpc) quiescent neutron star transient. Previous 0.5-10 keV X-ray observations of Cen X-4 in quiescence identified two spectral components: soft thermal emission from the neutron star atmosphere and a hard power-law tail of unknown origin. We report here on a simultaneous observation of Cen X-4 with NuSTAR (3-79 keV) and XMM-Newton (0.3-10 keV) in 2013 January, providing the first sensitive hard X-ray spectrum of a quiescent neutron star transient. The 0.3-79 keV luminosity was 1.1× 1033 D^2_kpc erg s-1, with sime60% in the thermal component. We clearly detect a cutoff of the hard spectral tail above 10 keV, the first time such a feature has been detected in this source class. We show that thermal Comptonization and synchrotron shock origins for the hard X-ray emission are ruled out on physical grounds. However, the hard X-ray spectrum is well fit by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with kTe = 18 keV, which can be understood as arising either in a hot layer above the neutron star atmosphere or in a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. The power-law cutoff energy may be set by the degree of Compton cooling of the bremsstrahlung electrons by thermal seed photons from the neutron star surface. Lower thermal luminosities should lead to higher (possibly undetectable) cutoff energies. We compare Cen X-4's behavior with PSR J1023+0038, IGR J18245-2452, and XSS J12270-4859, which have shown transitions between LMXB and radio pulsar modes at a similar X-ray luminosity.

  17. A HARD X-RAY POWER-LAW SPECTRAL CUTOFF IN CENTAURUS X-4

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Nowak, Michael A.; Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Fürst, Felix; Harrison, Fiona A.; Rana, Vikram; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Miller, Jon M.; Stern, Daniel; Wik, Daniel R.; Zhang, William W.; Wilms, Jörn

    2014-12-20

    The low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Cen X-4 is the brightest and closest (<1.2 kpc) quiescent neutron star transient. Previous 0.5-10 keV X-ray observations of Cen X-4 in quiescence identified two spectral components: soft thermal emission from the neutron star atmosphere and a hard power-law tail of unknown origin. We report here on a simultaneous observation of Cen X-4 with NuSTAR (3-79 keV) and XMM-Newton (0.3-10 keV) in 2013 January, providing the first sensitive hard X-ray spectrum of a quiescent neutron star transient. The 0.3-79 keV luminosity was 1.1×10{sup 33} D{sub kpc}{sup 2} erg s{sup –1}, with ≅60% in the thermal component. We clearly detect a cutoff of the hard spectral tail above 10 keV, the first time such a feature has been detected in this source class. We show that thermal Comptonization and synchrotron shock origins for the hard X-ray emission are ruled out on physical grounds. However, the hard X-ray spectrum is well fit by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with kT{sub e} = 18 keV, which can be understood as arising either in a hot layer above the neutron star atmosphere or in a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. The power-law cutoff energy may be set by the degree of Compton cooling of the bremsstrahlung electrons by thermal seed photons from the neutron star surface. Lower thermal luminosities should lead to higher (possibly undetectable) cutoff energies. We compare Cen X-4's behavior with PSR J1023+0038, IGR J18245–2452, and XSS J12270–4859, which have shown transitions between LMXB and radio pulsar modes at a similar X-ray luminosity.

  18. Parameterized algorithms for quantitative differentials in spectrally equivalent medical diagnostic x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Okunade, Akintunde Akangbe

    2005-06-15

    Qualitative and quantitative equivalence of spectra transmitted by two different elemental filters require a good match in terms of shape and size over the entire energy range of 0-150 keV used in medical diagnostic radiology. However, the photoelectric absorptions and Compton scattering involved in the interaction of x rays with matter at these relatively low photon energies differ in a nonuniform manner with energy and atomic number. By careful choice of thicknesses for filter materials with an atomic number between 12 and 39, when compared with aluminum, it is possible to obtain transmitted beams of the same shape (quality) but not of the same size (quantity). In this paper, calculations have been carried out for the matching of the shapes and sizes of beams transmitted through specified thicknesses of aluminium filter and spectrally equivalent thicknesses of other filter materials (different from aluminium) using FORTRAN source codes traceable to the American Association of Physics in Medicine (AAPM), College Park, MD, USA. Parametrized algorithms for the evaluation of quantitative differentials (deficit or surplus) in radiation output (namely, photon fluence, exposure, kerma, energy imparted, absorbed dose, and effective dose) from these transmitted spectrally equivalent beams were developed. These differentials range between 1%, and 4% at 1 mm Al filtration and between 8%, and 25% for filtration of 6 mm Al for different filter materials in comparison with aluminum. Also developed were models for factors for converting measures of photon fluence, exposure-area product, (EAP), and kerma-area product (KAP) to risk related quantities such as energy imparted, absorbed dose, and effective dose from the spectrally equivalent beams. The thicknesses of other filter materials that are spectrally equivalent to given thicknesses of aluminum filter were characterized using polynomial functions. The fact that the use of equivalent spectra in radiological practice can

  19. TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL ANALYSES OF SPECTRAL INDICES OF NONTHERMAL EMISSIONS DERIVED FROM HARD X-RAYS AND MICROWAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, Ayumi; Kiyohara, Junko; Takasaki, Hiroyuki; Narukage, Noriyuki; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Masuda, Satoshi; Shimojo, Masumi; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2013-02-15

    We studied electron spectral indices of nonthermal emissions seen in hard X-rays (HXRs) and microwaves. We analyzed 12 flares observed by the Hard X-Ray Telescope aboard Yohkoh, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH), and compared the spectral indices derived from total fluxes of HXRs and microwaves. Except for four events, which have very soft HXR spectra suffering from the thermal component, these flares show a gap {Delta}{delta} between the electron spectral indices derived from HXRs {delta} {sub X} and those from microwaves {delta}{sub {mu}} ({Delta}{delta} = {delta} {sub X} - {delta}{sub {mu}}) of about 1.6. Furthermore, from the start to the peak times of the HXR bursts, the time profiles of the HXR spectral index {delta} {sub X} evolve synchronously with those of the microwave spectral index {delta}{sub {mu}}, keeping the constant gap. We also examined the spatially resolved distribution of the microwave spectral index by using NoRH data. The microwave spectral index {delta}{sub {mu}} tends to be larger, which means a softer spectrum, at HXR footpoint sources with stronger magnetic field than that at the loop tops. These results suggest that the electron spectra are bent at around several hundreds of keV, and become harder at the higher energy range that contributes the microwave gyrosynchrotron emission.

  20. X-ray spectral and timing behavior of Scorpius X-1. Spectral hardening during the flaring branch

    SciTech Connect

    Titarchuk, Lev; Seifina, Elena

    2014-07-10

    We present an analysis of the spectral and timing properties of X-ray emission from the Z-source Sco X-1 during its evolution between the horizontal (HB) and flaring (FB) branches observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the 1996-2002 period. We find that the broadband (3-250 keV) energy spectra during all spectral states can be adequately reproduced by a model, consisting of two Comptonized components and an iron line. We suggest that the seed photons of kT{sub s1} ≲ 0.7 keV coming from the disk and of temperature kT{sub s2} ≲ 1.8 keV coming from the neutron star (NS) are each upscattered by hot electrons of a 'Compton cloud' (hereafter the Comptb1 and Comptb2 components, respectively, which are associated with the similarly subscripted parameters). The photon power-law index Γ{sub 2} is almost constant (Γ{sub 2} ∼ 2) for all spectral states. In turn, Γ{sub 1} demonstrates a two-phase behavior with the spectral state: Γ{sub 1} is quasi-constant at the level Γ{sub 1} ∼ 2 for the HB–NB and Γ{sub 1} is less than 2, namely in the range of 1.3 < Γ{sub 1} < 2, when the source traces the FB. We also detect a decrease kT{sub s2} from 1.8 keV to 0.7 keV during the FB. We interpret this apparent quasi-stability of the indices during the HB–NB in the framework of the model in which the spectrum is determined by the Comptonized thermal components. This effect established for the Comptonized spectral components of the Z-source Sco X-1 is similar to what was previously found in the atoll sources 4U 1728-34, GX 3+1 and 4U 1820-30 and the Z-source GX 340+0 through all spectral states. However, we interpret the index reduction phase detected during the FB in Sco X-1 within the framework of a model in which the spectrum at the FB is determined by high radiation pressure from the NS surface.

  1. X-Ray Spectral and Timing Behavior of Scorpius X-1. Spectral Hardening during the Flaring Branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Seifina, Elena; Shrader, Chris

    2014-07-01

    We present an analysis of the spectral and timing properties of X-ray emission from the Z-source Sco X-1 during its evolution between the horizontal (HB) and flaring (FB) branches observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the 1996-2002 period. We find that the broadband (3-250 keV) energy spectra during all spectral states can be adequately reproduced by a model, consisting of two Comptonized components and an iron line. We suggest that the seed photons of kT s1 <~ 0.7 keV coming from the disk and of temperature kT s2 <~ 1.8 keV coming from the neutron star (NS) are each upscattered by hot electrons of a "Compton cloud" (hereafter the Comptb1 and Comptb2 components, respectively, which are associated with the similarly subscripted parameters). The photon power-law index Γ2 is almost constant (Γ2 ~ 2) for all spectral states. In turn, Γ1 demonstrates a two-phase behavior with the spectral state: Γ1 is quasi-constant at the level Γ1 ~ 2 for the HB-NB and Γ1 is less than 2, namely in the range of 1.3 < Γ1 < 2, when the source traces the FB. We also detect a decrease kT s2 from 1.8 keV to 0.7 keV during the FB. We interpret this apparent quasi-stability of the indices during the HB-NB in the framework of the model in which the spectrum is determined by the Comptonized thermal components. This effect established for the Comptonized spectral components of the Z-source Sco X-1 is similar to what was previously found in the atoll sources 4U 1728-34, GX 3+1 and 4U 1820-30 and the Z-source GX 340+0 through all spectral states. However, we interpret the index reduction phase detected during the FB in Sco X-1 within the framework of a model in which the spectrum at the FB is determined by high radiation pressure from the NS surface.

  2. X-ray spectral variability of LINERs selected from the Palomar sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Garcia, L.; González-Martín, O.; Masegosa, J.; Márquez, I.

    2014-07-01

    Variability in active galactic nuclei (AGN) has been discovered at X-ray, UV, and radio frequencies on timescales from hours to years, being one of their most important features. Among the AGN family and according to theoretical studies, low-ionization nuclear emission line region (LINER) nuclei would be variable objects at long timescales because of their large black hole masses and low accretion rates. Our aim is to investigate the spectral X-ray variability in LINERs, leading to an understanding of the nature of this kind of objects, including their accretion mechanism. We selected 18 LINERs from the Palomar sample, and used Chandra and XMM-Newton public archives to analyze their X-ray spectral properties at different epochs with timescales of years. Spectral modeling allowed us to investigate the parameter(s) responsible for the variations. The main result from the analysis is that long term spectral variability is very common, mostly related to the nuclear power at hard (2-10 keV) energies.

  3. Spectrally-resolved Soft X-ray Observations and the Temperature Structure of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry; McTiernan, James; Woods, Thomas N.

    2015-04-01

    Solar X-ray observations provide important diagnostics of plasma heating and particle acceleration, during solar flares and quiescent periods. How the corona is heated to its ~1-3 MK nominal temperature remains one of the fundamental unanswered questions of solar physics; heating of plasma to tens of MK during solar flares -- particularly to the hottest observed temperatures of up to ~50 MK -- is also still poorly understood. Soft X-ray emission (~0.1-10 keV; or ~0.1-10 nm) is particularly sensitive to hot coronal plasma and serves as a probe of the thermal processes driving coronal plasma heating. Spectrally- and temporally-resolved measurements are crucial for understanding these energetic processes, but there have historically been very few such observations. We present new solar soft X-ray spectra from the Amptek X123-SDD, measuring quiescent solar X-ray emission from ~0.5 to ~30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution from two SDO/EVE calibration sounding rocket underflights in 2012 and 2013. Combined with observations from RHESSI, GOES/XRS, SDO/EVE, and SDO/AIA, the temperature distribution derived from these data suggest significant hot (5-10 MK) emission from active regions, and the 2013 spectra suggest a low-FIP enhancement of only ~1.6 relative to the photosphere, 40% of the usually-observed value from quiescent coronal plasma. We explore the implications of these findings on coronal heating. We discuss future missions for spectrally-resolved soft X-ray observations using the X123-SDD, including the upcoming MinXSS 3U CubeSat using the X123-SDD and scheduled for deployment in mid-2015, and the CubIXSS 6U CubeSat mission concept.

  4. The Chandra COSMOS-Legacy Survey: Source X-Ray Spectral Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, S.; Lanzuisi, G.; Civano, F.; Iwasawa, K.; Suh, H.; Comastri, A.; Zamorani, G.; Allevato, V.; Griffiths, R.; Miyaji, T.; Ranalli, P.; Salvato, M.; Schawinski, K.; Silverman, J.; Treister, E.; Urry, C. M.; Vignali, C.

    2016-10-01

    We present the X-ray spectral analysis of the 1855 extragalactic sources in the Chandra COSMOS-Legacy survey catalog having more than 30 net counts in the 0.5–7 keV band. A total of 38% of the sources are optically classified type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 60% are type 2 AGNs, and 2% are passive, low-redshift galaxies. We study the distribution of AGN photon index Γ and of the intrinsic absorption {N}{{H},{{z}}} based on the sources’ optical classification: type 1 AGNs have a slightly steeper mean photon index Γ than type 2 AGNs, which, on the other hand, have average {N}{{H},{{z}}} ∼ 3 times higher than type 1 AGNs. We find that ∼15% of type 1 AGNs have {N}{{H},{{z}}}\\gt {10}22 cm‑2, i.e., are obscured according to the X-ray spectral fitting; the vast majority of these sources have {L}2{--10{keV}} \\gt 1044 erg s‑1. The existence of these objects suggests that optical and X-ray obscuration can be caused by different phenomena, the X-ray obscuration being, for example, caused by dust-free material surrounding the inner part of the nuclei. Approximately 18% of type 2 AGNs have {N}{{H},{{z}}}\\lt {10}22 cm‑2, and most of these sources have low X-ray luminosities (L {}2{--10{keV}} \\lt 1043 erg s‑1). We expect a part of these sources to be low-accretion, unobscured AGNs lacking broad emission lines. Finally, we also find a direct proportional trend between {N}{{H},{{z}}} and host-galaxy mass and star formation rate, although part of this trend is due to a redshift selection effect.

  5. Use of a priori spectral information in the measurement of x-ray flux with filtered diode arrays.

    PubMed

    Marrs, R E; Widmann, K; Brown, G V; Heeter, R F; MacLaren, S A; May, M J; Moore, A S; Schneider, M B

    2015-10-01

    Filtered x-ray diode (XRD) arrays are often used to measure x-ray spectra vs. time from spectrally continuous x-ray sources such as hohlraums. A priori models of the incident x-ray spectrum enable a more accurate unfolding of the x-ray flux as compared to the standard technique of modifying a thermal Planckian with spectral peaks or dips at the response energy of each filtered XRD channel. A model x-ray spectrum consisting of a thermal Planckian, a Gaussian at higher energy, and (in some cases) a high energy background provides an excellent fit to XRD-array measurements of x-ray emission from laser heated hohlraums. If high-resolution measurements of part of the x-ray emission spectrum are available, that information can be included in the a priori model. In cases where the x-ray emission spectrum is not Planckian, candidate x-ray spectra can be allowed or excluded by fitting them to measured XRD voltages. Examples are presented from the filtered XRD arrays, named Dante, at the National Ignition Facility and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. PMID:26520959

  6. Use of a priori spectral information in the measurement of x-ray flux with filtered diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrs, R. E.; Widmann, K.; Brown, G. V.; Heeter, R. F.; MacLaren, S. A.; May, M. J.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.

    2015-10-01

    Filtered x-ray diode (XRD) arrays are often used to measure x-ray spectra vs. time from spectrally continuous x-ray sources such as hohlraums. A priori models of the incident x-ray spectrum enable a more accurate unfolding of the x-ray flux as compared to the standard technique of modifying a thermal Planckian with spectral peaks or dips at the response energy of each filtered XRD channel. A model x-ray spectrum consisting of a thermal Planckian, a Gaussian at higher energy, and (in some cases) a high energy background provides an excellent fit to XRD-array measurements of x-ray emission from laser heated hohlraums. If high-resolution measurements of part of the x-ray emission spectrum are available, that information can be included in the a priori model. In cases where the x-ray emission spectrum is not Planckian, candidate x-ray spectra can be allowed or excluded by fitting them to measured XRD voltages. Examples are presented from the filtered XRD arrays, named Dante, at the National Ignition Facility and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  7. Optical and X-ray radiation from fast pulsars - Effects of duty cycle and spectral shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pacini, F.; Salvati, M.

    1987-01-01

    The optical luminosity of PSR 0540 is considerably stronger than what one would have predicted in a simple model developed earlier where the pulses are synchrotron radiation by secondary electrons near the light cylinder. This discrepancy can be eliminated if one incorporates into the model the effects of the large duty cycle and the spectral properties of PSR 0540. It is also shown that the same model can provide a reasonable fit to the observed X-ray fluxes from fast pulsars.

  8. Wide-band X-ray spectral and timing analysis of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiragi, Kazuyoshi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Mizuno, Motohiro; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Yamasaki, Tomonori

    X-ray spectra of AGNs contain conplex features such as the continuum, emission line, ab-sorption, reflection component, high energy cut-off. These features are thought to reflect the material structure around AGN, and X-ray studies can clarify a physical geometry of AGNs. Especially, the hard X-ray observation above 10 keV is important to measure the reflection component. So far, hard X-ray studies of time variation of AGN spectra have been limited because of high background rate. Suzaku HXD achieve the highest S/N ratio by an effective background rejection. Combining the data with the XIS soft X-ray date, we can study the AGN X-ray spectra in more detail than ever. Here, we report the spectral and timing analysis of 14 Seyfert galaxies observed with Suzaku, in order to decompose each spectral component. The reflection component via a torus is considered to be less variable, while the varible component is considered to come from the central engine directly. Using this consideration, we tried to decompose a direct component and a reflection component. We compared the spectral parameters obtained by spectral fitting with direct nuclear plus reflection with those obtained from the difference spectra between high and low state. In particular, we forcus attention on the power-law index, reflection fraction, and the Fe-Ka line. As a result, the photon index, the Fe line intensity, and the refrection component is almost the same between high and low state. However, some of them are not the case, and the equivalent width of Fe-Ka line against the best-fit reflection component is unreasonable for some objects. These indicate that two-component model is valid for most of Seyfert galaxies, but the behavior of some Seyfert galaxies cannot be explained by two-conmponent model. Highly ionized Fe-K lines are observed as both emission and absorption, and some objects show a time variability of these lines. We will report this matter.

  9. Investigation of Solar Flares Using Spectrally, Spatially, and Temporally Resolved Observations in Gamma Rays, Hard X Rays, and Microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, Carol Jo; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The high-energy components of solar flares radiate at a wide range of wavelengths. We are using spatially, spectrally, and temporally resolved hard X-ray, gamma-ray, and microwave observations of solar flares to investigate flare models and to understand the flare acceleration process. The hard X-ray and gamma-ray observations are obtained with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spacecraft that was launched on February 5, 2002. The microwave observations are obtained with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO), which has been dedicated to daily observations of solar flares in microwaves with a five-element interferometer since June 1992. These studies are expected to yield exciting new insights into the fundamental physics of the flare acceleration processes.

  10. Broad-band short term X-ray spectral variability of the quasar PDS 456

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzeu, G.; Reeves, J.; Nardini, E.; Braito, V.; Costa, M.; Tombesi, F.

    2015-07-01

    We present an analysis of a recent 500 ks Suzaku observation, carried out in 2013, of the nearby (z=0.184) luminous (L_{bol}˜10^{47} erg s^{-1}) quasar PDS 456 in which the X-ray flux was unusually low. Short term X-ray spectral variability has been detected, which may be caused by two variable coverers of column density log (N_{H,1}/cm^{-2})=22.3±0.1 and log (N_{H,2}/cm(-2) )=23.2±0.1 We find that the partial covering requires an outflow velocity of ˜0.25 c, coincident with the velocity of the highly ionised outflow at the 99.9 % confidence level. Therefore the partial covering clouds could be the denser clumpy part of an inhomogeneous wind. An obscuration event occurs 1250 ks into the observation, where the spectrum becomes totally opaque at Fe K. This implies that the size of the absorber and likewise the X-ray emitter, to be less than 20 Rg. We also analyse the flaring behaviour in the lightcurve. The behaviour of the soft and hard X-ray flux, suggested a corona characterised by an extended "warm" region of ˜20 Rg in size combined with more compact regions of "hot" electrons of ˜8 Rg in size.

  11. High pressure XANES and XMCD in the tender X-ray energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, F.; Garbarino, G.; Jacobs, J.; Vitoux, H.; Steinmann, R.; Guillou, F.; Snigirev, A.; Snigireva, I.; Voisin, P.; Braithwaite, D.; Aoki, D.; Brison, J.-P.; Kantor, I.; Lyatun, I.; Rogalev, A.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an experimental setup at the ESRF beamline ID12 dedicated to X-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism measurements at high pressure adapted for the tender X-ray energy range and compatible with low temperatures and with high magnetic field. The focused incoming X-ray beam passes through a thin diamond disk attached to a fully perforated diamond anvil and X-ray fluorescence photons from the sample are collected in back-scattering geometry through the same diamond disk. The pressure in the cell is measured using the ruby luminescence through a full diamond anvil. The highest pressure attainable with this diamond anvil cell (DAC) depends on the thickness of the diamond disk and it is above 16 GPa for a 80-μm thick plate and exceeds 4.5 GPa in the case of 30-μm diamond disk. Excellent performances of this setup in the tender X-ray range are illustrated with X-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of the phase transitions in KCl at the potassium and chlorine K-edges (3.61 and 2.82 keV, respectively) as well as in CdS at the sulfur K-edge (2.47 keV). This DAC together with a dedicated total fluorescence yield (TFY) detector could be mounted in the main heat exchanger of a cryostat and inserted in a bore of a superconducting magnet, this makes possible to perform X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) experiments at low temperature, high magnetic field and high pressure. Feasibility of this approach is shown with the XMCD results obtained at the U M?-edges in ferromagnetic superconductor UGe?.

  12. X-Ray Fluctuation Power Spectral Densities of Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, A.; Edelson, R.; Vaughan, S.; Uttley, P.; George, I. M.; Griffiths, R. E.; Kaspi, S.; Lawrence, A.; McHandy, I.; Nandra, K.

    2003-01-01

    By combining complementary monitoring observations spanning long, medium and short time scales, we have constructed power spectral densities (PSDs) of six Seyfert 1 galaxies. These PSDs span approx. greater than 4 orders of magnitude in temporal frequency, sampling variations on time scales ranging from tens of minutes to over a year. In at least four cases, the PSD shows a "break," a significant departure from a power law, typically on time scales of order a few days. This is similar to the behavior of Galactic X-ray binaries (XRBs), lower mass compact systems with breaks on time scales of seconds. NGC 3783 shows tentative evidence for a doubly-broken power law, a feature that until now has only been seen in the (much better-defined) PSDs of low-state XRBs. It is also interesting that (when one previously-observed object is added to make a small sample of seven), an apparently significant correlation is seen between the break time scale T and the putative black hole mass M(sub BH), while none is seen between break time scale and luminosity. The data are consistent with the linear relation T = M(sub BH) /10(exp 6.5) solar mass; extrapolation over 6-7 orders of magnitude is in reasonable agreement with XRBs. All of this strengthens the case for a physical similarity between Seyfert 1s and XRBs.

  13. High Spectral Resolution, High Cadence, Imaging X-Ray Microcalorimeters for Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, Simon R.; Bailey, Catherine N.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; DeLuca, Edward E.; Chervenak, Jay A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Daniel P.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Sadleir, Jack E.; Smith, Stephen J.; Smith, Randall K.

    2010-01-01

    High spectral resolution, high cadence, imaging x-ray spectroscopy has the potential to revolutionize the study of the solar corona. To that end we have been developing transition-edge-sensor (TES) based x-ray micro calorimeter arrays for future solar physics missions where imaging and high energy resolution spectroscopy will enable previously impossible studies of the dynamics and energetics of the solar corona. The characteristics of these x-ray microcalorimeters are significantly different from conventional micro calorimeters developed for astrophysics because they need to accommodate much higher count rates (300-1000 cps) while maintaining high energy resolution of less than 4 eV FWHM in the X-ray energy band of 0.2-10 keV. The other main difference is a smaller pixel size (less than 75 x 75 square microns) than is typical for x-ray micro calorimeters in order to provide angular resolution less than 1 arcsecond. We have achieved at energy resolution of 2.15 eV at 6 keV in a pixel with a 12 x 12 square micron TES sensor and 34 x 34 x 9.1 micron gold absorber, and a resolution of 2.30 eV at 6 keV in a pixel with a 35 x 35 micron TES and a 57 x 57 x 9.1 micron gold absorber. This performance has been achieved in pixels that are fabricated directly onto solid substrates, ie. they are not supported by silicon nitride membranes. We present the results from these detectors, the expected performance at high count-rates, and prospects for the use of this technology for future Solar missions.

  14. An X-ray timing and spectral analysis of the AGN NGC 4051

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspita Triani, Dian; Mendez, Mariano; Kunjaya, Chatief; Putra, Mahasena

    2016-07-01

    NGC 4051 is a narrow line Seyfert galaxy 1 (NLS1), and it is one of the brightest Active Galactic Nuclei in the X-ray band. We analysed the power density and energy spectra of NGC 4051 using all available data obtained with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer from 1996 to 2011. We divided the data into several time intervals to study possible changes of the spectral and timing properties of the source. All power spectra show a power-law component, but in one of the time intervals a broad, Loretntzian-like, component at ~0.2 Hz is also required to fit the data. The energy spectra are all well fitted with a reflection component. During a period of 26 months, from 2009 to 2011, NGC 4051 showed significant flaring activity in the hard X-ray band. We analysed the data during that period separately. We discuss the results of the timing and spectral fits in the different intervals, and compare our findings with those previously published using only a fraction of the data.

  15. Spectral Modeling of the Comptonized Continua of Accreting X-Ray Pulsars: Recent Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael T.; Becker, P. A.; Marcu, D.; Pottschmidt, K.; Wilms, J.; Wood, K. S.

    2014-01-01

    We are undertaking a program to analyze the X-ray spectra of the accretion flows onto strongly magnetic neutron stars in high mass binary systems such as Her X-1, Cen X-3, and LMC X-4. These accreting pulsars typically have X-ray spectra consisting of broad Comptonized cutoff power-laws. Current theory suggests these X-ray spectra result from the impact of the high-velocity magnetically channeled plasma accretion flows onto the surfaces of the neutron stars. The flows have such high energy density that shocks developing in the plasmas can be radiation-dominated. These X-ray pulsars often, but not always, show cyclotron resonant scattering features implying neutron star surface magnetic field strengths above 10^12 G. Over the past few years a number of studies have reported both positive and negative correlations of the cyclotron line energy centroids with X-ray luminosity in a number of pulsars. However, the detailed analysis of the cyclotron line centroids suffers from the lack of a robust model for the Comptonized X-ray continuum upon which the cyclotron lines are superposed. We discuss in this presentation our progress in developing tools for the analysis of the X-ray spectra formed in these systems. The range of parameter conditions presented by the many known real accreting pulsar systems substantially exceeds that of the limited set of pulsars on which the original analytic model of Becker and Wolff (2007) was validated. In the high temperature optically thick plasmas, the processes of bremsstrahlung emission from the hot plasma, black body emission from a thermal mound near the neutron star surface, and cyclotron emission from electrons in the first Landau excited state, all contribute to the total local photon population in the shock structure. We discuss our strategy for numerically accounting for the relative contribution to the full X-ray spectrum made by each of these physical processes. Solving for the integrated spectrum involves numerical

  16. The broad-band x ray spectral variability of Mkn 841

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, I. M.; Nandra, K.; Fabian, A. C.; Turner, T. J.; Done, C.; Day, C. S. R.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a detailed spectral analysis of four X-ray observations of the luminous Seyfert 1.5 galaxy Mkn 841 performed using the EXOSAT and Ginga satellites over the period June 1984 to July 1990 are reported. Preliminary results from a short ROSAT PSPC observation of Mkn 841 in July 1990 are also presented. Variability is apparent in both the soft (0.1-1.0 keV) and medium (1-20 keV) energy bands. Above 1 keV, the spectra are adequately modelled by a power-law with a strong emission line of equivalent width approximately 450 eV. The energy of the line (approximately 6.4 keV) is indicative of K-shell fluorescence from neutral iron, leading to the interpretation that the line arises via X-ray illumination of cold material surrounding the source. In addition to the flux variability, the continuum shape also changes in a dramatic fashion, with variations in the apparent photon index Delta(Gamma) approximately 0.6. The large equivalent width of the emission line clearly indicates a strongly enhanced reflection component in the source, compared to other Seyferts observed with Ginga. The spectral changes are interpreted in terms of a variable power-law continuum superimposed on a flatter reflection component. For one Ginga observation, the reflected flux appears to dominate the medium energy X-ray emission, resulting in an unusually flat slope (Gamma approximately 1.0). The soft X-ray excess is found to be highly variable by a factor approximately 10. These variations are not correlated with the hard flux, but it seems likely that the soft component arises via reprocessing of the hard X-rays. We find no evidence for intrinsic absorption, with the equivalent hydrogen column density constrained to be less than or equal to few x 10(exp 20) cm(exp -2). The implications of these results for physical models for the emission regions in this and other X-ray bright Seyferts are briefly discussed.

  17. X-RAY SPECTRAL CUTOFF AND THE LACK OF HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES M81 X-6 AND HOLMBERG IX X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Dewangan, G. C.; Misra, R.; Jithesh, V.; Ravikumar, C. D.

    2013-07-10

    We present broadband X-ray spectral study of two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), M81 X-6 and Holmberg IX X-1, based on Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations. We perform joint broadband spectral analysis of the brightest sources in the field, i.e., the two ULXs and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in M81, and demonstrate that the X-ray spectra of the ULXs cut off at energies {approx}> 3 keV with negligible contribution at high energies in the Suzaku HXD/PIN band. The 90% upper limit on the 10-30 keV band luminosity of an underlying broadband power-law component is 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} for M81 X-6 and 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} for Holmberg IX X-1. These limits are more than an order of magnitude lower than the bolometric (0.1-30 keV) luminosity of 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} for M81 X-6 and 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} for Holmberg IX X-1. Our results confirm earlier indications of spectral cutoffs inferred from the XMM-Newton observations of bright ULXs and show that there is not an additional high-energy power-law component contributing significantly to the X-ray emission. The spectral form of the two ULXs are very different from those of Galactic black hole X-ray binaries (BHBs) or AGNs. This implies that the ULXs are neither simply scaled-up versions of stellar-mass BHBs nor scaled-down versions of AGNs.

  18. Hercules X-1: Spectral Variability of an X-Ray Pulsar in a Stellar Binary System. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    A cosmic X-ray spectroscopy experiment onboard the Orbiting Solar Observatory 8 (OSO-8), observed Her x-1 continuously for approximately 8 days. Spectral-temporal correlations of the X-ray emission were obtained. The major results concern observations of: (1) iron band emission, (2) spectral hardening (increase in effective x-ray temperature) within the X-ray pulse, and (3) a transition from an X-ray low state to a high state. The spectrum obtained prior to the high state can be interpreted as reflected emission from a hot coronal gas surrounding an accretion disk, which itself shields the primary X-ray source from the line of sight during the low state. The spectral hardening within the X-ray pulse was indicative of the beaming mechanism at the neutron star surface. The hardest spectrum by pulse phase was identified with the line of sight close to the Her x-1 magnetic dipole axis, and the X-ray pencil beam become harder with decreasing angle between the line of sight and the dipole axis.

  19. ARE SPECTRAL AND TIMING CORRELATIONS SIMILAR IN DIFFERENT SPECTRAL STATES IN BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES?

    SciTech Connect

    Kalamkar, M.; Klis, M. van der; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Altamirano, D.

    2015-03-20

    We study the outbursts of the black hole X-ray binaries MAXI J1659-152, SWIFT J1753.5-0127, and GX 339-4 with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The bandpass of the XRT has access to emission from both components of the accretion flow: the accretion disk and the corona/hot flow. This allows a correlated spectral and variability study, with variability from both components of the accretion flow. We present for the first time a combined study of the evolution of spectral parameters (disk temperature and radius) and timing parameters (frequency and strength) of all power spectral components in different spectral states. Comparison of the correlations in different spectral states shows that the frequency and strength of the power spectral components exhibit dependencies on the disk temperature that are different in the (low-)hard and the hard-intermediate states (HIMSs); most of these correlations that are clearly observed in the HIMS (in MAXI J1659-152 and GX 339-4) are not seen in the (low-)hard state (in GX 339-4 and SWIFT J1753.5-0127). Also, the responses of the individual frequency components to changes in the disk temperature are markedly different from one component to the next. Hence, the spectral-timing evolution cannot be explained by a single correlation that spans both these spectral states. We discuss our findings in the context of the existing models proposed to explain the origin of variability.

  20. Spontaneous and X-Ray Triggered Crystallization at Long Range in Self-Assembling Filament Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Honggang; Pashuck, Eugene T.; Velichko, Yuri S.; Weigand, Steven J.; Cheetham, Andrew G.; Newcomb, Christina J.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2011-01-01

    We report here crystallization at long range in networks of like-charge supramolecular filaments mediated by repulsive forces. The crystallization is spontaneous beyond a given concentration of the molecules that form the filaments, but can be triggered by X-ray photons at lower concentrations. The crystalline domains formed by X-ray irradiation, with inter-filament separations of up to 320 angstroms, are stable for hours after the beam is turned off, and ions that screen charges on the filaments suppress ordering. We hypothesize that the stability of crystalline domains emerges from a balance of repulsive tensions linked to native or X-ray induced charges and the mechanical compressive entrapment of filaments within a network. Similar phenomena may occur naturally in the cytoskeleton of cells, and if induced externally in biological or artificial systems lead to possible biomedical and lithographic functions. PMID:20019248

  1. Single-shot x-ray phase contrast imaging with an algorithmic approach using spectral detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mini; Park, Chan-Soo; Fredette, Nathaniel R.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging has been investigated during the last two decades for potential benefits in soft tissue imaging. Long imaging time, high radiation dose and general measurement complexity involving motion of x-ray optical components have prevented the clinical translation of these methods. In all existing popular phase contrast imaging methods, multiple measurements per projection angle involving motion of optical components are required to achieve quantitatively accurate estimation of absorption, phase and differential phase. Recently we proposed an algorithmic approach to use spectral detection data in a phase contrast imaging setup to obtain absorption, phase and differential phase in a single-step. Our generic approach has been shown via simulations in all three types of phase contrast imaging: propagation, coded aperture and grating interferometry. While other groups have used spectral detector in phase contrast imaging setups, our proposed method is unique in outlining an approach to use this spectral data to simplify phase contrast imaging. In this abstract we show the first experimental proof of our single-shot phase retrieval using a Medipix3 photon counting detector in an edge illumination aperture (also referred to as coded aperture) phase contrast set up as well as for a free space propagation setup. Our preliminary results validate our new transport equation for edge illumination PCI and our spectral phase retrieval algorithm for both PCI methods being investigated. Comparison with simulations also point to excellent performance of Medipix3 built-in charge sharing correction mechanism.

  2. Multivariate analysis of X-ray, ion and electron spectral images: from surface to 3D materials characterization.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Keenan, Michael Robert

    2005-02-01

    Spectral imaging where a complete spectrum is collected from each of a series of spatial locations (1D lines, 2D images or 3D volumes) is now available on a wide range of analytical tools - from electron and x-ray to ion beam instruments. With this capability to collect extremely large spectral images comes the need for automated data analysis tools that can rapidly and without bias reduce a large number of raw spectra to a compact, chemically relevant, and easily interpreted representation. It is clear that manual interrogation of individual spectra is impractical even for very small spectral images (< 5000 spectra). More typical spectral images can contain tens of thousands to millions of spectra, which given the constraint of acquisition time may contain between 5 and 300 counts per 1000-channel spectrum. Conventional manual approaches to spectral image analysis such as summing spectra from regions or constructing x-ray maps are prone to bias and possibly error. One way to comprehensively analyze spectral image data, which has been automated, is to utilize an unsupervised self-modeling multivariate statistical analysis method such as multivariate curve resolution (MCR). This approach has proven capable of solving a wide range of analytical problems based upon the counting of x-rays (SEM/STEM-EDX, XRF, PIXE), electrons (EELS, XPS) and ions (TOF-SIMS). As an example of the MCR approach, a STEM x-ray spectral image from a ZrB2-SiC composite was acquired and analyzed. The data were generated in a FEI Tecnai F30-ST TEM/STEM operated at 300kV, equipped with an EDAX SUTW x-ray detector. The spectral image was acquired with the TIA software on the STEM at 128 by 128 pixels (12nm/pixel) for 100msec dwell per pixel (total acquisition time was 30 minutes) with a probe of approximately the same size as each pixel. Each spectrum in the image had, on average, 500 counts. The calculation took 5 seconds on a PC workstation with dual 2.4GHz PentiumIV Xeon processors and 2Gbytes

  3. Temporal resolved x-ray penumbral imaging technique using heuristic image reconstruction procedure and wide dynamic range x-ray streak camera

    SciTech Connect

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Izawa, Yasukazu; Nozaki, Shinya; Chen, Yen-wei

    2004-10-01

    Temporal resolved x-ray penumbral imaging has been developed using an image reconstruction procedure of the heuristic method and a wide dynamic range x-ray streak camera (XSC). Reconstruction procedure of the penumbral imaging is inherently intolerant to noise, a reconstructed image is strongly distorted by artifacts caused by noise in a penumbral image. Statistical fluctuation in the number of detected photon is the dominant source of noise in an x-ray image, however acceptable brightness of an image is limited by dynamic range of an XSC. The wide dynamic range XSC was used to obtain penumbral images bright enough to be reconstructed. Additionally, the heuristic method was introduced in the penumbral image reconstruction procedure. Distortion of reconstructed images is sufficiently suppressed by these improvements. Density profiles of laser driven brominated plastic and tin plasma were measured with this technique.

  4. X-ray spectral analysis of the steady states of GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peris, Charith; Remillard, Ronald A.; Steiner, James F.; Dil Vrtilek, Saeqa; Varniere, Peggy; Rodriguez, Jerome; Pooley, Guy G.

    2016-04-01

    Of the black hole binaries (BHBs) discovered thus far, GRS 1915+105 stands out as an exceptional source primarily due to its wild X-ray variability, the diversity of which has not been replicated in any other stellar-mass black hole. Although extreme variability is commonplace in its light-curve, about half of the observations of GRS1915+105 show fairly steady X-ray intensity. We report on the X-ray spectral behavior within these steady observations. Our work is based on a vast RXTE/PCA data set obtained on GRS 1915+105 during the course of its entire mission and 10 years of radio data from the Ryle Telescope, which overlap the X-ray data. We find that the steady observations within the X-ray data set naturally separate into two regions in a color-color diagram, which we refer to as steady-soft and steady-hard. GRS 1915+105 displays significant curvature in the Comptonization component within the PCA band pass suggesting significantly heating from a hot disk present in all states. A new Comptonization model 'simplcut' was developed in order to model this curvature to best effect. A majority of the steady-soft observations display a roughly constant inner disk radius, remarkably reminiscent of canonical soft state black hole binaries. In contrast, the steady-hard observations display a growing disk truncation that is correlated to the mass accretion rate through the disk, which suggests a magnetically truncated disk. A comparison of X-ray model parameters to the canonical state definitions show that almost all steady-soft observations match the criteria of either thermal or steep power law state, while the thermal state observations dominate the constant radius branch. A large portion 80 % of the steady-hard observations matches the hard state criteria when the disk fraction constraint is neglected. These results combine to suggest that within the complexity of this source is a simpler underlying basis of states, which map to those observed in canonical BHBs.

  5. Rapid spectral and flux time variations in a solar burst observed at various dm-mm wavelengths and at hard X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zodivaz, A. M.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J. E. R.; Takakura, T.; Cliver, E. W.; Tapping, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    A solar burst was observed with high sensitivity and time resolution at cm-mm wavelengths by two different radio observatories (Itapetinga and Algonquin), with high spectral time resolution at dm-mm wavelengths by patrol instruments (Sagamore Hill), and at hard X-rays (HXM Hinotori). At the onset of the major burst time structure there was a rapid rise in the spectral turnover frequency (from 5 to 15 GHz), in about 10s, coincident to a reduction of the spectral index in the optically thin part of the spectrum. The burst maxima were not time coincident at the optically thin radio frequencies and at the different hard X-ray energy ranges. The profiles at higher radio frequencies exhibited better time coincidence to the high energy X-rays. The hardest X-ray spectrum (-3) coincided with peak radio emission at the higher frequency (44 GHz). The event appeared to be built up by a first major injection of softer particles followed by other injections of harder particles. Ultrafast time structures were identified as superimposed on the burst emission at the cm-mm high sensitivity data at X-rays, with predominant repetition rates ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 Hz.

  6. Understanding X-ray Spectral and Timing Characteristics of Active Galactic Nuclei by a Novel Picture with Multiple Primary Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, H.; Makishima, K.; Yamada, S.; Miyake, K.

    2014-07-01

    Our understanding of the central engine of type I Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) has been hampered by spectral ambiguity among different X-ray components: e.g., Comptonized primary emission, secondary components possibly affected by strong relativistic effects (e.g., Miniutti et al. 2007), and/or complex partial absorption (e.g., Miller et al. 2008). With a variability-assisted spectral analysis method developed in Noda et al. (2011, 2013), we succeeded in model-independently decomposing the AGN spectra, and establishing a novel view of the engine, that it consists of multiple primary X-ray continua with distinct spectral shapes, variability timescales, and Eddington-ratio dependences (Noda et al. 2013). The novel view with the multiple primary X-ray components can explain several long-lasting problems with the AGN central engine. The hardest of the primary components can now partially explain the "too strong hard X-ray hump", and make the secondary reflection strength moderate. The well-known X-ray spectral softening, when a source brightens, can be successfully reproduced by an increasing dominance of a softer-slope primary component towards higher Eddington ratios. Furthermore, the puzzling lack of good optical vs. X-ray intensity correlation, in some AGNs, can be solved by considering that the optical emission is correlated only with some of the primary X-ray components.

  7. X-ray spectral variability of LINERs selected from the Palomar sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-García, L.; González-Martín, O.; Masegosa, J.; Márquez, I.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Variability is a general property of active galactic nuclei (AGN). The way in which these changes occur at X-rays is not yet clearly understood. In the particular case of low-ionization nuclear emission line region (LINER) nuclei, variations on the timescales from months to years have been found for some objects, but the main driver of these changes is still debated. Aims: The main purpose of this work is to investigate the X-ray variability in LINERs, including the main driver of these variations, and to search for possible differences between type 1 and 2 objects. Methods: We examined the 18 LINERs in the Palomar sample with data retrieved from the Chandra and/or XMM-Newton archives that correspond to observations gathered at different epochs. All the spectra for the same object were fitted simultaneously to study long-term variations. The nature of the variability patterns were studied by allowing different parameters to vary during the spectral fit. Whenever possible, short-term variations from the analysis of the light curves and long-term UV variability were studied. Results: Short-term variations are not reported in X-rays. Three LINERs are classified as non-AGN candidates in X-rays, all of them are Compton-thick candidates; none of them show variations at these frequencies, and two of them vary in the UV. Long-term X-ray variations were analyzed in 12 out of 15 AGN candidates; about half of them showed variability (7 out of the 12). At UV frequencies, most of the AGN candidates with available data are variable (five out of six). Thus, 13 AGN candidates are analyzed at UV and/or X-rays, ten of which are variable at least in one energy band. None of the three objects that do not vary in X-rays have available UV data. This means that variability on long-timescales is very common in LINERs. These X-ray variations are mainly driven by changes in the nuclear power, while changes in absorptions are found only for NGC 1052. We do not find any difference

  8. Origin of the X-ray broad iron spectral feature in GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, Misaki; Ebisawa, Ken; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Inoue, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    The X-ray spectrum of GRS 1915+105 is known to have a "broad iron spectral feature" in the spectral hard state. Similar spectral features are often observed in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and other black-hole binaries (BHBs), and several models have been proposed for explaining it. In order to distinguish spectral models, time variation provides an important key. In AGNs, variation amplitude has been found to drop significantly at the iron K-energy band at timescales of ˜10 ks. If spectral variations of black holes are normalized by their masses, the spectral variations of BHBs on timescales of sub-seconds should exhibit similar characteristics to those of AGNs. In this paper, we investigated spectral variations of GRS 1915+105 at timescales down to ˜10 ms. This was made possible for the first time with the Suzaku XIS Parallel-sum clocking (P-sum) mode, which has the CCD energy-resolution as well as a time-resolution of 7.8 ms. Consequently, we found that the variation amplitude of GRS 1915+105 does not drop at the iron K-energy band on any timescales from 0.06 s to 63000 s, and that the entire X-ray flux and the iron feature are independently variable at timescales of hours. These are naturally understood in the framework of the "partial covering" model, in which variation timescales of the continuum flux and partial absorbers are independent. The difference of the energy dependence of the variation amplitude between AGNs and BHBs is presumably due to different mechanisms of the outflow winds, i.e., the partial absorbers are due to UV-line driven winds (AGNs) or thermally driven winds (BHBs).

  9. An X-ray spectral model for clumpy tori in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Xiaobo E-mail: lixb@ihep.ac.cn

    2014-05-20

    We construct an X-ray spectral model for the clumpy torus in an active galactic nucleus (AGN) using Geant4, which includes the physical processes of the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, Rayleigh scattering, γ conversion, fluorescence line, and Auger process. Since the electrons in the torus are expected to be bounded instead of free, the deviation of the scattering cross section from the Klein-Nishina cross section has also been included, which changes the X-ray spectra by up to 25% below 10 keV. We have investigated the effect of the clumpiness parameters on the reflection spectra and the strength of the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The volume filling factor of the clouds in the clumpy torus only slightly influences the reflection spectra, however, the total column density and the number of clouds along the line of sight significantly change the shapes and amplitudes of the reflection spectra. The effect of column density is similar to the case of a smooth torus, while a small number of clouds along the line of sight will smooth out the anisotropy of the reflection spectra and the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The smoothing effect is mild in the low column density case (N {sub H} = 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}), whereas it is much more evident in the high column density case (N {sub H} = 10{sup 25} cm{sup –2}). Our model provides a quantitative tool for the spectral analysis of the clumpy torus. We suggest that the joint fits of the broad band spectral energy distributions of AGNs (from X-ray to infrared) should better constrain the structure of the torus.

  10. An X-Ray Spectral Analysis of the Central Regions of NGC 4593

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenneman, Laura W.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Wilms, Jörn; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth

    2007-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of XMM-Newton EPIC-pn data for the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4593. We discuss the X-ray spectral properties of this source, as well as its variations with time. The 0.5-10 keV spectrum shows significant complexity beyond a simple power-law form, with clear evidence existing for a ``soft excess,'' as well as absorption by highly ionized plasma (a warm absorber) within the central engine of this active galactic nucleus. We show that the soft excess is best described as originating from thermal Comptonization by plasma that is appreciably cooler than the primary X-ray-emitting plasma; we find that the form of the soft excess cannot be reproduced adequately by reflection from an ionized accretion disk. The only measurable deviation from the power-law continuum in the hard spectrum comes from the presence of cold and ionized fluorescent iron Kα emission lines at 6.4 and 6.97 keV, respectively. While constraints on the ionized iron line are weak, the cold line is found to be narrow at CCD resolution with a flux that does not track the temporal changes in the underlying continuum, implying an origin in the outer radii of the accretion disk or the putative molecular torus of Seyfert unification schemes. The X-ray continuum itself varies on all accessible timescales. We detect a ~230 s time lag between soft and hard EPIC-pn bands that, if interpreted as scattering timescales within a Comptonizing disk corona, can be used to constrain the physical size of the primary X-ray source to a characteristic length scale of ~2rg. Taken together, the small implied coronal size and the large implied iron-line emitting region indicate a departure from the current picture of a ``typical'' AGN geometry.

  11. X-Ray Spectral Analysis of the Steady States of GRS1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peris, Charith S.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Steiner, James F.; Vrtilek, Saeqa D.; Varnière, Peggy; Rodriguez, Jerome; Pooley, Guy

    2016-05-01

    We report on the X-ray spectral behavior within the steady states of GRS1915+105. Our work is based on the full data set of the source obtained using the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and 15 GHz radio data obtained using the Ryle Telescope. The steady observations within the X-ray data set naturally separated into two regions in the color–color diagram and we refer to these regions as steady-soft and steady-hard. GRS1915+105 displays significant curvature in the coronal component in both the soft and hard data within the RXTE/PCA bandpass. A majority of the steady-soft observations displays a roughly constant inner disk radius ({R}{{in}}), while the steady-hard observations display an evolving disk truncation which is correlated to the mass accretion rate through the disk. The disk flux and coronal flux are strongly correlated in steady-hard observations and very weakly correlated in the steady-soft observations. Within the steady-hard observations, we observe two particular circumstances when there are correlations between the coronal X-ray flux and the radio flux with log slopes η ˜ 0.68+/- 0.35 and η ˜ 1.12+/- 0.13. They are consistent with the upper and lower tracks of Gallo et al. (2012), respectively. A comparison of the model parameters to the state definitions shows that almost all of the steady-soft observations match the criteria of either a thermal or steep power-law state, while a large portion of the steady-hard observations match the hard-state criteria when the disk fraction constraint is neglected.

  12. X-Ray Spectral and Temporal Analysis of Narrow Line Seyfert 1 Galaxy Was 61

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Liming; Wang, Ting-Gui; Ai, Yanli; Yuan, Weimin; Zhou, Hongyan; Dong, Xiao-Bo

    2016-03-01

    We present an analysis of spectrum and variability of the bright reddened narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy Was 61 using 90 ks archival XMM-Newton data. The X-ray spectrum in 0.2-10 keV can be characterized by an absorbed power-law plus soft excess and an Fe Kα emission line. The power-law spectral index remains constant during the flux variation. The absorbing material is mildly ionized, with a column density of 3.2 × 1021 cm-2, and does not appear to vary during the period of the X-ray observation. If the same material causes the optical reddening (E(B-V) ≃ 0.6 mag), it must be located outside the narrow line region with a dust-to-gas ratio similar to the average Galactic value. We detect significant variations of the Fe Kα line during the observational period. A broad Fe Kα line at ≃ 6.7 {{keV}} with a width of ˜0.6 keV is detected in the low flux segment of the first 40 ks exposure, and is absent in the spectra of other segments; a narrow Fe Kα emission line ˜6.4 keV with a width of ˜0.1 keV is observed in the subsequent 20 ks segment, which has a count rate 35% higher and is in the next day. We believe this is due to the change in geometry and kinematics of the X-ray emitting corona. The temperature and flux of soft X-ray excess appear to correlate with the flux of the hard power-law component. Comptonization of disc photons by a warm and optically thick inner disk is preferred to interpret the soft excess, rather than the ionized reflection.

  13. X-Ray Spectral Analysis of the Steady States of GRS1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peris, Charith S.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Steiner, James F.; Vrtilek, Saeqa D.; Varnière, Peggy; Rodriguez, Jerome; Pooley, Guy

    2016-05-01

    We report on the X-ray spectral behavior within the steady states of GRS1915+105. Our work is based on the full data set of the source obtained using the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and 15 GHz radio data obtained using the Ryle Telescope. The steady observations within the X-ray data set naturally separated into two regions in the color-color diagram and we refer to these regions as steady-soft and steady-hard. GRS1915+105 displays significant curvature in the coronal component in both the soft and hard data within the RXTE/PCA bandpass. A majority of the steady-soft observations displays a roughly constant inner disk radius ({R}{{in}}), while the steady-hard observations display an evolving disk truncation which is correlated to the mass accretion rate through the disk. The disk flux and coronal flux are strongly correlated in steady-hard observations and very weakly correlated in the steady-soft observations. Within the steady-hard observations, we observe two particular circumstances when there are correlations between the coronal X-ray flux and the radio flux with log slopes η ˜ 0.68+/- 0.35 and η ˜ 1.12+/- 0.13. They are consistent with the upper and lower tracks of Gallo et al. (2012), respectively. A comparison of the model parameters to the state definitions shows that almost all of the steady-soft observations match the criteria of either a thermal or steep power-law state, while a large portion of the steady-hard observations match the hard-state criteria when the disk fraction constraint is neglected.

  14. The X-ray spectrum and spectral energy distribution of FIRST J155633.8+351758: a LoBAL quasar with a probable polar outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrington, Robert C.; Brotherton, Michael S.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Ganguly, Rajib; Shang, Zhaohui; DiPompeo, Michael; Chatterjee, Ritaban; Lacy, Mark; Gregg, Michael D.; Hall, Patrick B.; Laurent-Muehleisen, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    We report the results of a new 60 ks Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer S-array (ACIS-S) observation of the reddened, radio-selected, highly polarized `FeLoBAL' quasar FIRST J1556+3517. We investigated a number of models of varied sophistication to fit the 531-photon spectrum. These models ranged from simple power laws to power laws absorbed by hydrogen gas in differing ionization states and degrees of partial covering. Preferred fits indicate that the intrinsic X-ray flux is consistent with that expected for quasars of similarly high luminosity, i.e. an intrinsic, dereddened and unabsorbed optical to X-ray spectral index of -1.7. We cannot tightly constrain the intrinsic X-ray power-law slope, but find indications that it is flat (photon index Γ = 1.7 or flatter at a >99 per cent confidence for a neutral hydrogen absorber model). Absorption is present, with a column density a few times 1023 cm-2, with both partially ionized models and partially covering neutral hydrogen models providing good fits. We present several lines of argument that suggest the fraction of X-ray emissions associated with the radio jet is not large. We combine our Chandra data with observations from the literature to construct the spectral energy distribution of FIRST J1556+3517 from radio to X-ray energies. We make corrections for Doppler beaming for the pole-on radio jet, optical dust reddening and X-ray absorption, in order to recover a probable intrinsic spectrum. The quasar FIRST J1556+3517 seems to be an intrinsically normal radio-quiet quasar with a reddened optical/UV spectrum, a Doppler-boosted but intrinsically weak radio jet and an X-ray absorber not dissimilar from that of other broad absorption line quasars.

  15. Spectral Interferences Manganese (Mn) - Europium (Eu) Lines in X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanc, Beril; Kaya, Mustafa; Gumus, Lokman; Kumral, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry is widely used for quantitative and semi quantitative analysis of many major, minor and trace elements in geological samples. Some advantages of the XRF method are; non-destructive sample preparation, applicability for powder, solid, paste and liquid samples and simple spectrum that are independent from chemical state. On the other hand, there are some disadvantages of the XRF methods such as poor sensitivity for low atomic number elements, matrix effect (physical matrix effects, such as fine versus course grain materials, may impact XRF performance) and interference effect (the spectral lines of elements may overlap distorting results for one or more elements). Especially, spectral interferences are very significant factors for accurate results. In this study, semi-quantitative analyzed manganese (II) oxide (MnO, 99.99%) was examined. Samples were pelleted and analyzed with XRF spectrometry (Bruker S8 Tiger). Unexpected peaks were obtained at the side of the major Mn peaks. Although sample does not contain Eu element, in results 0,3% Eu2O3 was observed. These result can occur high concentration of MnO and proximity of Mn and Eu lines. It can be eliminated by using correction equation or Mn concentration can confirm with other methods (such as Atomic absorption spectroscopy). Keywords: Spectral Interferences; Manganese (Mn); Europium (Eu); X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry Spectrum.

  16. The Next Generation Atlas of Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions from Radio to X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhaohui; Brotherton, Michael S.; Wills, Beverley J.; Wills, D.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Dale, Daniel A.; Green, Richard F.; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Nemmen, Rodrigo S.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Ganguly, Rajib; Hines, Dean C.; Kelly, Benjamin J.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Li, Jun; Tang, Baitian; Xie, Yanxia

    2011-09-01

    We have produced the next generation of quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs), essentially updating the work of Elvis et al. by using high-quality data obtained with several space- and ground-based telescopes, including NASA's Great Observatories. We present an atlas of SEDs of 85 optically bright, non-blazar quasars over the electromagnetic spectrum from radio to X-rays. The heterogeneous sample includes 27 radio-quiet and 58 radio-loud quasars. Most objects have quasi-simultaneous ultraviolet-optical spectroscopic data, supplemented with some far-ultraviolet spectra, and more than half also have Spitzer mid-infrared Infrared Spectrograph spectra. The X-ray spectral parameters are collected from the literature where available. The radio, far-infrared, and near-infrared photometric data are also obtained from either the literature or new observations. We construct composite SEDs for radio-loud and radio-quiet objects and compare these to those of Elvis et al., finding that ours have similar overall shapes, but our improved spectral resolution reveals more detailed features, especially in the mid- and near-infrared.

  17. THE NEXT GENERATION ATLAS OF QUASAR SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM RADIO TO X-RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Shang Zhaohui; Li Jun; Xie Yanxia; Brotherton, Michael S.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Dale, Daniel A.; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Kelly, Benjamin J.; Wills, Beverley J.; Wills, D.; Green, Richard F.; Nemmen, Rodrigo S.; Ganguly, Rajib; Hines, Dean C.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Tang, Baitian

    2011-09-01

    We have produced the next generation of quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs), essentially updating the work of Elvis et al. by using high-quality data obtained with several space- and ground-based telescopes, including NASA's Great Observatories. We present an atlas of SEDs of 85 optically bright, non-blazar quasars over the electromagnetic spectrum from radio to X-rays. The heterogeneous sample includes 27 radio-quiet and 58 radio-loud quasars. Most objects have quasi-simultaneous ultraviolet-optical spectroscopic data, supplemented with some far-ultraviolet spectra, and more than half also have Spitzer mid-infrared Infrared Spectrograph spectra. The X-ray spectral parameters are collected from the literature where available. The radio, far-infrared, and near-infrared photometric data are also obtained from either the literature or new observations. We construct composite SEDs for radio-loud and radio-quiet objects and compare these to those of Elvis et al., finding that ours have similar overall shapes, but our improved spectral resolution reveals more detailed features, especially in the mid- and near-infrared.

  18. X-RAY SPECTRAL COMPONENTS OBSERVED IN THE AFTERGLOW OF GRB 130925A

    SciTech Connect

    Bellm, Eric C.; Forster, Karl; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Perley, Daniel A.; Rana, Vikram R.; Barrière, Nicolas M.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Bhalerao, Varun; Cenko, S. Bradley; Christensen, Finn E.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hailey, Charles J.; Horesh, Assaf; Ofek, Eran O.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Stern, Daniel; and others

    2014-04-01

    We have identified spectral features in the late-time X-ray afterglow of the unusually long, slow-decaying GRB 130925A using NuSTAR, Swift/X-Ray Telescope, and Chandra. A spectral component in addition to an absorbed power law is required at >4σ significance, and its spectral shape varies between two observation epochs at 2 × 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6} s after the burst. Several models can fit this additional component, each with very different physical implications. A broad, resolved Gaussian absorption feature of several keV width improves the fit, but it is poorly constrained in the second epoch. An additive blackbody or second power-law component provide better fits. Both are challenging to interpret: the blackbody radius is near the scale of a compact remnant (10{sup 8} cm), while the second power-law component requires an unobserved high-energy cutoff in order to be consistent with the non-detection by Fermi/Large Area Telescope.

  19. X-Ray Spectral Components Observed in the Afterglow of GRB 130925A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellm, Eric C.; Barriere, Nicolas M.; Bhalerao, Varun; Boggs, Steven E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Forster, Karl; Fryer, Chris L.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Horesh, Assaf; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Madsen, Kristin K.; Miller, Jon M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Perley, Daniel A.; Rana, Vikram R.; Miller, Jon M.; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    We have identified spectral features in the late-time X-ray afterglow of the unusually long, slow-decaying GRB 130925A using NuSTAR, Swift/X-Ray Telescope, and Chandra. A spectral component in addition to an absorbed power law is required at greater than 4 less than 1 significance, and its spectral shape varies between two observation epochs at 2 x 10 (sup 5) and 10 (sup 6) seconds after the burst. Several models can fit this additional component, each with very different physical implications. A broad, resolved Gaussian absorption feature of several kiloelectronvolts width improves the fit, but it is poorly constrained in the second epoch. An additive blackbody or second power-law component provide better fits. Both are challenging to interpret: the blackbody radius is near the scale of a compact remnant (10 (sup 8) centimeters), while the second power-law component requires an unobserved high-energy cutoff in order to be consistent with the non-detection by Fermi/Large Area Telescope.

  20. Spectral and timing nature of the symbiotic X-ray binary 4U 1954+319: The slowest rotating neutron star in an X-ray binary system

    SciTech Connect

    Enoto, Teruaki; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jörn

    2014-05-10

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its ∼5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (∼7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-Kα line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (∼60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (≳ 10{sup 12} G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (10{sup 33}-10{sup 35} erg s{sup –1}), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a ∼10{sup 13} G NS, this scheme can explain the ∼5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (∼10{sup 16} G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (∼50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfvén shell for a ∼10{sup 13} G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  1. Spectral and Timing Nature of the Symbiotic X-Ray Binary 4U 1954+319: The Slowest Rotating Neutron Star in AN X-Ray Binary System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'Ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jorn

    2014-01-01

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its approx. 5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (is approx. 7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-K alpha line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (approx. 60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (approx. greater than 10(exp12) G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (10(exp33)-10(exp35) erg s(exp-1)), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a approx. 10(exp13) G NS, this scheme can explain the approx. 5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (approx. 10(exp16) G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (approx. 50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfv´en shell for a approx. 10(exp13) G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  2. Spectral and Timing Nature of the Symbiotic X-Ray Binary 4U 1954+319: The Slowest Rotating Neutron Star in an X-Ray Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its ~5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (~7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-Kα line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (~60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (gsim 1012 G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (1033-1035 erg s-1), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a ~1013 G NS, this scheme can explain the ~5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (~1016 G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (~50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfvén shell for a ~1013 G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  3. Spectral properties of x-ray selected narrow emission line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero Colmenero, Encarnacion

    This thesis reports a study of the X-ray and optical properties of two samples of X-ray selected Narrow Emission Line Galaxies (NELGs), and their comparison with the properties of broad line Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). One sample (18 NELGs) is drawn from the ROSAT International X-ray Optical Survey (RIXOS), the other (19 NELGs and 33 AGN) from the ROSAT UK Deep Survey. ROSAT multi-channel X-ray spectra have been extracted and fitted with power-law, bremsstrahlung and black body models for the brighter RIXOS sources. In most cases, power-law and bremsstrahlung models provide the best results. The average spectral energy index, alpha, of the RIXOS NELGs is 0.96 +/- 0.07, similar to that of AGN (alpha ~ 1). For the fainter RIXOS NELGs, as well as for all the UK Deep Survey sources, counts in three spectral bands have been extracted and fitted with a power-law model, assuming the Galactic value for NH. The brighter RIXOS sources demonstrated that the results obtained by these two different extraction and fitting procedures provide consistent results. Two average X-ray spectra, one for the NELGs and another for the AGN, were created from the UK Deep Survey sources. The power-law spectral slope of the average NELG is S = 0.45 +/- 0.09, whilst that of the AGN is S = 0.96 +/- 0.03. ROSAT X-ray surveys have shown that the fractional surface density of NELGs increases with respect to AGN at faint fluxes (< 2 x 10-15erg cm-2 s -1), thus suggesting that NELGs are important contributors to the residual soft (< 2 keV) X-ray background (XRB). Moreover, the spectral slope of this background (S ~ 0.4, 1-10 keV) is harder than that of AGN (S ~ 1), which are known to contribute most of the XRB at higher flux levels. The work presented in this thesis shows unequivocally for the first time that the integrated spectrum of the faintest NELGs (alpha ~ 0.4) is consistent with that of the soft X-ray background, finally reconciling it with the properties of the sources that are thought to

  4. Radiative Signatures of Reconnection in X-ray Binary Spectral States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri

    Accreting black holes (BHs) in Galactic X-ray Binary (XRB) systems represent some of the main targets of space-based high-energy observatories such as NASA s RXTE, Chandra, and NuSTAR, as well as the international observatories XMM Newton, INTEGRAL, Suzaku (Astro-E), and Astro-H. The overall radiative energy output (mostly X-rays) is ultimately powered by the conversion of the gravitational potential energy of the matter falling onto a black hole and forming an accretion disk or a hot accretion flow around it. Observationally, these systems are found to cycle between a few discrete spectral states, characterized by different overall X-ray power and spectral hardness: (1) the bright thermal high-soft state, dominated by a soft (1 keV) thermal component attributed to a thin dense accretion disk with a relatively weak corona producing a power-law tail emission to at least 1 MeV; (2) the low-hard state, showing no signs of a thin accretion disk and dominated by a single hard (with index ~ -1.7) power law truncating at about 100 keV; and (3) the bright Steep Power Law state with both a standard thin disk and a powerful coronal power-law (with index about -2.5) emission extending to at least 1 MeV. Explaining the key features of these nonthermal spectra, i.e., their power law indices and high-energy cutoffs, is one of the outstanding problems in high-energy astrophysics. The hard (10keV 1MeV) X-ray emission in these states is believed to be produced by inverse-Compton scattering in relativistically-hot gas, presumably heated by magnetic reconnection processes, and forming either an accretion disk corona or the hot accretion flow itself. Since the radiative cooling time of the energetic electrons in the intense radiation fields found in these systems is very short, the observed non-thermal hard X-ray spectra should directly reflect the instantaneous energy spectra of the electrons accelerated in reconnection events. Recent advances in kinetic simulations of reconnection

  5. The GALAXIES beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron: inelastic X-ray scattering and photoelectron spectroscopy in the hard X-ray range.

    PubMed

    Rueff, J P; Ablett, J M; Céolin, D; Prieur, D; Moreno, Th; Balédent, V; Lassalle-Kaiser, B; Rault, J E; Simon, M; Shukla, A

    2015-01-01

    The GALAXIES beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron is dedicated to inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) in the 2.3-12 keV hard X-ray range. These two techniques offer powerful complementary methods of characterization of materials with bulk sensitivity, chemical and orbital selectivity, resonant enhancement and high resolving power. After a description of the beamline components and endstations, the beamline capabilities are demonstrated through a selection of recent works both in the solid and gas phases and using either IXS or HAXPES approaches. Prospects for studies on liquids are discussed.

  6. The GALAXIES beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron: inelastic X-ray scattering and photoelectron spectroscopy in the hard X-ray range.

    PubMed

    Rueff, J P; Ablett, J M; Céolin, D; Prieur, D; Moreno, Th; Balédent, V; Lassalle-Kaiser, B; Rault, J E; Simon, M; Shukla, A

    2015-01-01

    The GALAXIES beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron is dedicated to inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) in the 2.3-12 keV hard X-ray range. These two techniques offer powerful complementary methods of characterization of materials with bulk sensitivity, chemical and orbital selectivity, resonant enhancement and high resolving power. After a description of the beamline components and endstations, the beamline capabilities are demonstrated through a selection of recent works both in the solid and gas phases and using either IXS or HAXPES approaches. Prospects for studies on liquids are discussed. PMID:25537606

  7. Predicted image quality of a CMOS APS X-ray detector across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinidis, A.

    2015-09-01

    Digital X-ray detectors based on Complementary Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor (CMOS) Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology have been introduced in the early 2000s in medical imaging applications. In a previous study the X-ray performance (i.e. presampling Modulation Transfer Function (pMTF), Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE)) of the Dexela 2923MAM CMOS APS X-ray detector was evaluated within the mammographic energy range using monochromatic synchrotron radiation (i.e. 17-35 keV). In this study image simulation was used to predict how the mammographic beam quality affects image quality. In particular, the experimentally measured monochromatic pMTF, NNPS and SNR parameters were combined with various mammographic spectral shapes (i.e. Molybdenum/Molybdenum (Mo/Mo), Rhodium/Rhodium (Rh/Rh), Tungsten/Aluminium (W/Al) and Tungsten/Rhodium (W/Rh) anode/filtration combinations at 28 kV). The image quality was measured in terms of Contrast-to-Noise Ratio (CNR) using a synthetic breast phantom (4 cm thick with 50% glandularity). The results can be used to optimize the imaging conditions in order to minimize patient's Mean Glandular Dose (MGD).

  8. Spectral properties of X-ray selected narrow emission line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Colmenero, E.

    1998-03-01

    This thesis reports a study of the X-ray and optical properties of two samples of X-ray selected Narrow Emission Line Galaxies (NELGs), and their comparison with the properties of broad line Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). One sample (18 NELGs) is drawn from the ROSAT International X-ray Optical Survey (RIXOS), the other (19 NELGs and 33 AGN) from the ROSAT UK Deep Survey. ROSAT multi-channel X-ray spectra have been extracted and fitted with power-law, bremsstrahlung and black body models for the brighter RIXOS sources. In most cases, power-law and bremsstrahlung models provide the best results. The average spectral energy index, alpha, of the RIXOS NELGs is 0.96 +/- 0.07, similar to that of AGN (alpha~1). For the fainter RIXOS NELGs, as well as for all the UK Deep Survey sources, counts in three spectral bands have been extracted and fitted with a power-law model, assuming the Galactic value for N_H. The brighter RIXOS sources demonstrated that the results obtained by these two different extraction and fitting procedures provide consistent results. Two average X-ray spectra, one for the NELGs and another for the AGN, were created from the UK Deep Survey sources. The power-law slope of the average NELG is alpha = 0.45 +/- 0.09, whilst that of the AGN is alpha = 0.96 +/- 0.03. ROSAT X-ray surveys have shown that the fractional surface density of NELGs increases with respect to AGN at faint fluxes (<= 2e-15 ergs cm-2 s-1), thus suggesting that NELGs are important contributors to the residual soft (<2 keV) X-ray background (XRB). Moreover, the spectral slope of this background (alpha~0.4, 1-10 keV) is harder than that of AGN (alpha~1), which are known to contribute most of the XRB at higher flux levels. The work presented in this thesis shows unequivocally for the first time that the integrated spectrum of the faintest NELGs (alpha~0.4) is consistent with that of the soft X-ray background, finally reconciling it with the properties of the sources that are thought to

  9. The complex ion structure of warm dense carbon measured by spectrally resolved x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W.; Vorberger, J.; Helfrich, J.; Frydrych, S.; Ortner, A.; Otten, A.; Roth, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Siegenthaler, K.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Wünsch, K.; Bachmann, B.; Döppner, T.; Bagnoud, V.; Blažević, A.; and others

    2015-05-15

    We present measurements of the complex ion structure of warm dense carbon close to the melting line at pressures around 100 GPa. High-pressure samples were created by laser-driven shock compression of graphite and probed by intense laser-generated x-ray sources with photon energies of 4.75 keV and 4.95 keV. High-efficiency crystal spectrometers allow for spectrally resolving the scattered radiation. Comparing the ratio of elastically and inelastically scattered radiation, we find evidence for a complex bonded liquid that is predicted by ab-initio quantum simulations showing the influence of chemical bonds under these conditions. Using graphite samples of different initial densities we demonstrate the capability of spectrally resolved x-ray scattering to monitor the carbon solid-liquid transition at relatively constant pressure of 150 GPa. Showing first single-pulse scattering spectra from cold graphite of unprecedented quality recorded at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we demonstrate the outstanding possibilities for future high-precision measurements at 4th Generation Light Sources.

  10. The Formal Underpinnings of the Response Functions Used in X-Ray Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, John E.

    2001-02-01

    This work provides an in-depth mathematical description of the response functions that are used for spatial and spectral analysis of X-ray data. The use of such functions is well known to anyone familiar with the analysis of X-ray data where they may be identified with the quantities contained in the ancillary response file (ARF), the redistribution matrix file (RMF), and the exposure map. Starting from first principles, explicit mathematical expressions for these functions, for both imaging and dispersive modes, are arrived at in terms of the underlying instrumental characteristics of the telescope including the effects of pointing motion. The response functions are presented in the context of integral equations relating the expected detector count rate to the source spectrum incident upon the telescope. Their application to the analysis of several source distributions is considered. These include multiple, possibly overlapping, spectrally distinct point sources, as well as extended sources. Assumptions and limitations behind the usage of these functions, as well as their practical computation, are addressed.

  11. Incident-energy-dependent spectral weight of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering in doped cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Kenji; Tohyama, Takami

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically investigate the incident-photon energy ωi dependence of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) tuned for the Cu L edge in cuprate superconductors by using the exact diagonalization technique for a single-band Hubbard model. Depending on the value of core-hole Coulomb interaction in the intermediate state, RIXS for non-spin-flip channel shows either a ωi-dependent fluorescencelike or ωi-independent Raman-like behavior for hole doping. An analysis of x-ray absorption suggests that the core-hole Coulomb interaction is larger than on-site Coulomb interaction in the Hubbard model, resulting in a fluorescencelike behavior in RIXS consistent with recent RIXS experiments. A shift on the high-energy side of the center of spectral distribution is also predicted for electron-doped systems though spectral weight is small. Main structures in the spin-flip channel exhibit a Raman-like behavior as expected, accompanied with a fluorescencelike behavior with small intensity.

  12. Observation of hohlraum-wall motion with spectrally selective x-ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Meezan, N. B.; Divol, L.; Hall, G. N.; Barrios, M. A.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Vonhof, S. A.; Nikroo, A.; Jaquez, J.; Bailey, C. G.; Hardy, C. M.; Ehrlich, R. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Hinkel, D. E.; Moody, J. D.

    2016-11-01

    The high fuel capsule compression required for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion requires careful control of the X-ray drive symmetry throughout the laser pulse. When the outer cone beams strike the hohlraum wall, the plasma ablated off the hohlraum wall expands into the hohlraum and can alter both the outer and inner cone beam propagations and hence the X-ray drive symmetry especially at the final stage of the drive pulse. To quantitatively understand the wall motion, we developed a new experimental technique which visualizes the expansion and stagnation of the hohlraum wall plasma. Details of the experiment and the technique of spectrally selective x-ray imaging are discussed.

  13. Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Christopher G

    2009-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

  14. Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. II - Soft X-ray/EUV reflectivity of the multilayer mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Weed, J. W.; Hoover, Richard B.; Allen, Maxwell J.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Deforest, Craig E.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The Multispectral Solar Telescope Array is a rocket-borne observatory which encompasses seven compact soft X-ray/EUV, multilayer-coated, and two compact far-UV, interference film-coated, Cassegrain and Ritchey-Chretien telescopes. Extensive measurements are presented on the efficiency and spectral bandpass of the X-ray/EUV telescopes. Attention is given to systematic errors and measurement errors.

  15. Multilayer X-ray mirrors for the (4.4-5)-nm carbon-window spectral region

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, S. S.; Barysheva, M. M.; Vainer, Yu. A.; Gaikovich, P. K.; Pariev, D. E. Pestov, A. E.; Salashchenko, N. N.; Chkhalo, N. I.

    2013-05-15

    Cr/C-based multilayer X-ray mirrors intended for the reflection of X-ray radiation in the 'carbon-window' spectral region ({lambda} = 4.4-5 nm) are fabricated and studied. The structures are formed by magnetron sputtering at different deposition parameters. Under normal incidence, record reflection coefficients up to 15% are reached. The structural parameters of the mirrors are investigated by reflectometry at wavelengths of 0.154 and 4.47 nm.

  16. Investigation of X-ray spectral response of D-T fusion produced neutron irradiated PIPS detectors for plasma X-ray diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneshwara Raja, P.; Narasimha Murty, N. V. L.; Rao, C. V. S.; Abhangi, Mitul

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the fusion-produced neutron irradiation induced changes in the X-ray spectral response of commercially available Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon (PIPS) detectors using the accelerator based D-T generator. After 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation up to a fluence of 3.6× 1010 n/cm2, the energy resolution (i.e. FWHM) of the detectors at room temperature is found to degrade by about 3.8 times that of the pre-irradiated value. From the X-ray spectral characteristics, it has been observed that the room temperature spectral response of PIPS detectors is too poor even at low neutron fluences. Irradiation is also carried out with Am-Be neutron source for studying the effect of scattered neutrons from the reactor walls on the detector performance. Comparative studies of the damage caused by 14.1 MeV neutrons and Am-Be source produced neutrons at the same neutron fluence are carried out by analyzing the irradiated detector characteristics. The degradation in the energy resolution of the detectors is attributed to the radiation induced changes in the detector leakage current. No considerable changes in the full depletion voltage and the effective doping concentration up to the neutron fluence of 3.6× 1010 n/cm2, are observed from the measured C-V characteristics. Partial recovery of the neutron irradiated detector characteristics is discussed.

  17. Spectral softening in the X-RAY afterglow of GRB 130925A as predicted by the dust scattering model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Shao, Lang

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) usually occur in a dense star-forming region with a massive circumburst medium. The small-angle scattering of intense prompt X-ray emission off the surrounding dust grains will have observable consequences and sometimes can dominate the X-ray afterglow. In most of the previous studies, only the Rayleigh-Gans (RG) approximation is employed for describing the scattering process, which works accurately for the typical size of grains (with radius of a ≤ 0.1 μm) in the diffuse interstellar medium. When the size of the grains may significantly increase, as in a more dense region where GRBs would occur, the RG approximation may not be valid enough for modeling detailed observational data. In order to study the temporal and spectral properties of the scattered X-ray emission more accurately with potentially larger dust grains, we provide a practical approach using the series expansions of anomalous diffraction (AD) approximation based on the complicated Mie theory. We apply our calculations to understand the puzzling X-ray afterglow of recently observed GRB 130925A that showed a significant spectral softening. We find that the X-ray scattering scenarios with either AD or RG approximation adopted could well reproduce both the temporal and spectral profile simultaneously. Given the plateau present in the early X-ray light curve, a typical distribution of smaller grains as in the interstellar medium would be suggested for GRB 130925A.

  18. Spectral Softening in the X-Ray Afterglow of GRB 130925A as Predicted by the Dust Scattering Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Shao, Lang

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) usually occur in a dense star-forming region with a massive circumburst medium. The small-angle scattering of intense prompt X-ray emission off the surrounding dust grains will have observable consequences and sometimes can dominate the X-ray afterglow. In most of the previous studies, only the Rayleigh-Gans (RG) approximation is employed for describing the scattering process, which works accurately for the typical size of grains (with radius of a <= 0.1 μm) in the diffuse interstellar medium. When the size of the grains may significantly increase, as in a more dense region where GRBs would occur, the RG approximation may not be valid enough for modeling detailed observational data. In order to study the temporal and spectral properties of the scattered X-ray emission more accurately with potentially larger dust grains, we provide a practical approach using the series expansions of anomalous diffraction (AD) approximation based on the complicated Mie theory. We apply our calculations to understand the puzzling X-ray afterglow of recently observed GRB 130925A that showed a significant spectral softening. We find that the X-ray scattering scenarios with either AD or RG approximation adopted could well reproduce both the temporal and spectral profile simultaneously. Given the plateau present in the early X-ray light curve, a typical distribution of smaller grains as in the interstellar medium would be suggested for GRB 130925A.

  19. The radio/X-ray correlation in Cyg X-3 and the nature of its hard spectral state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Segreto, Alberto; Pooley, Guy G.

    2016-02-01

    We study the radio/X-ray correlation in Cyg X-3. It has been known that the soft and hard X-ray fluxes in the hard spectral state are correlated positively and negatively, respectively, with the radio flux. We show that this implies that the observed ˜1-100 keV flux (which is a fair approximation to the bolometric flux) is completely uncorrelated with the radio flux. We can recover a positive correlation (seen in other sources and expected theoretically) if the soft X-rays are strongly absorbed by a local medium. Then, however, the intrinsic X-ray spectrum of Cyg X-3 in its hard state becomes relatively soft, similar to that of an intermediate spectral state of black hole binaries, but not to their true hard state. We also find the radio spectra in the hard state of Cyg X-3 are hard on average, and the flux distributions of the radio emission and soft X-rays can be described by sums of two lognormal functions. We compare Cyg X-3 with other X-ray binaries using colour-colour, colour-Eddington ratio and Eddington ratio-radio flux diagrams. We find Cyg X-3 to be spectrally most similar to GRS 1915+105, except that Cyg X-3 is substantially more radio loud, which appears to be due to its jet emission enhanced by interaction with the powerful stellar wind from the Wolf-Rayet donor.

  20. THE FIRST HARD X-RAY POWER SPECTRAL DENSITY FUNCTIONS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2013-06-10

    We present results of our power spectral density (PSD) analysis of 30 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using the 58 month light curves from Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) in the 14-150 keV band. PSDs were fit using a Monte Carlo based algorithm to take into account windowing effects and measurement error. All but one source were found to be fit very well using an unbroken power law with a slope of {approx} - 1, consistent at low frequencies with previous studies in the 2-10 keV band, with no evidence of a break in the PSD. For five of the highest signal-to-noise ratio sources, we tested the energy dependence of the PSD and found no significant difference in the PSD at different energies. Unlike previous studies of X-ray variability in AGNs, we do not find any significant correlations between the hard X-ray variability and different properties of the AGN including luminosity and black hole mass. The lack of break frequencies and correlations seem to indicate that AGNs are similar to the high state of Galactic black holes.

  1. A practical material decomposition method for x-ray dual spectral computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingjing; Zhao, Xing

    2016-03-17

    X-ray dual spectral CT (DSCT) scans the measured object with two different x-ray spectra, and the acquired rawdata can be used to perform the material decomposition of the object. Direct calibration methods allow a faster material decomposition for DSCT and can be separated in two groups: image-based and rawdata-based. The image-based method is an approximative method, and beam hardening artifacts remain in the resulting material-selective images. The rawdata-based method generally obtains better image quality than the image-based method, but this method requires geometrically consistent rawdata. However, today's clinical dual energy CT scanners usually measure different rays for different energy spectra and acquire geometrically inconsistent rawdata sets, and thus cannot meet the requirement. This paper proposes a practical material decomposition method to perform rawdata-based material decomposition in the case of inconsistent measurement. This method first yields the desired consistent rawdata sets from the measured inconsistent rawdata sets, and then employs rawdata-based technique to perform material decomposition and reconstruct material-selective images. The proposed method was evaluated by use of simulated FORBILD thorax phantom rawdata and dental CT rawdata, and simulation results indicate that this method can produce highly quantitative DSCT images in the case of inconsistent DSCT measurements. PMID:27257878

  2. A practical material decomposition method for x-ray dual spectral computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingjing; Zhao, Xing

    2016-03-17

    X-ray dual spectral CT (DSCT) scans the measured object with two different x-ray spectra, and the acquired rawdata can be used to perform the material decomposition of the object. Direct calibration methods allow a faster material decomposition for DSCT and can be separated in two groups: image-based and rawdata-based. The image-based method is an approximative method, and beam hardening artifacts remain in the resulting material-selective images. The rawdata-based method generally obtains better image quality than the image-based method, but this method requires geometrically consistent rawdata. However, today's clinical dual energy CT scanners usually measure different rays for different energy spectra and acquire geometrically inconsistent rawdata sets, and thus cannot meet the requirement. This paper proposes a practical material decomposition method to perform rawdata-based material decomposition in the case of inconsistent measurement. This method first yields the desired consistent rawdata sets from the measured inconsistent rawdata sets, and then employs rawdata-based technique to perform material decomposition and reconstruct material-selective images. The proposed method was evaluated by use of simulated FORBILD thorax phantom rawdata and dental CT rawdata, and simulation results indicate that this method can produce highly quantitative DSCT images in the case of inconsistent DSCT measurements.

  3. The Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. II - Soft X-ray/EUV reflectivity of the multilayer mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Weed, J. W.; Hoover, Richard B. C., Jr.; Allen, Max J.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Deforest, Craig E.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Walker, Arthur B. C.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed seven compact soft X-ray/EUV (XUV) multilayer coated and two compact FUV interference film coated Cassegrain and Ritchey-Chretien telescopes for a rocket borne observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. We report here on extensive measurements of the efficiency and spectral bandpass of the XUV telescopes carried out at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory.

  4. X-RAY VARIABILITY AND HARDNESS OF ESO 243-49 HLX-1: CLEAR EVIDENCE FOR SPECTRAL STATE TRANSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Servillat, Mathieu; Farrell, Sean A.; Lin Dacheng; Godet, Olivier; Barret, Didier; Webb, Natalie A.

    2011-12-10

    The ultraluminous X-ray (ULX) source ESO 243-49 HLX-1, which reaches a maximum luminosity of 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} (0.2-10 keV), currently provides the strongest evidence for the existence of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). To study the spectral variability of the source, we conduct an ongoing monitoring campaign with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT), which now spans more than two years. We found that HLX-1 showed two fast rise and exponential decay type outbursts in the Swift XRT light curve with increases in the count rate of a factor {approx}40 separated by 375 {+-} 13 days. We obtained new XMM-Newton and Chandra dedicated pointings that were triggered at the lowest and highest luminosities, respectively. From spectral fitting, the unabsorbed luminosities ranged from 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} to 1.25 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. We confirm here the detection of spectral state transitions from HLX-1 reminiscent of Galactic black hole binaries (GBHBs): at high luminosities, the X-ray spectrum showed a thermal state dominated by a disk component with temperatures of 0.26 keV at most, and at low luminosities the spectrum is dominated by a hard power law with a photon index in the range 1.4-2.1, consistent with a hard state. The source was also observed in a state consistent with the steep power-law state, with a photon index of {approx}3.5. In the thermal state, the luminosity of the disk component appears to scale with the fourth power of the inner disk temperature, which supports the presence of an optically thick, geometrically thin accretion disk. The low fractional variability (rms of 9% {+-} 9%) in this state also suggests the presence of a dominant disk. The spectral changes and long-term variability of the source cannot be explained by variations of the beaming angle and are not consistent with the source being in a super-Eddington accretion state as is proposed for most ULX sources with lower luminosities. All this

  5. On spectral and temporal coherence of x-ray free-electron laser beams.

    PubMed

    Ahad, Lutful; Vartiainen, Ismo; Setälä, Tero; Friberg, Ari T; David, Christian; Makita, Mikako; Turunen, Jari

    2016-06-13

    A model for the coherence properties of free-electron lasers (FELs) in time and frequency domains is introduced within the framework of classical second-order coherence theory of nonstationary light. An iterative phase-retrieval algorithm is applied to construct an ensemble of field realizations in both domains, based on single-pulse spectra measured at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in self-amplified spontaneous emission mode. Such an ensemble describes the specific FEL pulse train in a statistically averaged sense. Two-time and two-frequency correlation functions are constructed, demonstrating that the hard X-ray free-electron laser at LCLS in this case behaves as a quasistationary source with low spectral and temporal coherence. We also show that the Gaussian Schell model provides a good description of this FEL. PMID:27410327

  6. Spectral X-Ray Diffraction using a 6 Megapixel Photon Counting Array Detector

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichniy, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2016-01-01

    Pixel-array array detectors allow single-photon counting to be performed on a massively parallel scale, with several million counting circuits and detectors in the array. Because the number of photoelectrons produced at the detector surface depends on the photon energy, these detectors offer the possibility of spectral imaging. In this work, a statistical model of the instrument response is used to calibrate the detector on a per-pixel basis. In turn, the calibrated sensor was used to perform separation of dual-energy diffraction measurements into two monochromatic images. Targeting applications include multi-wavelength diffraction to aid in protein structure determination and X-ray diffraction imaging. PMID:27041789

  7. X-ray Dust Halos Seen With Extreme Dynamic Range: What Do We Learn?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Randall

    2008-03-01

    The exquisite angular resolution available with Chandra should allow precision measurements of faint diffuse emission surrounding bright sources, such as the X-ray scattering halos created by interstellar dust. However, the ACIS CCDs suffer from pileup when observing bright sources, and this creates difficulties when trying to extract the scattered halo near the source. The initial study of the X-ray halo around GX13+1 using only the ACIS-I detector done by Smith, Edgar & Shafer (2002) suffered from a lack of sensitivity within 50'' of the source, limiting what conclusions could be drawn. To address this problem, observations of GX13+1 were obtained with the Chandra HRC-I and simultaneously with the RXTE PCA. Combined with the existing ACIS-I data, this allowed measurements of the X-ray halo between 2-1000''. After considering a range of dust models, each assumed to be smoothly distributed with or without a dense cloud along the line of sight, the results show that there is no evidence in this data for a dense cloud near the source, as suggested by Xiang et al. 2005. Finally, although no model leads to formally acceptable results, the Weingartner & Draine (2001) and nearly all of the composite grain models from Zubko, Dwek & Arendt (2004) give poor fits. I thank Dr. Michael Juda of the HRC-I team for providing significant assistance; this work was supported by Chandra Observing Grant GO56144X.

  8. Hard X-ray spectral properties of distant AGN in the NuSTAR surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Moro, Agnese

    2016-08-01

    I will present a study on the average broad X-ray band (~0.5-30 keV) spectral properties of the NuSTAR sources detected in the ECDF-S, EGS and COSMOS fields. Constructing the rest-frame composite spectra of AGN in different hydrogen column density (NH) and 10-40 keV luminosity bins, using Chandra and NuSTAR data, we investigate the typical spectral parameters of the AGN population, such as the photon index, NH, strength of the iron emission line (~6.4 keV) and of the Compton reflection at ~20-30 keV. Placing constraints on the reflection fraction (R) is of particular importance for the synthesis models of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB), as this parameter is strongly linked with the fraction of Compton-thick AGN needed to fit the CXB spectrum. Thanks to its sensitivity at ~20-30 keV, NuSTAR allows for the first time, to directly place such constraints for non-local AGN. We find typical reflection fractions of R~1-1.5, consistent the AGN in the local Universe, with a tentative evidence for the most obscured AGN to have, on average, stronger Compton reflection compared to unobscured AGN. Moreover, contrary to previous works, we do not find significant evidence for a decrease of the reflection strength with luminosity for typical Γ=1.8-1.9. Our results support CXB models that require a relatively small fraction of CT AGN, of the order of ~10-15%.

  9. Linear fitting of multi-threshold counting data with a pixel-array detector for spectral X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichney, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments and modeling are described to perform spectral fitting of multi-threshold counting measurements on a pixel-array detector. An analytical model was developed for describing the probability density function of detected voltage in X-ray photon-counting arrays, utilizing fractional photon counting to account for edge/corner effects from voltage plumes that spread across multiple pixels. Each pixel was mathematically calibrated by fitting the detected voltage distributions to the model at both 13.5 keV and 15.0 keV X-ray energies. The model and established pixel responses were then exploited to statistically recover images of X-ray intensity as a function of X-ray energy in a simulated multi-wavelength and multi-counting threshold experiment. PMID:25178010

  10. X-ray and Ultraviolet Spectral Evolution of LMC X-3 During Normal and Anomalous Low States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torpin, Trevor; Boyd, P. T.; Smale, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    The bright black-hole X-ray binary LMC X-3 is a lower-mass high-mass X-ray binary with a 1.7 day orbital period. Both the X-ray source and its bright optical/UV companion show non-periodic high amplitude variability on timescales much longer than this (100-300 days). Previous observations do not present a clean picture of whether Roche-lobe overflow or wind accretion is the dominant mechanism driving this dramatic long-term variability. RXTE monitoring has recently revealed that LMC X-3 undergoes surprising anomalous low states (ALSs), during which the X-ray source is virtually indistinguishable from background, and stays low for three to six months at a time (Smale & Boyd 2012). The cause of these ALSs is not known. NASA's Swift telescope is uniquely capable of shedding light on this mystery by providing simultaneous X-ray, UV, and optical observations of the source during its normal long-term variability. Swift has obtained simultaneous multiwavelength data at a variety of X-ray fluxes while the system was displaying its normal variability state, as well as dense monitoring during an ALS and during a recent normal low state. Comparison of X-ray spectral modeling with the UV variability offers the best chance to disentangle the various sources of UV radiation in the system. We present the results of spectral fitting of the Swift XRT and, when available, XMM/Newton spectra which probe the accretion state of the black hole. We compare these with the UV flux arising from the stellar surface and outer accretion disk, searching for correlations and lags that could reveal whether a substantial fraction of the UV flux is due to reprocessing of X-rays within the system, or arises from another mechanism.

  11. Discovery of Spatial and Spectral Structure in the X-Ray Emission from the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Hester, J. Jeff; Tennant, Allyn F.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Marshall, Herman L.; Karovska, Margarita; Nichols, Joy S.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory observed the Crab Nebula and pulsar during orbital calibration. Zeroth-order images with the High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) readout by the Advanced Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer spectroscopy array (ACIS-S) show a striking richness of X-ray structure at a resolution comparable to that of the best ground-based visible-light observations. The HETG-ACIS-S images reveal, for the first time, an X-ray inner ring within the X-ray torus, the suggestion of a hollow-tube structure for the torus, and X-ray knots along the inner ring and (perhaps) along the inward extension of the X-ray jet. Although complicated by instrumental effects and the brightness of the Crab Nebula, the spectrometric analysis shows systematic variations of the X-ray spectrum throughout the nebula.

  12. Origin of the characteristic X-ray spectral variations of IRAS 13224-3809

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Hiroki; Mizumoto, Misaki; Ebisawa, Ken; Sameshima, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    The narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1) IRAS 13224-3809 is known to exhibit significant X-ray spectral variation, a sharp spectral drop at ˜7 keV, strong soft excess emission, and a hint of an iron L-edge feature, which is very similar to the NLS1 1H 0707-495. We have proposed the "Variable Double Partial Covering (VDPC) model" to explain the energy spectra and spectral variability of 1H 0707-495 (Mizumoto et al. 2014, PASJ, 66, 122). In this model, the observed flux/spectral variations below 10 keV within ˜ a day are primarily caused by change of the partial covering fraction of patchy clouds composed by double absorption layers in the line of sight. In this paper, we apply the VDPC model to IRAS 13224-3809. Consequently, we have found that the VDPC model can explain the observed spectral variations of IRAS 13224-3809 in the 0.5-10 keV band. In particular, we can explain the observed root mean square (RMS) spectra (energy dependence of the fractional flux variation) in the entire 0.5-10 keV band. In addition to the well-known significant drop in the iron K-band, we have found intriguing iron L-peaks in the RMS spectra when the iron L-edge is particularly deep. This feature, which is also found in 1H 0707-495, is naturally explained with the VDPC model, such that the RMS variations increase at the energies where optical depths of the partial absorbers are large. The absorbers have a larger optical depth at the iron L-edge than in the adjacent energy bands, and thus a characteristic iron L-peak appears. On the other hand, just below the iron K-edge, the optical depth is the lowest and the RMS spectrum has a broad dip.

  13. Origin of the characteristic X-ray spectral variations of IRAS 13224-3809

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Hiroki; Mizumoto, Misaki; Ebisawa, Ken; Sameshima, Hiroaki

    2016-10-01

    The narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1) IRAS 13224-3809 is known to exhibit significant X-ray spectral variation, a sharp spectral drop at ˜7 keV, strong soft excess emission, and a hint of an iron L-edge feature, which is very similar to the NLS1 1H 0707-495. We have proposed the "Variable Double Partial Covering (VDPC) model" to explain the energy spectra and spectral variability of 1H 0707-495 (Mizumoto et al. 2014, PASJ, 66, 122). In this model, the observed flux/spectral variations below 10 keV within ˜ a day are primarily caused by change of the partial covering fraction of patchy clouds composed by double absorption layers in the line of sight. In this paper, we apply the VDPC model to IRAS 13224-3809. Consequently, we have found that the VDPC model can explain the observed spectral variations of IRAS 13224-3809 in the 0.5-10 keV band. In particular, we can explain the observed root mean square (RMS) spectra (energy dependence of the fractional flux variation) in the entire 0.5-10 keV band. In addition to the well-known significant drop in the iron K-band, we have found intriguing iron L-peaks in the RMS spectra when the iron L-edge is particularly deep. This feature, which is also found in 1H 0707-495, is naturally explained with the VDPC model, such that the RMS variations increase at the energies where optical depths of the partial absorbers are large. The absorbers have a larger optical depth at the iron L-edge than in the adjacent energy bands, and thus a characteristic iron L-peak appears. On the other hand, just below the iron K-edge, the optical depth is the lowest and the RMS spectrum has a broad dip.

  14. Spectral evolution of microwaves and hard X-rays in the 1989 March 18 flare and its interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongwoo W.; Gary, Dale E.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the time variation of microwave spectra and hard X-ray spectra of 1989 March 18, which are obtained from the Solar Array at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) and the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), respectively. From this observation, it is noted that the hard X-ray spectra gradually soften over 50 - 200 keV on-and-after the maximum phase while the microwaves at 1 - 15 GHz show neither a change in spectral shape nor as rapid a decay as hard X-rays. This leads to decoupling of hard X-rays from the microwaves in the decay phase away from their good correlation seen in the initial rise phase. To interpret this observation, we adopt a view that microwave-emitting particles and hard X-ray particles are physically separated in an inhomogeneous magnetic loop, but linked via interactions with the Whistler waves generated during flares. From this viewpoint, it is argued that the observed decoupling of microwaves from hard X-rays may be due to the different ability of each source region to maintain high energy electrons in response to the Whistler waves passing through the entire loop. To demonstrate this possibility, we solve a Fokker-Planck equation that describes evolution of electrons interacting with the Whistler waves, taking into account the variation of Fokker-Planck coefficients with physical quantities of the background medium. The numerical Fokker-Planck solutions are then used to calculate microwave spectra and hard X-ray spectra for agreement with observations. Our model results are as follows: in a sronger field region, the energy loss by electron escape due to scattering by the waves is greatly enhanced resulting in steep particle distributions that reproduce the observed hard X-ray spectra. In a region with weaker fields and lower density, this loss term is reduced allowing high energy electrons to survive longer so that microwaves can be emitted there in excess of hard X-rays during the decay phase

  15. A cascaded model of spectral distortions due to spectral response effects and pulse pileup effects in a photon-counting x-ray detector for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Cammin, Jochen E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Taguchi, Katsuyuki E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Xu, Jennifer; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Hartsough, Neal E.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Energy discriminating, photon-counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology for computed tomography (CT) with various potential benefits for clinical CT. The photon energies measured by PCDs can be distorted due to the interactions of a photon with the detector and the interaction of multiple coincident photons. These effects result in distorted recorded x-ray spectra which may lead to artifacts in reconstructed CT images and inaccuracies in tissue identification. Model-based compensation techniques have the potential to account for the distortion effects. This approach requires only a small number of parameters and is applicable to a wide range of spectra and count rates, but it needs an accurate model of the spectral distortions occurring in PCDs. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of those spectral distortions and to evaluate the model using a PCD (model DXMCT-1; DxRay, Inc., Northridge, CA) and various x-ray spectra in a wide range of count rates. Methods: The authors hypothesize that the complex phenomena of spectral distortions can be modeled by: (1) separating them into count-rate independent factors that we call the spectral response effects (SRE), and count-rate dependent factors that we call the pulse pileup effects (PPE), (2) developing separate models for SRE and PPE, and (3) cascading the SRE and PPE models into a combined SRE+PPE model that describes PCD distortions at both low and high count rates. The SRE model describes the probability distribution of the recorded spectrum, with a photo peak and a continuum tail, given the incident photon energy. Model parameters were obtained from calibration measurements with three radioisotopes and then interpolated linearly for other energies. The PPE model used was developed in the authors’ previous work [K. Taguchi et al., “Modeling the performance of a photon counting x-ray detector for CT: Energy response and pulse pileup effects,” Med. Phys. 38(2), 1089–1102 (2011

  16. A cascaded model of spectral distortions due to spectral response effects and pulse pileup effects in a photon-counting x-ray detector for CT

    PubMed Central

    Cammin, Jochen; Xu, Jennifer; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Hartsough, Neal E.; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Energy discriminating, photon-counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology for computed tomography (CT) with various potential benefits for clinical CT. The photon energies measured by PCDs can be distorted due to the interactions of a photon with the detector and the interaction of multiple coincident photons. These effects result in distorted recorded x-ray spectra which may lead to artifacts in reconstructed CT images and inaccuracies in tissue identification. Model-based compensation techniques have the potential to account for the distortion effects. This approach requires only a small number of parameters and is applicable to a wide range of spectra and count rates, but it needs an accurate model of the spectral distortions occurring in PCDs. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of those spectral distortions and to evaluate the model using a PCD (model DXMCT-1; DxRay, Inc., Northridge, CA) and various x-ray spectra in a wide range of count rates. Methods: The authors hypothesize that the complex phenomena of spectral distortions can be modeled by: (1) separating them into count-rate independent factors that we call the spectral response effects (SRE), and count-rate dependent factors that we call the pulse pileup effects (PPE), (2) developing separate models for SRE and PPE, and (3) cascading the SRE and PPE models into a combined SRE+PPE model that describes PCD distortions at both low and high count rates. The SRE model describes the probability distribution of the recorded spectrum, with a photo peak and a continuum tail, given the incident photon energy. Model parameters were obtained from calibration measurements with three radioisotopes and then interpolated linearly for other energies. The PPE model used was developed in the authors’ previous work [K. Taguchi , “Modeling the performance of a photon counting x-ray detector for CT: Energy response and pulse pileup effects,” Med. Phys. 38(2), 1089–1102 (2011)]. The

  17. High Resolution Temporal and Spectral Monitoring of Eta Carinae's X-Ray Emission the June Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Henley, D.; Pittard, J. M.; Gull, T. R.; Davidson, K.; Swank, J. H.; Petre, R.; Ishibashi, K.

    2004-01-01

    The supermassive and luminous star Eta Carinae undergoes strong X-ray variations every 5.5 years when its 2-10 keV X-ray emission brightens rapidly with wild fluctuations before dropping by a factor of 100 to a minimum lasting 3 months. The most recent X-ray "eclipse" began in June 2003 and during this time Eta Carinae was intensely observed throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. Here we report the first results of frequent monitoring of the 2-10 keV band X-ray emission by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer along wit high resolution X-ray spectra obtained with the transmission gratings on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We compare these observations to those results obtained during the previous X-ray eclipse in 1998, and interpret the variations in the X-ray brightness, in the amount of absorption, in the X-ray emission measure and in the K-shell emission lines in terms of a colliding wind binary model.

  18. Extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray spectral lines in Rb XXIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indu, Khatri; Arun, Goyal; Sunny, Aggarwal; A, K. Singh; Man, Mohan

    2016-03-01

    An extensive theoretical set of atomic data for Rb XXIX in a wide range with L-shell electron excitations to the M-shell has been reported. We have computed energy levels for the lowest 113 fine structure levels of Rb XXIX. The fully relativistic multiconfigurational Dirac-Fock method (MCDF) within the framework of Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian taking quantum electrodynamics (QED) and Breit corrections into account has been adopted for calculations. Radiative data are reported for electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2), and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions from the ground level, although calculations have been performed for a much larger number of levels. To assess the accuracy of results, we performed analogous calculations using flexible atomic code (FAC). Comparisons are made with existing available results and a good agreement has been achieved. Most of the wavelengths calculated lie in the soft x-ray (SXR) region. Lifetimes for all 113 levels have also been provided for the first time. Additionally, we have provided the spectra for allowed transitions from n = 2 to n = 3 within the x-ray region and also compared our SXR photon wavelengths with experimentally recognized wavelengths. We hope that our results will be beneficial in fusion plasma research and astrophysical applications.

  19. A wide-acceptance Compton spectrometer for spectral characterization of a medical x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy, Michelle A.; Gehring, A.; Belian, A.; Haines, T.; Hunter, J.; James, M.; Klasky, M.; Mendez, J.; Moir, D.; Sedillo, R.; Shurter, R.; Stearns, J.; Van Syoc, K.; Volegov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate knowledge of the x-ray spectra used in medical treatment and radiography is important for dose calculations and material decomposition analysis. Indirect measurements via transmission through materials are possible. However, such spectra are challenging to measure directly due to the high photon fluxes. One method of direct measurement is via a Compton spectrometer (CS) method. In this approach, the x-rays are converted to a much lower flux of electrons via Compton scattering on a converter foil (typically beryllium or aluminum). The electrons are then momentum selected by bending in a magnetic field. With tight angular acceptance of electrons into the magnet of ~ 1 deg, there is a linear correlation between incident photon energy and electron position recorded on an image plate. Here we present measurements of Bremsstrahlung spectrum from a medical therapy machine, a Scanditronix M22 Microtron. Spectra with energy endpoints from 6 to 20 MeV are directly measured, using a CS with a wide energy range from 0.5 to 20 MeV. We discuss the sensitivity of the device and the effects of converter material and collimation on the accuracy of the reconstructed spectra. Approaches toward improving the sensitivity, including the use of coded apertures, and potential future applications to characterization of spectra are also discussed.

  20. A positron-sensitive photon detector for the UV or X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zutavern, F. J.; Schnatterly, S. E.; Källne, E.; Franck, C. P.; Aton, T.; Rife, J.

    1980-05-01

    This paper describes the conversion of a light sensitive self-scanning silicon photodiode array into a soft X-ray detector. We combine a photodiode array, a UHV compatible soft X-ray sensitive phosphor and read out electronics. The detector has been tested in the soft X-ray and UV regions. The results indicate a high quantum efficiency in the soft X-ray region.

  1. Spectral Analyses of the Nearest Persistent Ultraluminous X-Ray Source M 33 X-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Shan-Shan; Wang, Jun-Xian; Gu, Wei-Min; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2009-12-01

    We provide a detailed analysis of 12 XMM observations of the nearest persistent extragalactic ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX), M 33 X-8. No significant spectral evolution has been detected for the period of the observations, and therefore we combine the individual observations to increase the signal-to-noise ratio for a spectral fitting. The combined spectra are best fitted by a self-consistent p-free disk plus power-law component model with p = 0.571+0.032-0.030, kTin (inner disk temperature) = 1.38+0.09-0.08 keV, and the flux ratio of the p-free disk component to the power-law component being 0.63 : 0.37 in the 0.3-10 keV band. The fitting indicates that the black hole in M 33 X-8 is of ˜10odot, and accretes at a super-Eddington rate (˜1.5LEdd); also, the phase of the accretion disk is close to that of a slim disk (p = 0.5). We report, for the first time, that an extra power-law component is required in addition to the p-free disk model for ULXs. In super-Eddington cases, the power-law component may possibly result from an optically thin inner region of the disk or a Comptonized corona, similar to that of a standard thin disk.

  2. An X-Ray Spectral and Temporal Model for Clumpy Tori in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Xiaobo

    2015-08-01

    We recently construct an X-ray spectral model for the clumpy torus in an active galactic nucleus (AGN) using Geant4 (Liu, Y., & Li, X. 2014, ApJ, 787, 52; Liu, Y., & Li, X. 2015, MNRAS, 448, L53) and investigate the effect of the clumpiness parameters on the reflection spectra and the strength of the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The volume filling factor of the clouds in the clumpy torus only slightly influences the reflection spectra, however, the total column density and the number of clouds along the line of sight significantly change the shapes and amplitudes of the reflection spectra. The effect of column density is similar to the case of a smooth torus, while a small number of clouds along the line of sight will smooth out the anisotropy of the reflection spectra and the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The smoothing effect is mild in the low column density case (NH=1023 cm-2), whereas it is much more evident in the high column density case (NH=1025 cm-2). Our model provides a quantitative tool for the spectral analysis of the clumpy torus. We have applied it to the NuSTAR spectra of NGC 1068 and found a small number of clouds along the line of sight is preferred. We will also discuss the temporal model for clumpy tori and its application in the reverberation of narrow Fe Kα line.

  3. A weighted polynomial based material decomposition method for spectral x-ray CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dufan; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Xiaohua; Xu, Xiaofei; Wang, Sen

    2016-05-21

    Currently in photon counting based spectral x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging, pre-reconstruction basis materials decomposition is an effective way to reconstruct densities of various materials. The iterative maximum-likelihood method requires precise spectrum information and is time-costly. In this paper, a novel non-iterative decomposition method based on polynomials is proposed for spectral CT, whose aim was to optimize the noise performance when there is more energy bins than the number of basis materials. Several subsets were taken from all the energy bins and conventional polynomials were established for each of them. The decomposition results from each polynomial were summed with pre-calculated weighting factors, which were designed to minimize the overall noises. Numerical studies showed that the decomposition noise of the proposed method was close to the Cramer-Rao lower bound under Poisson noises. Furthermore, experiments were carried out with an XCounter Filte X1 photon counting detector for two-material decomposition and three-material decomposition for validation. PMID:27082291

  4. HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM SOLAR FLARES WITH HARD SPECTRAL INDICES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate, T.; Nishizuka, N.; Oi, A.; Ohyama, M.; Nakajima, H.

    2012-03-10

    We analyze 10 flare events that radiate intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission with significant photons over 300 keV to verify that the electrons that have a common origin of acceleration mechanism and energy power-law distribution with solar flares emit HXRs and microwaves. Most of these events have the following characteristics. HXRs emanate from the footpoints of flare loops, while microwaves emanate from the tops of flare loops. The time profiles of the microwave emission show delays of peak with respect to those of the corresponding HXR emission. The spectral indices of microwave emissions show gradual hardening in all events, while the spectral indices of the corresponding HXR emissions are roughly constant in most of the events, though rather rapid hardening is simultaneously observed in some for both indices during the onset time and the peak time. These characteristics suggest that the microwave emission emanates from the trapped electrons. Then, taking into account the role of the trapping of electrons for the microwave emission, we compare the observed microwave spectra with the model spectra calculated by a gyrosynchrotron code. As a result, we successfully reproduce the eight microwave spectra. From this result, we conclude that the electrons that have a common acceleration and a common energy distribution with solar flares emit both HXR and microwave emissions in the eight events, though microwave emission is contributed to by electrons with much higher energy than HXR emission.

  5. A weighted polynomial based material decomposition method for spectral x-ray CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dufan; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Xiaohua; Xu, Xiaofei; Wang, Sen

    2016-05-21

    Currently in photon counting based spectral x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging, pre-reconstruction basis materials decomposition is an effective way to reconstruct densities of various materials. The iterative maximum-likelihood method requires precise spectrum information and is time-costly. In this paper, a novel non-iterative decomposition method based on polynomials is proposed for spectral CT, whose aim was to optimize the noise performance when there is more energy bins than the number of basis materials. Several subsets were taken from all the energy bins and conventional polynomials were established for each of them. The decomposition results from each polynomial were summed with pre-calculated weighting factors, which were designed to minimize the overall noises. Numerical studies showed that the decomposition noise of the proposed method was close to the Cramer-Rao lower bound under Poisson noises. Furthermore, experiments were carried out with an XCounter Filte X1 photon counting detector for two-material decomposition and three-material decomposition for validation.

  6. An efficient plane-grating monochromator based on conical diffraction for continuous tuning in the entire soft X-ray range including tender X-rays (2-8 keV).

    PubMed

    Jark, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was verified that the diffraction efficiency of reflection gratings with rectangular profile, when illuminated at grazing angles of incidence with the beam trajectory along the grooves and not perpendicular to them, remains very high for tender X-rays of several keV photon energy. This very efficient operation of a reflection grating in the extreme off-plane orientation, i.e. in conical diffraction, offers the possibility of designing a conical diffraction monochromator scheme that provides efficient continuous photon energy tuning over rather large tuning ranges. For example, the tuning could cover photon energies from below 1000 eV up to 8 keV. The expected transmission of the entire instrument is high as all components are always operated below the critical angle for total reflection. In the simplest version of the instrument a plane grating is preceded by a plane mirror rotating simultaneously with it. The photon energy selection will then be made using the combination of a focusing mirror and exit slit. As is common for grating monochromators for soft X-ray radiation, the minimum spectral bandwidth is source-size-limited, while the bandwidth can be adjusted freely to any larger value. As far as tender X-rays (2-8 keV) are concerned, the minimum bandwidth is at least one and up to two orders of magnitude larger than the bandwidth provided by Si(111) double-crystal monochromators in a collimated beam. Therefore the instrument will provide more flux, which can even be increased at the expense of a bandwidth increase. On the other hand, for softer X-rays with photon energies below 1 keV, competitive relative spectral resolving powers of the order of 10000 are possible.

  7. Spectral variability in the X-ray pulsar GX 1+4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Pravdo, S. H.; Rothschild, R. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of the galactic center region, hard X-ray source GX 1+4 by the GSFC X-ray spectroscopy experiment on OSO-8 confirm that GX 1+4 is a slow X-ray pulsar. The amount of absorption by cold matter in the spectrum of GX 1+4 varies significantly within a 24 hour period, behavior typical of many X-ray binary systems. The light curve for the pulsations from GX 1+4 appears to be energy dependent.

  8. Removing Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charged Exchange Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargelin, Brad

    2004-01-01

    feasibility of our longer-range plan. For example, we successfully injected He into EBIT (not a small feat because of the difficulty of maintaining a good vacuum with He and avoiding electrical breakdown) to collect a H-like oxygen CX spectrum. The highest energy CX spectrum recorded with the XRS to date is that of the Ar K-shell emission. These measurements provided the first observation of the relative intensity ratios of resolved He-like singlet and triplet n=2->1 lines. We also carried out measurements of He-like Ne as a function of collision energy (i.e., ion temperature). Significant differences in the resulting x-ray spectra were noted. In all cases, the intensity of high-n H-like Lyman lines is significantly higher than current theoretical CX models predict.

  9. Image-based spectral distortion correction for photon-counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using an image-based method to correct for distortions induced by various artifacts in the x-ray spectrum recorded with photon-counting detectors for their application in breast computed tomography (CT). Methods: The polyenergetic incident spectrum was simulated with the tungsten anode spectral model using the interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) code and carefully calibrated to match the x-ray tube in this study. Experiments were performed on a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) photon-counting detector with five energy thresholds. Energy bins were adjusted to evenly distribute the recorded counts above the noise floor. BR12 phantoms of various thicknesses were used for calibration. A nonlinear function was selected to fit the count correlation between the simulated and the measured spectra in the calibration process. To evaluate the proposed spectral distortion correction method, an empirical fitting derived from the calibration process was applied on the raw images recorded for polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms of 8.7, 48.8, and 100.0 mm. Both the corrected counts and the effective attenuation coefficient were compared to the simulated values for each of the five energy bins. The feasibility of applying the proposed method to quantitative material decomposition was tested using a dual-energy imaging technique with a three-material phantom that consisted of water, lipid, and protein. The performance of the spectral distortion correction method was quantified using the relative root-mean-square (RMS) error with respect to the expected values from simulations or areal analysis of the decomposition phantom. Results: The implementation of the proposed method reduced the relative RMS error of the output counts in the five energy bins with respect to the simulated incident counts from 23.0%, 33.0%, and 54.0% to 1.2%, 1.8%, and 7.7% for 8.7, 48.8, and 100.0 mm PMMA phantoms, respectively. The accuracy of the effective attenuation

  10. Revealing a hard X-ray spectral component that reverberates within one light hour of the central supermassive black hole in Ark 564

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustini, M.; Turner, T. J.; Reeves, J. N.; Miller, L.; Legg, E.; Kraemer, S. B.; George, I. M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Arakelian 564 (Ark 564, z = 0.0247) is an X-ray-bright narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy. By using advanced X-ray timing techniques, an excess of "delayed" emission in the hard X-ray band (4-7.5 keV) following about 1000 s after "flaring" light in the soft X-ray band (0.4 - 1 keV) was recently detected. Aims: We report on the X-ray spectral analysis of eight XMM-Newton and one Suzaku observation of Ark 564. Our aim is to characterise the X-ray spectral properties of the source in the light of these recently reported results. Methods: High-resolution spectroscopy was performed with the RGS in the soft X-ray band, while broad-band spectroscopy was performed with the EPIC-pn and XIS/PIN instruments. We analysed time-averaged, flux-selected, and time-resolved spectra. Results: Despite the strong variability in flux during our observational campaign, the broad-band spectral shape of Ark 564 does not vary dramatically and can be reproduced either by a superposition of a power law and a blackbody emission or by a Comptonized power-law emission model. High-resolution spectroscopy revealed ionised gas along the line of sight at the systemic redshift of the source, with a low column density (NH ~ 1021 cm-2) and a range of ionisation states (-0.8 < log (ξ/erg cm s-1) < 2.4). Broad-band spectroscopy revealed a very steep intrinsic continuum (photon index Γ ~ 2.6) and a rather weak emission feature in the iron K band (EW ~ 150 eV); modelling this feature with a reflection component requires highly ionised gas, log (ξ/erg cm s-1) > 3.5. A reflection-dominated or an absorption-dominated model are similarly able to well reproduce the time-averaged data from a statistical point of view, in both cases requiring contrived geometries and/or unlikely physical parameters. Finally, through time-resolved analysis we spectroscopically identified the "delayed" emission as a spectral hardening above ~4 keV; the most likely interpretation for this component is a reprocessing of the

  11. Recovery of x-ray absorption spectral profile in etched TiO{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Keiji; Niibe, Masahito; Kawakami, Retsuo; Nakano, Yoshitaka

    2015-05-15

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of plasma-etched TiO{sub 2} thin films were observed using the total fluorescence yield method involving visible emission. The disrupted spectrum recovered its as-grown (nonetched) profile, upon soft x-ray (SX) irradiation. This recovery was investigated by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, spatial distribution measurements, exposing recovered samples to air, and NEXAFS measurements of ultrafine TiO{sub 2} particles. The spectral profile recovered upon UV irradiation, and at sample positions outside of the SX irradiation site. The recovered spectral profiles were disrupted again, upon exposure to air. Nonetched ultrafine TiO{sub 2} particles also exhibited a disrupted spectral profile, which was recovered upon SX irradiation. The spectral recovery is explained by a model involving electrons trapped in oxygen vacancies generated by etching.

  12. Monte Carlo validation of optimal material discrimination using spectral x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nik, S. J.; Thing, R. S.; Watts, R.; Dale, T.; Currie, B.; Meyer, J.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a framework to validate an algorithm for determination of optimal material discrimination in spectral x-ray imaging. Using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations based on the BEAMnrc package, material decomposition was performed on the projection images of phantoms containing up to three materials. The simulated projection data was first decomposed into material basis images by minimizing the z-score between expected and simulated counts. Statistical analysis was performed for the pixels within the region-of-interest consisting of contrast material(s) in the MC simulations. With the consideration of scattered radiation and a realistic scanning geometry, the theoretical optima of energy bin borders provided by the algorithm were shown to have an accuracy of ±2 keV for the decomposition of 2 and 3 materials. Finally, the signal-to-noise ratio predicted by the theoretical model was also validated. The counts per pixel needed for achieving a specific imaging aim can therefore be estimated using the validated model.

  13. Note: Effect of photodiode aluminum cathode frame on spectral sensitivity in the soft x-ray energy band

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, M. B. Den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J. A.; Johnson, J.; Franz, P.

    2014-09-15

    Silicon photodiodes used for soft x-ray detection typically have a thin metal electrode partially covering the active area of the photodiode, which subtly alters the spectral sensitivity of the photodiode. As a specific example, AXUV4BST photodiodes from International Radiation Detectors have a 1.0 μm thick aluminum frame covering 19% of the active area of the photodiode, which attenuates the measured x-ray signal below ∼6 keV. This effect has a small systematic impact on the electron temperature calculated from measurements of soft x-ray bremsstrahlung emission from a high-temperature plasma. Although the systematic error introduced by the aluminum frame is only a few percent in typical experimental conditions on the Madison Symmetric Torus, it may be more significant for other instruments that use similar detectors.

  14. Spectral Evolution During the Rises of X-ray Bursts Observed from 4U 1728-34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boztepe, Tuǧba; Ozel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Guver, Tolga

    2016-07-01

    X-ray bursts observed from low mass X-ray binaries are thought to be due to rapid unstable thermonuclear burning of He or H accreted onto the surface of the neutron star from the companion. Here, we focus on the rises of these events, which reflect the properties and location of the initial ignition and spread velocity. We use time resolved X-ray spectroscopic data observed from 4U 1728-34 with RXTE/PCA to model the shape and speed of the evolution of spectral parameters during the rise. We present our initial results of this analysis and present our constrains the spreading and ignition location for these systems.

  15. Spectral clustering for optical confirmation and redshift estimation of X-ray selected galaxy cluster candidates in the SDSS Stripe 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, E.; Takey, A.; Shoukry, A.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a galaxy cluster finding algorithm based on spectral clustering technique to identify optical counterparts and estimate optical redshifts for X-ray selected cluster candidates. As an application, we run our algorithm on a sample of X-ray cluster candidates selected from the third XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalog (3XMM-DR5) that are located in the Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our method works on galaxies described in the color-magnitude feature space. We begin by examining 45 galaxy clusters with published spectroscopic redshifts in the range of 0.1-0.8 with a median of 0.36. As a result, we are able to identify their optical counterparts and estimate their photometric redshifts, which have a typical accuracy of 0.025 and agree with the published ones. Then, we investigate another 40 X-ray cluster candidates (from the same cluster survey) with no redshift information in the literature and found that 12 candidates are considered as galaxy clusters in the redshift range from 0.29 to 0.76 with a median of 0.57. These systems are newly discovered clusters in X-rays and optical data. Among them 7 clusters have spectroscopic redshifts for at least one member galaxy.

  16. Temperature-dependent spectral weight transfer in YBa2Cu3Ox probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.-Y.

    2010-03-01

    The x-ray absorption spectroscopy was utilized to critically examine the temperature dependency of the spectral weight in YBa2Cu3Ox. Large excess spectral weight for the Zhang- Rice singlet due to dynamics of holes is found with its doping dependence showing similar doom-like shape as that for Tc. Furthermore, appreciable spectral weight transfer from the upper Hubbard band to Zhang-Rice singlet was observed as the temperature acrosses the onset temperature for the pseudogap. The observed spectral weight transfer follows the change of the pseudogap, indicating a strong link between pseudogap and the upper Hubbard band.

  17. Flat panel X-ray detector with reduced internal scattering for improved attenuation accuracy and dynamic range

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Peter D.; Claytor, Thomas N.; Berry, Phillip C.; Hills, Charles R.

    2010-10-12

    An x-ray detector is disclosed that has had all unnecessary material removed from the x-ray beam path, and all of the remaining material in the beam path made as light and as low in atomic number as possible. The resulting detector is essentially transparent to x-rays and, thus, has greatly reduced internal scatter. The result of this is that x-ray attenuation data measured for the object under examination are much more accurate and have an increased dynamic range. The benefits of this improvement are that beam hardening corrections can be made accurately, that computed tomography reconstructions can be used for quantitative determination of material properties including density and atomic number, and that lower exposures may be possible as a result of the increased dynamic range.

  18. A fully Bayesian method for jointly fitting instrumental calibration and X-ray spectral models

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jin; Yu, Yaming; Van Dyk, David A.; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Drake, Jeremy; Ratzlaff, Pete; Connors, Alanna; Meng, Xiao-Li E-mail: yamingy@ics.uci.edu E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jdrake@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: meng@stat.harvard.edu

    2014-10-20

    Owing to a lack of robust principled methods, systematic instrumental uncertainties have generally been ignored in astrophysical data analysis despite wide recognition of the importance of including them. Ignoring calibration uncertainty can cause bias in the estimation of source model parameters and can lead to underestimation of the variance of these estimates. We previously introduced a pragmatic Bayesian method to address this problem. The method is 'pragmatic' in that it introduced an ad hoc technique that simplified computation by neglecting the potential information in the data for narrowing the uncertainty for the calibration product. Following that work, we use a principal component analysis to efficiently represent the uncertainty of the effective area of an X-ray (or γ-ray) telescope. Here, however, we leverage this representation to enable a principled, fully Bayesian method that coherently accounts for the calibration uncertainty in high-energy spectral analysis. In this setting, the method is compared with standard analysis techniques and the pragmatic Bayesian method. The advantage of the fully Bayesian method is that it allows the data to provide information not only for estimation of the source parameters but also for the calibration product—here the effective area, conditional on the adopted spectral model. In this way, it can yield more accurate and efficient estimates of the source parameters along with valid estimates of their uncertainty. Provided that the source spectrum can be accurately described by a parameterized model, this method allows rigorous inference about the effective area by quantifying which possible curves are most consistent with the data.

  19. A Fully Bayesian Method for Jointly Fitting Instrumental Calibration and X-Ray Spectral Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; van Dyk, David A.; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Connors, Alanna; Drake, Jeremy; Meng, Xiao-Li; Ratzlaff, Pete; Yu, Yaming

    2014-10-01

    Owing to a lack of robust principled methods, systematic instrumental uncertainties have generally been ignored in astrophysical data analysis despite wide recognition of the importance of including them. Ignoring calibration uncertainty can cause bias in the estimation of source model parameters and can lead to underestimation of the variance of these estimates. We previously introduced a pragmatic Bayesian method to address this problem. The method is "pragmatic" in that it introduced an ad hoc technique that simplified computation by neglecting the potential information in the data for narrowing the uncertainty for the calibration product. Following that work, we use a principal component analysis to efficiently represent the uncertainty of the effective area of an X-ray (or γ-ray) telescope. Here, however, we leverage this representation to enable a principled, fully Bayesian method that coherently accounts for the calibration uncertainty in high-energy spectral analysis. In this setting, the method is compared with standard analysis techniques and the pragmatic Bayesian method. The advantage of the fully Bayesian method is that it allows the data to provide information not only for estimation of the source parameters but also for the calibration product—here the effective area, conditional on the adopted spectral model. In this way, it can yield more accurate and efficient estimates of the source parameters along with valid estimates of their uncertainty. Provided that the source spectrum can be accurately described by a parameterized model, this method allows rigorous inference about the effective area by quantifying which possible curves are most consistent with the data.

  20. Spectral and Timing Investigations of Dwarf Novae Selected in Hard X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorstensen, John; Remillard, Ronald A.

    2000-01-01

    There are 9 dwarf novae (DN) among the 43 cataclysmic variables (accreting white dwarfs in close binary systems) that were detected during the HEAO-1 all-sky X-ray survey (1977-1979). On the other hand, there are roughly one hundred dwarf novae that are closer and/or optically brighter and yet they were not detected as hard X-ray sources. Two of the HEAO-1 DN show evidence for X-ray pulsations that imply strong magnetic fields on the white dwarf surface, and magnetic CVs are known to be strong X-ray sources. However, substantial flux in hard X-rays may be caused by non-magnetic effects, such as an optically thin boundary layer near a massive white dwarf. We proposed RXTE observations to measure plasma temperatures and to search for X-ray pulsations. The observations would distinguish whether these DN belong to one of (rare) magnetic subclasses. For those that do not show pulsations, the observations support efforts to define empirical relations between X-ray temperature, the accretion rate, and the mass of the white dwarf. The latter is determined via optical studies of the dynamics of the binary constituents.

  1. X-ray attenuation of adipose breast tissue: in-vitro and in-vivo measurements using spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Erhard, Klaus; Berggren, Karl; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Cederström, Björn; Johansson, Henrik; Lundqvist, Mats; Moa, Elin; Homan, Hanno; Willsher, Paula; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Wallis, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    The development of new x-ray imaging techniques often requires prior knowledge of tissue attenuation, but the sources of such information are sparse. We have measured the attenuation of adipose breast tissue using spectral imaging, in vitro and in vivo. For the in-vitro measurement, fixed samples of adipose breast tissue were imaged on a spectral mammography system, and the energy-dependent x-ray attenuation was measured in terms of equivalent thicknesses of aluminum and poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA). For the in-vivo measurement, a similar procedure was applied on a number of spectral screening mammograms. The results of the two measurements agreed well and were consistent with published attenuation data and with measurements on tissue-equivalent material.

  2. High-resolution single-shot spectral monitoring of hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Makita, M.; Karvinen, P.; Zhu, D.; Juranic, P. N.; Grünert, J.; Cartier, S.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Lemke, H. T.; Mozzanica, A.; Nelson, S.; Patthey, L.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Feng, Y.; David, C.

    2015-10-16

    We have developed an on-line spectrometer for hard x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation based on a nanostructured diamond diffraction grating and a bent crystal analyzer. Our method provides high spectral resolution, interferes negligibly with the XFEL beam, and can withstand the intense hard x-ray pulses at high repetition rates of >100 Hz. The spectrometer is capable of providing shot-to-shot spectral information for the normalization of data obtained in scientific experiments and optimization of the accelerator operation parameters. We have demonstrated these capabilities of the setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source, in self-amplified spontaneous emission mode at full energy of >1 mJ with a 120 Hz repetition rate, obtaining a resolving power of Ε/δΕ > 3 × 104. In conclusion, the device was also used to monitor the effects of pulse duration down to 8 fs by analysis of the spectral spike width.

  3. Spectral Modeling of the Comptonized Continua of Accreting X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael Thomas; Pottschmidt, Katja; Becker, Peter A.; Marcu, Diana; Wilms, Jörn; Wood, Kent S.

    2015-01-01

    We are undertaking a program to analyze the X-ray spectra of the accretion flows onto strongly magnetic neutron stars in high mass binary systems such as Cen X-3, and XTE J1946+274. These accreting pulsars typically have X-ray spectra consisting of broad Comptonized cutoff power-laws. Current theory suggests these X-ray spectra result from radiation-dominated shocks that develop in the high-velocity magnetically channeled plasma accretion flows onto the surfaces of the neutron stars. These X-ray pulsars often, but not always, show cyclotron resonant scattering features implying neutron star surface magnetic field strengths above 1012 G. Proper fitting of cyclotron line centroids (for example, to investigate how the line centroid varies with X-ray luminosity) requires a robust model for the Comptonized X-ray continuum upon which the cyclotron lines are superposed, and this can be provided by a continuum model based on the physics of the accretion column.We discuss in this presentation our ongoing program for the analysis of the X-ray spectra formed in these systems. Our program consists of two parts. First, we are modeling the X-ray spectra from the Suzaku X-ray satellite of accreting X-ray pulsars Cen X-3 and XTE J1946+274 utilizing the best currently existing empirical models. The second part of our program is building a new analysis tool based on the analytical model of Becker and Wolff (2007). In the high temperature optically thick plasma flows, the processes of bremsstrahlung emission from the hot plasma, black body emission from a thermal mound near the neutron star surface, and cyclotron emission from electrons in the first Landau excited state, all contribute to the total observed X-ray spectrum. We show recent results from our new implementation and its comparison with the Suzaku data for these X-ray pulsars.This research is supported by the NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program.

  4. Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charge Exchange Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargelin, B.

    2002-01-01

    The proposed research uses the electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study X-ray emission from charge-exchange recombination of highly charged ions with neutral gases. The resulting data fill a void in existing experimental and theoretical understanding of this atomic physics process, and are needed to explain all or part of the observed X-ray emission from the soft X-ray background, stellar winds, the Galactic Center, supernova ejecta, and photoionized nebulae. Progress made during the first year of the grant is described, as is work planned for the second year.

  5. Temporal and spectral behavior of sub-picosecond laser-created X-ray sources from low- to moderate-Z elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Renaudin, P.; Dorchies, F.; Harmand, M.; Peyrusse, O.; Audebert, P.; Jacquemot, S.; Calisti, A.; Benredjem, D.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a set of experiments in which solid targets of different atomic numbers ( Z) were irradiated with laser pulses of time durations ranging from 300 fs to 33 ps, and energies up to 26 J. The time-resolved X-ray emission in the 7.6-8.1 Å spectral range was measured using an ultra-fast X-ray streak camera coupled with a conical Bragg crystal. In this way we were able to follow the dramatic modification of the spectral features as a function of the laser duration. The features evolve from a "ns-type" emission, characterized by narrow and well-defined spectral lines, to very broad spectral features, due not only to the Stark broadening but also to the proliferation of satellites lines. The measured spectra also show strong time dependence, which allows us to follow the time evolution of the hydrodynamic parameters. We then compare the derived parameter with the CHIVAS hydro-radiative simulations. The experimental results are also compared with the AVERROES/TRANSPEC collisional-radiative code, and with precise spectral line shape calculations (PPP and PrismSPECT). The results seem to indicate regimes of interaction where hot electrons play an important role on spectral line formation.

  6. ON THE NATURE OF THE mHz X-RAY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FROM ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE M82 X-1: SEARCH FOR TIMING-SPECTRAL CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E. E-mail: tod.strohmayer@nasa.gov

    2013-07-10

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs ({approx}0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling. We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.

  7. On the Nature of the mHz X-ray Quasi-Periodic Oscillations from Ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-1: Search for Timing-Spectral Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs (0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass.We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling.We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.

  8. Evaluating the impact of x-ray spectral shape on image quality in flat-panel CT breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, Stephen J.; Thacker, Samta; Gong Xing; Liu, Bob

    2007-01-15

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in exploring the feasibility of dedicated computed tomography (CT) breast imaging using a flat-panel digital detector in a truncated cone-beam imaging geometry. Preliminary results are promising and it appears as if three-dimensional tomographic imaging of the breast has great potential for reducing the masking effect of superimposed parenchymal structure typically observed with conventional mammography. In this study, a mathematical framework used for determining optimal design and acquisition parameters for such a CT breast imaging system is described. The ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is used as a figure of merit, under the assumptions that the imaging system is linear and shift invariant. Computation of the ideal observer SNR used a parallel-cascade model to predict signal and noise propagation through the detector, as well as a realistic model of the lesion detection task in breast imaging. For all evaluations, the total mean glandular dose for a CT breast imaging study was constrained to be approximately equivalent to that of a two-view conventional mammography study. The framework presented was used to explore the effect of x-ray spectral shape across an extensive range of kVp settings, filter material types, and filter thicknesses. The results give an indication of how spectral shape can affect image quality in flat-panel CT breast imaging.

  9. Novel instrumentation for spectrally resolved soft x-ray plasma tomography: Development and pilot results on TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmaenok, L. A.; Golovkin, S. V.; Govorun, V. N.; Ekimov, A. V.; Salashchenko, N. N.; Pickalov, V. V.; Belik, V. P.; Schüller, F. C.; Donné, A. J. H.; Oomens, A. A. M.; Prokhorov, K. A.; Andreev, S. S.; Sorokin, A. A.; Podlaskin, B. G.; Khasanov, L. V.

    2001-02-01

    A novel instrumentation for wavelength- and time-resolved plasma emission tomography in the range 0.1-4 keV has been demonstrated on the Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR). The technique is intended for reconstruction of distributions of local emission coefficients (LEC) for selected spectral lines of impurity ions. Further determination (with additional data on electron density and temperature) of spatial distributions of impurity ions at particular ionization stages will become feasible. Spectrally selective plasma images at several viewpoints around plasma are obtained with miniature pinhole cameras supplemented with multilayer mirrors as dispersion elements. The x-ray image is converted to a visible image and transported by a fiber bundle to a gain enhanced recording camera with an electron bombarded charge coupled device tube. A part of the system has been installed on temporary TEXTOR ports. First demonstration results have been obtained on plasma imaging and on subsequent LEC reconstruction using a modified iterative sinogram restoration tomography algorithm. The complete diagnostics will be operational after the TEXTOR shutdown in 2001.

  10. Short-term X-ray spectral variability of the quasar PDS 456 observed in a low-flux state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzeu, G. A.; Reeves, J. N.; Nardini, E.; Braito, V.; Costa, M. T.; Tombesi, F.; Gofford, J.

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a recent, 2013 Suzaku campaign on the nearby (z = 0.184) luminous (Lbol ˜ 1047 erg s-1) quasar PDS 456. This consisted of three observations, covering a total duration of ˜1 Ms and a net exposure of 455 ks. During these observations, the X-ray flux was unusually low, suppressed by a factor of >10 in the soft X-ray band when compared to previous observations. We investigated the broad-band continuum by constructing a spectral energy distribution (SED), making use of the optical/UV photometry and hard X-ray spectra from the later simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR campaign in 2014. The high-energy part of this low-flux SED cannot be accounted for by physically self-consistent accretion disc and corona models without attenuation by absorbing gas, which partially covers a substantial fraction of the line of sight towards the X-ray continuum. At least two layers of absorbing gas are required, of column density log (NH,low/cm-2) = 22.3 ± 0.1 and log (NH,high/cm-2) = 23.2 ± 0.1, with average line-of-sight covering factors of ˜80 per cent (with typical ˜5 per cent variations) and 60 per cent (±10-15 per cent), respectively. During these observations PDS 456 displays significant short-term X-ray spectral variability, on time-scales of ˜100 ks, which can be accounted for by variable covering of the absorbing gas along the line of sight. The partial covering absorber prefers an outflow velocity of v_pc = 0.25^{+0.01}_{-0.05} c at the >99.9 per cent confidence level over the case where vpc = 0. This is consistent with the velocity of the highly ionized outflow responsible for the blueshifted iron K absorption profile. We therefore suggest that the partial covering clouds could be the denser, or clumpy part of an inhomogeneous accretion disc wind. Finally estimates are placed upon the size-scale of the X-ray emission region from the source variability. The radial extent of the X-ray emitter is found to be of the order ˜15-20Rg

  11. Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charge Exchange Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargelin, B.

    2003-01-01

    The proposed research uses the electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to study the X-ray emission from charge-exchange recombination of highly charged ions with neutral gases. The resulting data fill a void in the existing experimental and theoretical data and are needed to explain all or part of the observed X-ray emission from the Galactic Ridge, solar and stellar winds, the Galactic Center, supernova ejecta, and photoionized nebulae.

  12. Variable q-range x-ray scattering chamber for chemical and materials science at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, O.; DeBartolo, J.; Kurtz, C.; Lee, B.; Seifert, S.; Winans, R.; Zuo, X.

    2014-03-01

    We present here the design of a novel variable q-range x-ray scattering instrument recently installed at Sector 12 of the Advanced Photon Source. This device provides automated, computer-controlled q-range changes for x-ray scattering experiments by varying the sample-to-detector distance within a large vacuum chamber. Eliminating the need to vent the system when changing camera lengths allows for quick and efficient change-overs between experimental setups. The detector cannot operate in a vacuum environment; therefore it is housed within an air chamber open to atmospheric pressure. A large carbon window isolates the detector from vacuum while allowing high x-ray transmission. An array of motorized beam stops mounted directly upstream of the window protects the detector from the direct x-ray beam for various types of scattering experiments. A smaller detector protrudes into the lower front section for simultaneous wide-angle x-ray scattering data collection. A fully automated support structure aligns the vacuum chamber to the x-ray trajectory.

  13. X-ray laser resonator for the kilo-electron-volt range

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jie; Tomov, Ivan V.; Er, Ali O.; Rentzepis, Peter M.

    2013-04-29

    We have designed, constructed, and tested an x-ray laser resonator operating in the hard x-ray, keV energy region. This ring x-ray laser cavity is formed by four highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystals. The crystals are set at the Bragg angles that allow for the complete 360 Degree-Sign round trip of the 2.37 A, 5.23 keV L{sub {alpha}} line of neodymium. In addition, we also present experimental data of a similar ring laser resonator that utilizes the Cr K{sub {alpha}}, 5.41 keV, x-ray line to propagate through the four mirrors of the cavity. The specific properties of these x-ray laser resonator mirrors, including reflection losses and cavity arrangement, are presented.

  14. Prediction and Measurement of X-Ray Spectral and Intensity Distributions from Low Energy Electron Impact Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.

    1999-01-01

    In-vacuum electron beam welding is a technology that NASA considered as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. The interaction of energetic electrons with metal produces x-rays. The radiation exposure to astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding must be characterized and minimized to insure safe operating conditions. This investigation characterized the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the United States Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA, by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine, for ground based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests consisted of Thermoluminescence Dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) and exposed to x-ray radiation generated by operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x-rays of energy less than 10 KeV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was verified. Therefore, alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by electron impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during actual operation of the in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. The calculated absorbed dose

  15. The dependence of the soft X ray spectral slope with radio property, luminosity, and redshift, for a large sample of AGN from the Einstein IPC data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunner, H.; Worrall, D. M.; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Elvis, Martin

    1989-01-01

    The dependence of the soft X-ray spectral slope on radio, optical and X-ray properties, and on redshift are reported for a large sample of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). The sample includes 317 optically and radio-selected AGN from a preliminary version of the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) quasar and AGN data base. The main results are: the difference in X-ray slope between radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN were confirmed for an independent and much larger sample of sources; a difference in X-ray slope between flat and steep radio spectrum AGN is observed only in high luminosity sub-sample; in flat radio spectrum AGNs there is an indication for a dependence of the X-ray spectral index on X-ray luminosity redshift and alpha sub 0x.

  16. Quantitative X-ray projection microscopy: phase-contrast and multi-spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Mayo, S C; Miller, P R; Wilkins, S W; Davis, T J; Gao, D; Gureyev, T E; Paganin, D; Parry, D J; Pogany, A; Stevenson, A W

    2002-08-01

    We outline a new approach to X-ray projection microscopy in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), which exploits phase contrast to boost the quality and information content of images. These developments have been made possible by the combination of a high-brightness field-emission gun (FEG)-based SEM, direct detection CCD technology and new phase retrieval algorithms. Using this approach we have been able to obtain spatial resolution of < 0.2 micro m and have demonstrated novel features such as: (i) phase-contrast enhanced visibility of high spatial frequency image features (e.g. edges and boundaries) over a wide energy range; (ii) energy-resolved imaging to simultaneously produce multiple quasi-monochromatic images using broad-band polychromatic illumination; (iii) easy implementation of microtomography; (iv) rapid and robust phase/amplitude-retrieval algorithms to enable new real-time and quantitative modes of microscopic imaging. These algorithms can also be applied successfully to recover object-plane information from intermediate-field images, unlocking the potentially greater contrast and resolution of the intermediate-field regime. Widespread applications are envisaged for fields such as materials science, biological and biomedical research and microelectronics device inspection. Some illustrative examples are presented. The quantitative methods described here are also very relevant to projection microscopy using other sources of radiation, such as visible light and electrons.

  17. Time-resolved imaging and spectral studies of an X-ray burst from the globular cluster Terzan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Marshall, H. L.; Hertz, P.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Elsner, R. F.; Ghosh, P.; Darbro, W.; Sutherland, P. G.; Soltan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The first image of an X-ray burst was recorded with the HRI detector at the Einstein Observatory while observing the globular cluster Terzan 2. The burst was coincident with a persistent X-ray source located near the center of the cluster (thus confirming an earlier suggested identification) and reached a peak luminosity exceeding 5 x 10 to the 38th (d/10 kpc) squared. After a rapid rise to peak luminosity, a double-peaked spectral variation was observed over the next approximately 20 s with anticorrelated changes in the apparent emission region radius and temperature derived from blackbody (and modified blackbody) spectral fits. A shell or disk geometry, which undergoes adiabatic expansion and contraction, may be implied for the burst emission region. Alternatively, Comptonization is required. It is also shown that the peak burst luminosity must exceed the Eddington limit.

  18. Time-dependent Electron Acceleration in Blazar Transients: X-Ray Time Lags and Spectral Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Tiffany R.; Becker, Peter A.; Finke, Justin D.

    2016-06-01

    Electromagnetic radiation from blazar jets often displays strong variability, extending from radio to γ-ray frequencies. In a few cases, this variability has been characterized using Fourier time lags, such as those detected in the X-rays from Mrk 421 using BeppoSAX. The lack of a theoretical framework to interpret the data has motivated us to develop a new model for the formation of the X-ray spectrum and the time lags in blazar jets based on a transport equation including terms describing stochastic Fermi acceleration, synchrotron losses, shock acceleration, adiabatic expansion, and spatial diffusion. We derive the exact solution for the Fourier transform of the electron distribution and use it to compute the Fourier transform of the synchrotron radiation spectrum and the associated X-ray time lags. The same theoretical framework is also used to compute the peak flare X-ray spectrum, assuming that a steady-state electron distribution is achieved during the peak of the flare. The model parameters are constrained by comparing the theoretical predictions with the observational data for Mrk 421. The resulting integrated model yields, for the first time, a complete first-principles physical explanation for both the formation of the observed time lags and the shape of the peak flare X-ray spectrum. It also yields direct estimates of the strength of the shock and the stochastic magnetohydrodynamical wave acceleration components in the Mrk 421 jet.

  19. Coherent control of long-range photoinduced electron transfer by stimulated X-ray Raman processes.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Konstantin E; Zhang, Yu; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-09-01

    We show that X-ray pulses resonant with selected core transitions can manipulate electron transfer (ET) in molecules with ultrafast and atomic selectivity. We present possible protocols for coherently controlling ET dynamics in donor-bridge-acceptor (DBA) systems by stimulated X-ray resonant Raman processes involving various transitions between the D, B, and A sites. Simulations presented for a Ru(II)-Co(III) model complex demonstrate how the shapes, phases and amplitudes of the X-ray pulses can be optimized to create charge on demand at selected atoms, by opening up otherwise blocked ET pathways. PMID:27559082

  20. Long-Term Spectral and Temporal Evolution of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar XTE J1810-197

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vurgun, Eda; Gogus, Ersin; Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Guver, Tolga

    2016-07-01

    We present spectral and timing studies of the first transient Anomalous X-ray Pulsar XTE J1810-197, a 5.54 s pulsar discovered in 2003, when its X-ray luminosity increased ~100 fold. We investigate the long-term behaviour of the surface temperature,emitting area, and the pulsed fraction. X-ray spectra are well fitted by a two-component blackbody model in which the cool component is most likely arising from the whole surface of star and the hot component is arising from a relatively small hot spot on it. The spectral analysis has also shown evidence for the presence of an absorbtion line feature around 1.2 keV in almost all observations. We fit this absorption feature with an asymmetric gaussian component since it shows an asymmetric structure. The pulse fraction exhibits slightly different temporal evolution in higher and lower energy bands. We will discuss correlative behaviour between the spectral and timing parameters in order to constrain magnetar cooling models.

  1. Spectral analysis of paramagnetic centers induced in human tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Kuchuro, I. I.

    2010-03-01

    Based on study of spectral and relaxation characteristics, we have established that paramagnetic centers induced in tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation are identical in nature. We show that for the same exposure dose, the intensity of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal induced by x-radiation with effective energy 34 keV is about an order of magnitude higher than the amplitude of the signal induced by gamma radiation. We have identified a three-fold attenuation of the EPR signal along the path of the x-radiation from the buccal to the lingual side of a tooth, which is evidence that the individual had undergone diagnostic x-ray examination of the dentition or skull. We have shown that the x-ray exposure doses reconstructed from the EPR spectra are an order of magnitude higher than the applied doses, while the dose loads due to gamma radiation are equal to the applied doses. The data obtained indicate that for adequate reconstruction of individual absorbed doses from EPR spectra of tooth enamel in the population subjected to the combined effect of x-radiation and accidental external gamma radiation as a result of the disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, we need to take into account the contribution to the dose load from diagnostic x-rays in examination of the teeth, jaw, or skull.

  2. Monte Carlo comparison of x-ray and proton CT for range calculations of proton therapy beams.

    PubMed

    Arbor, N; Dauvergne, D; Dedes, G; Létang, J M; Parodi, K; Quiñones, C T; Testa, E; Rit, S

    2015-10-01

    Proton computed tomography (CT) has been described as a solution for imaging the proton stopping power of patient tissues, therefore reducing the uncertainty of the conversion of x-ray CT images to relative stopping power (RSP) maps and its associated margins. This study aimed to investigate this assertion under the assumption of ideal detection systems. We have developed a Monte Carlo framework to assess proton CT performances for the main steps of a proton therapy treatment planning, i.e. proton or x-ray CT imaging, conversion to RSP maps based on the calibration of a tissue phantom, and proton dose simulations. Irradiations of a computational phantom with pencil beams were simulated on various anatomical sites and the proton range was assessed on the reference, the proton CT-based and the x-ray CT-based material maps. Errors on the tissue's RSP reconstructed from proton CT were found to be significantly smaller and less dependent on the tissue distribution. The imaging dose was also found to be much more uniform and conformal to the primary beam. The mean absolute deviation for range calculations based on x-ray CT varies from 0.18 to 2.01 mm depending on the localization, while it is smaller than 0.1 mm for proton CT. Under the assumption of a perfect detection system, proton range predictions based on proton CT are therefore both more accurate and more uniform than those based on x-ray CT.

  3. High Spectral Resolution X-ray Observation of Magnetic CVs: EX Hya

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, G; Brickhouse, N S; Mauche, C W

    2008-04-07

    In magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs) the primary is a highly magnetized white dwarf (WD) whose field controls the accretion flow close to the WD, leading to a shock and accretion column that radiate chiefly in X-rays. We present preliminary results from a 500 ks Chandra HETG observation of the brightest magnetic CV EX Hya. From the observational dataset we are able to measure the temperature and density at different points of the cooling accretion column using sensitive line ratios. We also construct line-based light curves to search for rotational modulation of the X-ray emission.

  4. An outburst scenario for the X-ray spectral variability in 3C 111

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Reeves, J. N.; Reynolds, C. S.; García, J.; Lohfink, A.

    2013-09-01

    We present a combined Suzaku and Swift BAT broad-band E = 0.6-200 keV spectral analysis of three 3C 111 observations obtained in 2010. The data are well described with an absorbed power-law continuum and a weak (R ≃ 0.2) cold reflection component from distant material. We constrain the continuum cutoff at EC ≃ 150-200 keV, which is in accordance with X-ray Comptonization corona models and supports claims that the jet emission is only dominant at much higher energies. Fe XXVI Lyα emission and absorption lines are also present in the first and second observations, respectively. The modelling and interpretation of the emission line is complex and we explore three possibilities. If originating from ionized-disc reflection, this should be emitted at rin ≥ 50 rg or, in the lamp-post configuration, the illuminating source should be at a height of h ≥ 30 rg above the black hole. Alternatively, the line could be modelled with a hot collisionally ionized plasma with temperature kT = 22.0^{+6.1}_{-3.2} keV or a photoionized plasma with log ξ = 4.52^{+0.10}_{-0.16} erg s-1 cm and column density NH > 3 × 1023 cm-2. However, the first and second scenarios are less favoured on statistical and physical grounds, respectively. The blueshifted absorption line in the second observation can be modelled as an ultrafast outflow (UFO) with ionization parameter log ξ = 4.47^{+0.76}_{-0.04} erg s-1 cm, column density N_H = (5.3^{+1.8}_{-1.3})× 10^{22} cm-2 and outflow velocity vout = 0.104 ± 0.006c. Interestingly, the parameters of the photoionized emission model remarkably match those of the absorbing UFO, supporting the possibility that the same material could be responsible for both emission and absorption. We suggest an outburst scenario in which an accretion disc wind, initially lying out of the line of sight and observed in emission, then crosses our view to the source and it is observed in absorption as a mildly relativistic UFO.

  5. An Outburst Scenario for the X-ray Spectral Variability in 3C 111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombesi, Francesco; Reeves, J. N.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Garcia, J.; Lohfink, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a combined Suzaku and Swift BAT broad-band E=0.6-200 keV spectral analysis of three 3C 111 observations obtained in 2010. The data are well described with an absorbed power-law continuum and a weak (R approximately equal to 0.2) cold reflection component from distant material. We constrain the continuum cutoff at E(sub C) approximately equal to 150- 200 keV, which is in accordance with X-ray Comptonization corona models and supports claims that the jet emission is only dominant at much higher energies. Fe XXVI Ly alpha emission and absorption lines are also present in the first and second observations, respectively. The modelling and interpretation of the emission line is complex and we explore three possibilities. If originating from ionized disc reflection, this should be emitted at r(sub in) greater than or equal to 50 r(sub g) or, in the lamp-post configuration, the illuminating source should be at a height of h greater than or equal to 30 r(sub g) over the black hole. Alternatively, the line could be modeled with a hot collisionally ionized plasma with temperature kT = 22.0(sup +6.1)(sub -3.2) keV or a photo-ionized plasma with logXi=4.52(sup +0.10)(sub -0.16) erg per second cm, and column density N(sub H) greater than 3×10(sup 23) per square centimeter. However, the first and second scenarios are less favored on statistical and physical grounds, respectively. The blue-shifted absorption line in the second observation can be modelled as an ultra-fast outflow (UFO) with ionization parameter logXi=4.47(sup +0.76) (sub -0.04) erg per second cm, column density NH=(5.3(sup +1.8)(sub -1.3))×10(sup 22) per square centimeter and outflow velocity v(sub out) = 0.104+/-0.006c. Interestingly, the parameters of the photoionized emission model remarkably match those of the absorbing UFO, supporting the possibility that the same material could be responsible for both emission and absorption. We suggest an outburst scenario in which an accretion disc wind

  6. Soft X-ray spectral fits of Geminga with model neutron star atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, R. D.; Pavlov, G. G.; Meszaros, P.

    1994-01-01

    The spectrum of the soft X-ray pulsar Geminga consists of two components, a softer one which can be interpreted as thermal-like radiation from the surface of the neutron star, and a harder one interpreted as radiation from a polar cap heated by relativistic particles. We have fitted the soft spectrum using a detailed magnetized hydrogen atmosphere model. The fitting parameters are the hydrogen column density, the effective temperature T(sub eff), the gravitational redshift z, and the distance to radius ratio, for different values of the magnetic field B. The best fits for this model are obtained when B less than or approximately 1 x 10(exp 12) G and z lies on the upper boundary of the explored range (z = 0.45). The values of T(sub eff) approximately = (2-3) x 10(exp 5) K are a factor of 2-3 times lower than the value of T(sub eff) obtained for blackbody fits with the same z. The lower T(sub eff) increases the compatibility with some proposed schemes for fast neutrino cooling of neutron stars (NSs) by the direct Urca process or by exotic matter, but conventional cooling cannot be excluded. The hydrogen atmosphere fits also imply a smaller distance to Geminga than that inferred from a blackbody fit. An accurate evaluation of the distance would require a better knowledge of the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) response to the low-energy region of the incident spectrum. Our modeling of the soft component with a cooler magnetized atmosphere also implies that the hard-component fit requires a characteristic temperature which is higher (by a factor of approximately 2-3) and a surface area which is smaller (by a factor of 10(exp 3), compared to previous blackbody fits.

  7. How to Build a Time Machine: Interfacing Hydrodynamics, Ionization Calculations and X-ray Spectral Codes for Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badenes, Carlos

    2006-02-01

    Thanks to Chandra and XMM-Newton, spatially resolved spectroscopy of SNRsin the X-ray band has become a reality. Several impressive data sets forejecta-dominated SNRs can now be found in the archives, the Cas A VLP justbeing one (albeit probably the most spectacular) example. However, it isoften hard to establish quantitative, unambiguous connections between theX-ray observations of SNRs and the dramatic events involved in a corecollapse or thermonuclear SN explosion. The reason for this is that thevery high quality of the data sets generated by Chandra and XMM for thelikes of Cas A, SNR 292.0+1.8, Tycho, and SN 1006 has surpassed our abilityto analyze them. The core of the problem is in the transient nature of theplasmas in SNRs, which results in anintimate relationship between the structure of the ejecta and AM, the SNRdynamics arising from their interaction, and the ensuing X-rayemission. Thus, the ONLY way to understand the X-ray observations ofejecta-dominated SNRs at all levels, from the spatially integrated spectrato the subarcsecond scales that can be resolved by Chandra, is to couplehydrodynamic simulations to nonequilibrium ionization (NEI) calculationsand X-ray spectral codes. I will review the basic ingredients that enterthis kind of calculations, and what are the prospects for using them tounderstand the X-ray emission from the shocked ejecta in young SNRs. Thisunderstanding (when it is possible), can turn SNRs into veritable timemachines, revealing the secrets of the titanic explosions that generatedthem hundreds of years ago.

  8. A New Model for Spectral Formation in Accretion-Powered X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael T.; Becker, P. A.; Wolfram, K. D.

    2006-09-01

    Accretion-powered X-ray pulsars are among the most luminous X-ray sources in the Galaxy yet no satisfactory model for the formation of their observed X-ray spectra has emerged. We report on a self-consistent calculation of the spectrum emerging from a magnetically funneled pulsar accretion flow that includes a treatment of the bulk and thermal Comptonization occurring in a radiation-dominated shock. Using a rigorous eigenfunction expansion method, we obtain a closed-form expression for the Green's function describing the upscattering of monochromatic radiation injected into the flow. The Green's function is convolved with bremsstrahlung, cyclotron, and blackbody source terms to calculate the emergent photon spectrum. We show that energization of photons in the shock naturally produces a X-ray spectrum with a relatively flat continuum and a high-energy exponential cutoff. Finally, we demonstrate the good agreement of our model with the spectra of bright pulsars such as Her X-1 and Cen X-3. This research was funded by NASA and the Office of Naval Research.

  9. X-ray polarimetric signatures induced by spectral variability in the framework of the receding torus model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, F.; Goosmann, R. W.; Petrucci, P.-O.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Obscuring circumnuclear dust is a well-established constituent of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Traditionally referred to as the receding dusty torus, its inner radius and angular extension should depend on the photo-ionizing luminosity of the central source. Aims: We quantify the expected time-dependent near-infrared (NIR), optical, ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray polarization of a receding dusty torus as a function of the variable X-ray flux level and spectral shape. Methods: Using a Monte Carlo approach, we simulate the radiative transfer between the multiple components of an AGN adopting model constraints from the bright Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151. We compare our model results to the observed NIR to UV polarization of the source and predict its X-ray polarization. Results: We find that the 2-8 keV polarization fraction of a standard AGN model varies from less then a few percent along polar viewing angles up to tens of percent at equatorial inclinations. At viewing angles around the type-1/type-2 transition, there is a different X-ray polarization variability in a static or a receding torus scenario. In the former case, the expected 2-8 keV polarization of NGC 4151 is found to be 1.21% ± 0.34% with a constant polarization position angle, while in the latter scenario it varies from 0.1% to 6% depending on the photon index of the primary radiation. Additionally, an orthogonal rotation of the polarization position angle with photon energy appears for very soft primary spectra. Conclusions: Future X-ray polarimetry missions will be able to test whether the receding model is valid for Seyfert galaxies seen at a viewing angle close to the torus horizon. The overall stability of the polarization position angle for photon indexes softer than Γ = 1.5 ensures that reliable measurements of X-ray polarization are possible. We derive a long-term observational strategy for NGC 4151 assuming observations with a small to medium-sized X-ray polarimetry satellite.

  10. Spectral Resolution for Five-Element, Filtered, X-Ray Detector (XRD) Arrays Using the Methods of Backus and Gilbert

    SciTech Connect

    FEHL,DAVID LEE; BIGGS,F.; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.

    2000-01-17

    The generalized method of Backus and Gilbert (BG) is described and applied to the inverse problem of obtaining spectra from a 5-channel, filtered array of x-ray detectors (XRD's). This diagnostic is routinely fielded on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories to study soft x-ray photons ({le}2300 eV), emitted by high density Z-pinch plasmas. The BG method defines spectral resolution limits on the system of response functions that are in good agreement with the unfold method currently in use. The resolution so defined is independent of the source spectrum. For noise-free, simulated data the BG approximating function is also in reasonable agreement with the source spectrum (150 eV black-body) and the unfold. This function may be used as an initial trial function for iterative methods or a regularization model.

  11. Developing a CCD camera with high spatial resolution for RIXS in the soft X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soman, M. R.; Hall, D. J.; Tutt, J. H.; Murray, N. J.; Holland, A. D.; Schmitt, T.; Raabe, J.; Schmitt, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrometer (SAXES) at the Swiss Light Source contains a high resolution Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). Using the current CCD-based camera system, the energy-dispersive spectrometer has an energy resolution (E/ΔE) of approximately 12,000 at 930 eV. A recent study predicted that through an upgrade to the grating and camera system, the energy resolution could be improved by a factor of 2. In order to achieve this goal in the spectral domain, the spatial resolution of the CCD must be improved to better than 5 μm from the current 24 μm spatial resolution (FWHM). The 400 eV-1600 eV energy X-rays detected by this spectrometer primarily interact within the field free region of the CCD, producing electron clouds which will diffuse isotropically until they reach the depleted region and buried channel. This diffusion of the charge leads to events which are split across several pixels. Through the analysis of the charge distribution across the pixels, various centroiding techniques can be used to pinpoint the spatial location of the X-ray interaction to the sub-pixel level, greatly improving the spatial resolution achieved. Using the PolLux soft X-ray microspectroscopy endstation at the Swiss Light Source, a beam of X-rays of energies from 200 eV to 1400 eV can be focused down to a spot size of approximately 20 nm. Scanning this spot across the 16 μm square pixels allows the sub-pixel response to be investigated. Previous work has demonstrated the potential improvement in spatial resolution achievable by centroiding events in a standard CCD. An Electron-Multiplying CCD (EM-CCD) has been used to improve the signal to effective readout noise ratio achieved resulting in a worst-case spatial resolution measurement of 4.5±0.2 μm and 3.9±0.1 μm at 530 eV and 680 eV respectively. A method is described that allows the contribution of the X-ray spot size to be deconvolved from these

  12. High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Sachindra

    2016-07-01

    High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) are interesting objects that provide a wide range of observational probes to the nature of the two stellar components, accretion process, stellar wind and orbital parameters of the systems. Most of the transient HMXBs are found to Be/X-ray binaries (~67%), consisting of a compact object (neutron star) in orbit around the companion Be star. The orbit of the compact object around the Be star is wide and highly eccentric. Be/X-ray binaries are generally quiescent in X-ray emission. The transient X-ray outbursts seen in these objects are known to be due to interaction between the compact object and the circumstellar disk surrounding the Be star. In the recent years, another class of transient HMXBs have been found which have supergiant companions and show shorter X-ray outbursts. X-ray, infrared and optical observations of these HMXBs provide vital information regarding these systems. The timing and broad-band X-ray spectral properties of a few HMXB pulsars, mainly Be/X-ray binary pulsars during regular X-ray outbursts will be discussed.

  13. Bismuth Sulfide Nanoflowers for Detection of X-rays in the Mammographic Energy Range

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Shruti; Osei, Ernest K.; Yeow, John T. W.

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of diagnostic x-rays, especially in the field of medical radiology, has necessitated a significant demand for high resolution, real-time radiation detectors. In this regard, the photoresponse of bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3), an n-type semiconducting metal chalcogenide, to low energy x-rays has been investigated in this study. In recent years, several types of nanomaterials of Bi2S3 have been widely studied for optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. However, photoresponse of Bi2S3 nanomaterials for dosimetric applications has not yet been reported. The photosensitivity of Bi2S3 with nanoscale “flower-like” structures was characterized under x-ray tube-potentials typically used in mammographic procedures. Both dark current and photocurrent were measured under varying x-ray doses, field sizes, and bias voltages for each of the tube potentials – 20, 23, 26 and 30 kV. Results show that the Bi2S3 nanoflowers instantaneously responded to even minor changes in the dose delivered. The photoresponse was found to be relatively high (few nA) at bias voltage as low as +1 V, and fairly repeatable for both short and long exposures to mammographic x-rays with minimal or no loss in sensitivity. The overall dose-sensitivity of the Bi2S3 nanoflowers was found to be similar to that of a micro-ionization chamber. PMID:25801531

  14. Bismuth sulfide nanoflowers for detection of X-rays in the mammographic energy range.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Shruti; Osei, Ernest K; Yeow, John T W

    2015-03-24

    The increased use of diagnostic x-rays, especially in the field of medical radiology, has necessitated a significant demand for high resolution, real-time radiation detectors. In this regard, the photoresponse of bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3), an n-type semiconducting metal chalcogenide, to low energy x-rays has been investigated in this study. In recent years, several types of nanomaterials of Bi2S3 have been widely studied for optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. However, photoresponse of Bi2S3 nanomaterials for dosimetric applications has not yet been reported. The photosensitivity of Bi2S3 with nanoscale "flower-like" structures was characterized under x-ray tube-potentials typically used in mammographic procedures. Both dark current and photocurrent were measured under varying x-ray doses, field sizes, and bias voltages for each of the tube potentials - 20, 23, 26 and 30 kV. Results show that the Bi2S3 nanoflowers instantaneously responded to even minor changes in the dose delivered. The photoresponse was found to be relatively high (few nA) at bias voltage as low as +1 V, and fairly repeatable for both short and long exposures to mammographic x-rays with minimal or no loss in sensitivity. The overall dose-sensitivity of the Bi2S3 nanoflowers was found to be similar to that of a micro-ionization chamber.

  15. Deconvolving X-ray spectral variability components in the Seyfert 1.5 NGC 3227

    SciTech Connect

    Arévalo, P.; Markowitz, A.

    2014-03-10

    We present the variability analysis of a 100 ks XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert 1.5 active galaxy, NGC 3227. The observation found NGC 3227 in a period where its hard power-law component displayed remarkably little long-term variability. This lucky event allows us to clearly observe a soft spectral component undergoing a large-amplitude but slow flux variation. Using combined spectral and timing analysis, we isolate two independent variable continuum components and characterize their behavior as a function of timescale. Rapid and coherent variations throughout the 0.2-10 keV band reveal a spectrally hard (photon index Γ ∼ 1.7-1.8) power law, dominating the observed variability on timescales of 30 ks and shorter. Another component produces coherent fluctuations in the 0.2-2 keV range and is much softer (Γ ∼ 3); it dominates the observed variability on timescales greater than 30 ks. Both components are viewed through the same absorbers identified in the time-averaged spectrum. The combined spectral and timing analysis breaks the degeneracy between models for the soft excess: it is consistent with a power-law or thermal Comptonized component but not with a blackbody or an ionized reflection component. We demonstrate that the rapid variability in NGC 3227 is intrinsic to continuum-emitting components and is not an effect of variable absorption.

  16. Spectral variability in hard X-rays and discovery of a 13,5 years period in bright quasar 3C273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, R.

    SPECTRAL VARIABILITY IN HARD X-RAYS AND DISCOVERY OF A 13.5 YEARS PERIOD IN BRIGHT QUASAR 3C273. R. K. Manchanda Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai-400005, India. ravi@tifr.res.in/Fax:+91-22-2152110 Among the large variety of active galactic nuclei, 3C 273 is the nearest quasi stellar object. The source has been studied in details in various energy bands and shows a large variety of morphological features. In the X-ray energy range 2-20 keV, the spectrum follows a power law with a spectral index of -1.5, however, the observed value of the spectral index in the 20-120 keV band shows a large variation. In the case of old archival data, the derived spectral index has a value between 1.5 and 2.2 while, the recent data from OSSE experiment showed a flat spectrum with index 0.8. Thus, to fit the GeV fluxes from the source, a break in the spectrum around 1 MeV has been proposed. In this paper we report the balloon-borne hard X-ray observations of 3C273 made with LASE instrument on Nov. 20, 1998 as a part of our continuing programme of balloon borne hard X-ray observations in the 20-200 keV band using high sensitivity Large Area Scintillation counter Experiment. Our data clearly show a steep spectrum in the 20-200 keV with spectral index a = -2.26+ 0.07 and its extrapolation can fit the GeV data. The presence of steep power law index is in complete contrast to earlier observation from OSSE. From a comparison with the available archival data of the source we have discovered that 50 keV flux from the source, shows very strong modulation with a period of about 13.5 years and which is also present at 100 keV and in the spectral index to a lesser degree. We discuss the periodicity in terms of precessing source geometry.

  17. Spectral X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction with a Combination of Energy-Integrating and Photon-Counting Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Xi, Yan; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop an algorithm for hybrid spectral computed tomography (CT) which combines energy-integrating and photon-counting detectors. While the energy-integrating scan is global, the photon-counting scan can have a local field of view (FOV). The algorithm synthesizes both spectral data and energy-integrating data. Low rank and sparsity prior is used for spectral CT reconstruction. An initial estimation is obtained from the projection data based on physical principles of x-ray interaction with the matter, which provides a more accurate Taylor expansion than previous work and can guarantee the convergence of the algorithm. Numerical simulation with clinical CT images are performed. The proposed algorithm produces very good spectral features outside the FOV when no K-edge material exists. Exterior reconstruction of K-edge material can be partially achieved. PMID:27171153

  18. Experimental study of spectral and spatial distribution of solar X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.; Catura, R. C.; Culhane, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The study of the physical conditions within the solar corona and the development of instrumentation and technical expertise necessary for advanced studies of solar X-ray emission are reported. Details are given on the Aerobee-borne-X-ray spectrometer/monochromator and also on the observing program. Preliminary discussions of some results are presented and include studies of helium-like line emission, mapping O(VII) and Ne(IX) lines, survey of O(VII) and Ne(IX) lines, study of plage regions and small flares, and analysis of line emission from individual active regions. It is concluded that the use of large-area collimated Bragg spectrometers to scan narrow wavelength intervals and the capability of the SPARCS pointing control to execute a complex observing program are established.

  19. STEMS3D: An X-ray spectral model for magnetar persistent radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogus, Ersin; Weng, Shan-Shan

    2016-07-01

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma-ray repeaters are recognized as the most promising magnetar candidates, as indicated by their energetic bursts and rapid spin-downs. It is expected that the strong magnetic field leaves distinctive imprints on the emergent radiation both by affecting the radiative processes in atmospheres of magnetars and by scattering in the upper magnetospheres. We construct a self-consistent physical model that incorporates emission from the magnetar surface and its reprocessing in the three-dimensional twisted magnetosphere using a Monte Carlo technique. The synthetic spectra are characterized by four parameters: surface temperature kT, surface magnetic field strength B, magnetospheric twist angle Δφ, and the normalized electron velocity β. We also create a tabular model (STEMS3D) and apply it to X-ray spectra of magnetars.

  20. Measurements of x-ray spectral flux and intensity distribution of APS/CHESS undulator radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinski, P.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Gluskin, E.; Cai, Z.

    1994-09-01

    Absolute radiation flux and polarization measurements of the APS undulators may have to be made under high thermal loading conditions. A method that may circumvent the high-heat-load problem was tested during a recent APS/CHESS undulator run. The technique makes use of a Si(Li) energy-dispersive detector to measure 5--35 keV x-rays scattered from a well-defined He gas volume at controlled pressure.

  1. Measurements of x-ray spectral flux of high brightness undulators by gas scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinski, P.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Gluskin, E.; Cai, Z. )

    1995-02-01

    Absolute radiation flux and polarization measurements of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) undulators may have to be made under high thermal loading conditions. A method that may circumvent the high-heat-load problem was tested during a recent APS/CHESS undulator run. The technique makes use of a Si(Li) energy-dispersive detector to measure 5--35 keV x rays scattered from a well-defined He gas volume at controlled pressure.

  2. Unsupervised classification of single-particle X-ray diffraction snapshots by spectral clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Chun Hong; Schwander, Peter; Abergel, Chantal; Andersson, Inger; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Bajt, Saša.; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barty, Anton; Bogan, Michael J.; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John; Chapman, Henry N.; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Coppola, Nicola; Deponte, Daniel P.; Ekeberg, Tomas; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Graafsma, Heinz; Gumprecht, Lars; Hajdu, Janos; Hampton, Christina Y.; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Hartmann, Robert; Hauser, Gunter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kimmel, Nils; Kiskinova, Maya; Liang, Mengning; Duane Loh, Ne-Te; Lomb, Lukas; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Martin, Andrew V.; Nass, Karol; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Reich, Christian; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schlichting, Ilme; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, Marvin; Seltzer, Virginie; Shoeman, Robert L.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Soltau, Heike; Starodub, Dmitri; Steinbrener, Jan; Stier, Gunter; Strüder, Lothar; Svenda, Martin; Ullrich, Joachim; Weidenspointner, Georg; White, Thomas A.; Wunderer, Cornelia; Ourmazd, Abbas

    2011-08-01

    Single-particle experiments using X-ray Free Electron Lasers produce more than 105 snapshots per hour, consisting of an admixture of blank shots (no particle intercepted), and exposures of one or more particles. Experimental data sets also often contain unintentional contamination with different species. We present an unsupervised method able to sort experimental snapshots without recourse to templates, specific noise models, or user-directed learning. The results show 90% agreement with manual classification.

  3. Unsupervised classification of single-particle X-ray diffraction snapshots by spectral clustering.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Chun Hong; Schwander, Peter; Abergel, Chantal; Andersson, Inger; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Bajt, Saša; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barty, Anton; Bogan, Michael J; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John; Chapman, Henry N; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Coppola, Nicola; DePonte, Daniel P; Ekeberg, Tomas; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Graafsma, Heinz; Gumprecht, Lars; Hajdu, Janos; Hampton, Christina Y; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Hartmann, Robert; Hauser, Gunter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kimmel, Nils; Kiskinova, Maya; Liang, Mengning; Loh, Ne-Te Duane; Lomb, Lukas; Maia, Filipe R N C; Martin, Andrew V; Nass, Karol; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Reich, Christian; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schlichting, Ilme; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, Marvin; Seltzer, Virginie; Shoeman, Robert L; Sierra, Raymond G; Soltau, Heike; Starodub, Dmitri; Steinbrener, Jan; Stier, Gunter; Strüder, Lothar; Svenda, Martin; Ullrich, Joachim; Weidenspointner, Georg; White, Thomas A; Wunderer, Cornelia; Ourmazd, Abbas

    2011-08-15

    Single-particle experiments using X-ray Free Electron Lasers produce more than 10(5) snapshots per hour, consisting of an admixture of blank shots (no particle intercepted), and exposures of one or more particles. Experimental data sets also often contain unintentional contamination with different species. We present an unsupervised method able to sort experimental snapshots without recourse to templates, specific noise models, or user-directed learning. The results show 90% agreement with manual classification.

  4. Unsupervised classification of single-particle X-ray diffraction snapshots by spectral clustering.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Chun Hong; Schwander, Peter; Abergel, Chantal; Andersson, Inger; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Bajt, Saša; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barty, Anton; Bogan, Michael J; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John; Chapman, Henry N; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Coppola, Nicola; DePonte, Daniel P; Ekeberg, Tomas; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Graafsma, Heinz; Gumprecht, Lars; Hajdu, Janos; Hampton, Christina Y; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Hartmann, Robert; Hauser, Gunter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kimmel, Nils; Kiskinova, Maya; Liang, Mengning; Loh, Ne-Te Duane; Lomb, Lukas; Maia, Filipe R N C; Martin, Andrew V; Nass, Karol; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Reich, Christian; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schlichting, Ilme; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, Marvin; Seltzer, Virginie; Shoeman, Robert L; Sierra, Raymond G; Soltau, Heike; Starodub, Dmitri; Steinbrener, Jan; Stier, Gunter; Strüder, Lothar; Svenda, Martin; Ullrich, Joachim; Weidenspointner, Georg; White, Thomas A; Wunderer, Cornelia; Ourmazd, Abbas

    2011-08-15

    Single-particle experiments using X-ray Free Electron Lasers produce more than 10(5) snapshots per hour, consisting of an admixture of blank shots (no particle intercepted), and exposures of one or more particles. Experimental data sets also often contain unintentional contamination with different species. We present an unsupervised method able to sort experimental snapshots without recourse to templates, specific noise models, or user-directed learning. The results show 90% agreement with manual classification. PMID:21935018

  5. Revelations of X-ray spectral analysis of the enigmatic black hole binary GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peris, Charith; Remillard, Ronald A.; Steiner, James; Dil Vrtilek, Saeqa; Varniere, Peggy; Rodriguez, Jerome; Pooley, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Of the black hole binaries discovered thus far, GRS 1915+105 stands out as an exceptional source primarily due to its wild X-ray variability, the diversity of which has not been replicated in any other stellar-mass black hole. Although extreme variability is commonplace in its light-curve, about half of the observations of GRS1915+105 show fairly steady X-ray intensity. We report on the X-ray spectral behavior within these steady observations. Our work is based on a vast RXTE/PCA data set obtained on GRS 1915+105 during the course of its entire mission and 10 years of radio data from the Ryle Telescope, which overlap the X-ray data. We find that the steady observations within the X-ray data set naturally separate into two regions in a color-color diagram, which we refer to as steady-soft and steady-hard. GRS 1915+105 displays significant curvature in the Comptonization component within the PCA band pass suggesting significantly heating from a hot disk present in all states. A new Comptonization model 'simplcut' was developed in order to model this curvature to best effect. A majority of the steady-soft observations display a roughly constant inner radius; remarkably reminiscent of canonical soft state black hole binaries. In contrast, the steady-hard observations display a growing disk truncation that is correlated to the mass accretion rate through the disk, which suggests a magnetically truncated disk. A comparison of X-ray model parameters to the canonical state definitions show that almost all steady-soft observations match the criteria of either thermal or steep power law state, while the thermal state observations dominate the constant radius branch. A large portion (80%) of the steady-hard observations matches the hard state criteria when the disk fraction constraint is neglected. These results suggest that within the complexity of this source is a simpler underlying basis of states, which map to those observed in canonical black hole binaries. When

  6. High-Resolution Soft X-Ray Spectral Analysis in the CK Region of Titanium Carbide (TiC) using the DV-X alpha Molecular Orbital Method

    SciTech Connect

    Shimomura, Kenta; Muramatsu, Yasuji; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2008-10-31

    We used the DV-X alpha method to analyze the high-resolution soft X-ray emission and absorption spectra in the CK region of titanium carbide (TiC). The spectral profiles of the X-ray emission and absorption can be ssuscfucelly reproduced by the occupied and unoccupied density of states (DOS ), respectively, in the C2p orbitals of the center carbon atoms in a Ti62C63 cluster model, suggesting that the center carbon atom in a large cluster model expanded to the cubic-structured 53 (= 125) atoms provides sufficient DOS for the X-ray spectral analysis of rock-salt structured metal carbides.

  7. A beam branching method for timing and spectral characterization of hard X-ray free-electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Owada, Shigeki; Togashi, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Karvinen, Petri; Vartiainen, Ismo; Eronen, Anni; David, Christian; Sato, Takahiro; Nakajima, Kyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-01-01

    We report a method for achieving advanced photon diagnostics of x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) under a quasi-noninvasive condition by using a beam-splitting scheme. Here, we used a transmission grating to generate multiple branches of x-ray beams. One of the two primary diffracted branches (+1st-order) is utilized for spectral measurement in a dispersive scheme, while the other (−1st-order) is dedicated for arrival timing diagnostics between the XFEL and the optical laser pulses. The transmitted x-ray beam (0th-order) is guided to an experimental station. To confirm the validity of this timing-monitoring scheme, we measured the correlation between the arrival timings of the −1st and 0th branches. The observed error was as small as 7.0 fs in root-mean-square. Our result showed the applicability of the beam branching scheme to advanced photon diagnostics, which will further enhance experimental capabilities of XFEL. PMID:26958586

  8. A beam branching method for timing and spectral characterization of hard X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Owada, Shigeki; Togashi, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Karvinen, Petri; Vartiainen, Ismo; Eronen, Anni; David, Christian; Sato, Takahiro; Nakajima, Kyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-05-01

    We report a method for achieving advanced photon diagnostics of x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) under a quasi-noninvasive condition by using a beam-splitting scheme. Here, we used a transmission grating to generate multiple branches of x-ray beams. One of the two primary diffracted branches (+1st-order) is utilized for spectral measurement in a dispersive scheme, while the other (-1st-order) is dedicated for arrival timing diagnostics between the XFEL and the optical laser pulses. The transmitted x-ray beam (0th-order) is guided to an experimental station. To confirm the validity of this timing-monitoring scheme, we measured the correlation between the arrival timings of the -1st and 0th branches. The observed error was as small as 7.0 fs in root-mean-square. Our result showed the applicability of the beam branching scheme to advanced photon diagnostics, which will further enhance experimental capabilities of XFEL.

  9. The 2005 Accretion Outburst in V1118 Ori: Evidence for A Spectral Change in X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audard, M.; Güdel, M.; Skinner, S. L.; Briggs, K. R.; Walter, F. M.; Stringfellow, G.; Hamilton, R. T.; Guinan, E. F.

    2005-12-01

    We present results from our X-ray monitoring campaign of the 2005 accretion outburst in the young low-mass star V1118 Ori. Optical and near-infrared photometry are presented as well. The X-ray data from early 2005 indicate that the X-ray flux and luminosity varied within a factor of two only, and were similar to the pre-outburst values measured in a serendipitous observation in 2002. Similarly, the hydrogen column density showed no evidence for significant excursions from the pre-outburst value of a few times 1021 cm-2. However, we observed a spectral change from a dominant hot plasma ( ˜ 25 MK) in 2002 and in January 2005 to a cooler plasma ( ˜ 8 MK) in February and March 2005. We argue that the closing in of the accretion disk during the outburst disrupted the hot magnetic loops high in the corona, whereas the lower cooler loops were less affected and became the dominant coronal component. We acknowledge support by NASA through Chandra award DD5-6029X and through XMM-Newton award NNG05GI96G to Columbia University. The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the NASA under contract NAS8-03060. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA. The PSI group acknowledges support from the Swiss National Science Foundation (grants 20-58827.99 and 20-66875.01). Stony Brook's participation in SMARTS is made possible by support from the offices of the Provost and the Vice President for Research. We thank J. Allyn Smith, P. McGehee, J. Espinoza, and D. Gonzalez for doing the observations with the SMARTS telescopes. We also thank H. Tannanbaum, N. Schartel, and the VLA TOO panel for granting time to observe V1118 Ori.

  10. Numerical Solution of the Radiative Transfer Equation: X-Ray Spectral Formation from Cylindrical Accretion onto a Magnetized Neutron Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairnelli, R.; Ceccobello, C.; Romano, P.; Titarchuk, L.

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the emerging X-ray spectra in several astrophysical objects is of great importance, in particular when the observational data are compared with theoretical models. This requires developing numerical routines for the solution of the radiative transfer equation according to the expected physical conditions of the systems under study. Aims. We have developed an algorithm solving the radiative transfer equation in the Fokker-Planck approximation when both thermal and bulk Comptonization take place. The algorithm is essentially a relaxation method, where stable solutions are obtained when the system has reached its steady-state equilibrium. Methods. We obtained the solution of the radiative transfer equation in the two-dimensional domain defined by the photon energy E and optical depth of the system pi using finite-differences for the partial derivatives, and imposing specific boundary conditions for the solutions. We treated the case of cylindrical accretion onto a magnetized neutron star. Results. We considered a blackbody seed spectrum of photons with exponential distribution across the accretion column and for an accretion where the velocity reaches its maximum at the stellar surface and at the top of the accretion column, respectively. In both cases higher values of the electron temperature and of the optical depth pi produce flatter and harder spectra. Other parameters contributing to the spectral formation are the steepness of the vertical velocity profile, the albedo at the star surface, and the radius of the accretion column. The latter parameter modifies the emerging spectra in a specular way for the two assumed accretion profiles. Conclusions. The algorithm has been implemented in the XPEC package for X-ray fitting and is specifically dedicated to the physical framework of accretion at the polar cap of a neutron star with a high magnetic field (approx > 10(exp 12) G). This latter case is expected to be of typical accreting systems such as X-ray

  11. High-resolution single-shot spectral monitoring of hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Makita, M.; Karvinen, P.; Zhu, D.; Juranic, P. N.; Grünert, J.; Cartier, S.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Lemke, H. T.; Mozzanica, A.; Nelson, S.; et al

    2015-10-16

    We have developed an on-line spectrometer for hard x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation based on a nanostructured diamond diffraction grating and a bent crystal analyzer. Our method provides high spectral resolution, interferes negligibly with the XFEL beam, and can withstand the intense hard x-ray pulses at high repetition rates of >100 Hz. The spectrometer is capable of providing shot-to-shot spectral information for the normalization of data obtained in scientific experiments and optimization of the accelerator operation parameters. We have demonstrated these capabilities of the setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source, in self-amplified spontaneous emission mode at full energy ofmore » >1 mJ with a 120 Hz repetition rate, obtaining a resolving power of Ε/δΕ > 3 × 104. In conclusion, the device was also used to monitor the effects of pulse duration down to 8 fs by analysis of the spectral spike width.« less

  12. Temporal behavior of unresolved transition array emission in water window soft x-ray spectral region from multiply charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Nishikino, Masaharu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    We have characterized the spectral structure and the temporal history of the laser-produced high-Z multi-charged ion plasmas for the efficient water window soft x-ray sources. Strong unresolved transition array emission was observed due to 4d-4f and 4f-5g transitions from Au, Pb, and Bi plasmas in the 280-700 eV photon energy region. The temporal behavior of the emission was essentially similar of that of the laser pulse with a slight delay between different transitions. These results provide feedback for accurate modeling of the atomic processes with the radiative hydrodynamic simulations.

  13. X-ray spectral diagnostics of laser harmonic generation in the interaction of relativistic femtosecond laser pulses with clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faenov, A. Ya; Oks, E.; Dalimier, E.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Pikuz, S. A.; Pikuz, T. A.; Zhvaniya, I. A.; Fukuda, Y.; Andreev, A.; Koga, J.; Sakaki, H.; Kotaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Hayashi, Y.; Kawachi, T.; Kando, M.; Kondo, K.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Kodama, R.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that the production of X-ray emission spectra in the interaction of high-intensity laser radiation with cluster targets may be affected by the bichromatic oscillating electric field arising from the generation of the second harmonic of laser radiation. A technique is proposed for diagnosing harmonic generation in laser - cluster interactions using the spectral line profiles of multiply charged helium ions. The efficiency of second harmonic generation at a laser intensity of 3 × 1018 W cm-2 is shown to amount to about 2%.

  14. Application of maximum-entropy spectral estimation to deconvolution of XPS data. [X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Klein, J. D.; Barton, J. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison is made between maximum-entropy spectral estimation and traditional methods of deconvolution used in electron spectroscopy. The maximum-entropy method is found to have higher resolution-enhancement capabilities and, if the broadening function is known, can be used with no adjustable parameters with a high degree of reliability. The method and its use in practice are briefly described, and a criterion is given for choosing the optimal order for the prediction filter based on the prediction-error power sequence. The method is demonstrated on a test case and applied to X-ray photoelectron spectra.

  15. Temporal behavior of unresolved transition array emission in water window soft x-ray spectral region from multiply charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, Thanh-Hung Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Nishikino, Masaharu

    2015-09-21

    We have characterized the spectral structure and the temporal history of the laser-produced high-Z multi-charged ion plasmas for the efficient water window soft x-ray sources. Strong unresolved transition array emission was observed due to 4d–4f and 4f–5g transitions from Au, Pb, and Bi plasmas in the 280–700 eV photon energy region. The temporal behavior of the emission was essentially similar of that of the laser pulse with a slight delay between different transitions. These results provide feedback for accurate modeling of the atomic processes with the radiative hydrodynamic simulations.

  16. Monte Carlo comparison of x-ray and proton CT for range calculations of proton therapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbor, N.; Dauvergne, D.; Dedes, G.; Létang, J. M.; Parodi, K.; Quiñones, C. T.; Testa, E.; Rit, S.

    2015-10-01

    Proton computed tomography (CT) has been described as a solution for imaging the proton stopping power of patient tissues, therefore reducing the uncertainty of the conversion of x-ray CT images to relative stopping power (RSP) maps and its associated margins. This study aimed to investigate this assertion under the assumption of ideal detection systems. We have developed a Monte Carlo framework to assess proton CT performances for the main steps of a proton therapy treatment planning, i.e. proton or x-ray CT imaging, conversion to RSP maps based on the calibration of a tissue phantom, and proton dose simulations. Irradiations of a computational phantom with pencil beams were simulated on various anatomical sites and the proton range was assessed on the reference, the proton CT-based and the x-ray CT-based material maps. Errors on the tissue’s RSP reconstructed from proton CT were found to be significantly smaller and less dependent on the tissue distribution. The imaging dose was also found to be much more uniform and conformal to the primary beam. The mean absolute deviation for range calculations based on x-ray CT varies from 0.18 to 2.01 mm depending on the localization, while it is smaller than 0.1 mm for proton CT. Under the assumption of a perfect detection system, proton range predictions based on proton CT are therefore both more accurate and more uniform than those based on x-ray CT.

  17. Spectral Modeling of the Charge-exchange X-Ray Emission from M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuinai; Wang, Q. Daniel; Ji, Li; Smith, Randall K.; Foster, Adam R.; Zhou, Xin

    2014-10-01

    It has been proposed that the charge-exchange (CX) process at the interface between hot and cool interstellar gases could contribute significantly to the observed soft X-ray emission in star-forming galaxies. We analyze the XMM-Newton/reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) spectrum of M82 using a newly developed CX model combined with a single-temperature thermal plasma to characterize the volume-filling hot gas. The CX process is largely responsible for not only the strongly enhanced forbidden lines of the Kα triplets of various He-like ions but also good fractions of the Lyα transitions of C VI (~87%), O VIII, and N VII (gsim50%) as well. In total about a quarter of the X-ray flux in the RGS 6-30 Å band originates in the CX. We infer an ion incident rate of 3 × 1051 s-1 undergoing CX at the hot and cool gas interface and an effective area of the interface of ~2 × 1045 cm2 that is one order of magnitude larger than the cross section of the global biconic outflow. With the CX contribution accounted for, the best-fit temperature of the hot gas is 0.6 keV, and the metal abundances are approximately solar. We further show that the same CX/thermal plasma model also gives an excellent description of the EPIC-pn spectrum of the outflow Cap, projected at 11.6 kpc away from the galactic disk of M82. This analysis demonstrates that the CX is potentially an important contributor to the X-ray emission from starburst galaxies and also an invaluable tool to probe the interface astrophysics.

  18. Spectral modeling of the charge-exchange X-ray emission from M82

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuinai; Ji, Li; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Q. Daniel; Smith, Randall K.; Foster, Adam R.

    2014-10-10

    It has been proposed that the charge-exchange (CX) process at the interface between hot and cool interstellar gases could contribute significantly to the observed soft X-ray emission in star-forming galaxies. We analyze the XMM-Newton/reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) spectrum of M82 using a newly developed CX model combined with a single-temperature thermal plasma to characterize the volume-filling hot gas. The CX process is largely responsible for not only the strongly enhanced forbidden lines of the Kα triplets of various He-like ions but also good fractions of the Lyα transitions of C VI (∼87%), O VIII, and N VII (≳50%) as well. In total about a quarter of the X-ray flux in the RGS 6-30 Å band originates in the CX. We infer an ion incident rate of 3 × 10{sup 51} s{sup –1} undergoing CX at the hot and cool gas interface and an effective area of the interface of ∼2 × 10{sup 45} cm{sup 2} that is one order of magnitude larger than the cross section of the global biconic outflow. With the CX contribution accounted for, the best-fit temperature of the hot gas is 0.6 keV, and the metal abundances are approximately solar. We further show that the same CX/thermal plasma model also gives an excellent description of the EPIC-pn spectrum of the outflow Cap, projected at 11.6 kpc away from the galactic disk of M82. This analysis demonstrates that the CX is potentially an important contributor to the X-ray emission from starburst galaxies and also an invaluable tool to probe the interface astrophysics.

  19. Polycrystalline lead iodide films produced by solution evaporation and tested in the mammography X-ray energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condeles, J. F.; Mulato, M.

    2016-02-01

    Lead iodide polycrystalline films have been deposited on corning glass substrates using solution evaporation in oven. Films 6 μm-thick were obtained with full coverage of the substrates as verified by scanning electron microscopy. Some pin-holes were observable. X-ray diffraction revealed a crystalline structure corresponding to the 4 H-PbI2 polytype formation. Polarized Raman scattering experiments indicated a lamellar structure. Anisotropy was also investigated using depolarization ratio calculations. The optical and electrical properties of the samples were investigated using photoluminescence and dark conductivity as a function of temperature, respectively. Activation energies of 0.10 up to 0.89 eV were related to two main electrical transport mechanisms. Films were also exposed to X-ray irradiation in the mammography X-ray energy range. The detector produced was also exposed to X-ray from 5 mR up to 1450 mR. A linear response was observed as a function of dose with a slope of 0.52 nA/mm2 per mR.

  20. X-ray absorption spectral studies of copper (II) mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, B.; Dar, Davood Ah; Shrivastava, B. D.; Prasad, J.; Srivastava, K.

    2014-09-01

    X-ray absorption spectra at the K-edge of copper have been studied in two copper mixed ligand complexes, one having tetramethyethylenediamine (tmen) and the other having tetraethyethylenediamine (teen) as one of the ligands. The spectra have been recorded at BL-8 dispersive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) beamline at the 2.5 GeV INDUS- 2 synchrotron, RRCAT, Indore, India. The data obtained has been processed using the data analysis program Athena. The energy of the K-absorption edge, chemical shift, edge-width and shift of the principal absorption maximum in the complexes have been determined and discussed. The values of these parameters have been found to be approximately the same in both the complexes indicating that the two complexes possess similar chemical environment around the copper metal atom. The chemical shift has been utilized to estimate effective nuclear charge on the absorbing atom. The normalized EXAFS spectra have been Fourier transformed. The position of the first peak in the Fourier transform gives the value of first shell bond length, which is shorter than the actual bond length because of energy dependence of the phase factors in the sine function of the EXAFS equation. This distance is thus the phase- uncorrected bond length. Bond length has also been determined by Levy's, Lytle's and Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) methods. The results obtained from LSS and the Fourier transformation methods are comparable with each other, since both are phase uncorrected bond lengths.

  1. X-ray dual energy spectral parameter optimization for bone Calcium/Phosphorus mass ratio estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulou, P. I.; Fountos, G. P.; Martini, N. D.; Koukou, V. N.; Michail, C. M.; Valais, I. G.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Nikiforidis, G. C.

    2015-09-01

    Calcium (Ca) and Phosphorus (P) bone mass ratio has been identified as an important, yet underutilized, risk factor in osteoporosis diagnosis. The purpose of this simulation study is to investigate the use of effective or mean mass attenuation coefficient in Ca/P mass ratio estimation with the use of a dual-energy method. The investigation was based on the minimization of the accuracy of Ca/P ratio, with respect to the Coefficient of Variation of the ratio. Different set-ups were examined, based on the K-edge filtering technique and single X-ray exposure. The modified X-ray output was attenuated by various Ca/P mass ratios resulting in nine calibration points, while keeping constant the total bone thickness. The simulated data were obtained considering a photon counting energy discriminating detector. The standard deviation of the residuals was used to compare and evaluate the accuracy between the different dual energy set-ups. The optimum mass attenuation coefficient for the Ca/P mass ratio estimation was the effective coefficient in all the examined set-ups. The variation of the residuals between the different set-ups was not significant.

  2. Measurement of high-dynamic range x-ray Thomson scattering spectra for the characterization of nano-plasmas at LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, M. J.; Gorkhover, T.; Bachmann, B.; Bucher, M.; Carron, S.; Coffee, R. N.; Drake, R. P.; Ferguson, K. R.; Fletcher, L. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Göde, S.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Kraus, D.; Krzywinski, J.; Levitan, A. L.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; O'Grady, C. P.; Osipov, T.; Pardini, T.; Peltz, C.; Skruszewicz, S.; Swiggers, M.; Bostedt, C.; Fennel, T.; Döppner, T.

    2016-11-01

    Atomic clusters can serve as ideal model systems for exploring ultrafast (˜100 fs) laser-driven ionization dynamics of dense matter on the nanometer scale. Resonant absorption of optical laser pulses enables heating to temperatures on the order of 1 keV at near solid density conditions. To date, direct probing of transient states of such nano-plasmas was limited to coherent x-ray imaging. Here we present the first measurement of spectrally resolved incoherent x-ray scattering from clusters, enabling measurements of transient temperature, densities, and ionization. Single shot x-ray Thomson scattering signals were recorded at 120 Hz using a crystal spectrometer in combination with a single-photon counting and energy-dispersive pnCCD. A precise pump laser collimation scheme enabled recording near background-free scattering spectra from Ar clusters with an unprecedented dynamic range of more than 3 orders of magnitude. Such measurements are important for understanding collective effects in laser-matter interactions on femtosecond time scales, opening new routes for the development of schemes for their ultrafast control.

  3. EVIDENCE FOR THE FULL HARD X-RAY SPECTRAL SIGNATURE OF NONUNIFORM IONIZATION IN A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yang; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R. E-mail: gordon.d.holman@nasa.gov

    2011-04-20

    The hard X-ray (HXR) emission from solar flares is observed primarily from the footpoints of flare magnetic loops, where nonthermal electrons are understood to emit thick-target bremsstrahlung as they stream from the fully ionized hot corona to the denser, cooler, and partially ionized chromosphere. The change in the plasma ionization along the path of the electrons should result in a characteristic upward break and corresponding flattening of the X-ray spectrum with increasing energy at lower energies, and a downward break at higher energies. Due to the presence of thermal emission, the upward break usually cannot be observed. We report the first evidence for both breaks in spectra measured with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) during the GOES X1.2 class flare that happened on 2002 October 31. The RHESSI X-ray spectral analysis shows both the breakup at {approx}49 keV and the breakdown at {approx}134 keV at the HXR peak time. The time evolution of both breaks also agrees with the nonuniform ionization (NUI) model. Other possible explanations for the breaks are considered, but the NUI model provides the simplest explanation for the spectral shape and its time evolution. We find that the average column density of the fully ionized plasma changed from 2 x10{sup 19} cm{sup -2} in the rise phase to 7 x10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} after the peak. This indicates that plasma in the target was heated and became ionized during the flare, in agreement with heating by the nonthermal electrons and chromospheric evaporation expected in the collisional thick-target model.

  4. Correlations between X-Ray Spectral Characteristics and Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in Scorpius X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Charles F.; Titarchuk, Lev; Kuznetsov, Sergey

    2007-07-01

    Correlations between 1-10 Hz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and spectral power-law index have been reported for black hole (BH) candidate sources and one neutron star source, 4U 1728-34. An examination of QPO frequency and index relationships in Sco X-1 is reported here. We discover that Sco X-1, representing Z-source groups, can be adequately modeled by a simple two-component model of Compton up-scattering with a soft photon electron temperature of about 0.4 keV, plus an Iron K line. The results show a strong correlation between spectral power-law index and kHz QPOs. Because Sco X-1 radiates near the Eddington limit, one can infer that the geometrical configuration of the Compton cloud (CC) is quasi-spherical from high radiation pressure in the CC. Thus, we conclude that the high Thomson optical depth of the Compton cloud, in the range of ~5-6 from the best-fit model parameters, is consistent with the neutron star's surface being obscured by material. Moreover, a spin frequency of Sco X-1 is likely suppressed due to photon scattering off CC electrons. In addition, we demonstrate how the power spectrum evolves when Sco X-1 transitions from the horizontal branch to the normal branch.

  5. Learning to Apply Metrology Principles to the Measurement of X-ray Intensities in the 500 eV to 110 keV Energy Range

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J.; Pond, T.; Silbernagel, C.; Torres, P.; Marlett, K.; Goldin, F.; Cyr, S.

    2011-02-08

    National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Livermore Operations, has two optical radiation calibration laboratories accredited by “the National Voluntary Laboratories Accreditation Program (NVLAP) which is the accrediting body of” the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and is now working towards accreditation for its X-ray laboratories. NSTec operates several laboratories with X-ray sources that generate X-rays in the energy range from 50 eV to 115 keV. These X-ray sources are used to characterize and calibrate diagnostics and diagnostic components used by the various national laboratories, particularly for plasma analysis on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF). Because X-ray photon flux measurement methods that can be accredited, i.e., traceable to NIST, have not been developed for sources operating in these energy ranges, NSTec, NIST, and the National Voluntary Accreditation Program (NVLAP) together have defined a path toward the development and validation of accredited metrology methods for X-ray energies. The methodology developed for the high energy X-ray (HEX) Laboratory was NSTec’s starting point for X-ray metrology accreditation and will be the basis for the accredited processes in the other X-ray laboratories. This paper will serve as a teaching tool, by way of this example using the NSTec X-ray sources, for the process and methods used in developing an accredited traceable metrology.

  6. Mcps-range photon-counting x-ray computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Sugimura, Shigeaki; Endo, Haruyuki; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2011-10-01

    10 Mcps photon counting was carried out using a detector consisting of a 2.0 mm-thick ZnO (zinc oxide) single-crystal scintillator and an MPPC (multipixel photon counter) module in an X-ray computed tomography (CT) system. The maximum count rate was 10 Mcps (mega counts per second) at a tube voltage of 70 kV and a tube current of 2.0 mA. Next, a photon-counting X-ray CT system consists of an X-ray generator, a turntable, a scan stage, a two-stage controller, the ZnO-MPPC detector, a counter card (CC), and a personal computer (PC). Tomography is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scan with a scan velocity of 25 mm/s. The pulses of the event signal from the module are counted by the CC in conjunction with the PC. The exposure time for obtaining a tomogram was 600 s at a scan step of 0.5 mm and a rotation step of 1.0°, and photon-counting CT was accomplished using iodine-based contrast media.

  7. BeppoSAX and RXTE Spectral Study of the Low-mass X-Ray Binary 4U 1705-44: Spectral Hardening during the Banana Branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev; Shrader, Chris; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the X-ray spectra of the atoll 4U 1705-44 when the source undergoes the island-banana state transition. We use the RXTE and BeppoSAX observations for this analysis. We demonstrate that the broadband energy spectral distributions for all evolutinary states can be fitted by a model consisting of two Comptonized components. One arises from the seed photons coming from a neutron star (NS) atmosphere at a temperature {{kT}}{{s}1}≲ 1.5 keV (herein Comptb1), and a second results from the seed photons of {T}{{s}2} ˜ 1.1-1.3 keV coming from the disk (herein Comptb2). We found that we needed to add a low-temperature blackbody and an iron-line (Gaussian) component to the model in order to obtain high-quality fits. The data analysis using this model indicates that the power-law photon index {{{Γ }}}1 of our model is always about 2, independently of the spectral state. Another parameter, {{{Γ }}}2, demonstrates a two-phase behavior depending on the spectral state. {{{Γ }}}2 is quasi-constant at {{{Γ }}}2˜ 2 when the electron temperature {{kT}}{{e}}(2)\\lt 80 keV, and {{{Γ }}}2 is less than 2, in the range of 1.3\\lt {{{Γ }}}2\\lt 2, when {{kT}}{{e}}(2)\\gt 80 keV. This phase is similar to that previously found in the Z-source Sco X-1. We interpret the decreasing index phase using a model in which a super-Eddington radiation pressure from the NS causes an expansion of the Compton cloud similar to that found previously in Sco X-1 during the Flaring branch.

  8. X-ray properties of K-selected galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.0: investigating trends with stellar mass, redshift and spectral type

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Therese M.; Kriek, Mariska; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Brammer, Gabriel; Franx, Marijn; Labbé, Ivo; Greene, Jenny E. E-mail: mkriek@berkeley.edu

    2014-03-01

    We examine how the total X-ray luminosity correlates with stellar mass, stellar population, and redshift for a K-band limited sample of ∼3500 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.0 from the NEWFIRM Medium Band Survey in the COSMOS field. The galaxy sample is divided into 32 different galaxy types, based on similarities between the spectral energy distributions. For each galaxy type, we further divide the sample into bins of redshift and stellar mass, and perform an X-ray stacking analysis using the Chandra COSMOS data. We find that full band X-ray luminosity is primarily increasing with stellar mass, and at similar mass and spectral type is higher at larger redshifts. When comparing at the same stellar mass, we find that the X-ray luminosity is slightly higher for younger galaxies (i.e., weaker 4000 Å breaks), but the scatter in this relation is large. We compare the observed X-ray luminosities to those expected from low- and high-mass X-ray binaries (XRBs). For blue galaxies, XRBs can almost fully account for the observed emission, while for older galaxies with larger 4000 Å breaks, active galactic nuclei (AGN) or hot gas dominate the measured X-ray flux. After correcting for XRBs, the X-ray luminosity is still slightly higher in younger galaxies, although this correlation is not significant. AGN appear to be a larger component of galaxy X-ray luminosity at earlier times, as the hardness ratio increases with redshift. Together with the slight increase in X-ray luminosity this may indicate more obscured AGNs or higher accretion rates at earlier times.

  9. Spectral analysis of x-ray emission created by intense laser irradiation of copper materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Malamud, G.; Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R.

    2012-10-15

    We have measured the x-ray emission, primarily from K{sub {alpha}},K{sub {beta}}, and He{sub {alpha}} lines, of elemental copper foil and 'foam' targets irradiated with a mid-10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulse. The copper foam at 0.1 times solid density is observed to produce 50% greater He{sub {alpha}} line emission than copper foil, and the measured signal is well-fit by a sum of three synthetic spectra generated by the atomic physics code FLYCHK. Additionally, spectra from both targets reveal characteristic inner shell K{sub {alpha}} transitions from hot electron interaction with the bulk copper. However, only the larger-volume foam target produced significant K{sub {beta}} radiation, confirming a lower bulk temperature in the higher volume sample.

  10. X-Ray Spectral Studies of AGN with the ASCA Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. Megan

    1999-01-01

    This project involved the interpretation of Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) observations of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), with emphasis on four different aspects of the AGN phenomenon: (1) Absorption by hot gas in blazars: This anomalous absorption was detected in several objects, notably the BL Lacertae (BL Lac) object 1426+428. (2) Separation of blazar and Seyfert components in superluminal radio galaxies and quasars: Both components were found in the radio galaxies samples, but with no clear trend in which dominates. (3) Detection of high energy Compton components in blazars: Both BL Lacs and quasars show hard X-ray spectra that represent the onset of the Compton-scattered gamma-ray component. (4) Correlation of X- and gamma-ray emission in blazars: Several multiwavelength monitoring campaigns showed a correlation between X- and gamma-rays in blazars.

  11. Warm Absorbers in X-rays (WAX), a comprehensive high resolution grating spectral study of a sample of Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, S.; Guainazzi, M.; Dewangan, G.; Chakravorty, S.; Kembhavi, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present results from a homogeneous analysis of the broadband 0.3-10 keV CCD resolution as well as of soft X-ray high-resolution grating spectra of a hard X-ray flux-limited sample of 26 Seyfert galaxies observed with XMM-Newton. We could put a strict lower limit on the detection fraction of 50%. We find a gap in the distribution of the ionisation parameter in the range 0.5X-rays. The WA parameters show no correlation among themselves, except for one case. The shallow slope of the logξ versus logv_{out} linear regression (0.12± 0.03) is inconsistent with the scaling laws predicted by radiation or magneto-hydrodynamic-driven winds. Our results suggest also that WA and Ultra Fast Outflows (UFOs) do not represent extreme manifestation of the same astrophysical system.

  12. Tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines: Unfiltered x-ray spectra from 20 kV to 640 kV

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Andrew M.; Boone, John M.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo methods were used to generate lightly filtered high resolution x-ray spectra spanning from 20 kV to 640 kV. Methods: X-ray spectra were simulated for a conventional tungsten anode. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended radiation transport code (MCNPX 2.6.0) was used to produce 35 spectra over the tube potential range from 20 kV to 640 kV, and cubic spline interpolation procedures were used to create piecewise polynomials characterizing the photon fluence per energy bin as a function of x-ray tube potential. Using these basis spectra and the cubic spline interpolation, 621 spectra were generated at 1 kV intervals from 20 to 640 kV. The tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines (TASMICS) produces minimally filtered (0.8 mm Be) x-ray spectra with 1 keV energy resolution. The TASMICS spectra were compared mathematically with other, previously reported spectra. Results: Using pairedt-test analyses, no statistically significant difference (i.e., p > 0.05) was observed between compared spectra over energy bins above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence. For all energy bins, the correlation of determination (R{sup 2}) demonstrated good correlation for all spectral comparisons. The mean overall difference (MOD) and mean absolute difference (MAD) were computed over energy bins (above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence) and over all the kV permutations compared. MOD and MAD comparisons with previously reported spectra were 2.7% and 9.7%, respectively (TASMIP), 0.1% and 12.0%, respectively [R. Birch and M. Marshall, “Computation of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectra and comparison with spectra measured with a Ge(Li) detector,” Phys. Med. Biol. 24, 505–517 (1979)], 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (Poludniowski), and 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (AAPM TG 195). The effective energy of TASMICS spectra with 2.5 mm of added Al filtration ranged from 17 keV (at 20 kV) to 138 keV (at 640 kV); with 0.2 mm of added Cu filtration the effective energy was 9

  13. Tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines: Unfiltered x-ray spectra from 20 kV to 640 kV

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Andrew M.; Boone, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo methods were used to generate lightly filtered high resolution x-ray spectra spanning from 20 kV to 640 kV. Methods: X-ray spectra were simulated for a conventional tungsten anode. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended radiation transport code (MCNPX 2.6.0) was used to produce 35 spectra over the tube potential range from 20 kV to 640 kV, and cubic spline interpolation procedures were used to create piecewise polynomials characterizing the photon fluence per energy bin as a function of x-ray tube potential. Using these basis spectra and the cubic spline interpolation, 621 spectra were generated at 1 kV intervals from 20 to 640 kV. The tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines (TASMICS) produces minimally filtered (0.8 mm Be) x-ray spectra with 1 keV energy resolution. The TASMICS spectra were compared mathematically with other, previously reported spectra. Results: Using paired t-test analyses, no statistically significant difference (i.e., p > 0.05) was observed between compared spectra over energy bins above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence. For all energy bins, the correlation of determination (R2) demonstrated good correlation for all spectral comparisons. The mean overall difference (MOD) and mean absolute difference (MAD) were computed over energy bins (above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence) and over all the kV permutations compared. MOD and MAD comparisons with previously reported spectra were 2.7% and 9.7%, respectively (TASMIP), 0.1% and 12.0%, respectively [R. Birch and M. Marshall, “Computation of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectra and comparison with spectra measured with a Ge(Li) detector,” Phys. Med. Biol. 24, 505–517 (1979)], 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (Poludniowski), and 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (AAPM TG 195). The effective energy of TASMICS spectra with 2.5 mm of added Al filtration ranged from 17 keV (at 20 kV) to 138 keV (at 640 kV); with 0.2 mm of added Cu filtration the effective energy was 9 ke

  14. Optical constants for hard x-ray multilayers over the energy range E = 35 - 180 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windt, David L.; Donguy, Soizik; Hailey, Charles J.; Koglin, Jason E.; Honkimaki, Veijo; Ziegler, Eric; Christensen, Finn E.; Harrison, Fiona A.

    2004-02-01

    We have determined experimentally optical constants for eight thin film materials that can be used in hard X-ray multilayer coatings. Thin film samples of Ni.97V.03, Mo, W, Pt, C, B4C, Si and SiC were deposited by magnetron sputtering onto superpolished optical flats. Optical constants were determined from fits to reflectance-vs-incidence angle measurements made using synchrotron radiation over the energy range E=35 180 keV. We have also measured the X-ray reflectance of a prototype W/SiC multilayer coating over the energy range E=35 100 keV, and we compare the measured reflectance with a calculation using the newly derived optical constants.

  15. X-ray spectral modelling of the AGN obscuring region in the CDFS: Bayesian model selection and catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, J.; Georgakakis, A.; Nandra, K.; Hsu, L.; Rangel, C.; Brightman, M.; Merloni, A.; Salvato, M.; Donley, J.; Kocevski, D.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Aims: Active galactic nuclei are known to have complex X-ray spectra that depend on both the properties of the accreting super-massive black hole (e.g. mass, accretion rate) and the distribution of obscuring material in its vicinity (i.e. the "torus"). Often however, simple and even unphysical models are adopted to represent the X-ray spectra of AGN, which do not capture the complexity and diversity of the observations. In the case of blank field surveys in particular, this should have an impact on e.g. the determination of the AGN luminosity function, the inferred accretion history of the Universe and also on our understanding of the relation between AGN and their host galaxies. Methods: We develop a Bayesian framework for model comparison and parameter estimation of X-ray spectra. We take into account uncertainties associated with both the Poisson nature of X-ray data and the determination of source redshift using photometric methods. We also demonstrate how Bayesian model comparison can be used to select among ten different physically motivated X-ray spectral models the one that provides a better representation of the observations. This methodology is applied to X-ray AGN in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South. Results: For the ~350 AGN in that field, our analysis identifies four components needed to represent the diversity of the observed X-ray spectra: (1) an intrinsic power law; (2) a cold obscurer which reprocesses the radiation due to photo-electric absorption, Compton scattering and Fe-K fluorescence; (3) an unabsorbed power law associated with Thomson scattering off ionised clouds; and (4) Compton reflection, most noticeable from a stronger-than-expected Fe-K line. Simpler models, such as a photo-electrically absorbed power law with a Thomson scattering component, are ruled out with decisive evidence (B > 100). We also find that ignoring the Thomson scattering component results in underestimation of the inferred column density, NH, of the obscurer

  16. Calibration of remote mineralogy algorithms using modal analyses of Apollo soils by X-ray diffraction and microscopic spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crites, S. T.; Taylor, J.; Martel, L.; Lucey, P. G.; Blake, D. F.

    2012-12-01

    We have launched a project to determine the modal mineralogy of over 100 soils from all Apollo sites using quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) and microscopic hyperspectral imaging at visible, near-IR and thermal IR wavelengths. The two methods are complementary: XRD is optimal for obtaining the major mineral modes because its measurement is not limited to the surfaces of grains, whereas the hyperspectral imaging method allows us to identify minerals present even down to a single grain, well below the quantitative detection limit of XRD. Each soil is also sent to RELAB to obtain visible, near-IR, and thermal-IR reflectance spectra. The goal is to use quantitative mineralogy in comparison with spectra of the same soils and with remote sensing data of the sampling stations to improve our ability to extract quantitative mineralogy from remote sensing observations. Previous groups have demonstrated methods for using lab mineralogy to validate remote sensing. The LSCC pioneered the method of comparing mineralogy to laboratory spectra of the same soils (Pieters et al. 2002); Blewett et al. (1997) directly compared remote sensing results for sample sites with lab measurements of representative soils from those sites. We are building upon the work of both groups by expanding the number of soils measured to 128, with an emphasis on immature soils to support recent work studying fresh exposures like crater central peaks, and also by incorporating the recent high spatial and spectral resolution data sets over expanded wavelength ranges (e.g. Diviner TIR, M3 hyperspectral VNIR) not available at the time of the previous studies. We have thus far measured 32 Apollo 16 soils using quantitative XRD and are continuing with our collection of soils from the other landing sites. We have developed a microscopic spectral imaging system that includes TIR, VIS, and NIR capabilities and have completed proof-of-concept scans of mineral separates and preliminary lunar soil scans with plans

  17. Characterizing the evolving X-ray spectral features during a superburst from 4U 1636-536

    SciTech Connect

    Keek, L.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Kuulkers, E.; Strohmayer, T. E.

    2014-07-10

    Recent studies have shown that runaway thermonuclear burning of material accreted onto neutron stars, i.e., Type I X-ray bursts, may affect the accretion disk. We investigate this by performing a detailed time-resolved spectral analysis of the superburst from 4U 1636-536 observed in 2001 with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer. Superbursts are attributed to the thermonuclear burning of carbon, and are approximately 1000 times more energetic than the regular short Type I bursts. This allows us to study detailed spectra for over 11 ks, compared to, at most, 100 s for regular bursts. A feature is present in the superburst spectra around 6.4 keV that is well fit with an emission line and an absorption edge, suggestive of reflection of the superburst off the accretion disk. The line and edge parameters evolve over time: the edge energy decreases from 9.4 keV at the peak to 8.1 keV in the tail, and both features become weaker in the tail. This is only the second superburst for which this has been detected and shows that this behavior is present even without strong radius expansion. Furthermore, we find the persistent flux more than doubles during the superburst and returns to the pre-superburst value in the tail. The combination of reflection features and increased persistent emission indicates that the superburst had a strong impact on the inner accretion disk and it emphasizes that X-ray bursts provide a unique probe of accretion physics.

  18. Long-term X-ray spectral variability in AGN from the Palomar sample observed by Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, S. D.; McHardy, I. M.; Skipper, C. J.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.

    2016-07-01

    We present X-ray spectral variability of 24 local active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the Palomar sample of nearby galaxies, as observed mainly by Swift. From hardness ratio measurements, we find that 18 AGN with low accretion rates show hardening with increasing count rate, converse to the softer-when-brighter behaviour normally observed in AGN with higher accretion rates. Two AGN show softening with increasing count rate, two show more complex behaviour, and two do not show any simple relationship. Sufficient data were available for the spectra of 13 AGN to be summed in flux-bins. In nine of these sources, correlated luminosity-dependent changes in the photon index (Γ) of a power-law component are found to be the main cause of hardness variability. For six objects, with a low accretion rate as a fraction of the Eddington rate (dot{m}_{Edd}), Γ is anticorrelated with dot{m}_{Edd}, i.e. `harder-when-brighter' behaviour is observed. The three higher dot{m}_{Edd}-rate objects show a positive correlation between Γ and dot{m}_{Edd}. This transition from harder-when-brighter at low dot{m}_{Edd}to softer-when-brighter at high dot{m}_{Edd} can be explained by a change in the dominant source of seed-photons for X-ray emission from cyclo-synchrotron emission from the Comptonizing corona itself to thermal seed-photons from the accretion disc. This transition is also seen in the `hard state' of black hole X-ray binaries (BHXRBs). The results support the idea that low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions are analogues of BHXRBs in the hard state and that Seyferts are analogues of BHXRBs in either the high-accretion rate end of the hard state or in the hard-intermediate state.

  19. Broad-band spectral analysis of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1748.9-2021

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintore, F.; Sanna, A.; Di Salvo, T.; Del Santo, M.; Riggio, A.; D'Aì, A.; Burderi, L.; Scarano, F.; Iaria, R.

    2016-04-01

    We analysed a 115-ks XMM-Newton observation and the stacking of 8 d of INTEGRAL observations, taken during the raise of the 2015 outburst of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1748.9-2021. The source showed numerous type-I burst episodes during the XMM-Newton observation, and for this reason we studied separately the persistent and burst epochs. We described the persistent emission with a combination of two soft thermal components, a cold thermal Comptonization component (˜2 keV) and an additional hard X-ray emission described by a power law (Γ ˜ 2.3). The continuum components can be associated with an accretion disc, the neutron star (NS) surface and a thermal Comptonization emission coming out of an optically thick plasma region, while the origin of the high-energy tail is still under debate. In addition, a number of broad (σ = 0.1-0.4 keV) emission features likely associated with reflection processes have been observed in the XMM-Newton data. The estimated 1.0-50 keV unabsorbed luminosity of the source is ˜5 × 1037 erg s-1, about 25 per cent of the Eddington limit assuming a 1.4 M⊙ NS. We suggest that the spectral properties of SAX J1748.9-2021 are consistent with a soft state, differently from many other accreting X-ray millisecond pulsars which are usually found in the hard state. Moreover, none of the observed type-I burst reached the Eddington luminosity. Assuming that the burst ignition and emission are produced above the whole NS surface, we estimate an NS radius of ˜7-8 km, consistent with previous results.

  20. Short-range order in amorphous SiO{sub x} by x ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, Yu. N.; Gritsenko, V. A.

    2011-07-01

    The Si 2p x ray photoelectron spectra of SiO{sub x} with a different composition of 0 {<=} x {<=} 2 have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The SiO{sub x} films were prepared by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition from SiH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O source at 750 deg. C. Neither random bonding nor random mixture models can adequately describe the structure of these compounds. The interpretation of the experimental results is discussed according to a large scale potential fluctuation due to the spatial variation of chemical composition in SiO{sub x}.

  1. Versatile high-repetition-rate phase-locked chopper system for fast timing experiments in the vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectral region.

    PubMed

    Plogmaker, Stefan; Linusson, Per; Eland, John H D; Baker, Neville; Johansson, Erik M J; Rensmo, Håkan; Feifel, Raimund; Siegbahn, Hans

    2012-01-01

    A novel light chopper system for fast timing experiments in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) and x-ray spectral region has been developed. It can be phase-locked and synchronized with a synchrotron radiation storage ring, accommodating repetition rates in the range of ~8 to ~120 kHz by choosing different sets of apertures and subharmonics of the ring frequency (MHz range). Also the opening time of the system can be varied from some nanoseconds to several microseconds to meet the needs of a broad range of applications. Adjusting these parameters, the device can be used either for the generation of single light pulses or pulse packages from a microwave driven, continuous He gas discharge lamp or from storage rings which are otherwise often considered as quasi-continuous light sources. This chopper can be utilized for many different kinds of experiments enabling, for example, unambiguous time-of-flight (TOF) multi-electron coincidence studies of atoms and molecules excited by a single light pulse as well as time-resolved visible laser pump x-ray probe electron spectroscopy of condensed matter in the valence and core level region.

  2. Versatile high-repetition-rate phase-locked chopper system for fast timing experiments in the vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectral region

    SciTech Connect

    Plogmaker, Stefan; Johansson, Erik M. J.; Rensmo, Haakan; Feifel, Raimund; Siegbahn, Hans; Linusson, Per; Eland, John H. D.; Baker, Neville

    2012-01-15

    A novel light chopper system for fast timing experiments in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) and x-ray spectral region has been developed. It can be phase-locked and synchronized with a synchrotron radiation storage ring, accommodating repetition rates in the range of {approx}8 to {approx}120 kHz by choosing different sets of apertures and subharmonics of the ring frequency (MHz range). Also the opening time of the system can be varied from some nanoseconds to several microseconds to meet the needs of a broad range of applications. Adjusting these parameters, the device can be used either for the generation of single light pulses or pulse packages from a microwave driven, continuous He gas discharge lamp or from storage rings which are otherwise often considered as quasi-continuous light sources. This chopper can be utilized for many different kinds of experiments enabling, for example, unambiguous time-of-flight (TOF) multi-electron coincidence studies of atoms and molecules excited by a single light pulse as well as time-resolved visible laser pump x-ray probe electron spectroscopy of condensed matter in the valence and core level region.

  3. Energy dependence of photon-induced Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-sections for some elements with 42≤Z≤68 in the energy range 38-80 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seven, Sabriye; Erdoğan, Hasan

    2015-12-01

    The energy dependence of photon-induced Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-sections for Mo, Ru, Pd, In, Sb, Cs, La, Pr, Sm, Tb and Er elements has been studied in the energy range of 38-80 keV with secondary excitation method. K x-ray intensities were measured using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometry. The measurements have been made by observing the x-ray emissions, with the help of HPGe detector coupled with a multichannel analyzer. The areas of the Kα and Kβ spectral peaks, as well as the net peak areas, have been determined by a fitting process. The measured Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-sections have been compared with calculated theoretical values in this energy regime. The results have been plotted versus excitation energy. The present experimental Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-section values for all the elements were in general agreement with the theoretical values calculated using photoionization cross-sections, fluorescence yields and fractional rates based on Hartree-Slater potentials.

  4. On the Nature of the mHz X-Ray QPOs from ULX M82 X-1: Evidence for Timing-Spectral (anti) Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1 we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its energy spectral power-law index. These quantities are known to correlate in stellar mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibiting Type-C QPOs (approx 0.2-15 Hz). The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of its mHz QPOs as Type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of Type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling and identify observations in which M82 X-1 was at least as bright as source 5. Using only those observations, we detect QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which the energy spectral power-law index varied from 1.7-2.2. Interestingly, we find evidence for an anti-correlation (Pearsons correlation coefficient = -0.95) between the power-law index and the QPO centroid frequency. While such an anti-correlation is observed in StMBHs at high Type-C QPO frequencies (approx 5-15 Hz), the frequency range over which it holds in StMBHs is significantly smaller (factor of approx 1.5-3) than the QPO range reported here from M82 X-1 (factor of 6). However, it remains possible that contamination from source 5 can bias our result. Joint Chandra/XMM-Newton observations in the future can resolve this problem and confirm the timing-spectral anti-correlation reported here.

  5. A Broad-band Spectral and Timing Study of the X-Ray Binary System Centaurus X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audley, Michael Damian

    1998-01-01

    This dissertation describes a multi-mission investigation of the high mass X-ray binary pulsar Centaurus X-3. Cen X-3 was observed with the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT) in December 1990. This was the first high-resolution solid state X-ray spectrometer to cover the iron K fluorescence region. The Fe K emission feature was resolved into two components for the first time. A broad 6.7 keV feature was found to be a blend of lines from Fe XXI-Fe XXVI with energies ranging from 6.6 to 6.9 keV due to photoionization of the companion's stellar wind. A narrow line at 6.4 keV due to fluorescence of iron in relatively low ionization states was also found. The quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) at about 40 mHz were used to estimate the surface magnetic field of Cen X-3 as approx. 2.6 x 10(exp 12) G and to predict that there should be a cyclotron scattering resonance absorption feature (CSRF) near 30 keV. In order to further resolve the iron line complex and to investigate the pulse-phase dependence of the iron line intensities, Cen X-3 was observed with the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA). Using ASCA's state-of-the-art non-dispersive X-ray spectrometers the 6.4 keV fluorescent iron line was found to be pulsing while the intensities of the 6.7 and 6.9 keV recombination lines do not vary with pulse phase. This confirms that the 6.4 keV line is due to reflection by relatively neutral matter close to the neutron star while the recombination lines originate in the extended stellar wind. The continuum spectrum was found to be modified by reflection from matter close to the neutron star. Observations with the EXOSAT GSPC were used to search for a CSRF. The EXOSAT spectra were consistent with the presence of a CSRF but an unambiguous detection was not possible because of a lack of sensitivity at energies higher than the cyclotron energy. Cen X-3 was then observed with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and evidence for a CSRF at 25.1 +/- 0.3 keV was

  6. SU-E-T-301: Spectral Comparison of the Xoft and Zeiss 50 KVp X-Ray Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, L; Rusch, T; Holt, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare x-ray spectra of the 50 kVp Xoft Axxent™ and Zeiss INTRABEAM™ x-ray sources after filtration by saline-filled balloons applicators or spherical polymer applicators, respectively. Methods: Measurements were made for 3.5, 4.0 and 5.0 cm diameter applicators using an AmpTek model XR-100T-CdTe cadmium telluride spectrometer with 100 μm diameter collimating aperture and model PX4 digital pulse processor. Spectra were then corrected for escape processes using AmpTek XRF-FP Escape software. Both Axxent and INTRABEAM sources were operated at 50 kV and 40 μA to eliminate pulse saturation. The balloon or spherical applicator was placed in a centering fixture in contact with the collimator cap. The distance through the collimator housing from the applicator surface to the spectrometer's beryllium entrance window was nominally 52mm. Approximately 500,000 counts were collected for each spectrum. Results: Measured spectra in all cases had a broad Bremsstrahlung continuum with subtle differences in characteristic low energy x-rays lines from the different materials used for the anode thin films and substrates. After corrections for escape events average energies were calculated for spectra emerging from applicators. The average energies were 28.2 ±0.3 keV, 29.0±0.7 keV, and 31.7±0.9 keV for the 3.5, 4.0 and 5.0 cm diameter applicators, respectively. Differences in average energies ranged from 2.0 to 5.6% for these diameters. The mean energies of the spectra are more dependent on balloon size than on the delivery system used. Conclusion: Energy spectra at the surfaces of 3.5, 4.0 and 5.0 cm diameter applicators were measured for the Axxent and INTRABEAM x-ray systems were using a Cd-Te spectrometer. The average energies of the two x-ray systems for comparable applicator sizes were within 5.6%, and as little as 0.6 keV difference for the smaller applicator size. Research sponsored by Xoft, a subsidiary of ICAD.

  7. High quality x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements with long energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X.; Newville, M.; Prakapenka, V.B.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    2009-07-31

    We describe an approach for acquiring high quality x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy spectra with wide energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC). Overcoming the serious interference of diamond Bragg peaks is essential for combining XAFS and DAC techniques in high pressure research, yet an effective method to obtain accurate XAFS spectrum free from DAC induced glitches has been lacking. It was found that these glitches, whose energy positions are very sensitive to the relative orientation between DAC and incident x-ray beam, can be effectively eliminated using an iterative algorithm based on repeated measurements over a small angular range of DAC orientation, e.g., within {+-}3{sup o} relative to the x-ray beam direction. Demonstration XAFS spectra are reported for rutile-type GeO{sub 2} recorded by traditional ambient pressure and high pressure DAC methods, showing similar quality at 440 eV above the absorption edge. Accurate XAFS spectra of GeO{sub 2} glass were obtained at high pressure up to 53 GPa, providing important insight into the structural polymorphism of GeO{sub 2} glass at high pressure. This method is expected be applicable for in situ XAFS measurements using a diamond anvil cell up to ultrahigh pressures.

  8. High quality x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements with long energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xinguo; Newville, Matthew; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Rivers, Mark L.; Sutton, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    We describe an approach for acquiring high quality x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy spectra with wide energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC). Overcoming the serious interference of diamond Bragg peaks is essential for combining XAFS and DAC techniques in high pressure research, yet an effective method to obtain accurate XAFS spectrum free from DAC induced glitches has been lacking. It was found that these glitches, whose energy positions are very sensitive to the relative orientation between DAC and incident x-ray beam, can be effectively eliminated using an iterative algorithm based on repeated measurements over a small angular range of DAC orientation, e.g., within ±3° relative to the x-ray beam direction. Demonstration XAFS spectra are reported for rutile-type GeO2 recorded by traditional ambient pressure and high pressure DAC methods, showing similar quality at 440 eV above the absorption edge. Accurate XAFS spectra of GeO2 glass were obtained at high pressure up to 53 GPa, providing important insight into the structural polymorphism of GeO2 glass at high pressure. This method is expected be applicable for in situ XAFS measurements using a diamond anvil cell up to ultrahigh pressures. PMID:19655966

  9. Multiple-view spectrally resolved x-ray imaging observations of polar-direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, R. C.; Johns, H. M.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Nagayama, T.; Hsu, S. C.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Cobble, J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Bradley, P. A.; Hakel, P.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Tregillis, I. L.; Wysocki, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    We present spatially, temporally, and spectrally resolved narrow- and broad-band x-ray images of polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on OMEGA. These self-emission images were obtained during the deceleration phase and bang time using several multiple monochromatic x-ray imaging instruments fielded along two or three quasi-orthogonal lines-of-sight, including equatorial and polar views. The instruments recorded images based on K-shell lines from a titanium tracer located in the shell as well as continuum emission. These observations constitute the first such data obtained for PDD implosions. The image data show features attributed to laser imprinting and zero-order hydrodynamics. Equatorial-view images show a "double bun" structure that is consistent with synthetic images obtained from post-processing 2D and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment. Polar-view images show a pentagonal, petal pattern that correlates with the PDD laser illumination used on OMEGA, thus revealing a 3D aspect of PDD OMEGA implosions not previously observed. Differences are noted with respect to a PDD experiment performed at National Ignition Facility.

  10. Multiple-view spectrally resolved x-ray imaging observations of polar-direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, R. C.; Johns, H. M.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Nagayama, T.; Hsu, S. C.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Cobble, J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Bradley, P. A.; Hakel, P.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Tregillis, I. L.; Wysocki, F. J.

    2014-12-15

    We present spatially, temporally, and spectrally resolved narrow- and broad-band x-ray images of polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on OMEGA. These self-emission images were obtained during the deceleration phase and bang time using several multiple monochromatic x-ray imaging instruments fielded along two or three quasi-orthogonal lines-of-sight, including equatorial and polar views. The instruments recorded images based on K-shell lines from a titanium tracer located in the shell as well as continuum emission. These observations constitute the first such data obtained for PDD implosions. The image data show features attributed to laser imprinting and zero-order hydrodynamics. Equatorial-view images show a “double bun” structure that is consistent with synthetic images obtained from post-processing 2D and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment. Polar-view images show a pentagonal, petal pattern that correlates with the PDD laser illumination used on OMEGA, thus revealing a 3D aspect of PDD OMEGA implosions not previously observed. Differences are noted with respect to a PDD experiment performed at National Ignition Facility.

  11. A Comprehensive Spectral Analysis of the X-Ray Pulsar 4U 1907+09 from Two Observations with the Suzaku X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Pottschmidt, Katja; Roth, Stefanie; Barragan, Laura; Furst, Felix; Suchy, Slawomir; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Wilms, Jorn; Rothschild, Richard

    2009-01-01

    We present results from two observations of the wind-accreting X-ray pulsar 4U 1907+09 using the Suzaku observatory, The broadband time-averaged spectrum allows us to examine the continuum emission of the source and the cyclotron resonance scattering feature at approx. 19 keV. Additionally, using the narrow CCD response of Suzaku near 6 ke V allows us to study in detail the Fe K bandpass and to quantify the Fe Kp line for this source for the first time. The source is absorbed by fully-covering material along the line of sight with a column density of N(sub H) approx. 2 x 10(exp 22)/sq cm, consistent with a wind accreting geometry, and a high Fe abundance (approx. 3 - 4 x solar). Time and phase-resolved analyses allow us to study variations in the source spectrum. In particular, dips found in the 2006 observation which are consistent with earlier observations occur in the hard X-ray bandpass, implying a variation of the whole continuum rather than occultation by intervening material, while a dip near the end of the 2007 observation occurs mainly in the lower energies implying an increase in NH along the line of sight, perhaps indicating clumpiness in the stellar wind

  12. Measurement of high-energy (10–60 keV) x-ray spectral line widths with eV accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, J. F. Feldman, U.; Glover, J. L.; Hudson, L. T.; Ralchenko, Y.; Henins, Albert; Pereira, N.; Di Stefano, C. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Chen, Hui; Williams, G. J.; Park, J.

    2014-11-15

    A high resolution crystal spectrometer utilizing a crystal in transmission geometry has been developed and experimentally optimized to measure the widths of emission lines in the 10–60 keV energy range with eV accuracy. The spectrometer achieves high spectral resolution by utilizing crystal planes with small lattice spacings (down to 2d = 0.099 nm), a large crystal bending radius and Rowland circle diameter (965 mm), and an image plate detector with high spatial resolution (60 μm in the case of the Fuji TR image plate). High resolution W L-shell and K-shell laboratory test spectra in the 10–60 keV range and Ho K-shell spectra near 47 keV recorded at the LLNL Titan laser facility are presented. The Ho K-shell spectra are the highest resolution hard x-ray spectra recorded from a solid target irradiated by a high-intensity laser.

  13. Task-based weights for photon counting spectral x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bornefalk, Hans

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for taking the spatial frequency composition of an imaging task into account when determining optimal bin weight factors for photon counting energy sensitive x-ray systems. A second purpose of the investigation is to evaluate the possible improvement compared to using pixel based weights. Methods: The Fourier based approach of imaging performance and detectability index d' is applied to pulse height discriminating photon counting systems. The dependency of d' on the bin weight factors is made explicit, taking into account both differences in signal and noise transfer characteristics across bins and the spatial frequency dependency of interbin correlations from reabsorbed scatter. Using a simplified model of a specific silicon detector, d' values for a high and a low frequency imaging task are determined for optimal weights and compared to pixel based weights. Results: The method successfully identifies bins where a large point spread function degrades detection of high spatial frequency targets. The method is also successful in determining how to downweigh highly correlated bins. Quantitative predictions for the simplified silicon detector model indicate that improvements in the detectability index when applying task-based weights instead of pixel based weights are small for high frequency targets, but could be in excess of 10% for low frequency tasks where scatter-induced correlation otherwise degrade detectability. Conclusions: The proposed method makes the spatial frequency dependency of complex correlation structures between bins and their effect on the system detective quantum efficiency easier to analyze and allows optimizing bin weights for given imaging tasks. A potential increase in detectability of double digit percents in silicon detector systems operated at typical CT energies (100 kVp) merits further evaluation on a real system. The method is noted to be of higher relevance for silicon detectors than for cadmium (zink

  14. Laboratory Data for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Chen, H.; Gu, M.-F.; Kahn, S. M.; Lepson, J. K.; Savin, D. W.; Utter, S. B.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory facilities have made great strides in producing large sets of reliable data for X-ray astronomy, which include ionization and recombination cross sections needed for charge balance calculations as well as the atomic data needed for interpreting X-ray line formation. We discuss data from the new generation sources and pay special attention to the LLNL electron beam ion trap experiment, which is unique in its ability to provide direct laboratory access to spectral data under precisely controlled conditions that simulate those found in many astrophysical plasmas. Examples of spectral data obtained in the 1-160 A wavelength range are given illustrating the type of laboratory X-ray data produced in support of such missions as Chandra, X-Ray Multi-Mirror telescope (XMM), Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) and Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite (EUVE).

  15. X-ray structural studies of quinone reductase 2 nanomolar range inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pegan, Scott D; Sturdy, Megan; Ferry, Gilles; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2011-01-01

    Quinone reductase 2 (QR2) is one of two members comprising the mammalian quinone reductase family of enzymes responsible for performing FAD mediated reductions of quinone substrates. In contrast to quinone reductase 1 (QR1) which uses NAD(P)H as its co-substrate, QR2 utilizes a rare group of hydride donors, N-methyl or N-ribosyl nicotinamide. Several studies have linked QR2 to the generation of quinone free radicals, several neuronal degenerative diseases, and cancer. QR2 has been also identified as the third melatonin receptor (MT3) through in cellulo and in vitro inhibition of QR2 by traditional MT3 ligands, and through recent X-ray structures of human QR2 (hQR2) in complex with melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin. Several MT3 specific ligands have been developed that exhibit both potent in cellulo inhibition of hQR2 nanomolar, affinity for MT3. The potency of these ligands suggest their use as molecular probes for hQR2. However, no definitive correlation between traditionally obtained MT3 ligand affinity and hQR2 inhibition exists limiting our understanding of how these ligands are accommodated in the hQR2 active site. To obtain a clearer relationship between the structures of developed MT3 ligands and their inhibitory properties, in cellulo and in vitro IC50 values were determined for a representative set of MT3 ligands (MCA-NAT, 2-I-MCANAT, prazosin, S26695, S32797, and S29434). Furthermore, X-ray structures for each of these ligands in complex with hQR2 were determined allowing for a structural evaluation of the binding modes of these ligands in relation to the potency of MT3 ligands. PMID:21538647

  16. X-ray structural studies of quinone reductase 2 nanomolar range inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pegan, Scott D.; Sturdy, Megan; Ferry, Gilles; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2011-09-06

    Quinone reductase 2 (QR2) is one of two members comprising the mammalian quinone reductase family of enzymes responsible for performing FAD mediated reductions of quinone substrates. In contrast to quinone reductase 1 (QR1) which uses NAD(P)H as its co-substrate, QR2 utilizes a rare group of hydride donors, N-methyl or N-ribosyl nicotinamide. Several studies have linked QR2 to the generation of quinone free radicals, several neuronal degenerative diseases, and cancer. QR2 has been also identified as the third melatonin receptor (MT3) through in cellulo and in vitro inhibition of QR2 by traditional MT3 ligands, and through recent X-ray structures of human QR2 (hQR2) in complex with melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin. Several MT3 specific ligands have been developed that exhibit both potent in cellulo inhibition of hQR2 nanomolar, affinity for MT3. The potency of these ligands suggest their use as molecular probes for hQR2. However, no definitive correlation between traditionally obtained MT3 ligand affinity and hQR2 inhibition exists limiting our understanding of how these ligands are accommodated in the hQR2 active site. To obtain a clearer relationship between the structures of developed MT3 ligands and their inhibitory properties, in cellulo and in vitro IC{sub 50} values were determined for a representative set of MT3 ligands (MCA-NAT, 2-I-MCANAT, prazosin, S26695, S32797, and S29434). Furthermore, X-ray structures for each of these ligands in complex with hQR2 were determined allowing for a structural evaluation of the binding modes of these ligands in relation to the potency of MT3 ligands.

  17. The effects of radiation damage on the spectral resolution of the Chandrayaan-1 x-ray spectrometer over the full mission duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. E.; Smith, D. R.

    2012-07-01

    The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) was launched onboard the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Chandrayaan-1 lunar mission in October 2008. The instrument consisted of 24 swept-charge device silicon X-ray detectors providing a total collecting area of ~24 cm2, corresponding to a 14° field of view (FWHM), with the ability to measure X-rays from 0.8 - 10 keV. During the 10 months the spacecraft was located in orbit around the Moon a number of solar flare X-ray events were detected, along with calibration data from X-ray sources housed inside the movable door of the instrument. This paper presents a further study of the degradation in spectral resolution of the measured X-ray calibration lines, adding a final calibration point towards the end of mission lifetime to the known results from the midpoint of the mission, giving a more detailed analysis of the extent of the radiation damage. The radiation environment the detectors were subjected to is discussed in light of the actual radiation damage effects on the spectral resolution observed in flight.

  18. Uranium enrichment measurements using the intensity ratios of self-fluorescence X-rays to 92* keV gamma ray in UXK alpha spectral region.

    PubMed

    Yücel, H; Dikmen, H

    2009-04-30

    In this paper, the known multigroup gamma-ray analysis method for uranium (MGAU) as one of the non-destructive gamma-ray spectrometry methods has been applied to certified reference nuclear materials (depleted, natural and enriched uranium) containing (235)U isotope in the range of 0.32-4.51% atom (235)U. Its analysis gives incorrect results for the low component (235)U in depleted and natural uranium samples where the build-up of the decay products begins to interfere with the analysis. The results reveal that the build-up of decay products seems to be significant and thus the algorithms for the presence of decay products should be improved to resulting in the correct enrichment value. For instance, for the case of (235)U analysis in depleted uranium or natural ore samples, self-induced X-rays such as 94.6 keV and 98.4 keV lying in UXK(alpha) spectral region used by MGAU can be excluded from the calculation. Because the significant increases have been observed in the intensities of uranium self-induced X-rays due to gamma-ray emissions with above 100 keV energy arising from decay products of (238)U and (235)U and these parents. Instead, the use of calibration curve to be made between the intensity ratios of self-fluorescence X-rays to 92(*)keV gamma-ray and the certified (235)U abundances is suggested for the determination of (235)U when higher amounts of decay products are detected in the gamma-ray spectrum acquired for the MGAU analysis. PMID:19203602

  19. A neural network-based method for spectral distortion correction in photon counting x-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touch, Mengheng; Clark, Darin P.; Barber, William; Badea, Cristian T.

    2016-08-01

    Spectral CT using a photon counting x-ray detector (PCXD) shows great potential for measuring material composition based on energy dependent x-ray attenuation. Spectral CT is especially suited for imaging with K-edge contrast agents to address the otherwise limited contrast in soft tissues. We have developed a micro-CT system based on a PCXD. This system enables both 4 energy bins acquisition, as well as full-spectrum mode in which the energy thresholds of the PCXD are swept to sample the full energy spectrum for each detector element and projection angle. Measurements provided by the PCXD, however, are distorted due to undesirable physical effects in the detector and can be very noisy due to photon starvation in narrow energy bins. To address spectral distortions, we propose and demonstrate a novel artificial neural network (ANN)-based spectral distortion correction mechanism, which learns to undo the distortion in spectral CT, resulting in improved material decomposition accuracy. To address noise, post-reconstruction denoising based on bilateral filtration, which jointly enforces intensity gradient sparsity between spectral samples, is used to further improve the robustness of ANN training and material decomposition accuracy. Our ANN-based distortion correction method is calibrated using 3D-printed phantoms and a model of our spectral CT system. To enable realistic simulations and validation of our method, we first modeled the spectral distortions using experimental data acquired from 109Cd and 133Ba radioactive sources measured with our PCXD. Next, we trained an ANN to learn the relationship between the distorted spectral CT projections and the ideal, distortion-free projections in a calibration step. This required knowledge of the ground truth, distortion-free spectral CT projections, which were obtained by simulating a spectral CT scan of the digital version of a 3D-printed phantom. Once the training was completed, the trained ANN was used to perform

  20. A neural network-based method for spectral distortion correction in photon counting x-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touch, Mengheng; Clark, Darin P.; Barber, William; Badea, Cristian T.

    2016-08-01

    Spectral CT using a photon counting x-ray detector (PCXD) shows great potential for measuring material composition based on energy dependent x-ray attenuation. Spectral CT is especially suited for imaging with K-edge contrast agents to address the otherwise limited contrast in soft tissues. We have developed a micro-CT system based on a PCXD. This system enables both 4 energy bins acquisition, as well as full-spectrum mode in which the energy thresholds of the PCXD are swept to sample the full energy spectrum for each detector element and projection angle. Measurements provided by the PCXD, however, are distorted due to undesirable physical effects in the detector and can be very noisy due to photon starvation in narrow energy bins. To address spectral distortions, we propose and demonstrate a novel artificial neural network (ANN)-based spectral distortion correction mechanism, which learns to undo the distortion in spectral CT, resulting in improved material decomposition accuracy. To address noise, post-reconstruction denoising based on bilateral filtration, which jointly enforces intensity gradient sparsity between spectral samples, is used to further improve the robustness of ANN training and material decomposition accuracy. Our ANN-based distortion correction method is calibrated using 3D-printed phantoms and a model of our spectral CT system. To enable realistic simulations and validation of our method, we first modeled the spectral distortions using experimental data acquired from 109Cd and 133Ba radioactive sources measured with our PCXD. Next, we trained an ANN to learn the relationship between the distorted spectral CT projections and the ideal, distortion-free projections in a calibration step. This required knowledge of the ground truth, distortion-free spectral CT projections, which were obtained by simulating a spectral CT scan of the digital version of a 3D-printed phantom. Once the training was completed, the trained ANN was used to perform

  1. A neural network-based method for spectral distortion correction in photon counting x-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Touch, Mengheng; Clark, Darin P; Barber, William; Badea, Cristian T

    2016-08-21

    Spectral CT using a photon counting x-ray detector (PCXD) shows great potential for measuring material composition based on energy dependent x-ray attenuation. Spectral CT is especially suited for imaging with K-edge contrast agents to address the otherwise limited contrast in soft tissues. We have developed a micro-CT system based on a PCXD. This system enables both 4 energy bins acquisition, as well as full-spectrum mode in which the energy thresholds of the PCXD are swept to sample the full energy spectrum for each detector element and projection angle. Measurements provided by the PCXD, however, are distorted due to undesirable physical effects in the detector and can be very noisy due to photon starvation in narrow energy bins. To address spectral distortions, we propose and demonstrate a novel artificial neural network (ANN)-based spectral distortion correction mechanism, which learns to undo the distortion in spectral CT, resulting in improved material decomposition accuracy. To address noise, post-reconstruction denoising based on bilateral filtration, which jointly enforces intensity gradient sparsity between spectral samples, is used to further improve the robustness of ANN training and material decomposition accuracy. Our ANN-based distortion correction method is calibrated using 3D-printed phantoms and a model of our spectral CT system. To enable realistic simulations and validation of our method, we first modeled the spectral distortions using experimental data acquired from (109)Cd and (133)Ba radioactive sources measured with our PCXD. Next, we trained an ANN to learn the relationship between the distorted spectral CT projections and the ideal, distortion-free projections in a calibration step. This required knowledge of the ground truth, distortion-free spectral CT projections, which were obtained by simulating a spectral CT scan of the digital version of a 3D-printed phantom. Once the training was completed, the trained ANN was used to perform

  2. A neural network-based method for spectral distortion correction in photon counting x-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Touch, Mengheng; Clark, Darin P; Barber, William; Badea, Cristian T

    2016-08-21

    Spectral CT using a photon counting x-ray detector (PCXD) shows great potential for measuring material composition based on energy dependent x-ray attenuation. Spectral CT is especially suited for imaging with K-edge contrast agents to address the otherwise limited contrast in soft tissues. We have developed a micro-CT system based on a PCXD. This system enables both 4 energy bins acquisition, as well as full-spectrum mode in which the energy thresholds of the PCXD are swept to sample the full energy spectrum for each detector element and projection angle. Measurements provided by the PCXD, however, are distorted due to undesirable physical effects in the detector and can be very noisy due to photon starvation in narrow energy bins. To address spectral distortions, we propose and demonstrate a novel artificial neural network (ANN)-based spectral distortion correction mechanism, which learns to undo the distortion in spectral CT, resulting in improved material decomposition accuracy. To address noise, post-reconstruction denoising based on bilateral filtration, which jointly enforces intensity gradient sparsity between spectral samples, is used to further improve the robustness of ANN training and material decomposition accuracy. Our ANN-based distortion correction method is calibrated using 3D-printed phantoms and a model of our spectral CT system. To enable realistic simulations and validation of our method, we first modeled the spectral distortions using experimental data acquired from (109)Cd and (133)Ba radioactive sources measured with our PCXD. Next, we trained an ANN to learn the relationship between the distorted spectral CT projections and the ideal, distortion-free projections in a calibration step. This required knowledge of the ground truth, distortion-free spectral CT projections, which were obtained by simulating a spectral CT scan of the digital version of a 3D-printed phantom. Once the training was completed, the trained ANN was used to perform

  3. Increased power, pulse length, and spectral purity free-electron laser for inverse-Compton X-ray production and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of thin film photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, Jeremy M.

    The free-electron laser (FEL) system can be configured to produce X-ray or extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light via Compton backscattering and to perform many types of spectroscopy including laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). In it's most common incarnation, the FEL is limited by three major factors: average laser power, laser spectral purity, and laser pulse length. Some examples of the limitations that these shortcomings give rise to include limiting the range of remote spectroscopy, degrading spectroscopic precision, and lowering the attainable x-ray flux, respectively. In this work, we explored three methods of improving the FEL. First, a beam expanding optic dubbed the TIRBBE was designed, built, and tested to prevent laser damage to the resonator mirrors and allow for higher average power. This optic had the added benefit of increasing the spectral purity. Second, a intra-cavity etalon filter dubbed the FROZEN FISH was designed, built, and tested to increase spectral purity and eliminate the frequency pulling (tendency of an FEL to pull towards longer wavelengths during a macropulse) all in a high damage threshold, fully wavelength adjustable package. Finally, a laser cooling scheme which allows for extension of the electron beam macropulse used to create the FEL light by counter-acting electron back-heating was explored. The first measurements of the back-heating temperature rise were taken, calculations of the required laser parameters were made, design of the full system was completed, and construction has begun. Experimental work using LIBS to characterize thin film solar cells was also completed in anticipation of using the improved FEL to better characterize such materials. The frequency tunability and picosecond micropulse width of the FEL will allow for exploration of the frequency response of LIBS ablation and fine resolution of the make up of these materials with depth unattainable with a conventional fixed frequency nanosecond pulse laser.

  4. Computer simulations and models for the performance characteristics of spectrally equivalent X-ray beams in medical diagnostic radiology

    PubMed Central

    Okunade, Akintunde A.

    2007-01-01

    In order to achieve uniformity in radiological imaging, it is recommended that the concept of equivalence in shape (quality) and size (quantity) of clinical Xray beams should be used for carrying out the comparative evaluation of image and patient dose. When used under the same irradiation geometry, X-ray beams that are strictly or relatively equivalent in terms of shape and size will produce identical or relatively identical image quality and patient dose. Simple mathematical models and software program EQSPECT.FOR were developed for the comparative evaluation of the performance characteristics in terms of contrast (C), contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and figure-of-merit (FOM = CNR2/DOSE) for spectrally equivalent beams transmitted through filter materials referred to as conventional and k-edged. At the same value of operating potential (kVp), results show that spectrally equivalent beam transmitted through conventional filter with higher atomic number (Z-value) in comparison with that transmitted through conventional filter with lower Z-value resulted in the same value of C and FOM. However, in comparison with the spectrally equivalent beam transmitted through filter of lower Z-value, the beam through filter of higher Z-value produced higher value of CNR and DOSE at equal tube loading (mAs) and kVp. Under the condition of equivalence of spectrum, at scaled (or reduced) tube loading and same kVp, filter materials of higher Z-value can produce the same values of C, CNR, DOSE and FOM as filter materials of lower Z-value. Unlike the case of comparison of spectrally equivalent beam transmitted through one conventional filter and that through another conventional filter, it is not possible to derive simple mathematical formulations for the relative performance of spectrally equivalent beam transmitted through a given conventional filter material and that through kedge filter material. PMID:21224928

  5. Improving the off-axis spatial resolution and dynamic range of the NIF X-ray streak cameras (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPhee, A. G.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.; Hares, J. D.; Hassett, J.; Hatch, B. W.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Datte, P. S.; Landen, O. L.; Palmer, N. E.; Piston, K. W.; Rekow, V. V.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2016-11-01

    We report simulations and experiments that demonstrate an increase in spatial resolution of the NIF core diagnostic x-ray streak cameras by at least a factor of two, especially off axis. A design was achieved by using a corrector electron optic to flatten the field curvature at the detector plane and corroborated by measurement. In addition, particle in cell simulations were performed to identify the regions in the streak camera that contribute the most to space charge blurring. These simulations provide a tool for convolving synthetic pre-shot spectra with the instrument function so signal levels can be set to maximize dynamic range for the relevant part of the streak record.

  6. Non-invasive material discrimination using spectral x-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Andrew J.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Robinson, Sean M.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; White, Timothy A.; Deinert, Mark

    2014-04-21

    Current radiographic methods are limited in their ability to determine the presence of nuclear materials in containers or composite objects. A central problem is the inability to distinguish the attenuation pattern of high-density metals from those with a larger greater thickness of a less- dense material. Here we show that spectrally sensitive detectors can be used to discriminate plutonium from multiple layers of other materials using a single-view radiograph. An inverse algorithm with adaptive regularization is used. The algorithm can determine the presence of plutonium in simulated radiographs with a mass resolution per unit area of at least 0.07 g•cm^-2.

  7. Non-invasive material discrimination using spectral x-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Andrew J.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Robinson, Sean M.; Jarman, Ken D.; White, Tim A.; Deinert, Mark R.

    2014-04-21

    Current radiographic methods are limited in their ability to determine the presence of nuclear materials in containers or composite objects. A central problem is the inability to distinguish the attenuation pattern of high-density metals from those with a greater thickness of a less dense material. Here, we show that spectrally sensitive detectors can be used to discriminate plutonium from multiple layers of other materials using a single-view radiograph. An inverse algorithm with adaptive regularization is used. The algorithm can determine the presence of plutonium in simulated radiographs with a mass resolution per unit area of at least 0.07 g cm{sup −2}.

  8. High resolution solar X-ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two high resolution solar X-ray payloads and their launches on Aerobee rockets with pointing system are described. The payloads included 5 to 25A X-ray spectrometers, multiaperture X-ray cameras, and command box attitude control inflight by means of a television image radioed to ground. Spatial resolution ranged from five arc minutes to ten arc seconds and spectral resolution ranged from 500 to 3000. Several laboratory tasks were completed in order to achieve the desired resolution. These included (1) development of techniques to align grid collimators, (2) studies of the spectrometric properties of crystals, (3) measurements of the absorption coefficients of various materials used in X-ray spectrometers, (4) evaluation of the performance of multiaperture cameras, and (5) development of facilities.

  9. ACCOUNTING FOR CALIBRATION UNCERTAINTIES IN X-RAY ANALYSIS: EFFECTIVE AREAS IN SPECTRAL FITTING

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyunsook; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Drake, Jeremy J.; Ratzlaff, Pete; Siemiginowska, Aneta E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: rpete@head.cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-04-20

    While considerable advance has been made to account for statistical uncertainties in astronomical analyses, systematic instrumental uncertainties have been generally ignored. This can be crucial to a proper interpretation of analysis results because instrumental calibration uncertainty is a form of systematic uncertainty. Ignoring it can underestimate error bars and introduce bias into the fitted values of model parameters. Accounting for such uncertainties currently requires extensive case-specific simulations if using existing analysis packages. Here, we present general statistical methods that incorporate calibration uncertainties into spectral analysis of high-energy data. We first present a method based on multiple imputation that can be applied with any fitting method, but is necessarily approximate. We then describe a more exact Bayesian approach that works in conjunction with a Markov chain Monte Carlo based fitting. We explore methods for improving computational efficiency, and in particular detail a method of summarizing calibration uncertainties with a principal component analysis of samples of plausible calibration files. This method is implemented using recently codified Chandra effective area uncertainties for low-resolution spectral analysis and is verified using both simulated and actual Chandra data. Our procedure for incorporating effective area uncertainty is easily generalized to other types of calibration uncertainties.

  10. A walk through the different spectral states of low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiemstra, Beike

    2012-02-01

    Lage-massa röntgendubbelstersystemen zijn systemen waarin een compact object, een neutronenster of een zwart gat, materie accreteert van een gewone ster die slechts een massa heeft kleiner dan of vergelijkbaar met die van onze zon. De materie-overdracht vindt plaats via een zogeheten accretieschijf waarin het materiaal naar het compacte object spiraliseert, en soms tot slechts een paar kilometer het compacte object nadert. Door interne wrijving wordt de accretieschijf zo heet dat het voornamelijk röntgenstraling uitzendt. Rondom de accretieschijf en het compacte object bevindt zich een heet plasma, de zogenoemde corona, dat röntgen- en gammastraling uitzendt. De geometrie en oorsprong van de corona zijn niet volledig bekend, maar waarnemingen en theoriën bevestigen de aanwezigheid ervan. Gebruik makend van röntgensatellieten bestuderen we de straling afkomstig van deze accretieschijf en corona welk bijdraagt aan het onderzoek aan compacte objecten en hun nabije omgeving. In dit proefschrift bestudeer ik specifieke eigenschappen van de accretieprocessen in röntgendubbelstersystemen. Deze processen manifesteren zich op verschillende manieren en zijn veranderlijk met tijd, leidend tot de verschillende zogeheten spectrale fases. De geometrie en de temperatuur van de accretieschijf en corona zijn karakteristiek in elk van deze fases. Dit proefschrift loopt door de verschillende spectrale fases heen waarbij vanuit een observationeel standpunt verscheidene bijzonderheden van elk van deze fases worden uitgelicht. Dit levert een belangrijke bijdrage aan de algemene kennis op het gebied van accretieprocessen in lage-massa röntgendubbelstersystemen.

  11. RXTE Spectral Study of the New X-ray Transient XTE J1859+226

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focke, W. B.; Markwardt, C. B.; Swank, J. H.; Taam, R. E.

    1999-12-01

    The transient galactic black hole candidate XTE J1859+226 was discovered by the RXTE All Sky Monitor (ASM) on 1999 October 9, within a day after its outburst began. Pointed observations with RXTE began on 1999 October 10.57, and continued at a rate of about twice per day. Preliminary results of fits to PCA and HEXTE spectra for October 9--14 show that a simple absorbed powerlaw is insufficient to model the data. The fit is greatly improved by using an absorbed cutoff powerlaw with reflection. The photon index rose from 1.8 on October 9 to 3.2 on October 14. The cutoff energy started near 100 keV, dropped to 50 keV, then rose to an undetectable level between October 12.86 and October 13.11, potentially indicating a state change. We will present spectral analysis of these and later data, along with comparison of the spectral and timing properties. This work was funded by NASA.

  12. Absolute spectral characterization of silicon barrier diode: Application to soft X-ray fusion diagnostics at Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Vezinet, D.; Mazon, D.; Malard, P.

    2013-07-14

    This paper presents an experimental protocol for absolute calibration of photo-detectors. Spectral characterization is achieved by a methodology that unlike the usual line emissions-based method, hinges on the Bremsstrahlung radiation of a Soft X-Ray (SXR) tube only. Although the proposed methodology can be applied virtually to any detector, the application presented in this paper is based on Tore Supra's SXR diagnostics, which uses Silicon Surface Barrier Diodes. The spectral response of these n-p junctions had previously been estimated on a purely empirical basis. This time, a series of second-order effects, like the spatial distribution of the source radiated power or multi-channel analyser non linearity, are taken into account to achieve accurate measurements. Consequently, a parameterised physical model is fitted to experimental results and the existence of an unexpected dead layer (at least 5 {mu}m thick) is evidenced. This contribution also echoes a more general on-going effort in favour of long-term quality of passive radiation measurements on Tokamaks.

  13. X-RAY SPECTRAL CURVATURE OF HIGH-FREQUENCY-PEAKED BL LAC OBJECTS: A PREDICTOR FOR THE TeV FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; Elvis, M.; Cavaliere, A.

    2011-10-01

    Most of the extragalactic sources detected at TeV energies are BL Lac objects. They belong to the subclass of high-frequency-peaked BL Lac objects (HBLs) exhibiting spectral energy distributions with a lower energy peak in the X-ray band; this is widely interpreted as synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons. The X-ray spectra are generally curved and well described in terms of a log-parabolic shape. In a previous investigation of TeV HBLs (TBLs) we found two correlations between their spectral parameters. (1) The synchrotron peak luminosity L{sub p} increases with its peak energy E{sub p} and (2) the curvature parameter b decreases as E{sub p} increases. The first is consistent with the synchrotron scenario, while the second is expected from statistical/stochastic acceleration mechanisms for the emitting electrons. Here, we present an extensive X-ray analysis of a sample of HBLs observed with XMM-Newton and Swift but undetected at TeV energies (UBLs), to compare their spectral behavior with that of TBLs. Investigating the distributions of their spectral parameters and comparing the TBL X-ray spectra with that of UBLs, we develop a criterion to select the best HBL candidates for future TeV observations.

  14. Attosecond broadband multilayer mirrors for the water window spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenmos, A.; Radünz, S.; Rauhut, R.; Hofstetter, M.; Venkatesan, S.; Wochnik, A.; Scheu, C.; Gullikson, E.; Fischer, S.; Nickel, B.; Kleineberg, U.

    2014-09-01

    Recent advances in the development of attosecond soft X-ray sources ranging into the `water window' spectral range, between the carbon 1s and oxygen 1s states (284 eV - 543 eV), are also driving the development of suited broadband multilayer optics for attosecond beam steering and dispersion management. The relatively low intensity of current High Harmonic Generation (HHG) soft X-ray sources calls for an efficient use of photons, thus the development of low-loss multilayer optics is of uttermost importance. Here, we report about the realization of atomically smooth interfaces in broadband CrSc multilayer mirrors by an optimized ion beam deposition and assisted interface polishing process.

  15. A digital x-ray tomosynthesis coupled near infrared spectral tomography system for dual-modality breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Michaelsen, Kelly E.; Pogue, Brian W.; Poplack, Steven P.; Shaw, Ian; Defrietas, Ken; Brooks, Ken; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-01-01

    A Near Infrared Spectral Tomography (NIRST) system has been developed and integrated into a commercial Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner to allow structural and functional imaging of breast in vivo. The NIRST instrument uses an 8-wavelength continuous wave (CW) laser-based scanning source assembly and a 75-element silicon photodiode solid-state detector panel to produce dense spectral and spatial projection data from which spectrally constrained 3D tomographic images of tissue chromophores are produced. Integration of the optical imaging system into the DBT scanner allows direct co-registration of the optical and DBT images, while also facilitating the synergistic use of x-ray contrast as anatomical priors in optical image reconstruction. Currently, the total scan time for a combined NIRST-DBT exam is ~50s with data collection from 8 wavelengths in the optical scan requiring ~42s to complete. The system was tested in breast simulating phantoms constructed using intralipid and blood in an agarose matrix with a 3 cm x 2 cm cylindrical inclusion at 1 cm depth from the surface. Diffuse image reconstruction of total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration resulted in accurate recovery of the lateral size and position of the inclusion to within 6% and 8%, respectively. Use of DBT structural priors in the NIRST reconstruction process improved the quantitative accuracy of the HbT recovery, and led to linear changes in imaged versus actual contrast, underscoring the advantages of dual-modality optical imaging approaches. The quantitative accuracy of the system can be further improved with independent measurements of scattering properties through integration of frequency or time domain data. PMID:23038553

  16. Arterial Wall Perfusion Measured with Photon Counting Spectral X-ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Steven M.; Korinek, Mark J.; Vercnocke, Andrew J.; Anderson, Jill L.; Halaweish, Ahmed; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2016-01-01

    Early atherosclerosis changes perfusion of the arterial wall due to localized proliferation of the vasa vasorum. When contrast agent passes through the artery, some enters the vasa vasorum and increases radiopacity of the arterial wall. Technical challenges to detecting changes in vasa vasorum density include the thin arterial wall, partial volume averaging at the arterial lumen/wall interface and calcification within the wall. We used a photon-counting spectral CT scanner to study carotid arteries of anesthetized pigs and micro-CT of these arteries to quantify vasa vasorum density. The left carotid artery wall was injected with autologous blood to stimulate vasa vasorum angiogenesis. The scans were performed at 25–120 keV; the tube-current-time product was 550 mAs. A 60 mL bolus of iodine contrast agent was injected into the femoral vein at 5mL/s. Two seconds post injection, an axial scan was acquired at every 3 s over 60 s (i.e., 20 time points). Each time point acquired 28 contiguous transaxial slices with reconstructed voxels 0.16 × 0.16 × 1 mm3. Regions-of-interest in the outer 2/3 of the arterial wall and in the middle 2/3 of the lumen were drawn and their enhancements plotted versus time. Lumenal CT values peaked several seconds after injection and then returned towards baseline. Arterial wall CT values peaked concurrent to the lumen. The peak arterial wall enhancement in the left carotid arterial wall correlated with increased vasa vasorum density observed in micro-CT images of the isolated arteries. PMID:27807391

  17. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5-10 GHz frequency range.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ∼6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ∼0.1° amplitude at ∼9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip. PMID:26429444

  18. Observations of solar X-ray bursts in the energy range 5-15 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datlowe, D. W.; Hudson, H. S.; Peterson, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    Bursts of solar X-rays in the energy range 5-15 keV are associated with flares and are due to thermal emission from a hot coronal plasma. The results of the first study of a large sample of separate bursts, 197 events associated with subflares, and of a few events of importance 1 are presented. The observations were made by a proportional counter on the satellite OSO-7 from October, 1971 to June, 1972. In most cases, the temperature characterizing the X-ray spectrum rises impulsively at the onset of the burst and then declines slowly throughout the remainder of the burst. The emission measure rises exponentially with a time scale of 30-100 sec and then declines slowly on a time scale of the order of 1,000 sec. It is shown that the growth of the thermal energy in the flare plasma throughout the burst can be due to the heating of new cool material.

  19. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5–10 GHz frequency range

    DOE PAGES

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; et al

    2015-09-10

    In this study, we present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme in order to study high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes of the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combination of the developed excitation mechanism with a single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. The required mechanical stability is achieved by a compact design of the microscope. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range,more » with 35 nm resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a –6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ~0.1° amplitude at –9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.« less

  20. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5-10 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ˜6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ˜0.1° amplitude at ˜9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  1. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5–10 GHz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-10

    In this study, we present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme in order to study high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes of the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combination of the developed excitation mechanism with a single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. The required mechanical stability is achieved by a compact design of the microscope. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with 35 nm resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a –6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ~0.1° amplitude at –9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  2. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5–10 GHz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetti, Stefano Chen, Zhao; Kukreja, Roopali; Spoddig, Detlef; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ollefs, Katharina; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-15

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ∼6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ∼0.1° amplitude at ∼9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  3. The spectral type of the optical counterpart to the high-mass X-ray binary IGR J06074+2205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, Pablo; Zezas, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    Spectroscopic observations of the optical counterpart to the high- mass X-ray binary IGR J06074+2205 were obtained from the 1.3m telescope of the Skinakas observatory in Crete (Greece) and from the 1.5m telescope of the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory at Mt. Hopkins (Arizona) on several occasions throughout 2006-2008.These observations allowed us to identify the spectral type of this source and study its long-term spectral variability.

  4. Novel approaches to address spectral distortions in photon counting x-ray CT using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touch, M.; Clark, D. P.; Barber, W.; Badea, C. T.

    2016-04-01

    Spectral CT using a photon-counting x-ray detector (PCXD) can potentially increase accuracy of measuring tissue composition. However, PCXD spectral measurements suffer from distortion due to charge sharing, pulse pileup, and Kescape energy loss. This study proposes two novel artificial neural network (ANN)-based algorithms: one to model and compensate for the distortion, and another one to directly correct for the distortion. The ANN-based distortion model was obtained by training to learn the distortion from a set of projections with a calibration scan. The ANN distortion was then applied in the forward statistical model to compensate for distortion in the projection decomposition. ANN was also used to learn to correct distortions directly in projections. The resulting corrected projections were used for reconstructing the image, denoising via joint bilateral filtration, and decomposition into three-material basis functions: Compton scattering, the photoelectric effect, and iodine. The ANN-based distortion model proved to be more robust to noise and worked better compared to using an imperfect parametric distortion model. In the presence of noise, the mean relative errors in iodine concentration estimation were 11.82% (ANN distortion model) and 16.72% (parametric model). With distortion correction, the mean relative error in iodine concentration estimation was improved by 50% over direct decomposition from distorted data. With our joint bilateral filtration, the resulting material image quality and iodine detectability as defined by the contrast-to-noise ratio were greatly enhanced allowing iodine concentrations as low as 2 mg/ml to be detected. Future work will be dedicated to experimental evaluation of our ANN-based methods using 3D-printed phantoms.

  5. Development of a soft x-ray diffractometer for a wideband multilayer grating with a novel layer structure in the 2-4 keV range

    SciTech Connect

    Imazono, Takashi; Koike, Masato; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Noboru; Koeda, Masaru; Nagano, Tetsuya; Sasai, Hiroyuki; Oue, Yuki; Yonezawa, Zeno; Kuramoto, Satoshi; Terauchi, Masami; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Handa, Nobuo; Murano, Takanori

    2012-07-11

    We have been developing a wavelength-dispersive soft x-ray spectrograph covering an energy region of 50-4000 eV to attach to a conventional electron microscope. Observation of soft x-ray emission in the 2-4 keV range needs a multilayer coated grating. In order to evaluate the performance of the optical component in the energy region, a goniometric apparatus has been newly developed and the preliminary performance has been tested using synchrotron radiation.

  6. Atomic Data in X-Ray Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, N. S.

    2000-01-01

    With the launches of the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) and the X-ray Multimirror Mission (XMM) and the upcoming launch of the Japanese mission ASTRO-E, high resolution X-ray spectroscopy of cosmic sources has begun. Early, deep observations of three stellar coronal sources will provide not only invaluable calibration data, but will also give us benchmarks for the atomic data under collisional equilibrium conditions. Analysis of the Chandra X-ray Observatory data, and data from other telescopes taken simultaneously, for these stars is ongoing as part of the Emission Line Project. Goals of the Emission Line Project are: (1) to determine and verify accurate and robust diagnostics and (2) to identify and prioritize issues in fundamental spectroscopy which will require further theoretical and/or laboratory work. The Astrophysical Plasma Emission Database will be described in some detail, as it is introducing standardization and flexibility into X-ray spectral modeling. Spectral models of X-ray astrophysical plasmas can be generally classified as dominated by either collisional ionization or by X-ray photoionization. While the atomic data needs for spectral models under these two types of ionization are significantly different, there axe overlapping data needs, as I will describe. Early results from the Emission Line Project benchmarks are providing an invaluable starting place, but continuing work to improve the accuracy and completeness of atomic data is needed. Additionally, we consider the possibility that some sources will require that both collisional ionization and photoionization be taken into account, or that time-dependent ionization be considered. Thus plasma spectral models of general use need to be computed over a wide range of physical conditions.

  7. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS IN ORBITAL/SUPERORBITAL PHASE SPACE AND HINTS OF SUPERORBITAL VARIABILITY IN THE HARD X-RAYS OF LS I +61°303

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jian; Torres, Diego F.; Zhang, Shu

    2014-04-10

    We present an INTEGRAL spectral analysis in the orbital/superorbital phase space of LS I +61°303. A hard X-ray spectrum with no cutoff is observed at all orbital/superorbital phases. The hard X-ray index is found to be uncorrelated with the radio index (non-simultaneously) measured at the same orbital and superorbital phases. In particular, the absence of an X-ray spectrum softening during periods of negative radio index does not favor a simple interpretation of the radio index variations in terms of a microquasar's changes of state. We uncover hints of superorbital variability in the hard X-ray flux, in phase with the superorbital modulation in soft X-rays. An orbital phase drift of the radio peak flux and index along the superorbital period is observed in the radio data. We explore its influence on a previously reported double-peak structure of a radio orbital light curve, and present it as a plausible explanation.

  8. GRBs and Lobster Eye X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; Pina, L.; Marsikova, V.; Inneman, A.

    2013-07-01

    A large majority of GRBs exhibit X-ray emission. In addition, a dedicated separate group of GRB, the XRFs, exists which emission dominates in the X-ray spectral range. And the third group of GRB related objects (yet hypothetical) are the group of off-axis observed GRBs (orphan afterglows). These facts justify the consideration of an independent experiment for monitoring, detection and analyses of GRBs and others fast X-ray transients in X-rays. We will present and discuss such experiment based on wide-field X-ray telescopes of Lobster Eye type. We show that the wide field and fine sensitivity of Lobster Eye X-ray All-Sky Monitor make such instruments important tools in study of GRBs.

  9. A Multi-Epoch Timing and Spectral Study of the Ultraluminous X-Ray NGC 5408 X-1 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dheeraj, Pasham; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2012-01-01

    We present results of new XMM-Newton observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) NGC 5408 X-1, one of the few ULXs to show quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). We detect QPOs in each of four new (approximately equal to 100 ks) pointings, expanding the range of frequencies observed from 10 to 40 mHz. We compare our results with the timing and spectral correlations seen in stellar-mass black hole systems, and find that the qualitative nature of the timing and spectral behavior of NGC 5408 X-1 is similar to systems in the steep power-law state exhibiting Type-C QPOs. However, in order for this analogy to quantitatively hold we must only be seeing the so-called saturated portion of the QPO frequency-photon index (or disk flux) relation. Assuming this to be the case, we place a lower limit on the mass of NGC 5408 X-1 of greater than or equal to 800 solar mass. Alternatively, the QPO frequency is largely independent of the spectral parameters, in which case a close analogy with the Type-C QPOs in stellar system is problematic. Measurement of the source's timing properties over a wider range of energy spectral index is needed to definitively resolve this ambiguity. We searched all the available data for both a broad Fe emission line as well as high-frequency QPO analogs (0.1- 1 Hz), but detected neither. We place upper limits on the equivalent width of any Fe emission feature in the 6-7 keV band and of the amplitude (rms) of a high-frequency QPO analog of approximately equal to 10 eV and approximately equal to 4%, respectively.

  10. Quasar x-ray spectra revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri, P.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, M.; Mcdowell, J.

    1992-01-01

    A sample of 45 quasars observed by the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) on the Einstein satellite is used to re-examine the relationship between the soft (0.2-3.5 keV) X-ray energy index and radio-loudness. We found the following: (1) the tendency for radio-loud quasars to have systematically flatter X-ray slopes than radio-quiet quasars (RQQ's) is confirmed with the soft X-ray excess having negligible effect; (2) there is a tendency for the flatness of the X-ray slope to correlate with radio core-dominance for radio-loud quasars, suggesting that a component of the X-ray emission is relativistically beamed; (3) for the RQQ's the soft X-ray slopes, with a mean of approximately 1.0, are consistent with the slopes found at higher energies (2-10 keV) although steeper than those observed for Seyfert 1 galaxies (also 2-10 keV) where the reflection model gives a good fit to the data; (4) the correlation of FeII emission line strength with X-ray energy index is confirmed for radio-quiet quasars using a subset of 18 quasars. The radio-loud quasars show no evidence for a correlation. This relation suggests a connection between the ionizing continuum and the line emission from the broad emission line region (BELR) of radio-quiet quasars, but in the opposite sense to that predicted by current photoionization models; and (5) the correlations of X-ray slope with radio core dominance and FeII equivalent width within the radio-loud and radio-quiet sub-classes respectively imply that the observed wide range of X-ray spectral slopes is real rather than due to the large measuring uncertainties for individual objects.

  11. High-Energy X-Ray Study of Short Range Order and Phase Transformations in Ti-V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsteiner, Ingo; Schoeps, Andreas; Reichert, Harald; Dosch, Helmut

    2006-03-01

    Phase transformations, especially precipitation processes, are a key factor in alloy design. Understanding these processes in the framework of statistical thermodynamics requires knowledge about the atomic interaction potentials between the alloy constituents. Experimentally, these parameters can be accessed via the diffuse x-ray scattering caused by the configurational short range order and lattice distortions. We employ a bulk sensitive high energy technique to study both phenomena simultaneously in situ, probing macroscopic single crystals in transmission geometry. The data recorded by a 2D detector reveal Bragg reflections from the precipitates superimposed on the diffuse scattering of the matrix. We present a detailed study of bcc Ti-V, a typical titanium β-alloy. The diffuse scattering is mainly due to lattice distortions induced by the atomic size mismatch. Depending on the annealing temperature, growth and dissolution of hcp α-Ti precipitates and minute fractions of TiC are observed. HRTEM experiments have been conducted to complement our results.

  12. A Soft X-Ray Spectral Episode for the Clocked Burster, GS 1826-24 as Measured by Swift and NuStar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenevez, J.; Galloway, D. K.; in 't Zand, J. J. M.; Tomsick, J. A.; Barret, D.; Chakrabarty, D.; Fürst, F.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Romano, P.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2016-02-01

    We report on NuSTAR and Swift observations of a soft state of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary GS 1826-24, commonly known as the “clocked” burster. The transition to the soft state was recorded in 2014 June through an increase of the 2-20 keV source intensity measured by MAXI, simultaneous with a decrease of the 15-50 keV intensity measured by Swift/BAT. The episode lasted approximately two months, after which the source returned to its usual hard state. We analyze the broadband spectrum measured by Swift/XRT and NuSTAR and estimate the accretion rate during the soft episode to be ≈ 13% {\\dot{m}}{{Edd}}, within the range of previous observations. However, the best-fit spectral model, adopting the double Comptonization used previously, exhibits significantly softer components. We detect seven type-I X-ray bursts, all significantly weaker (and with shorter rise and decay times) than observed previously. The burst profiles and recurrence times vary significantly, ruling out the regular bursts that are typical for this source. One burst exhibited photospheric radius expansion and we estimate the source distance as (5.7+/- 0.2) {ξ }b-1/2 kpc, where ξb parameterizes the possible anisotropy of the burst emission. The observed soft state may most likely be interpreted as a change in accretion geometry at about similar bolometric luminosity as in the hard state. The different burst behavior can therefore be attributed to this change in accretion flow geometry, but the fundamental cause and process for this effect remain unclear.

  13. Wide-Band KB Optics for Spectro-Microscopy Imaging Applications in the 6-13 keV X-ray Energy Range

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, E.; De Panfilis, S.; Peverini, L.; Vaerenbergh, P. van; Rocca, F.

    2007-01-19

    We present a Kirkpatrick-Baez optics (KB) system specially optimized to operate in the 6-13 keV X-ray range, where valuable characteristic lines are present. The mirrors are coated with aperiodic laterally graded (Ru/B4C)35 multilayers to define a 15% energy bandpass and to gain flux as compared to total reflection mirrors. For any X-ray energy selected the shape of each mirror can be optimized with a dynamical bending system so as to concentrate the X-ray beam into a micrometer-size spot. Once the KB mirrors are aligned at the X-ray energy corresponding to the barycenter of the XAS spectrum to be performed they remain in a steady state during the micro-XAS scans to minimize beam displacements. Results regarding the performance of the wideband KB optics and of the spectro-microscopy setup are presented, including beam stability issues.

  14. Design and performance of a versatile curved-crystal spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy in the tender x-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavčič, M.; Budnar, M.; Mühleisen, A.; Gasser, F.; Žitnik, M.; Bučar, K.; Bohinc, R.

    2012-03-01

    A complete in-vacuum curved-crystal x-ray emission spectrometer in Johansson geometry has been constructed for a 2-6 keV energy range with sub natural line-width energy resolution. The spectrometer is designed to measure x-ray emission induced by photon and charged particle impact on solid and gaseous targets. It works with a relatively large x-ray source placed inside the Rowland circle and employs position sensitive detection of diffracted x-rays. Its compact modular design enables fast and easy installation at a synchrotron or particle accelerator beamline. The paper presents main characteristics of the spectrometer and illustrates its capabilities by showing few selected experimental examples.

  15. Design and performance of a versatile curved-crystal spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy in the tender x-ray range

    SciTech Connect

    Kavcic, M.; Budnar, M.; Muehleisen, A.; Gasser, F.; Zitnik, M.; Bucar, K.; Bohinc, R.

    2012-03-15

    A complete in-vacuum curved-crystal x-ray emission spectrometer in Johansson geometry has been constructed for a 2-6 keV energy range with sub natural line-width energy resolution. The spectrometer is designed to measure x-ray emission induced by photon and charged particle impact on solid and gaseous targets. It works with a relatively large x-ray source placed inside the Rowland circle and employs position sensitive detection of diffracted x-rays. Its compact modular design enables fast and easy installation at a synchrotron or particle accelerator beamline. The paper presents main characteristics of the spectrometer and illustrates its capabilities by showing few selected experimental examples.

  16. Design and performance of a versatile curved-crystal spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy in the tender x-ray range.

    PubMed

    Kavčič, M; Budnar, M; Mühleisen, A; Gasser, F; Žitnik, M; Bučar, K; Bohinc, R

    2012-03-01

    A complete in-vacuum curved-crystal x-ray emission spectrometer in Johansson geometry has been constructed for a 2-6 keV energy range with sub natural line-width energy resolution. The spectrometer is designed to measure x-ray emission induced by photon and charged particle impact on solid and gaseous targets. It works with a relatively large x-ray source placed inside the Rowland circle and employs position sensitive detection of diffracted x-rays. Its compact modular design enables fast and easy installation at a synchrotron or particle accelerator beamline. The paper presents main characteristics of the spectrometer and illustrates its capabilities by showing few selected experimental examples.

  17. Feedback at the Working Surface: A Joint X-ray and Low-Frequency Radio Spectral Study of the Cocoon Shock in Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Michael W.; Rafferty, D. A.; McKean, J. P.

    2013-04-01

    We report on preliminary results from a joint spectral analysis of the cocoon shock region in Cygnus A using deep archival Chandra data and new low-frequency radio data from LOFAR. Being both bright in X-rays and the most powerful radio source in the local universe, the FRII radio galaxy Cygnus A represents an ideal opportunity to study the interaction between the jets produced by the central AGN and the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM) in which that AGN is embedded. Using the entire 235 ksec archival Chandra exposure, we have performed a spatially resolved, X-ray spectral analysis of the ICM in Cygnus A. By combining the resulting X-ray images and temperature maps with spectral index maps between 30-80 MHz and 120-180 MHz calculated from a recent, deep LOFAR observation, we can resolve the X-ray and radio emitting plasmas in any given region on spatial scales of 3-4 kpc over the central 100 kpc. We clearly resolve the cocoon shock surrounding Cygnus A and determine the Mach number of the shock as a function of position angle. Temperature jumps associated with this shock are detected over a large fraction of the total shock circumference. Significant non-thermal emission is also detected in the regions surrounding the SE and NW leading edges of the shock near the hotspots. In this talk, we will present a detailed analysis of the energetics of this interface region between the radio plasma inside the cocoon shock and the X-ray emitting gas outside the shock. Inside the shock, we will present constraints on the emission mechanisms in the jet, counter-jet, and hotspots based on the combined radio and X-ray spectra. Using maps of the spectral age derived from the LOFAR data and independent age estimates based on various cavity features seen in the X-ray image, we will present a picture of the evolution of the shock region in Cygnus A over the past 50 Myr. Finally, we will discuss the implications these observations have for AGN feedback models as well as the

  18. The X-ray Spectrum and Spectral Energy Distribution of FIRST J155633.8+351758: A Beamed Radio-Quiet Quasar with a Polar Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrington, Robert C.; Brotherton, M. S.; Gallagher, S. C.; Ganguly, R.; Shang, Z.; Lacy, M.; Gregg, M. D.; Hall, P. B.; Laurent-Muehleisen, S. A.

    2007-12-01

    We report the results of a 60 ks Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-S observation of the reddened, radio-selected, highly polarized "FeLoBAL" quasar FIRST J155633.8+351758. Our analyses of the 531 photon spectrum indicate that the intrinsic X-ray flux is consistent with that expected for quasars of similarly high luminosity. We cannot tightly constrain the intrinsic X-ray power-law slope, but find indications that it is flat (photon index Γ = 1.7 or flatter). No iron K-α line is detected, and the X-rays appear to be down by only an order of magnitude below their intrinsic unabsorbed levels. Absorption is present with both partially ionized models and neutral hydrogen models with partial covering providing good fits. The level of partial covering in the latter model is consistent with the rest-frame ultraviolet maximum polarization of 13%, in the sense that light scattered by electrons around the X-ray absorber could account for both results. We present the spectral energy distribution (SED) of FIRST J155633.8+351758 from radio through X-ray energies, and make corrections for Doppler beaming for the pole-on radio-quiet jet, optical dust reddening, and X-ray absorption. The corrected SED appears to be that of a luminous radio-quiet quasar deficient in the mid and far-infrared, suggesting that the dust covering fraction of the quasar is not large and that star formation is not excessive. FIRST J155633.8+351758 seems to be an intrinsically normal radio-quiet quasar with an X-ray absorber not dissimilar from that of other broad absorption line quasars studied in detail at X-ray wavelengths. We acknowledge support from Chandra Award No. GO6-7105X, from the US NSF (grant AST 05-07781), from NASA under the grant NNG05GD03G, and from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant 10643001). This work was performed under the auspices of the US DOE by the University of California, LLNL (Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48).

  19. Theoretical and Monte Carlo optimization of a stacked three-layer flat-panel x-ray imager for applications in multi-spectral diagnostic medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Maurino, Sebastian; Badano, Aldo; Cunningham, Ian A.; Karim, Karim S.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new design of a stacked three-layer flat-panel x-ray detector for dual-energy (DE) imaging. Each layer consists of its own scintillator of individual thickness and an underlying thin-film-transistor-based flat-panel. Three images are obtained simultaneously in the detector during the same x-ray exposure, thereby eliminating any motion artifacts. The detector operation is two-fold: a conventional radiography image can be obtained by combining all three layers' images, while a DE subtraction image can be obtained from the front and back layers' images, where the middle layer acts as a mid-filter that helps achieve spectral separation. We proceed to optimize the detector parameters for two sample imaging tasks that could particularly benefit from this new detector by obtaining the best possible signal to noise ratio per root entrance exposure using well-established theoretical models adapted to fit our new design. These results are compared to a conventional DE temporal subtraction detector and a single-shot DE subtraction detector with a copper mid-filter, both of which underwent the same theoretical optimization. The findings are then validated using advanced Monte Carlo simulations for all optimized detector setups. Given the performance expected from initial results and the recent decrease in price for digital x-ray detectors, the simplicity of the three-layer stacked imager approach appears promising to usher in a new generation of multi-spectral digital x-ray diagnostics.

  20. Modeling the spectral response for the soft X-ray imager onboard the ASTRO-H satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Katada, Shuhei; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nagino, Ryo; Anabuki, Naohisa; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Tanaka, Takaaki; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Nobukawa, Kumiko Kawabata; Washino, Ryosaku; Mori, Koji; Isoda, Eri; Sakata, Miho; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Tamasawa, Koki; Tanno, Shoma; Yoshino, Yuma; Konno, Takahiro; Ueda, Shutaro

    2016-09-01

    The ASTRO-H satellite is the 6th Japanese X-ray astronomical observatory to be launched in early 2016. The satellite carries four kinds of detectors, and one of them is an X-ray CCD camera, the soft X-ray imager (SXI), installed on the focal plane of an X-ray telescope. The SXI contains four CCD chips, each with an imaging area of 31 mm × 31 mm , arrayed in mosaic, covering the field-of-view of 38‧ ×38‧ , the widest ever flown in orbit. The CCDs are a P-channel back-illuminated (BI) type with a depletion layer thickness of 200 μ m . We operate the CCDs in a photon counting mode in which the position and energy of each photon are measured in the energy band of 0.4-12 keV. To evaluate the X-ray spectra obtained with the SXI, an accurate calibration of its response function is essential. For this purpose, we performed calibration experiments at Kyoto and Photon Factory of KEK, each with different X-ray sources with various X-ray energies. We fit the obtained spectra with 5 components; primary peak, secondary peak, constant tail, Si escape and Si fluorescence, and then model their energy dependence using physics-based or empirical formulae. Since this is the first adoption of P-channel BI-type CCDs on an X-ray astronomical satellite, we need to take special care on the constant tail component which is originated in partial charge collection. It is found that we need to assume a trapping layer at the incident surface of the CCD and implement it in the response model. In addition, the Si fluorescence component of the SXI response is significantly weak, compared with those of front-illuminated type CCDs.

  1. LONG-TERM SPECTRAL VARIATIONS OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES IN THE INTERACTING GALAXY SYSTEMS M 51 AND NGC 4490/85

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Tessei; Ebisawa, Ken; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Matsushita, Kyoko; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro

    2010-10-10

    Variable ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), which are considered to be black hole binaries (BHBs), are known to show state transitions similar to Galactic BHBs. However, the relation between the ULX states and the Galactic BHB states is still unclear, primarily due to the less well-understood behaviors of ULXs in contrast to the Galactic BHBs. Here, we report a statistical X-ray spectral study of 34 energy spectra from seven bright ULXs in the interacting galaxy systems M 51 and NGC 4490/85, using archive data from multiple Chandra and XMM-Newton observations spanning a few years. In order to compare them with Galactic BHB states, we applied representative spectral models of BHBs-a power-law (PL), a multi-color disk blackbody (MCD), and a slim-disk model-to all the ULX spectra. We found a hint of a bimodal structure in the luminosity distribution of the samples, suggesting that ULXs have two states that respectively have typical luminosities of (3-6)x 10{sup 39} and (1.5-3)x 10{sup 39} ergs s{sup -1}. Most spectra in the brighter state are explained by the MCD or the slim-disk model, whereas those in the fainter state are explained by the PL model. In particular, the slim-disk model successfully explains the observed spectral variations of NGC 4490/85 ULX-6 and ULX-8 by changes of the mass accretion rate to a black hole of an estimated mass of <40 M{sub sun}. From the best-fit model parameters of each state, we speculate that the brighter state in these two ULXs corresponds to the brightest state of Galactic BHBs, which is often called the 'apparently standard state'. The fainter state of the ULXs has a PL-shaped spectrum, but the photon index range is much wider than that seen in any single state of Galactic BHBs. We thus speculate that it is a state unique to ULXs. Some sources show much fainter and steeper spectra than the faint state, which we identified as yet another state.

  2. Long-term Spectral Variations of Ultraluminous X-ray Sources in the Interacting Galaxy Systems M 51 and NGC 4490/85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Tessei; Ebisawa, Ken; Matsushita, Kyoko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro

    2010-10-01

    Variable ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), which are considered to be black hole binaries (BHBs), are known to show state transitions similar to Galactic BHBs. However, the relation between the ULX states and the Galactic BHB states is still unclear, primarily due to the less well-understood behaviors of ULXs in contrast to the Galactic BHBs. Here, we report a statistical X-ray spectral study of 34 energy spectra from seven bright ULXs in the interacting galaxy systems M 51 and NGC 4490/85, using archive data from multiple Chandra and XMM-Newton observations spanning a few years. In order to compare them with Galactic BHB states, we applied representative spectral models of BHBs—a power-law (PL), a multi-color disk blackbody (MCD), and a slim-disk model—to all the ULX spectra. We found a hint of a bimodal structure in the luminosity distribution of the samples, suggesting that ULXs have two states that respectively have typical luminosities of (3-6)× 1039 and (1.5-3)× 1039 ergs s-1. Most spectra in the brighter state are explained by the MCD or the slim-disk model, whereas those in the fainter state are explained by the PL model. In particular, the slim-disk model successfully explains the observed spectral variations of NGC 4490/85 ULX-6 and ULX-8 by changes of the mass accretion rate to a black hole of an estimated mass of <40 M sun. From the best-fit model parameters of each state, we speculate that the brighter state in these two ULXs corresponds to the brightest state of Galactic BHBs, which is often called the "apparently standard state." The fainter state of the ULXs has a PL-shaped spectrum, but the photon index range is much wider than that seen in any single state of Galactic BHBs. We thus speculate that it is a state unique to ULXs. Some sources show much fainter and steeper spectra than the faint state, which we identified as yet another state.

  3. The contribution of AGNs to the X-ray background.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comastri, A.; Setti, G.; Zamorani, G.; Hasinger, G.

    1995-04-01

    We report the results of a detailed analysis of the contribution of various classes of AGNs (Seyfert galaxies and quasars) to the extragalactic X-ray background (XRB). The model is based on the unification schemes of AGNs, on their related X-ray spectral properties in the light of recent observational results and on the X-ray luminosity function derived by Boyle et al. (1993). The integrated emission from AGNs, when folded with an appropriate cosmological evolution law, can provide a good fit to the XRB over a wide energy range, from several to ~100keV, while it contributes only about 74% of the ROSAT soft XRB. The baseline model predictions have been checked against all available observational constraints from both hard and soft X-ray surveys (counts, redshift distributions and average X-ray source spectral properties).

  4. Laboratory Data for X-Ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G.V.; Chen, H.; Gu, M.F.; Kahn, S.M.; Lepson, J.K.; Savin, D.W.; Utter, S.B.

    2000-03-02

    Laboratory facilities have made great strides in producing large sets of reliable data for X-ray astronomy, which include ionization and recombination cross sections needed for charge balance calculations as well as the atomic data needed for interpreting X-ray line formation. We discuss data from the new generation sources and pay special attention to the LLNL electron beam ion trap experiment, which is unique in it's ability to provide direct laboratory access to spectral data under precisely controlled conditions that simulate those found in many astrophysical plasmas. Examples of spectral data obtained in the 1-160 A wavelength range are given illustrating the type of laboratory X-ray data produced in support of such missions as Chandra, XMM, ASCA and EUVE.

  5. Explorer Program: X-ray Timing Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This booklet describes the X-ray Timing Explorer (XTE), one in a series of Explorer missions administered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Office of Space Science and managed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The X-ray astronomy observatory is scheduled for launch into low-Earth orbit by Delta 2 expendable launch vehicle in late summer of 1995. The mission is expected to operate for at least 2 years and will carry out in-depth timing and spectral studies of the X-ray sources in the 2 to 200 kilo-electron Volt (keV) range. XTE is intended to study the temporal and broad-band spectral phenomena associated with stellar and galactic systems containing compact objects, including neutron stars, white dwarfs, and black holes.

  6. The Spectral Analysis of X-Ray Binaries from the XMM-Newton Space Craft Data using SAS Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baki, P.; Mito, C. O.

    2009-10-01

    A spectral data analysis on a luminous object of sky-coordinates 12h52m24.28s-29d115'02.3'12.6arcsec using Science Analysis Software (SAS) is presented. The analysis, based on data acquired by the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) camera aboard the XMM-Newton Space satellite, shows that the primary constituents of the X-ray source are Fe (Iron) and O (oxygen). This suggests that the source may be a magnetized plasma in a binary system and as this magnetic field accelerates the cooling of a star, one may speculate that this may be a compact star in its last stages of a thermonuclear fusion process. Nous présentons une analyse du spectre d'une source a rayons X située -- en coordonnées sidérales - à 12h52m24.28s - 29d115'02.312.6 arcsec. Science Analysis Software (SAS) est le programme informatique utilisé pour l'analyse des données. Cette analyse est basée sur les données provenant du spectromètre à haute résolution (RGS) à bord du satellite spatiale XMM-Newton. Nous montrons que ladite source est principalement constituée de Fer (Fe) et d'oxygene (O). Ce résultat suggère que la source pourrait être un plasma magnétisé au sein d'un système binaire. Et du fait que ce champ magnétique accélère le refroidissement de l'étoile, nous supposons que cette étoile pourrait ètre un objet compact en phase terminale d'un processus de fusion thermonucléaire.

  7. A dichotomy between the hard state spectral properties of black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, M. J.; Gilfanov, M.; Sunyaev, R.

    2016-10-01

    We analyse the spectra of black hole (BH) and neutron star (NS) X-ray binaries (XBs) in the hard state using archival RXTE observations. We find that there is a clear dichotomy in the strength of Comptonisation between NS and BH sources, as measured by both the Compton y -parameter and amplification factor A, with distinct groups of BH and NS XBs separated at y ˜ 0.9 and A ˜ 3. The electron temperature kTe can occupy a broad range in BH systems, from kTe ˜ 30 - 200 keV, whereas for NSs kTe is peaked at ˜15 - 25 keV, but can extend to higher values. The difference between BHs and NSs in y implies that kTe is higher at a given optical depth for BH XBs. Our results also imply that for NS systems the accreting material loses ˜1/2 - 2/3 of its energy through Comptonisation in the corona. The remaining energy is released on the surface of the neutron star, making it a powerful source of soft radiation, which alters the properties of the Comptonizing corona. Finally, we find evidence at the ˜2.4σ confidence level that Comptonisation parameters may be correlated with the neutron star spin, whereas no correlation with the BH spin is found. Our results highlight a further observational distinction between BH and NS XBs that is a consequence of NSs possessing a physical surface.

  8. X-ray variability with spectral state transitions in NS-LMXBs observed with MAXI/GSC and Swift/BAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Kazumi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Matsuoka, Masaru; Sugizaki, Mutsumi

    2015-10-01

    X-ray variabilities with spectral state transitions in bright low-mass X-ray binaries containing a neutron star are investigated by using the one-day bin light curves of MAXI/GSC (Gas Slit Camera) and Swift/BAT (Burst Alert Telescope). Four sources (4U 1636-536, 4U 1705-44, 4U 1608-52, and GS 1826-238) exhibited small-amplitude X-ray variabilities with spectral state transitions. Such "mini-outbursts" were characterized by smaller amplitudes (several times) and shorter duration (less than several tens of days) than those of "normal outbursts." A theoretical model of disk instability by Mineshige and Osaki (PASJ, 37, 1, 1985) predicts both large-amplitude outbursts and small-amplitude variabilities. We interpret the normal outbursts as the former prediction of this model, and the mini-outbursts as the latter. Here, we can also call the mini-outburst a "purr-type outburst" referring to the theoretical work. We suggest that similar variabilities lasting for several tens of days without spectral state transitions, which are often observed in the hard state, may be repeats of mini-outbursts.

  9. LONG-TERM X-RAY MONITORING OF LS I +61{sup 0}303: ANALYSIS OF SPECTRAL VARIABILITY AND FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jian; Zhang Shu; Chen Yupeng; Wang Jianmin; Torres, Diego F.; Hadasch, Daniela; Rea, Nanda; Ray, Paul S.; Kretschmar, Peter

    2011-06-01

    We report on the full analysis of a Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array monitoring of the {gamma}-ray binary system LS I +61{sup 0}303. The data set covers 42 contiguous cycles of the system orbital motion. Analyzing this X-ray monitoring data set, the largest to date for this source, we report on the variability of the orbital profile and the spectral distribution, and provide strong evidence for an anti-correlation between flux and spectral index (the higher the flux, the harder the spectral index). Furthermore, we present the analysis of two newly discovered kilosecond-timescale flares, which present significant variability also on shorter timescales and tend to occur at orbital phases between 0.6 and 0.9. However, a detailed timing analysis of the flares does not show any coherent or quasi-coherent (QPO) structure in their power spectra. We also investigated the possible appearance of the radio super-orbital modulation at X-ray energies, but we could not unambiguously detect such modulation in the system flux history nor in the evolution of its orbital modulation fraction.

  10. Harmonic generation in VUV/x-ray range at the Duke storage ring FEL using electron beam outcoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Burnham, B.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    We suggest using the OK-4 FEL operating in giant pulse mode to generate intracavity optical power at a level of hundreds of megawatts. These levels of power are sufficient to generate harmonics in the electron beam density. The prebunched electron beam then radiates coherently in an additional wiggler which is tuned on a harmonic of the OK-4 wavelength. The electron beam is turned by an achromatic bend into this wiggler, and harmonic radiation propagates with a small angle with respect to the OK-4 optical axis. This radiation will pass around the mirror of the OK-4 optical cavity and can then be utilized. This electron outcoupling scheme was suggested by N.A. Vinokurov as a method of optics independent outcoupling for high power FELs where electron beam bunching is provided in the master oscillator. This scheme is perfectly suited for optics independent harmonic generation. We suggest to operate the OK-4 FEL as a master oscillator in the UV range of 100 to 250 nm where conventional optics are available. This harmonic generation scheme would allow us to cover the VUV and soft X-Ray range with tunable coherent radiation. In this paper we present the possible layout of this system at the Duke storage ring and its expected operating parameters.

  11. Design of an ultrahigh-energy-resolution and wide-energy-range soft X-ray beamline.

    PubMed

    Xue, L; Reininger, R; Wu, Y-Q; Zou, Y; Xu, Z-M; Shi, Y-B; Dong, J; Ding, H; Sun, J-L; Guo, F-Z; Wang, Y; Tai, R-Z

    2014-01-01

    A new ultrahigh-energy-resolution and wide-energy-range soft X-ray beamline has been designed and is under construction at the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The beamline has two branches: one dedicated to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and the other to photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM). The two branches share the same plane-grating monochromator, which is equipped with four variable-line-spacing gratings and covers the 20-2000 eV energy range. Two elliptically polarized undulators are employed to provide photons with variable polarization, linear in every inclination and circular. The expected energy resolution is approximately 10 meV at 1000 eV with a flux of more than 3 × 10(10) photons s(-1) at the ARPES sample positions. The refocusing of both branches is based on Kirkpatrick-Baez pairs. The expected spot sizes when using a 10 µm exit slit are 15 µm × 5 µm (horizontal × vertical FWHM) at the ARPES station and 10 µm × 5 µm (horizontal × vertical FWHM) at the PEEM station. The use of plane optical elements upstream of the exit slit, a variable-line-spacing grating and a pre-mirror in the monochromator that allows the influence of the thermal deformation to be eliminated are essential for achieving the ultrahigh-energy resolution.

  12. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of gold in the 38-50-keV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, M T; Rae, N A; Glover, J L; Barnea, Z; de Jonge, M D; Tran, C Q; Wang, J; Chantler, C T

    2010-11-12

    We used synchrotron x rays to measure the x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of gold at nine energies from 38 to 50 keV with accuracies of 0.1%. Our results are much more accurate than previous measurements in this energy range. A comparison of our measurements with calculated mass attenuation coefficients shows that our measurements fall almost exactly midway between the XCOM and FFAST calculated theoretical values, which differ from one another in this energy region by about 4%, even though the range includes no absorption edge. The consistency and accuracy of these measurements open the way to investigations of the x-ray attenuation in the region of the L absorption edge of gold.

  13. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of this proposal was to perform an accurate measurement of the broadband x-ray spectrum of a neutron-star low-mass x-ray binary found in a hard x-ray state. This goal was accomplished using data obtained under another proposal, which has provided exciting new information on the hard x-ray emission of neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. In "BeppoSAX Observations of the Atoll X-Ray Binary 4U0614+091", we present our analysis of the spectrum of 4U0614+091 over the energy band from 0.3-150 keV. Our data confirm the presence of a hard x-ray tail that can be modeled as thermal Comptonization of low-energy photons on electrons having a very high temperature, greater than 220 keV, or as a non-thermal powerlaw. Such a very hard x-ray spectrum has not been previously seen from neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. We also detected a spectral feature that can be interpreted as reprocessing, via Compton reflection, of the direct emission by an optically-thick disk and found a correlation between the photon index of the power-law tail and the fraction of radiation reflected which is similar to the correlation found for black hole candidate x-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. A secondary goal was to measure the timing properties of the x-ray emission from neutronstar low-mass x-ray binaries in their low/hard states.

  14. X-ray optics of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Letfullin, Renat R; Rice, Colin E W; George, Thomas F

    2014-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been investigated as contrast agents for traditional x-ray medical procedures, utilizing the strong absorption characteristics of the nanoparticles to enhance the contrast of the detected x-ray image. Here we use the Kramers-Kronig relation for complex atomic scattering factors to find the real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction for the medium composed of single-element materials or compounds in the x-ray range of the spectrum. These complex index of refraction values are then plugged into a Lorenz-Mie theory to calculate the absorption efficiency of various size gold nanoparticles for photon energies in the 1-100 keV range. Since the output from most medical diagnostic x-ray devices follows a wide and filtered spectrum of photon energies, we introduce and compute the effective intensity-absorption-efficiency values for gold nanoparticles of radii varying from 5 to 50 nm, where we use the TASMIP model to integrate over all spectral energies generated by typical tungsten anode x-ray tubes with kilovolt potentials ranging from 50 to 150 kVp.

  15. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li + ion beam-driven hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R. J.; Moats, A. R.; Leeper, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li+ ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies (⩽100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  16. Spectral and timing properties of the black hole X-ray binary H1743–322 in the low/hard state studied with Suzaku

    SciTech Connect

    Shidatsu, M.; Ueda, Y.; Hori, T.; Yamada, S.; Done, C.; Yamaoka, K.; Kubota, A.; Nagayama, T.; Moritani, Y.

    2014-07-10

    We report on the results from Suzaku observations of the Galactic black hole X-ray binary H1743–322 in the low/hard state during its outburst in 2012 October. We appropriately take into account the effects of dust scattering to accurately analyze the X-ray spectra. The time-averaged spectra in the 1-200 keV band are dominated by a hard power-law component of a photon index of ≈1.6 with a high-energy cutoff at ≈60 keV, which is well described with the Comptonization of the disk emission by the hot corona. We estimate the inner disk radius from the multi-color disk component, and find that it is 1.3-2.3 times larger than the radius in the high/soft state. This suggests that the standard disk was not extended to the innermost stable circular orbit. A reflection component from the disk is detected with R = Ω/2π ≈ 0.6 (Ω is the solid angle). We also successfully estimate the stable disk component independent of the time-averaged spectral modeling by analyzing short-term spectral variability on a ∼1 s timescale. A weak low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation at 0.1-0.2 Hz is detected, whose frequency is found to correlate with the X-ray luminosity and photon index. This result may be explained by the evolution of the disk truncation radius.

  17. SAXES, a high resolution spectrometer for resonant x-ray emission in the 400-1600 eV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiringhelli, G.; Piazzalunga, A.; Dallera, C.; Trezzi, G.; Braicovich, L.; Schmitt, T.; Strocov, V. N.; Betemps, R.; Patthey, L.; Wang, X.; Grioni, M.

    2006-11-15

    We present a 5 m long spectrometer for soft x rays to be used at a synchrotron radiation beamline for resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering in the 400-1600 eV energy range. It is based on a variable line spacing spherical grating (average groove density of 3200 mm{sup -1}, R=58.55 m) and a charge coupled device two dimensional detector. With an x-ray spot on the sample of 10 {mu}m, the targeted resolving power is higher than 10 000 at all energies below 1100 eV and better than 7000 at 1500 eV. The off-line tests made with Al and Mg K{alpha}{sub 1,2} fluorescence emissions indicate that the spectrometer can actually work at 12 000 and 17 000 resolving power at the L{sub 3} edges of Cu (930 eV) and of Ti (470 eV), respectively. SAXES (superadvanced x-ray emission spectrometer) is mounted on a rotating platform allowing to vary the scattering angle from 25 degree sign to 130 degree sign . The spectrometer will be operational at the ADRESS (advanced resonant spectroscopies) beamline of the Swiss Light Source from 2007.

  18. X-RAY SPECTRAL RESIDUALS IN NGC 5408 X-1: DIFFUSE EMISSION FROM STAR FORMATION, OR THE SIGNATURE OF A SUPER-EDDINGTON WIND?

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Andrew D; Roberts, Timothy P.; Middleton, Matthew J

    2015-11-20

    If ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are powered by accretion onto stellar remnant black holes, then many must be accreting at super-Eddington rates. It is predicted that such high accretion rates should give rise to massive, radiatively driven winds. However, observational evidence of a wind, in the form of absorption or emission features, has remained elusive. As such, the reported detection of X-ray spectral residuals in XMM-Newton spectra of NGC 5408 X-1, which could be related to absorption in a wind is potentially very exciting. However, it has previously been assumed by several authors that these features simply originate from background diffuse plasma emission related to star formation in the ULX’s host galaxy. In this work we utilize the spatial resolving power of Chandra to test whether we can rule out this latter interpretation. We demonstrate that the majority of the luminosity in these spectral features is emitted from a highly localized region close to the ULX, and appears point-like even with Chandra. It is therefore highly likely that the spectral features are associated with the ULX itself, and little of the flux in this spectral component originates from spatially extended emission in the host galaxy. This may be consistent with the suggestion of absorption in an optically thin phase of a super-Eddington wind. Alternatively, we could be seeing emission from collisionally ionized material close to the black hole, but critically this would be difficult to reconcile with models where the source inclination largely determines the observed X-ray spectral and timing properties.

  19. Reduction in the intensity of solar X-ray emission in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range and heating of the solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzoeva, I. K.

    2013-04-15

    The time profiles of the energy spectra of low-intensity flares and the structure of the thermal background of the soft X-ray component of solar corona emission over the period of January-February, 2003, are investigated using the data of the RHESSI project. A reduction in the intensity of X-ray emission of the solar flares and the corona thermal background in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range is revealed. The RHESSI data are compared with the data from the Interball-Geotail project. A new mechanism of solar corona heating is proposed on the basis of the results obtained.

  20. Polarized X-rays from accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipankar

    2016-07-01

    Accreting neutron stars span a wide range in X-ray luminosity and magnetic field strength. Accretion may be wind-fed or disk-fed, and the dominant X-ray flux may originate in the disk or a magnetically confined accretion column. In all such systems X-ray polarization may arise due to Compton or Magneto-Compton scattering, and on some occasions polarization of non-thermal emission from jet-like ejection may also be detectable. Spectral and temporal behaviour of the polarized X-rays would carry information regarding the radiation process, as well as of the matter dynamics - and can assist the detection of effects such as the Lense-Thirring precession. This talk will review our current knowledge of the expected X-ray polarization from accreting neutron stars and explore the prospects of detection with upcoming polarimetry missions.

  1. Small area silicon diffused junction x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Pehl, R.H.; Larsh, A.E.

    1981-10-01

    The low temperature performance of silicon diffused junction detectors in the measurement of low energy x-rays is reported. The detectors have an area of 0.04 cm/sup 2/ and a thickness of 100 ..mu..m. The spectral resolutions of these detectors were found to be in close agreement with expected values indicating that the defects introduced by the high temperature processing required in the device fabrication were not deleteriously affecting the detection of low energy x-rays. Device performance over a temperature range of 77 to 150/sup 0/K is given. These detectors were designed to detect low energy x-rays in the presence of minimum ionizing electrons. The successful application of silicon diffused junction technology to x-ray detector fabrication may facilitate the development of other novel silicon x-ray detector designs.

  2. Evaluation of field-portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of lead contamination on small-arms firing ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.F.; Taylor, J.D.; Bass, D.A.; Zellmer, D.; Rieck, M.

    1995-02-01

    Field analytical methods for the characterization of lead contamination in soil are being developed. In this study, the usefulness of a commercially available, field-portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) is evaluated for determining the extent of lead contamination in soils on small-arms firing ranges at a military installation. This field screening technique provides significant time and cost savings for the study of sites with lead-contaminated soil. Data obtained with the XRF unit in the field are compared with data obtained from soil samples analyzed in an analytical laboratory by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Results indicate that the field-portable XRF unit evaluated in this study provides data that are useful in determining the extent and relative magnitude of lead contamination. For the commercial unit used in this study, improvements in the spectral resolution and in the limit of detection would be required to make the unit more than just a screening tool.

  3. Time-resolved analysis of the X-ray emission of femtosecond-laser-produced plasmas in the 1.5-keV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Audebert, P.; Nagels-Silvert, V.; Geindre, J. P.; Gauthier, J. C.; Adam, J. C.; Héron, A.; Chenais-Popovics, C.

    Recent experimental results on ion beams produced in high-intensity laser-solid interactions indicate the presence of very intense electric fields in the target. This suggests the possibility of efficiently heating a solid material by means of the fast electrons created during the laser-solid interactions and trapped in the target, rather than by the laser photons themselves. We tested this mechanism by irradiating very small cubic aluminum targets with the LULI 100-TW, 300-fs laser at 1.06-μm wavelength. X-ray spectra were measured with an ultra-fast streak camera, coupled to a conical Bragg crystal, providing spectra in the 1.5-keV range with high temporal and spectral resolution. The results indicate the creation of a hot plasma, but a very low coupling between the rapid electrons and the solid. A tentative explanation, in agreement with other experimental results and with preliminary particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, points out the fatal role of the laser prepulse.

  4. The 2006-2007 Active Phase Of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts, and Burst Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavril, Fotis P.; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2009-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in >11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 8-3x10(exp 3)s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT approx. 2 - 6 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus three emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of (1.9+/-0.4)x10(exp -7) Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a net spin-down of the pulsar. We discuss these events in the context of the magnetar model.

  5. A diffuse soft X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.

    1981-01-01

    A design for a diffuse X-ray spectrometer utilizing Bragg reflection is described. The geometry has a very high throughput for a given physical size and allows simultaneous observation at all wavelengths within its range. Spectral resolving power is about 35 to 50. A similar unit equipped with thallium acid pthallate crystals will cover the 11 - 24 A-range with about half this throughput and twice the resolving power.

  6. A detailed X-ray investigation of ζ Puppis. III. Spectral analysis of the whole RGS spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, A.; Rauw, G.; Nazé, Y.

    2013-03-01

    Context. ζ Pup is the X-ray brightest O-type star of the sky. This object was regularly observed with the RGS instrument onboard XMM-Newton for calibration purposes, which led to an unprecedented set of high-quality spectra. Aims: We have previously reduced and extracted this data set and integrated it into the most detailed high-resolution X-ray spectrum of any early-type star so far. Here we present the analysis of this spectrum, taking into account for the presence of structures in the stellar wind. Methods: For this purpose, we used our new modeling tool that allows fitting the entire spectrum with a multi-temperature plasma. We illustrate the impact of a proper treatment of the radial dependence of the X-ray opacity of the cool wind on the best-fit radial distribution of the temperature of the X-ray plasma. Results: The best-fit of the RGS spectrum of ζ Pup is obtained assuming no porosity. Four plasma components at temperatures between 0.10 and 0.69 keV are needed to adequately represent the observed spectrum. Whilst the hardest emission is concentrated between ~3 and 4 R∗, the softer emission starts already at 1.5 R∗ and extends to the outer regions of the wind. Conclusions: The inferred radial distribution of the plasma temperatures agrees rather well with theoretical expectations. The mass-loss rate and CNO abundances corresponding to our best-fit model also agree quite well with the results of recent studies of ζ Pup in the UV and optical domain. Based on observations collected with XMM-Newton, an ESA Science Mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA).

  7. Neutron spectral measurements in an intense photon field associated with a high-energy x-ray radiotherapy machine.

    PubMed

    Holeman, G R; Price, K W; Friedman, L F; Nath, R

    1977-01-01

    High-energy x-ray radiotherapy machines in the supermegavoltage region generate complex neutron energy spectra which make an exact evaluation of neutron shielding difficult. Fast neutrons resulting from photonuclear reactions in the x-ray target and collimators undergo successive collisions in the surrounding materials and are moderated by varying amounts. In order to examine the neutron radiation exposures quantitatively, the neutron energy spectra have been measured inside and outside the treatment room of a Sagittaire medical linear accelerator (25-MV x rays) located at Yale-New Haven Hospital. The measurements were made using a Bonner spectrometer consisting of 2-, 3-, 5-, 8-, 10- and 12-in.-diameter polyethylene spheres with 6Li and 7Li thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips at the centers, in addition to bare and cadmium-covered chips. The individual TLD chips were calibrated for neutron and photon response. The spectrometer was calibrated using a known PuBe spectrum Spectrometer measurements were made at Yale Electron Accelerator Laboratory and results compared with a neutron time-of-flight spectrometer and an activation technique. The agreement between the results from these independent methods is found to be good, except for the measurements in the direct photon beam. Quality factors have been inferred for the neutron fields inside and outside the treatment room. Values of the inferred quality factors fall primarily between 4 and 8, depending on location.

  8. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  9. Characterization of medium-range order in organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials by fluctuation x-ray microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.; Paterson, D.; McNulty, I.; Treacy, M. M. J.; Kumar, D.; Du, P.; Wiesner, U.; Gibson, J. M.; Experimental Facilities Division; Arizona State Univ.; Cornell Univ.

    2006-01-01

    Medium-range order (MRO) is crucial for understanding the nature of defects, mechanical behaviors, rheology in polymers, order-disorder processes and nucleation, etc. Measuring MRO is a challenging problem. Recently, we have developed fluctuation x-ray microscopy (FXM), which offers quantitative insight into MRO in materials at the micrometer scale. In this paper, we have applied our further-developed technique for characterization of MRO in nanomaterials. The study of mesostructured polymer-inorganic hybrid materials is an exciting, emerging research area offering enormous scientific and technological promise. The ability to control the shape, size and order of hybrid materials is a key requirement for their future development. By choice of the appropriate block copolymer system and inorganic precursors, the shape and size of the hybrid materials can be controlled at the nanometer scale. However, the control of formation and ordering of the nanostructures with medium to long range order remains a challenge that limits advances in many fields of nanotechnology. By using FXM here we examine the influence of sol-gel process variables on medium range order. The FXM method is described elsewhere. Two hybrids of PI-b-PEO/aluminosilicates with {approx}20nm phase separation length scale were prepared using known procedures. The PI-b-PEO amphiphilic block copolymer was synthesized via anionic polymerization techniques. Hybrids were fabricated by dissolving 0.05 g of PI-b-PEO in tetrahydrofuran (THF) (sample A) or a THF/chloroform mixture (28/72 v/v) (sample B) and adding 0.3 g of pre-hydrolyzed sol-gel inorganic precursors (3-glycidyloxypropyl-trimethoxysilane and aluminum-tri-secbutoxide). Samples were spin coated onto Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} windows on Si substrate. Both samples were UV/ozone treated for degrading the isoprene components in order to increase contrast for x-ray scattering experiments. The sample A was further cacinated at 350 C to remove all organic components

  10. Azimuthal anisotropy of the scattered radiation in grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Gangadhar Tiwari, M. K.; Singh, A. K.; Ghosh, Haranath

    2015-06-24

    The Compton and elastic scattering radiations are the major contributor to the spectral background of an x-ray fluorescence spectrum, which eventually limits the element detection sensitivities of the technique to µg/g (ppm) range. In the present work, we provide a detail mathematical descriptions and show that how polarization properties of the synchrotron radiation influence the spectral background in the x-ray fluorescence technique. We demonstrate our theoretical understandings through experimental observations using total x-ray fluorescence measurements on standard reference materials. Interestingly, the azimuthal anisotropy of the scattered radiation is shown to have a vital role on the significance of the x-ray fluorescence detection sensitivities.

  11. Short-range order in Fe-based metallic glasses: Wide-angle X-ray scattering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Babilas, Rafał; Hawełek, Łukasz; Burian, Andrzej

    2014-11-15

    The local atomic structure of the Fe{sub 80}B{sub 20}, Fe{sub 70}Nb{sub 10}B{sub 20} and Fe{sub 62}Nb{sub 8}B{sub 30} glasses prepared in the form of ribbons has been studied by wide-angle X-ray scattering. Structural information about the amorphous ribbons has been derived from analysis of the radial distribution functions using the least-squares curve-fitting method. The obtained structural parameters indicate that Fe–Fe, Fe–B, Fe–Nb and Nb–B contributions are involved in the near-neighbor coordination spheres. The possible similarities of the local atomic arrangement in the investigated glasses and the crystalline Fe{sub 3}B, Fe{sub 23}B{sub 6} and bcc Fe structures are also discussed. - Graphical abstract: Pair distribution functions (a) and best-fit model and experimental radial distribution functions for Fe{sub 80}B{sub 20} (b), Fe{sub 70}Nb{sub 10}B{sub 20} (c) and Fe{sub 62}Nb{sub 8}B{sub 30} (d) metallic glasses. - Highlights: • The short-range ordering in the Fe-based metallic glasses is presented. • The results of RDF function have been analyzed using the least-squares method. • The Fe–Fe, Fe–B, Fe–Nb or Nb–B contributions are involved in coordination spheres. • The structural unit is distorted triangular prism containing B, Fe or Nb atoms. • Similarities of atomic arrangement in glassy and crystalline structures are discussed.

  12. The XMM-Newton survey of the ELAIS-S1 field. I. Number counts, angular correlation function and X-ray spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puccetti, S.; Fiore, F.; D'Elia, V.; Pillitteri, I.; Feruglio, C.; Grazian, A.; Brusa, M.; Ciliegi, P.; Comastri, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Mignoli, M.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.; La Franca, F.; Sacchi, N.; Franceschini, A.; Berta, S.; Buttery, H.; Dias, J. E.

    2006-10-01

    Aims.The formation and evolution of cosmic structures can be probed by studying the evolution of the luminosity function of the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), galaxies and clusters of galaxies and of the clustering of the X-ray active Universe, compared to the IR-UV active Universe. Methods: .To this purpose, we have surveyed with XMM-Newton the central ~0.6 deg2 region of the ELAIS-S1 field down to flux limits of ~5.5 × 10-16 erg~cm-2~s-1 (0.5-2 keV, soft band, S), ~2 × 10-15 erg~cm-2~s-1 (2-10 keV, hard band, H), and ~4 × 10-15 erg~cm-2~s-1 (5-10 keV, ultra hard band, HH). We present here the analysis of the XMM-Newton observations, the number counts in different energy bands and the clustering properties of the X-ray sources. Results: .We detect a total of 478 sources, 395 and 205 of which detected in the S and H bands respectively. We identified 7 clearly extended sources and estimated their redshift through X-ray spectral fits with thermal models. In four cases the redshift is consistent with z=0.4, so we may have detected a large scale structure formed by groups and clusters of galaxies through their hot intra-cluster gas emission. We have computed the angular correlation function of the sources in the S and H bands finding best fit correlation angles θ_0=5.2 ± 3.8 arcsec and θ_0=12.8 ± 7.8 arcsec in the two bands respectively. The correlation angle of H band sources is therefore formally ~2.5 times that of the S band sources, although the difference is at only ~1σ confidence level. A rough estimate of the present-day correlation length r0 can be obtained inverting the Limber equation and assuming an appropriate redshift distribution dN/dz. The results range between 12.8 and 9.8 h-1 Mpc in the S band and between 17.9 and 13.4 h-1 Mpc in the H band, with 30-40% statistical errors, assuming either smooth redshift distributions or redshift distributions with spikes accounting for the presence of significant structure at z=0.4. The relative density of the

  13. Exploring the Full Range of Properties of Quasar Spectral Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, B.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work is to support our ISO, far-infrared (IR) observing program of quasars and active galaxies. We have obtained, as far as possible, complete spectral energy distributions (radio-X-ray) of the ISO sample in order to fully delineate the continuum shapes and to allow detailed modelling of that continuum. This includes: ground-based optical, near-IR and mm data, the spectral ranges closest to the ISO data, within 1-2 years of the ISO observations themselves. ISO was launched in Nov 1995 and is currently observing routinely. It has an estimated lifetime is 2 years. All near-IR and optical imaging and spectroscopy are now in hand and in the process of being reduced, mm data collection and proposal writing continues.

  14. Towards attosecond X-ray pulses from the FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.

    2004-07-01

    The ability to study ultrafast phenomena has been recently advanced by the demonstrated production and measurement of a single, 650-attosecond (10{sup 18} sec), VUV x-ray pulse[1] and, latter, a 250-attosecond pulse[2]. The next frontier is a production of the x-ray pulses with shorter wavelengths and in a broader spectral range. Several techniques for a generation of an isolated, attosecond duration, short-wavelength x-ray pulse based upon the ponderomotive laser acceleration [3], SASE and harmonic cascade FELs ([4] - [6]) had been already proposed. In this paper we briefly review a technique proposed in [5] and present some new results.

  15. TIMING AND SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF Be/X-RAY PULSAR EXO 2030+375 DURING A TYPE I OUTBURST

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, Sachindra; Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Maitra, Chandreyee; Paul, Biswajit

    2013-02-20

    We present results from a study of broadband timing and spectral properties of EXO 2030+375 using a Suzaku observation. Pulsations with a period of 41.41 s and strong energy-dependent pulse profiles were clearly detected up to 100 keV. Narrow dips are seen in the profiles up to {approx}70 keV. The presence of prominent dips at several phases in the profiles up to such high energy ranges was not seen before. At higher energies, these dips gradually disappeared and the profile appeared to be single-peaked. The 1.0-200.0 keV broadband spectrum is found to be well described by a partial covering high-energy cutoff power-law model. Several low-energy emission lines are also detected in the pulsar spectrum. We fitted the spectrum using neutral as well as partially ionized absorbers along with the above continuum model yielding similar parameter values. The partial covering with a partially ionized absorber resulted in a marginally better fit. The spectral fitting did not require any cyclotron feature in the best-fit model. To investigate the changes in spectral parameters at dips, we carried out pulse-phase-resolved spectroscopy. During the dips, the value of the additional column density was estimated to be high compared to other pulse phases. While using a partially ionized absorber, the value of the ionization parameter is also higher at the dips. This may be the reason for the presence of dips up to higher energies. No other spectral parameters show any systematic variation with pulse phases of the pulsar.

  16. First international comparison of primary absorbed dose to water standards in the medium-energy X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büermann, Ludwig; Guerra, Antonio Stefano; Pimpinella, Maria; Pinto, Massimo; de Pooter, Jacco; de Prez, Leon; Jansen, Bartel; Denoziere, Marc; Rapp, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first international comparison of primary measurement standards of absorbed dose to water for the medium-energy X-ray range. Three of the participants (VSL, PTB, LNE-LNHB) used their existing water calorimeter based standards and one participant (ENEA) recently developed a new standard based on a water-graphite calorimeter. The participants calibrated three transfer chambers of the same type in terms of absorbed dose to water (NDw) and in addition in terms of air kerma (NK) using the CCRI radiation qualities in the range 100 kV to 250 kV. The additional NK values were intended to be used for a physical analysis of the ratios NDw/NK. All participants had previously participated in the BIPM.RI(I)-K3 key comparison of air kerma standards. Ratios of pairs of NMI's NK results of the current comparison were found to be consistent with the corresponding key comparison results within the expanded uncertainties of 0.6 % - 1 %. The NDw results were analysed in terms of the degrees of equivalence with the comparison reference values which were calculated for each beam quality as the weighted means of all results. The participant's results were consistent with the reference value within the expanded uncertainties. However, these expanded uncertainties varied significantly and ranged between about 1-1.8 % for the water calorimeter based standards and were estimated at 3.7 % for the water-graphite calorimeter. It was shown previously that the ratios NDw/NK for the type of ionization chamber used as transfer chamber in this comparison were very close (within less than 1 %) to the calculated values of (bar muen/ρ)w,ad, the mean values of the water-to-air ratio of the mass-energy-absorption coefficients at the depth d in water. Some of the participant's results deviated significantly from the expected behavior. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of

  17. X-RAY POINT-SOURCE POPULATIONS CONSTITUTING THE GALACTIC RIDGE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Ebisawa, Ken; Yoshida, Tessei

    2013-03-20

    Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of X-ray astronomy; this is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra bulge field, we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard-band continuum and Fe K line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-thermal sources with different fractions in different flux ranges. From their X-ray properties, we speculate that the group A non-thermal sources are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf (WD) binaries such as magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), pre-CVs, and symbiotic stars, whereas the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flares and quiescence, respectively. In the log N-log S curve of the 2-8 keV band, the group A non-thermal sources are dominant above Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is gradually taken over by Galactic sources in the fainter flux ranges. The Fe K{alpha} emission is mostly from the group A thermal (WD binaries) and the group B (X-ray active stars) sources.

  18. Novel amide-type ligand bearing bis-pyridine cores: Synthesis, spectral characterizations and X-ray structure analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Shaoyong

    2016-08-01

    The novel salicylamide-type ligand containing bis-pyridine moieties, i.e. 2-((6-chloropyridin-3-yl)methoxy)-N-(2-((6-chloropyridin-3-yl)methylthio)phenyl)benzamide, which has been successfully synthesized and characterized by typical spectroscopic techniques mainly including IR, 1H NMR and ESI-MS. The structure of target compound was further determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction method and which crystallized in the monoclinic system with space group P2(1)/c.

  19. X-ray spectral and Mossbauer investigations of structure defects and the degree of inversion of manganese-zinc ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichok, P. P.; Pashchenko, V. P.; Kompaniets, V. I.; Brovkina, G. T.

    1982-03-01

    X-ray and Mossbauer spectroscopy is used to investigate the effect of vacuum cooling on the valence of cations of manganese and iron, nonstoichiometry and the degree of inversion of manganese-zinc ferrites. The dependence of the valency of the cations of manganese and iron, the degree of inversion, and the degree of nonstoichiometry on the partial pressure of oxygen produced in the cooling stage is established. An interrelationship is found between the defects and the degree of inversion of manganese-zinc ferrites.

  20. A Broadband X-Ray Spectral Study of the Intermediate-mass Black Hole Candidate M82 X-1 with NuSTAR, Chandra, and Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brightman, Murray; Harrison, Fiona A.; Barret, Didier; Davis, Shane W.; Fürst, Felix; Madsen, Kristin K.; Middleton, Matthew; Miller, Jon M.; Stern, Daniel; Tao, Lian; Walton, Dominic J.

    2016-09-01

    M82 X-1 is one of the brightest ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) known, which, assuming Eddington-limited accretion and other considerations, makes it one of the best intermediate-mass black-hole (IMBH) candidates. However, the ULX may still be explained by super-Eddington accretion onto a stellar remnant black hole. We present simultaneous NuSTAR, Chandra, and Swift/XRT observations during the peak of a flaring episode with the aim of modeling the emission of M82 X-1 and yielding insights into its nature. We find that thin accretion disk models all require accretion rates at or above the Eddington limit in order to reproduce the spectral shape, given a range of black-hole masses and spins. Since at these high Eddington ratios the thin-disk model breaks down due to radial advection in the disk, we discard the results of the thin-disk models as unphysical. We find that the temperature profile as a function of disk radius (T(r)\\propto {r}-p) is significantly flatter (p={0.55}-0.04+0.07) than expected for a standard thin disk (p = 0.75). A flatter profile is instead characteristic of a slim disk, which is highly suggestive of super-Eddington accretion. Furthermore, radiation hydrodynamical simulations of super-Eddington accretion have shown that the predicted spectra of these systems are very similar to what we observe for M82 X-1. We therefore conclude that M82 X-1 is a super-Eddington accretor. Our mass estimates inferred from the inner disk radius imply a stellar remnant black hole ({M}{{BH}} = {26}-6+9 M ⊙) when assuming zero spin and face-on inclination, or an IMBH for maximal spin and a highly inclined disk.

  1. X-Ray Emission from the Soft X-Ray Transient Aquila X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    Aquila X-1 is the most prolific of soft X-ray transients. It is believed to contain a rapidly spinning neutron star sporadically accreting near the Eddington limit from a low-mass companion star. The interest in studying the repeated X-ray outbursts from Aquila X-1 is twofold: (1) studying the relation between optical, soft and hard X-ray emission during the outburst onset, development and decay; (2) relating the spectral component to thermal and non-thermal processes occurring near the magnetosphere and in the boundary layer of a time-variable accretion disk. Our investigation is based on the BATSE monitoring of Aquila X-1 performed by our group. We observed Aquila X-1 in 1997 and re-analyzed archival information obtained in April 1994 during a period of extraordinary outbursting activity of the source in the hard X-ray range. Our results allow, for the first time for this important source, to obtain simultaneous spectral information from 2 keV to 200 keV. A black body (T = 0.8 keV) plus a broken power-law spectrum describe accurately the 1994 spectrum. Substantial hard X-ray emission is evident in the data, confirming that the accretion phase during sub-Eddington limit episodes is capable of producing energetic hard emission near 5 x 10(exp 35) ergs(exp -1). A preliminary paper summarizes our results, and a more comprehensive account is being written. We performed a theoretical analysis of possible emission mechanisms, and confirmed that a non-thermal emission mechanism triggered in a highly sheared magnetosphere at the accretion disk inner boundary can explain the hard X-ray emission. An anticorrelation between soft and hard X-ray emission is indeed prominently observed as predicted by this model.

  2. Quasi-periodic Oscillations Associated with Spectral Branches in Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Observations of Circinus X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirey, Robert E.; Bradt, Hale V.; Levine, Alan M.; Morgan, Edward H.

    1998-10-01

    We present Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) All-Sky Monitor observations of the X-ray binary Circinus X-1 that illustrate the variety of intensity profiles associated with the 16.55 day flaring cycle of the source. We also present eight observations of Cir X-1 made with the RXTE Proportional Counter Array over the course of a cycle wherein the average intensity of the flaring state decreased gradually over ~12 days. Fourier power density spectra for these observations show a narrow quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) peak that shifts in frequency between 6.8 and 32 Hz, as well as a broad QPO peak that remains roughly stationary at ~4 Hz. We identify these as Z-source horizontal and normal branch oscillations (HBOs/NBOs), respectively. Color-color and hardness-intensity diagrams (CDs/HIDs) show curvilinear tracks for each of the observations. The properties of the QPOs and very low frequency noise allow us to identify segments of these tracks with Z-source horizontal, normal, and flaring branches that shift location in the CDs and HIDs over the course of the 16.55 day cycle. These results contradict a previous prediction, based on the hypothesis that Cir X-1 is a high-Ṁ atoll source, that HBOs should never occur in this source.

  3. Mid- and Near-infrared spectral properties of a sample of Swift-BAT X-ray selected AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Angel; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Malkan, Matthew A.; Ichikawa, Kohei; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Shirahata, M.; Nakagawa, Takao; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Oyabu, Shinki

    2015-08-01

    We present a comparative study of the mid- (MIR) to near-infrared (NIR) properties of a sample of X-ray selected AGNs from the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) 70-month all-sky hard X-ray (14-195 keV) survey. For a sample of 78 AGNs, including both Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 sources with black hole masses derived from 2MASS K-band magnitudes and literature, we obtain spectroscopic data from the IRC (2.5 - 5 μm) and IRS (in the 5-14 μm band) instruments onboard the Akari and Spitzer satellites, respectively. We test possible correlations between the 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.2 and 12.7 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features, the continuum slope and CO optical depth, as well as CO2, H2O, and amorphous silicates. Using the 3.3, 6.2 and 11.3 μm PAH emission features as a proxy for the star-formation rate (SFR) we report the AGN type and Eddington-ratio dependences of circum-nuclear star formation.

  4. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  5. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  6. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  7. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  8. X-Ray Properties of K-Selected Galaxies at 0.5 Less than z Less than 2.0: Investigating Trends with Stellar Mass, Redshift and Spectral Type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Therese M.; Kriek, Mariska; vanDokkum, Peter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Franx, Marijn; Greene, Jenny E.; Labbe, Ivo; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2014-01-01

    We examine how the total X-ray luminosity correlates with stellar mass, stellar population, and redshift for a K-band limited sample of approximately 3500 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.0 from the NEWFIRM Medium Band Survey in the COSMOS field. The galaxy sample is divided into 32 different galaxy types, based on similarities between the spectral energy distributions. For each galaxy type, we further divide the sample into bins of redshift and stellar mass, and perform an X-ray stacking analysis using the Chandra COSMOS data. We find that full band X-ray luminosity is primarily increasing with stellar mass, and at similar mass and spectral type is higher at larger redshifts. When comparing at the same stellar mass, we find that the X-ray luminosity is slightly higher for younger galaxies (i.e., weaker 4000 angstrom breaks), but the scatter in this relation is large. We compare the observed X-ray luminosities to those expected from low- and high-mass X-ray binaries (XRBs). For blue galaxies, XRBs can almost fully account for the observed emission, while for older galaxies with larger 4000 angstrom breaks, active galactic nuclei (AGN) or hot gas dominate the measured X-ray flux. After correcting for XRBs, the X-ray luminosity is still slightly higher in younger galaxies, although this correlation is not significant. AGN appear to be a larger component of galaxy X-ray luminosity at earlier times, as the hardness ratio increases with redshift. Together with the slight increase in X-ray luminosity this may indicate more obscured AGNs or higher accretion rates at earlier times.

  9. The effect of characteristic x-rays on the spatial and spectral resolution of a CZT-based detector for breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Stephen J.; Didier, Clay S.

    2011-03-01

    In an effort to improve the early stage detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, a number of research groups have been investigating the use of x-ray computerized tomography (CT) systems dedicated for use in imaging the breast. Preliminary results suggest that dedicated breast CT systems can provide improved visualization of 3D breast tissue as compared to conventional mammography. However, current breast CT prototypes that are being investigated have limitations resulting in less than desirable spatial resolution, lesion contrast, and signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. Another option is a CT breast imaging system that uses a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) based detector operating in a photon counting mode. This paper uses a Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used for breast CT. It is concluded that using CZT of 500-750 μm would not cause significant differences in spatial or spectral resolution, nor in stopping power as compared to using CZT with thickness 2-3 mm.

  10. X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  11. Determination of sulfur and chlorine in fodder by X-ray fluorescence spectral analysis and comparison with other analytical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nečemer, Marijan; Kump, Peter; Rajčevič, Marija; Jačimović, Radojko; Budič, Bojan; Ponikvar, Maja

    2003-07-01

    Sulfur and chlorine are essential elements in the metabolic processes of ruminants, and correct planning strategy of ruminant nutrition should provide a sufficient content of S and Cl in the animal's body. S and Cl can be found in various types of animal fodder in the form of organic compounds and minerals. In this work, the Cl and S content in forage was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), and its performance was then compared in parallel analyses by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and potentiometric methods. The results were compared and critically evaluated in order to assess the performance and capability of the XRF technique in analysis of animal fodder.

  12. Next-generation detectors for x-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, Richard M.; Holland, Andrew D.; Mukerjee, Kallol; Keay, Adam; Turner, Martin J. L.; Abbey, Antony F.; Hutchinson, Ian B.; Ashton, T. J. R.; Beardmore, Andrew P.; Short, Alexander D. T.; Pool, Peter J.; Burt, David; Vernon, D.

    2004-09-01

    The next generation of X-ray astronomy instruments will require position sensitive detectors in the form of charge coupled devices (CCDs) for X-ray spectroscopy and imaging that will have the ability to probe the X-ray universe with a greater efficiency. This will require the development of CCDs with structures that will improve on the quantum efficiency of the current state of the art over a broader spectral range in addition to reducing spectral features, which may affect spectral resolution and signal to background levels. These devices will also have to be designed to withstand the harsh radiation environments associated with orbits that extend beyond the Earth"s magnetosphere. The next generation X-ray telescopes will incorporate larger X-ray optics that will allow deeper observations of the X-ray universe and sensors will have to compensate for this by an increased readout speed. This study will aim to describe some of the results obtained from test CCD structures that may fit many of the requirements described above.

  13. Black hole mass determination in the X-ray binary 4U 1630-47: Scaling of spectral and variability characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Seifina, Elena; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai E-mail: titarchuk@fe.infn.it E-mail: nikolai.v.shaposhnikov@nasa.gov

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive investigation on the evolution of spectral and timing properties of the Galactic black hole candidate 4U 1630-47 during its spectral transitions. In particular, we show how a scaling of the correlation of the photon index of the Comptonized spectral component Γ with low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), ν {sub L}, and mass accretion rate, M-dot , can be applied to the black hole mass and the inclination angle estimates. We analyze the transition episodes observed with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and BeppoSAX satellites. We find that the broadband X-ray energy spectra of 4U 1630-47 during all spectral states can be modeled by a combination of a thermal component, a Comptonized component, and a red-skewed iron-line component. We also establish that Γ monotonically increases during transition from the low-hard state to the high-soft state and then saturates for high mass accretion rates. The index saturation levels vary for different transition episodes. Correlations of Γ versus ν {sub L} also show saturation at Γ ∼ 3. Γ-- M-dot and Γ-ν {sub L} correlations with their index saturation revealed in 4U 1630-47 are similar to those established in a number of other black hole candidates and can be considered as an observational evidence for the presence of a black hole in these sources. The scaling technique, which relies on XTE J1550-564, GRO 1655-40, and H1743-322 as reference sources, allows us to evaluate a black hole mass in 4U 1630-47 yielding M {sub BH} ∼ 10 ± 0.1 solar masses and to constrain the inclination angle of i ≲ 70°.

  14. Black Hole Mass Determination In the X-Ray Binary 4U 1630-47: Scaling of Spectral and Variability Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive investigation on the evolution of spectral and timing properties of the Galactic black hole candidate 4U 1630-47 during its spectral transitions. In particular, we show how a scaling of the correlation of the photon index of the Comptonized spectral component gamma with low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), ?(sub L), and mass accretion rate, M, can be applied to the black hole mass and the inclination angle estimates.We analyze the transition episodes observed with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and BeppoSAX satellites.We find that the broadband X-ray energy spectra of 4U 1630-47 during all spectral states can be modeled by a combination of a thermal component, a Comptonized component, and a red-skewed iron-line component. We also establish that gamma monotonically increases during transition from the low-hard state to the high-soft state and then saturates for high mass accretion rates. The index saturation levels vary for different transition episodes. Correlations of gamma versus ?(sub L) also show saturation at gamma (is) approximately 3. Gamma -M and gamma -?(sub L) correlations with their index saturation revealed in 4U 1630-47 are similar to those established in a number of other black hole candidates and can be considered as an observational evidence for the presence of a black hole in these sources. The scaling technique, which relies on XTE J1550-564, GRO 1655-40, and H1743-322 as reference sources, allows us to evaluate a black hole mass in 4U 1630-47 yielding M(sub BH) (is) approximately 10 +/- 0.1 solar masses and to constrain the inclination angle of i (is) approximately less than 70 deg.

  15. High resolution spectrometer for extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the 6 keV to 15 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J. F.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, Albert; Feldman, U.

    2016-11-01

    A Cauchois transmission-crystal spectrometer has been developed with high crystal resolving power in the 6 keV-15 keV energy range and sufficient sensitivity to record single-shot spectra from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Titan laser and other comparable or more energetic lasers. The spectrometer capabilities were tested by recording the W L transitions from a laboratory source and the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum through a Cu foil.

  16. The 2006-2007 Active Phase of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts,and Burst Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2011-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in > 11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 0.4 - 1.8 x 10(exp 3) s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT approx 2 - 9 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus two emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of (1.9+/-0.4) x 10(exp -7) Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a net spin-down of the pulsar. Within the framework of the magnetar model, the net spin-down of the star could be explained by regions of the superfluid that rotate. slower than the rest. The bursts, flux enhancements, and pulse morphology changes can be explained as arising from crustal deformations due to stresses imposed by the highly twisted internal magnetic field. However, unlike other AXP outbursts, we cannot account for a major twist being implanted in the magnetosphere.

  17. Soft x-ray interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the soft x-ray interferometry workshop held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was to discuss with the scientific community the proposed technical design of the soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer being developed at the ALS. Different design strategies for the instrument`s components were discussed, as well as detection methods, signal processing issues, and how to meet the manufacturing tolerances that are necessary for the instrument to achieve the desired levels of performance. Workshop participants were encouraged to report on their experiences in the field of Fourier transform spectroscopy. The ALS is developing a Fourier transform spectrometer that is intended to operate up to 100 eV. The motivation is solely improved resolution and not the throughput (Jaquinot) or multiplex (Fellgett) advantage, neither of which apply for the sources and detectors used in this spectral range. The proposed implementation of this is via a Mach-Zehnder geometry that has been (1) distorted from a square to a rhombus to get grazing incidence of a suitable angle for 100 eV and (2) provided with a mirror-motion system to make the path difference between the interfering beams tunable. The experiment consists of measuring the emergent light intensity (I(x)) as a function of the path difference (x). The resolving power of the system is limited by the amount of path difference obtainable that is 1 cm (one million half-waves at 200{angstrom} wavelength) in the design thus allowing a resolving power of one million. The free spectral range of the system is limited by the closeness with which the function I(x) is sampled. It is proposed to illuminate a helium absorption cell with roughly 1%-band-width light from a monochromator thus allowing one hundred aliases without spectral overlap even for sampling of I(x) at one hundredth of the Nyquist frequency.

  18. Spatial resolution of a hard x-ray CCD detector

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Pereira, Nino R.; Weber, Bruce V.; Schumer, Joseph W.; Apruzese, John P.; Hudson, Lawrence T.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Boyer, Craig N.; Skirlo, Scott

    2010-08-10

    The spatial resolution of an x-ray CCD detector was determined from the widths of the tungsten x-ray lines in the spectrum formed by a crystal spectrometer in the 58 to 70 keV energy range. The detector had 20{mu}m pixel, 1700 by 1200 pixel format, and a CsI x-ray conversion scintillator. The spectral lines from a megavolt x-ray generator were focused on the spectrometer's Rowland circle by a curved transmission crystal. The line shapes were Lorentzian with an average width after removal of the natural and instrumental line widths of 95{mu}m (4.75 pixels). A high spatial frequency background, primarily resulting from scattered gamma rays, was removed from the spectral image by Fourier analysis. The spectral lines, having low spatial frequency in the direction perpendicular to the dispersion, were enhanced by partially removing the Lorentzian line shape and by fitting Lorentzian curves to broad unresolved spectral features. This demonstrates the ability to improve the spectral resolution of hard x-ray spectra that are recorded by a CCD detector with well-characterized intrinsic spatial resolution.

  19. Spatial resolution of a hard x-ray CCD detector.

    PubMed

    Seely, John F; Pereira, Nino R; Weber, Bruce V; Schumer, Joseph W; Apruzese, John P; Hudson, Lawrence T; Szabo, Csilla I; Boyer, Craig N; Skirlo, Scott

    2010-08-10

    The spatial resolution of an x-ray CCD detector was determined from the widths of the tungsten x-ray lines in the spectrum formed by a crystal spectrometer in the 58 to 70 keV energy range. The detector had 20 microm pixel, 1700 by 1200 pixel format, and a CsI x-ray conversion scintillator. The spectral lines from a megavolt x-ray generator were focused on the spectrometer's Rowland circle by a curved transmission crystal. The line shapes were Lorentzian with an average width after removal of the natural and instrumental line widths of 95 microm (4.75 pixels). A high spatial frequency background, primarily resulting from scattered gamma rays, was removed from the spectral image by Fourier analysis. The spectral lines, having low spatial frequency in the direction perpendicular to the dispersion, were enhanced by partially removing the Lorentzian line shape and by fitting Lorentzian curves to broad unresolved spectral features. This demonstrates the ability to improve the spectral resolution of hard x-ray spectra that are recorded by a CCD detector with well-characterized intrinsic spatial resolution.

  20. X-ray irradiated model stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madej, J.; Różańska, A.

    2000-04-01

    We present equations and details of the computer code for precise calculation of LTE model atmospheres which are illuminated by an external radiation field. Both radiative and hydrostatic equilibrium, and coherent Thomson electron scattering have been assumed. Radiation field at each frequency and depth level is computed with the method of variable Eddington factors. The code is fully suitable for the study of mutual illumination effects in close binaries. We have subsequently computed few sets of model stellar atmospheres of Teff = 1.8x 104 K, and log g = 4.0 (B3 V type star), consisting of hydrogen and helium in solar proportion, and iron of number abundance NFe / N_H = 3.7 x 10-5. We assume, that the atmosphere is illuminated by isotropic X-rays of diluted thermal spectral distribution with temperature Trad =108 K. In case of iron-rich models external X-rays cause heating of the uppermost layers up to 4 x 106 K. Such a choice of Teff and Trad differing by 4 orders of magnitude is relevant to the supposed conditions on some rings of the accretion disk in active galactic nuclei (AGN), illuminated by an X-ray source. Our code qualitatively reproduces the structure of an atmosphere and its spectrum for wavelengths ranging from infrared to X-rays. Outgoing spectra clearly exhibit all three components: spectrum of B star, external X-ray blackbody spectrum partly backscattered by the model atmosphere, and radiation from the uppermost layers, heated to very high temperatures. The latter shows He I and He II Lyman opacity jumps, and numerous b-f jumps of highly ionized iron, all of them in emission. We demonstrate that in all atmospheres of our paper the external illumination by X-rays reduces the H I Lyman jump. This is in agreement with observations of AGNs spectra.

  1. Atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Jason E. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Wilcox, Jaroslava Z. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention comprises an apparatus for performing in-situ elemental analyses of surfaces. The invention comprises an atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer with an electron column which generates, accelerates, and focuses electrons in a column which is isolated from ambient pressure by a:thin, electron transparent membrane. After passing through the membrane, the electrons impinge on the sample in atmosphere to generate characteristic x-rays. An x-ray detector, shaping amplifier, and multi-channel analyzer are used for x-ray detection and signal analysis. By comparing the resultant data to known x-ray spectral signatures, the elemental composition of the surface can be determined.

  2. Tokamak x ray diagnostic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.W.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Von Goeler, S.; Hsuan, H.; Johnson, L.C.; Liew, S.L.; McGuire, K.; Pare, V.

    1987-01-01

    Three classes of x-ray diagnostic instruments enable measurement of a variety of tokamak physics parameters from different features of the x-ray emission spectrum. (1) The soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) pulse-height-analysis (PHA) diagnostic measures impurity concentrations from characteristic line intensities and the continuum enhancement, and measures the electron temperature from the continuum slope. (2) The Bragg x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) measures the ion temperature and neutral-beam-induced toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler broadening and wavelength shift, respectively, of spectral lines of medium-Z impurity ions. Impurity charge state distributions, precise wavelengths, and inner-shell excitation and recombination rates can also be studied. X rays are diffracted and focused by a bent crystal onto a position-sensitive detector. The spectral resolving power E/..delta..E is greater than 10/sup 4/ and time resolution is 10 ms. (3) The x-ray imaging system (XIS) measures the spatial structure of rapid fluctuations (0.1 to 100 kHZ) providing information on MHD phenomena, impurity transport rates, toroidal rotation velocity, plasma position, and the electron temperature profile. It uses an array of silicon surface-barrier diodes which view different chords of the plasma through a common slot aperture and operate in current (as opposed to counting) mode. The effectiveness of shields to protect detectors from fusion-neutron radiation effects has been studied both theoretically and experimentally.

  3. On the Nature of the Variability Power Decay towards Soft Spectral States in X-Ray Binaries. Case Study in Cyg X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhinikov, Nikolai

    2007-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the Fourier Power Density Spectrum (PDS) observed from black hole X-ray binaries in low/hard and intermediate spectral states is a broad band-limited noise, characterized by a constant below some frequency (a "break" frequency) and a power law above this frequency. It has been shown that the variability of this type can be produced by the inward diffusion of the local driving perturbations in a bounded configuration (accretion disk or corona). In the framework of this model, the perturbation diffusion time to is related to the phenomenological break frequency, while the PDS power-law slope above the "break" is determined by the viscosity distribution over the configuration. The perturbation diffusion scenario explains the decay of the power of X-ray variability observed in a number of compact sources (containing black hole and neutron star) during an evolution of theses sources from low/hard to high/soft states. We compare the model predictions with the subset of data from Cyg X-1 collected by the Rossi X-ray Time Explorer (RXTE). Our extensive analysis of the Cyg X-1 PDSs demonstrates that the observed integrated power P(sub x), decreases approximately as a square root of the characteristic frequency of the driving oscillations v(sub dr). The RXTE observations of Cyg X-1 allow us to infer P(sub dr), and t(sub o) as a function of v(sub dr). We also apply the basic parameters of observed PDSs, power-law index and low frequency quasiperiodic oscillations. to infer Reynolds (Re) number from the observations using the method developed in our previous paper. Our analysis shows that Re-number increases from values about 10 in low/hard state to that about 70 during the high/soft state. Subject headings: accretion, accretion disks-black hole physics-stars:individual (Cyg X-1) :radiation mechanisms: nonthermal-physical data and processes

  4. BROADBAND X-RAY SPECTRAL INVESTIGATIONS OF MAGNETARS, 4U 0142+61, 1E 1841–045, 1E 2259+586, AND 1E 1048.1–5937

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Shan-Shan; Göğüş, Ersin

    2015-12-10

    We have generated an extended version of a rather simplified but physically oriented three-dimensional magnetar emission model, STEMS3D, to allow spectral investigations up to 100 keV. We then applied our model to the broadband spectra of four magnetars: 4U 0142+61, 1E 1841–045, 1E 2259+586, and 1E 1048.1–5937, using data collected with Swift/XRT or XMM-Newton in soft X-rays, and the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array in the hard X-ray band. We found that the hard X-ray emission of 4U 0142+61 was spectrally hard compared to earlier detections, indicating that the source was likely in a transition to or from a harder state. We find that the surface properties of the four magnetars are consistent with what we have obtained using only the soft X-ray data with STEMS3D, implying that our physically motivated magnetar emission model is a robust tool. Based on our broadband spectral investigations, we conclude that resonant scattering of the surface photons in the magnetosphere alone cannot account for the hard X-ray emission in magnetars; therefore, an additional non-thermal process, or a population of relativistic electrons is required. We also discuss the implication of the non-detection of persistent hard X-ray emission in 1E 1048.1–5937.

  5. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy in systems without long-range order: existence of an intermediate-field regime.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Successful X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy studies often require that signals be optimized while minimizing power density in the sample to decrease radiation damage and, at free-electron laser sources, thermal impact. This suggests exploration of scattering outside the Fraunhofer far-field diffraction limit d(2)/λ < R, where d is the incident beam size, λ is the photon wavelength and R is the sample-to-detector distance. Here it is shown that, in an intermediate regime d(2)/λ > R > dξ/λ, where ξ is the structural correlation length in the material, the ensemble averages of the scattered intensity and of the structure factor are equal. Similarly, in the regime d(2)/λ > R > dξ(τ)/λ, where ξ(τ) is a time-dependent dynamics length scale of interest, the ensemble-averaged correlation functions g(1)(τ) and g(2)(τ) of the scattered electric field are also equal to their values in the far-field limit. This broadens the parameter space for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy experiments, but detectors with smaller pixel size and variable focusing are required to more fully exploit the potential for such studies.

  6. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  7. Spectral and Temporal Properties of the Ultraluminous X-Ray Pulsar in M82 from 15 years of Chandra Observations and Analysis of the Pulsed Emission Using NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brightman, Murray; Harrison, Fiona; Walton, Dominic J.; Fuerst, Felix; Hornschemeier, Ann; Zezas, Andreas; Bachetti, Matteo; Grefenstette, Brian; Ptak, Andrew; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Yukita, Mihoko

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery by Bachetti et al. of a pulsar in M82 that can reach luminosities of up to 1040 erg s‑1, a factor of ∼100 times the Eddington luminosity for a 1.4 M⊙ compact object, poses a challenge for accretion physics. In order to better understand the nature of this source and its duty cycle, and in light of several physical models that have been subsequently published, we conduct a spectral and temporal analysis of the 0.5–8 keV X-ray emission from this source from 15 years of Chandra observations. We analyze 19 ACIS observations where the point-spread function (PSF) of the pulsar is not contaminated by nearby sources. We fit the Chandra spectra of the pulsar with a power-law model and a disk blackbody model, subjected to interstellar absorption in M82. We carefully assess for the effect of pile-up in our observations, where four observations have a pile-up fraction of >10%, which we account for during spectral modeling with a convolution model. When fitted with a power-law model, the average photon index when the source is at high luminosity (LX > 1039 erg s‑1) is Γ = 1.33 ± 0.15. For the disk blackbody model, the average temperature is Tin = 3.24 ± 0.65 keV, the spectral shape being consistent with other luminous X-ray pulsars. We also investigated the inclusion of a soft excess component and spectral break, finding that the spectra are also consistent with these features common to luminous X-ray pulsars. In addition, we present spectral analysis from NuSTAR over the 3–50 keV range where we have isolated the pulsed component. We find that the pulsed emission in this band is best fit by a power-law with a high-energy cutoff, where Γ = 0.6 ± 0.3 and {E}{{C}}={14}-3+5 keV. While the pulsar has previously been identified as a transient, we find from our longer-baseline study that it has been remarkably active over the 15-year period, where for 9/19 (47%) observations that we analyzed, the pulsar appears to be emitting at a luminosity in

  8. X-Rays from Young Stars and Eggs in the Eagle Nebula (M16)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Gagne, Marc; Mytyk, Anna

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory observed the Eagle Nebula (M16) a young star forming region containing the dark columns of dust and cold molecular gas known as the ""Pillars of Creation"" or ""elephant trunks"". We identify more than 1000 X-ray sources coincident with K-band stars that are premain sequence stars ranging in spectral type from O to M. A handful of the hard X-ray sources in the pillars are spatially coincident with deeply embedded young stellar objects seen in JHK images. However none of the X-ray sources are associated with the evaporating gaseous globules (EGGs) first observed by Hester et al. (1996).

  9. The Chandra X-ray Observatory: An Astronomical Facility Available to the World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Randall K.

    2006-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray observatory, one of NASA's "Great Observatories," provides high angular and spectral resolution X-ray data which is freely available to all. In this review I describe the instruments on chandra along with their current calibration, as well as the chandra proposal system, the freely-available Chandra analysis software package CIAO, and the Chandra archive. As Chandra is in its 6th year of operation, the archive already contains calibrated observations of a large range of X-ray sources. The Chandra X-ray Center is committed to assisting astronomers from any country who wish to use data from the archive or propose for observations

  10. Design and fabrication process of silicon micro-calorimeters on simple SOI technology for X-ray spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliane, A.; Agnese, P.; Pigot, C.; Sauvageot, J.-L.; de Moro, F.; Ribot, H.; Gasse, A.; Szeflinski, V.; Gobil, Y.

    2008-09-01

    Several successful development programs have been conducted on infra-red bolometer arrays at the "Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique" (CEA-LETI Grenoble) in collaboration with the CEA-SAp (Saclay); taking advantage of this background, we are now developing an X-ray spectro-imaging camera for next generation space astronomy missions, using silicon only technology. We have developed monolithic silicon micro-calorimeters based on implanted thermistors in an improved array that could be used for future space missions. The 8×8 array consists of a grid of 64 suspended pixels fabricated on a silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer. Each pixel of this detector array is made of a tantalum (Ta) absorber, which is bound by means of indium bump hybridization, to a silicon thermistor. The absorber array is bound to the thermistor array in a collective process. The fabrication process of our detector involves a combination of standard technologies and silicon bulk micro-machining techniques, based on deposition, photolithography and plasma etching steps. Finally, we present the results of measurements performed on these four primary building blocks that are required to create a detector array up to 32×32 pixels in size.

  11. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. PMID:26967404

  12. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  13. An in-vacuum x-ray diffraction microscope for use in the 0.7-2.9 keV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vine, D. J.; Williams, G. J.; Clark, J. N.; Putkunz, C. T.; Pfeifer, M. A.; Legnini, D.; Roehrig, C.; Wrobel, E.; Huwald, E.; van Riessen, G.; Abbey, B.; Beetz, T.; Irwin, J.; Feser, M.; Hornberger, B.; McNulty, I.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.

    2012-03-01

    A dedicated in-vacuum coherent x-ray diffraction microscope was installed at the 2-ID-B beamline of the Advanced Photon Source for use with 0.7-2.9 keV x-rays. The instrument can accommodate three common implementations of diffractive imaging; plane wave illumination; defocused-probe (Fresnel diffractive imaging) and scanning (ptychography) using either a pinhole, focused or defocused probe. The microscope design includes active feedback to limit motion of the optics with respect to the sample. Upper bounds on the relative optics-to-sample displacement have been measured to be 5.8 nm(v) and 4.4 nm(h) rms/h using capacitance micrometry and 27 nm/h using x-ray point projection imaging. The stability of the measurement platform and in-vacuum operation allows for long exposure times, high signal-to-noise and large dynamic range two-dimensional intensity measurements to be acquired. Finally, we illustrate the microscope's stability with a recent experimental result.

  14. Absolute calibration of Kodak Biomax-MS film response to x rays in the 1.5- to 8-keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Anderson, D.; Schmitt, B. L.

    2006-10-01

    The absolute response of Kodak Biomax-MS film to x rays in the range from 1.5- to 8-keV has been measured using a laboratory electron-beam generated x-ray source. The measurements were taken at specific line energies by using Bragg diffraction to produce monochromatic beams of x rays. Multiple exposures were taken on Biomax MS film up to levels exceeding optical densities of 2 as measured by a microdensitometer. The absolute beam intensity for each exposure was measured with a Si (Li) detector. Additional response measurements were taken with Kodak direct exposure film (DEF) so as to compare the results of this technique to previously published calibrations. The Biomax-MS results have been fitted to a semiempirical mathematical model (Knauer et al., these proceedings). Users of the model can infer absolute fluences from observed exposure levels at either interpolated or extrapolated energies. To summarize the results: Biomax MS has comparable sensitivity to DEF film below 3keV but has reduced sensitivity above 3keV (˜50%). The lower exposure results from thinner emulsion layers, designed for use with phosphor screens. The ease with which Biomax-MS can be used in place of DEF (same format film, same developing process, and comparable sensitivity) makes it a good replacement.

  15. X-ray Pulsation Searches with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Paul S.; Arzoumanian, Zaven

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is an X-ray telescope with capabilities optimized for the study of the structure, dynamics, and energetics of neutron stars through high-precision timing of rotation- and accretion-powered pulsars in the 0.2-12 keV band. It has large collecting area (twice that of the XMM-Newton EPIC-pn camera), CCD-quality spectral resolution, and high-precision photon time tagging referenced to UTC through an onboard GPS receiver. NICER will begin its 18-month prime mission as an attached payload on the International Space Station around the end of 2016. I will describe the science planning for the pulsation search science working group, which is charged with searching for pulsations and studying flux modulation properties of pulsars and other neutron stars. A primary goal of our observations is to detect pulsations from new millisecond pulsars that will contribute to NICER’s studies of the neutron star equation of state through pulse profile modeling. Beyond that, our working group will search for pulsations in a range of source categories, including LMXBs, new X-ray transients that might be accreting millisecond pulsars, X-ray counterparts to unassociated Fermi LAT sources, gamma-ray binaries, isolated neutron stars, and ultra-luminous X-ray sources. I will survey our science plans and give an overview of our planned observations during NICER’s prime mission.

  16. Einstein observations of extended galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, F. D.

    1979-01-01

    Features of the X-ray pictures taken aboard the space observatory are presented. Imaging proportional counter pictures in three broad X-ray energy ranges were obtained. The X-ray spectrum of supernova remnants is described.

  17. Structural information from multilamellar liposomes at full hydration: Full q-range fitting with high quality x-ray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabst, Georg; Rappolt, Michael; Amenitsch, Heinz; Laggner, Peter

    2000-09-01

    We present a method for analyzing small angle x-ray scattering data on multilamellar phospholipid bilayer systems at full hydration. The method utilizes a modified Caillé theory structure factor in combination with a Gaussian model representation of the electron density profile such that it accounts also for the diffuse scattering between Bragg peaks. Thus the method can retrieve structural information even if only a few orders of diffraction are observed. We further introduce a procedure to derive fundamental parameters, such as area per lipid, membrane thickness, and number of water molecules per lipid, directly from the electron density profile without the need of additional volumetric measurements. The theoretical apparatus is applied to experimental data on 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine liposome preparations.

  18. FY06 LDRD Final Report Next-generation x-ray optics: focusing hard x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovaroff, M; Soufli, R

    2007-03-01

    The original goal of our research was to open up a new class of scientific experiments by increasing the power of newly available x-ray sources by orders of magnitude. This was accomplished by developing a new generation of x-ray optics, based on hard x-ray (10-200 keV) reflective and diffractive focusing elements. The optical systems we envision begin with a core reflective optic, which has the ability to capture and concentrate x-rays across a wide range of energies and angles band, combined with diffractive optics, based on large-scale multilayer structures, that will further enhance the spatial, spectral and temporal resolving power of the system. Enabling technologies developed at LLNL such as precise mounting of thermally formed substrates, smoothing techniques and multilayer films of ultra-high reflectance and precision were crucial in the development and demonstration of our research objectives. Highlights of this phase of the project include: the design and fabrication of a concentrator optic for the Pleiades Thomson X-ray source located at LLNL, smoothing of glass substrates through application of polyimide films, and the design, fabrication and testing of novel volume multilayers structures. Part of our research into substrate smooth led to the development of a new technique (patent pending) to construct high-quality, inexpensive x-ray optics. This innovation resulted in LLNL constructing a x-ray optic for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) and allowed LLNL to join the international experiment.

  19. X ray imaging microscope for cancer research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA technology employed during the Stanford MSFC LLNL Rocket X Ray Spectroheliograph flight established that doubly reflecting, normal incidence multilayer optics can be designed, fabricated, and used for high resolution x ray imaging of the Sun. Technology developed as part of the MSFC X Ray Microscope program, showed that high quality, high resolution multilayer x ray imaging microscopes are feasible. Using technology developed at Stanford University and at the DOE Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Troy W. Barbee, Jr. has fabricated multilayer coatings with near theoretical reflectivities and perfect bandpass matching for a new rocket borne solar observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA). Advanced Flow Polishing has provided multilayer mirror substrates with sub-angstrom (rms) smoothnesss for the astronomical x ray telescopes and x ray microscopes. The combination of these important technological advancements has paved the way for the development of a Water Window Imaging X Ray Microscope for cancer research.

  20. [Ultrastructural and X-ray spectral analysis of cells U-937 during apoptosis process induced by hypertony].

    PubMed

    Snigirevskaia, E S; Moshkov, A V; Iurinskaia, V E; Vereninov, A A; Komissarchik, Ia Iu

    2014-01-01

    The results of this work concerning ultrastructural changes of U-937 cells in a state of apoptosis are largely in consistent with the same information available in the literature. However, we have got the original data on the ultrastructural changes of cell organelles and immune localization and distribution of proteasomes. It has been demonstrated that Golgi apparatus is located close to the plasma membrane in the case of apoptosis induced by incubating the cells in a hypertonic suchrose solution (200-400 mM). The fact can be considered as an indirect indication of depolymerization of cytoskeletal elements, in particular, MTs maintaining Golgi apparatus in a cell centre. In the later stages of apoptosis, the distances between Golgi cisterna are significantly increased. It can be explained by hydrolysis of golgins binding cisterna between each other. Mitochondria are not significantly changed in these cells. They have regularly disposed crista and sufficiently dense matrix with a few vacuoles. Proteasomes as rod-shaped osmiophilic particles (12 x 30 nm) have been revealed during each apoptosis stage both in nuclei and cytopl;asm of cells studied. The particles form aggregates of different densitities and sizes unlimited by membrane. It has been proposed that the particle aggregates revealed in the work are analogous to "processing bodies" or aggresomes described in the literature. They can be detected in cells under conditions of suppressed nucleus transcriptional processes in the nucleus and participate in storing and degradation of various mRNAs, RNP and proteins. The changes of intracellular contents of Na and K in a single cell during apoptosis induced by osmotic shock have been revealed using method of X-ray microanalysis. It has been demonstrated the increase in the ratio of intracellular contents Na+/K+ in the most of apoptotic cells in comparing with control cells. PMID:25707210

  1. X-ray spectra of galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of the various classes of Galactic X-ray sources are discussed, with particular emphasis on binary sources containing an accreting compact object, where post-emission scattering in an accretion disk often prevents the initially produced X-radiation from being observed directly. Theoretical interpretations and X-ray observations are considered for the cataclysmic variables, binary systems with a white dwarf as the compact object and which suffer relatively less from Thomson scattering, and the similar phenomenological spectral characteristics of the bulge sources, including soft transients, bursters and steady X-ray sources with thermal spectra, thought to represent an accreting neutron star, are pointed out. The spectral characteristics of X-ray pulsars in accreting binary systems (rather than the Crab pulsar, which is losing rotational kinetic energy with time) are then presented and interpreted in terms of accretion in the polar regions, and mechanisms for the newly discovered X-ray emission from late-type RS CVn stars are considered.

  2. The feasibility of independent observations/detections of GRBs in X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Hudec, R.; Skulinova, M.; Pina, L.; Sveda, L.; Semencova, V.; Inneman, A.

    2009-05-25

    According to the observational statistics a large majority of all GRBs exhibit X-ray emission. In addition, a dedicated separate group of GRB, the XRFs, exists which emission dominates in the X-ray spectral range. And the third group of GRB related objects (yet hypothetical) are the group of off-axis observed GRBs (orphan afterglows). These facts justify the consideration of an independent experiment for monitoring, detection and analyses of GRBs and others fast X-ray transients in X-rays. We will present and discuss such experiment based on wide-field X-ray telescopes of Lobster Eye type. The wide field and fine sensitivity of Lobster Eye X-ray All-Sky Monitor make such instruments important tools in study of GRBs and related objects.

  3. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  4. A longer XMM-Newton look at I Zwicky - 1. Distinct modes of X-ray spectral variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, L. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Costantini, E.; Fabian, A. C.

    2007-05-01

    The short-term spectral variability of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy I Zwicky 1 (I Zw 1) as observed in an 85ks XMM-Newton observation is discussed in detail. I Zw 1 shows distinct modes of variability prior to and after a flux dip in the broad-band light curve. Before the dip the variability can be described as arising from changes in shape and normalization of the spectral components. Only changes in normalization are manifested after the dip. The change in the mode of behaviour occurs on dynamically short time-scales in I Zw 1. The data suggest that the accretion-disc corona in I Zw 1 could have two components that are co-existing. The first, a uniform, physically diffuse plasma responsible for the `typical' long-term (e.g. years) behaviour; and a second compact, centrally located component causing the rapid flux and spectral changes. This compact component could be the base of a short or aborted jet as sometimes proposed for radio-quiet active galaxies. Modelling of the average and time-resolved rms spectra demonstrate that a blurred Compton-reflection model can describe the spectral variability if we allow for pivoting of the continuum component prior to the dip.

  5. Calibrating image plate sensitivity in the 700 to 5000 eV spectral energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugh, Michael J.; Lee, Joshua; Romano, Edward; Schneider, Marilyn

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes a method to calibrate image plate sensitivity for use in the low energy spectral range. Image plates, also known as photostimulable luminescence (PSL) detectors, have often proved to be a valuable tool as a detector for plasma physics studies. Their advantages of large dynamic range, high stopping power, and resistance to neutron damage sometimes outweigh the problems of limited resolution and the remote processing required. The neutron damage resistance is required when the X-ray source is producing a high neutron flux. The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a key diagnostic on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) target chamber at LLNL for use in determining the symmetry of the laser beams. The SXI is essential to proper interpretation of the data from the Dante diagnostic to determine the X-ray radiation temperature. It is comprised of two diagnostics located at the top and the bottom of the target chamber. The usual detector is a large array CCD camera. For shots giving high yields of neutrons, the camera would not only be blinded by the neutrons, it would be damaged. To get around this problem, an image plate (IP) is used as the detector. The NIF application covers the energy range from 700 to 5000 eV. The type of image plates typically used for plasma physics are the Fuji BAS-MS, BAS-SR, and BAS-TR models. All models consist of an X-ray sensitive material made of BaF(Br,I):Eu2+ embedded in a plastic binder. X-rays incident on the phosphor ionize the Eu 2+ producing Eu3+ and free electrons that are trapped in lattice defects (F-centers) produced by the absence of halogen ions in the BaF2 crystal. An image plate readout scanner irradiates the IP with a red laser causing reduction of the Eu3+ and emission of a blue photon. The photon is collected using a photomultiplier and digitized to make an electronic image. Image plates are cleared of all F-centers by putting them under a bright light for about 10 minutes. They are then ready for producing a

  6. Monolithic CMOS imaging x-ray spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Murray, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff is developing monolithic CMOS detectors optimized for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this multi-year program is to produce CMOS x-ray imaging spectrometers that are Fano noise limited over the 0.1-10keV energy band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Small format test devices from a previous wafer fabrication run (2011-2012) have recently been back-thinned and tested for response below 1keV. These devices perform as expected in regards to dark current, read noise, spectral response and Quantum Efficiency (QE). We demonstrate that running these devices at rates ~> 1Mpix/second eliminates the need for cooling as shot noise from any dark current is greatly mitigated. The test devices were fabricated on 15μm, high resistivity custom (~30kΩ-cm) epitaxial silicon and have a 16 by 192 pixel format. They incorporate 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels which have ~40μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel analog CDS signal chain. Newer, improved, lower noise detectors have just been fabricated (October 2013). These new detectors are fabricated on 9μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. They incorporate similar 16μm pitch, 6TPPD pixels but have ~ 50% higher sensitivity and much (3×) lower read noise. These new detectors have undergone preliminary testing for functionality in Front Illuminated (FI) form and are presently being prepared for back thinning and packaging. Monolithic CMOS devices such as these, would be ideal candidate detectors for the focal planes of Solar, planetary and other space-borne x-ray astronomy missions. The high through-put, low noise and excellent low energy response, provide high dynamic range and good time resolution; bright, time varying x-ray features could be temporally and

  7. Quantitative extraction of spectral line intensities and widths from x-ray spectra recorded with gated microchannel plate detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Greg; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Lake, P. W.; Nielsen-Weber, L. B.

    2007-06-15

    Plasma spectroscopy requires determination of spectral line intensities and widths. At Sandia National Laboratories Z facility we use elliptical crystal spectrometers equipped with gated microchannel plate detectors to record time and space resolved spectra. We collect a large volume of data typically consisting of five to six snapshots in time and five to ten spectral lines with 30 spatial elements per frame, totaling to more than 900 measurements per experiment. This large volume of data requires efficiency in processing. We have addressed this challenge by using a line fitting routine to automatically fit each spectrum using assumed line profiles and taking into account photoelectron statistics to efficiently extract line intensities and widths with uncertainties. We verified that the random data noise obeys Poisson statistics. Rescale factors for converting film exposure to effective counts required for understanding the photoelectron statistics are presented. An example of the application of these results to the analysis of spectra recorded in Z experiments is presented.

  8. X ray spectra of cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Halpern, Jules

    1990-01-01

    X ray spectral parameters of cataclysmic variables observed with the 'Einstein' imaging proportional counter were determined by fitting an optically thin, thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum to the raw data. Most of the sources show temperatures of order a few keV, while a few sources exhibit harder spectra with temperatures in excess of 10 keV. Estimated 0.1 to 3.5 keV luminosities are generally in the range from 10(exp 30) to 10(exp 32) erg/sec. The results are consistent with the x rays originating in a disk/white dwarf boundary layer of non-magnetic systems, or in a hot, post-shock region in the accretion column of DQ Her stars, with a negligible contribution from the corona of the companion. In a few objects column densities were found that are unusually high for interstellar material. It was suggested that the absorption occurs in the system itself.

  9. Be/X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, Pablo

    2011-03-01

    The interest in X/ γ-ray Astronomy has grown enormously in the last decades thanks to the ability to send X-ray space missions above the Earth’s atmosphere. There are more than half a million X-ray sources detected and over a hundred missions (past and currently operational) devoted to the study of cosmic X/ γ rays. With the improved sensibilities of the currently active missions new detections occur almost on a daily basis. Among these, neutron-star X-ray binaries form an important group because they are among the brightest extra-solar objects in the sky and are characterized by dramatic variability in brightness on timescales ranging from milliseconds to months and years. Their main source of power is the gravitational energy released by matter accreted from a companion star and falling onto the neutron star in a relatively close binary system. Neutron-star X-ray binaries divide into high-mass and low-mass systems according to whether the mass of the donor star is above ˜8 or below ˜2 M⊙, respectively. Massive X-ray binaries divide further into supergiant X-ray binaries and Be/X-ray binaries depending on the evolutionary status of the optical companion. Virtually all Be/X-ray binaries show X-ray pulsations. Therefore, these systems can be used as unique natural laboratories to investigate the properties of matter under extreme conditions of gravity and magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to review the observational properties of Be/X-ray binaries. The open questions in Be/X-ray binaries include those related to the Be star companion, that is, the so-called “Be phenomenon”, such as, timescales associated to the formation and dissipation of the equatorial disc, mass-ejection mechanisms, V/ R variability, and rotation rates; those related to the neutron star, such as, mass determination, accretion physics, and spin period evolution; but also, those that result from the interaction of the two constituents, such as, disc truncation and mass

  10. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  11. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  12. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  13. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  14. X Ray Topography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchin, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some aspects in X-ray topography, including formation of dislocations, characteristics of stacking faults, x-ray contrast in defect inspection, Berg-Barrett technique, and Lang traversing crystal and Borrmann's methods. (CC)

  15. EUV spectroscopy of high-redshift x-ray objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, M. P.; Wolff, M. T.; Wood, K. S.; Barbee, T. W., Jr.; Barstow, M. A.

    2010-07-01

    As astronomical observations are pushed to cosmological distances (z>3) the spectral energy distributions of X-ray objects, AGN for example, will be redshifted into the EUV waveband. Consequently, a wealth of critical spectral diagnostics, provided by, for example, the Fe L-shell complex and the O VII/VIII lines, will be lost to future planned X-ray missions (e.g., IXO, Gen-X) if operated at traditional X-ray energies. This opens up a critical gap in performance located at short EUV wavelengths, where critical X-ray spectral transitions occur in high-z objects. However, normal-incidence multilayer-grating technology, which performs best precisely at such wavelengths, together with advanced nanolaminate replication techniques have been developed and are now mature to the point where advanced EUV instrument designs with performance complementary to IXO and Gen-X are practical. Such EUV instruments could be flown either independently or as secondary instruments on these X-ray missions. We present here a critical examination of the limits placed on extragalactic EUV measurements by ISM absorption, the range where high-z measurements are practical, and the requirements this imposes on next-generation instrument designs. We conclude with a discussion of a breakthrough technology, nanolaminate replication, which enables such instruments.

  16. Long-range structure of Cu(InxGa1-x)3Se5: A complementary neutron and anomalous x-ray diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, S.; Marrón, D. fürtes; León, M.; Feyerherm, R.; Dudzik, E.; Friedrich, E. J.; Tovar, M.; Tomm, Y.; Wolf, C.; Schorr, S.; Schedel-Niedrig, Th.; Lux-Steiner, M. Ch.; Merino, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Distinguishing the scattering contributions of isoelectronic atomic species by means of conventional x-ray- and/or electron diffraction techniques is a difficult task. Such a problem occurs when determining the crystal structure of compounds containing different types of atoms with equal number of electrons. We propose a new structural model of Cu(InxGa1-x)3Se5 which is valid for the entire compositional range of the CuIn3Se5-CuGa3Se5 solid solution. Our model is based on neutron and anomalous x-ray diffraction experiments. These complementary techniques allow the separation of scattering contributions of the isoelectronic species Cu+ and Ga3+, contributing nearly identically in monoenergetic x-ray diffraction experiments. We have found that CuIII3Se5 (III=In,Ga) in its room temperature near-equilibrium modification exhibits a modified stannite structure (space group I4¯2m). Different occupation factors of the species involved, Cu+, In3+, Ga3+, and vacancies have been found at three different cationic positions of the structure (Wyckoff sites 2a, 2b, and 4d) depending on the composition of the compound. Significantly, Cu+ does not occupy the 2b site for the In-free compound, but does for the In-containing case. Structural parameters, including lattice constants, tetragonal distortions, and occupation factors are given for samples covering the entire range of the CuIn3Se5-CuGa3Se5 solid solution. At the light of the result, the denotation of Cu-poor 1:3:5 compounds as chalcopyrite-related materials is only valid in reference to their composition.

  17. Structure and orientation of the Mn4Ca cluster in plant photosystem II membranes studied by polarized range-extended x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pushkar, Yulia; Yano, Junko; Glatzel, Pieter; Messinger, Johannes; Lewis, Azul; Sauer, Kenneth; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal

    2007-03-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy has provided important insights into the structure and function of the Mn(4)Ca cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II (PS II). The range of manganese extended x-ray absorption fine structure data collected from PS II until now has been, however, limited by the presence of iron in PS II. Using a crystal spectrometer with high energy resolution to detect solely the manganese Kalpha fluorescence, we are able to extend the extended x-ray absorption fine structure range beyond the onset of the iron absorption edge. This results in improvement in resolution of the manganese-backscatterer distances in PS II from 0.14 to 0.09A(.) The high resolution data obtained from oriented spinach PS II membranes in the S(1) state show that there are three di-mu-oxo-bridged manganese-manganese distances of approximately 2.7 and approximately 2.8A in a 2:1 ratio and that these three manganese-manganese vectors are aligned at an average orientation of approximately 60 degrees relative to the membrane normal. Furthermore, we are able to observe the separation of the Fourier peaks corresponding to the approximately 3.2A manganese-manganese and the approximately 3.4A manganese-calcium interactions in oriented PS II samples and determine their orientation relative to the membrane normal. The average of the manganese-calcium vectors at approximately 3.4A is aligned along the membrane normal, while the approximately 3.2A manganese-manganese vector is oriented near the membrane plane. A comparison of this structural information with the proposed Mn(4)Ca cluster models based on spectroscopic and diffraction data provides input for refining and selecting among these models.

  18. Syntheses, spectral characterization, X-ray studies and in vitro cytotoxic activities of triorganotin(IV) derivatives of p-substituted N-methylbenzylaminedithiocarbamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Naqeebullah; Farina, Yang; Mun, Lo Kong; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Awang, Normah

    2014-11-01

    Two new organotin(IV) complexes of the type R3SnL, where (L = p-bromo-N-methylbenzylaminedithiocarbamate and p-fluoro-N-methylbenzylaminedithiocarbamate, and R = phenyl) have been synthesized in 1:1 molar ratio with good yields and isolated as crystalline solids. The newly synthesized compounds gave fairly sharp melting points indicating that the compounds were pure. A systematic investigation of the derivatives were carried out both in solid and in solution and were suitably characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H, 13C, 119Sn NMR spectroscopies. The dithiocarbamate ligands chelated to the tin metal monodentately using only one sulfur atom showing a pair of bands due to ν(Cdbnd S) below 1000 cm-1. This phenomenon was supported by the occurrence of new medium to weak absorptions in the region 411-545, in the spectra of complexes, assigned to ν(Snsbnd S) and ν(Snsbnd C). The crystal structures of the two triorganotin(IV) complexes have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both the complexes crystallized in the monoclinic, P2(1)/n space group. The spectral investigations and single crystal X-ray diffraction data illustrate that the two dithiocarbamato ligands in the triphenyltin(IV) derivatives 1 and 2 are monodentate and the geometry at tin is best described as a distorted tetrahedron. The in vitro antiproliferative tests of these two derivatives on three human cell lines, leukemic lymphoblastoma Jurkat cells, lymphoblastoma K-562 cells, hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells and one mouse fibroblast cells L929 show dose-dependent decrease of cell proliferation in all cell lines.

  19. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>10(13) photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV. PMID:27131669

  20. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>10(13) photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV.

  1. A complementary dual-slope ADC with high frame rate and wide input range for fast X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daehee; Cho, Minsik; Kang, Dong-Uk; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Hyunduk; Cho, Gyuseong

    2014-02-01

    The single-slope analog-to-digital converter (SS-ADC) is the most commonly used column-level ADC for high-speed industrial, complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based X-ray image sensors because of its small chip area (the width of a pixel), its simple circuit structure, and its low power consumption. However, it generally has a long conversion time, so we propose an innovative design: a complimentary dual-slope ADC (CDS-ADC) that uses two opposite ramp signals instead of a single ramp to double the conversion speed. This CDS-ADC occupies only 15% more area than the original SS-ADC. A prototype 12-bit CDS-ADC and a 12-bit SS-ADC were fabricated using a 0.35-µm 1P 4M CMOS process. During comparison of the two, the measured maximum differential non-linearity (DNL) of the CDS-ADC was a 0.49 least significant bit (LSB), the maximum integral non-linearity (INL) was a 0.43 LSB, the effective number of bits (ENOB) was 9.18 bits, and the figure of merit (FOM) was 0.03 pJ/conversion. The total power consumption was 0.031 uW. The conversion time of the new CDS-ADC was half that of the SS-ADC. The proposed dual-slope concept can be extended to further multiply the conversion speed by using multiple pairs of dual-slope ramps.

  2. X-Ray Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  3. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  4. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  5. X-ray Attenuation and Absorption Calculations.

    1988-02-25

    This point-source, polychromatic, discrete energy X-ray transport and energy deposition code system calculates first-order spectral estimates of X-ray energy transmission through slab materials and the associated spectrum of energy absorbed by the material.

  6. THE EMISSION FROM AN INNER DISK AND A CORONA IN THE LOW AND INTERMEDIATE SPECTRAL STATES OF BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao Erlin; Liu, B. F.

    2012-01-10

    Recent observations reveal that a cool disk may survive in the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) for some black hole X-ray binaries (BHXRBs) in the canonical low/hard state. The spectrum is characterized by a power law with a photon index {Gamma} {approx} 1.5-2.1 in the range of 2-10 keV and a weak disk component with a temperature of {approx}0.2 keV. In this work, we revisit the formation of such a cool, optically thick, geometrically thin disk in the innermost region of BHXRBs at the low/hard state within the context of disk accretion fed by condensation of the hot corona. By taking into account the cooling process associated with both Compton and conductive processes in a corona and the irradiation of the hot corona to the disk, we calculate the structure of the corona. For viscosity parameter {alpha} = 0.2, it is found that the inner disk can exist for an accretion rate ranging from M-dot{approx}0.006 to 0.03 M-dot{sub Edd}, over which the electron temperatures of the corona are in the range of 1-5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} K producing the hard X-ray emission. We calculate the emergent spectra of the inner disk and corona for different mass accretion rates. The effect of viscosity parameter {alpha} and albedo a (a is defined as the energy ratio of reflected radiation from the surface of the thin disk to incident radiation upon it from the corona) on the emergent spectra is also presented. Our model is used to explain the recent observations of GX 339-4 and Cyg X-1, in which the thin disk may exist at the ISCO region in the low/hard state at a luminosity around a few percent of L{sub Edd}. It is found that the observed maximal effective temperature of the thermal component and the hard X-ray photon index {Gamma} can be matched well by our model.

  7. Separating Peaks in X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David; Taylor, Clayborne; Wade, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Deconvolution algorithm assists in analysis of x-ray spectra from scanning electron microscopes, electron microprobe analyzers, x-ray fluorescence spectrometers, and like. New algorithm automatically deconvolves x-ray spectrum, identifies locations of spectral peaks, and selects chemical elements most likely producing peaks. Technique based on similarities between zero- and second-order terms of Taylor-series expansions of Gaussian distribution and of damped sinusoid. Principal advantage of algorithm: no requirement to adjust weighting factors or other parameters when analyzing general x-ray spectra.

  8. A novel flat-response x-ray detector in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhichao; Jiang, Xiaohua; Liu, Shenye; Huang, Tianxuan; Zheng, Jian; Yang, Jiamin; Li, Sanwei; Guo, Liang; Zhao, Xuefeng; Du, Huabin; Song, Tianming; Yi, Rongqing; Liu, Yonggang; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2010-07-01

    A novel flat-response x-ray detector has been developed for the measurement of radiation flux from a hohlraum. In order to obtain a flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, it is found that both the cathode and the filter of the detector can be made of gold. A further improvement on the compound filter can then largely relax the requirement of the calibration x-ray beam. The calibration of the detector, which is carried out on Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility at Institute of High Energy Physics, shows that the detector has a desired flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, with a response flatness smaller than 13%. The detector has been successfully applied in the hohlraum experiment on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. The radiation temperatures inferred from the detector agree well with those from the diagnostic instrument Dante installed at the same azimuth angle from the hohlraum axis, demonstrating the feasibility of the detector.

  9. Radiation exposure due to cosmic rays and solar X-ray photons at various atmospheric heights in aviation range over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-07-01

    In this presentation we present our work on the continuous monitoring of radiation exposure in terms of effective dose rates, due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar X-rays at various altitudes within aviation range over India. As India belongs to equatorial region, there is negligible contribution from solar energetic particles (SEP). The calculation of cosmic ray counts as well as the solar X-ray photons are performed on the basis of the observation of various Dignity series balloon experiments on cosmic ray and solar high energy radiation studies, conducted by ICSP and Monte Carlo simulations performed with GEANT4 detector simulation software. The information on solar activity level from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES) are employed in the calculations. A program, which is done entirely in MATLAB is employed to update regularly in a website, where we show images of dose rate (μSv) distribution over India at four different heights within the aviation range (updating at an interval of 30 minutes) and the approximate dose rates thats should be experienced by a pilot in an entire flight time between pairs of stations distributed all over India.

  10. A novel flat-response x-ray detector in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhichao; Guo Liang; Jiang Xiaohua; Liu Shenye; Huang Tianxuan; Yang Jiamin; Li Sanwei; Zhao Xuefeng; Du Huabin; Song Tianming; Yi Rongqing; Liu Yonggang; Jiang Shaoen; Ding Yongkun; Zheng Jian

    2010-07-15

    A novel flat-response x-ray detector has been developed for the measurement of radiation flux from a hohlraum. In order to obtain a flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, it is found that both the cathode and the filter of the detector can be made of gold. A further improvement on the compound filter can then largely relax the requirement of the calibration x-ray beam. The calibration of the detector, which is carried out on Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility at Institute of High Energy Physics, shows that the detector has a desired flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, with a response flatness smaller than 13%. The detector has been successfully applied in the hohlraum experiment on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. The radiation temperatures inferred from the detector agree well with those from the diagnostic instrument Dante installed at the same azimuth angle from the hohlraum axis, demonstrating the feasibility of the detector.

  11. The Focusing Optics Solar X-ray Imager (FOXSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, S.; Glesener, L.; Krucker, S.; Ramsey, B.; Ishikawa, S.; Takahashi, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager is a sounding rocket payload funded under the NASA Low Cost Access to Space program to test hard x-ray focusing optics and position-sensitive solid state detectors for solar observations. Today's leading solar hard x-ray instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager provides excellent spatial (2 arcseconds) and spectral (1~keV) resolution. Yet, due to its use of indirect imaging, the derived images have a low dynamic range (<30) and sensitivity. These limitations make it difficult to study faint x-ray sources in the solar corona which are crucial for understanding the solar flare acceleration process. Grazing-incidence x-ray focusing optics combined with position-sensitive solid state detectors can overcome both of these limitations enabling the next breakthrough in understanding particle acceleration in solar flares. The foxsi project is led by the Space Science Laboratory at the University of California. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, with experience from the HERO balloon project, is responsible for the grazing-incidence optics, while the Astro H team (JAXA/ISAS) will provide double-sided silicon strip detectors. FOXSI will be a pathfinder for the next generation of solar hard x-ray spectroscopic imagers. Such observatories will be able to image the non-thermal electrons within the solar flare acceleration region, trace their paths through the corona, and provide essential quantitative measurements such as energy spectra, density, and energy content in accelerated electrons.

  12. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method

    SciTech Connect

    Hurvitz, G.; Ehrlich, Y.; Shpilman, Z.; Levy, I.; Fraenkel, M.; Strum, G.

    2012-08-15

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses focused-ion-beam technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on transmission electron microscopy grids. High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements.

  13. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method.

    PubMed

    Hurvitz, G; Ehrlich, Y; Strum, G; Shpilman, Z; Levy, I; Fraenkel, M

    2012-08-01

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses focused-ion-beam technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on transmission electron microscopy grids. High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements.

  14. High-energy monitoring of NGC 4593 with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR. X-ray spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursini, F.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Matt, G.; Bianchi, S.; Cappi, M.; De Marco, B.; De Rosa, A.; Malzac, J.; Marinucci, A.; Ponti, G.; Tortosa, A.

    2016-11-01

    We present results from a joint XMM-Newton/NuSTAR monitoring of the Seyfert 1 NGC 4593, consisting of 5 × 20 ks simultaneous observations spaced by 2 d, performed in 2015 January. The source is variable, both in flux and spectral shape, on time-scales down to a few ks and with a clear softer-when-brighter behaviour. In agreement with past observations, we find the presence of a warm absorber well described by a two-phase ionized outflow. The source exhibits a cold, narrow and constant Fe Kα line at 6.4 keV, and a broad component is also detected. The broad-band (0.3-79 keV) spectrum is well described by a primary power law with Γ ≃ 1.6-1.8 and an exponential cut-off varying from 90^{+ 40}_{- 20} to >700 keV, two distinct reflection components, and a variable soft excess correlated with the primary power law. This campaign shows that probing the variability of Seyfert 1 galaxies on different time-scales is of prime importance to investigate the high-energy emission of active galactic nuclei.

  15. Circinus X-1: a Laboratory for Studying the Accretion Phenomenon in Compact Binary X-Ray Sources. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson-Saba, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of the binary X-ray source Circinus X-1 provide samples of a range of spectral and temporal behavior whose variety is thought to reflect a broad continuum of accretion conditions in an eccentric binary system. The data support an identification of three or more X-ray spectral components, probably associated with distinct emission regions.

  16. Characterisation of a TES-Based X-ray Microcalorimeter in the Energy Range from 150 to 1800 eV Using an Adiabatic Demagnetisation Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottardi, L.; Takei, Y.; van der Kuur, J.; de Korte, P. A. J.; Hoevers, H. F. C.; Boersma, D.; Bruijn, M.; Mels, W.; Ridder, M. L.; Takken, D.; van Weers, H.

    2008-04-01

    We characterised a TES-based X-ray microcalorimeter in an adiabatic demagnetisation refrigerator (ADR) using synchrotron radiation. The detector response and energy resolution was measured at the beam-line in the PTB radiometry laboratory at the electron storage ring BESSY II in the range from 200 to 1800 eV. We present and discuss the results of the energy resolution measurements as a function of energy, beam intensity and detector working point. The measured energy resolution ranges between 1.5 to 2.1 eV in the investigated energy range and is weakly dependent on the detector set point. A first analysis shows a count-rate capability, without considerable loss of performance, of about 500 counts per second.

  17. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Feldhaus, J.; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

  18. Fine pitch CdTe-based hard-X-ray polarimeter performance for space science in the 70-300 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antier, S.; Limousin, O.; Ferrando, P.

    2015-07-01

    X-rays astrophysical sources have been almost characterized through imaging, spectroscopy and timing analysis. Nevertheless, more observational parameters such as polarization are needed because some radiation mechanisms present in gamma-ray sources are still unclear. We have developed a CdTe based fine-pitch imaging spectrometer, Caliste to study polarization. With a 58-micron pitch and 1 keV energy resolution at 60 keV, we are able to accurately reconstruct the polarization angle and fraction of an impinging flux of photons which are scattered by 90° after Compton diffusion within the crystal. In this paper, we present the principles and the results obtained for this kind of measurements: on one hand, we compare simulations results with experimental data taken at ESRF ID15A (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility) using a 35-300 keV mono-energetic polarized beam. Applying a judicious energy selection to our data set, we reach a remarkable sensitivity level characterized by a measured Quality factor of 0.78±0.02 in the 200-300 keV range; and a measured Q factor of 0.64±0.0 at 70 keV where hard X-rays mirrors are already available.

  19. Identification of X-ray spectra in the Na-like to O-like rubidium ions in the range of 3.8-7.3 Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis-Petit, D.; Comet, M.; Bonnet, T.; Hannachi, F.; Gobet, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Gosselin, G.; Méot, V.; Morel, P.; Pain, J.-Ch.; Gilleron, F.; Frank, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Blazevic, A.; Dorchies, F.; Peyrusse, O.; Cayzac, W.; Roth, M.

    2014-11-01

    The X-rays emitted by a rubidium plasma source created by the PHELIX laser at an intensity of about 6×1014 W/cm2 were studied. The lines have been measured using Bragg crystals in the wavelength range between 3.8 and 7.3 Å and identified by means of a numerical method developed to describe highly charged rubidium ions in LTE plasma. The experimental plasma temperature, density and charge state distributions have been estimated using non-LTE codes such as CHIVAS and AVERROES. The LTE plasma temperature and density used in the calculations are those allowing to reproduce the calculated NLTE charge state distribution. In order to optimize the use of computational resources, a criterion is established to select the configurations contributing most to the spectra among all those obtained in detailed level accounting based on the MCDF code. Seventy Rb X-rays have been identified among which forty-nine are reported for the first time. The capabilities of our method are demonstrated by the good agreement of our identifications with previously published data when available.

  20. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  1. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis using special X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wobrauschek, P.; Kregsamer, P.; Ladisich, W.; Rieder, R.; Streli, C.

    1993-02-01

    The parameter variations of exciting radiation, like spectral distribution, intensity, brilliance, polarization and the phenomenon of X-ray total reflection, leads to improved lower limits of detection (LLD) in XRF. Observations and results from experiments performed with different X-ray tubes such as fine focus Cu and Mo anodes, a specially designed Au anode operated with 100 kV and high power rotating anodes are reported. Results from measurements with monochromatic X-rays tuned with a multilayer structure as well as the use of polarized X-rays from the synchrotron will be shown. All developed measuring devices will be described in terms of their recent design features showing the possible geometric arrangements denned by the beam-reflector-detector position. The extrapolated detection limits for the K-shell excitation of rare earth elements are in the region of 0.3 ng, for medium Z elements in the pg range and for optimized conditions, with a rotating Cu anode, 170 fg for Mn are achieved corresponding to the pg g -1 (ppt) concentration level.

  2. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  3. The SWIRE/Chandra Survey: The X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Kilgard, Roy; Kim, Dong-Woo; Kim, Minsun; Polletta, Mari; Lonsdale, Carol; Smith, Harding E.; Surace, Jason; Owen, Frazer N.; Franceschini, A.; Siana, Brian; Shupe, David

    2009-12-01

    We report a moderate-depth (70 ks), contiguous 0.7 deg2 Chandra survey in the Lockman Hole Field of the Spitzer/SWIRE Legacy Survey coincident with a completed, ultra-deep VLA survey with deep optical and near-infrared imaging in-hand. The primary motivation is to distinguish starburst galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGNs), including the significant, highly obscured (log N H > 23) subset. Chandra has detected 775 X-ray sources to a limiting broadband (0.3-8 keV) flux ~4 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1. We present the X-ray catalog, fluxes, hardness ratios, and multi-wavelength fluxes. The log N versus log S agrees with those of previous surveys covering similar flux ranges. The Chandra and Spitzer flux limits are well matched: 771 (99%) of the X-ray sources have infrared (IR) or optical counterparts, and 333 have MIPS 24 μm detections. There are four optical-only X-ray sources and four with no visible optical/IR counterpart. The very deep (~2.7 μJy rms) VLA data yield 251 (>4σ) radio counterparts, 44% of the X-ray sources in the field. We confirm that the tendency for lower X-ray flux sources to be harder is primarily due to absorption. As expected, there is no correlation between observed IR and X-ray fluxes. Optically bright, type 1, and red AGNs lie in distinct regions of the IR versus X-ray flux plots, demonstrating the wide range of spectral energy distributions in this sample and providing the potential for classification/source selection. Many optically bright sources, which lie outside the AGN region in the optical versus X-ray plots (fr /fx >10), lie inside the region predicted for red AGNs in IR versus X-ray plots, consistent with the presence of an active nucleus. More than 40% of the X-ray sources in the VLA field are radio-loud using the classical definition, RL . The majority of these are red and relatively faint in the optical so that the use of RL to select those AGNs with the strongest radio emission becomes questionable. Using the 24 μm to radio

  4. ANS hard X-ray experiment development program. [emission from X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsignault, D.; Gursky, H.; Frank, R.; Kubierschky, K.; Austin, G.; Paganetti, R.; Bawdekar, V.

    1974-01-01

    The hard X-ray (HXX) experiment is one of three experiments included in the Dutch Astronomical Netherlands Satellite, which was launched into orbit on 30 August 1974. The overall objective of the HXX experiment is the detailed study of the emission from known X-ray sources over the energy range 1.5-30keV. The instrument is capable of the following measurements: (1) spectral content over the full energy range with an energy resolution of approximately 20% and time resolution down to 4 seconds; (2) source time variability down to 4 milliseconds; (3) silicon emission lines at 1.86 and 2.00keV; (4) source location to a limit of one arc minute in ecliptic latitude; and (5) spatial structure with angular resolution of the arc minutes. Scientific aspects of experiment, engineering design and implementation of the experiment, and program history are included.

  5. The Astro-E High Resolution X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Audley, Michael D.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Breon, Susan R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Gendreau, Keith C.; Holt, Stephen S.; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; McCammon, Dan; Mihara, Tatehiro

    1999-01-01

    The Astro-E High Resolution X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) was developed jointly by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in Japan. The instrument is based on a new approach to spectroscopy, the X-ray microcalorimeter. This device senses the energies of individual X-ray photons as heat with extreme precision. A 32 channel array of microcalorimeters is being employed, each with an energy resolution of about 12 eV at 6 keV (the Fe-K region). This will provide spectral resolving power 10 times higher than any other non-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The instrument incorporates a three stage cooling system capable of operating the array at 60 mK for about two years in orbit. The array sits at the focus of a grazing incidence conical mirror. The quantum efficiency of the microcalorimeters and the reflectivity of the X-ray mirror system combine to give high throughput over the 0.3-12 keV energy band. This new capability will enable the study of a wide range of high-energy astrophysical sources with unprecedented spectral sensitivity. This paper presents the basic design requirements and implementation of the XRS, and also describes the instrument parameters and performance.

  6. The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, F.; Kemp, G. E.; Barrios, M. A.; Pino, J.; Scott, H.; Ayers, S.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; Regan, S. P.; Bedzyk, M.; Shoup, M. J.; Agliata, A.; Yaakobi, B.; Marshall, F. J.; Hamilton, R. A.; Jaquez, J.; Farrell, M.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-11-15

    The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the OMEGA laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 2–18 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations.

  7. The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega.

    PubMed

    Pérez, F; Kemp, G E; Regan, S P; Barrios, M A; Pino, J; Scott, H; Ayers, S; Chen, H; Emig, J; Colvin, J D; Bedzyk, M; Shoup, M J; Agliata, A; Yaakobi, B; Marshall, F J; Hamilton, R A; Jaquez, J; Farrell, M; Nikroo, A; Fournier, K B

    2014-11-01

    The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the Omega laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 2-18 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations. PMID:25430189

  8. The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega.

    PubMed

    Pérez, F; Kemp, G E; Regan, S P; Barrios, M A; Pino, J; Scott, H; Ayers, S; Chen, H; Emig, J; Colvin, J D; Bedzyk, M; Shoup, M J; Agliata, A; Yaakobi, B; Marshall, F J; Hamilton, R A; Jaquez, J; Farrell, M; Nikroo, A; Fournier, K B

    2014-11-01

    The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the Omega laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 2-18 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations.

  9. Recent X-ray Variability of Eta Car Approaching The X-ray Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M.; Swank, J. H.; Ishibashi, K.; Gull, T.; Humphreys, R.; Damineli, A.; Walborn, N.; Hillier, D. J.; Davidson, K.; White, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss recent X-ray spectral variability of the supermassive star Eta Car in the interval since the last X-ray eclipse in 1998. We concentrate on the interval just prior to the next X-ray eclipse which is expected to occur in June 2003. We compare the X-ray behavior during the 2001-2003 cycle with the previous cycle (1996-1998) and note similarities and differences in the temporal X-ray behavior. We also compare a recent X-ray observation of Eta Car obtained with the Chandra high energy transmission grating in October 2002 with an earlier observation from Nov 2002, and interpret these results in terms of the proposed colliding wind binary model for the star. In addition we discuss planned observations for the upcoming X-ray eclipse.

  10. Intermediate-range order in water ices : nonresonant inelastic x-ray scatterig measurements and real-space full multiple scattering calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Fister, T. T.; Nagel, K. P.; Vila, F. D.; Seidler, G. T.; Hamner, C.; Cross, J. O.; Rehr, J. J.; Univ. Washington; Washington State Univ.

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of the nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) from the O 1s orbitals in ice Ih, and also report calculations of the corresponding spectra for ice Ih and several other phases of water ice. We find that the intermediate-energy fine structure may be calculated well using an ab initio real-space full multiple scattering approach and that it provides a strong fingerprint of the intermediate-range order for some ice phases. Both experiment and theory find that the intermediate-range fine structure, unlike the near-edge structure, is independent of momentum transfer (q) to very high q. These results have important consequences for future NRIXS measurements of high-pressure phases of ice.

  11. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-ray? What is Panoramic X-ray? Panoramic radiography , also called panoramic x-ray , is a two- ... Exams Dental Cone Beam CT X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety About this Site ...

  12. X-ray spectral measurement of high-temperature plasma parameters in porous targets irradiated with high-power laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilov, V V; Gol'tsov, A Yu; Koval'skii, N G; Koptyaev, S N; Magunov, A I; Pikuz, T A; Skobelev, I Yu; Faenov, A Ya

    2001-12-31

    The X-ray spectra of multiply charged ions were recorded from planar agar (C{sub 12}H{sub 18}O{sub 9}){sub n} based targets with an average density of 2 mg cm{sup -3} irradiated by high-power laser pulses ({lambda}=1.054 {mu}m, {tau}=2.5 ns, I {approx} 5 x10{sup 13} W cm{sup -2}). The spectra were recorded with a high spectral and spatial resolution employing spherically bent (focusing) crystals of mica and quartz. An analysis of the experimental data obtained by the irradiation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped agar samples allowed us to determine the main parameters of the plasma produced inside the targets. The ion temperature of plasma in low-density porous targets was estimated for the first time to be 1.5 - 2 times higher than the electron temperature. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  13. X-Ray Spectral Model of Reprocess by Smooth and Clumpy Molecular Tori in Active Galactic Nuclei with the Framework MONACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furui, Shun'ya; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Ohno, Masanori; Hayashi, Kazuma

    2016-02-01

    We construct an X-ray spectral model of reprocessing by a torus in an active galactic nucleus (AGN) with the Monte Carlo simulation framework MONACO. Two torus geometries of smooth and clumpy cases are considered and compared. In order to reproduce a Compton shoulder accurately, MONACO includes not only free electron scattering but also bound electron scattering. Raman and Rayleigh scattering are also treated, and scattering cross sections dependent on chemical states of hydrogen and helium are included. Doppler broadening by turbulence velocity can be implemented. Our model gives results consistent with other available models, such as MYTorus, except for differences due to different physical parameters and assumptions. We studied the dependence on torus parameters for a Compton shoulder, and found that a intensity ratio of a Compton shoulder to the line core mainly depends on column density, inclination angle, and metal abundance. For instance, an increase of metal abundance makes a Compton shoulder relatively weak. Also, the shape of a Compton shoulder depends on the column density. Furthermore, these dependences become different between smooth and clumpy cases. Then, we discuss the possibility of ASTRO-H/SXS spectroscopy of Compton shoulders in AGN reflection spectra.

  14. Provenance of Holocene sediment on the Chukchi-Alaskan margin based on combined diffuse spectral reflectance and quantitative X-Ray Diffraction analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, J.D.; Polyak, L.; Grebmeier, J.M.; Darby, D.; Eberl, D.D.; Naidu, S.; Nof, D.

    2009-01-01

    Sediment clay and silt mineral assemblages provide an excellent means of assessing the provenance of fine-grained Arctic sediment especially when a unique mineral assemblage can be tied to specific source areas. The diffuse spectral reflectance (DSR) first derivative measurements and quantitative X-Ray Diffraction (qXRD) on a high-resolution sediment core from the continental slope north of Alaska constrain the sediment mineralogy. DSR results are augmented by measurements on several adjacent cores and compared to surface sediment samples from the northern Alaskan shelf and slope. Using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), we infer that the three leading DSR modes relate to mixtures of smectite + dolomite, illite + goethite, and chlorite + muscovite. This interpretation is consistent with the down core qXRD results. While the smectite + dolomite, and illite + goethite factors show increased variability down core, the chlorite + muscovite factor had highest positive loadings in the middle Holocene, between ca. 6.0 and 3.6??ka. Because the most likely source of the chlorite + muscovite suite in this vicinity lies in the North Pacific, we argue that the oscillations in chlorite + muscovite values likely reflect an increase in the inflow of Pacific water to the Arctic through the Bering Strait. The time interval of this event is associated in other parts of the globe with a non-linear response of the climate system to the decrease in insolation, which may be related to changes in water exchange between the Pacific and Arctic Ocean. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Haugh and M. B. Schneider

    2008-10-31

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. The intensity distribution taken by the SXI camera during a NIF shot is used to determine how accurately NIF can aim laser beams. This is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 μm square pixels, and 15 μm thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 10W, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/ΔE≈10. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within ±1% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation occurred at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was not observable below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris, damage, and surface defects on the CCD chip. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager.

  16. X-ray spectral measurements for tungsten-anode from 20 to 49 kVp on a digital breast tomosynthesis system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Da; Li Xinhua; Liu, Bob

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: This paper presents new spectral measurements of a tungsten-target digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system, including spectra of 43-49 kVp. Methods: Raw x-ray spectra of 20-49 kVp were directly measured from the tube port of a Selenia Dimensions DBT system using a CdTe based spectrometer. Two configurations of collimation were employed: one with two tungsten pinholes of 25{mu}m and 200{mu}m diameters, and the other with a single pinhole of 25{mu}m diameter, for acquiring spectra from the focal spot and from the focal spot as well as its vicinity. Stripping correction was applied to the measured spectra to compensate distortions due to escape events. The measured spectra were compared with the existing mammographic spectra of the TASMIP model in terms of photon fluence per exposure, spectral components, and half-value layer (HVL). HVLs were calculated from the spectra with a numerical filtration of 0.7 mm aluminum and were compared against actual measurements on the DBT system using W/Al (target-filter) combination, without paddle in the beam. Results: The spectra from the double-pinhole configuration, in which the acceptance aperture pointed right at the focal spot, were harder than the single-pinhole spectra which include both primary and off-focus radiation. HVL calculated from the single-pinhole setup agreed with the measured HVL within 0.04 mm aluminum, while the HVL values from the double-pinhole setup were larger than the single-pinhole HVL by at most 0.1 mm aluminum. The spectra from single-pinhole setup agreed well with the TASMIP mammographic spectra, and are more relevant for clinical purpose. Conclusions: The spectra data would be useful for future research on DBT system with tungsten targets.

  17. Calculations of photo-induced X-ray production cross-sections in the energy range 1-150 keV and average fluorescence yields for Zn, Cd and Hg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, J. M.; Guerra, M.; Parente, F.; Madeira, T. I.; Indelicato, P.; Santos, J. P.; Marques, J. P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we calculate the K-, L- and M-shells X-ray production, and X-ray fluorescence cross-sections after photo-induced ionization, for Zn, Cd, and Hg, and for incident photon energy range from 1 to 150 keV. For this purpose, the corresponding average fluorescence yields for Zn, Cd, and Hg as well as the photoionization cross-sections were calculated using the Dirac-Fock method. Subshell fluorescence, intrashell and intershell yields are obtained consistently from radiative and radiationless transitions calculated in the exact same method. A comprehensive account of the relations between the X-ray production, X-ray fluorescence cross-sections and the photoionization cross-sections and these yields is presented. Comparisons are made with results from other authors. The obtained values for the photoionization cross-sections are in good agreement with the widely used data of Scofield in the studied energy range. However our results for the X-ray fluorescence cross sections seem to favor some data relatively to others. The energy dependence of the average fluorescence yields is discussed, in particular, the reliability of extrapolated data for lighter elements from measurements and calculations in heavier elements above the inner shell absorption edges is questioned. Tabulated data on photoionization and X-ray production cross-sections are presented for the incident photon energy range 1-150 keV in steps of 1 keV.

  18. Calculations of photo-induced X-ray production cross-sections in the energy range 1-150 keV and average fluorescence yields for Zn, Cd and Hg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, J. M.; Guerra, M.; Parente, F.; Madeira, T. I.; Indelicato, P.; Santos, J. P.; Marques, J. P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we calculate the K-, L- and M-shells X-ray production, and X-ray fluorescence cross-sections after photo-induced ionization, for Zn, Cd, and Hg, and for incident photon energy range from 1 to 150 keV. For this purpose, the corresponding average fluorescence yields for Zn, Cd, and Hg as well as the photoionization cross-sections were calculated using the Dirac-Fock method. Subshell fluorescence, intrashell and intershell yields are obtained consistently from radiative and radiationless transitions calculated in the exact same method. A comprehensive account of the relations between the X-ray production, X-ray fluorescence cross-sections and the photoionization cross-sections and these yields is presented. Comparisons are made with results from other authors. The obtained values for the photoionization cross-sections are in good agreement with the widely used data of Scofield in the studied energy range. However our results for the X-ray fluorescence cross sections seem to favor some data relatively to others. The energy dependence of the average fluorescence yields is discussed, in particular, the reliability of extrapolated data for lighter elements from measurements and calculations in heavier elements above the inner shell absorption edges is questioned. Tabulated data on photoionization and X-ray production cross-sections are presented for the incident photon energy range 1-150 keV in steps of 1 keV.

  19. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  20. First Hard X-Ray Detection of the Non-Thermal Emission Around the Arches Cluster: Morphology and Spectral Studies With NuSTAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivonos, Roman A.; Tomsick, John A.; Bauer, Franz E.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barriere, Nicolas M.; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, JaeSub; Madsen, Kristin K.; Mori, Kaya; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended non-thermal X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe K(alpha) line emission at 6.4 keV from material that is neutral or in a low ionization state can be produced either by X-ray photoionization or by cosmic-ray particle bombardment or both. In this paper, we report on the first detection of the extended emission around the Arches cluster above 10 keV with the NuSTAR mission, and present results on its morphology and spectrum. The spatial distribution of the hard X-ray emission is found to be consistent with the broad region around the cluster where the 6.4 keV line is observed. The interpretation of the hard X-ray emission within the context of the X-ray reflection model puts a strong constraint on the luminosity of the possible illuminating hard X-ray source. The properties of the observed emission are also in broad agreement with the low-energy cosmic-ray proton excitation scenario. Key words: cosmic rays - Galaxy: center - ISM: general - X-rays: individual (Arches cluster)

  1. Towards a microchannel-based X-ray detector with two-dimensional spatial and time resolution and high dynamic range

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Mane, Anil; Elam, Jeffrey; Obaid, Razib; Wetstein, Matthew J.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray detectors that combine two-dimensional spatial resolution with a high time resolution are needed in numerous applications of synchrotron radiation. Most detectors with this combination of capabilities are based on semiconductor technology and are therefore limited in size. Furthermore, the time resolution is often realised through rapid time-gating of the acquisition, followed by a slower readout. Here, a detector technology is realised based on relatively inexpensive microchannel plates that uses GHz waveform sampling for a millimeter-scale spatial resolution and better than 100 ps time resolution. The technology is capable of continuous streaming of time- and location-tagged events at rates greater than 10(7) events per cm(2). Time-gating can be used for improved dynamic range.

  2. Comparison of the NIST and BIPM Air-Kerma Standards for Measurements in the Low-Energy X-Ray Range

    PubMed Central

    Burns, D. T.; Lamperti, P.; O’Brien, M.

    1999-01-01

    A direct comparison was made between the air-kerma standards used for the measurement of low-energy x rays at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). The comparison was carried out at the BIPM using the BIPM reference beam qualities in the range from 10 kV to 100 kV. The results show the standards to be in agreement to around 0.5 % at reference beam qualities up to 50 kV and at 100 kV. The result at the 80 kV beam quality is less favorable, with agreement at the 1 % level.

  3. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  4. POLIX: A Thomson X-ray polarimeter for a small satellite mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Biswajit; Gopala Krishna, M. R.; Puthiya Veetil, Rishin

    2016-07-01

    POLIX is a Thomson X-ray polarimeter for a small satellite mission of ISRO. The instrument consists of a collimator, a scatterer and a set proportional counters to detect the scattered X-rays. We will describe the design, specifications, sensitivity, and development status of this instrument and some of the important scientific goals. This instrument will provide unprecedented opportunity to measure X-ray polarisation in the medium energy range in a large number of sources of different classes with a minimum detectable linear polarisation degree of 2-3%. The prime objects for observation with this instrument are the X-ray bright accretion powered neutron stars, accreting black holes in different spectral states, rotation powered pulsars, magnetars, and active galactic nuclei. This instrument will be a bridge between the soft X-ray polarimeters and the Compton polarimeters.

  5. X-ray Flares and their Type III Radio Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, N.; Reid, H.

    2012-12-01

    Oppositely directed accelerated electron beams in solar flares can produce Hard X-rays in the chromosphere and radio emission from the low corona to the interplanetary medium. The temporal and inferred spectral correlation of these electron beams indicates a common acceleration region. We used the RHESSI X-ray flare catalogue and the PHOENIX catalogue of radio bursts to select a list of events with impulsive X-ray signatures that was correlated in time with type III radio emission in the decimetric range. We furthermore selected events for which the Nançay Radioheliograph had spatially resolved information in the 450-150 MHz range. We investigate the percentage of decimetric/metric type III radio bursts that have a counterpart at lower frequencies (14 - 1 MHz) observed with Wind/Waves. We will discuss the electron beam characteristics deduced from X-ray observations that affect the relationship between coronal and interplanetary type III bursts. Moreover, we will use the combined images in radio and X-ray frequencies to deduce the role of the local coronal environment.

  6. Optics-free x-ray FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-03-28

    There is a need for an Optics-Free FEL Oscillators (OFFELO) to further the advantages of free-electron lasers and turning them in fully coherent light sources. While SASE (Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission) FELs demonstrated the capability of providing very high gain and short pulses of radiation and scalability to the X-ray range, the spectra of SASE FELs remains rather wide ({approx}0.5%-1%) compared with typical short wavelengths FEL-oscillators (0.01%-0.0003% in OK-4 FEL). Absence of good optics in VUV and X-ray ranges makes traditional oscillator schemes with very high average and peak spectral brightness either very complex or, strictly speaking, impossible. In this paper, we discuss lattice of the X-ray optics-free FEL oscillator and present results of initial computer simulations of the feedback process and the evolution of FEL spectrum in X-ray OFFELO. We also discuss main limiting factors and feasibility of X-ray OFFELO.

  7. Molecular imaging using X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Barty, Anton; Küpper, Jochen; Chapman, Henry N

    2013-01-01

    The opening of hard X-ray free-electron laser facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the United States, has ushered in a new era in structural determination. With X-ray pulse durations down to 10 fs or shorter, and up to 10(13) transversely coherent photons per pulse in a narrow spectral bandwidth, focused irradiances of 10(18) to 10(21) W cm(-2) or higher can be produced at X-ray energies ranging from 500 eV to 10 keV. New techniques for determining the structure of systems that cannot be crystallized and for studying the time-resolved behavior of irreversible reactions at femtosecond timescales are now available.

  8. Molecular Imaging Using X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barty, Anton; Küpper, Jochen; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-04-01

    The opening of hard X-ray free-electron laser facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the United States, has ushered in a new era in structural determination. With X-ray pulse durations down to 10 fs or shorter, and up to 1013 transversely coherent photons per pulse in a narrow spectral bandwidth, focused irradiances of 1018 to 1021 W cm-2 or higher can be produced at X-ray energies ranging from 500 eV to 10 keV. New techniques for determining the structure of systems that cannot be crystallized and for studying the time-resolved behavior of irreversible reactions at femtosecond timescales are now available.

  9. Molecular imaging using X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Barty, Anton; Küpper, Jochen; Chapman, Henry N

    2013-01-01

    The opening of hard X-ray free-electron laser facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the United States, has ushered in a new era in structural determination. With X-ray pulse durations down to 10 fs or shorter, and up to 10(13) transversely coherent photons per pulse in a narrow spectral bandwidth, focused irradiances of 10(18) to 10(21) W cm(-2) or higher can be produced at X-ray energies ranging from 500 eV to 10 keV. New techniques for determining the structure of systems that cannot be crystallized and for studying the time-resolved behavior of irreversible reactions at femtosecond timescales are now available. PMID:23331310

  10. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Carini, Gabriella; Denes, Peter; Gruener, Sol; Lessner, Elianne

    2012-08-01

    The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) X-ray and neutron user facilities attract more than 12,000 researchers each year to perform cutting-edge science at these state-of-the-art sources. While impressive breakthroughs in X-ray and neutron sources give us the powerful illumination needed to peer into the nano- to mesoscale world, a stumbling block continues to be the distinct lag in detector development, which is slowing progress toward data collection and analysis. Urgently needed detector improvements would reveal chemical composition and bonding in 3-D and in real time, allow researchers to watch “movies” of essential life processes as they happen, and make much more efficient use of every X-ray and neutron produced by the source The immense scientific potential that will come from better detectors has triggered worldwide activity in this area. Europe in particular has made impressive strides, outpacing the United States on several fronts. Maintaining a vital U.S. leadership in this key research endeavor will require targeted investments in detector R&D and infrastructure. To clarify the gap between detector development and source advances, and to identify opportunities to maximize the scientific impact of BES user facilities, a workshop on Neutron and X-ray Detectors was held August 1-3, 2012, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Participants from universities, national laboratories, and commercial organizations from the United States and around the globe participated in plenary sessions, breakout groups, and joint open-discussion summary sessions. Sources have become immensely more powerful and are now brighter (more particles focused onto the sample per second) and more precise (higher spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution). To fully utilize these source advances, detectors must become faster, more efficient, and more discriminating. In supporting the mission of today’s cutting-edge neutron and X-ray sources, the workshop identified six detector research challenges

  11. Complete Hard X-Ray Surveys, AGN Luminosity Functions and the X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, Jack

    2011-01-01

    AGN are believed to make up most of the Cosmic X-Ray Background (CXB) above a few keV, but this background cannot be fully resolved at energies less than 10 keV due to absorption. The Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL missions are performing the first complete hard x-ray surveys with minimal bias due to absorption. The most recent results for both missions will be presented. Although the fraction of the CXB resolved by these surveys is small, it is possible to derive unbiased number counts and luminosity functions for AGN in the local universe. The survey energy range from 15-150 keV contains the important reflection and cutoff spectral features dominate the shape of the AGN contribution to the CXB. Average spectral characteristics of survey detected AGN will be presented and compared with model distributions. The numbers of hard x-ray blazars detected in these surveys are finally sufficient to estimate this important component's contribution the cosmic background. Constraints on CXB models and their significance will be discussed.

  12. X-Ray Absorbed, Broad-Lined, Red AGN and the Cosmic X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Wilkes, Belinda

    2005-01-01

    We have obtained XMM spectra for five red, 2MASS AGN, selected from a sample observed by Chandra to be X-ray bright and to cover a range of hardness ratios. Our results confirm the presence of substantial absorbing material in three sources which have optical classifications ranging from Type 1 to Type 2, with an intrinsically flat (hard) power law continuum indicated in the other two. The presence of both X-ray absorption and broad optical emission lines with the usual strength suggests either a small (nuclear) absorber or a favored viewing angle so as to cover the X-ray source but not the broad emission line region (BELR). A soft excess is detected in all three Type 1 sources. We speculate that this soft X-ray emission may arise in an extended region of ionized gas, perhaps linked with the polarized (scattered) light which is a feature of these sources. The spectral complexity revealed by XMM emphasizes the limitations of the low S/N Chandra data. Overall, the new XMM results strengthen our conclusions (Wilkes et al. 2002) that the observed X-ray continua of red AGN are unusually hard at energies greater than 2 keV. Whether due to substantial line-of-sight absorption or to an intrinsically hard or reflection-dominated spectrum, these 'red' AGN have an observed spectral form consistent with contributing significantly to the missing had absorbed population of the Cosmic X-ray Background (CXRB). When absorption and or reflection is taken into account, all these AGN have power law slopes typical of broad-line (Type 1) AGN (Gamma approximately 1.9). This appears to resolve the spectral paradox which for so long has existed between the CXRB and the AGN thought to be the dominant contributors. It also suggests two scenarios whereby Type 1 AGN/QSOs may be responsible for a significant fraction of the CXRB at energies above 2 keV: 1) X-ray absorbed AGN/QSOs with visible broad emission lines; 2) AGN/QSOs with complex spectra whose hardness greater than 2 keV is not

  13. X-ray tensor tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecki, A.; Potdevin, G.; Biernath, T.; Eggl, E.; Willer, K.; Lasser, T.; Maisenbacher, J.; Gibmeier, J.; Wanner, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for x-ray computed tomography that yields information about the local micro-morphology and its orientation in each voxel of the reconstructed 3D tomogram. Contrary to conventional x-ray CT, which only reconstructs a single scalar value for each point in the 3D image, our approach provides a full scattering tensor with multiple independent structural parameters in each volume element. In the application example shown in this study, we highlight that our method can visualize sub-pixel fiber orientations in a carbon composite sample, hence demonstrating its value for non-destructive testing applications. Moreover, as the method is based on the use of a conventional x-ray tube, we believe that it will also have a great impact in the wider range of material science investigations and in future medical diagnostics. The authors declare no competing financial interests.

  14. Effects of Galactic absorption on soft X-ray surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamorani, G.; Gioia, I. M.; Maccacaro, T.; Wolter, A.

    1988-01-01

    A bias in the spectral distribution of X-ray sources detected in X-ray surveys is discussed which is due to the combination of the intrinsic characteristics of X-ray telescopes and the effects of low-energy photoelectric absorption within the Galaxy. A statistical method for obtaining information on the average spectrum of X-ray sources detected in well-defined surveys is presented. This method can be applied to surveys performed with X-ray telescopes working at relatively soft X-ray energies, such as Einstein, Exosat, and Rosat.

  15. Analyzing the Spectra of Accreting X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael

    , we will develop the new software module (essentially a computer code representing the theoretical model) necessary to perform the analysis of accretion-powered pulsar X-ray spectra in the XSPEC spectral analysis environment. Also in this first year we will analyze new Suzaku Cycle 6 Target of Opportunity observations of GX 304-1 and 4U 0115+63, two known cyclotron line sources, that we have recently carried out. In the second year of this study we will apply our new XSPEC spectral continuum module to the archival X-ray observational data from a number of accreting X-ray pulsars from the RXTE/PCA/HEXTE and Suzaku/XIS/HXD instruments to extract basic accretion parameters. Our source list contains eight pulsars, seven of which have observed cyclotron scattering lines. These pulsars span a range in magnetic field strength, luminosity, expected accretion rate, expected polar cap size, and Comptonizing temperature. In the second year of this work we also plan to make our new fully tested XSPEC continuum analysis module available to the Goddard Space Flight Center HEASARC for distribution to the astrophysical research community. The development and analysis tasks proposed here will provide for the first time a physical basis for the analysis and interpretation of data on accreting X-ray pulsar spectra.

  16. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  17. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore » data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  18. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux h