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Sample records for xenon gas mixture

  1. A Method for Calculating Viscosity and Thermal Conductivity of a Helium-Xenon Gas Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Paul K.

    2006-01-01

    A method for calculating viscosity and thermal conductivity of a helium-xenon (He-Xe) gas mixture was employed, and results were compared to AiResearch (part of Honeywell) analytical data. The method of choice was that presented by Hirschfelder with Singh's third-order correction factor applied to thermal conductivity. Values for viscosity and thermal conductivity were calculated over a temperature range of 400 to 1200 K for He-Xe gas mixture molecular weights of 20.183, 39.94, and 83.8 kg/kmol. First-order values for both transport properties were in good agreement with AiResearch analytical data. Third-order-corrected thermal conductivity values were all greater than AiResearch data, but were considered to be a better approximation of thermal conductivity because higher-order effects of mass and temperature were taken into consideration. Viscosity, conductivity, and Prandtl number were then compared to experimental data presented by Taylor.

  2. Electroluminescence yield for {lambda} > 165 nm in neon-xenon mixtures: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Borges, F.I.G.M.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Conde, C.A.N.; Kubota, S.

    1996-12-31

    The electroluminescence yield for {lambda} > 165 am in different neon-xenon mixtures is studied as a function of the reduced electric field. These studies were performed using a uniform-field gas proportional scintillation counter. The experimental values obtained for the scintillation and ionization thresholds decrease from approximately 1 and 6 Vcm{sup -1} torr{sup -1} for 100% xenon, to about 0.5 and 3.8 Vcm{sup -1} torr{sup -1} for 20% xenon, to 0.4 and 2.8 Vcm{sup -1} torr{sup -1} for 10% xenon and to 0.3 and 2.2 Vcm{sup -1} torr{sup -1} for 5% xenon. Detector energy resolutions for the Al K line (1.5 keV) are 15% for 20% xenon, 19% for 10% xenon and 22% for 5% xenon.

  3. Photochemical method for the separation of mixtures of xenon and krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Donohue, T.; Geosling, C.E.

    1984-05-01

    This invention relates generally to processes for the separation of noble gases and more specifically to processes for the separation of xenon from a gaseous mixture containing krypton. Fluorine is added to the mixture and the resulting mixture then irradiated with light of about 250-370 nm to form crystals of xenon difluoride. The unreacted gases are removed and the remaining crystals are decomposed, typically by thermal means, to yield xenon and fluorine gas. The xenon gas may be easily isolated by conventional means from the fluorine gas. Krypton may also be easily isolated from the remaining gases by conventional means. The process is particularly applicable to the treatment of off gases from a nuclear reactor or reprocessing plant.

  4. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Magyar, Rudolph J.; Root, Seth; Mattsson, Thomas; Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Flicker, Dawn G.

    2015-04-22

    Mixtures of light elements with heavy elements are important in inertial confinement fusion. We explore the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) at elevated temperature and pressure is used to obtain the thermodynamic state properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. In order to validate these simulations, we have performed shock compression experiments using the Sandia Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with the completion of dissociation in ethane. Furthermore, themore » DFT-based simulation results compare well with the experimental data along the principal Hugoniots and are used to provide insight into the dissociation and temperature along the Hugoniots as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for several compositions suggesting a limiting compression for C-C bonded systems.« less

  5. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Magyar, Rudolph J.; Root, Seth; Mattsson, Thomas; Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Flicker, Dawn G.

    2015-04-22

    Mixtures of light elements with heavy elements are important in inertial confinement fusion. We explore the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) at elevated temperature and pressure is used to obtain the thermodynamic state properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. In order to validate these simulations, we have performed shock compression experiments using the Sandia Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with the completion of dissociation in ethane. Furthermore, the DFT-based simulation results compare well with the experimental data along the principal Hugoniots and are used to provide insight into the dissociation and temperature along the Hugoniots as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for several compositions suggesting a limiting compression for C-C bonded systems.

  6. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flicker, Dawn; Magyar, Rudolph; Root, Seth; Cochrane, Kyle; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Mixtures of light and heavy elements arise in inertial confinement fusion and planetary science. We present results on the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT/QMD) at elevated-temperature and pressure is used to obtain the properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. To validate the QMD simulations, we performed high-precision shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis of the simulations correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with completion of dissociation in ethane. DFT-based simulation results compare well with experimental data and are used to provide insight into the dissociation as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for ethane, Xe-ethane, polymethyl-pentene, and polystyrene, suggesting that a limiting compression exists for C-C bonded systems. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Analysis of the properties of the molecular-cluster xenon mixture in the mesoscopic phase transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurlapov, L. I.; Kassymov, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the results of calculation of the concentrations of cluster subcomponents in a molecular-cluster xenon mixture at temperatures and pressures at which the gas experiences a mesoscopic phase transition. The existence of such a transition follows from singularities of the temperature dependence of viscosity, from the behavior of the cluster thermodiffusion coefficient, and from the features of the distributions of cluster subcomponents in the centrifuge. The mesoscopic phase transition is manifested in the intermediate position of the molecular-cluster mixture between the gas and the liquid judging from its properties in the transition region.

  8. Review of Helium and Xenon Pure Component and Mixture Transport Properties and Recommendation of Estimating Approach for Project Prometheus (Viscosity and Thermal Conductivity)

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, Melissa A.; Vargo, David D.

    2007-01-30

    The selected configuration for the Project Prometheus Space Nuclear Power Plant was a direct coupling of Brayton energy conversion loop(s) to a single reactor heat source through the gas coolant/working fluid. A mixture of helium (He) and xenon (Xe) gas was assumed as the coolant/working fluid. Helium has superior thermal conductivity while xenon is added to increase the gas atomic weight to benefit turbomachinery design. Both elements have the advantage of being non-reactive. HeXe transport properties (viscosity and thermal conductivity) were needed to calculate pressure drops and heat transfer rates. HeXe mixture data are limited, necessitating the use of semi-empirical correlations to calculate mixture properties. Several approaches are available. Pure component properties are generally required in the mixture calculations. While analytical methods are available to estimate pure component properties, adequate helium and xenon pure component data are available. This paper compares the sources of pure component data and the approaches to calculate mixture properties. Calculated mixture properties are compared to the limited mixture data and approaches are recommended to calculate both pure component and mixture properties. Given the limited quantity of HeXe mixture data (all at one atmosphere), additional testing may have been required for Project Prometheus to augment the existing data and confirm the selection of mixture property calculation methods.

  9. Diffusion NMR methods applied to xenon gas for materials study.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Rosen, M S; Wang, R; Cory, D G; Walsworth, R L

    2002-12-01

    We report initial NMR studies of (i) xenon gas diffusion in model heterogeneous porous media and (ii) continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas. Both areas utilize the pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) techniques in the gas phase, with the aim of obtaining more sophisticated information than just translational self-diffusion coefficients--a brief overview of this area is provided in the Introduction. The heterogeneous or multiple-length scale model porous media consisted of random packs of mixed glass beads of two different sizes. We focus on observing the approach of the time-dependent gas diffusion coefficient, D(t) (an indicator of mean squared displacement), to the long-time asymptote, with the aim of understanding the long-length scale structural information that may be derived from a heterogeneous porous system. We find that D(t) of imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times is similar for the mixed bead pack and a pack of the smaller sized beads alone, hence reflecting the pore surface area to volume ratio of the smaller bead sample. The approach of D(t) to the long-time limit follows that of a pack of the larger sized beads alone, although the limiting D(t) for the mixed bead pack is lower, reflecting the lower porosity of the sample compared to that of a pack of mono-sized glass beads. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate D(t) data between the short- and long-time limits. Initial studies of continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas demonstrate velocity-sensitive imaging of much higher flows than can generally be obtained with liquids (20-200 mm s-1). Gas velocity imaging is, however, found to be limited to a resolution of about 1 mm s-1 owing to the high diffusivity of gases compared with liquids. We also present the first gas-phase NMR scattering, or diffusive-diffraction, data, namely flow-enhanced structural features in the echo attenuation data from laser-polarized xenon flowing through a 2 mm glass bead pack. PMID:12807139

  10. Diffusion NMR methods applied to xenon gas for materials study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Wang, R.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    We report initial NMR studies of (i) xenon gas diffusion in model heterogeneous porous media and (ii) continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas. Both areas utilize the pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) techniques in the gas phase, with the aim of obtaining more sophisticated information than just translational self-diffusion coefficients--a brief overview of this area is provided in the Introduction. The heterogeneous or multiple-length scale model porous media consisted of random packs of mixed glass beads of two different sizes. We focus on observing the approach of the time-dependent gas diffusion coefficient, D(t) (an indicator of mean squared displacement), to the long-time asymptote, with the aim of understanding the long-length scale structural information that may be derived from a heterogeneous porous system. We find that D(t) of imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times is similar for the mixed bead pack and a pack of the smaller sized beads alone, hence reflecting the pore surface area to volume ratio of the smaller bead sample. The approach of D(t) to the long-time limit follows that of a pack of the larger sized beads alone, although the limiting D(t) for the mixed bead pack is lower, reflecting the lower porosity of the sample compared to that of a pack of mono-sized glass beads. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate D(t) data between the short- and long-time limits. Initial studies of continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas demonstrate velocity-sensitive imaging of much higher flows than can generally be obtained with liquids (20-200 mm s-1). Gas velocity imaging is, however, found to be limited to a resolution of about 1 mm s-1 owing to the high diffusivity of gases compared with liquids. We also present the first gas-phase NMR scattering, or diffusive-diffraction, data, namely flow-enhanced structural features in the echo attenuation data from laser-polarized xenon flowing through a 2 mm glass bead pack. c2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. SEPARATION OF GAS MIXTURES BY THERMOACOUSTIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    G.W. SWIFT; D.A. GELLER; P.S. SPOOR

    2001-06-01

    Imposing sound on a binary gas mixture in a duct separates the two gases along the acoustic-propagation axis. Mole-fraction differences as large as 10% and separation fluxes as high as 0.001 M-squared c, where M is Mach number and c is sound speed, are easily observed. We describe the accidental discovery of this phenomenon in a helium-xenon mixture, subsequent experiments with a helium-argon mixture, and theoretical developments. The phenomenon occurs because a thin layer of the gas adjacent to the wall is immobilized by viscosity while the rest of the gas moves back and forth with the wave, and the heat capacity of the wall holds this thin layer of the gas at constant temperature while the rest of the gas experiences temperature oscillations due to the wave's oscillating pressure. The oscillating temperature gradient causes the light and heavy atoms in the gas to take turns diffusing into and out of the immobilized layer, so that the oscillating motion of the wave outside the immobilized layer tends to carry light-enriched gas in one direction and heavy-enriched gas in the opposite direction. Experiment and theory are in very good agreement for the initial separation fluxes and the saturation mole-fraction differences.

  12. Mobility and fluorescence of barium ions in xenon gas for the exo experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez Medina, Julio Cesar

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) is an experiment which aims to observe the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe. The measurement of this decay would give information about the absolute neutrino mass and whether or not the neutrino is its own antiparticle. Since this is a very rare decay, the ability to reject background events by detecting the barium ion daughter from the double beta decay would be a major advantage. EXO is currently operating a detector with 200 kg of enriched liquid xenon, and there are plans to build a ton scale xenon detector. Measurements of the purity of liquid xenon in our liquid xenon test cell are reported. These results are relevant to the research on detection of single barium ions by our research group at Colorado State University. Details of the operation of the purity monitor are described. The effects of using a purifier, recirculation and laser ablation on the purity of liquid xenon are discussed. Mobility measurements of barium in xenon gas are reported for the first time. The variation of mobility with xenon gas pressure suggests that a significant fraction of molecular ions are formed when barium ions interact with xenon gas at high pressures. The measured mobility of Ba+ in Xe gas at different pressures is compared with the predicted theoretical value, and deviations are explained by a model that describes the fraction of molecular ions in Xe gas as a function of pressure. The results are useful for the analysis of experiments of fluorescence of Ba+ in xenon gas. It is also important to know the mobility of the ions in order to calculate the time they interact with an excitation laser in fluorescence experiments and in proposed 136 Ba+ daughter detection schemes. This thesis presents results of detection of laser induced fluorescence of Ba+ ions in Xe gas. Measurements of the pressure broadening of the excitation spectra of Ba+ in xenon gas are presented. Nonradiative decays due to gas collisions and optical pumping

  13. [Effects of xenon and krypton-containing breathing mixtures on clinical and biochemical blood indices in animals].

    PubMed

    Kussmaul', A R; Bogacheva, M A; Shkurat, T P; Pavlov, B N

    2007-01-01

    Effects of 24-hr breathing air mixtures containing xenon (XBM) and krypton (KBM) were compared in terms of hormonal status, and blood biochemical indices and morphology in laboratory animals. Some changes observed in blood and hormone indices could be a nonspecific adaptive response. Hence, we should elicit whether these effects are quickly reversible or long. For several indices krypton was a more favorable factor than xenon. However, some of its effects invite to delve into effects of different krypton concentrations on organism.

  14. Characteristics of a high pressure gas proportional counter filled with xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, H.; Ramsey, B. D.

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of a conventional cylindrical geometry proportional counter filled with high pressure xenon gas up to 10 atm. were fundamentally investigated for use as a detector in hard X-ray astronomy. With a 2 percent methane gas mixture the energy resolutions at 10 atm. were 9.8 percent and 7.3 percent for 22 keV and 60 keV X-rays, respectively. From calculations of the Townsend ionization coefficient, it is shown that proportional counters at high pressure operate at weaker reduced electric field than low pressure counters. The characteristics of a parallel grid proportional counter at low pressure showed similar pressure dependence. It is suggested that this is the fundamental reason for the degradation of resolution observed with increasing pressure.

  15. Human Regional Pulmonary Gas Exchange with Xenon Polarization Transfer (XTC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradian, Iga; Butler, James; Hrovat, Mirko; Topulos, George; Hersman, Elizabeth; Ruset, Iulian; Covrig, Silviu; Frederick, Eric; Ketel, Stephen; Hersman, F. W.; Patz, Samuel

    2007-03-01

    Xenon Transfer Contrast (XTC) is an existing imaging method (Ruppert et al, Magn Reson Med, 51:676-687, 2004) that measures the fraction F of ^129Xe magnetization that diffuses from alveolar gas spaces to septal parenchymal tissue in lungs in a specified exchange time. As previously implemented, XTC is a 2-breath method and has been demonstrated in anesthetized animals. To use XTC in humans and to avoid issues associated with obtaining identical gas volumes on subsequent breath-hold experiments as well as precise image registration in post-processing, a single breath XTC method was developed that acquires three consecutive gradient echo images in an 8s acquisition. We report here initial measurements of the mean and variance of F for 5 normal healthy subjects as well as 7 asymptomatic smokers. The experiments were performed at two lung volumes (˜45 and 65% of TLC). We found that both the mean and variance of F increased with smoking history. In comparison, standard pulmonary function tests such as DLCO FEV1 showed no correlation with smoking history.

  16. TEA laser gas mixture optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipchak, W. Michael; Luck, Clarence F.

    1982-11-01

    The topographical plot of an optimized parameter, such as pulse energy or peak power, on the gas mixture plane is presented as a useful aid in realizing optimum mixtures of helium, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen, for operation of CO2 TEA lasers. A method for generating such a plot is discussed and an example is shown. The potential benefits of this graphical technique are also discussed.

  17. TEA laser gas mixture optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lipchak, W.M.; Luck, C.F.

    1982-11-01

    The topographical plot of an optimized parameter, such as pulse energy or peak power, on the gas mixture plane is presented as a useful aid in realizing optimum mixtures of helium, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen, for operation of CO/sub 2/ TEA lasers. A method for generating such a plot is discussed and an example is shown. The potential benefits of this graphical technique are also discussed.

  18. Ionization coefficients in gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marić, D.; Šašić, O.; Jovanović, J.; Radmilović-Rađenović, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2007-03-01

    We have tested the application of the common E/N ( E—electric field, N—gas number density) or Wieland approximation [Van Brunt, R.J., 1987. Common parametrizations of electron transport, collision cross section, and dielectric strength data for binary gas mixtures. J. Appl. Phys. 61 (5), 1773-1787.] and the common mean energy (CME) combination of the data for pure gases to obtain ionization coefficients for mixtures. Test calculations were made for Ar-CH4, Ar-N2, He-Xe and CH4-N2 mixtures. Standard combination procedure gives poor results in general, due to the fact that the electron energy distribution is considerably different in mixtures and in individual gases at the same values of E/N. The CME method may be used for mixtures of gases with ionization coefficients that do not differ by more than two orders of magnitude which is better than any other technique that was proposed [Marić, D., Radmilović-Rađenović, M., Petrović, Z.Lj., 2005. On parametrization and mixture laws for electron ionization coefficients. Eur. Phys. J. D 35, 313-321.].

  19. Detection of residual krypton in xenon gas for WIMP dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobi, Attila

    2011-04-01

    The next generation of WIMP dark matter searches using liquid xenon as a target medium will require unprecedented rejection of residual krypton contamination. Krypton contains the beta emitting isotope 85 Kr, with a relative abundance of about 10-11 (85 Kr /nat Kr), and this beta decay can be an important source of background for these experiments. Krypton is typically present in commercially produced xenon at the level of tens of parts-per-billion, about four orders of magnitude too large for present day dark matter experiments such as XENON, LUX, and XMASS. Additional processing via gas chromatography and distillation are used to separate krypton from xenon, but measuring the remaining krypton level at the part-per-trillion (ppt) level is challenging. Recently we have developed a highly sensitive and simple technique to measure residual krypton contamination in xenon gas using an RGA mass spectrometer and a liquid nitrogen cold trap. We describe here the results of our calibration experiments to determine the ultimate limit of detection of the method, and we discuss the implications for the next generation of WIMP dark matter experiments. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  20. Equations of State for Mixtures: Results from DFT Simulations of Xenon/Ethane Mixtures Compared to High Accuracy Validation Experiments on Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyar, Rudolph

    2013-06-01

    We report a computational and validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties of liquid / dense plasma mixtures of xenon and ethane to explore and to illustrate the physics of the molecular scale mixing of light elements with heavy elements. Accurate EOS models are crucial to achieve high-fidelity hydrodynamics simulations of many high-energy-density phenomena such as inertial confinement fusion and strong shock waves. While the EOS is often tabulated for separate species, the equation of state for arbitrary mixtures is generally not available, requiring properties of the mixture to be approximated by combining physical properties of the pure systems. The main goal of this study is to access how accurate this approximation is under shock conditions. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) at elevated-temperature and pressure is used to assess the thermodynamics of the xenon-ethane mixture. The simulations are unbiased as to elemental species and therefore provide comparable accuracy when describing total energies, pressures, and other physical properties of mixtures as they do for pure systems. In addition, we have performed shock compression experiments using the Sandia Z-accelerator on pure xenon, ethane, and various mixture ratios thereof. The Hugoniot results are compared to the DFT-MD results and the predictions of different rules for combing EOS tables. The DFT-based simulation results compare well with the experimental points, and it is found that a mixing rule based on pressure equilibration performs reliably well for the mixtures considered. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Effects of xenon cover gas in CO/sub 2/ laser welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, T.L.

    1980-07-01

    Weld spatter in CO/sub 2/ laser welding is detrimental to miniature components. The effects of using xenon gas as an inert laser welding atmosphere to reduce weld spatter are discussed. The laser plume characteristics, weld penetration, and weld spatter are evaluated.

  2. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; McCorkle, Dennis L.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches.

  3. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-02-20

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches. 6 figs.

  4. An improved measurement of electron-ion recombination in high-pressure xenon gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, L.; Sorel, M.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Camargo, M.; Cárcel, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Irastorza, I. G.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopez-March, N.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez-Lema, G.; Martínez, A.; Miller, T.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Querol, M.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Shuman, D.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R.; White, J. T.; Yahlali, N.

    2015-03-01

    We report on results obtained with the NEXT-DEMO prototype of the NEXT-100 high-pressure xenon gas time projection chamber (TPC), filled with pure xenon gas at 10 bar pressure and exposed to an alpha decay calibration source. Compared to our previous measurements with alpha particles, an upgraded detector and improved analysis techniques have been used. We measure event-by-event correlated fluctuations between ionization and scintillation due to electron-ion recombination in the gas, with correlation coefficients between -0.80 and -0.56 depending on the drift field conditions. By combining the two signals, we obtain a 2.8% FWHM energy resolution for 5.49 MeV alpha particles and a measurement of the optical gain of the electroluminescent TPC. The improved energy resolution also allows us to measure the specific activity of the radon in the gas due to natural impurities. Finally, we measure the average ratio of excited to ionized atoms produced in the xenon gas by alpha particles to be 0.561± 0.045, translating into an average energy to produce a primary scintillation photon of Wex=(39.2± 3.2) eV.

  5. Physiological response of rats to delivery of helium and xenon: implications for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, M. P.; Sigaloff, K. C.; Kubatina, L. V.; Donahue, M. A.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; ALbert, M. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The physiological effects of various hyperpolarized helium and xenon MRI-compatible breathing protocols were investigated in 17 Sprague-Dawley rats, by continuous monitoring of blood oxygen saturation, heart rate, EKG, temperature and endotracheal pressure. The protocols included alternating breaths of pure noble gas and oxygen, continuous breaths of pure noble gas, breath-holds of pure noble gas for varying durations, and helium breath-holds preceded by two helium rinses. Alternate-breath protocols up to 128 breaths caused a decrease in oxygen saturation level of less than 5% for either helium or xenon, whereas 16 continuous-breaths caused a 31.5% +/- 2.3% decrease in oxygen saturation for helium and a 30.7% +/- 1. 3% decrease for xenon. Breath-hold protocols up to 25 s did not cause the oxygen saturation to fall below 90% for either of the noble gases. Oxygen saturation values below 90% are considered pathological. At 30 s of breath-hold, the blood oxygen saturation dropped precipitously to 82% +/- 0.6% for helium, and to 76.5% +/- 7. 4% for xenon. Breath-holds longer than 10 s preceded by pre-rinses caused oxygen saturation to drop below 90%. These findings demonstrate the need for standardized noble gas inhalation procedures that have been carefully tested, and for continuous physiological monitoring to ensure the safety of the subject. We find short breath-hold and alternate-breath protocols to be safe procedures for use in hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, M. M.; Zhang, D. X.; Xu, D.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H2 from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H2 in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  7. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, D. X.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W.; Zhang, M. M.; Xu, D.

    2014-01-29

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H{sub 2} from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H{sub 2} in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  8. Ternary gas mixture for diffuse discharge switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    A new diffuse discharge gas switch wherein a mixture of gases is used to take advantage of desirable properties of the respective gases. There is a conducting gas, an insulating gas, and a third gas that has low ionization energy resulting in a net increase in the number of electrons available to produce a current.

  9. Structural Plasticity of the Phage P22 Tail Needle gp26 Probed with Xenon Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Olia, A.; Casjens, S; Cingolani, G

    2009-01-01

    The tail needle, gp26, is a highly stable homo-trimeric fiber found in the tail apparatus of bacteriophage P22. In the mature virion, gp26 is responsible for plugging the DNA exit channel, and likely plays an important role in penetrating the host cell envelope. In this article, we have determined the 1.98 A resolution crystal structure of gp26 bound to xenon gas. The structure led us to identify a calcium and a chloride ion intimately bound at the interior of alpha-helical core, as well as seven small cavities occupied by xenon atoms. The two ions engage in buried polar interactions with gp26 side chains that provide specificity and register to gp26 helical core, thus enhancing its stability. Conversely, the distribution of xenon accessible cavities correlates well with the flexibility of the fiber observed in solution and in the crystal structure. We suggest that small internal cavities in gp26 between the helical core and the C-terminal tip allow for flexible swinging of the latter, without affecting the overall stability of the protein. The C-terminal tip may be important in scanning the bacterial surface in search of a cell-envelope penetration site, or for recognition of a yet unidentified receptor on the surface of the host.

  10. Dielectric gas mixtures containing sulfur hexafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Chathan M.

    1979-01-01

    Electrically insulating gaseous media of unexpectedly high dielectric strength comprised of mixtures of two or more dielectric gases are disclosed wherein the dielectric strength of at least one gas in each mixture increases at less than a linear rate with increasing pressure and the mixture gases are present in such proportions that the sum of their electrical discharge voltages at their respective partial pressures exceeds the electrical discharge voltage of each individual gas at the same temperature and pressure as that of the mixture.

  11. Development and evaluation of a silver mordenite composite sorbent for the partitioning of xenon from krypton in gas compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Garn, Troy G.; Greenhalgh, Mitchell; Law, Jack D.

    2015-12-22

    A new engineered form composite sorbent for the selective separation of xenon from krypton in simulant composition off-gas streams resulting from the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel has been developed and evaluated. A sodium mordenite powder was incorporated into a macroporous polymer binder, formed into spherical beads and successfully converted to a 9 wt.% silver form composite sorbent. The final engineered form sorbent retained the characteristic surface area indicative of sodium mordenite powder. The sorbent was evaluated for xenon adsorption potential with capacities measured as high as 30 millimoles of xenon per kilogram of sorbent achieved at ambient temperature and 460 millimoles of xenon per kilogram sorbent at 220 K. Xenon/krypton selectivity was calculated to be 22.4 with a 1020 µL/L xenon, 150 µL/L krypton in a balance of air feed gas at 220 K. Furthermore, adsorption/desorption thermal cycling effects were evaluated with results indicating sorbent performance was not significantly impacted while undergoing numerous adsorption/desorption thermal cycles.

  12. Development and evaluation of a silver mordenite composite sorbent for the partitioning of xenon from krypton in gas compositions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garn, Troy G.; Greenhalgh, Mitchell; Law, Jack D.

    2015-12-22

    A new engineered form composite sorbent for the selective separation of xenon from krypton in simulant composition off-gas streams resulting from the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel has been developed and evaluated. A sodium mordenite powder was incorporated into a macroporous polymer binder, formed into spherical beads and successfully converted to a 9 wt.% silver form composite sorbent. The final engineered form sorbent retained the characteristic surface area indicative of sodium mordenite powder. The sorbent was evaluated for xenon adsorption potential with capacities measured as high as 30 millimoles of xenon per kilogram of sorbent achieved at ambient temperature andmore » 460 millimoles of xenon per kilogram sorbent at 220 K. Xenon/krypton selectivity was calculated to be 22.4 with a 1020 µL/L xenon, 150 µL/L krypton in a balance of air feed gas at 220 K. Furthermore, adsorption/desorption thermal cycling effects were evaluated with results indicating sorbent performance was not significantly impacted while undergoing numerous adsorption/desorption thermal cycles.« less

  13. Further gas mixtures with low environment impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberti, B.; Aielli, G.; Camarri, P.; Cardarelli, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Stante, L.; Pastori and, E.; Santonico, R.

    2016-09-01

    Further gas mixtures with low environment impact have been tested. For the best RPC performance the main effort was to look for a mixture giving a comfortable avalanche-streamer separation and a gas density ensuring sufficient primary ionization. The measurements have been carried out on small size chambers at cosmic ray rates using the waveforms recorded on the oscilloscope. Efficiencies and distributions of amplitude and charge will be presented.

  14. Separation and purification of xenon

    DOEpatents

    Schlea, deceased, Carl Solomon

    1978-03-14

    Xenon is separated from a mixture of xenon and krypton by extractive distillation using carbon tetrafluoride as the partitioning agent. Krypton is flushed out of the distillation column with CF.sub.4 in the gaseous overhead stream while purified xenon is recovered from the liquid bottoms. The distillation is conducted at about atmospheric pressure or at subatmospheric pressure.

  15. Improved gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Maxey, D.V.; Carter, J.G.

    1980-03-28

    Improved binary and ternary gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one molecular gas or mixture of two molecular gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a noble gas having a very small cross section at and below about 1.0 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electric field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

  16. Gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; McCorkle, Dennis L.; Maxey, David V.; Carter, James G.

    1982-01-05

    Improved binary and ternary gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one molecular gas or mixture of two molecular gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a noble gas having a very small cross section at and below about 1.0 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electric field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

  17. Improved gas mixtures for gas-filled particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Maxey, D.V.; Carter, J.G.

    Improved binary and tertiary gas mixture for gas-filled particle detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one gas or mixture of two gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a gas (Ar) having a very small cross section at and below about 0.5 eV; whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electron field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

  18. Gas mixtures for gas-filled particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; McCorkle, Dennis L.; Maxey, David V.; Carter, James G.

    1980-01-01

    Improved binary and tertiary gas mixtures for gas-filled particle detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one gas or mixture of two gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a gas (Ar) having a very small cross section at and below aout 0.5 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electron field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

  19. Is xenon eldest?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, K.

    It is well known that the solubility of noble gases in magmas decreases with increasing atomic weight. Xenon, the weightiest of the stable noble gases, is the least soluble atmospheric gas in magma. It is not unreasonable to suppose that the noble gases should have degassed from (or equilibrated with) a bubbling mantle in order of increasing solubility, such that xenon was the most rapidly degassed and helium the least. The apparent relative ages of the famous radiogenic noble gas isotopes agrees, at least qualitatively, with this premise. When atmospheric loss processes are assigned their proper place, several long-standing xenonological puzzles become added evidence for xenon's relative antiquity. Xenon being the afore-mentioned sense the oldest atmospheric gas, will have been most greatly subject to escape, be it impact-driven or EUV-driven. Nonradiogenic xenon's pronounced isotopic fractionation has already been attributed to escape; why it should be more fractionated than krypton would be assigned to xenon's greater atmospheric age. The small atmospheric inventory of xenon relative to the other nonradiogenic noblegases, known as the 'missing xenon' problem, could easily be explained by differential escape. The relatively tiny atmospheric inventories of the radiogenic daughter products of 129 Iodine and 244 Plutonium, both much smaller than would be expected from the inferred abundances of the parents in meteorites, offer a third and fourth data to support the hypothesis that Earth has lost most of its xenon.

  20. Is xenon eldest?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K.

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that the solubility of noble gases in magmas decreases with increasing atomic weight. Xenon, the weightiest of the stable noble gases, is the least soluble atmospheric gas in magma. It is not unreasonable to suppose that the noble gases should have degassed from (or equilibrated with) a bubbling mantle in order of increasing solubility, such that xenon was the most rapidly degassed and helium the least. The apparent relative ages of the famous radiogenic noble gas isotopes agrees, at least qualitatively, with this premise. When atmospheric loss processes are assigned their proper place, several long-standing xenonological puzzles become added evidence for xenon's relative antiquity. Xenon being the afore-mentioned sense the oldest atmospheric gas, will have been most greatly subject to escape, be it impact-driven or EUV-driven. Nonradiogenic xenon's pronounced isotopic fractionation has already been attributed to escape; why it should be more fractionated than krypton would be assigned to xenon's greater atmospheric age. The small atmospheric inventory of xenon relative to the other nonradiogenic noblegases, known as the 'missing xenon' problem, could easily be explained by differential escape. The relatively tiny atmospheric inventories of the radiogenic daughter products of 129 Iodine and 244 Plutonium, both much smaller than would be expected from the inferred abundances of the parents in meteorites, offer a third and fourth data to support the hypothesis that Earth has lost most of its xenon.

  1. Mesoscale Backtracking by Means of Atmospheric Transport Modeling of Xenon Plumes Measured by Radionuclide Gas Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armand, P. P.; Achim, P.; Taffary, T.

    2006-12-01

    The monitoring of atmospheric radioactive xenon concentration is performed for nuclear safety regulatory requirements. It is also planned to be used for the detection of hypothetical nuclear tests in the framework of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). In this context, the French Atomic Energy Commission designed a high sensitive and automated fieldable station, named SPALAX, to measure the activity concentrations of xenon isotopes in the atmosphere. SPALAX stations were set up in Western Europe and have been operated quite continuously for three years or more, detecting principally xenon-133 and more scarcely xenon-135, xenon-133m and xenon-131m. There are around 150 nuclear power plants in the European Union, research reactors, reprocessing plants, medical production and application facilities releasing radioactive xenon in normal or incidental operations. A numerical study was carried out aiming to explain the SPALAX measurements. The mesoscale Atmospheric Transport Modelling involves the MM5 suite (PSU- NCAR) to predict the wind fields on nested domains, and FLEXPART, a 3D Lagrangian particle dispersion code, used to simulate the backward transport of xenon plumes detected by the SPALAX. For every event of detection, at least one potential xenon source has a significant efficiency of emission. The identified likely sources are located quite close to the SPALAX stations (some tens of kilometres), or situated farther (a few hundreds of kilometres). A base line of some mBq per cubic meter in xenon-133 is generated by the nuclear power plants. Peaks of xenon-133 ranging from tens to hundreds of mBq per cubic meter originate from a radioisotope production facility. The calculated xenon source terms required to obtain the SPALAX measurements are discussed and seem consistent with realistic emissions from the xenon sources in Western Europe.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Thermal plasmas in gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, A. B.

    2001-10-01

    The calculation and measurement of the properties of thermal plasmas in mixtures of different gases are reviewed. The calculation of composition, thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients is described. Particular attention is given to the calculation of diffusion coefficients, which is a significant problem in mixed-gas plasmas. The combined diffusion coefficient formulation is shown to be a useful method for the treatment of diffusion. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of thermal plasmas in gas mixtures is considered, using the examples of demixing in welding arcs, the turbulent mixing of atmospheric air into a plasma jet and a plasma waste destruction process. Diagnostic techniques for mixed-gas plasmas, in particular emission spectroscopy, laser scattering and laser-induced fluorescence, are discussed.

  3. Effects of xenon gas on generation and propagation of shock waves in the cavity of excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, Shinichiroh; Maeno, Kazuo; Honma, Hiroki

    1993-05-01

    High repetition rate excimer lasers are expected for wide industrial application. The power of excimer laser, however, decreases rapidly in a higher repetition rate operation. Shock or acoustic waves, which are caused by the periodic pulse discharge, may limit the repetition rate of an excimer laser up to 2.5 kHz. Such waves cause inhomogeneity of gas density in the discharge region of the excimer laser. In high repetition rate operation this inhomogeneity remains at the next discharge. Arcing may be generated by this inhomogeneity and the homogeneous excitation of the laser gas is obstructed. Although these phenomena have been reported, the research for the effects of shock waves has remained insufficient. And the relation between these shock waves and discharge phenomena has not been clarified. To resolve this problem, we developed a scaling model chamber of a UV preionized excimer laser cavity with windows for flow visualization. We report the first result by using this model and Schlieren technique in a pure helium gas case. In our experiment three types of shock waves are found in the discharge cavity. Those shock waves are generated from the boundary of the main discharge area, from sparking pin gaps, and from the main electrode surfaces. In this study we focus on the effect of xenon gas on the generation and the propagation of shock waves. Components of the Xe-Cl excimer laser gas are helium, xenon, and hydrogen chloride. In those gases xenon has the largest molecular weight of 131.29. So we conclude xenon plays an important role in the shock wave propagation and in discharge phenomenon.

  4. IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Jason M. Keith

    2005-02-01

    This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

  5. THEORETICAL STUDY ON THE INTERACTION BETWEEN XENON AND POSITIVE SILVER CLUSTERS IN GAS PHASE AND ON THE (001) CHABAZITE SURFACE

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, D.

    2009-03-16

    A systematic study on the adsorption of xenon on silver clusters in the gas phase and on the (001) surface of silver-exchanged chabazite is reported. Density functional theory at the B3LYP level with the cluster model was employed. The results indicate that the dominant part of the binding is the {sigma} donation, which is the charge transfer from the 5p orbital of Xe to the 5s orbital of Ag and is not the previously suggested d{sub {pi}}-d{sub {pi}} back-donation. A correlation between the binding energy and the degree of {sigma} donation is found. Xenon was found to bind strongly to silver cluster cations and not to neutral ones. The binding strength decreases as the cluster size increases for both cases, clusters in the gas-phase and on the chabazite surface. The Ag{sup +} cation is the strongest binding site for xenon both in gas phase and on the chabazite surface with the binding energies of 73.9 and 14.5 kJ/mol, respectively. The results also suggest that the smaller silver clusters contribute to the negative chemical shifts observed in the {sup 129}Xe NMR spectra in experiments.

  6. Dark matter directionality revisited with a high pressure xenon gas detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mohlabeng, Gopolang; Kong, Kyoungchul; Li, Jin; Para, Adam; Yoo, Jonghee

    2015-07-20

    An observation of the anisotropy of dark matter interactions in a direction-sensitive detector would provide decisive evidence for the discovery of galactic dark matter. Directional information would also provide a crucial input to understanding its distribution in the local Universe. Most of the existing directional dark matter detectors utilize particle tracking methods in a low-pressure gas time projection chamber. These low pressure detectors require excessively large volumes in order to be competitive in the search for physics beyond the current limit. In order to avoid these volume limitations, we consider a novel proposal, which exploits a columnar recombination effect inmore » a high-pressure gas time projection chamber. The ratio of scintillation to ionization signals observed in the detector carries the angular information of the particle interactions. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of a future directional detector focused on the proposed high-pressure Xenon gas time projection chamber. We study the prospect of detecting an anisotropy in the dark matter velocity distribution. We find that tens of events are needed to exclude an isotropic distribution of dark matter interactions at 95% confidence level in the most optimistic case with head-to-tail information. However, one needs at least 10-20 times more events without head-to-tail information for light dark matter below ~50 GeV. For an intermediate mass range, we find it challenging to observe an anisotropy of the dark matter distribution. Our results also show that the directional information significantly improves precision measurements of dark matter mass and the elastic scattering cross section for a heavy dark matter.« less

  7. Dark matter directionality revisited with a high pressure xenon gas detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mohlabeng, Gopolang; Kong, Kyoungchul; Li, Jin; Para, Adam; Yoo, Jonghee

    2015-07-20

    An observation of the anisotropy of dark matter interactions in a direction-sensitive detector would provide decisive evidence for the discovery of galactic dark matter. Directional information would also provide a crucial input to understanding its distribution in the local Universe. Most of the existing directional dark matter detectors utilize particle tracking methods in a low-pressure gas time projection chamber. These low pressure detectors require excessively large volumes in order to be competitive in the search for physics beyond the current limit. In order to avoid these volume limitations, we consider a novel proposal, which exploits a columnar recombination effect in a high-pressure gas time projection chamber. The ratio of scintillation to ionization signals observed in the detector carries the angular information of the particle interactions. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of a future directional detector focused on the proposed high-pressure Xenon gas time projection chamber. We study the prospect of detecting an anisotropy in the dark matter velocity distribution. We find that tens of events are needed to exclude an isotropic distribution of dark matter interactions at 95% confidence level in the most optimistic case with head-to-tail information. However, one needs at least 10-20 times more events without head-to-tail information for light dark matter below ~50 GeV. For an intermediate mass range, we find it challenging to observe an anisotropy of the dark matter distribution. Our results also show that the directional information significantly improves precision measurements of dark matter mass and the elastic scattering cross section for a heavy dark matter.

  8. Precursors in gas-liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasenko, V. G.; Gorelik, R. S.; Nakoryakov, V. E.; Timkin, L. S.

    2013-10-01

    Two types of precursors propagating at the speed of sound in a pure liquid have been revealed in the experiments on the evolution of pressure pulses in a gas-liquid mixture; at the same time, the main pressure pulse propagates at a low equilibrium speed of sound and its evolution is described by the Burgers-Korteweg-de Vries equation. The first high-frequency precursor is a complete analog of a classical Sommerfeld precursor, because the resonance dispersion equation for a bubble mixture coincides with that for insulators in the Lorentz model, and oscillates at a frequency close to the "plasma frequency." The second low-frequency precursor has been revealed in this work. The frequency of the low-frequency precursor is close to the resonance frequency of pulsations of bubbles, which is almost an order of magnitude lower than the frequency of the high-frequency precursor. The low-frequency precursor has a much larger amplitude of pulsations and smaller damping and is not described within the homogeneous model of the gas-liquid mixture. The observed phenomenon of low-frequency precursors has been explained within a simple heterogeneous model of a bubble liquid.

  9. Dusty Plasma Structures in Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, D. V.; Antipov, S. N.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    The possibility of attainment of large Mach numbers is analyzed for the case of heavy ions drifting in a light gas. Under conditions of typical experiments with dust structures in plasmas, the use of the mixture of light and heavy gases is shown to make it possible to suppress the ion heating in the electric field and to form supersonic flows characterized by large Mach numbers. The drift of krypton ions in helium is considered as an example. Experiments with dc glow discharge at 1-10% of Kr show that the transition to the discharge in mixture leads to increase of interaction anisotropy and reinforcement of coupling of dust particles in the direction of ion drift. On the other hand, under certain conditions the phenomenon of abnormal 'heating' of dust particles was observed when the particles can obtain high kinetic energy which is several orders of magnitude higher than typical.

  10. The narrow pulse approximation and long length scale determination in xenon gas diffusion NMR studies of model porous media.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Sen, P N; Hürlimann, M D; Patz, S; Cory, D G; Walsworth, R L

    2002-06-01

    We report a systematic study of xenon gas diffusion NMR in simple model porous media, random packs of mono-sized glass beads, and focus on three specific areas peculiar to gas-phase diffusion. These topics are: (i) diffusion of spins on the order of the pore dimensions during the application of the diffusion encoding gradient pulses in a PGSE experiment (breakdown of the narrow pulse approximation and imperfect background gradient cancellation), (ii) the ability to derive long length scale structural information, and (iii) effects of finite sample size. We find that the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(t), of the imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times in small beads is significantly affected by the gas pressure. In particular, as expected, we find smaller deviations between measured D(t) and theoretical predictions as the gas pressure is increased, resulting from reduced diffusion during the application of the gradient pulse. The deviations are then completely removed when water D(t) is observed in the same samples. The use of gas also allows us to probe D(t) over a wide range of length scales and observe the long time asymptotic limit which is proportional to the inverse tortuosity of the sample, as well as the diffusion distance where this limit takes effect (approximately 1-1.5 bead diameters). The Padé approximation can be used as a reference for expected xenon D(t) data between the short and the long time limits, allowing us to explore deviations from the expected behavior at intermediate times as a result of finite sample size effects. Finally, the application of the Padé interpolation between the long and the short time asymptotic limits yields a fitted length scale (the Padé length), which is found to be approximately 0.13b for all bead packs, where b is the bead diameter. PMID:12165255

  11. The narrow pulse approximation and long length scale determination in xenon gas diffusion NMR studies of model porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Sen, P. N.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Patz, S.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    We report a systematic study of xenon gas diffusion NMR in simple model porous media, random packs of mono-sized glass beads, and focus on three specific areas peculiar to gas-phase diffusion. These topics are: (i) diffusion of spins on the order of the pore dimensions during the application of the diffusion encoding gradient pulses in a PGSE experiment (breakdown of the narrow pulse approximation and imperfect background gradient cancellation), (ii) the ability to derive long length scale structural information, and (iii) effects of finite sample size. We find that the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(t), of the imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times in small beads is significantly affected by the gas pressure. In particular, as expected, we find smaller deviations between measured D(t) and theoretical predictions as the gas pressure is increased, resulting from reduced diffusion during the application of the gradient pulse. The deviations are then completely removed when water D(t) is observed in the same samples. The use of gas also allows us to probe D(t) over a wide range of length scales and observe the long time asymptotic limit which is proportional to the inverse tortuosity of the sample, as well as the diffusion distance where this limit takes effect (approximately 1-1.5 bead diameters). The Pade approximation can be used as a reference for expected xenon D(t) data between the short and the long time limits, allowing us to explore deviations from the expected behavior at intermediate times as a result of finite sample size effects. Finally, the application of the Pade interpolation between the long and the short time asymptotic limits yields a fitted length scale (the Pade length), which is found to be approximately 0.13b for all bead packs, where b is the bead diameter. c. 2002 Elsevier Sciences (USA).

  12. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The sample cell at the heart of CVX-2 will sit inside a thermostat providing three layers of insulation. The cell itself comprises a copper body that conducts heat efficiently and smoothes out thermal variations that that would destroy the xenon's uniformity. Inside the cell, the oscillating screen viscometer element is supported between two pairs of electrodes that deflect the screen and then measure screen motion.

  13. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Because xenon near the critical point will collapse under its own weight, experiments on Earth (green line) are limited as they get closer (toward the left) to the critical point. CVX in the microgravity of space (red line) moved into unmeasured territory that scientists had not been able to reach.

  14. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Shear thirning will cause a normally viscous fluid -- such as pie filling or whipped cream -- to deform and flow more readily under high shear conditions. In shear thinning, a pocket of fluid will deform and move one edge forward, as depicted here.

  15. Spark decomposition studies of dielectric gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauers, I.; Christophorou, L. G.

    The ultimate usefulness of a high voltage insulating gas depends not only on the ability of the gas to withstand high voltages, but also on the degradation of the gas resulting from spark discharges, corona or prolonged electrical stress and the effect(s) of the by-products on the equipment and, possibly, the environment. In view of these considerations, the study of long-range spark decomposition was undertaken in an effort to improve the decomposition characteristics of dielectric gases through proper tailoring of gas mixtures while maintaining high breakdown strengths. The data reported are on the analyses of gases sparked by capactive (0.1 micro F) discharge into a 0.5-mm gap, resulting in an energy input of approximately 5 J per spark. The nature of the decomposition products of SF6 formed by high voltage discharges observed is found to be critically dependent on impurities (particularly H2O), electrode material and insulating materials present in the system.

  16. Studies of xenon ECR plasma: search for a better understanding of the gas-mixing and anomalous effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Mal, Kedar; Kanjilal, D.

    2014-12-01

    Pure and oxygen-mixed xenon plasmas were produced using 10 GHz all-permanent-magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The charge state distributions (CSDs) of highly abundant isotopes (129Xe, 131 Xe and 132 Xe) were studied by extracting the ions from the plasma and analyzed them in mass and energy using a large acceptance analyzer-switching dipole magnet. In earlier studies (Drentje 1992 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 63 2875, Kawai et al 2001 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 10 451), the CSD of oxygen and nitrogen ECR plasmas showed that isotopic intensity ratio of ions varies with the charge state (anomalous effect). The anomalous effect in the pure and oxygen-mixed xenon ECR plasma was absent up to +13 charge state. With oxygen, a very small positive gas-mixing effect on the charge state beyond +8 was observed. In this paper, we present CSDs of xenon isotopes with and without oxygen mixing (at optimized ion source parameters) and compare the intensity of isotopes for various charge states to shed light on the previously noticed anomalous effect in the ECR plasma.

  17. Formation of Structured Water and Gas Hydrate by the Use of Xenon Gas in Vegetable Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Hiroko; Suzuki, Toru; Kawagoe, Yoshinori; Makino, Yoshio; Oshita, Seiichi

    Freezing is a valuable technique for food preservation. However, vegetables are known to be softening remarkably after freezing and thawing process. It is expected to find alternative technique instead of freezing. Recently, the application of structured water and/or gas hydrate had been attempted to prolong the preservation of vegetable. In this study, the formation process of structure water and/or gas hydrate in pure water and carrot tissue was investigated by using NMR relaxation times, T1 and T2, of which applying condition was up to 0.4MPa and 0.8MPa at 5oC. Under the pressure of 0.4MPa, no gas hydrate was appeared, however, at 0.8MPa, formation of gas hydrate was recognized in both water and carrot tissue. Once the gas hydrate formation process in carrot tissue started, T1 and T2 increased remarkably. After that, as the gas hydrate developed, then T1 and T2 turned to decrease. Since this phenomenon was not observed in pure water, it is suggested that behavior of NMR relaxation time just after the formation of gas hydrate in carrot tissue may be peculiar to compartment system such as inter and intracellular spaces.

  18. Antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon.

    PubMed

    Spaggiari, Sabrina; Kepp, Oliver; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Chaba, Kariman; Adjemian, Sandy; Pype, Jan; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Lemaire, Marc; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-08-15

    Although chemically non-reactive, inert noble gases may influence multiple physiological and pathological processes via hitherto uncharacterized physical effects. Here we report a cell-based detection system for assessing the effects of pre-defined gas mixtures on the induction of apoptotic cell death. In this setting, the conventional atmosphere for cell culture was substituted with gas combinations, including the same amount of oxygen (20%) and carbon dioxide (5%) but 75% helium, neon, argon, krypton, or xenon instead of nitrogen. The replacement of nitrogen with noble gases per se had no effects on the viability of cultured human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Conversely, argon and xenon (but not helium, neon, and krypton) significantly limited cell loss induced by the broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor staurosporine, the DNA-damaging agent mitoxantrone and several mitochondrial toxins. Such cytoprotective effects were coupled to the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity, as demonstrated by means of a mitochondrial transmembrane potential-sensitive dye and by assessing the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. In line with this notion, argon and xenon inhibited the apoptotic activation of caspase-3, as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy coupled to automated image analysis. The antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon may explain their clinically relevant cytoprotective effects. PMID:23907115

  19. Antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon.

    PubMed

    Spaggiari, Sabrina; Kepp, Oliver; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Chaba, Kariman; Adjemian, Sandy; Pype, Jan; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Lemaire, Marc; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-08-15

    Although chemically non-reactive, inert noble gases may influence multiple physiological and pathological processes via hitherto uncharacterized physical effects. Here we report a cell-based detection system for assessing the effects of pre-defined gas mixtures on the induction of apoptotic cell death. In this setting, the conventional atmosphere for cell culture was substituted with gas combinations, including the same amount of oxygen (20%) and carbon dioxide (5%) but 75% helium, neon, argon, krypton, or xenon instead of nitrogen. The replacement of nitrogen with noble gases per se had no effects on the viability of cultured human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Conversely, argon and xenon (but not helium, neon, and krypton) significantly limited cell loss induced by the broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor staurosporine, the DNA-damaging agent mitoxantrone and several mitochondrial toxins. Such cytoprotective effects were coupled to the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity, as demonstrated by means of a mitochondrial transmembrane potential-sensitive dye and by assessing the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. In line with this notion, argon and xenon inhibited the apoptotic activation of caspase-3, as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy coupled to automated image analysis. The antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon may explain their clinically relevant cytoprotective effects.

  20. Xenon Filled Silicon Germanium Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewinter, F.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is presented that shows the desirability and feasibility of using a xenon fill in the initial stages of operation of a silicon-germanium radioisotope thermoelectric generator to be used in outer-planetary exploration. The xenon cover gas offers protection against oxidation and against material sublimation, and allows the generator to deliver required power throughout the prelaunch and launch phases. The protective mechanisms afforded by the xenon cover gas and the mechanization of a xenon supply system are also discussed.

  1. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of liquid xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Resembling a tiny bit of window screen, the oscillator at the heart of CVX-2 will vibrate between two pairs of paddle-like electrodes. The slight bend in the shape of the mesh has no effect on the data. What counts are the mesh's displacement in the xenon fluid and the rate at which the displacement dampens. The unit shown here is encased in a small test cell and capped with a sapphire windown to contain the xenon at high pressure.

  2. A note on the biological activity of the noble gas compound xenon trioxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S. M.; Smith, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Comparison of xenon trioxide for toxicity in the few common oxidants using three bioassays. On a molar basis XeO3 and HOCl were similar, but XeO3 was less active than expected when comparisons were based on normality.

  3. Noble Gas (Argon and Xenon)-Saturated Cold Storage Solutions Reduce Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in a Rat Model of Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Y.; Pype, J.L.; Martin, A.R.; Chong, C.F.; Daniel, L.; Gaudart, J.; Ibrahim, Z.; Magalon, G.; Lemaire, M.; Hardwigsen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Following kidney transplantation, ischemia-reperfusion injury contributes to adverse outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a cold-storage solution saturated with noble gas (xenon or argon) could limit ischemia-reperfusion injury following cold ischemia. Methods Sixty Wistar rats were randomly allocated to 4 experimental groups. Kidneys were harvested and then stored for 6 h before transplantation in cold-storage solution (Celsior®) saturated with either air, nitrogen, xenon or argon. A syngenic orthotopic transplantation was performed. Renal function was determined on days 7 and 14 after transplantation. Transplanted kidneys were removed on day 14 for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Results Creatinine clearance was significantly higher and urinary albumin significantly lower in the argon and xenon groups than in the other groups at days 7 and 14. These effects were considerably more pronounced for argon than for xenon. In addition, kidneys stored with argon, and to a lesser extent those stored with xenon, displayed preserved renal architecture as well as higher CD-10 and little active caspase-3 expression compared to other groups. Conclusion Argon- or xenon-satured cold-storage solution preserved renal architecture and function following transplantation by reducing ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:22470401

  4. Novel sorbent development and evaluation for the capture of krypton and xenon from nuclear fuel reprocessing off-gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Garn, T.G.; Greenhalgh, M.R.; Law, J.D.

    2013-07-01

    The release of volatile radionuclides generated during Used Nuclear Fuel reprocessing in the US will most certainly need to be controlled to meet US regulatory emission limits. A US DOE sponsored Off-Gas Sigma Team has been tasked with a multi-lab collaborative research and development effort to investigate and evaluate emissions and immobilization control technologies for the volatile radioactive species generated from commercial Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) Reprocessing. Physical Adsorption technology is a simpler and potential economical alternative to cryogenic distillation processes that can be used for the capture of krypton and xenon and has resulted in a novel composite sorbent development procedure using synthesized mordenite as the active material. Utilizing the sorbent development procedure, Idaho National Laboratory sigma team members have developed two composite sorbents that have been evaluated for krypton and xenon capacities at ambient and 191 K temperature using numerous test gas compositions. Adsorption isotherms have been generated to predict equilibration and maximum capacities enabling modeling to support process equipment scale-up. (authors)

  5. Novel Sorbent Development and Evaluation for the Capture of Krypton and Xenon from Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D. Law

    2013-09-01

    The release of volatile radionuclides generated during Used Nuclear Fuel reprocessing in the US will most certainly need to be controlled to meet US regulatory emission limits. A US DOE sponsored Off-Gas Sigma Team has been tasked with a multi-lab collaborative research and development effort to investigate and evaluate emissions and immobilization control technologies for the volatile radioactive species generated from commercial Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) Reprocessing. Physical Adsorption technology is a simpler and potential economical alternative to cryogenic distillation processes that can be used for the capture of krypton and xenon and has resulted in a novel composite sorbent development procedure using synthesized mordenite as the active material. Utilizing the sorbent development procedure, INL sigma team members have developed two composite sorbents that have been evaluated for krypton and xenon capacities at ambient and 191 K temperature using numerous test gas compositions. Adsorption isotherms have been generated to predict equilibration and maximum capacities enabling modeling to support process equipment scale-up.

  6. Novel Sorbent Development and Evaluation for the Capture of Krypton and Xenon from Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D. Law

    2013-10-01

    The release of volatile radionuclides generated during Used Nuclear Fuel reprocessing in the US will most certainly need to be controlled to meet US regulatory emission limits. A US DOE sponsored Off-Gas Sigma Team has been tasked with a multi-lab collaborative research and development effort to investigate and evaluate emissions and immobilization control technologies for the volatile radioactive species generated from commercial Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) Reprocessing. Physical Adsorption technology is a simpler and potential economical alternative to cryogenic distillation processes that can be used for the capture of krypton and xenon and has resulted in a novel composite sorbent development procedure using synthesized mordenite as the active material. Utilizing the sorbent development procedure, INL sigma team members have developed two composite sorbents that have been evaluated for krypton and xenon capacities at ambient and 191 K temperature using numerous test gas compositions. Adsorption isotherms have been generated to predict equilibration and maximum capacities enabling modeling to support process equipment scale-up.

  7. Electrical Breakdown in a Martian Gas Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, C. R.; Calle, C. I.; Nelson, E.

    2003-01-01

    The high probability for dust interactions during Martian dust storms and dust devils combined with the cold, dry climate of Mars most likely result in airborne dust that is highly charged. On Earth, potential gradients up to 5 kV/m have been recorded and in some cases resulted in lightning. Although the Martian atmosphere is not conducive to lightning generation, it is widely believed that electrical discharge in the form of a corona occurs. In order to understand the breakdown of gases, Paschen measurements are taken which relate the minimum potential required to spark across a gap between two electrodes. The minimum potential is plotted versus the pressure-distance value for electrodes of a given geometry. For most gases, the potential decreases as the pressure decreases. For CO2, the minimum in the curve happens to be at Mars atmospheric pressures (5-7 mm Hg) for many distances and geometries. However, a very small amount (<0.1%) of mixing gases radically changes the curve, as noted by Leach. Here, we present the first experimental results of a Paschen curve for a Mars gas mixture compared with 100% pure CO2.

  8. Separation of gas mixtures by supported complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.A.

    1987-05-29

    The current project centers on the preparation and characterization of complexes that can be used to separate H/sub 2/ from gas mixtures. Of interest are complexes which are inexpensive and which reversibly bind H/sub 2/. In particular, dimeric complexes of chromium, ((C/sub 5/H/sub 4/R)Cr(CO)/sub 3/)/sub 2/ (R = H, CO/sub 2/CH/sub 3/, alkyl), are being studied in this project. The basic methodology used is to prepare various derivatives containing substitution on the cyclopentadienyl ligand and to screen these derivatives for reversible reaction with H/sub 2/. Once reversibility is achieved, kinetic and equilibrium data will be collected to fully characterize the system and possibly elucidate the effects of substituents on H/sub 2/ binding. Also of interest are complexes which reversibly and catalytically incorporate H/sub 2/ into an organic ketone substrate. An Rh/Sn complex which reversibly hydrogenates/dehydrogenates cyclohexanone will be discussed. Although Rh is not inexpensive, it is present in very low concentration and represents a potentially inexpensive yet selective H/sub 2/ separation method. 5 refs.

  9. Chemical recognition of gases and gas mixtures with terahertz waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, R. H.; Mittleman, D. M.; Nuss, M. C.

    1996-12-01

    A time-domain chemical-recognition system for classifying gases and analyzing gas mixtures is presented. We analyze the free induction decay exhibited by gases excited by far-infrared (terahertz) pulses in the time domain, using digital signal-processing techniques. A simple geometric picture is used for the classification of the waveforms measured for unknown gas species. We demonstrate how the recognition system can be used to determine the partial pressures of an ammonia-water gas mixture.

  10. THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM GAS MIXTURE

    DOEpatents

    Jury, S.H.

    1964-03-17

    A method of separating uranium from a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and other gases is described that comprises bringing the mixture into contact with anhydrous calcium sulfate to preferentially absorb the uranium hexafluoride on the sulfate. The calcium sulfate is then leached with a selective solvent for the adsorbed uranium. (AEC)

  11. Inferential determination of various properties of a gas mixture

    DOEpatents

    Morrow, Thomas B.; Behring, II, Kendricks A.

    2007-03-27

    Methods for inferentially determining various properties of a gas mixture, when the speed of sound in the gas is known at an arbitrary temperature and pressure. The method can be applied to natural gas mixtures, where the known parameters are the sound speed, temperature, pressure, and concentrations of any dilute components of the gas. The method uses a set of reference gases and their calculated density and speed of sound values to estimate the density of the subject gas. Additional calculations can be made to estimate the molecular weight of the subject gas, which can then be used as the basis for heating value calculations. The method may also be applied to inferentially determine density and molecular weight for gas mixtures other than natural gases.

  12. Devices for the Production of Reference Gas Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Fijało, Cyprian; Dymerski, Tomasz; Gębicki, Jacek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-09-01

    For many years there has been growing demand for gaseous reference materials, which is connected with development in many fields of science and technology. As a result, new methodological and instrumental solutions appear that can be used for this purpose. Appropriate quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) must be used to make sure that measurement data are a reliable source of information. Reference materials are a significant element of such systems. In the case of gas samples, such materials are generally called reference gas mixtures. This article presents the application and classification of reference gas mixtures, which are a specific type of reference materials, and the methods for obtaining them are described. Construction solutions of devices for the production of reference gas mixtures are detailed, and a description of a prototype device for dynamic production of reference gas mixtures containing aroma compounds is presented. PMID:27437588

  13. Devices for the Production of Reference Gas Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Fijało, Cyprian; Dymerski, Tomasz; Gębicki, Jacek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-09-01

    For many years there has been growing demand for gaseous reference materials, which is connected with development in many fields of science and technology. As a result, new methodological and instrumental solutions appear that can be used for this purpose. Appropriate quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) must be used to make sure that measurement data are a reliable source of information. Reference materials are a significant element of such systems. In the case of gas samples, such materials are generally called reference gas mixtures. This article presents the application and classification of reference gas mixtures, which are a specific type of reference materials, and the methods for obtaining them are described. Construction solutions of devices for the production of reference gas mixtures are detailed, and a description of a prototype device for dynamic production of reference gas mixtures containing aroma compounds is presented.

  14. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. This is a detail view of MSFC 0100143.

  15. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  16. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  17. A Decade of Xenon Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Presents reactions for the formation of xenon compounds and compounds of the other inert gases. Provides bonding and structure theories for noble gas compounds and speculates on possible applications. (GS)

  18. Krypton and xenon in Apollo 14 samples - Fission and neutron capture effects in gas-rich samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozd, R.; Hohenberg, C.; Morgan, C.

    1975-01-01

    Gas-rich Apollo 14 breccias and trench soil are examined for fission xenon from the decay of the extinct isotopes Pu-244 and I-129, and some samples have been found to have an excess fission component which apparently was incorporated after decay elsewhere and was not produced by in situ decay. Two samples have excess Xe-129 resulting from the decay of I-129. The excess is correlated at low temperatures with excess Xe-128 resulting from neutron capture on I-127. This neutron capture effect is accompanied by related low-temperature excesses of Kr-80 and Kr-82 from neutron capture on the bromine isotopes. Surface correlated concentrations of iodine and bromine are calculated from the neutron capture excesses.

  19. Characterization of Nuclear Recoils in High Pressure Xenon Gas: Towards a Simultaneous Search for WIMP Dark Matter and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Nygren, D.

    Xenon has recently been the medium of choice in several large scale detectors searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Though present-day large scale experiments use liquid xenon, the gas phase o_ers advantages favorable to both types of searches such as improved intrinsic energy resolution and fewer fluctuations in the partition of deposited energy between scintillation and ionization channels. We recently constructed a high pressure xenon gas TPC as a prototype for the NEXT (Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC) neutrinoless double beta decay experiment and have demonstrated the feasibility of 0.5% FWHM energy resolution at the 136Xe double beta Q-value with 3-D tracking capabilities. We now present results from this prototype on the simultaneous observation of scintillation and ionization produced by nuclear recoils at approximately 14 bar pressure. The recoils were produced by neutrons of approximately 2-6 MeV emitted from a radioisotope plutonium-beryllium source, and primary scintillation (S1) and electroluminescent photons produced by ionization (S2) were observed. We discuss the potential of gaseous xenon to distinguish between electron and nuclear recoils through the ratio of these two signals S2/S1. From these results combined with the possibility of using columnar recombination to sense nuclear recoil directionality at high pressures we envision a dual-purpose, ton-scale gaseous xenon detector capable of a combined search for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. This work has been performed within the context of the NEXT collaboration.

  20. Characterization of Nuclear Recoils in High Pressure Xenon Gas: Towards a Simultaneous Search for WIMP Dark Matter and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Oliveira, C. A.B.; Nygren, D.

    2015-03-24

    Xenon has recently been the medium of choice in several large scale detectors searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Though present-day large scale experiments use liquid xenon, the gas phase offers advantages favorable to both types of searches such as improved intrinsic energy resolution and fewer fluctuations in the partition of deposited energy between scintillation and ionization channels. We recently constructed a high pressure xenon gas TPC as a prototype for the NEXT (Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC) neutrinoless double beta decay experiment and have demonstrated the feasibility of 0.5% FWHM energy resolution at themore » 136Xe double beta Q-value with 3-D tracking capabilities. We now present results from this prototype on the simultaneous observation of scintillation and ionization produced by nuclear recoils at approximately 14 bar pressure. The recoils were produced by neutrons of approximately 2-6 MeV emitted from a radioisotope plutonium-beryllium source, and primary scintillation (S1) and electroluminescent photons produced by ionization (S2) were observed. We discuss the potential of gaseous xenon to distinguish between electron and nuclear recoils through the ratio of these two signals S2/S1. From these results combined with the possibility of using columnar recombination to sense nuclear recoil directionality at high pressures we envision a dual-purpose, ton-scale gaseous xenon detector capable of a combined search for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. This work has been performed within the context of the NEXT collaboration.« less

  1. Characterization of Nuclear Recoils in High Pressure Xenon Gas: Towards a Simultaneous Search for WIMP Dark Matter and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Oliveira, C. A.B.; Nygren, D.

    2015-03-24

    Xenon has recently been the medium of choice in several large scale detectors searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Though present-day large scale experiments use liquid xenon, the gas phase offers advantages favorable to both types of searches such as improved intrinsic energy resolution and fewer fluctuations in the partition of deposited energy between scintillation and ionization channels. We recently constructed a high pressure xenon gas TPC as a prototype for the NEXT (Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC) neutrinoless double beta decay experiment and have demonstrated the feasibility of 0.5% FWHM energy resolution at the 136Xe double beta Q-value with 3-D tracking capabilities. We now present results from this prototype on the simultaneous observation of scintillation and ionization produced by nuclear recoils at approximately 14 bar pressure. The recoils were produced by neutrons of approximately 2-6 MeV emitted from a radioisotope plutonium-beryllium source, and primary scintillation (S1) and electroluminescent photons produced by ionization (S2) were observed. We discuss the potential of gaseous xenon to distinguish between electron and nuclear recoils through the ratio of these two signals S2/S1. From these results combined with the possibility of using columnar recombination to sense nuclear recoil directionality at high pressures we envision a dual-purpose, ton-scale gaseous xenon detector capable of a combined search for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. This work has been performed within the context of the NEXT collaboration.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Gas Mixtures in Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brokaw, Richard S.

    1960-01-01

    The expression for the thermal conductivity of gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium is presented in a simpler and less restrictive form. This new form is shown to be equivalent to the previous equations.

  3. Composition for absorbing hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Lee, Myung W.

    1999-01-01

    A hydrogen storage composition is provided which defines a physical sol-gel matrix having an average pore size of less than 3.5 angstroms which effectively excludes gaseous metal hydride poisons while permitting hydrogen gas to enter. The composition is useful for separating hydrogen gas from diverse gas streams which may have contaminants that would otherwise render the hydrogen absorbing material inactive.

  4. 2D multinuclear NMR, hyperpolarized xenon and gas storage in organosilica nanochannels with crystalline order in the walls.

    PubMed

    Comotti, Angiolina; Bracco, Silvia; Valsesia, Patrizia; Ferretti, Lisa; Sozzani, Piero

    2007-07-11

    The combination of 2D 1H-13C and 1H-29Si solid state NMR, hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, together with adsorption measurements of vapors and gases for environmental and energetic relevance, was used to investigate the structure and the properties of periodic mesoporous hybrid p-phenylenesilica endowed with crystalline order in the walls. The interplay of 1H, 13C, and 29Si in the 2D heteronuclear correlation NMR measurements, together with the application of Lee-Goldburg homonuclear decoupling, revealed the spatial relationships (<5 angstroms) among various spin-active nuclei of the framework. Indeed, the through-space correlations in the 2D experiments evidenced, for the first time, the interfaces of the matrix walls with guest molecules confined in the nanochannels. Organic-inorganic and organic-organic heterogeneous interfaces between the matrix and the guests were identified. The open-pore structure and the easy accessibility of the nanochannels to the gas phase have been demonstrated by highly sensitive hyperpolarized (HP) xenon NMR, under extreme xenon dilution. Two-dimensional exchange experiments showed the exchange time to be as short as 2 ms. Through variable-temperature HP 129Xe NMR experiments we were able to achieve an unprecedented description of the nanochannel space and surface, a physisorption energy of 13.9 kJ mol-1, and the chemical shift value of xenon probing the internal surfaces. These results prompted us to measure the high storage capacity of the matrix towards benzene, hexafluorobenzene, ethanol, and carbon dioxide. Both host-guest, CH...pi, and OH...pi interactions contribute to the stabilization of the aromatic guests (benzene and hexafluorobenzene) on the extended surfaces. The full carbon dioxide loading in the channels could be detected by synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction experiments. The selective adsorption of carbon dioxide (ca. 90 wt %) vs that of oxygen and hydrogen, together with the permanent

  5. Regional comparison of technetium-99m DTPA aerosol and radioactive gas ventilation (xenon and krypton) studies in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanna, L.; Alderson, P.O.; Waxman, A.D.; Berman, D.S.; Brachman, M.B.; Kroop, S.A.; Goldsmith, M.; Tanasescu, D.E.

    1986-09-01

    The regional distribution of (99mTc)DTPA aerosol was compared with that of /sup 133/Xe (n = 30) and krypton (n = 24) in a group of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. All patients had an aerosol study using a recently available commercial generator system, a ventilation study with one of the gases, and perfusion imaging. Regional information was assessed visually on xenon, krypton, and aerosol studies independently by considering each lung as three equal-sized zones. In addition, gas ventilation findings peripheral to regions of aerosol turbulence (hot spots) were evaluated. Only 64% of the zones were in complete agreement on xenon and aerosol. Most of the discordance between xenon and aerosol was accounted for by minor degrees of /sup 133/Xe washout retention in zones that appeared normal in the aerosol study. An agreement rate of 85% was noted between 81mKr and aerosol regionally. The regions of discordance between aerosol and gas studies, however, usually were associated with unimpressive perfusion defects that did not change the scintigraphic probability for pulmonary embolism in any patient. Regarding zones of aerosol hyperdeposition, 76% had associated washout abnormalities on xenon; however, there was no correlation between the presence of these abnormalities or perfusion abnormalities. The results confirm the high sensitivity of /sup 133/Xe washout imaging, but suggest that radioaerosol imaging will detect most parenchymal abnormalities associated with perfusion defects of significance.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann equation for microscale gas flows of binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaoli; Asinari, Pietro; Zheng, Chuguang

    2009-02-01

    Modeling and simulating gas flows in and around microdevices are a challenging task in both science and engineering. In practical applications, a gas is usually a mixture made of different components. In this paper we propose a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) model for microscale flows of a binary mixture based on a recently developed LBE model for continuum mixtures [P. Asinari and L.-S. Luo, J. Comput. Phys. 227, 3878 (2008)]. A consistent boundary condition for gas-solid interactions is proposed and analyzed. The LBE is validated and compared with theoretical results or other reported data. The results show that the model can serve as a potential method for flows of binary mixture in the microscale.

  7. Critical Viscosity of Xenon investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Dr. Robert F. Berg (right), principal investigator and Dr. Micheal R. Moldover (left), co-investigator, for the Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX/CVX-2) experiment. They are with the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of chemicals.

  8. Reduced viscosity interpreted for fluid/gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis predicts decrease in fluid viscosity by comparing pressure profile of fluid/gas mixture with that of power-law fluid. Fluid is taken to be viscous, non-Newtonian, and incompressible; the gas to be ideal; the flow to be inertia-free, isothermal, and one dimensional. Analysis assists in design of flow systems for petroleum, coal, polymers, and other materials.

  9. Tortuosity measurement and the effects of finite pulse widths on xenon gas diffusion NMR studies of porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Sen, P. N.; Schwartz, L. M.; Patz, S.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    We have extended the utility of NMR as a technique to probe porous media structure over length scales of approximately 100-2000 microm by using the spin 1/2 noble gas 129Xe imbibed into the system's pore space. Such length scales are much greater than can be probed with NMR diffusion studies of water-saturated porous media. We utilized Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo NMR measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(t), of the xenon gas filling the pore space to study further the measurements of both the pore surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V(p), and the tortuosity (pore connectivity) of the medium. In uniform-size glass bead packs, we observed D(t) decreasing with increasing t, reaching an observed asymptote of approximately 0.62-0.65D(0), that could be measured over diffusion distances extending over multiple bead diameters. Measurements of D(t)/D(0) at differing gas pressures showed this tortuosity limit was not affected by changing the characteristic diffusion length of the spins during the diffusion encoding gradient pulse. This was not the case at the short time limit, where D(t)/D(0) was noticeably affected by the gas pressure in the sample. Increasing the gas pressure, and hence reducing D(0) and the diffusion during the gradient pulse served to reduce the previously observed deviation of D(t)/D(0) from the S/V(p) relation. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate between the long and short time limits in D(t). While the short time D(t) points lay above the interpolation line in the case of small beads, due to diffusion during the gradient pulse on the order of the pore size, it was also noted that the experimental D(t) data fell below the Pade line in the case of large beads, most likely due to finite size effects.

  10. Tortuosity measurement and the effects of finite pulse widths on xenon gas diffusion NMR studies of porous media.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Hürlimann, M D; Sen, P N; Schwartz, L M; Patz, S; Walsworth, R L

    2001-01-01

    We have extended the utility of NMR as a technique to probe porous media structure over length scales of approximately 100-2000 microm by using the spin 1/2 noble gas 129Xe imbibed into the system's pore space. Such length scales are much greater than can be probed with NMR diffusion studies of water-saturated porous media. We utilized Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo NMR measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(t), of the xenon gas filling the pore space to study further the measurements of both the pore surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V(p), and the tortuosity (pore connectivity) of the medium. In uniform-size glass bead packs, we observed D(t) decreasing with increasing t, reaching an observed asymptote of approximately 0.62-0.65D(0), that could be measured over diffusion distances extending over multiple bead diameters. Measurements of D(t)/D(0) at differing gas pressures showed this tortuosity limit was not affected by changing the characteristic diffusion length of the spins during the diffusion encoding gradient pulse. This was not the case at the short time limit, where D(t)/D(0) was noticeably affected by the gas pressure in the sample. Increasing the gas pressure, and hence reducing D(0) and the diffusion during the gradient pulse served to reduce the previously observed deviation of D(t)/D(0) from the S/V(p) relation. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate between the long and short time limits in D(t). While the short time D(t) points lay above the interpolation line in the case of small beads, due to diffusion during the gradient pulse on the order of the pore size, it was also noted that the experimental D(t) data fell below the Pade line in the case of large beads, most likely due to finite size effects. PMID:11445310

  11. Ultraviolet-B radiation enhancement in dielectric barrier discharge based xenon chloride exciplex source by air

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, P.; Prakash, R.; Pal, U. N.; Kumar, M.; Vyas, V.

    2014-07-07

    A single barrier dielectric barrier discharge tube of quartz with multi-strip Titanium-Gold (Ti-Au) coatings have been developed and utilized for ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation production peaking at wavelength 308 nm. The observed radiation at this wavelength has been examined for the mixtures of the Xenon together with chlorine and air admixtures. The gas mixture composition, chlorine gas content, total gas pressure, and air pressure dependency of the UV intensity, has been analyzed. It is found that the larger concentration of Cl{sub 2} deteriorates the performance of the developed source and around 2% Cl{sub 2} in this source produced optimum results. Furthermore, an addition of air in the xenon and chlorine working gas environment leads to achieve same intensity of UV-B light but at lower working gas pressure where significant amount of gas is air.

  12. High severity pyrolysis of shale and petroleum gas oil mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Leftin, H.P.; Newsome, D.S.

    1986-01-01

    Light gas oil and heavy gas oil from Paraho shale oil and their mixtures with a petroleum light gas oil were pyrolyzed in the presence of steam at 880-900/sup 0/C and contact times between 60 and 90 ms in a nonisothermal bench-scale pyrolysis reactor. Blending of petroleum LGO into the shale oil feeds provided product yields that were the weighted linear combination of the yields of the individual components of the blends. Partial denitrogenation and a pronounced decrease in the rate of coke deposition on the reactor walls were observed when petroleum gas oil was blended with the shale gas oils.

  13. Recovery of purified helium or hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Merriman, J.R.; Pashley, J.H.; Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.

    1974-01-15

    A process is described for the removal of helium or hydrogen from gaseous mixtures also containing contaminants. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a liquid fluorocarbon in an absorption zone maintained at superatomspheric pressure to preferentially absorb the contaminants in the fluorocarbon. Unabsorbed gas enriched in hydrogen or helium is withdrawn from the absorption zone as product. Liquid fluorocarbon enriched in contaminants is withdrawn separately from the absorption zone. (10 claims)

  14. Gas sampling system for reactive gas-solid mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Daum, Edward D.; Downs, William; Jankura, Bryan J.; McCoury, Jr., John M.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sampling a gas containing a reactive particulate solid phase flowing through a duct and for communicating a representative sample to a gas analyzer. A sample probe sheath 32 with an angular opening 34 extends vertically into a sample gas duct 30. The angular opening 34 is opposite the gas flow. A gas sampling probe 36 concentrically located within sheath 32 along with calibration probe 40 partly extend in the sheath 32. Calibration probe 40 extends further in the sheath 32 than gas sampling probe 36 for purging the probe sheath area with a calibration gas during calibration.

  15. Gas sampling system for reactive gas-solid mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Daum, Edward D.; Downs, William; Jankura, Bryan J.; McCoury, Jr., John M.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sampling gas containing a reactive particulate solid phase flowing through a duct and for communicating a representative sample to a gas analyzer. A sample probe sheath 32 with an angular opening 34 extends vertically into a sample gas duct 30. The angular opening 34 is opposite the gas flow. A gas sampling probe 36 concentrically located within sheath 32 along with calibration probe 40 partly extends in the sheath 32. Calibration probe 40 extends further in the sheath 32 than gas sampling probe 36 for purging the probe sheath area with a calibration gas during calibration.

  16. Pulsed electron beam propagation in argon and nitrogen gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Zhirkov, I. S.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents the results of current measurements for the electron beam, propagating inside a drift tube filled in with a gas mixture (Ar and N2). The experiments were performed using the TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The main characteristics of electron beam were as follows: 60 ns pulse duration, up to 200 J energy, and 5 cm diameter. The electron beam propagated inside the drift tube assembled of three sections. Gas pressures inside the drift tube were 760 ± 3, 300 ± 3, and 50 ± 1 Torr. The studies were performed in argon, nitrogen, and their mixtures of 33%, 50%, and 66% volume concentrations, respectively.

  17. First proof of topological signature in the high pressure xenon gas TPC with electroluminescence amplification for the NEXT experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ferrario, P.

    2016-01-19

    The NEXT experiment aims to observe the neutrinoless double beta decay of xenon in a high-pressure 136Xe gas TPC using electroluminescence (EL) to amplify the signal from ionization. One of the main advantages of this technology is the possibility to reconstruct the topology of events with energies close to Qββ. This paper presents the first demonstration that the topology provides extra handles to reject background events using data obtained with the NEXT-DEMO prototype. Single electrons resulting from the interactions of 22Na 1275 keV gammas and electron-positron pairs produced by conversions of gammas from the 228Th decay chain were used tomore » represent the background and the signal in a double beta decay. Furthermore, these data were used to develop algorithms for the reconstruction of tracks and the identification of the energy deposited at the end-points, providing an extra background rejection factor of 24.3 ± 1.4 (stat.)%, while maintaining an efficiency of 66.7 ± 1% for signal events.« less

  18. Gas mixture studies for streamer operated Resistive Plate Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoloni, A.; Longhin, A.; Mengucci, A.; Pupilli, F.; Ventura, M.

    2016-06-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers operated in streamer mode are interesting detectors in neutrino and astro-particle physics applications (like OPERA and ARGO experiments). Such experiments are typically characterized by large area apparatuses with no stringent requirements on detector aging and rate capabilities. In this paper, results of cosmic ray tests performed on a RPC prototype using different gas mixtures are presented, the principal aim being the optimization of the TetraFluoroPropene concentration in Argon-based mixtures. The introduction of TetraFluoroPropene, besides its low Global Warming Power, is helpful because it simplifies safety requirements allowing to remove also isobutane from the mixture. Results obtained with mixtures containing SF6, CF4, CO2, N2 and He are also shown, presented both in terms of detectors properties (efficiency, multiple-streamer probability and time resolution) and in terms of streamer characteristics.

  19. Handheld calculator program simplifies calculation of data for gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Karger, W.

    1982-01-11

    For natural gases having several components, Elliott Co.'s handheld calculator program can characterize the gas mixture with a printout that provides its molecular weight, molar specific heat at constant pressure, pseudocritical pressure and temperature, ratio of specific heats, and adiabatic compression exponent. The program also provides for further calculations that yield specific gravity, specific heat/lb, and compressibility.

  20. The Search for Dark Matter with the XENON100 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aprile, Elena

    2008-11-23

    The XENON Dark Matter Experiment aims at the direct detection of dark matter Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with dual phase (liquid/gas) xenon time projection chambers (XeTPCs). Following the successful performance of the XENON10 detector, which has shown in 2007 the best sensitivity to spin-independent coupling of WIMPs to matter, we have designed and completed the construction of a new TPC with an active LXe shield, containing a total of 170 kg of xenon. The detector is currently undergoing final commissioning at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory. I will review the XENON10 results and present the status of the XENON100 experiment.

  1. Electrochemical separation and concentration of hydrogen sulfide from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Winnick, Jack; Sather, Norman F.; Huang, Hann S.

    1984-10-30

    A method of removing sulfur oxides of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas mixtures (150.degree.-1000.degree. C.) is the subject of the present invention. An electrochemical cell is employed. The cell is provided with inert electrodes and an electrolyte which will provide anions compatible with the sulfur containing anions formed at the anode. The electrolyte is also selected to provide inert stable cations at the temperatures encountered. The gas mixture is passed by the cathode where the sulfur gases are converted to SO.sub.4 -- or, in the case of H.sub.2 S, to S--. The anions migrate to the anode where they are converted to a stable gaseous form at much greater concentration levels (>10X). Current flow may be effected by utilizing an external source of electrical energy or by passing a reducing gas such as hydrogen past the anode.

  2. ELECTROCHEMICAL SEPARATION AND CONCENTRATION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE FROM GAS MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Winnick, Jack; Sather, Norman F.; Huang, Hann S.

    1984-10-30

    A method of removing sulfur oxides of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas mixtures (150.degree.-1000.degree. C.) is the subject of the present invention. An electrochemical cell is employed. The cell is provided with inert electrodes and an electrolyte which will provide anions compatible with the sulfur containing anions formed at the anode. The electrolyte is also selected to provide inert stable cations at the temperatures encountered. The gas mixture is passed by the cathode where the sulfur gases are converted to SO.sub.4 -- or, in the case of H.sub.2 S, to S--. The anions migrate to the anode where they are converted to a stable gaseous form at much greater concentration levels (>10X). Current flow may be effected by utilizing an external source of electrical energy or by passing a reducing gas such as hydrogen past the anode.

  3. Xenon Additives Detection in Helium Micro-Plasma Gas Analytical Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Alexander; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy; Mustafaev, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    Electron energy spectra of Xe atoms at He filled micro-plasma afterglow gas analyzer were observed using Collisional Electron Spectroscopy (CES) method [1]. According to CES, diffusion path confinement for characteristic electrons makes it possible to measure electrons energy distribution function (EEDF) at a high (up to atmospheric) gas pressure. Simple geometry micro-plasma CES sensor consists of two plane parallel electrodes detector and microprocessor-based acquisition system providing current-voltage curve measurement in the afterglow of the plasma discharge. Electron energy spectra are deduced as 2-nd derivative of the measured current-voltage curve to select characteristic peaks of the species to be detected. Said derivatives were obtained by the smoothing-differentiating procedure using spline least-squares approximation of a current-voltage curve. Experimental results on CES electron energy spectra at 10-40 Torr in pure He and in admixture with 0.3% Xe are discussed. It demonstrates a prototype of the new miniature micro-plasma sensors for industry, safety and healthcare applications. [1]. A.A.Kudryavtsev, A.B.Tsyganov. US Patent 7,309,992. Gas analysis method and ionization detector for carrying out said method, issued December 18, 2007.

  4. Gravimetric methods for the preparation of standard gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, M. J. T.; Vargha, G. M.; Brown, A. S.

    2011-10-01

    The most widely used method for the preparation of primary standard gas mixtures involves weighing the individual components into a cylinder. We present a new mathematical description of the method and its uncertainties. We use this to demonstrate how strategies for serial dilution can be identified that minimize the uncertainty in the final mixture and show how they can be implemented practically. We review published reports of high accuracy gravimetry and give examples of relative uncertainties in the composition of standards approaching 1 part-per-million in the best cases and in the range of 100 to 1000 parts-per-million more typically.

  5. Method for the simultaneous preparation of Radon-211, Xenon-125, Xenon-123, Astatine-211, Iodine-125 and Iodine-123

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Lambrecht, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    A method for simultaneously preparing Radon-211, Astatine-211, Xenon-125, Xenon-123, Iodine-125 and Iodine-123 in a process that includes irradiating a fertile metal material then using a one-step chemical procedure to collect a first mixture of about equal amounts of Radon-211 and Xenon-125, and a separate second mixture of about equal amounts of Iodine-123 and Astatine-211.

  6. Calibration and uncertainty assessment for certified reference gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Franklin R; Possolo, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The weighted least squares method to build an analysis function described in ISO 6143, Gas analysis--Comparison methods for determining and checking the composition of calibration gas mixtures, is modified to take into account the typically small number of instrumental readings that are obtained for each primary standard gas mixture used in calibration. The theoretical basis for this modification is explained, and its superior performance is illustrated in a simulation study built around a concrete example, using real data. The corresponding uncertainty assessment is obtained by application of a Monte Carlo method consistent with the guidance in the Supplement 1 to the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement, which avoids the need for two successive applications of the linearizing approximation of the conventional method for uncertainty propagation. The three main steps that NIST currently uses to certify a reference gas mixture (homogeneity study, calibration, and assignment of value and uncertainty assessment), are described and illustrated using data pertaining to an actual standard reference material.

  7. Solid Xenon Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakishiyeva, Durdana N.; Mahapatra, Rupak; Saab, Tarek; Yoo, Jonghee

    2010-08-01

    Crystals like Germanium and Silicon need to be grown in specialized facilities which is time and money costly. It takes many runs to test the detector once it's manufactured and mishaps are very probable. It is of a great challenge to grow big germanium crystals and that's why stacking them up in a tower is the only way at the moment to increase testing mass. Liquid Noble gas experiments experiencing contamination problems, their predicted energy resolution at 10 keV and lower energy range is not as good as predicted. Every experiment is targeting one specific purpose, looking for one thing. Why not to design an experiment that is diverse and build a detector that can search for Dark Matter, Solar Axions, Neutrinoless Double Beta decay, etc. Solid Xenon detector is such detector. We designed a simple Xenon crystal growing chamber that was put together at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The first phase of this experiment was to demonstrate that a good, crack free Xenon crystal can be grown (regardless of many failed attempts by various groups) and our first goal, 1 kg crystal, was successful.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of convection in laser-polarized xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Tseng, C. H.; Wong, G. P.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the flow and diffusion of laser-polarized xenon (129Xe) gas undergoing convection above evaporating laser-polarized liquid xenon. The large xenon NMR signal provided by the laser-polarization technique allows more rapid imaging than one can achieve with thermally polarized gas-liquid systems, permitting shorter time-scale events such as rapid gas flow and gas-liquid dynamics to be observed. Two-dimensional velocity-encoded imaging shows convective gas flow above the evaporating liquid xenon, and also permits the measurement of enhanced gas diffusion near regions of large velocity variation.

  9. Application of Two Phase (Liquid/Gas) Xenon Gamma-Camera for the Detection of Special Nuclear Material and PET Medical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McKinsey, Daniel Nicholas

    2013-08-27

    The McKinsey group at Yale has been awarded a grant from DTRA for the building of a Liquid Xenon Gamma Ray Color Camera (LXe-GRCC), which combines state-of-the-art detection of LXe scintillation light and time projection chamber (TPC) charge readout. The DTRA application requires a movable detector and hence only a single phase (liquid) xenon detector can be considered in this case. We propose to extend the DTRA project to applications that allow a two phase (liquid/gas) xenon TPC. This entails additional (yet minimal) hardware and extension of the research effort funded by DTRA. The two phase detector will have better energy and angular resolution. Such detectors will be useful for PET medical imaging and detection of special nuclear material in stationary applications (e.g. port of entry). The expertise of the UConn group in gas phase TPCs will enhance the capabilities of the Yale group and the synergy between the two groups will be very beneficial for this research project as well as the education and research projects of the two universities. The LXe technology to be used in this project has matured rapidly over the past few years, developed for use in detectors for nuclear physics and astrophysics. This technology may now be applied in a straightforward way to the imaging of gamma rays. According to detailed Monte Carlo simulations recently performed at Yale University, energy resolution of 1% and angular resolution of 3 degrees may be obtained for 1.0 MeV gamma rays, using existing technology. With further research and development, energy resolution of 0.5% and angular resolution of 1.3 degrees will be possible at 1.0 MeV. Because liquid xenon is a high density, high Z material, it is highly efficient for scattering and capturing gamma rays. In addition, this technology scales elegantly to large detector areas, with several square meter apertures possible. The Yale research group is highly experienced in the development and use of noble liquid detectors for

  10. Gas adsorption and gas mixture separations using mixed-ligand MOF material

    DOEpatents

    Hupp, Joseph T.; Mulfort, Karen L.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Bae, Youn-Sang

    2011-01-04

    A method of separating a mixture of carbon dioxiode and hydrocarbon gas using a mixed-ligand, metal-organic framework (MOF) material having metal ions coordinated to carboxylate ligands and pyridyl ligands.

  11. Pulsed electron beam propagation in argon and nitrogen gas mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Zhirkov, I. S.

    2015-10-15

    The paper presents the results of current measurements for the electron beam, propagating inside a drift tube filled in with a gas mixture (Ar and N{sub 2}). The experiments were performed using the TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The main characteristics of electron beam were as follows: 60 ns pulse duration, up to 200 J energy, and 5 cm diameter. The electron beam propagated inside the drift tube assembled of three sections. Gas pressures inside the drift tube were 760 ± 3, 300 ± 3, and 50 ± 1 Torr. The studies were performed in argon, nitrogen, and their mixtures of 33%, 50%, and 66% volume concentrations, respectively.

  12. Diffusion and viscosity coefficients for helium. [in astrophysical gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1982-01-01

    The first order Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation is solved numerically to obtain diffusion and viscosity coefficients for a ternary gas mixture composed of electron, protons, and helium. The coefficients are tabulated for five He/H abundances ranging from 0.01 to 10 and for both He II and He III. Comparison with Burgers's thermal diffusion coefficients reveals a maximum difference of 9-10% for both He II and He III throughout the range of helium abundances considered. The viscosity coefficients are compared to those of Chapman and Cowling and show a maximum difference of only 5-6% for He II but 15-16% for He III. For the astrophysically important gas mixtures, it is concluded that the results of existing studies which employed Burgers's or Chapman and Cowling's coefficients will remain substantially unaltered.

  13. Plasma polymerization of an ethylene-nitrogen gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudis, M.; Wydeven, T.

    1975-01-01

    A procedure has been developed whereby nitrogen can be incorporated into an organic film from an ethylene-nitrogen gas mixture using an internal electrode capacitively coupled radio frequency reactor. The presence of nitrogen has been shown directly by infrared transmittance spectra and electron spectroscopic chemical analysis data, and further indirect evidence was provided by dielectric measurements and by the reverse osmosis properties of the film. Preparation of a nitrogen containing film did not require vapor from an organic nitrogen containing liquid monomer. Some control over the bonding and stoichiometry of the polymer film was provided by the added degree of freedom of the nitrogen partial pressure in the gas mixture. This new parameter strongly affected the dielectric properties of the plasma polymerized film and could affect the reverse osmosis behavior.

  14. Gettering of hydrogen and methane from a helium gas mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cárdenas, Rosa Elia; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172{sup ®} getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. The optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650 °C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110 °C to remove the hydrogen. This approach eliminated the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.

  15. Gettering of Hydrogen and Methane from a Helium Gas Mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Rosa E.; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-10-21

    In our study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H2 and CH4 can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172® getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. Moreover, the optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650°C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110°C to remove the hydrogen. Finally, this approach eliminated the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.

  16. Gettering of Hydrogen and Methane from a Helium Gas Mixture

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cardenas, Rosa E.; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-10-21

    In our study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H2 and CH4 can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172® getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. Moreover, the optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650°C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110°C to remove the hydrogen. Finally, this approach eliminatedmore » the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.« less

  17. Heat/Fluid Flow Performance of Binary Gas Mixtures Formed with Helium Across Parallel-Plate Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Antonio; Manchu, Sreedhar

    2006-11-01

    The present study examines the trade-off between heat transfer enhancement and pressure drop increments caused by the flow of laminar binary gases in parallel-plate channels. Helium is the primary gas and carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen, oxygen and xenon are the secondary gases. From fluid physics, two thermophysical properties: viscosity and density affect the gas flow, whereas four thermophysical properties: viscosity, density, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity at constant pressure influence the forced convection. From physical-chemistry, the collection of four thermophysical properties depends on temperature, pressure and molar gas composition. The simultaneous development of laminar velocity and temperature of each binary gas mixture is predicted using the finite volume method for two Reynolds numbers based on hydraulic diameter, i.e., 1000 and 2000. The two target parameters are the total heat transfer or mean convection coefficient and the pressure drop. The beneficial connectedness of the two target parameters changing with the molar gas composition is reported in terms of a proper figure-of-merit, the heat/fluid flow performance parameter for the two Reynolds numbers.

  18. Deflagration to detonation transition in combustible gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, N.N.; Panfilov, I.I.

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents the results of a computational investigation of the process of deflagration to detonation transition in a combustible gas mixture. The type of combustion (i.e., deflagration or detonation) supported by a two-step reaction scheme is studied as a function of the activation energies. It is shown that both a deflagration to detonation transition and a deflagration wave that lags behind a leading shock are possible. Two types of deflagration to detonation transitions are found theoretically: initiation of detonation from the flame zone and initiation of detonation along a contact discontinuity in the compressed gas near the primary shock wave.

  19. Predicting detection probabilities for gas mixtures over HSI backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Tardiff, Mark F.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Chilton, Lawrence

    2009-12-29

    Detecting and identifying weak gaseous plumes using thermal image data acquired by airborne detectors is an area of ongoing research. This contribution investigates the relative detectability of gas mixtures over different backgrounds and a range of plume temperatures that are warmer and cooler than the ground. The focus of this analysis to support mission planning. When the mission is intended to collect evidence of particular chemicals, the analysis presented is this report can be used to determine conditions under which useful data can be acquired. Initial analyses can be used to determine whether LWIR is useful for the anticipated gas, temperature, and background combination.

  20. Process for testing a xenon gas feed system of a hollow cathode assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The design and manufacturing processes for Hollow Cathode Assemblies (HCA's) that operate over a broad range of emission currents up to 30 Amperes, at low potentials, with lifetimes in excess of 17,500 hours. The processes include contamination control procedures which cover hollow cathode component cleaning procedures, gas feed system designs and specifications, and hollow cathode activation and operating procedures to thereby produce cathode assemblies that have demonstrated stable and repeatable operating conditions, for both the discharge current and voltage. The HCA of this invention provides lifetimes of greater than 10,000 hours, and expected lifetimes of greater than 17,500 hours, whereas the present state-of-the-art is less than 500 hours at emission currents in excess of 1 Ampere. Stable operation is provided over a large range of operating emission currents, up to a 6:1 ratio, and this HCA can emit electron currents of up to 30 Amperes in magnitude to an external anode that simulates the current drawn to a space plasma, at voltages of less than 20 Volts.

  1. Xenon Fractionation and Archean Hydrogen Escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Xenon is the heaviest gas found in significant quantities in natural planetary atmospheres. It would seem the least likely to escape. Yet there is more evidence for xenon escape from Earth than for any element other than helium and perhaps neon. The most straightforward evidence is that most of the radiogenic Xe from the decay of (129)I (half-life 15.7 Myr) and (244)Pu (half-life 81 Myr) that is Earth's birthright is missing. The missing xenon is often attributed to the impact erosion of early atmospheres of Earth and its ancestors. It is obvious that if most of the radiogenic xenon were driven off by impacts, most of the rest of the atmophiles fared the same fate. The other line of evidence is in the nonradiogenic isotopes of xenon and its silent partner, krypton. Atmospheric xenon is strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) compared to any known solar system source (Figure 1). This is in stark contrast to krypton, which may not be fractionated at all: atmospheric Kr is slightly heavier than solar Kr (at about 0.5% per amu), but it is the same as in carbonaceous chondrites. Nonradiogenic xenon is also under abundant relative to krypton (the so-called "missing xenon" problem). Together these observations imply that xenon has been subject to fractionating escape and krypton not.

  2. Critical Viscosity of Xenon team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure (at left) that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister (right) holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

  3. Critical Viscosity of Xenon team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure (at left) that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister (right) holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (left) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

  4. Separation of light gas mixtures using SAPO-34 membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Poshusta, J.C.; Tuan, V.A.; Pape, E.A.; Noble, R.D.; Falconer, J.L.

    2000-04-01

    Continuous SAPO-34 membranes were prepared on porous alumina tubular supports, and shown to be useful for light gas separations at low and high temperatures. Single-gas permeances of CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} decreased with increasing kinetic diameter. For the best membrane at 300 K, the He and H{sub 2} permeances were less than that of CO{sub 2}, because He, H{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} were small compared to the SAPO-34 pore, and differences in the heat of adsorption determined the permeance order. The smaller component permeated the fastest in CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures between 300 and 470 K. For H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures, which were separated by competitive adsorption at room temperature, the larger component permeated faster below 400 K. The CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivity at room temperature was 36 and decreased with temperature. The H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} mixture selectivity was 8 and constant with temperature up to 480 K. Calcination, slow temperature cycles, and exposure to water vapor had no permanent effect on membrane performance, but temperature changes of approximately 30 K/min decreased the membrane's effectiveness.

  5. Ternary gas mixtures for high-voltage industrial insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, M. O.; Chan, C. C.; Christophorou, L. G.

    1981-10-01

    Gas dielectrics for insulating power apparatus, e.g., gas insulated transmission lines (GITL), were evaluated. Particular attention was given to mixtures using large proportions of an electron moderating gas (viz., N2, CHF3, or 1,1,1-C2H3F3) and smaller quantities of two electron attaching gases: SF6 and one fluorocarbon (e.g., c-C4F8). The proportions were sought at which the three gases function best as a team, moderating free electrons from higher to lower energies and there attaching them. Small amounts of the electron attaching additives can drastically raise the dielectric strength of the moderator. Certain combinations of SF6 and fluorocarbons do not produce the undesirable spark by products associated with either SF6 or fluorocarbons alone and also show improved negative polarity impulse breakdown characteristics over pure SF6. Small scale breakdown measurements were made of various ternary mixtures in the GITL geometry. It was found that nitrogen moderates electrons to extremely low energies, where SF6 attaches; the dipolar gases moderate to somewhat higher energies, where some fluorocarbons attach best.

  6. Aerobic fitness in patients with fibrositis. A controlled study of respiratory gas exchange and 133-xenon clearance from exercising muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.M.; Clark, S.R.; Goldberg, L.; Nelson, D.; Bonafede, R.P.; Porter, J.; Specht, D.

    1989-04-01

    Aerobic fitness was evaluated in 25 women with fibrositis, by having them exercise to volitional exhaustion on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Compared with published standards, greater than 80% of the fibrositis patients were not physically fit, as assessed by maximal oxygen uptake. Compared with matched sedentary controls, fibrositis patients accurately perceived their level of exertion in relation to oxygen consumption and attained a similar level of lactic acidosis, as assessed by their respiratory quotient and ventilatory threshold. Exercising muscle blood flow was estimated by 133-xenon clearance in a subgroup of 16 fibrositis patients and compared with that in 16 matched sedentary controls; the fibrositis patients exhibited reduced 133-xenon clearance. These results indicate a need to include aerobic fitness as a matched variable in future controlled studies of fibrositis and suggest that the detraining phenomenon may be of relevance to the etiopathogenesis of the disease.

  7. Binary and ternary gas mixtures for use in glow discharge closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Scott R.; Christophorou, Loucas G.

    1990-01-01

    Highly efficient binary and ternary gas mixtures for use in diffuse glow discharge closing switches are disclosed. The binary mixtures are combinations of helium or neon and selected perfluorides. The ternary mixtures are combinations of helium, neon, or argon, a selected perfluoride, and a small amount of gas that exhibits enhanced ionization characteristics. These mixtures are shown to be the optimum choices for use in diffuse glow discharge closing switches by virtue of the combined physio-electric properties of the mixture components.

  8. Asymptotic-preserving Boltzmann model equations for binary gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Liang, Yihua

    2016-02-01

    An improved system of Boltzmann model equations is developed for binary gas mixture. This system of model equations has a complete asymptotic preserving property that can strictly recover the Navier-Stokes equations in the continuum limit with the correct constitutive relations and the correct viscosity, thermal conduction, diffusion, and thermal diffusion coefficients. In this equation system, the self- and cross-collision terms in Boltzmann equations are replaced by single relaxation terms. In monocomponent case, this system of equations can be reduced to the commonly used Shakhov equation. The conservation property and the H theorem which are important for model equations are also satisfied by this system of model equations. PMID:26986408

  9. Cellular detonation diffraction in gas-particle mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Khmel, T. A.; Kratova, Y. V.

    2010-12-01

    Diffraction of cellular heterogeneous detonation out of a channel into open half-space in a mixture of aluminum particles and oxygen is investigated numerically. The flow is found to be very similar to gas detonation diffraction. The detonation weakening behind the step results in combustion front deceleration and decoupling from the leading shock wave. Subsequent re-initiation takes place in a transverse wave. New transverse waves are generated along the expanding front. The computations that were performed show that the critical number of cells is several times less than that for gases. This is confirmed by theoretical estimates based upon the Mitrofanov-Soloukhin approach.

  10. Xenon: anesthesia for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Joyce, J A

    2000-06-01

    Xenon is a naturally occurring, gaseous element that comprises 0.000008% of air, or 0.05 parts per million. It was discovered by Ramsey and Travers in 1898. Xenon is found on the Periodic Table in group 0, which is the group commonly referred to as the noble or inert gases. It is obtained by fractionally distilling liquefied air. Xenon has been studied sporadically within the discipline of anesthesia as a replacement for nitrous oxide. Because it is a naturally occurring element, xenon is not a pollutant. It is not an occupationally hazardous gas. It is neither teratogenic nor fetotoxic, as is nitrous oxide; it does not contribute to the depletion of stratospheric ozone, as do chlorofluorocarbons and nitrous oxide. Xenon does not contribute to global warming and the greenhouse effect, as does nitrous oxide. Xenon provides excellent anesthesia and analgesia at its minimum alveolar concentration, 71%, as well as excellent analgesia at "subanesthetic" concentrations. Xenon also provides excellent cardiovascular and hemodynamic stability and offers both rapid induction and emergence. Because of the relatively high cost of xenon, a low-flow, closed-system technique is needed to be most cost effective.

  11. Atmospheric xenon radioactive isotope monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, J P; Pointurier, F; Blanchard, X; Taffary, T

    2004-01-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) organisation is implementing a world-wide monitoring network in order to check that the State Signatories comply with the treaty. One of the monitoring facilities consists of an atmospheric noble gas monitoring equipment. According to the requirements annexed in the treaty, the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) developed a device, called SPALAX, which automatically extracts xenon from ambient air and makes in situ measurements of the activities of four xenon radioisotopes (131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe, 135Xe). The originality of this device is noticeable essentially in the gas sample processing method: thanks to the coupling of a gas permeator and of a noble gas specific adsorbent, it can selectively extract and concentrate xenon to more than 3 x 10 E6. This process is carried out continuously without cryogenic cooling, without any regeneration time. The detection of the xenon radioactive isotopes is done automatically by high spectral resolution gamma spectrometry, a robust technology well-suited for on-field instrumentation. In the year 2000, a prototype was involved in an international evaluation exercise directed by the CTBT organisation (CTBTO). This exercise demonstrated that the SPALAX equipment perfectly met the requirements of the CTBTO for such systems. On the basis of the continuous 24-h resolution record of the atmospheric xenon radioactive isotopes concentrations, the SPALAX system also demonstrated that ambient levels of 133Xe can fluctuate quickly from less than the detection limit to over 40 x 10(-3) Bq m(-3). In order to build an industrial version of this equipment, the CEA entered into a partnership with a French engineering company (S.F.I., Marseille, France), which is now able to produce an industrial version of SPALAX, i.e. more compact and more efficient than the prototypes. The 133Xe minimum detectable concentration is 0.15 x 10(-3) Bq m(-3) air per 24 h sampling cycle.

  12. Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

    2013-01-29

    A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

  13. Superconducting cable cooling system by helium gas and a mixture of gas and liquid helium

    DOEpatents

    Dean, John W.

    1977-01-01

    Thermally contacting, oppositely streaming cryogenic fluid streams in the same enclosure in a closed cycle that changes from a cool high pressure helium gas to a cooler reduced pressure helium fluid comprised of a mixture of gas and boiling liquid so as to be near the same temperature but at different pressures respectively in go and return legs that are in thermal contact with each other and in thermal contact with a longitudinally extending superconducting transmission line enclosed in the same cable enclosure that insulates the line from the ambient at a temperature T.sub.1. By first circulating the fluid in a go leg from a refrigerator at one end of the line as a high pressure helium gas near the normal boiling temperature of helium; then circulating the gas through an expander at the other end of the line where the gas becomes a mixture of reduced pressure gas and boiling liquid at its boiling temperature; then by circulating the mixture in a return leg that is separated from but in thermal contact with the gas in the go leg and in the same enclosure therewith; and finally returning the resulting low pressure gas to the refrigerator for compression into a high pressure gas at T.sub.2 is a closed cycle, where T.sub.1 >T.sub.2, the temperature distribution is such that the line temperature is nearly constant along its length from the refrigerator to the expander due to the boiling of the liquid in the mixture. A heat exchanger between the go and return lines removes the gas from the liquid in the return leg while cooling the go leg.

  14. Chemical discrimination in turbulent gas mixtures with MOX sensors validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Rodríguez-Luján, Irene; Trincavelli, Marco; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón

    2014-10-16

    Chemical detection systems based on chemo-resistive sensors usually include a gas chamber to control the sample air flow and to minimize turbulence. However, such a kind of experimental setup does not reproduce the gas concentration fluctuations observed in natural environments and destroys the spatio-temporal information contained in gas plumes. Aiming at reproducing more realistic environments, we utilize a wind tunnel with two independent gas sources that get naturally mixed along a turbulent flow. For the first time, chemo-resistive gas sensors are exposed to dynamic gas mixtures generated with several concentration levels at the sources. Moreover, the ground truth of gas concentrations at the sensor location was estimated by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We used a support vector machine as a tool to show that chemo-resistive transduction can be utilized to reliably identify chemical components in dynamic turbulent mixtures, as long as sufficient gas concentration coverage is used. We show that in open sampling systems, training the classifiers only on high concentrations of gases produces less effective classification and that it is important to calibrate the classification method with data at low gas concentrations to achieve optimal performance.

  15. Chemical Discrimination in Turbulent Gas Mixtures with MOX Sensors Validated by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Rodríguez-Luján, Irene; Trincavelli, Marco; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Chemical detection systems based on chemo-resistive sensors usually include a gas chamber to control the sample air flow and to minimize turbulence. However, such a kind of experimental setup does not reproduce the gas concentration fluctuations observed in natural environments and destroys the spatio-temporal information contained in gas plumes. Aiming at reproducing more realistic environments, we utilize a wind tunnel with two independent gas sources that get naturally mixed along a turbulent flow. For the first time, chemo-resistive gas sensors are exposed to dynamic gas mixtures generated with several concentration levels at the sources. Moreover, the ground truth of gas concentrations at the sensor location was estimated by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We used a support vector machine as a tool to show that chemo-resistive transduction can be utilized to reliably identify chemical components in dynamic turbulent mixtures, as long as sufficient gas concentration coverage is used. We show that in open sampling systems, training the classifiers only on high concentrations of gases produces less effective classification and that it is important to calibrate the classification method with data at low gas concentrations to achieve optimal performance. PMID:25325339

  16. A fluidic device for measuring constituent masses of a flowing binary gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.

    1973-01-01

    A continuous reading mass flow device was developed to measure the component flow of a binary gas mixture. The basic components of the device are a fluidic humidity sensor and a specially designed flow calorimeter. These components provide readings of gas mixture ratio, mixture heat capacity, heat dissipated by the calorimeter and the gas temperature rise across the calorimeter. These parameter values, applied in the general definitions of specific heat capacity and the heat capacity of a gas mixture, produce calculated component flow rates of the mixture being metered. A test program was conducted to evaluate both the steady state and dynamic performance of the device.

  17. Operation of gas electron multiplier (GEM) with propane gas at low pressure and comparison with tissue-equivalent gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nardo, L.; Farahmand, M.

    2016-05-01

    A Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC), based on a single GEM foil of standard geometry, has been tested with pure propane gas at low pressure, in order to simulate a tissue site of about 1 μm equivalent size. In this work, the performance of GEM with propane gas at a pressure of 21 and 28 kPa will be presented. The effective gas gain was measured in various conditions using a 244Cm alpha source. The dependence of effective gain on the electric field strength along the GEM channel and in the drift and induction region was investigated. A maximum effective gain of about 5×103 has been reached. Results obtained in pure propane gas are compared with gas gain measurements in gas mixtures commonly employed in microdosimetry, that is propane and methane based Tissue-Equivalent gas mixtures.

  18. Venus, Earth, Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Xenon has been regarded as an important goal of many proposed missions to Venus. This talk is intended to explain why. Despite its being the heaviest gas found in natural planetary atmospheres, there is more evidence that Xe escaped from Earth than for any element apart from helium: (i) Atmospheric Xe is very strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) from any known solar system source. This suggests fractionating escape that preferentially left the heavy Xe isotopes behind. (ii) Xe is underabundant compared to Kr, a lighter noble gas that is not strongly mass fractionated in air. (iii) Radiogenic Xe is strongly depleted by factors of several to ~100 compared to the quantities expected from radioactive decay of primordial solar system materials. In these respects Xe on Mars is similar to Xe on Earth, but with one key difference: Xe on Mars is readily explained by a simple process like hydrodynamic escape that acts on an initially solar or meteoritic Xe. This is not so for Earth. Earth's Xe cannot be derived by an uncontrived mass fractionating process acting on any known type of Solar System Xe. Earth is a stranger, made from different stuff than any known meteorite or Mars or even the Sun. Who else is in Earth's family? Comets? We know nothing. Father Zeus? Data from Jupiter are good enough to show that jovian Xe is not strongly mass-fractionated but not good enough to determine whether Jupiter resembles the Earth or the Sun. Sister Venus? Noble gas data from Venus are incomplete, with Kr uncertain and Xe unmeasured. Krypton was measured by several instruments on several spacecraft. The reported Kr abundances are discrepant and were once highly controversial. These discrepancies appear to have been not so much resolved as forgotten. Xenon was not detected on Venus. Upper limits were reported for the two most abundant xenon isotopes 129Xe and 132Xe. From the limited data it is not possible to tell whether Venus's affinities lie with the solar wind, or with

  19. Fermion-fermion interaction in a dilute gas-mixture Bose condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Mogilyuk, T. I.

    2011-11-15

    A mixture of a one-component Bose gas and two-component Fermi gas is considered at temperatures at which the Bose gas is completely condensed. Two fermions in such a mixture can interact with each other exchanging bosons from the condensate or supercondensate. The interaction potential, a change in the effective mass, the decay, and fermion spectrum are calculated in this quantum Fermi-Bose mixture.

  20. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of gas and dust mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, R. A.; Sijacki, D.; Clarke, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    We present a `two-fluid' implementation of dust in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) in the test particle limit. The scheme is able to handle both short and long stopping times and reproduces the short friction time limit, which is not properly handled in other implementations. We apply novel tests to verify its accuracy and limitations, including multidimensional tests that have not been previously applied to the drag-coupled dust problem and which are particularly relevant to self-gravitating protoplanetary discs. Our tests demonstrate several key requirements for accurate simulations of gas-dust mixtures. First, in standard SPH particle jitter can degrade the dust solution, even when the gas density is well reproduced. The use of integral gradients, a Wendland kernel and a large number of neighbours can control this, albeit at a greater computational cost. Secondly, when it is necessary to limit the artificial viscosity we recommend using the Cullen & Dehnen switch, since the alternative, using α ˜ 0.1, can generate a large velocity noise up to σv ≲ 0.3cs in the dust particles. Thirdly, we find that an accurate dust density estimate requires >400 neighbours, since, unlike the gas, the dust particles do not feel regularization forces. This density noise applies to all particle-based two-fluid implementations of dust, irrespective of the hydro solver and could lead to numerically induced fragmentation. Although our tests show accurate dusty gas simulations are possible, care must be taken to minimize the contribution from numerical noise.

  1. In situ measurement of atmospheric krypton and xenon on Mars with Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, P. G.; Malespin, C. A.; Franz, H. B.; Pepin, R. O.; Trainer, M. G.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Atreya, S. K.; Freissinet, C.; Jones, J. H.; Manning, H.; Owen, T.; Pavlov, A. A.; Wiens, R. C.; Wong, M. H.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2016-11-01

    Mars Science Laboratory's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation has measured all of the stable isotopes of the heavy noble gases krypton and xenon in the martian atmosphere, in situ, from the Curiosity Rover at Gale Crater, Mars. Previous knowledge of martian atmospheric krypton and xenon isotope ratios has been based upon a combination of the Viking mission's krypton and xenon detections and measurements of noble gas isotope ratios in martian meteorites. However, the meteorite measurements reveal an impure mixture of atmospheric, mantle, and spallation contributions. The xenon and krypton isotopic measurements reported here include the complete set of stable isotopes, unmeasured by Viking. The new results generally agree with Mars meteorite measurements but also provide a unique opportunity to identify various non-atmospheric heavy noble gas components in the meteorites. Kr isotopic measurements define a solar-like atmospheric composition, but deviating from the solar wind pattern at 80Kr and 82Kr in a manner consistent with contributions originating from neutron capture in Br. The Xe measurements suggest an intriguing possibility that isotopes lighter than 132Xe have been enriched to varying degrees by spallation and neutron capture products degassed to the atmosphere from the regolith, and a model is constructed to explore this possibility. Such a spallation component, however, is not apparent in atmospheric Xe trapped in the glassy phases of martian meteorites.

  2. Xenon Blocks Neuronal Injury Associated with Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; David, Hélène N.; Vallée, Nicolas; Meckler, Cedric; Demaistre, Sebastien; Lambrechts, Kate; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Abraini, Jacques H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite state-of-the-art hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment, about 30% of patients suffering neurologic decompression sickness (DCS) exhibit incomplete recovery. Since the mechanisms of neurologic DCS involve ischemic processes which result in excitotoxicity, it is likely that HBO in combination with an anti-excitotoxic treatment would improve the outcome in patients being treated for DCS. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of the noble gas xenon in an ex vivo model of neurologic DCS. Xenon has been shown to provide neuroprotection in multiple models of acute ischemic insults. Fast decompression compared to slow decompression induced an increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a well-known marker of sub-lethal cell injury. Post-decompression administration of xenon blocked the increase in LDH release induced by fast decompression. These data suggest that xenon could be an efficient additional treatment to HBO for the treatment of neurologic DCS. PMID:26469983

  3. Xenon Blocks Neuronal Injury Associated with Decompression.

    PubMed

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; David, Hélène N; Vallée, Nicolas; Meckler, Cedric; Demaistre, Sebastien; Lambrechts, Kate; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Abraini, Jacques H

    2015-01-01

    Despite state-of-the-art hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment, about 30% of patients suffering neurologic decompression sickness (DCS) exhibit incomplete recovery. Since the mechanisms of neurologic DCS involve ischemic processes which result in excitotoxicity, it is likely that HBO in combination with an anti-excitotoxic treatment would improve the outcome in patients being treated for DCS. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of the noble gas xenon in an ex vivo model of neurologic DCS. Xenon has been shown to provide neuroprotection in multiple models of acute ischemic insults. Fast decompression compared to slow decompression induced an increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a well-known marker of sub-lethal cell injury. Post-decompression administration of xenon blocked the increase in LDH release induced by fast decompression. These data suggest that xenon could be an efficient additional treatment to HBO for the treatment of neurologic DCS. PMID:26469983

  4. Temperature and vibrational distribution function in high-pressure diatomic gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Guofeng; Lempert, Walter R; Adamovich, Igor V; Rich, William J

    2009-03-01

    Temperatures and vibrational populations are investigated experimentally and numerically in a CO-N2-O2 gas mixture. By spatially resolved Raman Q-branch spectra measurement, the strong vibrational excitation was observed in the gas mixtures at a high gas pressure. Numerical calculation, which incorporates both major processes of molecular energy transfer and diffusion of vibrationally excited species across the spatially nonuniform excitation region, provides indepth perception of vibrational kinetics of these diatomic molecular gas mixtures and is verified by the experimental data. The results demonstrate that strong vibrational nonequilibrium for all diatomic species can be sustained by the optical pumping method with a focused CO laser in a relatively cold (300-400 K) molecular gas mixture up to one atmospheric pressure. However, the results also demand further investigations on determining accurate rates of the V-V exchange gas mixture such as for N2-O2.

  5. Pathway to cryogen free production of hyperpolarized Krypton-83 and Xenon-129.

    PubMed

    Six, Joseph S; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Stupic, Karl F; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) (129)Xe and hp (83)Kr for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are typically obtained through spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) in gas mixtures with dilute concentrations of the respective noble gas. The usage of dilute noble gases mixtures requires cryogenic gas separation after SEOP, a step that makes clinical and preclinical applications of hp (129)Xe MRI cumbersome. For hp (83)Kr MRI, cryogenic concentration is not practical due to depolarization that is caused by quadrupolar relaxation in the condensed phase. In this work, the concept of stopped flow SEOP with concentrated noble gas mixtures at low pressures was explored using a laser with 23.3 W of output power and 0.25 nm linewidth. For (129)Xe SEOP without cryogenic separation, the highest obtained MR signal intensity from the hp xenon-nitrogen gas mixture was equivalent to that arising from 15.5±1.9% spin polarized (129)Xe in pure xenon gas. The production rate of the hp gas mixture, measured at 298 K, was 1.8 cm(3)/min. For hp (83)Kr, the equivalent of 4.4±0.5% spin polarization in pure krypton at a production rate of 2 cm(3)/min was produced. The general dependency of spin polarization upon gas pressure obtained in stopped flow SEOP is reported for various noble gas concentrations. Aspects of SEOP specific to the two noble gas isotopes are discussed and compared with current theoretical opinions. A non-linear pressure broadening of the Rb D(1) transition was observed and taken into account for the qualitative description of the SEOP process.

  6. Hyperpolarized xenon magnetic resonance of the lung and the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, Arvind Krishnamachari

    2001-04-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a new diagnostic modality that has been used successfully for lung imaging. Xenon is soluble in blood and inhaled xenon is transported to the brain via circulating blood. Xenon also accumulates in the lipid rich white matter of the brain. Hyperpolarized xenon can hence be used as a tissue- sensitive probe of brain function. The goals of this study were to identify the NMR resonances of xenon in the rat brain and evaluate the role of hyperpolarized xenon for brain MRI. We have developed systems to produce sufficient volumes of hyperpolarized xenon for in vivo brain experiments. The specialized instrumentation developed include an apparatus for optical pump-cell manufacture and high purity gas manifolds for filling cells. A hyperpolarized gas delivery system was designed to ventilate small animals with hyperpolarized xenon for transport to the brain. The T1 of xenon dissolved in blood indicates that the lifetime of xenon in the blood is sufficient for significant magnetization to be transferred to distal tissues. A variety of carrier agents for intravenous delivery of hyperpolarized xenon were tested for transport to distal tissues. Using our new gas delivery system, high SNR 129Xe images of rat lungs were obtained. Spectroscopy with hyperpolarized xenon indicated that xenon was transported from the lungs to the blood and tissues with intact magnetization. After preliminary studies that indicated the feasibility for in vivo rat brain studies, experiments were performed with adult rats and young rats with different stages of white matter development. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments showed the prominence of one peak from xenon in the rat brain, which was assigned to brain lipids. Cerebral brain perfusion was calculated from the wash-out of the hyperpolarized xenon signal in the brain. An increase in brain perfusion during maturation was observed. These experiments showed that hyperpolarized xenon MRI

  7. The Cosmochemistry of Terrestrial Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmour, J. D.; Parai, R.

    2016-08-01

    As an alternative to seeking specific meteoritic xenon signatures in the Earth, we investigate how the processes that relate meteoritic xenon to the solar composition can account for the variation observed among terrestrial xenon signatures.

  8. 10 CFR 503.38 - Permanent exemption for certain fuel mixtures containing natural gas or petroleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... these regulations. (c) Solar mixtures. OFE will grant a permanent mixtures exemption for the use of a mixture of solar energy (including wind, tide, and other intermittent sources) and petroleum or natural gas, where: (1) Solar energy will account for at least 20 percent of the total annual Btu heat...

  9. 10 CFR 503.38 - Permanent exemption for certain fuel mixtures containing natural gas or petroleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... these regulations. (c) Solar mixtures. OFE will grant a permanent mixtures exemption for the use of a mixture of solar energy (including wind, tide, and other intermittent sources) and petroleum or natural gas, where: (1) Solar energy will account for at least 20 percent of the total annual Btu heat...

  10. Simultaneous resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization and electron avalanche ionization in gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2008-07-15

    Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and electron avalanche ionization (EAI) are measured simultaneously in Ar:Xe mixtures at different partial pressures of mixture components. A simple theory for combined REMPI+EAI in gas mixture is developed. It is shown that the REMPI electrons seed the avalanche process, and thus the avalanche process amplifies the REMPI signal. Possible applications are discussed.

  11. Quantitative Fourier transform infrared analysis of gas phase cigarette smoke and other gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Cueto, R.; Church, D.F.; Pryor, W.A. )

    1989-03-01

    A new method for the analysis of selected components in complex gas mixtures has been developed utilizing a relatively inexpensive Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and a continuous flow gas cell. The method was used to monitor nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide concentrations in cigarette smoke with time. Using multivariate least-square regression analysis, it is possible to simultaneously quantitate both NO and NO{sub 2}, even in the presence of overlapping peaks. Using this method, the oxidation of nitric oxide in the presence of isoprene in cigarette smoke and in a model system was followed with time. The method also can be applied to other compounds in smoke or to any other gaseous mixture.

  12. Binary and ternary gas mixtures for use in glow discharge closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, S.R.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1988-04-27

    Highly efficient binary and ternary gas mixtures for use in diffuse glow discharge closing switches are disclosed. The binary mixtures are combinations of helium or neon and selected perfluorides. The ternary mixtures are combinations of helium, neon, or argon, a selected perfluoride, and a small amount of gas that exhibits enhanced ionization characteristics. These mixtures are shown to be the optimum choices for use in diffuse glow discharge closing switches by virtue if the combines physio-electric properties of the mixture components. 9 figs.

  13. Argon-Hydrogen Shielding Gas Mixtures for Activating Flux-Assisted Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Her-Yueh

    2010-11-01

    Using activating flux for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) to improve penetration capability is a well-established technique. Argon is an inert gas and the one most widely used as a shielding gas for GTAW. For the most austenitic stainless steels, pure argon does not provide adequate weld penetration. Argon-hydrogen mixtures give a more even heat input to the workpiece, increasing the arc voltage, which tends to increase the volume of molten material in the weld pool as well as the weld depth-to-width ratio. Great interest has been shown in the interaction between activating flux and the hydrogen concentration in an argon-based shielding gas. In this study, the weld morphology, the arc profile, the retained delta ferrite content, the angular distortion, and the microstructures were examined. The application of an activating flux combining argon and hydrogen for GTAW is important in the industry. The results of this study are presented here.

  14. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, Roger D

    2015-03-31

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  15. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.

    2013-03-12

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  16. Two-dimensional simulation of the development of an inhomogeneous volume discharge in a Ne/Xe/HCl gas mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Bychkov, Yu. I. Yampolskaya, S. A.; Yastremskii, A. G.

    2013-05-15

    The kinetic processes accompanying plasma column formation in an inhomogeneous discharge in a Ne/Xe/HCl gas mixture at a pressure of 4 atm were investigated by using a two-dimensional model. Two cathode spots spaced by 0.7 cm were initiated by distorting the cathode surface at local points, which resulted in an increase in the field strength in the cathode region. Three regimes differing in the charging voltage, electric circuit inductance, and electric field strength at the local cathode points were considered. The spatiotemporal distributions of the discharge current; the electron density; and the densities of excited xenon atoms, HCl(v = 0) molecules in the ground state, and HCl(v > 0) molecules in vibrational levels were calculated. The development of the discharge with increasing the electron density from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} was analyzed, and three characteristic stages in the evolution of the current distribution were demonstrated. The width of the plasma column was found to depend on the energy deposited in the discharge. The width of the plasma column was found to decrease in inverse proportion to the deposited energy due to spatiotemporal variations in the rates of electron production and loss. The calculated dependences of the cross-sectional area of the plasma column on the energy deposited in the discharge agree with the experimental results.

  17. Recovering Residual Xenon Propellant for an Ion Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathi, Gani; Skakkottai, P.; wu, Jiunn Jeng

    2006-01-01

    Future nuclear-powered Ion-Propulsion- System-propelled spacecraft such as Jupiter Icy Moon Orbiter (JIMO) will carry more than 10,000 kg of xenon propellant. Typically, a small percentage of this propellant cannot be used towards the end of the mission because of the pressure drop requirements for maintaining flow. For large missions such as JIMO, this could easily translate to over 250 kg of unusable xenon. A proposed system, the Xenon Recovery System (XRS), for recovering almost all of the xenon remaining in the tank, would include a cryopump in the form of a condenser/evaporator that would be alternatively cooled by a radiator, then heated electrically. When the pressure of the xenon in the tank falls below 0.7 MPa (100 psia), the previously isolated XRS will be brought online and the gas from the tank would enter the cryopump that is initially cooled to a temperature below saturation temperature of xenon. This causes xenon liquefaction and further cryopumping from the tank till the cryopump is full of liquid xenon. At this point, the cryopump is heated electrically by small heaters (70 to 80 W) to evaporate the liquid that is collected as high-pressure gas (<7 MPa; 1,000 psia) in an intermediate accumulator. Check valves between the tank and the XRS prevent the reverse flow of xenon during the heating cycle. The accumulator serves as the high-pressure source of xenon gas to the Xenon Feed System (XFS) downstream of the XRS. This cycle is repeated till almost all the xenon is recovered. Currently, this system is being baselined for JIMO.

  18. Dissipation process of binary gas mixtures in thermally relativistic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, dissipation process of binary gas mixtures in thermally relativistic flows is discussed with focus on characteristics of diffusion flux. As an analytical object, we consider the relativistic rarefied-shock layer around a triangular prism. Numerical results for the diffusion flux are compared with the Navier–Stokes–Fourier (NSF) order approximation of the diffusion flux, which is calculated using the diffusion and thermal-diffusion coefficients by Kox et al (1976 Physica A 84 165–74). In the case of uniform flow with small Lorentz contraction, the diffusion flux, which is obtained by calculating the relativistic Boltzmann equation, is roughly approximated by the NSF order approximation inside the shock wave, whereas the diffusion flux in the vicinity of a wall is markedly different from the NSF order approximation. The magnitude of the diffusion flux, which is obtained by calculating the relativistic Boltzmann equation, is similar to that of the NSF order approximation inside the shock wave, unlike the pressure deviator, dynamic pressure and heat flux, even when the Lorentz contraction in the uniform flow becomes large, because the diffusion flux does not depend on the generic Knudsen number from its definition in Eckart’s frame. Finally, the author concludes that for accuracy diffusion flux must be calculated using the particle four-flow and averaged four velocity, which are formulated using the four velocity defined by each species of hard spherical particles.

  19. Dissipation process of binary gas mixtures in thermally relativistic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, dissipation process of binary gas mixtures in thermally relativistic flows is discussed with focus on characteristics of diffusion flux. As an analytical object, we consider the relativistic rarefied-shock layer around a triangular prism. Numerical results for the diffusion flux are compared with the Navier-Stokes-Fourier (NSF) order approximation of the diffusion flux, which is calculated using the diffusion and thermal-diffusion coefficients by Kox et al (1976 Physica A 84 165-74). In the case of uniform flow with small Lorentz contraction, the diffusion flux, which is obtained by calculating the relativistic Boltzmann equation, is roughly approximated by the NSF order approximation inside the shock wave, whereas the diffusion flux in the vicinity of a wall is markedly different from the NSF order approximation. The magnitude of the diffusion flux, which is obtained by calculating the relativistic Boltzmann equation, is similar to that of the NSF order approximation inside the shock wave, unlike the pressure deviator, dynamic pressure and heat flux, even when the Lorentz contraction in the uniform flow becomes large, because the diffusion flux does not depend on the generic Knudsen number from its definition in Eckart’s frame. Finally, the author concludes that for accuracy diffusion flux must be calculated using the particle four-flow and averaged four velocity, which are formulated using the four velocity defined by each species of hard spherical particles.

  20. Metastable sound speed in gas-liquid mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bursik, J. W.; Hall, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    A new method of calculating speed of sound for two-phase flow is presented. The new equation assumes no phase change during the propagation of an acoustic disturbance and assumes that only the total entropy of the mixture remains constant during the process. The new equation predicts single-phase values for the speed of sound in the limit of all gas or all liquid and agrees with available two-phase, air-water sound speed data. Other expressions used in the two-phase flow literature for calculating two-phase, metastable sound speed are reviewed and discussed. Comparisons are made between the new expression and several of the previous expressions -- most notably a triply isentropic equation as used, a triply isentropic equation as used, among others, by Karplus and by Wallis. Appropriate differences are pointed out and a thermodynamic criterion is derived which must be satisfied in order for the triply isentropic expression to be thermodynamically consistent. This criterion is not satisfied for the cases examined, which included two-phase nitrogen, air-water, two-phase parahydrogen, and steam-water. Consequently, the new equation derived is found to be superior to the other equations reviewed.

  1. Flammability of selected heat resistant alloys in oxygen gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zawierucha, R.; McIlroy, K.; Million, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    Within recent years, the use of oxygen has increased in applications where elevated temperatures and corrosion may be significant factors. In such situations, traditional alloys used in oxygen systems will not be adequate. Where alternative alloys must be utilized, based upon environmental requirements, it is essential that they may be characterized with respect to their ignition and combustion resistance in oxygen. Promoted ignition and promoted ignition-combustion are terms which have been used to describe a situation where a substance with low oxygen supports the combustion of a compatibility ignites and more ignition resistant material. In this paper, data will be presented on the promoted ignition-combustion behavior of selected heat resistant engineering alloys that may be considered for gaseous oxygen applications in severe environments. In this investigation, alloys have been evaluated via both flowing and static (fixed volume) approaches using a rod configuration. Oxygen-nitrogen gas mixtures with compositions ranging from approximately 40 to 99.7% oxygen at pressures of 3.55 to 34.6 MPa were used in the comparative studies.

  2. Response of tomato plants to simulated landfill gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, J.J.; Leone, I.A.; Flower, F.B.

    1985-01-01

    The roots of tomato plants were fumigated with simulated refuse-generated gas mixtures at levels of methane (CH/sub 4/), carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/), and oxygen (O/sub 2/) previously measured in the atmospheres of landfill cover soils associated with poor growth or death of plants. A concentration of 18% CO/sub 2/ or greater, exceeded in almost 30% of thirty-two landfills examined throughout the US, caused reduced growth and visible symptoms on tomato after 1 wk, regardless of O/sub 2/ level. Doubling the CO/sub 2/ level to that encountered in a typical local site (Edgeboro Landfill) resulted in more severe symptom development and the subsequent death of plants. Methane, in concentrations of 20% and above, found in more than 25% of the landfills visited, while not observed to be toxic per se; was associated with drastic O/sub 2/ depletion in the soil atmosphere, which activity was believed to be the cause of the plant decline.

  3. The nonlinear model for emergence of stable conditions in gas mixture in force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalutskov, Oleg; Uvarova, Liudmila

    2016-06-01

    The case of M-component liquid evaporation from the straight cylindrical capillary into N - component gas mixture in presence of external forces was reviewed. It is assumed that the gas mixture is not ideal. The stable states in gas phase can be formed during the evaporation process for the certain model parameter valuesbecause of the mass transfer initial equationsnonlinearity. The critical concentrations of the resulting gas mixture components (the critical component concentrations at which the stable states occur in mixture) were determined mathematically for the case of single-component fluid evaporation into two-component atmosphere. It was concluded that this equilibrium concentration ratio of the mixture components can be achieved by external force influence on the mass transfer processes. It is one of the ways to create sustainable gas clusters that can be used effectively in modern nanotechnology.

  4. Steady-state temperature distribution within a Brayton rotating unit operating in a power conversion system using helium-xenon gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, R. L.; Namkoong, D.; Edkin, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    The Brayton rotating unit (BRU), consisting of a turbine, an alternator, and a compressor, was tested as part of a Brayton cycle power conversion system over a side range of steady state operating conditions. The working fluid in the system was a mixture of helium-xenon gases. Turbine inlet temperature was varied from 1200 to 1600 F, compressor inlet temperature from 60 to 120 F, compressor discharge pressure from 20 to 45 psia, rotative speed from 32 400 to 39 600 rpm, and alternator liquid-coolant flow rate from 0.01 to 0.27 pound per second. Test results indicated that the BRU internal temperatures were highly sensitive to alternator coolant flow below the design value of 0.12 pound per second but much less so at higher values. The armature winding temperature was not influenced significantly by turbine inlet temperature, but was sensitive, up to 20 F per kVA alternator output, to varying alternator output. When only the rotational speed was changed (+ or - 10% of rated value), the BRU internal temperatures varied directly with the speed.

  5. Gas-phase detonation propagation in mixture composition gradients.

    PubMed

    Kessler, D A; Gamezo, V N; Oran, E S

    2012-02-13

    The propagation of detonations through several fuel-air mixtures with spatially varying fuel concentrations is examined numerically. The detonations propagate through two-dimensional channels, inside of which the gradient of mixture composition is oriented normal to the direction of propagation. The simulations are performed using a two-component, single-step reaction model calibrated so that one-dimensional detonation properties of model low- and high-activation-energy mixtures are similar to those observed in a typical hydrocarbon-air mixture. In the low-activation-energy mixture, the reaction zone structure is complex, consisting of curved fuel-lean and fuel-rich detonations near the line of stoichiometry that transition to decoupled shocks and turbulent deflagrations near the channel walls where the mixture is extremely fuel-lean or fuel-rich. Reactants that are not consumed by the leading detonation combine downstream and burn in a diffusion flame. Detonation cells produced by the unstable reaction front vary in size across the channel, growing larger away from the line of stoichiometry. As the size of the channel decreases relative to the size of a detonation cell, the effect of the mixture composition gradient is lessened and cells of similar sizes form. In the high-activation-energy mixture, detonations propagate more slowly as the magnitude of the mixture composition gradient is increased and can be quenched in a large enough gradient. PMID:22213660

  6. 49 CFR 173.305 - Charging of cylinders with a mixture of compressed gas and other material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... nonflammable mixtures. Mixtures containing compressed gas or gases including insecticides, which mixtures are... relief devices of a type examined by the Bureau of Explosives and approved by the Associate...

  7. 49 CFR 173.305 - Charging of cylinders with a mixture of compressed gas and other material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... nonflammable mixtures. Mixtures containing compressed gas or gases including insecticides, which mixtures are... relief devices of a type examined by the Bureau of Explosives and approved by the Associate...

  8. 49 CFR 173.305 - Charging of cylinders with a mixture of compressed gas and other material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... nonflammable mixtures. Mixtures containing compressed gas or gases including insecticides, which mixtures are... relief devices of a type examined by the Bureau of Explosives and approved by the Associate...

  9. 49 CFR 173.305 - Charging of cylinders with a mixture of compressed gas and other material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... nonflammable mixtures. Mixtures containing compressed gas or gases including insecticides, which mixtures are... relief devices of a type examined by the Bureau of Explosives and approved by the Associate...

  10. 49 CFR 173.305 - Charging of cylinders with a mixture of compressed gas and other material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... nonflammable mixtures. Mixtures containing compressed gas or gases including insecticides, which mixtures are... relief devices of a type examined by the Bureau of Explosives and approved by the Associate...

  11. The impact of air-fuel mixture composition on SI engine performance during natural gas and producer gas combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybyła, G.; Postrzednik, S.; Żmudka, Z.

    2016-09-01

    The paper summarizers results of experimental tests of SI engine fuelled with gaseous fuels such as, natural gas and three mixtures of producer gas substitute that simulated real producer gas composition. The engine was operated under full open throttle and charged with different air-fuel mixture composition (changed value of air excess ratio). The spark timing was adjusted to obtain maximum brake torque (MBT) for each fuel and air-fuel mixture. This paper reports engine indicated performance based on in-cylinder, cycle resolved pressure measurements. The engine performance utilizing producer gas in terms of indicated efficiency is increased by about 2 percentage points when compared to fuelling with natural gas. The engine power de-rating when producer gas is utilized instead the natural gas, varies from 24% to 28,6% under stoichiometric combustion conditions. For lean burn (λ=1.5) the difference are lower and varies from 22% to 24.5%.

  12. 30 CFR 75.1106-6 - Exemption of small low pressure gas cylinders containing nonflammable or nonexplosive gas mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemption of small low pressure gas cylinders containing nonflammable or nonexplosive gas mixtures. 75.1106-6 Section 75.1106-6 Mineral Resources MINE... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-6 Exemption of small low pressure gas...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1106-6 - Exemption of small low pressure gas cylinders containing nonflammable or nonexplosive gas mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exemption of small low pressure gas cylinders containing nonflammable or nonexplosive gas mixtures. 75.1106-6 Section 75.1106-6 Mineral Resources MINE... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-6 Exemption of small low pressure gas...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1106-6 - Exemption of small low pressure gas cylinders containing nonflammable or nonexplosive gas mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exemption of small low pressure gas cylinders containing nonflammable or nonexplosive gas mixtures. 75.1106-6 Section 75.1106-6 Mineral Resources MINE... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-6 Exemption of small low pressure gas...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1106-6 - Exemption of small low pressure gas cylinders containing nonflammable or nonexplosive gas mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exemption of small low pressure gas cylinders containing nonflammable or nonexplosive gas mixtures. 75.1106-6 Section 75.1106-6 Mineral Resources MINE... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-6 Exemption of small low pressure gas...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1106-6 - Exemption of small low pressure gas cylinders containing nonflammable or nonexplosive gas mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exemption of small low pressure gas cylinders containing nonflammable or nonexplosive gas mixtures. 75.1106-6 Section 75.1106-6 Mineral Resources MINE... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-6 Exemption of small low pressure gas...

  17. Falling microbead counter-flow process for separating gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hornbostel, Marc D.; Krishnan, Gopala N.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2015-07-07

    A method and reactor for removing a component from a gas stream is provided. In one embodiment, the method includes providing the gas stream containing the component that is to be removed and adsorbing the component out of the gas stream as the gas stream rises via microbeads of a sorbent falling down an adsorber section of a reactor.

  18. Falling microbead counter-flow process for separating gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hornbostel, Marc D.; Krishnan, Gopala N.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2015-10-27

    A method and reactor for removing a component from a gas stream is provided. In one embodiment, the method includes providing the gas stream containing the component that is to be removed and adsorbing the component out of the gas stream as the gas stream rises via microbeads of a sorbent falling down an adsorber section of a reactor.

  19. Calculation of the relative speed of sound in a gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, M J; Maitland, G

    1975-12-01

    Since the frequency spectrum of a voice signal is directly dependent on the velocity of sound, studies of speech spectra include the problem of calculating the speed of sound in the gas mixture being used. A computer program written in BASIC has been developed to calculate the speed of sound relative to air in various diving gas mixtures. In addition, a set of tables available as a separate technical report has been generated using this program. These tables are designed to provide a standard reference for reporting spectral shifts in speech due to different gas mixtures under normal diving conditions. PMID:1226588

  20. Process for the separation of components from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Merriman, J.R.; Pashley, J.H.; Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.

    1973-10-01

    A process for the removal, from gaseous mixtures of a desired component selected from oxygen, iodine, methyl iodide, and lower oxides of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur is described. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a liquid fluorocarbon in an absorption zone maintained at superatmospheric pressure to preferentially absorb the desired component in the fluorocarbon. Unabsorbed constituents of the gaseous mixture are withdrawn from the absorption zone. Liquid fluorocarbon enriched in the desired component is withdrawn separately from the zone, following which the desired component is recovered from the fluorocarbon absorbent. (Official Gazette)

  1. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  2. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC RETENTION PARAMETERS DATABASE FOR REFRIGERANT MIXTURE COMPOSITION MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Composition management of mixed refrigerant systems is a challenging problem in the laboratory, manufacturing facilities, and large refrigeration machinery. Ths issue of composition management is especially critical for the maintenance of machinery that utilizes zeotropic mixture...

  3. Effect of noble gas mixtures on the performance of regenerative-type cryocoolers analytical estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daney, D. E.

    1990-09-01

    The performance of regenerators that use noble gas mixtures is compared to the performance of those that use pure helium gas. Both helium-argon and helium-krypton mixtures are investigated. For some heat transfer surfaces, a modest gain in heat transfer can be achieved with these mixtures. The concomitant increase in pressure drop, however, more than offsets the heat transfer gain so the net regenerator loss increases for all evaluated cases. The dependence of heat transfer on Prandtl number (Pr) was not measured for the range associated with noble gas mixtures, 0.2 less than Pr less than 0.5, and it is estimated that the uncertainty from the source can exceed 20 percent. The estimates for the transport properties (Prandtl number, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) of helium-argon and helium-krypton mixtures because of the absence of experimental data at low temperature are given.

  4. Ion mobilities in Xe/Ne and other rare-gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Piscitelli, D; Phelps, A V; de Urquijo, J; Basurto, E; Pitchford, L C

    2003-10-01

    The ion mobility or drift velocity data important for modeling glow discharges in rare gas mixtures are not generally available, nor are the ion-neutral scattering cross sections needed to calculate these data. In this paper we propose a set of cross sections for Xe+ and Ne+ collisions with Xe and Ne atoms. Ion mobilities at 300 K calculated using this cross section set in a Monte Carlo simulation are reported for reduced field strengths, E/N, up to 1500 x 10(-21) V m(2), in pure gases and in Xe/Ne mixtures containing 5% and 20% Xe/Ne, which are mixtures of interest for plasma display panels (PDPs). The calculated Xe+ mobilities depend strongly on the mixture composition, but the Ne+ mobility varies only slightly with increasing Xe in the mixture over the range studied here. The mobilities in pure gases compare well with available experimental values, and mobilities in gas mixtures at low E/N compare well with our recent measurements which will be published separately. Results from these calculations of ion mobilities are used to evaluate the predictions of Blanc's law and of the mixture rule proposed by Mason and Hahn [Phys. Rev. A 5, 438 (1972)] for determining the ion mobilities in mixtures from a knowledge of the mobilities in each of the pure gases. The mixture rule of Mason and Hahn is accurate to better than 10% at high field strengths over a wide range of conditions of interest for modeling PDPs. We conclude that a good estimate of ion mobilities at high E/N in Xe/Ne and other binary rare gas mixtures can be obtained using this mixture rule combined with known values of mobilities in parent gases and with the Langevin form for mobility of rare gas ions ion in other gases. This conclusion is supported by results in Ar/Ne mixtures which are also presented here.

  5. Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Basel, Richard A.

    1996-01-01

    A gas sensor measures O.sub.2 content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system.

  6. Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, R.J.; Basel, R.A.

    1996-03-12

    A gas sensor measures O{sub 2} content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons, H{sub 2}O and/or CO{sub 2}, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system. 4 figs.

  7. 10 CFR 503.38 - Permanent exemption for certain fuel mixtures containing natural gas or petroleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... mixture of solar energy (including wind, tide, and other intermittent sources) and petroleum or natural gas, where: (1) Solar energy will account for at least 20 percent of the total annual Btu heat input... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permanent exemption for certain fuel mixtures...

  8. 10 CFR 503.38 - Permanent exemption for certain fuel mixtures containing natural gas or petroleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... mixture of solar energy (including wind, tide, and other intermittent sources) and petroleum or natural gas, where: (1) Solar energy will account for at least 20 percent of the total annual Btu heat input... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permanent exemption for certain fuel mixtures...

  9. 10 CFR 503.38 - Permanent exemption for certain fuel mixtures containing natural gas or petroleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... mixture of solar energy (including wind, tide, and other intermittent sources) and petroleum or natural gas, where: (1) Solar energy will account for at least 20 percent of the total annual Btu heat input... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permanent exemption for certain fuel mixtures...

  10. Gas gain limitation in low pressure proportional counters filled with TEG mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, T. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Proportional counters filled with tissue equivalent gas mixtures (TEPC) can be used to simulate interactions and energy transferred to small tissue volumes. One criteria which allows to use TEPC as the dose meter is that the particle ranges are larger compared to the gas volume. TEPC achieve this by operating at low gas pressures. Single ionization events dominate the distribution of low-LET radiation at low gas pressure and therefore their detection is of primary importance, a high gas gain is necessary. Therefore gas gain factor has been measured for Methane- and Propane-based tissue equivalent gas mixtures. The highest stable gas gains, second ionization Townsend coefficient and electron avalanche dimensions have been determined.

  11. Thermal neutrons registration by xenon gamma-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shustov, A. E.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Dukhvalov, A. G.; Krivova, K. V.; Novikov, A. S.; Petrenko, D. V.; Vlasik, K. F.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.

    2016-02-01

    Experimental results of thermal neutrons detection by high pressure xenon gamma- ray spectrometers are presented. The study was performed with two devices with sensitive volumes of 0.2 and 2 litters filled with compressed mixture of xenon and hydrogen without neutron-capture additives. Spectra from Pu-Be neutron source were acquired using both detectors. Count rates of the most intensive prompt neutron-capture gamma-ray lines of xenon isotopes were calculated in order to estimate thermal neutrons efficiency registration for each spectrometer.

  12. Grad's moment method for relativistic gas mixtures of Maxwellian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Gilberto M.; Marques, Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures of relativistic gases are analyzed within the framework of Boltzmann equation by using Grad's moment method. A relativistic mixture of r constituent is characterized by the moments of the distribution function: particle four-flows, energy-momentum tensors, and third-order moment tensors. By using Eckart's decomposition and introducing 13r + 1 scalar fields - related with the four-velocity, temperature of the mixture, particle number densities, diffusion fluxes, non-equilibrium pressures, heat fluxes, and pressure deviator tensors - Grad's distribution functions are obtained. Grad's distribution functions are used to determine the third-order tensors and their production terms for mixtures whose constituent's rest masses are not too disparate, so that it follows a system of 13r + 1 scalar field equations. By restricting to a binary mixture characterized by the six fields of partial particle number densities, four-velocity and temperature, the remainder 21 scalar equations are used to determine the constitutive equations for the non-equilibrium pressures, diffusion fluxes, pressure deviator tensors, and heat fluxes. Hence the Navier-Stokes and generalized Fourier and Fick laws are obtained and the transport coefficients of bulk and shear viscosities, thermal conductivity, diffusion, thermal-diffusion, and diffusion-thermal are determined. Analytic expressions for the transport coefficients in the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic limiting cases are given. Furthermore, solutions of the relativistic field equations for the binary mixture are obtained in form of forced and free waves. In the low frequency limiting case the phase velocity and the attenuation coefficient are determined for forced waves. In the small wavenumber limiting case it is shown that there exist four longitudinal eigenmodes, two of them corresponding to propagating sound modes and two associated with non-propagating diffusive modes.

  13. HXeOBr in a xenon matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Khriachtchev, Leonid; Tapio, Salla; Domanskaya, Alexandra V.; Raesaenen, Markku; Isokoski, Karoliina; Lundell, Jan

    2011-03-28

    We report on a new noble-gas molecule HXeOBr prepared in a low-temperature xenon matrix from the HBr and N{sub 2}O precursors by UV photolysis and thermal annealing. This molecule is assigned with the help of deuteration experiments and ab initio calculations including anharmonic methods. The H-Xe stretching frequency of HXeOBr is observed at 1634 cm{sup -1}, which is larger by 56 cm{sup -1} than the frequency of HXeOH identified previously. The experiments show a higher thermal stability of HXeOBr molecules in a xenon matrix compared to HXeOH.

  14. Measurements of laminar burning velocities for natural gas-hydrogen-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zuohua; Zhang, Yong; Zeng, Ke; Liu, Bing; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Deming

    2006-07-15

    Laminar flame characteristics of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames were studied in a constant-volume bomb at normal temperature and pressure. Laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths were obtained at various ratios of hydrogen to natural gas (volume fraction from 0 to 100%) and equivalence ratios (f from 0.6 to 1.4). The influence of stretch rate on flame was also analyzed. The results show that, for lean mixture combustion, the flame radius increases with time but the increasing rate decreases with flame expansion for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, while at high hydrogen fractions, there exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time. For rich mixture combustion, the flame radius shows a slowly increasing rate at early stages of flame propagation and a quickly increasing rate at late stages of flame propagation for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, and there also exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time for mixtures with high hydrogen fractions. Combustion at stoichiometric mixture demonstrates the linear relationship between flame radius and time for natural gas-air, hydrogen-air, and natural gas-hydrogen-air flames. Laminar burning velocities increase exponentially with the increase of hydrogen fraction in mixtures, while the Markstein length decreases and flame instability increases with the increase of hydrogen fractions in mixture. For a fixed hydrogen fraction, the Markstein number shows an increase and flame stability increases with the increase of equivalence ratios. Based on the experimental data, a formula for calculating the laminar burning velocities of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames is proposed. (author)

  15. Electron temperature and density measurement of tungsten inert gas arcs with Ar-He shielding gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn-Kauffeldt, M.; Marques, J.-L.; Forster, G.; Schein, J.

    2013-10-01

    The diagnostics of atmospheric welding plasma is a well-established technology. In most cases the measurements are limited to processes using pure shielding gas. However in many applications shielding gas is a mixture of various components including metal vapor in gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Shielding gas mixtures are intentionally used for tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding in order to improve the welding performance. For example adding Helium to Argon shielding gas allows the weld geometry and porosity to be influenced. Yet thermal plasmas produced with gas mixtures or metal vapor still require further experimental investigation. In this work coherent Thomson scattering is used to measure electron temperature and density in these plasmas, since this technique allows independent measurements of electron and ion temperature. Here thermal plasmas generated by a TIG process with 50% Argon and 50% Helium shielding gas mixture have been investigated. Electron temperature and density measured by coherent Thomson scattering have been compared to the results of spectroscopic measurements of the plasma density using Stark broadening of the 696.5 nm Argon spectral line. Further investigations of MIG processes using Thomson scattering technique are planned.

  16. Emission spectroscopic study on gas-gas interactions in glow discharge plasmas using several binary gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2010-01-01

    Emission spectra of constituent gas species from glow discharge plasmas using argon-helium, krypton-helium, argon-krypton, and krypton-argon gas mixtures were analyzed to elucidate collisional energy transfer between these gas species occurring in the plasma. In the argon-helium mixed gas plasma, the enhancement or quenching of particular Ar II lines was observed when helium was added to an argon-matrix glow discharge plasma, meaning that a redistribution in the population among the excited levels could be induced through argon-helium collisions. On the other hand, the krypton-helium plasma showed little change in the emission intensities of Kr II lines when helium was added to a krypton-matrix glow discharge plasma, meaning that energy exchanges between krypton and helium excited species occur inactively. These phenomena are principally because the excitation energy as well as the spin multiplicity between collision partners follow both the energy resonance conditions and the spin conservation rule in collisions of the second kind in the argon-helium system, but not in the krypton-helium system. In the argon-krypton and krypton-argon mixed gas plasmas, significant intensity changes of particular Ar II or Kr II lines could not be found; therefore, there were no dominant channels for energy exchanges between argon and krypton species in the mixed gas plasmas.

  17. Environmental Applications of Stable Xenon and Radioxenon Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Dresel, P. Evan; Olsen, Khris B.; Hayes, James C.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Waichler, Scott R.; Kennedy, B. M.

    2008-06-01

    Improved detection capabilities are needed at several Department of Energy sites to make remedial decisions about facilities and landfill cleanup. For facility monitoring air samples can be collected from within a facility and analyzed for short lived radioxenons to estimate inventories of residual plutonium holdup within the facility. For landfill cleanup activities soil gas sampling for xenon isotopes can be used to define the locations of spent fuel and transuranic wastes. Short-lived radioxenon isotopes are continuously produced by spontaneous fission of plutonium-240 in transuranic wastes. Large volume soil-gas samples provide extremely sensitive measurement of radioxenon in the subsurface; a characteristic of transuranic waste. The analysis employs a modified Automated Radioxenon Sampling and Analysis (ARSA) system. Proof of principle measurements at a Hanford Site liquid waste disposal site showed xenon-133 at levels in soil gas are approximately 16,000 times the detection limit and lower levels of xenon-135 from the spontaneous fission of plutonium-240 were also measured. Stable xenon isotopes are also produced by spontaneous fission but are subject to background concentrations in ambient air samples (facilities) but less so in soil gas where free exchange with ambient air is restricted. Rare gas mass spectrometry is used for highly precise stable xenon isotopic measurements. Stable xenon isotopic ratios from fission are distinct from natural xenon background ratios. Neutron capture on xenon-135 produces an excess of xenon-136 above fission ratios and thus provides a means of distinguishing reactor sources (e.g. spent fuel) from separated transuranic materials (plutonium).

  18. Prediction of acute toxicity of chemicals in mixtures: worms Tubifex tubifex and gas/liquid distribution.

    PubMed

    Tichý, M; Borek-Dohalský, V; Matousová, D; Rucki, M; Feltl, L; Roth, Z

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this contribution is to support our proposal of the procedure for predicting acute toxicity of binary mixtures by QSAR analysis techniques. The changes of a mixture composition are described by molar ratio R and visualized in the R-plot (QCAR--quantitative composition-activity relationships). The approach was inspired by Rault and Dalton's laws, their positive and negative deviations in the behavior of a mixture of real gases, by Loewe and Muischnek isoboles and by the Finney test of additivity. Acute toxicity was determined by the laboratory test with woms Tubifex tubifex. The additivity of the acute toxicity in the binary mixture benzene + nitrobenzene was confirmed and a new interaction is described: "mixed interaction" with the binary mixture aniline + ethanol. The "mixed interaction" means that depending on mixture composition, both potentiation and inhibition can occur. As the first physicochemical descriptor of the changes caused by the changing composition of binary mixtures, the gas/liquid equilibrium was studied and a composition of the gaseous phase was determined by a gas chromatographic method. The method for determination of concentrations in the gaseous phase was described. The gaseous phase composition of benzene + nitrobenzene. benzene + ethanol, benzene + aniline and ethanol + aniline mixtures was analyzed. It was found that if the concentrations of the mixture's components in the gaseous phase behave nonideally (they are not additive), the acute toxicity of the same mixture is not additive as well. Another descriptor to distinguish between potentiation and inhibition will be, however, necessary. The properties, both gaseous phase composition and the acute toxicity, of the benzene + nitrobenzene mixture are additive. In mixtures with the mixed interaction, the R-plot of the composition of the gaseous phase is complex with a large variation of results.

  19. Scalability study of solid xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, J.; Cease, H.; Jaskierny, W. F.; Markley, D.; Pahlka, R. B.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Saab, T.; Filipenko, M.

    2015-04-01

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employed a cryostat cooled by liquid nitrogen combined with a xenon purification and chiller system. A modified {\\it Bridgeman's technique} reproduces a large scale optically transparent solid xenon.

  20. Scalability study of solid xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, J.; Cease, H.; Jaskierny, W. F.; Markley, D.; Pahlka, R. B.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Saab, T.; Filipenko, M.

    2015-04-01

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employed a cryostat cooled by liquid nitrogen combined with a xenon purification and chiller system. A modified Bridgeman's technique reproduces a large scale optically transparent solid xenon.

  1. Rayleigh-Brillouin Scattering in Binary-Gas Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gu, Z; Ubachs, W; Marques, W; van de Water, W

    2015-06-19

    Precise measurements are performed on spectral line shapes of spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering in mixtures of the noble gases Ar and Kr, with He. Admixture of a light He atomic fraction results in marked changes of the spectra, although in all experiments He is merely a spectator atom: it affects the relaxation of density fluctuations of the heavy constituent, but its contribution to the scattered light intensity is negligibly small. The results are compared to a theory for the spectral line shape without adjustable parameters, yielding excellent agreement for the case of binary monatomic gases, signifying a step towards modeling and understanding of light scattering in more complex molecular media. PMID:26196978

  2. Ion swarm data for electrical discharge modeling in air and flue gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, D.; Benhenni, M.; Eichwald, O.; Yousfi, M.

    2003-07-01

    The first step of this work is the determination of the elastic and inelastic ion-molecule collision cross sections for the main ions (N2+, O2+, CO2+, H2O+ and O-) usually present either in the air or flue gas discharges. The obtained cross section sets, given for ion kinetic energies not exceeding 100 eV, correspond to the interactions of each ion with its parent molecule (symmetric case) or nonparent molecule (asymmetric case). Then by using these different cross section sets, it is possible to obtain the ion swarm data for the different gas mixtures involving N2, CO2, H2O and O2 molecules whatever their relative proportions. These ion swarm data are obtained from an optimized Monte Carlo method well adapted for the ion transport in gas mixtures. This also allows us to clearly show that the classical linear approximations usually applied for the ion swarm data in mixtures such as Blanc's law are far to be valid. Then, the ion swarm data are given in three cases of gas mixtures: a dry air (80% N2, 20% O2), a ternary gas mixture (82% N2, 12% CO2, 6% O2) and a typical flue gas (76% N2, 12% CO2, 6% O2, 6% H2O). From these reliable ion swarm data, electrical discharge modeling for a wire to plane electrode configuration has been carried out in these three mixtures at the atmospheric pressure for different applied voltages. Under the same discharge conditions, large discrepancies in the streamer formation and propagation have been observed in these three mixture cases. They are due to the deviations existing not only between the different effective electron-molecule ionization rates but also between the ion transport properties mainly because of the presence of a highly polar molecule such as H2O. This emphasizes the necessity to properly consider the ion transport in the discharge modeling.

  3. Some possibilities of using gas mixtures other than air in aerodynamic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Dean R

    1956-01-01

    A study is made of the advantages that can be realized in compressible-flow research by employing a substitute heavy gas in place of air. The present report is based on the idea that by properly mixing a heavy monatomic gas with a suitable heavy polyatomic gas, it is possible to obtain a heavy gas mixture which has the correct ratio of specific heats and which is nontoxic, nonflammable, thermally stable, chemically inert, and comprised of commercially available components. Calculations were made of wind-tunnel characteristics for 63 gas pairs comprising 21 different polyatomic gases properly mixed with each of three monatomic gases (argon, krypton, and zenon).

  4. Proton irradiation of simple gas mixtures: Influence of irradiation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, Norbert J.; Schuster, R.; Hofmann, A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to get information about the influence of irradiation parameters on radiolysis processes of astrophysical interest, methane gas targets were irradiated with 6.5 MeV protons at a pressure of 1 bar and room temperature. Yields of higher hydrocarbons like ethane or propane were found by analysis of irradiated gas samples using gas chromatography. The handling of the proton beam was of great experimental importance for determining the irradiation parameters. In a series of experiments current density of the proton beam and total absorbed energy were shown to have a large influence on the yields of produced hydrocarbons. Mechanistic interpretations of the results are given and conclusions are drawn with regard to the chemistry and the simulation of various astrophysical systems.

  5. Influence of the gas mixture temperature on the efficiency of synthesis gas production from ethanol in a nonequilibrium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsymbalyuk, A. N.; Levko, D. S.; Chernyak, V. Ya.; Martysh, E. V.; Nedybalyuk, O. A.; Solomenko, E. V.

    2013-08-01

    The mechanism behind the plasma conversion of a mixture of ethanol vapor, water vapor, air, and carbon dioxide CO2 in the nonequilibrium plasma of a tornado discharge is studied. The influence of the CO2 flow rate, the current through the discharge, and the gas temperature in the discharge on the concentrations of molecular hydrogen and carbon monoxide CO is studied. Comparison between the concentrations of the gaseous mixture's main components at the output from the reactor obtained experimentally and by numerical simulation shows that the adopted kinetic mechanism adequately describes the plasma kinetics in the mixture.

  6. Measurement of nitrogen content in a gas mixture by transforming the nitrogen into a substance detectable with nondispersive infrared detection

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Thomas E.; Miller, Michael A.

    2007-03-13

    A method of determining the amount of nitrogen in a gas mixture. The constituent gases of the mixture are dissociated and transformed to create a substance that may measured using nondispersive infrared adsorption techniques.

  7. Measurement of nitrogen content in a gas mixture by transforming the nitrogen into a substance detectable with nondispersive infrared detection

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Thomas E.; Miller, Michael A.

    2010-08-24

    A method of determining the amount of nitrogen in a gas mixture. The constituent gases of the mixture are dissociated and transformed to create a substance that may measured using nondispersive infrared adsorption techniques.

  8. Inflammable gas mixture detection with a single catalytic sensor based on the electric field effect.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ziyuan; Tong, Min-Ming; Meng, Wen; Li, Meng

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a new way to analyze mixtures of inflammable gases with a single catalytic sensor. The analysis technology was based on a new finding that an electric field on the catalytic sensor can change the output sensitivity of the sensor. The analysis of mixed inflammable gases results from processing the output signals obtained by adjusting the electric field parameter of the catalytic sensor. For the signal process, we designed a group of equations based on the heat balance of catalytic sensor expressing the relationship between the output signals and the concentration of gases. With these equations and the outputs of different electric fields, the gas concentration in a mixture could be calculated. In experiments, a mixture of methane, butane and ethane was analyzed by this new method, and the results showed that the concentration of each gas in the mixture could be detected with a single catalytic sensor, and the maximum relative error was less than 5%. PMID:24717635

  9. Microwave-assisted generation of standard gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guohua; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2002-05-15

    Microwave heating was employed for preparation of the standard gas of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semivolatile organic compounds (semi-VOCs) by using a 1000 W commercial domestic microwave oven and 1 L gas-sampling bulbs. The VOCs investigated were benzene, chloroform, 1,3-dichlorobenzene, tetrachloroethylene, toluene, and 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and the semi-VOCs used were the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) PCB 1016 and PCB 1248. Since these weakly or nonpolar molecules are very poor absorbers of microwave energy, an appropriate amount of water was introduced to accept microwave radiation and act as the thermal source to accelerate their evaporation. The glass bulb may also contribute thermal energy to the VOCs/semi-VOCs by accepting microwave energy to a small degree. For 0.5 microL of liquid VOCs on 10 mg of glass wool, it was shown that 15 microL of H2O and 60 s of microwave heating yielded a very efficient evaporation [97.2-106.4%, compared with a classic method (Muller, L; Gorecki, T.; Pawliszyn, J. Fresenius' J. Anal. Chem. 1999, 364, 610-616)]. For 1 microL of PCB solution (1000 microg/mL in hexane), 15 microL of H2O and 90 s of microwave heating also provided a complete evaporation. The addition of water was particularly significant for microwave-assisted evaporation of PCBs because semi-VOCs are much more difficult to evaporate than VOCs. This developed microwave technique proved to be quite simple, powerful, rapid, accurate, and safe for the preparation of VOC/semi-VOC standard gas. Solid- phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography was used for the gas analysis.

  10. Operation of static and flowing Cs DPAL with different buffer gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knize, R. J.; Zhdanov, B. V.; Rotondaro, M. T.; Shaffer, M. K.

    2016-03-01

    Cs DPAL operation using Ethane, Methane and mixtures of these hydrocarbons with noble gases He and Ar as a buffer gases for spin-orbit relaxation was studied in this work. The best Cs DPAL performance in continuous wave operation with flowing gain medium was achieved using pure Methane, pure Ethane or a mixture of Ethane (minimum of 200 Torr) and He with a total buffer gas pressure of 300 torr.

  11. Weak discontinuity waves in a relativistic mixture of two stiffened gas components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conforto, F.; Giambò, S.

    2010-11-01

    A simple interface-capturing approach is developed in order to deduce the relativistic fluid equations for a two-component mixture, using a stiffened gas equation of state. The two species are assumed to be at thermal equilibrium and the total pressure of the mixture is expressed in terms of the pressures of the two components by Dalton's law. Moreover, weak discontinuity waves compatible with such a fluid are examined.

  12. Sub-shock formation in Grad 10-moment equations for a binary gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, Marzia; Conforto, Fiammetta; Martalò, Giorgio

    2016-09-01

    The shock structure problem for Grad 10-moment equations for an inert binary mixture is investigated: necessary conditions for the formation of sub-shocks in fields of only one gas or of both components are rigorously obtained, and a detailed comparison with the shock-wave structure of its principal sub-system (deduced assuming vanishing viscous stress tensors) and of the equilibrium Euler sub-system is performed. Some numerical simulations for a mixture of argon and helium are presented.

  13. An homeopathic cure to pure Xenon large diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, C. D. R.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gonzalez-Diaz, D.; Monrabal, F.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Dos Santos, J. M. F.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.

    2016-02-01

    The NEXT neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ0ν) experiment will use a high-pressure gas electroluminescence-based TPC to search for the decay of Xe-136. One of the main advantages of this technology is the possibility to reconstruct the topology of events with energies close to Qββ. The rejection potential associated to the topology reconstruction is limited by our capacity to properly reconstruct the original path of the electrons in the gas. This reconstruction is limited by different factors that include the geometry of the detector, the density of the sensors in the tracking plane and the separation among them, etc. Ultimately, the resolution is limited by the physics of electron diffusion in the gas. In this paper we present a series of molecular additives that can be used in Xenon gas at very low partial pressure to reduce both longitudinal and transverse diffusion. We will show the results of different Monte-Carlo simulations of electron transport in the gas mixtures from wich we have extracted the value of some important parameters like diffusion, drift velocity and light yields. These results show that there is a series of candidates that can reduce diffusion without affecting the energy resolution of the detector and they should be studied experimentally. A comparison with preliminary results from such an ongoing experimental effort is given.

  14. Numerical simulation of the passive gas mixture flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyncl, Martin; Pelant, Jaroslav

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is the numerical solution of the equations describing the non-stationary compressible turbulent multicomponent flow in gravitational field. The mixture of perfect inert gases is assumed. We work with the RANS equations equipped with the k-omega and the EARSM turbulence models. For the simulation of the wall roughness we use the modification of the specific turbulent dissipation. The finite volume method is used, with thermodynamic constants being functions in time and space. In order to compute the fluxes through the boundary faces we use the modification of the Riemann solver, which is the original result. We present the computational results, computed with the own-developed code (C, FORTRAN, multiprocessor, unstructured meshes in general).

  15. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Concentric Annular Flows of Binary Inert Gas Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, R. S.; Martin, J. J.; Yocum, D. J.; Stewart, E. T.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of heat transfer and pressure drop of binary inert gas mixtures flowing through smooth concentric circular annuli, tubes with fully developed velocity profiles, and constant heating rate are described. There is a general lack of agreement among the constant property heat transfer correlations for such mixtures. No inert gas mixture data exist for annular channels. The intent of this study was to develop highly accurate and benchmarked pressure drop and heat transfer correlations that can be used to size heat exchangers and cores for direct gas Brayton nuclear power plants. The inside surface of the annular channel is heated while the outer surface of the channel is insulated. Annulus ratios range 0.5 < r* < 0.83. These smooth tube data may serve as a reference to the heat transfer and pressure drop performance in annuli, tubes, and channels having helixes or spacer ribs, or other surfaces.

  16. Two-phase turbine engines. [using gas-liquid mixture accelerated in nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.; Hays, L. G.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of a two-phase turbine which utilizes a uniform mixture of gas and liquid accelerated in nozzles of the types reported by Elliott and Weinberg (1968). The mixture acts directly on an axial flow or tangential impulse turbine or is separated into gas and liquid streams which operate separately on a gas turbine and a hydraulic turbine. The basic two-phase cycles are examined, taking into account working fluids, aspects of nozzle expansion, details of turbine cycle operation, and the effect of mixture ratio variation. Attention is also given to two-phase nozzle efficiency, two-phase turbine operating characteristics and efficiencies, separator turbines, and impulse turbine experiments.

  17. Requirements for Xenon International

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Harper, Warren W.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Humble, Paul H.; Madison, Jill C.; Morris, Scott J.; Panisko, Mark E.; Ripplinger, Mike D.; Stewart, Timothy L.

    2015-12-30

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  18. Requirements for Xenon International

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

    2013-09-26

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  19. CO2 + N2O mixture gas hydrate formation kinetics and effect of soil minerals on mixture-gas hydrate formation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkh-Amgalan, T.; Kyung, D.; Lee, W.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 mitigation is one of the most pressing global scientific topics in last 30 years. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of the main greenhouse gases (GHGs) defined by the Kyoto Protocol and its global warming potential (GWP) of one metric ton is equivalent to 310 metric tons of CO2. They have similar physical and chemical properties and therefore, mixture-gas (50% CO2 + 50% N2O) hydrate formation process was studied experimentally and computationally. There were no significant research to reduce N20 gas and we tried to make hydrate to mitigate N20 and CO2 in same time. Mixture gas hydrate formation periods were approximately two times faster than pure N2O hydrate formation kinetic in general. The fastest induction time of mixture-gas hydrate formation observed in Illite and Quartz among various soil mineral suspensions. It was also observed that hydrate formation kinetic was faster with clay mineral suspensions such as Nontronite, Sphalerite and Montmorillonite. Temperature and pressure change were not significant on hydrate formation kinetic; however, induction time can be significantly affected by various chemical species forming under the different suspension pHs. The distribution of chemical species in each mineral suspension was estimated by a chemical equilibrium model, PHREEQC, and used for the identification of hydrate formation characteristics in the suspensions. With the experimental limitations, a study on the molecular scale modeling has a great importance for the prediction of phase behavior of the gas hydrates. We have also performed molecular dynamics computer simulations on N2O and CO2 hydrate structures to estimate the residual free energy of two-phase (hydrate cage and guest molecule) at three different temperature ranges of 260K, 273K, and 280K. The calculation result implies that N2O hydrates are thermodynamically stable at real-world gas hydrate existing condition within given temperature and pressure. This phenomenon proves that mixture-gas could be

  20. Ionization efficiency studies for xenon ions with thesuperconducting ECR ion source VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Daniela; Lyneis, Claude M.; Todd, DamonS.; Tarvainen,Olli

    2007-06-05

    Ionization efficiency studies for high charge state xenon ions using a calibrated gas leak are presented. A 75% enriched {sup 129}Xe gas leak with a gas flow equivalent to 5.11p{mu}A was used in all the measurements. The experiments were performed at the VENUS (Versatile ECR ion source for Nuclear Science) ion source for 18 GHz, 28 GHz and double frequency operation. Overall, total ionization efficiencies close to 100% and ionization efficiencies into a single charge state up to 22% were measured. The influence of the biased disk on the ionization efficiency was studied and the results were somewhat surprising. When the biased disk was removed from the plasma chamber, the ionization efficiency was dramatically reduced for single frequency operation. However, using double frequency heating the ionization efficiencies achieved without the biased disk almost matched the ionization efficiencies achieved with the biased probe. In addition, we have studied the influence of the support gas on the charge state distribution of the xenon ions. Either pure oxygen or a mixture of oxygen and helium were used as support gases. The addition of a small amount of helium can increase the ionization efficiency into a single charge state by narrowing the charge state distribution. Furthermore by varying the helium flow the most efficient charge state can be shifted over a wide range without compromising the ionization efficiency. This is not possible using only oxygen as support gas. Results from these studies are presented and discussed.

  1. Shock wave processes in collisional gas particle mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmel, T. A.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Structures and propagation of shock waves in high density particle suspensions in gas are investigated theoretically and numerically. A physical and mathematical model which takes into account integral collisions between the particles on the basis of molecular-kinetic approaches of theory of granular materials is applied. The possibility of different types of shock waves, including double front structures is revealed. The role of particle collisions in the dynamics of particle dense layer expansion under an influence of divergent shock wave and in processes of shock wave diffraction past a backward-facing step is analyzed.

  2. Modeling of the gas-phase chemistry in C-H-O gas mixtures for diamond chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petherbridge, James R.; May, Paul W.; Ashfold, Michael N. R.

    2001-05-01

    The boundaries of the diamond deposition region in the C-H-O (Bachmann) atomic phase composition diagram have been reproduced successfully for 38 different C, H, and O containing gas mixtures using the CHEMKIN computer package, together with just two criteria—a minimum mole fraction of methyl radicals [CH3] and a limiting value of the [H]/[C2H2] ratio. The diamond growth/no-growth boundary coincides with the line along which the input mole fractions of C and O are equal. For every gas mixture studied, no-growth regions are found to coincide with a negligible (<10-10) mole fraction of CH3 radicals, while for gas mixtures lying within the diamond growth region the CH3 mole fraction is ˜10-7. Each no-growth→diamond growth boundary is seen to be accompanied by a 2-3 order of magnitude step in CH3 mole fraction. The boundary between diamond and nondiamond growth is less clearly defined, but can be reproduced by assuming a critical, temperature dependent [H]/[C2H2] ratio (0.2, in the case that Tgas=2000 K) that reflects the crucial role of H atoms in the etching of nondiamond phases. The analysis allows prediction of the composition process window for good quality diamond growth for all stable input gas mixtures considered in this study.

  3. Variable-temperature cryogenic trap for the separation of gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a continuous variable-temperature U-shaped cold trap which can both purify vacuum-line combustion products for subsequent stable isotopic analysis and isolate the methane and ethane constituents of natural gases. The canister containing the trap is submerged in liquid nitrogen, and, as the gas cools, the gas mixture components condense sequentially according to their relative vapor pressures. After the about 12 min required for the bottom of the trap to reach the liquid-nitrogen temperature, passage of electric current through the resistance wire wrapped around the tubing covering the U-trap permits distillation of successive gas components at optimal temperatures. Data on the separation achieved for two mixtures, the first being typical vacuum-line combustion products of geochemical samples such as rocks and the second being natural gas, are presented, and the thermal behavior and power consumption are reported.

  4. A Study for Health Hazard Evaluation of Methylene Chloride Evaporated from the Tear Gas Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun-Kyo; Yi, Gwang-Yong; Chung, Kwang-Jae; Shin, Jung-Ah; Lee, In-Seop

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the health hazard of those exposed to methylene chloride by assessing its atmospheric concentration when a tear gas mixture was aerially dispersed. The concentration of methylene chloride ranged from 311.1-980.3 ppm (geometric mean, 555.8 ppm), 30 seconds after the dispersion started. However, the concentration fell rapidly to below 10 ppm after dispersion was completed. The concentration during the dispersion did not surpass the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health 'immediately dangerous to life or health' value of 2,300 ppm, but did exceed the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists excursion limit of 250 ppm. Since methylene chloride is highly volatile (vapor pressure, 349 mmHg at 20℃), the postdispersion atmospheric concentration can rise instantaneously. Moreover, the o-chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile formulation of tear gas (CS gas) is an acute upper respiratory tract irritant. Therefore, tear gas mixtures should be handled with delicate care. PMID:22953168

  5. The measurement of oxygen fugacities in flowing gas mixtures at temperatures below 1200°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckett, J. R.; Mendybaev, R. A.

    1997-10-01

    We measured oxygen fugacities in H 2CO 2 and COCO 2 gas mixtures in the temperature interval 700-1350°C using an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) oxygen sensor. At high temperatures in excess of 1200°C, measured emfs are consistent with expectations based on the gas composition. At lower temperatures in H 2CO 2 gas mixtures, the oxygen fugacity ( fO 2) obtained assuming Nernstian behavior of the oxygen sensor is as much as two log units more reducing (˜900°C) to one log unit more oxidizing (˜700°C) than expected by assuming equilibrium speciation. The deviations in H 2CO 2 gas mixtures arise from two sources: (1) poor contact between the electrode and the zirconia electrolyte, leading to apparent fO 2 values that are higher than expected and (2) disequilibrium in the vapor, leading to lower than expected fO 2 values in the temperature range ˜700-1200°C (for experiments near the iron-wustite (IW) buffer) and higher than expected fO 2 at lower temperatures. The first problem can be alleviated by spring-loading and lightly sintering a Pt mesh internal electrode against the electrolyte and the second by forcing the entire gas stream to equilibrate by passing it through a Pt catalyst. With these measures, experiments employing H 2CO 2 gas mixtures can be conducted routinely in the temperature range 700-1200°C and the fO 2 determined with an accuracy comparable to that obtained at higher temperatures (2σ < ±0.1 log units). Above ˜770°C, apparent oxygen fugacities measured using an oxygen sensor in COCO 2 gas mixtures near IW are consistent with equilibration in the vapor regardless of whether or not a Pt catalyst is present. At lower temperatures, however, the measured values are more oxidizing than the expected equilibrium values. Under more reducing conditions, the deviations begin to occur at even higher temperatures, ˜930°C for IW-3. The anomalously high fO 2 values are probably related to the condensation of graphite, which removes C

  6. Probing lung physiology with xenon polarization transfer contrast (XTC).

    PubMed

    Ruppert, K; Brookeman, J R; Hagspiel, K D; Mugler, J P

    2000-09-01

    One of the major goals of hyperpolarized-gas MRI has been to obtain (129)Xe dissolved-phase images in humans. So far, this goal has remained elusive, mainly due to the low concentration of xenon that dissolves in tissue. A method is proposed and demonstrated in dogs that allows information about the dissolved phase to be obtained by imaging the gas phase following the application of a series of RF pulses that selectively destroy the longitudinal magnetization of xenon dissolved in the lung parenchyma. During the delay time between consecutive RF pulses, the depolarized xenon rapidly exchanges with the gas phase, thus lowering the gas polarization. It is demonstrated that the resulting contrast in the (129)Xe gas image provides information about the local tissue density. It is further argued that minor pulse-sequence modifications may provide information about the alveolar surface area or lung perfusion.

  7. Effective diffusion coefficients of gas mixture in heavy oil under constant-pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huazhou Andy; Sun, Huijuan; Yang, Daoyong

    2016-09-01

    We develop a method to determine the effective diffusion coefficient for each individual component of a gas mixture in a non-volatile liquid (e.g., heavy oil) at high pressures with compositional analysis. Theoretically, a multi-component one-way diffusion model is coupled with the volume-translated Peng-Robinson equation of state to quantify the mass transfer between gas and liquid (e.g., heavy oil). Experimentally, the diffusion tests have been conducted with a PVT setup for one pure CO2-heavy oil system and one C3H8-CO2-heavy oil system under constant temperature and pressure, respectively. Both the gas-phase volume and liquid-phase swelling effect are simultaneously recorded during the measurement. As for the C3H8-CO2-heavy oil system, the gas chromatography method is employed to measure compositions of the gas phase at the beginning and end of the diffusion measurement, respectively. The effective diffusion coefficients are then determined by minimizing the discrepancy between the measured and calculated gas-phase composition at the end of diffusion measurement. The newly developed technique can quantify the contributions of each component of mixture to the bulk mass transfer from gas into liquid. The effective diffusion coefficient of C3H8 in the C3H8-CO2 mixture at 3945 ± 20 kPa and 293.85 K, i.e., 18.19 × 10^{ - 10} m^{ 2} / s, is found to be much higher than CO2 at 3950 ± 18 kPa and 293.85 K, i.e., 8.68 × 10^{ - 10} m^{ 2} / s. In comparison with pure CO2, the presence of C3H8 in the C3H8-CO2 mixture contributes to a faster diffusion of CO2 from the gas phase into heavy oil and consequently a larger swelling factor of heavy oil.

  8. Ideal gas solubilities and solubility selectivities in a binary mixture of room-temperature ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Finotello Alexia; Bara Jason E.; Narayan Suguna; Campder Dean; Noble Richard D.

    2008-07-01

    This study focuses on the solubility behaviors of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} gases in binary mixtures of imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) using l-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide ((C{sub 2}mim)(Tf{sub 2}N)) and l-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ((C{sub 2}mim)(BF{sub 4})) at 40{sup o}C and low pressures (about 1 atm). The mixtures tested were 0, 25, 50, 75, 90, 95, and 100 mol % (C{sub 2}mim)(BF{sub 4}) in (C{sub 2}-mim)(Tf2{sub N}). Results show that regular solution theory (RST) can be used to describe the gas solubility and selectivity behaviors in RTIL mixtures using an average mixture solubility parameter or an average measured mixture molar volume. Interestingly, the solubility selectivity, defined as the ratio of gas mole fractions in the RTIL mixture, of CO{sub 2} with N{sub 2} or CH{sub 4} in pure (C{sub 2}mim)(BF4) can be enhanced by adding 5 mol% (C{sub 2}-mim)(Tf{sub 2}N).

  9. New SI-traceable reference gas mixtures for fluorinated gases at atmospheric concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillevic, Myriam; Wyss, Simon A.; Pascale, Céline; Vollmer, Martin K.; Niederhauser, Bernhard; Reimann, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In order to better support the monitoring of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, we develop a method to produce reference gas mixtures for fluorinated gases (F-gases, i.e. gases containing fluorine atoms) in a SI-traceable way, meaning that the amount of substance fraction in mole per mole is traceable to SI-units. These research activities are conducted in the framework of the HIGHGAS and AtmoChem-ECV projects. First, single-component mixtures in synthetic air at ~85 nmol/mol (ppb) are generated for HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane, a widely used HFC) and HFC-1234yf (2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene, a car air conditioner fluid of growing importance). These mixtures are first dynamically produced by permeation: a permeator containing the pure substance loses mass linearly over time under a constant gas flow, in the permeation chamber of a magnetic suspension balance, which is regularly calibrated. This primary mixture is then pressurised into Silconert2000-coated stainless steel cylinders by cryo-filling. In a second step these mixtures are dynamically diluted using 2 subsequent dilution steps piloted by mass flow controllers (MFC) and pressure controllers. The assigned mixture concentration is calculated mostly based on the permeator mass loss, on the carrier gas purity and on the MFCs flows. An uncertainty budget is presented, resulting in an expanded uncertainty of 2% for the HFC-125 reference mixture and of 2.5% for the HFC-1234yf mixture (95% confidence interval). The final gas, with near-atmospheric concentration (17.11 pmol/mol for HFC-125, 2.14 pmol/mol for HFC-1234yf) is then measured with Medusa-GC/MS technology against standards calibrated on existing reference scales. The assigned values of the dynamic standards are in excellent agreement with measurements vs the existing reference scales, SIO-14 from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography for HFC-125 and Empa-2013 for HFC-1234yf. Moreover, the Medusa-GC/MS measurements show the excellent purity of the SI

  10. Program on the combustion chemistry of low- and intermediate-Btu gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-30

    Low and intermediate Btu (LBTU and IBTU) gas mixtures are essentially mixtures of CO, H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/ diluted with nitrogen and CO/sub 2/. Although the combustion properties of these three fuels have been extensively investigated and their individual combustion kinetics are reasonably well established, prediction techniques for applying these gas mixtures remain for the most part empirical. This program has aimed to bring together and apply some of the fundamental combustion parameters to the CO-H/sub 2/-CH/sub 4/ flame system with the hope of reducing some of this empiricism. Four topical reports have resulted from this program. This final report summarizes these reports and other activities undertaken in this program. This program was initiated June 22, 1976 under ERDA Contract No. E(49-18)-2406 and was later continued under DOE/PETC and DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-76ET10653.

  11. Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantsev, S. Yu.; Kononov, I. G.; Kossyi, I. A.; Tarasova, N. M.; Firsov, K. N.

    2009-03-01

    Ignition of a stoichiometric CH4: O2 mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume is studied experimentally. It is found that the spark initiates a feebly radiating incomplete-combustion wave, which is much faster than the combustion wave, but is substantially slower than the detonation wave. With a time delay of 500-700 μs, a bright optical flash occupying the entire chamber volume is observed, which indicates fast (involving branching chain reactions) ignition of the gas mixture. A conclusion is drawn regarding the common nature of the process of ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume and the previously investigated initiation of combustion by laser sparks excited at solid targets, high-power microwave discharges, and high-current gliding discharges.

  12. Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantsev, S. Yu.; Kononov, I. G.; Kossyi, I. A.; Tarasova, N. M.; Firsov, K. N.

    2009-03-15

    Ignition of a stoichiometric CH{sub 4}: O{sub 2} mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume is studied experimentally. It is found that the spark initiates a feebly radiating incomplete-combustion wave, which is much faster than the combustion wave, but is substantially slower than the detonation wave. With a time delay of 500-700 {mu}s, a bright optical flash occupying the entire chamber volume is observed, which indicates fast (involving branching chain reactions) ignition of the gas mixture. A conclusion is drawn regarding the common nature of the process of ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume and the previously investigated initiation of combustion by laser sparks excited at solid targets, high-power microwave discharges, and high-current gliding discharges.

  13. Hovering performance of hummingbirds in hyperoxic gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Altshuler, D L; Chai, P; Chen, J S

    2001-06-01

    Hummingbirds evolved during a period of decline in atmospheric oxygen concentration and currently encounter varying levels of oxygen availability along their elevational distribution. We tested the hypothesis that inspiration of hyperoxic gas increases hummingbird hovering performance when birds are simultaneously challenged aerodynamically. We measured the maximum duration of hovering flight while simultaneously monitoring the rate of oxygen consumption of ruby-throated hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris) in low-density heliox that was either normoxic (21% O2) or hyperoxic (35% O2). As air density decreased below 0.85 kg x m(-3), hummingbirds hovered significantly longer in hyperoxia than in normoxia, but the air density at which the birds could no longer sustain hovering flight was independent of oxygen concentration. At low air densities in hyperoxia flight trials, hummingbirds appeared to increase their rate of oxygen consumption relative to flight sequences at equivalent densities in normoxia trials, but these differences were not significant. We tested the hypothesis that hummingbirds can discriminate between environments that differ in oxygen concentration. In another density-reduction experiment, hummingbirds were allowed to choose between artificial feeders infused with either normoxic or hyperoxic gases. The hypothesis was not supported because birds failed to associate oxygen concentration with a particular feeder independently of air density. Supplemental oxygen thus yields increased hovering duration at intermediate air densities, but the minimum density at which birds can fly is limited exclusively by aerodynamic considerations.

  14. Removal of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures by wollastonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelsht, V. S.; Muratalieva, V. Zh.

    2013-09-01

    Wollastonite synthesis and decomposition were analyzed from the viewpoint of thermodynamics (using the TERRA software). It is shown that wollastonite synthesis from limestone and silica takes place at a minimum content of nitrogen (10-5 N2) with a release of carbon dioxide. The synthesis temperature is T ≥ 560 K. Wollastonite is decomposed in the presence of flue gas (4N2) with limestone and silica formation and burial of carbon dioxide in the form of CaCO3(c). Wollastonite decomposition temperature is T ≤ 420 K. The cyclic reciprocating process for complete removal of carbon dioxide by wollastonite is suggested. Four strokes of the reciprocating system with the fixed temperatures of wollastonite decomposition (T=300 K) and wollastonite synthesis (T=560 K) are presented. Total energy consumption (T = 560 K) is Δ I ≈ 130 kJ/mole, 30 % of energy is spent for heating and 70 % of energy is spent for chemical reaction. This is comparable with the heat of CO2 solution in ethanolamin.

  15. Hydrocracking of vacuum gas oil-vegetable oil mixtures for biofuels production.

    PubMed

    Bezergianni, Stella; Kalogianni, Aggeliki; Vasalos, Iacovos A

    2009-06-01

    Hydrocracking of vacuum gas oil (VGO)--vegetable oil mixtures is a prominent process for the production of biofuels. In this work both pre-hydrotreated and non-hydrotreated VGO are assessed whether they are suitable fossil components in a VGO-vegetable oil mixture as feed-stocks to a hydrocracking process. This assessment indicates the necessity of a VGO pre-hydrotreated step prior to hydrocracking the VGO-vegetable oil mixture. Moreover, the comparison of two different mixing ratios suggests that higher vegetable oil content favors hydrocracking product yields and qualities. Three commercial catalysts of different activity are utilized in order to identify a range of products that can be produced via a hydrocracking route. Finally, the effect of temperature on hydrocracking VGO-vegetable oil mixtures is studied in terms of conversion and selectivity to diesel, jet/kerosene and naphtha.

  16. Approximation of flammability region for natural gas-air-diluent mixture.

    PubMed

    Liao, S Y; Jiang, D M; Huang, Z H; Cheng, Q; Gao, J; Hu, Y

    2005-10-17

    The growing implementation of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in reducing NO(x) emissions of engine is of paramount motivation to perform a fundamental research on the flammability characteristics of fuel-air-diluent mixtures. In this work, the influences of EGR on the flammability region of natural gas-air-diluent flames were experimentally studied in a constant volume bomb. An assumption of critical burning velocity at flammability limit is proposed to approximately determine the flammability region of these mixtures. Based on this assumption, an estimation of the flammability map for natural gas-air-diluent mixtures was obtained by using the empirical formula of burning velocity data. The flammability regions of natural gas-air mixtures with EGR are plotted versus the EGR rate. From the comparison of estimated results and experimental measurements, it is suggested that the accuracy of prediction is largely dependent upon the formula of burning velocity used. Meanwhile, the influence of pressure on the critical burning velocity at flammability limit is also investigated. On the basis of the pressure dependence criterion, the estimation was performed for the circumstance of high temperature and pressure, and the prediction results still agree well with those of experiments.

  17. Concentration measurement systems with stable solutions for binary gas mixtures using two flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Chongho; Kawashima, Kenji; Kagawa, Toshiharu

    2011-06-01

    The previously proposed gas concentration measurement system (Yamazaki et al 2007 Meas. Sci. Technol. 18 2762-8) shows a considerable error for some combinations of gases. The error increases when the system of equations determining mole fractions becomes a mathematically ill-conditioned system. Because the parameters of the equations reflect the material properties of the gases, the current paper considers flowmeters whose flow rate indication does not involve any gas property. This paper firstly illustrates the ill condition for the combination of venturi meter and laminar flowmeters. The paper then discusses the simultaneous measurement of flow rate and mole fractions by flowmeter combinations: an ultrasonic flowmeter and a venturi meter, an ultrasonic flowmeter and a laminar flowmeter. Experiments are conducted for a mixture of argon and air. When a venturi meter and a laminar flowmeter are used, the equations to evaluate the gas mixture ratio become an ill-conditioned system, and hence the evaluated mixture ratio shows a considerable error. On the other hand, the combination of an ultrasonic flowmeter and a laminar flowmeter detects the gas mixture ratio with proper accuracy.

  18. Xenon and iodine reveal multiple distinct exotic xenon components in Efremovka "nanodiamonds"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmour, J. D.; Holland, G.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Fisenko, A. V.; Crowther, S. A.; Turner, G.

    2016-03-01

    We identify new xenon components in a nanodiamond-rich residue from the reduced CV3 chondrite Efremovka. We demonstrate for the first time that these, and the previously identified xenon components Xe-P3 and Xe-P6, are associated with elevated I/Xe ratios. The 129I/127I ratio associated with xenon loss from these presolar compositions during processing on planetesimals in the early solar system was (0.369 ± 0.019) × 10-4, a factor of 3-4 lower than the canonical value. This suggests either incorporation of iodine into carbonaceous grains before the last input of freshly synthesized 129I to the solar system's precursor material, or loss of noble gases during processing of planetesimals around 30 Myr after solar system formation. The xenon/iodine ratios and model closure ages were revealed by laser step pyrolysis analysis of a neutron-irradiated, coarse-grained nanodiamond separate. Three distinct low temperature compositions are identified by characteristic I/Xe ratios and 136Xe/132Xe ratios. There is some evidence of multiple compositions with distinct I/Xe ratios in the higher temperature releases associated with Xe-P6. The presence of iodine alongside Q-Xe and these components in nanodiamonds constrains the pathway by which extreme volatiles entered the solid phase and may facilitate the identification of their carriers. There is no detectable iodine contribution to the presolar Xe-HL component, which is released at intermediate temperatures; this suggests a distinct trapping process. Releases associated with the other components all include significant contributions of 128Xe produced from iodine by neutron capture during reactor irradiation. We propose a revised model relating the origin of Xe-P3 (which exhibits an s-process deficit) through a "Q-process" to the Q component (which makes the dominant contribution to the heavy noble gas budget of primitive material). The Q-process incorporates noble gases and iodine into specific carbonaceous phases with mass

  19. Optically enhanced production of metastable xenon.

    PubMed

    Hickman, G T; Franson, J D; Pittman, T B

    2016-09-15

    Metastable states of noble gas atoms are typically produced by electrical discharge techniques or "all-optical" excitation methods. Here we combine electrical discharges with optical pumping to demonstrate "optically enhanced" production of metastable xenon (Xe*). We experimentally measure large increases in Xe* density with relatively small optical control field powers. This technique may have applications in systems where large metastable state densities are desirable. PMID:27628400

  20. Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a high-current electric discharge in a closed volume

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Gritsinin, S. I.; Kop'ev, V. A.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kuleshov, P. S.; Popov, N. A.; Starik, A. M.; Tarasova, N. M.

    2009-06-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies and numerical calculations of the ignition of a stoichiometric CH{sub 4}: O{sub 2} gas mixture by a high-current gliding discharge. It is shown that this type of discharge generates an axially propagating thermal wave (precursor) that penetrates into the gas medium and leads to fast gas heating. This process is followed by an almost simultaneous ignition of the gas mixture over the entire reactor volume.

  1. Full-spectrum k-distribution look-up table for nonhomogeneous gas-soot mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaojun; Modest, Michael F.; He, Boshu

    2016-06-01

    Full-spectrum k-distribution (FSK) look-up tables provide great accuracy combined with outstanding numerical efficiency for the evaluation of radiative transfer in nonhomogeneous gaseous media. However, previously published tables cannot be used for gas-soot mixtures that are found in most combustion scenarios since it is impossible to assemble k-distributions for a gas mixed with nongray absorbing particles from gas-only full-spectrum k-distributions. Consequently, a new FSK look-up table has been constructed by optimizing the previous table recently published by the authors and then adding one soot volume fraction to this optimized table. Two steps comprise the optimization scheme: (1) direct calculation of the nongray stretching factors (a-values) using the k-distributions (k-values) rather than tabulating them; (2) deletion of unnecessary mole fractions at many thermodynamic states. Results show that after optimization, the size of the new table is reduced from 5 GB (including the k-values and the a-values for gases only) to 3.2 GB (including the k-values for both gases and soot) while both accuracy and efficiency remain the same. Two scaled flames are used to validate the new table. It is shown that the new table gives results of excellent accuracy for those benchmark results together with cheap computational cost for both gas mixtures and gas-soot mixtures.

  2. Electrochemical separation and concentration of sulfur containing gases from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Winnick, Jack

    1981-01-01

    A method of removing sulfur oxides of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas mixtures (150.degree.-1000.degree. C.) is the subject of the present invention. An electrochemical cell is employed. The cell is provided with inert electrodes and an electrolyte which will provide anions compatible with the sulfur containing anions formed at the anode. The electrolyte is also selected to provide inert stable cations at the temperatures encountered. The gas mixture is passed by the cathode where the sulfur gases are converted to SO.sub.4.sup.= or, in the case of H.sub.2 S, to S.sup.=. The anions migrate to the anode where they are converted to a stable gaseous form at much greater concentration levels (>10X). Current flow may be effected by utilizing an external source of electrical energy or by passing a reducing gas such as hydrogen past the anode.

  3. Binary and ternary gas mixtures with temperature enhanced diffuse glow discharge characteristics for use in closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; Hunter, S.R.

    1988-06-28

    An improvement to the gas mixture used in diffuse glow discharge closing switches is disclosed which includes binary and ternary gas mixtures which are formulated to exhibit decreasing electron attachment with increasing temperature. This increases the efficiency of the conductance of the glow discharge and further inhibits the formation of an arc. 11 figs.

  4. Binary and ternary gas mixtures with temperature enhanced diffuse glow discharge characteristics for use in closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1990-01-01

    An improvement to the gas mixture used in diffuse glow discharge closing switches is disclosed which includes binary and ternary gas mixtures which are formulated to exhibit decreasing electron attachment with increasing temperature. This increases the efficiency of the conductance of the glow discharge and further inhibits the formation of an arc.

  5. Binary and ternary gas mixtures with temperature enhanced diffuse glow discharge characteristics for use in closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; Hunter, S.R.

    1990-06-26

    An improvement to the gas mixture used in diffuse glow discharge closing switches is disclosed which includes binary and ternary gas mixtures which are formulated to exhibit decreasing electron attachment with increasing temperature. This increases the efficiency of the conductance of the glow discharge and further inhibits the formation of an arc. 11 figs.

  6. Gamma detectors based on high pressure xenon: their development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulin, Sergey E.; Dmitrenko, Valery V.; Grachev, V. M.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasic, K. F.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Duhvalov, A. G.; Kotler, F. G.; Pushkin, K. N.

    2004-01-01

    Various modifications of xenon detectors and their parameters in comparison with gamma-detectors of other types are considered. Prospects of xenon detectors' applications in gamma-spectroscopy based on experimental results are discussed including detection and control of radioactive and fissile materials displacement, definition of uranium enrichment rate, and measurements of nuclear reactor radioactive gas waste concentration. Possibilities for xenon detector use for environmental control and measurement of cosmic gamma radiation on orbital stations are considered.

  7. Gamma detectors based on high-pressure xenon: their development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulin, Sergey E.; Dmitrenko, Valery V.; Grachev, V. M.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Dukhvalov, A. G.; Kotler, F. G.; Pushkin, K. N.

    2004-10-01

    Various modifications of xenon detectors and their parameters in comparison with gamma-detectors of other types are considered. Prospects of xenon detectors' applicatins in gamma-spectroscopy based on experimental results are discussed including detection and control of radioactive and fissile materials displacement, definition of uranium enrichment rate, and measurements of nuclear reactor radioactive gas waste concentration. Possibilities for xenon detector use for environmental control and measurement of cosmic gamma radiation on orbital stations are considered.

  8. Intermolecular polarizabilities in H{sub 2}-rare-gas mixtures (H{sub 2}–He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe): Insight from collisional isotropic spectral properties

    SciTech Connect

    Głaz, Waldemar Bancewicz, Tadeusz; Godet, Jean-Luc; Gustafsson, Magnus; Maroulis, George; Haskopoulos, Anastasios

    2014-08-21

    The report presents results of theoretical and numerical analysis of the electrical properties related to the isotropic part of the polarizability induced by interactions within compounds built up of a hydrogen H{sub 2} molecule and a set of noble gas atoms, Rg, ranging from the least massive helium up to the heaviest xenon perturber. The Cartesian components of the collisional polarizabilities of the H{sub 2}–Rg systems are found by means of the quantum chemistry methods and their dependence on the intermolecular distance is determined. On the basis of these data, the spherical, symmetry adapted components of the trace polarizability are derived in order to provide data sets that are convenient for evaluating collisional spectral profiles of the isotropic polarized part of light scattered by the H{sub 2}–Rg mixtures. Three independent methods of numerical computing of the spectral intensities are applied at room temperature (295 K). The properties of the roto-translational profiles obtained are discussed in order to determine the role played by contributions corresponding to each of the symmetry adapted parts of the trace polarizability. By spreading the analysis over the collection of the H{sub 2}–Rg systems, evolution of the spectral properties with the growing masses of the supermolecular compounds can be observed.

  9. Distillation column for the XENON1T experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieguth, Alexander; XENON Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The XENON1T experiment will probe a new parameter space in the direct dark matter search. Besides the enlargement of target mass to the ton scale, a further background reduction with respect to its predecessor XENON100 is necessary. A major contribution to the intrinsic contamination is the β-decaying isotope 85Kr, which leads to the requirement of a concentration less than 0.2 ppt of natural krypton in xenon. Its removal from the xenon gas is achieved by cryogenic distillation. For the new experiment a custom-build distillation column with a separation factor larger than 105 and a throughput of 3kg/h has been designed and built at the University of Muenster. Furthermore its performance has been characterized using different trace gas detection techniques, e.g. a novel 83mKr-tracer method, and its functionality has been tested successfully. The distillation column, which is installed and commissioned at the XENON1T experiment, is ready to process the 3.5 tons of xenon.

  10. An experimental setup with ultrasonic gas analyzers and real time analysis of the composition of a binary gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, V.; Vítek, M.; Doubek, M.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes an automated measuring apparatus with an ultrasonic gas analyzer and realtime analysis of the composition of the gas. The apparatus is designed for preparing binary gas mixtures and making measurements in a wide range of pressures (from 0.8 bara to 15 bara) and temperatures (between -15°C and 80°C). The apparatus was developed to determine the thermophysical properties of fluorocarbon mixtures for potential use in the cooling circuits of several Large Hadron Collider projects at CERN. The design of its control system took into account the safety and reliability o the gas analyzer, and the need to limit the presence of laboratory personnel. The control system was implemented in PVSS-II, the Supervisory, Control and Data Acquisition standard chosen for LHC and its experiments at CERN. The second part of the paper describes the implementation and verification of the algorithm for continuous real-time determination of the composition of the refrigerant mixture. The algorithm is based on minimizing the quadratic norm fromthe measured data and from the pre-generated look-up tables acquired from the NIST REFPROP software package.

  11. Transport Properties of a Rarefied Ch4-N2 Gas Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokin, L. R.; Kalashnikov, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The area of application of the rarefied neutral methane-nitrogen gas mixture is considered. Experimental data on the transport properties of this mixture and its components were analyzed and generalized on the basis of molecular-kinetic theory relations with the use of the potentials of pair uniform and cross interactions of CH4 and N2 molecules. The parameters of three spherical symmetric three-parameter m-6 Lennard-Jones interaction potentials with a repulsive branch of varying rigidity were determined with the use of the nonlinear weight method of least squares. Tables of reference data on the viscosity of the indicated mixture and the coefficients of interdiffusion of its components were calculated for the concentration range 0-1 at temperatures 100-1150 K. Estimates of the confidential errors in determining the properties of this mixture have been made with the use of the error matrix of parameters of the indicated potentials. The results of calculations were compared with the corresponding reference data obtained earlier for the CH4-N2 gas mixture.

  12. Bubbling behaviors induced by gas-liquid mixture permeating through a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liang; Li, Mingbo; Chen, Wenyu; Xie, Haibo; Fu, Xin

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the bubbling behaviors induced by gas-liquid mixture permeating through porous medium (PM), which was observed in developing immersion lithography system and was found having great differences with traditional bubbling behaviors injected with only gas phase through the PM. An experimental setup was built up to investigate the bubbling characteristics affected by the mixed liquid phase. Both the flow regimes of gas-liquid mixture in micro-channel (upstream of the PM) and the bubbling flow regimes in water tank (downstream of the PM) were recorded synchronously by high-speed camera. The transitions between the flow regimes are governed by gas and liquid Weber numbers. Based on the image analysis, the characteristic parameters of bubbling region, including the diameter of bubbling area on PM surface, gas-phase volume flux, and dispersion angle of bubbles in suspending liquid, were studied under different proportions of gas and liquid flow rate. Corresponding empirical correlations were developed to describe and predict these parameters. Then, the pertinent bubble characteristics in different bubbling flow regimes were systematically investigated. Specifically, the bubble size distribution and the Sauter mean diameter affected by increasing liquid flow rate were studied, and the corresponding analysis was given based on the hydrodynamics of bubble-bubble and bubble-liquid interactions. According to dimensionless analysis, the general prediction equation of Sauter mean diameter under different operating conditions was proposed and confirmed by experimental data. The study of this paper is helpful to improve the collection performance of immersion lithography and aims to reveal the differences between the bubbling behaviors on PM caused by only gas flow and gas-liquid mixture flow, respectively, for the researches of fluid flow.

  13. Flash pyrolysis of New Mexico sub-bituminous coal in helium-methane gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, M.S.; Fallon, P.T.; Steinberg, M.

    1986-04-01

    A New Mexico sub-bituminous coal was flash pyrolyzed in gas mixtures of helium and methane at 1000/sup 0/C and 50 psi in an 1-in. I.D. entrained down-flow tubular reactor. The mixture contained 0 to 40% helium in methane. Under tested experimental conditions, pyrolysis in gas mixtures resulted in higher yields of ethylene and BTX than in pure methane. For example, under a coal flow rate of 1.0 lb/hr and methane flow rate of 4.0 lb/hr, pyrolysis in pure methane produced 7.7% C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and 9.0% BTX on the basis of carbon contained in coal; under similar coal and methane flow rates, as high as 14.8% C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and 15.3% BTX were obtained on pyrolysis in 25% He + 75% CH/sub 4/ gas mixture. The data show that the coal flow rate and methane flow rate both independently effect the yields of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and BTS. At constant methane flow rate, increase in coal flow rate decreases the yields of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and BTX; at constant coal flow rate, increase in methane flow rate increases the yields of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and BTX. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Flash pyrolysis of New Mexico sub-bituminous coal in helium-methane gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, M.S.; Fallon, P.T.; Steinberg, M.

    1986-01-01

    A New Mexico sub-bituminous coal was flash pyrolyzed in gas mixtures of helium and methane at 1000/sup 0/C and 50 psi in an 1-in. I.D. entrained down-flow tubular reactor. The mixture contained 0 to 40% helium in methane. Under tested experimental conditions, pyrolysis in gas mixtures resulted in higher yields of ethylene and BTX than in pure methane. For example, under a coal flow rate of 1.0 lb/hr and methane flow rate of 4.0 lb/hr, pyrolysis in pure methane produced 7.7% C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and 9.0% BTX on the basis of carbon contained in coal; under similar coal and methane flow rates, as high as 14.8% C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and 15.3% BTX were obtained on pyrolysis in 25% He + 75% CH/sub 4/ gas mixture. The data show that the coal flow rate and methane flow rate both independently affect the yields of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and BTX. At constant methane flow rate, increase in coal flow rate decreases the yields of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and BTX; at constant coal flow rate, increase in methane flow rate increases the yields of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and BTX.

  15. A study of non-flammable gas mixture for resistive plate counter

    SciTech Connect

    Takamatsu, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Abe, K.

    1996-06-01

    The RPC (resistive plate counter) has good time and position resolution. These factors make it an attractive candidate for trigger system at collider experiment. The standard gas mixtures (Ar+iso-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}+Freon) used in RPC are very flammable when leaked into air. In view of safety issue, the authors have studied non-flammable gas of Ar+CO{sub 2}+iso-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}+Freon as a function of ratio Ar:CO{sub 2} allowed in non-flammable gas mixtures for the RPC with ABS electrodes. The basic performance of the various mixtures have been measured; singles (untriggered) count rate, detection efficiency and charge spectra versus operating voltage. They have found a set of non-flammable mixtures of the kind of AR+CO{sub 2}+Freon contained less than {approximately}8.4% of iso-C{sub 4}H{sub 10} for K{sub L}/muon counter of KEK B-factory at KEK.

  16. The structure of variable property, compressible mixing layers in binary gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozusko, F.; Grosch, C. E.; Jackson, T. L.; Kennedy, Christipher A.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the structure of a parallel compressible mixing layer in a binary mixture of gases. The gases included in this study are hydrogen (H2), helium (He), nitrogen (N2), oxygen (02), neon (Ne) and argon (Ar). Profiles of the variation of the Lewis and Prandtl numbers across the mixing layer for all thirty combinations of gases are given. It is shown that the Lewis number can vary by as much as a factor of eight and the Prandtl number by a factor of two across the mixing layer. Thus assuming constant values for the Lewis and Prandtl numbers of a binary gas mixture in the shear layer, as is done in many theoretical studies, is a poor approximation. We also present profiles of the velocity, mass fraction, temperature and density for representative binary gas mixtures at zero and supersonic Mach numbers. We show that the shape of these profiles is strongly dependent on which gases are in the mixture as well as on whether the denser gas is in the fast stream or the slow stream.

  17. Viscous slip coefficients for binary gas mixtures measured from mass flow rates through a single microtube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Takamori, K.; Perrier, P.; Graur, I.; Matsuda, Y.; Niimi, T.

    2016-09-01

    The viscous slip coefficient for helium-argon binary gas mixture is extracted from the experimental values of the mass flow rate through a microtube. The mass flow rate is measured by the constant-volume method. The viscous slip coefficient was obtained by identifying the measured mass flow rate through a microtube with the corresponding analytical expression, which is a function of the Knudsen number. The measurements were carried out in the slip flow regime where the first-order slip boundary condition can be applied. The measured viscous slip coefficients of binary gas mixtures exhibit a concave function of the molar ratio of the mixture, showing a similar profile with numerical results. However, from the detailed comparison between the measured and numerical values with the complete and incomplete accommodation at a surface, it is inappropriate to estimate the viscous slip coefficient for the mixture numerically by employing separately measured tangential momentum accommodation coefficient for each component. The time variation of the molar ratio in the downstream chamber was measured by sampling the gas from the chamber using the quadrupole mass spectrometer. In our measurements, it is indicated that the volume flow rate of argon is larger than that of helium because of the difference in the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient.

  18. Thermophysical properties of CF4/O2 and SF6/O2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damyanova, M.; Hohm, U.; Balabanova, E.; Barton, D.

    2016-03-01

    Fitting formulae are presented for the calculation of the second interaction virial coefficients, mixture viscosities and binary diffusion coefficients for CF4/O2 and SF6/O2 gas mixtures in the temperature range between 200 K and 1000 K. The data recommended are obtained from the isotropic (n-6) Lennard-Jones intermolecular interaction potentials of the pure substances by using the Hohm-Zarkova-Damyanova mixing rules. In general, a good agreement is observed between our results and the experimental and theoretical data found in the literature.

  19. Reactive sputtering of titanium in Ar/CH4 gas mixture: Target poisoning and film characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Fouad, O.A.; Rumaiz, A.; Shah, S.

    2009-03-01

    Reactive sputtering of titanium target in the presence of Ar/CH{sub 4} gas mixture has been investigated. With the addition of methane gas to above 1.5% of the process gas a transition from the metallic sputtering mode to the poison mode was observed as indicated by the change in cathode current. As the methane gas flow concentration increased up to 10%, the target was gradually poisoned. The hysteresis in the cathode current could be plotted by first increasing and then subsequently decreasing the methane concentration. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of the deposited films confirmed the formation of carbide phases and the transition of the process from the metallic to compound sputtering mode as the methane concentration in the sputtering gas is increased. The paper discusses a sputtering model that gives a rational explanation of the target poisoning phenomenon and shows an agreement between the experimental observations and calculated results.

  20. Evolution of ideal gas mixtures confined in an insulated container by two identical pistons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Rumelo C.; Esguerra, Jose Perico H.

    2010-09-01

    We study the quasistatic adiabatic expansion of monatomic-diatomic ideal gas mixtures bounded by identical pistons and obtain closed form expressions for the temperature of the gas as a function of the time. We find that the temperature decreases as an inverse power of the time for large times, with the exponent as a function of the monatomic to diatomic gas ratio. The piston speeds increase from zero to a maximum value determined by the heat capacity of the gas and the masses of the pistons. Plots of the temperature and piston speed versus the logarithm of the time show points of inflection, which are interpreted as signaling the onset of steady state behavior. These points shift to later times as the monatomic to diatomic gas ratio is varied from purely monatomic to purely diatomic.

  1. Methods to produce calibration mixtures for anesthetic gas monitors and how to perform volumetric calculations on anesthetic gases.

    PubMed

    Christensen, P L; Nielsen, J; Kann, T

    1992-10-01

    A simple procedure for making calibration mixtures of oxygen and the anesthetic gases isoflurane, enflurane, and halothane is described. One to ten grams of the anesthetic substance is evaporated in a closed, 11,361-cc glass bottle filled with oxygen gas at atmospheric pressure. The carefully mixed gas is used to calibrate anesthetic gas monitors. By comparison of calculated and measured volumetric results it is shown that at atmospheric conditions the volumetric behavior of anesthetic gas mixtures can be described with reasonable accuracy using the ideal gas law. A procedure is described for calculating the deviation from ideal gas behavior in cases in which this is needed. PMID:1453187

  2. Implementation of Ultrasonic Sensing for High Resolution Measurement of Binary Gas Mixture Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Berry, Stephane; Bitadze, Alexander; Bonneau, Pierre; Bousson, Nicolas; Boyd, George; Bozza, Gennaro; Crespo-Lopez, Olivier; Riva, Enrico Da; Degeorge, Cyril; Deterre, Cecile; DiGirolamo, Beniamino; Doubek, Martin; Favre, Gilles; Godlewski, Jan; Hallewell, Gregory; Hasib, Ahmed; Katunin, Sergey; Langevin, Nicolas; Lombard, Didier; Mathieu, Michel; McMahon, Stephen; Nagai, Koichi; Pearson, Benjamin; Robinson, David; Rossi, Cecilia; Rozanov, Alexandre; Strauss, Michael; Vitek, Michal; Vacek, Vaclav; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ultrasonic instrument for continuous real-time analysis of the fractional mixture of a binary gas system. The instrument is particularly well suited to measurement of leaks of a high molecular weight gas into a system that is nominally composed of a single gas. Sensitivity < 5 × 10−5 is demonstrated to leaks of octaflouropropane (C3F8) coolant into nitrogen during a long duration (18 month) continuous study. The sensitivity of the described measurement system is shown to depend on the difference in molecular masses of the two gases in the mixture. The impact of temperature and pressure variances on the accuracy of the measurement is analysed. Practical considerations for the implementation and deployment of long term, in situ ultrasonic leak detection systems are also described. Although development of the described systems was motivated by the requirements of an evaporative fluorocarbon cooling system, the instrument is applicable to the detection of leaks of many other gases and to processes requiring continuous knowledge of particular binary gas mixture fractions. PMID:24961217

  3. Fundamental equations of a mixture of gas and small spherical solid particles from simple kinetic theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    The fundamental equations of a mixture of a gas and pseudofluid of small spherical solid particles are derived from the Boltzmann equation of two-fluid theory. The distribution function of the gas molecules is defined in the same manner as in the ordinary kinetic theory of gases, but the distribution function for the solid particles is different from that of the gas molecules, because it is necessary to take into account the different size and physical properties of solid particles. In the proposed simple kinetic theory, two additional parameters are introduced: one is the radius of the spheres and the other is the instantaneous temperature of the solid particles in the distribution of the solid particles. The Boltzmann equation for each species of the mixture is formally written, and the transfer equations of these Boltzmann equations are derived and compared to the well-known fundamental equations of the mixture of a gas and small solid particles from continuum theory. The equations obtained reveal some insight into various terms in the fundamental equations. For instance, the partial pressure of the pseudofluid of solid particles is not negligible if the volume fraction of solid particles is not negligible as in the case of lunar ash flow.

  4. Xenon-Ion Drilling of Tungsten Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    High-velocity xenon ions used to drill holes of controlled size and distribution through tungsten layer that sheaths surface of controlled-porosity dispenser cathode of traveling wave-tube electron emitter. Controlled-porosity dispenser cathode employs barium/calcium/ aluminum oxide mixture that migrates through pores in cathode surface, thus coating it and reducing its work function. Rapid, precise drilling technique applied to films of other metals and used in other applications where micron-scale holes required. Method requires only few hours, as opposed to tens of hours by prior methods.

  5. Nuclear spin relaxation of {sup 129}Xe due to persistent xenon dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Berry-Pusey, B. N.; Anger, B. C.; Laicher, G.; Saam, B.

    2006-12-15

    We have measured longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of {sup 129}Xe in Xe-N{sub 2} mixtures at densities below 0.5 amagats in a magnetic field of 8.0 T. We find that intrinsic spin relaxation in this regime is principally due to fluctuations in the intramolecular spin-rotation (SR) and chemical-shift-anisotropy (CSA) interactions, mediated by the formation of {sup 129}Xe-Xe persistent dimers. Our results are consistent with previous work done in one case at much lower applied fields where the CSA interaction is negligible and in another case at much higher gas densities where transient xenon dimers mediate the interactions. We have verified that a large applied field suppresses the persistent-dimer mechanism, consistent with standard relaxation theory, allowing us to measure room-temperature gas-phase relaxation times T{sub 1} for {sup 129}Xe greater than 25 h at 8.0 T. These data also yield a maximum possible low-field T{sub 1} for pure xenon gas at room temperature of 5.45{+-}0.2 h. The coupling strengths for the SR and CSA interactions that we extract are in fair agreement with estimates based both on previous experimental work and on ab initio calculations. Our results have potential implications for the production and storage of large quantities of hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe for use in various applications.

  6. A study of nonflammable gas mixtures for limited streamer tubes in the VENUS detector at TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uebayashi, T.; Haba, J.; Kamitani, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Nagashima, Y.; Osabe, H.; Sakamoto, S.; Sugimoto, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Tsukamoto, A.; Yamashita, Y.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takasaki, F.; Homma, Y.; Hojyo, Y.; Sakae, H.

    1988-03-01

    Performances of limited streamer tubes operated with nonflammable gas mixtures composed of argon (Ar), carbon-dioxide (CO2) and isobutane (i-C4H10) with ratios of 1:1.5:0.15, 1:2:0.2, 1:3:0.3, 1:4:0.4 and 1:6:0.6 were studied. It was found that these mixtures were very suitable for the VENUS detector. The charge spectra exhibited very sharp distributions and indicated the possibility for the limited streamer tubes to be applied to calorimetry use. A mixture of 1:2:0.2 was chosen for the VENUS streamer tubes because of its moderate gain and long efficiency plateau.

  7. A study of nonflammable gas mixtures for limited streamer tubes in the VENUS detector at TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uebayashi, T.; Haba, J.; Kamitani, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Nagashima, Y.; Osabe, H.; Sakamoto, S.; Sugimoto, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Tsukamoto, A.; Yamashita, Y.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takasaki, F.; Homma, Y.; Hojyo, Y.; Sakae, H.

    1998-03-01

    Performances of limited streamer tubes operated with nonflammable gas mixtures composed of argon (Ar), carbon-dioxide (CO2) and isobutane (i-C4H10) with ratios of 1:1.5:0.15, 1:2:0.2, 1:3:0.3, 1:4:0.4 and 1:6:0.6 were studied. It was found that these mixtures were very suitable for the VENUS detector. The charge spectra exhibited very sharp distributions and indicated the possibility for the limited streamer tubes to be applied to calorimetry use. A mixture of 1:2:0.2 was chosen for the VENUS streamer tubes because of its moderate gain and long efficiency plateau.

  8. Shear Thinning in Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergm Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Yao, Minwu; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    We measured shear thinning, a viscosity decrease ordinarily associated with complex liquids such as molten plastics or ketchup, near the critical point of xenon. The data span a wide range of dimensionless shear rate: the product of the shear rate and the relaxation time of critical fluctuations was greater than 0.001 and was less than 700. As predicted by theory, shear thinning occurred when this product was greater than 1. The measurements were conducted aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia to avoid the density stratification caused by Earth's gravity.

  9. Study of thermite mixture consolidated by the cold gas dynamic spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciochini, A.; Maines, G.; Poupart, C.; Akbarnejad, H.; Radulescu, M.; Jodoin, B.; Zhang, F.; Lee, J. J.

    2014-05-01

    The present study focused on the cold gas dynamic spray process for manufacturing porosity free, finely structured energetic materials with high reactivity and structural integrity. The experiments have focused the reaction between the aluminium and metal oxide, such as Al-CuO system. The consolidation of the materials used the cold gas dynamic spray technique, where the particles are accelerated to high speeds and consolidated via plastic deformation upon impact. Reactive composites are formed in arbitrary shapes with close to zero porosity and without any reactions during the consolidation phase. Reactivity of mixtures has been investigated through flame propagation analysis on cold sprayed samples and compacted powder mixture. Deflagration tests showed the influence of porosity on the reactivity.

  10. [Effect of krypton-containing gas mixture on Japanese quail embryo development].

    PubMed

    Kussmaul', A R; Gur'eva, T S; Dadasheva, O A; Pavlov, N B; Pavlov, B N

    2008-01-01

    Investigated were effects of gas mixture with up to 3.0 kgs/cm2 of krypton on the embryonic development of domesticated Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica dom.). Results demonstrated absence of a serious krypton effect on Japanese quail embryos. Development of embryos proceeded in due course; morphometrically the experimental embryos were essentially similar to controls. It should be noted that despite exposure to acute hypoxic hypoxia during the initial 12 hours of development in the krypton-containing gas mixture, viability of quail embryos was high enough which can be ascribed to the krypton protective action. Besides, an additional experiment showed that krypton partial pressure of 5-5.5 kgs/cm2 produces the narcotic effect on adult Japanese quails.

  11. Atomically detailed models of gas mixture diffusion through CuBTC membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Keskin S; Liu JC; Johnson JK.

    2009-10-01

    Metal–organic frameworks are intriguing crystalline nanoporous materials that have potential applications in adsorption-based and membrane-based gas separations. We describe atomically detailed simulations of gas adsorption and diffusion in CuBTC that have been used to predict the performance of CuBTC membranes for separation of H2/CH4, CO2/CH4 and CO2/H2 mixtures. CuBTC membranes are predicted to have higher selectivities for all three mixtures than MOF-5 membranes, the only other metal–organic framework material for which detailed predictions of membrane selectivities have been made. Our results give insight into the physical properties that will be desirable in tuning the pore structure of MOFs for specific membrane-based separations

  12. Study of thermite mixtures consolidated by cold gas dynamic spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciochini, Antoine; Maines, Geoffrey; Poupart, Christian; Radulescu, Matei; Jodoin, Bertrand; Lee, Julian

    2013-06-01

    The present study focused on the cold gas dynamic spray process for manufacturing finely structured energetic materials with high reactivity, vanishing porosity, as well as structural integrity and arbitrary shape. The experiments have focused the reaction between the aluminum and metal oxides, such as Al-CuO and Al-MoO3 systems. To increase the reactivity, an initial mechanical activation was achieved through interrupted ball milling. The consolidation of the materials used the supersonic cold gas spray technique, where the particles are accelerated to high speeds and consolidated via plastic deformation upon impact, forming activated nano-composites in arbitrary shapes with close to zero porosity. This technique permits to retain the feedstock powder micro-structure and prevents any reactions during the consolidation phase. Reactivity of mixtures has been investigated through flame propagation analysis on cold sprayed samples and compacted powder mixture. Deflagration tests showed the influence of porosity on the reactivity.

  13. Eco-friendly gas mixtures for Resistive Plate Chambers based on tetrafluoropropene and Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Benussi, L.; Piccolo, D.; Bianco, S.; Ferrini, M.; Muhammad, S.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Russo, A.; Saviano, G.

    2016-08-01

    Due to the recent restrictions deriving from the application of the Kyoto protocol, the main components of the gas mixtures presently used in the Resistive Plate Chambers systems of the LHC experiments will be most probably phased out of production in the coming years. Identifying possible replacements with the adequate characteristics requires an intense R&D activity, which was recently started, in collaborations with various experiments. Possible new gases have been proposed and are thoroughly investigated. Some tests on one of the most promising candidate—HFO-1234ze, an allotropic form of tetrafluoropropane—have already been reported. Here an innovative approach, based on the use of Helium, to solve the problem related to the high operating voltage needed to operate the chambers with HFO-1234ze based gas mixtures, is discussed and the first results are shown.

  14. Cryotrapping assisted mass spectrometry for the analysis of complex gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Jose A.; Tabares, Francisco L.

    2007-03-15

    A simple method is described for the unambiguous identification of the individual components in a gas mixture showing strong overlapping of their mass spectrometric cracking patterns. The method, herein referred to as cryotrapping assisted mass spectrometry, takes advantage of the different vapor pressure values of the individual components at low temperature (78 K for liquid nitrogen traps), and thus of the different depletion efficiencies and outgassing patterns during the fast cooling and slow warming up of the trap, respectively. Examples of the use of this technique for gas mixtures with application to plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon and carbon-nitrogen hard films are shown. Detection of traces of specific C{sub 3} hydrocarbons (<50 ppm of initial methane) in methane/hydrogen plasmas and the possible trapping of thermally unstable C-N compounds in N{sub 2} containing deposition plasmas are addressed as representative examples of specific applications of the technique.

  15. Viscous shock layer solutions for turbulent flow of radiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous shock layer equations for hypersonic laminar and turbulent flows of radiating or nonradiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium are presented for two-dimensional and axially symmetric flow fields. Solutions are obtained using an implicit finite difference scheme and results are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically blunted cone configurations at free stream conditions representative of entry into the atmosphere of Venus. These data are compared with solutions obtained using other methods of analysis.

  16. Viscous-shock-layer solutions for turbulent flow of radiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous-shock-layer equations for hypersonic laminar and turbulent flows of radiating or nonradiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium are presented for two-dimensional and axially-symmetric flow fields. Solutions were obtained using an implicit finite-difference scheme and results are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically-blunted cone configurations at freestream conditions representative of entry into the atmosphere of Venus. These data are compared with solutions obtained using other methods of analysis.

  17. Adsorption process to recover hydrogen from feed gas mixtures having low hydrogen concentration

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Weist, Jr., Edward Landis; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Novosat, Paul Anthony

    2010-04-13

    A process for selectively separating hydrogen from at least one more strongly adsorbable component in a plurality of adsorption beds to produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from a low hydrogen concentration feed with a high recovery rate. Each of the plurality of adsorption beds subjected to a repetitive cycle. The process comprises an adsorption step for producing the hydrogen-rich product from a feed gas mixture comprising 5% to 50% hydrogen, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas withdrawal steps, a provide purge step resulting in a first pressure decrease, a blowdown step resulting in a second pressure decrease, a purge step, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas introduction steps, and a repressurization step. The second pressure decrease is at least 2 times greater than the first pressure decrease.

  18. Process and catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid hydrocarbon mixture

    DOEpatents

    Rao, V. Udaya S.; Gormley, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Synthesis gas containing CO and H.sub.2 is converted to a high-octane hydrocarbon liquid in the gasoline boiling point range by bringing the gas into contact with a heterogeneous catalyst including, in physical mixture, a zeolite molecular sieve, cobalt at 6-20% by weight, and thoria at 0.5-3.9% by weight. The contacting occurs at a temperature of 250.degree.-300.degree. C., and a pressure of 10-30 atmospheres. The conditions can be selected to form a major portion of the hydrocarbon product in the gasoline boiling range with a research octane of more than 80 and less than 10% by weight aromatics.

  19. Plasma nitriding using high H2 content gas mixtures for a cavitation erosion resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allenstein, A. N.; Lepienski, C. M.; Buschinelli, A. J. A.; Brunatto, S. F.

    2013-07-01

    Plasma nitriding using high H2 content gas mixtures in CA-6NM martensitic stainless steel was studied in the present work. Nitriding was performed in H2 + N2 gas mixtures for 5, 10 and 20% N2, in volume, at 773 K (500 °C), during 2 h. Changes in the surface morphology and nitrided layer constitution were characterized by SEM, XRD, roughness analysis, and nanoindentation technique. Cavitation erosion behavior of the nitrided samples was also investigated by means of a 20 kHz ultrasonic vibrator. The study was emphasized for the three first cavitation stages (incubation, acceleration, and maximum erosion rate stage) of the cumulative erosion-time curve. Results indicate that the gas mixture nitrogen content strongly influences the phases' formation and its distribution on the nitrided layer. Better cavitation erosion resistance which was attributed to the finer and more homogeneous distribution of the nitrided layer phases was verified for samples treated at 5% N2. Otherwise, worse cavitation erosion behavior for samples nitrided at 20% N2 is supposed to be due to the formation of multiphase compound layer constituted by Fe4N + Fe2-3N + CrN, which can infer residual stress in treated surface.

  20. A general stagnation-point convective heating equation for arbitrary gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, K.; Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    The stagnation-point convective heat transfer to an axisymmetric blunt body for arbitrary gases in chemical equilibrium was investigated. The gases considered were base gases of nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, helium, neon, argon, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and methane and 22 gas mixtures composed of the base gases. Enthalpies ranged from 2.3 to 116.2 MJ/kg, pressures ranged from 0.001 to 100 atmospheres, and the wall temperatures were 300 and 1111 K. A general equation for the stagnation-point convective heat transfer in base gases and gas mixtures was derived and is a function of the mass fraction, the molecular weight, and a transport parameter of the base gases. The relation compares well with present boundary-layer computer results and with other analytical and experimental results. In addition, the analysis verified that the convective heat transfer in gas mixtures can be determined from a summation relation involving the heat transfer coefficients of the base gases. The basic technique developed for the prediction of stagnation-point convective heating to an axisymmetric blunt body could be applied to other heat transfer problems.

  1. Emergence in Elderly Patient Undergoing General Anesthesia with Xenon

    PubMed Central

    Wefki Abdelgawwad Shousha, Ahmed Abdelgawwad; Paparazzo, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. It is a consensus that the postoperative cognitive function is impaired in elderly patients after general anaesthesia, and such category patient takes more time to recover. Xenon is a noble gas with anesthetic properties mediated by antagonism of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. With a minimum alveolar concentration of 0.63, xenon is intended for maintaining hypnosis with 30% oxygen. The fast recovery after xenon anaesthesia was hypothesized to be advantageous in this scenario. Case Presentation. We report the case of 99-year-old woman who underwent sigmoid colon carcinoma resection with colorectal anastomosis. We carried out the induction phase by propofol, oxygen, fentanil, and rocuronium bromide, and then we proceeded to a rapid sequence endotracheal intubation consequently. The patient was monitored by IBP, NIBP, ECG, cardiac frequency, respiratory rate, capnometry, TOF Guard, blood gas analysis, and BIS. For maintenance we administrated oxygen, remifentanil, rocuronium bromide, and xenon gas 60–65%. Shortly after the end of surgery the patients started an autonomous respiratory activity, and a high BIS level was also recorded. Decision was made by our team to proceed into the emergence phase. The residual neuromuscular block was antagonized by sugammadex, modified Aldrete score was implicated, and we got our patient fully awake without any cognitive dysfunction or delirium. Conclusion. The rapid emergence to full orientation in very elderly patient who had been anesthetized by xenon shows concordance to the high BIS values and the clinical signs of the depth of anesthesia. PMID:23762640

  2. Extremely low flow tracheal gas insufflation of helium-oxygen mixture improves gas exchange in a rabbit model of piston-type high-frequency oscillatory ventilation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to show the effects of the tracheal gas insufflation (TGI) technique on gas exchange using helium-oxygen mixtures during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). We hypothesized that a helium-oxygen mixture delivered into the trachea using the TGI technique (0.3 L/min) would enhance gas exchange during HFOV. Methods Three rabbits were prepared and ventilated by HFOV with carrier 70% helium/oxygen or 70% nitrogen/oxygen gas mixture with TGI in a crossover study. Changing the gas mixture from nitrogen70% to helium70% and back was performed three times per animal with constant ventilation parameters. Results Compared with the nitrogen-oxygen mixture, the helium-oxygen mixture of TGI reduced PaCO2 by 7.6 mmHg (p < 0.01) and improved PaO2 by 14 mmHg (p < 0.01). Amplitude during TGI was significantly lower with the helium-oxygen mixture than with the nitrogen-oxygen mixture (p < 0.01) and did not significantly affect mean airway pressure. Conclusions This study demonstrated that a helium-oxygen mixture delivered into the trachea using the TGI technique would enhance CO2 elimination and improve oxygenation during HFOV. PMID:23566050

  3. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2010-11-09

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  4. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2014-08-19

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  5. Determination of the concentration of SF 6 in an accelerator gas mixture by measuring the velocity of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilburn, W. S.; Gould, C. R.; Haase, D. G.; Hoffenberg, R. S.; Mioduszewski, S.; Roberson, N. R.

    1995-02-01

    A simple and reliable method for determining the concentration of SF 6 in an accelerator gas mixture with N 2 and CO 2 is described. The technique makes use of the low velocity of sound in SF 6 (approximately {1}/{3} that of air). The sound velocity of the mixture is determined by measuring the spacing of acoustic resonances in a tube filled with the gas. Data from standard gas mixtures containing 0-10% SF 6 are presented, showing that the technique is accurate to approximately 0.5% absolute.

  6. Regularized moment equations for binary gas mixtures: Derivation and linear analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar; Struchtrup, Henning; Torrilhon, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    The applicability of the order of magnitude method [H. Struchtrup, "Stable transport equations for rarefied gases at high orders in the Knudsen number," Phys. Fluids 16, 3921-3934 (2004)] is extended to binary gas mixtures in order to derive various sets of equations—having minimum number of moments at a given order of accuracy in the Knudsen number—for binary mixtures of monatomic-inert-ideal gases interacting with the Maxwell interaction potential. For simplicity, the equations are derived in the linear regime up to third order accuracy in the Knudsen number. At zeroth order, the method produces the Euler equations; at first order, it results into the Fick, Navier-Stokes, and Fourier equations; at second order, it yields a set of 17 moment equations; and at third order, it leads to the regularized 17-moment equations. The transport coefficients in the Fick, Navier-Stokes, and Fourier equations obtained through order of magnitude method are compared with those obtained through the classical Chapman-Enskog expansion method. It is established that the different temperatures of different constituents do not play a role up to second order accurate theories in the Knudsen number, whereas they do contribute to third order accurate theory in the Knudsen number. Furthermore, it is found empirically that the zeroth, first, and second order accurate equations are linearly stable for all binary gas mixtures; however, although the third order accurate regularized 17-moment equations are linearly stable for most of the mixtures, they are linearly unstable for mixtures having extreme difference in molecular masses.

  7. Determination of time-course change rate for arterial xenon using the time course of tissue xenon concentration in xenon-enhanced computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sase, Shigeru; Takahashi, Hideaki; Ikeda, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Minoru; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Michihiro

    2008-06-15

    In calculating tissue blood flow (TBF) according to the Fick principle, time-course information on arterial tracer concentration is indispensable and has a considerable influence on the accuracy of calculated TBF. In TBF measurement by xenon-enhanced computed tomography (Xe-CT), nonradioactive xenon gas is administered by inhalation as a tracer, and end-tidal xenon is used as a substitute for arterial xenon. There has been the assumption that the time-course change rate for end-tidal xenon concentration (Ke) and that for arterial xenon concentration (Ka) are substantially equal. Respiratory gas sampling is noninvasive to the patient and Ke can be easily measured by exponential curve fitting to end-tidal xenon concentrations. However, it is pointed out that there would be a large difference between Ke and Ka in many cases. The purpose of this work was to develop a method of determining the Ka value using the time course of tissue xenon concentration in Xe-CT. The authors incorporated Ka into the Kety autoradiographic equation as a parameter to be solved, and developed a method of least-squares to obtain the solution for Ka from the time-course changes in xenon concentration in the tissue. The authors applied this method of least-squares to the data from Xe-CT abdominal studies performed on 17 patients; the solution for Ka was found pixel by pixel in the spleen, and its Ka map was created for each patient. On the one hand, the authors obtained the average value of the Ka map of the spleen as the calculated Ka (Ka{sub calc}) for each patient. On the other hand, the authors measured Ka (Ka{sub meas}) using the time-course changes in CT enhancement in the abdominal aorta for each patient. There was a good correlation between Ka{sub calc} and Ka{sub meas} (r=0.966, P<0.0001), and these two Ka values were close to each other (Ka{sub calc}=0.935xKa{sub meas}+0.089). This demonstrates that Ka{sub calc} would be close to the true Ka value. Accuracy of TBF by Xe-CT can be

  8. Xenon-enhanced CT imaging of local pulmonary ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, Jehangir K.; Tran, Binh Q.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1996-04-01

    We are using the unique features of electron beam CT (EBCT) in conjunction with respiratory and cardiac gating to explore the use of non-radioactive xenon gas as a pulmonary ventilation contrast agent. The goal is to construct accurate and quantitative high-resolution maps of local pulmonary ventilation in humans. We are evaluating xenon-enhanced computed tomography in the pig model with dynamic tracer washout/dilution and single breath inhalation imaging protocols. Scanning is done via an EBCT scanner which offers 50 msec scan aperture speeds. CT attenuation coefficients (image gray scale value) show a linear increase with xenon concentration (r equals 0.99). We measure a 1.55 Hounsfield Unit (HU) enhancement (kV equals 130, mA equals 623) per percentage increase in xenon gas concentration giving an approximately 155 HU enhancement with 100% xenon gas concentration as measured in a plexiglass super-syringe. Early results indicate that a single breath (from functional residual capacity to total lung capacity) of 100% xenon gas provides an average 32 +/- 1.85 (SE) HU enhancement in the lung parenchyma (maximum 50 HU) and should not encounter unwanted xenon side effects. However, changes in lung density occurring during even short breath holds (as short as 10 seconds) may limit using a single breath technique to synchronous volumetric scanning, currently possible only with EBCT. Preliminary results indicate close agreement between measured regional xenon concentration-time curves and theoretical predictions for the same sample. More than 10 breaths with inspirations to as high as 25 cmH2O airway pressure were needed to clear tracer from all lung regions and some regions had nearly linear rather than mono-exponential clearance curves. When regional parenchymal xenon concentration-time curves were analyzed, vertical gradients in ventilation and redistribution of ventilation at higher inspiratory flow rates were consistent with known pulmonary physiology. We present

  9. Status of the XENON Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbini, Marco; XENON Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Astronomical and cosmological observations indicate that a large amount of the energy content of the Universe is made of dark matter. The most promising dark matter candidates are the so-called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles. The search for these particles is performed with various experimental approaches. The XENON Project, at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, is devoted to the direct search of dark matter particles. It consists in operating a double-phase time projection chamber using ultra-pure liquid Xenon as both target and detection medium for dark matter particle interactions. The WIMPs can be indeed detected via their elastic scattering off Xenon nuclei. The XENON100 detector with 160 kg of liquid Xenon has reached in 2012 the sensitivity of 2×10-45 cm2 at 55 GeV/c 2 and 90% confidence level on spin-independent elastic WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section. The next generation XENON1T detector, that will host 3.3 tonnes of ultra-pure liquid Xenon, is in its final stage of construction and will likely start taking data by the end of 2015. The detector is designed to increase the sensitivity by two orders of magnitude.

  10. Adiabatic temperature changes of magma-gas mixtures during ascent and eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, L.G.; Ghiorso, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    Most quantitative studies of flow dynamics in eruptive conduits during volcanic eruptions use a simplified energy equation that ignores either temperature changes, or the thermal effects of gas exsolution. In this paper we assess the effects of those simplifications by analyzing the influence of equilibrium gas exsolution and expansion on final temperatures, velocities, and liquid viscosities of magma-gas mixtures during adiabatic decompression. For a given initial pressure (p1), temperature (T1) and melt composition, the final temperature (Tf) and velocity (Umax) will vary depending on the degree to which friction and other irreversible processes reduce mechanical energy within the conduit. The final conditions range between two thermodynamic end members: (1) Constant enthalpy (dh=0), in which Tf is maximal and no energy goes into lifting or acceleration; and (2) constant entropy (ds=0), in which Tf is minimal and maximum energy goes into lifting and acceleration. For ds=0, T1=900 ??C and p1=200 MPa, a water-saturated albitic melt cools by ???200 ??C during decompression, but only about 250 ??C of this temperature decrease can be attributed to the energy of gas exsolution per se: The remainder results from expansion of gas that has already exsolved. For the same T1 and p1, and dh=0, Tf is 10-15 ??C hotter than T1 but is about 10-25 ??C cooler than Tf in similar calculations that ignore the energy of gas exsolution. For ds=0, p1=200 MPa and T1= 9,000 ??C, assuming that all the enthalpy change of decompression goes into kinetic energy, a water-saturated albitic mixture can theoretically accelerate to ???800 m/s. Similar calculations that ignore gas exsolution (but take into account gas expansion) give velocities about 10-15% higher. For the same T1, p1 = 200 MPa, and ds = 0, the cooling associated with gas expansion and exsolution increases final melt viscosity more than 2.5 orders of magnitude. For dh = 0, isenthalpic heating decreases final melt viscosity by about

  11. [Fire disaster due to deflagration of a propane gas-air mixture].

    PubMed

    Nadjem, Hadi; Vogt, Susanne; Simon, Karl-Heinz; Pollak, Stefan; Geisenberger, Dorothee; Kramer, Lena; Pircher, Rebecca; Perdekampl, Markus Große; Thierauf-Emberger, Annette

    2015-01-01

    On 26 Nov 2012, a serious fire occurred at Neustadt/Black Forest in which 14 persons in a sheltered workshop died and 10 other individuals were injured. The fire was caused by the unbridled escape of propane gas due to accidental disconnection of the screw fixing between a gas bottle and a catalytic heater. Deflagration of the propane gas-air mixture set the workshop facilities on fire. In spite of partly extensive burns the fatally injured victims could be rapidly identified. The results of the fire investigations at the scene and the autopsy findings are presented. Carboxyhemoglobin concentrations ranged between 8 and 56 % and signs of fire fume inhalation were present in all cases. Three victims had eardrum ruptures due to the sudden increase in air pressure during the deflagration. PMID:26548032

  12. [Fire disaster due to deflagration of a propane gas-air mixture].

    PubMed

    Nadjem, Hadi; Vogt, Susanne; Simon, Karl-Heinz; Pollak, Stefan; Geisenberger, Dorothee; Kramer, Lena; Pircher, Rebecca; Perdekampl, Markus Große; Thierauf-Emberger, Annette

    2015-01-01

    On 26 Nov 2012, a serious fire occurred at Neustadt/Black Forest in which 14 persons in a sheltered workshop died and 10 other individuals were injured. The fire was caused by the unbridled escape of propane gas due to accidental disconnection of the screw fixing between a gas bottle and a catalytic heater. Deflagration of the propane gas-air mixture set the workshop facilities on fire. In spite of partly extensive burns the fatally injured victims could be rapidly identified. The results of the fire investigations at the scene and the autopsy findings are presented. Carboxyhemoglobin concentrations ranged between 8 and 56 % and signs of fire fume inhalation were present in all cases. Three victims had eardrum ruptures due to the sudden increase in air pressure during the deflagration.

  13. Electron Density Measurements in UV-Preionized XeCl and CO2 Laser Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Shigeyuki; Sato, Saburo; Goto, Tatsumi

    1989-11-01

    A Langmuir probe technique has been used to measure electron densities and temperatures in UV-preionized XeCl excimer and CO2 laser gas mixtures in a laser tube. For this experiment, only pin electrodes (preionization sparks) were operated with no discharge between the main electrodes. The measured electron densities were about 108 cm-3 in both the excimer and CO2 laser gases, compared with 1010 cm-3 in pure He gas. The electron density was found to increase due to the proximity of the main electrodes. The coefficients of absorption for excimer and CO2 laser gas were obtained from the characteristics of the electron densities vs the distance from the UV source. Based on the absorption coefficient for XeCl, 0.9 cm-1 atm-1, we propose pin-electrode arrangements for spatially uniform preionization.

  14. Additional development of large diameter carbon monofilament. [from boron, hydrogen, and methane gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, B. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The chemical vapor process for preparing a large diameter carbon-base monofilament from a BCl3, Ch4 and H2 gas mixture with a carbon substrate fiber was studied. The effect of reactor geometry, total gas flows and deposition temperature on the tensile strength of the monofilament were investigated. It was noted that consistent results could only be obtained when the carbon substrate fiber was cleaned. The strength of the monofilament was found to depend on the highest temperature and the temperature profile of the monofilament in the reactor. The strength of monofilament produced in the dc and RF reactors were found to be similar and similar alloy compositions in the monofilament were attained when the same gas ratios were used. The tensile strength of the monofilament at 500 C was found to be 60 to 70% of the room temperature tensile strength. No degradation was noted after exposure to molten aluminum.

  15. A computational investigation of the effectiveness of different shielding gas mixtures for arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, A. B.; Tanaka, M.; Tashiro, S.; Sato, T.; Lowke, J. J.

    2009-06-01

    Tungsten-inert-gas welding arcs are modelled using a two-dimensional axisymmetric computational code. Both electrodes (the tungsten cathode and the metal anode workpiece) and the arc plasma are included self-consistently in the computational domain. The influence of adding helium, hydrogen and nitrogen to the argon shielding gas is investigated. It is found that addition of any of the gases increases the heat flow to and the current density at the anode. The shear stress and the arc pressure at the anode surface are increased by adding hydrogen or nitrogen or up to about 50 mol% helium, but decrease when more helium is added. It is predicted that the effect of adding any of the gases is to increase the depth of the weld pool, in agreement with the experimental evidence. The results are explained by referring to the thermodynamic and transport properties of the gas mixtures.

  16. Atmospheric pressure glow discharge generated in nitrogen-methane gas mixture: PTR-MS analyzes of the exhaust gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torokova, Lucie; Mazankova, Vera; Krcma, Frantisek; Mason, Nigel J.; Matejcik, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the results of an extensive study of with the in situ mass spectrometry analysis of gaseous phase species produced by an atmospheric plasma glow discharge in N2-CH4 gas mixtures (with methane concentrations ranging from 1% to 4%). The products are studied using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). HCN and CH3CN are identified as the main gaseous products. Hydrazine, methanimine, methyldiazene, ethylamine, cyclohexadiene, pyrazineacetylene, ethylene, propyne and propene are identified as minor compounds. All the detected compounds and their relative abundances are determined with respect to the experimental conditions (gas composition and applied power). The same molecules were observed by the Cassini-Huygens probe in Titan's atmosphere (which has same N2-CH4 gas mixtures). Such, experiments show that the formation of such complex organics in atmospheres containing C, N and H, like that of Titan, could be a source of prebiotic molecules. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  17. Kinetic model for the vibrational energy exchange in flowing molecular gas mixtures. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offenhaeuser, F.

    1987-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the development of a computational model for the description of the vibrational energy exchange in flowing gas mixtures, taking into account a given number of energy levels for each vibrational degree of freedom. It is possible to select an arbitrary number of energy levels. The presented model uses values in the range from 10 to approximately 40. The distribution of energy with respect to these levels can differ from the equilibrium distribution. The kinetic model developed can be employed for arbitrary gaseous mixtures with an arbitrary number of vibrational degrees of freedom for each type of gas. The application of the model to CO2-H2ON2-O2-He mixtures is discussed. The obtained relations can be utilized in a study of the suitability of radiation-related transitional processes, involving the CO2 molecule, for laser applications. It is found that the computational results provided by the model agree very well with experimental data obtained for a CO2 laser. Possibilities for the activation of a 16-micron and 14-micron laser are considered.

  18. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch catalyst/wax mixtures using dense gas extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, M.W.; Rohar, P.C.; Hickey, R.F.

    1995-12-01

    The separation of a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst from wax products is an important issue when the synthesis is conducted in a slurry bubble column reactor. This paper describes a new technique based on dense gas extraction of the soluble hydrocarbon components from the insoluble catalyst particles using light hydrocarbons as propane, butane, and pentane as the solvent. The extractions were conducted in a continuous unit operated near the critical point of the extraction gas on a catalyst/wax mixture containing about 4.91 wt% catalyst. The catalyst-free wax was collected in the second stage collector while the catalyst and some insoluble wax components were collected in the first stage collector. The yield of catalyst-free wax was about 60 wt% of the feed mixture. The catalyst content of the catalyst/wax mixture in the first stage was about 14.8 wt%. The catalyst content in the second stage collector was less than 1 part in 100,000.

  19. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch catalyst/wax mixtures using dense gas extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, M.W.; Rohar, P.C.; Hickey, R.F.; White, C.M.; Quiring, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The separation of a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst from wax products is an important issue when the synthesis is conducted in a slurry bubble column reactor. This paper describes a new technique based on dense gas extraction of the soluble hydrocarbon components from the insoluble catalyst particles using light hydrocarbons as propane, butane, and pentane an the solvent. The extractions were conducted in a continuous unit operated near the critical point of the extraction gas on a catalyst/wax mixture containing about 4.91 wt% catalyst. The catalyst-free wax was collected in the second stage collector while the catalyst and some insoluble wax components were collected in the first stage collector. The yield of catalyst-free wax was about 60 wt% of the food mixture. The catalyst content of the catalyst/wax mixture in the first stage was about 14.8 wt%. The catalyst content in the second stage collector was less than 1 part in 100,000.

  20. XENON in medical area: emphasis on neuroprotection in hypoxia and anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Xenon is a medical gas capable of establishing neuroprotection, inducing anesthesia as well as serving in modern laser technology and nuclear medicine as a contrast agent. In spite of its high cost, its lack of side effects, safe cardiovascular and organoprotective profile and effective neuroprotective role after hypoxic-ischemic injury (HI) favor its applications in clinics. Xenon performs its anesthetic and neuroprotective functions through binding to glycine site of glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor competitively and blocking it. This blockage inhibits the overstimulation of NMDA receptors, thus preventing their following downstream calcium accumulating cascades. Xenon is also used in combination therapies together with hypothermia or sevoflurane. The neuroprotective effects of xenon and hypothermia cooperate synergistically whether they are applied synchronously or asynchronously. Distinguishing properties of Xenon promise for innovations in medical gas field once further studies are fulfilled and Xenon’s high cost is overcome. PMID:23369273

  1. Study on a pulse tube cryocooler using gas mixture as its working fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, C. M.; He, Y. L.; Chen, Z. Q.

    2000-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a one-stage pulse tube cryocooler, gas mixtures are used for comparison, which have been used in other cryocoolers. A mixture of hydrogen and helium was investigated in this study. When the structure of the pulse tube is the same as mentioned in [C. Wang, P.Y. Wu, Zh.Q. Chen, Numerical modeling of an orifice pulse tube cryocooler, Cryogenics 32 (1992) 785] and the working conditions are: frequency 15 Hz, average pressure 1.1 MPa, hot end temperature 300 K and cold end temperature 80 K, it has been found that there are optimal molar percentage for the maximal cooling power and the maximal-coefficient of performance (COP) of this cryocooler.

  2. Discrete velocity computations with stochastic variance reduction of the Boltzmann equation for gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Peter; Varghese, Philip; Goldstein, David

    2014-12-09

    We extend a variance reduced discrete velocity method developed at UT Austin [1, 2] to gas mixtures with large mass ratios and flows with trace species. The mixture is stored as a collection of independent velocity distribution functions, each with a unique grid in velocity space. Different collision types (A-A, A-B, B-B, etc.) are treated independently, and the variance reduction scheme is formulated with different equilibrium functions for each separate collision type. The individual treatment of species enables increased focus on species important to the physics of the flow, even if the important species are present in trace amounts. The method is verified through comparisons to Direct Simulation Monte Carlo computations and the computational workload per time step is investigated for the variance reduced method.

  3. Chondritic xenon in the Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Caracausi, Antonio; Avice, Guillaume; Burnard, Peter G; Füri, Evelyn; Marty, Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Noble gas isotopes are powerful tracers of the origins of planetary volatiles, and the accretion and evolution of the Earth. The compositions of magmatic gases provide insights into the evolution of the Earth's mantle and atmosphere. Despite recent analytical progress in the study of planetary materials and mantle-derived gases, the possible dual origin of the planetary gases in the mantle and the atmosphere remains unconstrained. Evidence relating to the relationship between the volatiles within our planet and the potential cosmochemical end-members is scarce. Here we show, using high-precision analysis of magmatic gas from the Eifel volcanic area (in Germany), that the light xenon isotopes identify a chondritic primordial component that differs from the precursor of atmospheric xenon. This is consistent with an asteroidal origin for the volatiles in the Earth's mantle, and indicates that the volatiles in the atmosphere and mantle originated from distinct cosmochemical sources. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the origin of Eifel magmatism being a deep mantle plume. The corresponding mantle source has been isolated from the convective mantle since about 4.45 billion years ago, in agreement with models that predict the early isolation of mantle domains. Xenon isotope systematics support a clear distinction between mid-ocean-ridge and continental or oceanic plume sources, with chemical heterogeneities dating back to the Earth's accretion. The deep reservoir now sampled by the Eifel gas had a lower volatile/refractory (iodine/plutonium) composition than the shallower mantle sampled by mid-ocean-ridge volcanism, highlighting the increasing contribution of volatile-rich material during the first tens of millions of years of terrestrial accretion. PMID:27111512

  4. Chondritic xenon in the Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Caracausi, Antonio; Avice, Guillaume; Burnard, Peter G; Füri, Evelyn; Marty, Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Noble gas isotopes are powerful tracers of the origins of planetary volatiles, and the accretion and evolution of the Earth. The compositions of magmatic gases provide insights into the evolution of the Earth's mantle and atmosphere. Despite recent analytical progress in the study of planetary materials and mantle-derived gases, the possible dual origin of the planetary gases in the mantle and the atmosphere remains unconstrained. Evidence relating to the relationship between the volatiles within our planet and the potential cosmochemical end-members is scarce. Here we show, using high-precision analysis of magmatic gas from the Eifel volcanic area (in Germany), that the light xenon isotopes identify a chondritic primordial component that differs from the precursor of atmospheric xenon. This is consistent with an asteroidal origin for the volatiles in the Earth's mantle, and indicates that the volatiles in the atmosphere and mantle originated from distinct cosmochemical sources. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the origin of Eifel magmatism being a deep mantle plume. The corresponding mantle source has been isolated from the convective mantle since about 4.45 billion years ago, in agreement with models that predict the early isolation of mantle domains. Xenon isotope systematics support a clear distinction between mid-ocean-ridge and continental or oceanic plume sources, with chemical heterogeneities dating back to the Earth's accretion. The deep reservoir now sampled by the Eifel gas had a lower volatile/refractory (iodine/plutonium) composition than the shallower mantle sampled by mid-ocean-ridge volcanism, highlighting the increasing contribution of volatile-rich material during the first tens of millions of years of terrestrial accretion.

  5. Helium detection in gas mixtures by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Eseller, Kemal E; Yueh, Fang-Yu; Singh, Jagdish P; Melikechi, Noureddine

    2012-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been evaluated as a tool for monitoring trace levels of helium in gas mixtures consisting mostly of hydrogen. Calibration data for helium in hydrogen was investigated at different helium concentration levels. At high concentrations of helium (>7.25%), the LIBS signal is quenched due to Penning ionization. The hydrogen alpha line (656.28 nm) was observed to broaden as the concentration of helium impurities in the hydrogen gas mixture increased. The helium line at 587.56 nm was selected as the analyte line for helium impurity detection. The effects of laser energy, the delay time between the laser pulse and data acquisition, and the gas pressure on the LIBS signal of helium were investigated to determine the optimum conditions for helium detection. The LIBS signal from the helium line at 587.56 nm shows good linear correlation with helium concentration for He concentrations below 1%. Thus, LIBS can be reliably used to detect the low levels of helium. The limit of detection for helium was found to be 78 ppm.

  6. Precision measurement of timing RPC gas mixtures with laser-beam induced electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, L.; Siebold, M.; Kaspar, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Kotte, R.; Laso Garcia, A.; Löser, M.; Schramm, U.; Wüstenfeld, J.

    2014-10-01

    The main goals of a new test facility at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf are precision measurements of the electron drift velocity and the Townsend coefficient of gases at atmospheric pressure in the strongest ever used homogenous electrical fields and the search for new RPC gas mixtures to substitute the climate harmful Freon. Picosecond UV laser pulses were focused into a sub-millimeter gas gap to initialize a defined tiny charge. These gaps are formed by electrodes of low-resistive ceramics or high-resistive float glass. The charge multiplication occurs in a strong homogeneous electric field of up to 100 kV/cm. Electron-ion pairs were generated in a cylindrical micro-volume by multi-photon ionization. The laser-pulse repetition rate ranges from 1 Hz to a few kHz. The RPC time resolution has been measured for different gases. First results of the Townsend coefficient at 100 kV/cm show a strong disagreement between the present measurement and Magboltz simulations for the typical timing RPC gas mixture C2F4H2/SF6/i-C4H10, while the measured electron drift velocities are in a good agreement with the model predictions.

  7. Solubilized xenon 133 lung scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.

    1988-11-01

    Lung scanning using solubilized xenon 133 can provide important information concerning both pulmonary perfusion and ventilation. This technique proved valuable in establishing the diagnosis of congenital lobar emphysema in a 7-month-old baby.

  8. Solubilities of krypton and xenon in dichlorodifluoromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, J.H.; Shockley, W.E.; Greene, C.W.

    1984-07-01

    The solubility behavior of krypton and xenon in dichlorodifluoromethane was investigated for the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) in support of the fluorocarbon absorption process. The solubility data derived from solute radioisotopes had uncertainties of approx. 0.1%. Values for Henry's law constants were initially determined under equilibrium conditions at infinite solute dilution. Based on these results, the study was extended to finite solute concentrations. Nonidealities in the two binary systems were expressed as gas phase fugacity coefficients for each solute at 10/sup 0/ intervals over the range -30 to +50/sup 0/C. 22 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Evaluation of the age of landfill gas methane in landfill gas-natural gas mixtures using co-occurring constituents.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, Henry B; Hagedorn, Benjamin; Verwiel, Mark

    2013-06-01

    At a municipal solid waste landfill in southern California (USA) overlying a natural gas reservoir, methane was detected at concentrations of up to 40% (by volume) in perimeter soil gas probes. Stable isotope and (14)C values of methane together with gas composition (major components and volatile organic compounds) data were evaluated to assess the relative contributions of landfill gas and natural gas to the measured methane concentrations. The data was further used to estimate the residence time of the landfill gas in the probes. Results showed that up to 37% of the measured methane was derived from landfill gas. In addition, the landfill gas in the probe samples has undergone extensive alteration due to dissolution of carbon dioxide in pore water. Data further indicates that the measured methane was released from the waste approximately 1.2 to 9.4 years ago, rather than representing evidence of an ongoing release.

  10. An investigation of condensation from steam-gas mixtures flowing downward inside a vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, S.Z.; Schrock, V.E.; Peterson, P.F.

    1995-09-01

    Previous experiments have been carried out by Vierow, Ogg, Kageyama and Siddique for condensation from steam/gas mixtures in vertical tubes. In each case the data scatter relative to the correlation was large and there was not close agreement among the three investigations. A new apparatus has been designed and built using the lessons learned from the earlier studies. Using the new apparatus, an extensive new data base has been obtained for pure steam, steam-air mixtures and steam-helium mixtures. Three different correlations, one implementing the degradation method initially proposed by Vierow and Schrock, a second diffusion layer theory initially proposed by Peterson, and third mass transfer conductance model are presented in this paper. The correlation using the simple degradation factor method has been shown, with some modification, to give satisfactory engineering accuracy when applied to the new data. However, this method is based on very simplified arguments that do not fully represent the complex physical phenomena involved. Better representation of the data has been found possible using modifications of the more complex and phenomenologically based method which treats the heat transfer conductance of the liquid film in series with the conductance on the vapor-gas side with the latter comprised of mass transfer and sensible heat transfer conductance acting in parallel. The mechanistic models, based on the modified diffusion layer theory or classical mass transfer theory for mass transfer conductance with transpiration successfully correlate the data for the heat transfer of vapor-gas side. Combined with the heat transfer of liquid film model proposed by Blangetti, the overall heat transfer coefficients predicted by the correlations from mechanistic models are in close agreement with experimental values.

  11. [Quantitative Analysis of the Hydration Process of Mine Gas Mixture Based on Raman Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao-yong; Yu, Yue; Wu, Qiang; Gao, Xia

    2015-07-01

    The research on micro crystal structure of mine gas hydrate is especially significant for the technology of gas hydrate separation. Using Raman spectroscopy to observe hydration process of 3 kinds of mine gas mixture on line which contains high concentration of carbon dioxide, this experiment obtained the information of the hydrate crystals including large and small cage occupancy. Meanwhile obtained the hydration number indirectly based on the statistical thermodynamic model of van der Waals and Platteeuw. The results show that cage occupancy and hydration number of mine gas hydrates change little during different growth stages. The large cages of hydrate phases are nearly full occupied by carbon dioxide and methane molecules together, with the occupancy ratios between 97.70% and 98.68%. Most of the guest molecules in large cages is carbon dioxide (78.58%-94.09%) and only a few (4.52%-19.12%) is filled with methane, it is because carbon dioxide concentration in the gas sample is higher than methane and there is competition between them. However the small cage occupancy ratios is generally low in the range from 17.93% to 82.41%, and the guest molecules are all methane. With the increase of methane concentration in gas sample, the cage occupancy both large and small which methane occupied has increased, meanwhile the large cage occupancy which methane occupied is lower than small cage. The hydration numbers of mine gas hydrate during different growth stages are between 6.13 and 7.33. Small cage occupancy has increased with the increase of methane concentration, this lead to hydration number decreases. Because of the uneven distribution of hydrate growth, the hydration numbers of 3 kinds of gas samples show irregular change during different growth stages. PMID:26717751

  12. [Quantitative Analysis of the Hydration Process of Mine Gas Mixture Based on Raman Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao-yong; Yu, Yue; Wu, Qiang; Gao, Xia

    2015-07-01

    The research on micro crystal structure of mine gas hydrate is especially significant for the technology of gas hydrate separation. Using Raman spectroscopy to observe hydration process of 3 kinds of mine gas mixture on line which contains high concentration of carbon dioxide, this experiment obtained the information of the hydrate crystals including large and small cage occupancy. Meanwhile obtained the hydration number indirectly based on the statistical thermodynamic model of van der Waals and Platteeuw. The results show that cage occupancy and hydration number of mine gas hydrates change little during different growth stages. The large cages of hydrate phases are nearly full occupied by carbon dioxide and methane molecules together, with the occupancy ratios between 97.70% and 98.68%. Most of the guest molecules in large cages is carbon dioxide (78.58%-94.09%) and only a few (4.52%-19.12%) is filled with methane, it is because carbon dioxide concentration in the gas sample is higher than methane and there is competition between them. However the small cage occupancy ratios is generally low in the range from 17.93% to 82.41%, and the guest molecules are all methane. With the increase of methane concentration in gas sample, the cage occupancy both large and small which methane occupied has increased, meanwhile the large cage occupancy which methane occupied is lower than small cage. The hydration numbers of mine gas hydrate during different growth stages are between 6.13 and 7.33. Small cage occupancy has increased with the increase of methane concentration, this lead to hydration number decreases. Because of the uneven distribution of hydrate growth, the hydration numbers of 3 kinds of gas samples show irregular change during different growth stages.

  13. Stability assessment of gas mixtures containing monoterpenes in varying cylinder materials and treatments.

    PubMed

    Rhoderick, George C; Lin, Janice

    2013-05-01

    Studies of climate change increasingly recognize the diverse influences exerted by monoterpenes in the atmosphere, including roles in particulates, ozone formation, and oxidizing potential. Measurements of key monoterpenes suggest atmospheric mole fractions ranging from low pmol/mol (parts-per-trillion; ppt) to nmol/mol (parts-per-billion; ppb), depending on location and compound. To accurately establish the mole fraction trends, assess the role of monoterpenes in atmospheric chemistry, and relate measurement records from many laboratories and researchers, it is essential to have good calibration standards. The feasibility of preparing well-characterized, stable gas cylinder standards for monoterpenes at the nmol/mol level was previously tested using treated (Aculife IV) aluminum gas cylinders at NIST. Results for 4 of the 11 monoterpenes, monitored versus an internal standard of benzene, indicated stability in these treated aluminum gas cylinders for over 6 months and projected long-term (years) stability. However, the mole fraction of the key monoterpene β-pinene decreased, while the mole fractions of α-pinene, d-limonene (R-(+)-limonene), p-cymene, and camphene (a terpene not present in the initial gas mixture) increased, indicating a chemical transformation of β-pinene to these species. A similar pattern of decreasing mole fraction was observed in α-pinene where growth of d-limonene, p-cymene, and camphene has been observed in treated gas cylinders prepared with a mixture of just α-pinene and benzene as the internal standard. The current research discusses the testing of other cylinders and treatments for the potential of long-term stability of monoterpenes in a gas mixture. In this current study, a similar pattern of decreasing mole fraction, although somewhat improved short-term stability, was observed for β-pinene and α-pinene, with growth of d-limonene, p-cymene, and camphene, in nickel-plated carbon steel cylinders. β-Pinene and α-pinene showed

  14. Method of testing gas insulated systems for the presence of conducting particles utilizing a gas mixture of nitrogen and sulfur hexafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Wootton, Roy E.

    1979-01-01

    A method of testing a gas insulated system for the presence of conducting particles. The method includes inserting a gaseous mixture comprising about 98 volume percent nitrogen and about 2 volume percent sulfur hexafluoride into the gas insulated system at a pressure greater than 60 lb./sq. in. gauge, and then applying a test voltage to the system. If particles are present within the system, the gaseous mixture will break down, providing an indicator of the presence of the particles.

  15. Lasing characteristics of gas mixtures involving UFG: Application to nuclear pumping of lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdeyen, J. T.; Eden, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    Intense blue-green fluorescence from a structured band centered at lambda approximately 484 nm was observed from Ar, CF3I and NF3 gas mixtures excited by an electron beam. This emission was tentatively assigned to the E yields A transition of the iodine monofluoride (IF) molecule. The fluorescence efficiency of the IF(E yields A) band and the IF (E) state radiative lifetime were estimated to be approximately 6% and 15 ns, respectively. The emission band structure, the short IF(E) radiative lifetime and the Franck-Condon shift between the E and A states suggest that IF is an attractive candidate for a blue-green laser.

  16. Gas viscosities of azeotropic mixtures of the halogenated hydrocarbons R500, R502, and R503

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, M.; Yokoyama, C.; Takahashi, S.

    1988-07-01

    Gas viscosities of azeotropic mixtures R500 (dichlorodifluoromethane (R12)-1, 1-difluoroethane (R152a)), R 502 (chlorodifluoromethane (R22)-chloropentafluoroethane (R115)), and R503 (chlorotrifluoromethane (R13)-trifluoromethane (R23)) were measured with an oscillating disk viscometer of the Maxwell type at 273.15-423.15 K up to 7.5 MPa. Two empirical equations for the viscosities were obtained; one is for the atmospheric viscosities as a function of temperature, and the other is for the viscosities in the whole range of the present measurement as a function of temperature and density.

  17. Role of thermal diffusion in cw IR laser absorption in gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Maleissye, J T; Lempereur, F

    1982-01-15

    The absorption of radiation from a cw CO(2) laser by a mixture of absorbing SF(6) and transparent buffer gases has been measured as a function of pressure of added transparent gas (C(4)H(10)). The results are analyzed in terms of thermal diffusion of excited SF6 molecules out of the irradiation zone. In the 60-400-Torr pressure range, thermal difusion depletes the concentration of SF(6) so that the overall absorption is decreased and competes with the various channels of collisional relaxation which enhance absorption. An approximate semiempirical expression is used to determine the transient perturbation of concentration which occurs inside the laser beam.

  18. Conversion of air mixture with ethanol and water vapors in nonequilibrium gas-discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchedrin, A. I.; Levko, D. S.; Chernyak, V. Ya.; Yukhimenko, V. V.; Naumov, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    In search for an alternative fuel for internal combustion engines, we have studied the possibility of obtaining molecular hydrogen via the conversion of air mixture with ethanol and water vapors in a new plasma reactor. It is shown that, in agreement with experimental data, the H2 concentration is a linear function of the discharge current and decreases with increasing gas flow rate in the interelectrode gap. It is established that the proposed approach provides higher molecular hydrogen concentrations as compared to those achieved with other methods.

  19. A computer program for calculation of spectral radiative properties of gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealy, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A computer code is described whereby calculations of radiative properties of gas mixtures may be made. The program is arranged so that distinct radiative processes for each species are computed in individual subroutines. Provision is made for calculating radiative properties in nonequilibrium situations - separate rotational, vibrational, and electronic temperatures may be used. These features should provide a flexibility not currently available in such programs. The basic equations and the program listing in FORTRAN 4 language are presented. Sample calculations are given for high temperature air and carbon dioxide and are compared to calculations made with previously developed programs.

  20. Quenching of Particle-Gas Combustible Mixtures Using Electric Particulate Suspension (EPS) and Dispersion Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colver, Gerald M.; Goroshin, Samuel; Lee, John H. S.

    2001-01-01

    A cooperative study is being carried out between Iowa State University and McGill University. The new study concerns wall and particle quenching effects in particle-gas mixtures. The primary objective is to measure and interpret flame quenching distances, flammability limits, and burning velocities in particulate suspensions. A secondary objective is to measure particle slip velocities and particle velocity distribution as these influence flame propagation. Two suspension techniques will be utilized and compared: (1) electric particle suspension/EPS; and (2) flow dispersion. Microgravity tests will permit testing of larger particles and higher and more uniform dust concentrations than is possible in normal gravity.

  1. Adsorption of a binary gas mixture which laterally interacts on a random heterogeneous surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.A.

    1992-10-01

    Analytical expressions for the adsorption of a binary gas mixture which laterally interacts on a heterogeneous surface are developed. The lateral interactions are of the Bragg-Williams type and the surface heterogeneity is modeled via a random distribution of sites described by a uniform distribution of Henry`s Law constants. The parametric study shows that complex phase behavior can be predicted, including azeotropes and sigmoidal shaped X-Y diagrams. Also, this model may be useful for modeling and designing adsorption processes as it requires few iterations to simultaneously solve the implicit and coupled algebraic expressions.

  2. Adsorption of a binary gas mixture which laterally interacts on a random heterogeneous surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the adsorption of a binary gas mixture which laterally interacts on a heterogeneous surface are developed. The lateral interactions are of the Bragg-Williams type and the surface heterogeneity is modeled via a random distribution of sites described by a uniform distribution of Henry's Law constants. The parametric study shows that complex phase behavior can be predicted, including azeotropes and sigmoidal shaped X-Y diagrams. Also, this model may be useful for modeling and designing adsorption processes as it requires few iterations to simultaneously solve the implicit and coupled algebraic expressions.

  3. A photochemical answer to the 'xenon paradox'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébrard; Marty, B.

    2012-12-01

    Xenon is depleted by one order of magnitude relative to other volatile elements when normalized to the chondritic composition. Furthermore, atmospheric xenon is far more enriched in the heavy isotopes relatively to chondritic and solar compositions (3-4%.amu-1) than atmospheric krypton (< 1%.amu-1). This discrepancy, known as the 'xenon paradox', has led to sophisticated models of atmospheric evolution coupled with mantle geodynamics (Pepin, 1991; Tolstikhin and Marty, 1998) and cometary contributions (Dauphas, 2003; Owen et al., 1992) that could explain terrestrial noble gas patterns under ad hoc conditions during the building stages of the Earth, no more than ~200 Ma following the beginning of solar system formation. Yet, xenon having an isotopic composition intermediate between the atmospheric and the chondritic ones has been recently documented in Archean (≤3 Ga-old) sedimentary rocks (Pujol et al., 2011), suggesting that isotopic fractionation of Xe occurred over a much longer period of time than previously thought, during the Hadean and the Archean eons. In that case, assuming a Rayleigh type isotope evolution for atmospheric Xe requires an enrichment fractionation factor of 1.3% in heavy isotopes for Xe remaining in the atmosphere. This is clearly within the range of values observed in laboratory experiments aimed at trapping and fractionating Xe isotopes in solids, which is only effective upon ionization (Marrocchi et al., 2011; Kuga et al., 2012). We report here a possibility for explaining the 'xenon paradox' through interaction of the Hadean/Archean atmosphere with EUV light from the young Sun. By using a new photochemical model, we have found out that atmospheric Xe depletion and enrichment in heavy Xe isotopes could be achieved by EUV photoionization deep enough in the atmosphere to allow the preferential implantation of the heavier Xe isotopes in organic aerosols, the formation of which is itself triggered by UV photochemistry. Most of the ionized

  4. Effects of temperature on the carbonation of flue gas desulphurization gypsum using a CO2/N2 gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Gyu; Ryu, Kyung Won; Chae, Soo Chun; Jang, Young Nam

    2015-01-01

    The carbonation of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum using a CO2/N2 gas mixture was investigated to study the feasibility of using the flue gas directly in the gypsum carbonation. The effect of the reaction temperature on the carbonation reaction and the carbonation conversion efficiency of the samples were considered. In this study, the carbonation conversion efficiency was calculated using a new method for decreasing the error range from a sample containing unreacted gypsum. The carbonation reaction at 40°C was nearly twice as fast as the reaction at room temperature. In addition, the carbonation conversion efficiency at 40°C (96%) was nearly the same as that at room temperature. However, the efficiency decreased significantly with temperature, especially above 60°C. It can, therefore, be concluded that the direct use of flue gas in gypsum carbonation is most feasible at 40°C. The temperature of carbonation strongly affected the CaCO3 polymorphs and the morphological characteristics. Calcite with various shapes was the dominant (40-90%) phase at all temperatures. At temperatures below 40°C, spherical-shaped vaterite was pronounced, while needle-flower-shaped aragonite was dominant at temperatures above 80°C.

  5. Standardization of xenon-127 and measurement of photon emission intensities.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M; Lépy, M-C; Cassette, P; Mougeot, X; Bé, M M

    2014-05-01

    Xenon-127 was standardized by internal gas counting using three proportional counters in a differential arrangement to eliminate edge effects. The detection efficiency of the proportional counters was calculated by considering the cascade of events following the electron capture and associated gamma transitions. Activity per unit volume was measured with 0.7% relative standard uncertainty. Gamma-ray spectrometry was performed and absolute photon emission intensities were derived. This study shows that (127)Xe could be a surrogate for (133)Xe for the calibration of remote radio-xenon monitoring stations.

  6. Transport Properties of He-N{sub 2} Binary Gas Mixtures for CBC Space Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier, Jean-Michel P.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2008-01-21

    In order to reduce the size and mass of the single-shaft turbo-machines, with little impact on the size of the heat transfer components in the CBC loop, He-Xe binary mixture with a molecular weight of 40 g/mole has been the working fluid of choice in space nuclear reactor power systems with Close Brayton Cycle (CBC) for energy conversion. This working fluid is also a suitable coolant for the fission reactors heat source designed with fast neutron energy spectra. For space nuclear reactors with thermal neutron energy spectra, however, the high capture neutron cross-section of Xe will reduce the beginning-of-life excess reactivity of the reactor, decreasing its effective operation lifetime. In addition, the neutron activation of Xe in the reactor will introduce a radioactivity source term in the CBC loop. Alternative working fluids with no activation concerns and comparable performance are N{sub 2} and the binary mixtures of He-N{sub 2}. This paper calculates the transport properties of these working fluids and compares their values to those of noble gas binary mixtures at the temperatures and pressures expected in CBC space reactor power system applications. Also investigated is the impact of using these working fluids on the pressure losses, heat transfer coefficient, and the aerodynamic loading of the blades in the CBC turbo-machines.

  7. Hugoniot measurements of double-shocked precompressed dense xenon plasmas.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Chen, Q F; Gu, Y J; Chen, Z Y

    2012-12-01

    The current partially ionized plasmas models for xenon show substantial differences since the description of pressure and thermal ionization region becomes a formidable task, prompting the need for an improved understanding of dense xenon plasmas behavior at above 100 GPa. We performed double-shock compression experiments on dense xenon to determine accurately the Hugoniot up to 172 GPa using a time-resolved optical radiation method. The planar strong shock wave was produced using a flyer plate impactor accelerated up to ∼6 km/s with a two-stage light-gas gun. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were acquired by using a multiwavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Shock velocity was measured and mass velocity was determined by the impedance-matching methods. The experimental equation of state of dense xenon plasmas are compared with the self-consistent fluid variational calculations of dense xenon in the region of partial ionization over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. PMID:23368058

  8. 10 CFR 504.7 - Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas in mixtures-electing powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural...) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.7 Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas... technically and financially feasible for a unit to use a mixture of petroleum or natural gas and an...

  9. 10 CFR 504.7 - Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas in mixtures-electing powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural...) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.7 Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas... technically and financially feasible for a unit to use a mixture of petroleum or natural gas and an...

  10. 10 CFR 504.7 - Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas in mixtures-electing powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural...) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.7 Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas... technically and financially feasible for a unit to use a mixture of petroleum or natural gas and an...

  11. 10 CFR 504.7 - Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas in mixtures-electing powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural...) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.7 Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas... technically and financially feasible for a unit to use a mixture of petroleum or natural gas and an...

  12. 10 CFR 504.7 - Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas in mixtures-electing powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural...) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.7 Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas... technically and financially feasible for a unit to use a mixture of petroleum or natural gas and an...

  13. Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-03-28

    In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

  14. High-pressure xenon detector development at Constellation Technology Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert A.; Bastian, Lloyd F.

    2006-08-01

    Xenon-filled ionization detectors, due to their high atomic number fill gas (Z=54), moderate densities (~0.3 g/cm 3-0.5 g/cm 3) and good energy resolution (2%-4% at 662 keV), fill an important niche between more familiar technologies such as NaI(Tl) scintillators and Germanium detectors. Until recently, difficulties with obtaining sufficient Xenon purity, reducing microphonic sensitivity, and developing low-noise electronics compatible with small ionization signals have hampered the development of this nuclear detection field. Constellation Technology Corporation, whose experience with xenon detectors goes back to the mid 1990's, has made significant progress in these areas and has developed a commercial line of detectors with active volumes ranging from small (35 g Xe) to large (1400 g Xe). Here we will discuss our development of a mobile, large area, spectroscopic array.

  15. Novel simulated moving-bed adsorber for the fractionation of gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rao, D P; Sivakumar, S V; Mandal, Susmita; Kota, Sridevi; Ramaprasad, B S G

    2005-03-25

    The separation of propylene-propane mixture is an energy intensive operation commercially practiced using cryogenic distillation. The separation by pressure swing adsorption has been studied as an alternative. A fixed-bed pressure swing adsorption yields the heavy component as a pure product. The product recovery and the productivity are not high. In a moving-bed process, because of the counter-current solid-gas contact, the separation achieved is similar to that of the fractionation by distillation. Although the moving-bed operation offers the upper limit for the performance of a cyclic adsorptive process, due to mechanical complexities in the handling of solids the 'simulated' moving-bed is preferred. By moving the inlet and outlet ports of streams located along the length of the bed, a moving-bed process can be realized in a fixed bed. We describe here a 'moving-port' system which permits injection or withdrawal of the fluid along the axial direction in a fixed bed. A fixed bed embedded with the moving-port systems emulates a simulated moving-bed adsorber. The proposed adsorber can fractionate a binary gas mixture into two product streams with high purities. It is similar to the Sorbex process of UOP but does not have the eluent as an additional separating agent. A parametric study indicates that high purity products and a higher productivity by an order of magnitude can be achieved with simulated moving-beds compared to the fixed beds.

  16. Gas energy meter for inferential determination of thermophysical properties of a gas mixture at multiple states of the gas

    DOEpatents

    Morrow, Thomas B.; Kelner, Eric; Owen, Thomas E.

    2008-07-08

    A gas energy meter that acquires the data and performs the processing for an inferential determination of one or more gas properties, such as heating value, molecular weight, or density. The meter has a sensor module that acquires temperature, pressure, CO2, and speed of sound data. Data is acquired at two different states of the gas, which eliminates the need to determine the concentration of nitrogen in the gas. A processing module receives this data and uses it to perform a "two-state" inferential algorithm.

  17. Cs vapor microcells with Ne-He buffer gas mixture for high operation-temperature miniature atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, E; Abdel Hafiz, M; Maurice, V; Fouilland, B; Gorecki, C; Boudot, R

    2015-07-13

    We report on the characterization of Cs vapor microfabricated cells filled with a Ne-He buffer gas mixture using coherent population trapping (CPT) spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of the Cs clock frequency is found to be canceled at the first order around a so-called inversion temperature higher than 80°C whose value depends on the buffer gas partial pressure ratio. This buffer gas mixture could be well-adapted for the development of miniature atomic clocks devoted to be used in specific applications such as defense and avionic systems with high operating temperature environment (typically higher than 85°C). This solution suggests an alternative to buffer gas mixtures generally used in optically-pumped vapor cell atomic clocks.

  18. Cs vapor microcells with Ne-He buffer gas mixture for high operation-temperature miniature atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, E; Abdel Hafiz, M; Maurice, V; Fouilland, B; Gorecki, C; Boudot, R

    2015-07-13

    We report on the characterization of Cs vapor microfabricated cells filled with a Ne-He buffer gas mixture using coherent population trapping (CPT) spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of the Cs clock frequency is found to be canceled at the first order around a so-called inversion temperature higher than 80°C whose value depends on the buffer gas partial pressure ratio. This buffer gas mixture could be well-adapted for the development of miniature atomic clocks devoted to be used in specific applications such as defense and avionic systems with high operating temperature environment (typically higher than 85°C). This solution suggests an alternative to buffer gas mixtures generally used in optically-pumped vapor cell atomic clocks. PMID:26191895

  19. Separation Analysis in a High-Speed Rotating Cylinder for a Binary Gas Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev; Kumaran, Viswanathan

    2015-11-01

    The solutions of the species balance equations linked with the generalized Onsager model for the secondary gas flow in a high-speed rotating cylinder are compared with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations for a binary gas mixture. The concentration fields are obtained three different types of driving mechanism. These are: (a) wall thermal forcing, (b) inflow/outflow of gas along the axis, and (c) momentum source/sink inside the flow domain, for the stratification parameter (A) in the range (0.707- 3.535), and Reynolds number (Re) in the range (102 - 106 with aspect ratio (length / diameter) = 2, 4, 8. Two different types of cases have been considered, (a) no mass difference (ɛa = (2 Δm/(m1 + m2)) = 0), and (b) with mass difference (ɛa = 0.2 and 0.5) while calculating the secondary flow field in the analytical solution. Here, the stratification prameter A = √((mavΩ2 R2)/(2 kB T)), and the Reynolds number Re = ρw Ω R2)/ μ, where m is the molecular mass, Ω and R are the angular velocity and radius of the cylinder, ρw is the wall density, μ is the gas viscosity and T is the gas temperature. The comparison between numerical and analytical solution reveals that the boundary conditions in the numerical simulations and analytical model have to be matched with care. The commonly used ``diffuse reflection'' boundary conditions at the solid walls in DSMC simulations result in a non-zero slip velocity as well as a ``temperature slip'' (gas temperature at the wall is different from wall temperature).

  20. 2D fluid simulations of discharges at atmospheric pressure in reactive gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdon, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Since a few years, low-temperature atmospheric pressure discharges have received a considerable interest as they efficiently produce many reactive chemical species at a low energy cost. This potential is of great interest for a wide range of applications as plasma assisted combustion or biomedical applications. Then, in current simulations of atmospheric pressure discharges, there is the need to take into account detailed kinetic schemes. It is interesting to note that in some conditions, the kinetics of the discharge may play a role on the discharge dynamics itself. To illustrate this, we consider the case of the propagation of He-N2 discharges in long capillary tubes, studied for the development of medical devices for endoscopic applications. Simulation results put forward that the discharge dynamics and structure depend on the amount of N2 in the He-N2 mixture. In particular, as the amount of N2 admixture increases, the discharge propagation velocity in the tube increases, reaches a maximum for about 0 . 1 % of N2 and then decreases, in agreement with experiments. For applications as plasma assisted combustion with nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, there is the need to handle the very different timescales of the nanosecond discharge with the much longer (micro to millisecond) timescales of combustion processes. This is challenging from a computational point of view. It is also important to better understand the coupling of the plasma induced chemistry and the gas heating. To illustrate this, we present the simulation of the flame ignition in lean mixtures by a nanosecond pulsed discharge between two point electrodes. In particular, among the different discharge regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, a ``spark'' regime has been put forward in the experiments, with an ultra-fast local heating of the gas. For other discharge regimes, the gas heating is much weaker. We have simulated the nanosecond spark regime and have observed shock waves

  1. Development of a functionalized Xenon biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, Megan M.; Ruiz, E. Janette; Rubin, Seth M.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Winssinger, Nicolas; Schultz, Peter G.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-03-25

    NMR-based biosensors that utilize laser-polarized xenon offer potential advantages beyond current sensing technologies. These advantages include the capacity to simultaneously detect multiple analytes, the applicability to in vivo spectroscopy and imaging, and the possibility of remote amplified detection. Here we present a detailed NMR characterization of the binding of a biotin-derivatized caged-xenon sensor to avidin. Binding of functionalized xenon to avidin leads to a change in the chemical shift of the encapsulated xenon in addition to a broadening of the resonance, both of which serve as NMR markers of ligand-target interaction. A control experiment in which the biotin-binding site of avidin was blocked with native biotin showed no such spectral changes, confirming that only specific binding, rather than nonspecific contact, between avidin and functionalized xenon leads to the effects on the xenon NMR spectrum. The exchange rate of xenon (between solution and cage) and the xenon spin-lattice relaxation rate were not changed significantly upon binding. We describe two methods for enhancing the signal from functionalized xenon by exploiting the laser-polarized xenon magnetization reservoir. We also show that the xenon chemical shifts are distinct for xenon encapsulated in different diastereomeric cage molecules. This demonstrates the potential for tuning the encapsulated xenon chemical shift, which is a key requirement for being able to multiplex the biosensor.

  2. Reactive ion-etching-induced damage in silicon using SF/sub 6/ gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, B.M.; Pinto, R.; Sachidananda Babu, R.

    1987-07-01

    Damage introduced in silicon during reactive-ion etching (RIE) in SI/sub 6/ gas containing 10 Vol % of H/sub 2/, He, N/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, or Ar has been investigated using Schottky barrier measurements and Rutherford backscattering. RIE was performed at 0.1 Watt cm/sup -2/ power density with the radio frequancy (rf) cathode covered with a quartz plate. The annealing effect on damage was studied at various temperatures up to 800 /sup 0/C in dry N/sub 2/. The results indicate that the damage has two components namely, a shallow near-surface region with lattice damage and a deep layer containing discrete defect centers which act as donors. The extent of the deep damage layer is the net balance between two competing processes: (a) the etch rate, and (b) the rate of damage migration into silicon. However, the damage has been found to reach a saturation level after RIE for 1 min in all the gas mixtures studied. The results also suggest that RIE in SF/sub 6/+10% H/sub 2/ gas mixture causes a deep damage layer which could, however, be annealed at 150 /sup 0/C aided significantly by the passivation of defect centers by hydrogen permeated during RIE. On the other hand, the damage induced in SF/sub 6/+10% Ar-etched samples has been found to anneal at 800 /sup 0/C indicating there by a higher level of lattice damage or amorphization of the near-surface layer of silicon. Therefore, the mass of the bombarding ion significantly affects the nature of the damage layers.

  3. Minimum Error Fickian Diffusion Coefficients for Mass Diffusion in Multicomponent Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, S.

    1999-04-01

    Mass diffusion in multicomponent gas mixtures is governed by a coupled system of linear equations for the diffusive mass fluxes in terms of thermodynamic driving forces, known as the generalized Stefan-Maxwell equation. In computations of mass diffusion in multicomponent gas mixtures, this coupling between the different components results in considerable computational overhead. Consequently, simplified diffusion models for the diffusive mass fluxes as explicit functions of the driving forces are an attractive alternative. These models can be interpreted as an approximate solution to the Stefan-Maxwell equation. Simplified diffusion models require the specification of “effective” diffusion coefficients which are usually expressed as functions of the binary diffusion coefficients of each species pair in the mixture. Current models for the effective diffusion coefficients are incapable of providing a priori control over the error incurred in the approximate solution. In this paper a general form for diagonal approximations is derived, which accounts for the requirement imposed by the special structure of the Stefan-Maxwell equation that such approximations be constructed in a reduced-dimensional subspace. In addition, it is shown that current models can be expressed as particular cases of two general forms, but not all these models correspond to the general form for diagonal approximations. A new minimum error diagonal approximation (MEDA) model is proposed, based on the criterion that the diagonal approximation minimize the error in the species velocities. Analytic expressions are derived for the MEDA model's effective diffusion coefficients based on this criterion. These effective diffusion coefficients automatically give the correct solution in two important limiting cases: for that of a binary mixture, and for the case of arbitrary number of components with identical binary diffusivities. Although these minimum error effective diffusion

  4. Analysis of an activated-carbon sorption compressor operating with gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzabar, N.; Grossman, G.

    2012-10-01

    Sorption compressors elevate the pressure of gases and can provide a more or less continuous mass flow. Unlike mechanical compressors, sorption compressors have no moving parts, and therefore do not emit vibrations and are highly reliable. There exist different sorption compressors for different operating conditions and various gases. However, there are no published reports of sorption compressors for mixed gases. Such compressors, among other applications, may drive mixed-refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocoolers. The adsorption of mixed gases is usually investigated under steady conditions, mainly for storage and separation processes. However, the sorption process in a compressor goes through varying states and mass changes; therefore, it differs from the common mixed gases adsorption applications. In this research a numerical analysis for mixed gas sorption compressors is developed, based on pure gas adsorption characteristics and the ideal adsorbed solution theory. Two pure gas adsorption models are used for calculating the conditions of the adsorbed phase: Langmuir and Sips; and the Peng-Robinson equation of state is used to calculate the conditions of the vapor phase. Two mixtures are investigated; nitrogen-methane and nitrogen-ethane. Finally, the analysis is verified against experimental results. This research provides initiatory observation for mixed gases sorption compressor in which each component is differently adsorbed.

  5. On-farm euthanasia of broiler chickens: effects of different gas mixtures on behavior and brain activity.

    PubMed

    Gerritzen, M A; Lambooij, B; Reimert, H; Stegeman, A; Spruijt, B

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the suitability of gas mixtures for euthanasia of groups of broilers in their housing by increasing the percentage of CO2. The suitability was assessed by the level of discomfort before loss of consciousness, and the killing rate. The gas mixtures injected into the housing were 1) 100% CO2, 2) 50% N2 + 50% CO2, and 3) 30% O2 + 40% CO2 + 30% N2, followed by 100% CO2. At 2 and 6 wk of age, groups of 20 broiler chickens per trial were exposed to increasing CO2 percentages due to the injection of these gas mixtures. Behavior and killing rate were examined. At the same time, 2 broilers per trial equipped with brain electrodes were observed for behavior and brain activity. Ten percent of the 2-wk-old broilers survived the increasing CO2 percentage due to the injection of 30% O2 + 40% CO2 + 30% N2 mixture, therefore this mixture was excluded for further testing at 6 wk of age. At 6 wk of age, 30% of the broilers survived in the 50% N2 + 50% CO2 group. The highest level of CO2 in the breathing air (42%) was reached by the injection of the 100% CO2 mixture, vs. 25% for the other 2 mixtures. In all 3 gas mixtures, head shaking, gasping, and convulsions were observed before loss of posture. Loss of posture and suppression of electrical activity of the brain (n = 7) occurred almost simultaneously. The results of this experiment indicate that euthanasia of groups of 2- and 6-wk-old broilers by gradually increasing the percentage of CO2 in the breathing air up to 40% is possible. PMID:15339003

  6. Laser induced avalanche ionization in gases or gas mixtures with resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization or femtosecond laser pulse pre-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.

    2012-08-15

    The paper discusses the requirements for avalanche ionization in gas or gas mixtures initiated by REMPI or femtosecond-laser pre-ionization. Numerical examples of dependencies on partial composition for Ar:Xe gas mixture with REMPI of argon and subsequent classic avalanche ionization of Xe are presented.

  7. Effect Of Gas Mixture Composition On Tar Removal Process In A Pulsed Corona Discharge Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonova E.; Naidis, G.

    2010-07-01

    The simulation of naphthalene (C10H8) removal from several gas mixtures (pure nitrogen, mixtures containing N2 with CO2, CO, H2, H2O, and biogas - the product of biomass gasification), has been investigated. The modeling is based on the experimental data obtained in the reactor with a pulsed positive corona discharge. The problem of simulation of the cleaning process includes description of two stages. The first, fast stage is generation of primary active species during streamer propagation. The second, slow stage is the chain of chemical transformations triggered by these species. The input parameters for the modeling of the second stage are G-values for generation of primary active species, obtained under consideration of streamer dynamics. Simulation of the second stage of the removal process takes into account the processes of chemical kinetics and diffusion outside and inside of streamer traces during multi-pulsed treatment. Besides neutral active species, streamer discharges produce electrons and ions. Primary positive ions (N2+, CO+, CO2+, H2+, H2O+) in a chain of fast ion-molecule reactions transform into more stable positive ions. The ions recombine with electrons. Both ion-molecule reactions and electron-ion recombination process are additional (to dissociation of gas molecules by electron impact in the streamer head) sources of neutral active species. The relative contribution of these sources to the G-values for H, OH and O is rather large. In our modeling two approaches have been used. At the first approach the contribution of ion-molecule reactions is estimated approximately assuming that the dominating stable ion is N4+ (in pure N2 and its mixtures with H2) or CO2+ (in mixtures including CO2). Other way is the calculations with kinetic scheme including the molecular ions, aquated ions such as H3O(H2O)m+, NO2(H2O)-, NO2(H2O)+ and other. The comparison of results of two approaches is presented. Only full kinetic scheme allowed describing the

  8. Methodology for Predicting Flammable Gas Mixtures in Double Contained Receiver Tanks [SEC 1 THRU SEC 3

    SciTech Connect

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-01-31

    This methodology document provides an estimate of the maximum concentrations of flammable gases (ammonia, hydrogen, and methane) which could exist in the vapor space of a double-contained receiver tank (DCRT) from the simultaneous saltwell pumping of one or more single-shell tanks (SSTs). This document expands Calculation Note 118 (Hedengren et a1 1997) and removes some of the conservatism from it, especially in vapor phase ammonia predictions. The methodologies of Calculation Note 118 (Hedengren et a1 1997) are essentially identical for predicting flammable gas mixtures in DCRTs from saltwell pumping for low DCRT ventilation rates, 1e, < 1 cfm. The hydrogen generation model has also been updated in the methodology of this document.

  9. The equivalent electrical permittivity of gas-solid mixtures at intermediate solid volume fractions.

    SciTech Connect

    Torczynski, John Robert; Ceccio, Steven Louis; Tortora, Paul Richard

    2005-07-01

    Several mixture models are evaluated for their suitability in predicting the equivalent permittivity of dielectric particles in a dielectric medium for intermediate solid volume fractions (0.4 to 0.6). Predictions of the Maxwell, Rayleigh, Bottcher and Bruggeman models are compared to computational simulations of several arrangements of solid particles in a gas and to the experimentally determined permittivity of a static particle bed. The experiment uses spherical glass beads in air, so air and glass permittivity values (1 and 7, respectively) are used with all of the models and simulations. The experimental system used to measure the permittivity of the static particle bed and its calibration are described. The Rayleigh model is found to be suitable for predicting permittivity over the entire range of solid volume fractions (0-0.6).

  10. An Improved Analytical Approach to Determine the Explosive Effects of Flammable Gas-Air Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J M

    2005-11-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex includes many sites and laboratories that store quantities of low-level, solid nuclear waste in drums and other types of shipping containers. The drums may be stored for long periods of time prior to being transported and final dispositioning. Based on the radioactivity (e.g., Pu{sup 239} equivalent), chemical nature (e.g. volatile organic compounds) and other characteristics of the stored waste, flammable gases may evolve. Documented safety analyses (DSAs) for storage of these drums must address storage and safety management issues to protect workers, the general public, and the environment. This paper discusses an improved analytical method for determining the explosion effects flammable gas-air mixtures as well as the subsequent accident phenomenology.

  11. Spontaneous symmetry breaking and inversion-line spectroscopy in gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presilla, Carlo; Jona-Lasinio, Giovanni

    2015-02-01

    According to quantum mechanics, chiral molecules, that is, molecules that rotate the polarization of light, should not exist. The simplest molecules which can be chiral have four or more atoms with two arrangements of minimal potential energy that are equivalent up to a parity operation. Chiral molecules correspond to states localized in one potential energy minimum and can not be stationary states of the Schrödinger equation. A possible solution of the paradox can be founded on the idea of spontaneous symmetry breaking. This idea was behind work we did previously involving a localization phase transition: at low pressure, the molecules are delocalized between the two minima of the potential energy while at higher pressure they become localized in one minimum due to the intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions. Evidence for such a transition is provided by measurements of the inversion spectrum of ammonia and deuterated ammonia at different pressures. A previously proposed model gives a satisfactory account of the empirical results without free parameters. In this paper, we extend this model to gas mixtures. We find that also in these systems a phase transition takes place at a critical pressure which depends on the composition of the mixture. Moreover, we derive formulas giving the dependence of the inversion frequencies on the pressure. These predictions are susceptible to experimental test.

  12. Measurement of activity coefficients of mixtures by head-space gas chromatography: general procedure.

    PubMed

    Luis, Patricia; Wouters, Christine; Van der Bruggen, Bart; Sandler, Stanley I

    2013-08-01

    Head-space gas chromatography (HS-GC) is an applicable method to perform vapor-liquid equilibrium measurements and determine activity coefficients. However, the reproducibility of the data may be conditioned by the experimental procedure concerning to the automated pressure-balanced system. The study developed in this work shows that a minimum volume of liquid in the vial is necessary to ensure the reliability of the activity coefficients since it may become a parameter that influences the magnitude of the peak areas: the helium introduced during the pressurization step may produce significant variations of the results when too small volume of liquid is selected. The minimum volume required should thus be evaluated prior to obtain experimentally the concentration in the vapor phase and the activity coefficients. In this work, the mixture acetonitrile-toluene is taken as example, requiring a sample volume of more than 5mL (about more than 25% of the vial volume). The vapor-liquid equilibrium and activity coefficients of mixtures at different concentrations (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 molar fraction) and four temperatures (35, 45, 55 and 70°C) have been determined. Relative standard deviations (RSD) lower than 5% have been obtained, indicating the good reproducibility of the method when a sample volume larger than 5mL is used. Finally, a general procedure to measure activity coefficients by means of pressure-balanced head-space gas chromatography is proposed. PMID:23809803

  13. Synthesis of formamide and isocyanic acid after ion irradiation of frozen gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaňuchová, Z.; Urso, R. G.; Baratta, G. A.; Brucato, J. R.; Palumbo, M. E.; Strazzulla, G.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Formamide (NH2HCO) and isocyanic acid (HNCO) have been observed as gaseous species in several astronomical environments such as cometary comae and pre- and proto-stellar objects. A debate is open on the formation route of those molecules, in particular if they are formed by chemical reactions in the gas phase and/or on grains. In this latter case it is relevant to understand if the formation occurs through surface reactions or is induced by energetic processing. Aims: We present arguments that support the formation of formamide in the solid phase by cosmic-ion-induced energetic processing of ices present as mantles of interstellar grains and on comets. Formamides, along with other molecules, are expelled in the gas phase when the physical parameters are appropriate to induce the desorption of ices. Methods: We have performed several laboratory experiments in which ice mixtures (H2O:CH4:N2, H2O:CH4:NH3, and CH3OH:N2) were bombarded with energetic (30-200 keV) ions (H+ or He+). FTIR spectroscopy was performed before, during, and after ion bombardment. In particular, the formation of HNCO and NH2HCO was measured quantiatively. Results: Energetic processing of ice can quantitatively reproduce the amount of NH2HCO observed in cometary comae and in many circumstellar regions. HNCO is also formed, but additional formation mechanisms are requested to quantitatively account for the astronomical observations. Conclusions: We suggest that energetic processing of ices in the pre- and proto-stellar regions and in comets is the main mechanism to produce formamide, which, once it is released in the gas phase because of desorption of ices, is observed in the gas phase in these astrophysical environments.

  14. Obtaining the cumulative k-distribution of a gas mixture from those of its components. [radiative transfer in stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstell, M. F.

    1993-01-01

    A review of the convolution theorem for obtaining the cumulative k-distribution of a gas mixture proven in Goody et al. (1989) and a discussion of its application to natural spectra are presented. Computational optimizations for use in analyzing high-altitude gas mixtures are introduced. Comparisons of the results of the optimizations, and criteria for deciding what altitudes are 'high' in this context are given. A few relevant features of the testing support software are examined. Some spectrally integrated results, and the circumstances the might permit substituting the method of principal absorbers are examined.

  15. Fast gas heating in N2/O2 mixtures under nanosecond surface dielectric barrier discharge: the effects of gas pressure and composition.

    PubMed

    Nudnova, M M; Kindysheva, S V; Aleksandrov, N L; Starikovskii, A Yu

    2015-08-13

    The fractional electron power quickly transferred to heat in non-equilibrium plasmas was studied experimentally and theoretically in N(2)/O(2) mixtures subjected to high electric fields. Measurements were performed in and after a nanosecond surface dielectric barrier discharge at various (300-750 Torr) gas pressures and (50-100%) N(2) percentages. Observations showed that the efficiency of fast gas heating is almost independent of pressure and becomes more profound when the fraction of O(2) in N(2)/O(2) mixtures increases. The processes that contribute towards the fast transfer of electron energy to thermal energy were numerically simulated under the conditions considered. Calculations were compared with measurements and the main channels of fast gas heating were analysed at the gas pressures, compositions and electric fields under study. It was shown that efficient fast gas heating in the mixtures with high fraction of O(2) is due to a notable contribution of heat release during quenching of electronically excited N(2) states in collisions with O(2) molecules and to ion-ion recombination. The effect of hydrocarbon addition to air on fast gas heating was numerically estimated. It was concluded that the fractional electron power transferred to heat in air, as a first approximation, could be used to estimate this effect in lean and stoichiometric hydrocarbon-air mixtures.

  16. Fast gas heating in N2/O2 mixtures under nanosecond surface dielectric barrier discharge: the effects of gas pressure and composition

    PubMed Central

    Nudnova, M. M; Kindysheva, S. V; Aleksandrov, N. L; Starikovskii, A. Yu

    2015-01-01

    The fractional electron power quickly transferred to heat in non-equilibrium plasmas was studied experimentally and theoretically in N2/O2 mixtures subjected to high electric fields. Measurements were performed in and after a nanosecond surface dielectric barrier discharge at various (300–750 Torr) gas pressures and (50–100%) N2 percentages. Observations showed that the efficiency of fast gas heating is almost independent of pressure and becomes more profound when the fraction of O2 in N2/O2 mixtures increases. The processes that contribute towards the fast transfer of electron energy to thermal energy were numerically simulated under the conditions considered. Calculations were compared with measurements and the main channels of fast gas heating were analysed at the gas pressures, compositions and electric fields under study. It was shown that efficient fast gas heating in the mixtures with high fraction of O2 is due to a notable contribution of heat release during quenching of electronically excited N2 states in collisions with O2 molecules and to ion–ion recombination. The effect of hydrocarbon addition to air on fast gas heating was numerically estimated. It was concluded that the fractional electron power transferred to heat in air, as a first approximation, could be used to estimate this effect in lean and stoichiometric hydrocarbon–air mixtures. PMID:26170431

  17. Supersonic Flow of Chemically Reacting Gas-Particle Mixtures. Volume 2: RAMP - A Computer Code for Analysis of Chemically Reacting Gas-Particle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penny, M. M.; Smith, S. D.; Anderson, P. G.; Sulyma, P. R.; Pearson, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program written in conjunction with the numerical solution of the flow of chemically reacting gas-particle mixtures was documented. The solution to the set of governing equations was obtained by utilizing the method of characteristics. The equations cast in characteristic form were shown to be formally the same for ideal, frozen, chemical equilibrium and chemical non-equilibrium reacting gas mixtures. The characteristic directions for the gas-particle system are found to be the conventional gas Mach lines, the gas streamlines and the particle streamlines. The basic mesh construction for the flow solution is along streamlines and normals to the streamlines for axisymmetric or two-dimensional flow. The analysis gives detailed information of the supersonic flow and provides for a continuous solution of the nozzle and exhaust plume flow fields. Boundary conditions for the flow solution are either the nozzle wall or the exhaust plume boundary.

  18. Perovskites with the Framework-Forming Xenon.

    PubMed

    Britvin, Sergey N; Kashtanov, Sergei A; Krzhizhanovskaya, Maria G; Gurinov, Andrey A; Glumov, Oleg V; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Kretser, Yury L; Zaitsev, Anatoly N; Chukanov, Nikita V; Krivovichev, Sergey V

    2015-11-23

    The Group 18 elements (noble gases) were the last ones in the periodic system to have not been encountered in perovskite structures. We herein report the synthesis of a new group of double perovskites KM(XeNaO6) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) containing framework-forming xenon. The structures of the new compounds, like other double perovskites, are built up of the alternating sequence of corner-sharing (XeO6) and (NaO6) octahedra arranged in a three-dimensional rocksalt order. The fact that xenon can be incorporated into the perovskite structure provides new insights into the problem of Xe depletion in the atmosphere. Since octahedrally coordinated Xe(VIII) and Si(IV) exhibit close values of ionic radii (0.48 and 0.40 Å, respectively), one could assume that Xe(VIII) can be incorporated into hyperbaric frameworks such as MgSiO3 perovskite. The ability of Xe to form stable inorganic frameworks can further extend the rich and still enigmatic chemistry of this noble gas. PMID:26429762

  19. Gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) on mixtures of aerosols in a smog chamber.

    PubMed

    Chandramouli, Bharadwaj; Jang, Myoseon; Kamens, Richard M

    2003-09-15

    The partitioning behavior of a set of diverse SOCs on two and three component mixtures of aerosols from different sources was studied using smog chamber experimental data. A set of SOCs of different compound types was introduced into a system containing a mixture of aerosols from two or more sources. Gas and particle samples were taken using a filter-filter-denuder sampling system, and a partitioning coefficient Kp was estimated using Kp = Cp/(CgTSP). Particle size distributions were measured using a differential mobility analyzer and a light scattering detector. Gas and particle samples were analyzed using GCMS. The aerosol composition in the chamber was tracked chemically using a combination of signature compounds and the organic matter mass fraction (f(om)) of the individual aerosol sources. The physical nature of the aerosol mixture in the chamber was determined using particle size distributions, and an aggregate Kp was estimated from theoretically calculated Kp on the individual sources. Model fits for Kp showed that when the mixture involved primary sources of aerosol, the aggregate Kp of the mixture could be successfully modeled as an external mixture of the Kp on the individual aerosols. There were significant differences observed for some SOCs between modeling the system as an external and as an internal mixture. However, when one of the aerosol sources was secondary, the aggregate model Kp required incorporation of the secondary aerosol products on the preexisting aerosol for adequate model fits. Modeling such a system as an external mixture grossly overpredicted the Kp of alkanes in the mixture. Indirect evidence of heterogeneous, acid-catalyzed reactions in the particle phase was also seen, leading to a significant increase in the polarity of the resulting aerosol mix and a resulting decrease in the observed Kp of alkanes in the chamber. The model was partly consistent with this decrease but could not completely explain the reduction in Kp because of

  20. Quantifying the impact of nitric oxide calibration gas mixture oxidation on reported nitrogen dioxide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Bryan P.; Quincey, Paul G.; Green, David; Fuller, Gary W.

    2015-03-01

    Chemiluminescent analysers for measuring nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in ambient air are generally calibrated with certified gas standard cylinders of NO in nitrogen. Verification of the NOx and NO amount fractions has been carried out on many such 'on-site' calibration cylinders at air quality monitoring stations. These measurements indicate that significant numbers of these gas mixtures have become somewhat degraded, with several percent of the NO oxidised to NO2. The effect of not compensating for this degradation on reported concentrations is discussed. If such degradation is not quantified and corrected for, there will be a systematic under-reporting of NO2 concentrations, which, due to the non-linearity of the effect, could reduce high reported NO2 concentrations at kerbside sites by around 20%. This could significantly reduce the number of reported exceedances of the NO2 limit value at such sites, compared to results obtained where there is no degradation of the NO cylinder.

  1. Density functional theory of gas-liquid phase separation in dilute binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Onuki, Akira

    2016-06-22

    We examine statics and dynamics of phase-separated states of dilute binary mixtures using density functional theory. In our systems, the difference of the solvation chemical potential between liquid and gas [Formula: see text] (the Gibbs energy of transfer) is considerably larger than the thermal energy [Formula: see text] for each solute particle and the attractive interaction among the solute particles is weaker than that among the solvent particles. In these conditions, the saturated vapor pressure increases by [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the solute density added in liquid. For [Formula: see text], phase separation is induced at low solute densities in liquid and the new phase remains in gaseous states, even when the liquid pressure is outside the coexistence curve of the solvent. This explains the widely observed formation of stable nanobubbles in ambient water with a dissolved gas. We calculate the density and stress profiles across planar and spherical interfaces, where the surface tension decreases with increasing interfacial solute adsorption. We realize stable solute-rich bubbles with radius about 30 nm, which minimize the free energy functional. We then study dynamics around such a bubble after a decompression of the surrounding liquid, where the bubble undergoes a damped oscillation. In addition, we present some exact and approximate expressions for the surface tension and the interfacial stress tensor.

  2. Flame generation and maintenance by non-stationary discharge in mixture of air and natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, Henrique De Souza; Sagas, Julio; Lacava, Pedro

    2013-09-01

    Plasma assisted combustion is a promising research field, where the high generation of reactive species by non-equilibrium plasmas is used to modify the combustion kinetics in order to improve the process either by increasing the production of specific species (like molecular hydrogen) or by decreasing pollutant emission. One typical issue observed in plasma assisted combustion is the increase of inflammability limits, i.e the observation of combustion and flame in situation where it is not observed in conventional combustion. To study the effect of a non-stationary discharge in flame generation and maintenance in a mixture for air and natural gas, the air mass flow rate was fixed in 0.80 g/s and the natural gas flow rate was varied between 0.02 and 0.14 g/s, resulting in a variation of equivalence ratio from 0.4 to 3.0. It is observed a dependence of inflammability limits with the applied power. The analysis by mass spectrometry indicates that the increase of inflammability limits with plasma is due not only applied power, but also to hydrogen production in the discharge. Visual analysis together with high speed camera measurements show a modification in spatial distribution of the flame, probably due to modifications both in flow velocity and flame velocity. Supported by FAPESP PRONEX project grant 11/50773-0.

  3. Hydrogen generation in a microhollow cathode discharge in high-pressure ammonia-argon gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, H.; Martus, K.; Lee, W. Y.; Becker, K.

    2004-04-01

    We explored the feasibility of using a single flow-through microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) as a non-thermal plasma source for hydrogen (H2) production for portable fuel cell applications. The MHCD device consisted of two thin metal electrodes separated by a mica spacer with a single-hole, roughly 100 [mu]m in diameter, through all three layers. The efficiency of the MHCD reactor for H2 generation from NH3 was analyzed by monitoring the products formed in the discharge in a mass spectrometer. Using a gas mixture of up to 10% NH3 in Ar at pressures up to one atmosphere, the MHCD reactor achieved a maximum ammonia conversion of slightly more than 20%. The overall power efficiency of the MHCD reactor reached a peak value of about 11%. The dependence of NH3 conversion and power efficiency on the residence time of the gas in the MHCD plasma was studied. Experiments using pulsed excitation of the MHCD plasma indicated that pulsing can increase the power efficiency. Design and operating criteria are proposed for a microplasma-based H2 generator that can achieve a power efficiency above the break-even point, i.e., a microplasma reactor that requires less electrical power to generate and maintain the plasma than the power that can be obtained from the conversion of the H2 generated in the microplasma reactor.

  4. Detection of a CO and NH3 gas mixture using carboxylic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ki-Young; Choi, Jinnil; Lee, Yang Doo; Kang, Byung Hyun; Yu, Youn-Yeol; Choi, Hyang Hee; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are extremely sensitive to environmental gases. However, detection of mixture gas is still a challenge. Here, we report that 10 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO) and ammonia (NH3) can be electrically detected using a carboxylic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (C-SWCNT). CO and NH3 gases were mixed carefully with the same concentrations of 10 ppm. Our sensor showed faster response to the CO gas than the NH3 gas. The sensing properties and effect of carboxylic acid group were demonstrated, and C-SWCNT sensors with good repeatability and fast responses over a range of concentrations may be used as a simple and effective detection method of CO and NH3 mixture gas.

  5. Viewing inside Pyroclastic Flows - Large-scale Experiments on hot pyroclast-gas mixture flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breard, E. C.; Lube, G.; Cronin, S. J.; Jones, J.

    2014-12-01

    Pyroclastic density currents are the largest threat from volcanoes. Direct observations of natural flows are persistently prevented because of their violence and remain limited to broad estimates of bulk flow behaviour. The Pyroclastic Flow Generator - a large-scale experimental facility to synthesize hot gas-particle mixture flows scaled to pyroclastic flows and surges - allows investigating the physical processes behind PDC behaviour in safety. The ability to simulate natural eruption conditions and to view and measure inside the hot flows allows deriving validation and calibration data sets for existing numerical models, and to improve the constitutive relationships necessary for their effective use as powerful tools in hazard assessment. We here report on a systematic series of large-scale experiments on up to 30 ms-1 fast, 2-4.5 m thick, 20-35 m long flows of natural pyroclastic material and gas. We will show high-speed movies and non-invasive sensor data that detail the internal structure of the analogue pyroclastic flows. The experimental PDCs are synthesized by the controlled 'eruption column collapse' of variably diluted suspensions into an instrumented channel. Experiments show four flow phases: mixture acceleration and dilution during free fall; impact and lateral blasting; PDC runout; and co-ignimbrite cloud formation. The fully turbulent flows reach Reynolds number up to 107 and depositional facies similar to natural deposits. In the PDC runout phase, the shear flows develop a four-partite structure from top to base: a fully turbulent, strongly density-stratified ash cloud with average particle concentrations <<1vol%; a transient, turbulent dense suspension region with particle concentrations between 1 and 10 vol%; a non-turbulent, aerated and highly mobile dense underflows with particle concentrations between 40 and 50 vol%; and a vertically aggrading bed of static material. We characterise these regions and the exchanges of energy and momentum

  6. Separation of gas mixtures by supported complexes. Final report, 1 October 1982-30 September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This final report covers research performed to identify and demonstrate advantageous procedures for the chemical separation of gases, such as CO, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/, from medium-Btu gas mixtures by use of supported complexes. Three complexes were chosen for rapid gas uptake and selectivity at 25/sup 0/C from among a group of 22 coordination complexes synthesized during this program. The three complexes showed considerable selectivity toward individual gases. For instance, Pd/sub 2/(dpm)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ or bis-..mu..-(bisdiphenylphosphinomethane)-dichlorodipalladium (Pd-Pd), rapidly bound carbon monoxide from solution. This complex could be regenerated, with the carbon monoxide reversibly removed, by warming to 40/sup 0/C. The presence of other gases, such as carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, ethylene, or acetylene, had no effect upon the rapid uptake of carbon monoxide or its removal. Such selectivity was also noted with Ru(CO)/sub 2/(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 3/, biscarbonyltris(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium. Although this complex bound hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and oxygen in solution, the hydrogen was taken up twice as fast as carbon monoxide and seven times faster than oxygen. These gases could be removed from the complex with mild heat or decreased pressure. Crystalline Rh(OH)(CO)(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 2/, hydroxocarbonylbis(triphenylphosphine)rhodium, rapidly bound carbon dioxide; the complex was regenerated at 50/sup 0/C under reduced pressure. The rapid uptake of carbon dioxide by this complex was not changed in the presence of oxygen. In general the three selected crystalline or solvent dissolved complexes performed well in the absence of polymeric support. The stability and favorable kinetics of the three complexes suggest that they could be utilized in a solution system for gas separation (Conceptual Analyses and Preliminary Economics). Further, these complexes appear to be superb candidates as transport agents for facilitated-transport, membrane systems

  7. Mie scattering from submicron-sized CO2 clusters formed in a supersonic expansion of a gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Jinno, S; Fukuda, Y; Sakaki, H; Yogo, A; Kanasaki, M; Kondo, K; Faenov, A Ya; Skobelev, I Yu; Pikuz, T A; Boldarev, A S; Gasilov, V A

    2013-09-01

    A detailed mathematical model is presented for a submicron-sized cluster formation in a binary gas mixture flowing through a three-staged conical nozzle. By measuring the angular distribution of light scattered from the clusters, the size of CO(2) clusters, produced in a supersonic expansion of the mixture gas of CO(2)(30%)/H(2)(70%) or CO(2)(10%)/He(90%), has been evaluated using the Mie scattering method. The mean sizes of CO(2) clusters are estimated to be 0.28 ± 0.03 μm for CO(2)/H(2) and 0.26 ± 0.04 μm for CO(2)/He, respectively. In addition, total gas density profiles in radial direction of the gas jet, measuring the phase shift of the light passing through the target by utilizing an interferometer, are found to be agreed with the numerical modeling within a factor of two. The dryness (= monomer/(monomer + cluster) ratio) in the targets is found to support the numerical modeling. The apparatus developed to evaluate the cluster-gas targets proved that our mathematical model of cluster formation is reliable enough for the binary gas mixture.

  8. Start-up, performance and optimization of a compost biofilter treating gas-phase mixture of benzene and toluene.

    PubMed

    Rene, Eldon R; Kar, Saurajyoti; Krishnan, Jagannathan; Pakshirajan, K; López, M Estefanía; Murthy, D V S; Swaminathan, T

    2015-08-01

    The performance of a compost biofilter inoculated with mixed microbial consortium was optimized for treating a gas-phase mixture of benzene and toluene. The biofilter was acclimated to these VOCs for a period of ∼18d. The effects of concentration and flow rate on the removal efficiency (RE) and elimination capacity (EC) were investigated by varying the inlet concentration of benzene (0.12-0.95g/m(3)), toluene (0.14-1.48g/m(3)) and gas-flow rate (0.024-0.072m(3)/h). At comparable loading rates, benzene removal in the mixture was reduced in the range of 6.6-41% in comparison with the individual benzene degradation. Toluene removal in mixture was even more affected as observed from the reductions in REs, ranging from 18.4% to 76%. The results were statistically interpreted by performing an analysis of variance (ANOVA) to elucidate the main and interaction effects.

  9. Simulation of the transition radiation detection conditions in the ATLAS TRT detector filled with argon and krypton gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, A. S.; Maevskiy, A. S.

    2015-12-15

    Performance of the Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) at the ATLAS experiment with argon and krypton gas mixtures was simulated. The efficiency of transition radiation registration, which is necessary for electron identification, was estimated along with the electron identification capabilities under such conditions.

  10. Introducing Students to Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis and Determination of Kerosene Components in a Complex Mixture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacot, Giselle Mae M.; Lee, Lyn May; Chin, Sung-Tong; Marriott, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-tandem MS (GC-MS/MS) are useful in many separation and characterization procedures. GC-MS is now a common tool in industry and research, and increasingly, GC-MS/MS is applied to the measurement of trace components in complex mixtures. This report describes an upper-level undergraduate experiment…

  11. Effect of Alumina on the Gaseous Reduction of Magnetite in CO/CO2 Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapelyushin, Yury; Xing, Xing; Zhang, Jianqiang; Jeong, Sunkwang; Sasaki, Yasushi; Ostrovski, Oleg

    2015-03-01

    Reduction of magnetite doped with alumina (3, 6 and 12 mass pct Al2O3) was studied using CO/CO2 gas mixture (80 vol pct CO) at 1023 K and 1123 K (750 °C and 850 °C). The reduction rate and degree of reduction were evaluated from the weight loss of a sample with time. The reduction behavior was analyzed using the results of XRD and SEM-EDS measurements and thermodynamic analysis. Effect of alumina on the magnetite reduction depended on the alumina content and temperature. Magnetite reduction at 1023 K (750 °C) was accelerated by the addition of 3 mass pct Al2O3, however, the rate of reduction significantly decreased with the further increase in the alumina content to 6 and 12 mass pct. Different effect of alumina was observed in reduction at 1123 K (850 °C); the rate of reduction of the Fe3O4-Al2O3 mixture with 6 mass pct Al2O3 was the fastest. Reduction of un-doped magnetite was developed topochemically with the formation of a dense iron shell. However, reduction of alumina-doped magnetite to wüstite started along certain lattice planes with the formation of network-like structure. In the course of reduction, Al3+ ions diffused from wüstite to the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solution enriching hercynite content in the solution at the reaction interface. Further reduction of alumina-rich Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solution resulted in the formation of micro-cracks which enhanced the rate of the reduction process.

  12. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yen Vinokur, Marcel; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal

    2015-04-07

    relaxation model, which can only be applied to molecules, the new model is applicable to atoms, molecules, ions, and their mixtures. Numerical examples and model validations are carried out with two gas mixtures using the maximum entropy linear model: one mixture consists of nitrogen molecules undergoing internal excitation and dissociation and the other consists of nitrogen atoms undergoing internal excitation and ionization. Results show that the original hundreds to thousands of microscopic equations can be reduced to two macroscopic equations with almost perfect agreement for the total number density and total internal energy using only one or two groups. We also obtain good prediction of the microscopic state populations using 5-10 groups in the macroscopic equations.

  13. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal; Vinokur, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    relaxation model, which can only be applied to molecules, the new model is applicable to atoms, molecules, ions, and their mixtures. Numerical examples and model validations are carried out with two gas mixtures using the maximum entropy linear model: one mixture consists of nitrogen molecules undergoing internal excitation and dissociation and the other consists of nitrogen atoms undergoing internal excitation and ionization. Results show that the original hundreds to thousands of microscopic equations can be reduced to two macroscopic equations with almost perfect agreement for the total number density and total internal energy using only one or two groups. We also obtain good prediction of the microscopic state populations using 5-10 groups in the macroscopic equations.

  14. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal; Vinokur, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    relaxation model, which can only be applied to molecules, the new model is applicable to atoms, molecules, ions, and their mixtures. Numerical examples and model validations are carried out with two gas mixtures using the maximum entropy linear model: one mixture consists of nitrogen molecules undergoing internal excitation and dissociation and the other consists of nitrogen atoms undergoing internal excitation and ionization. Results show that the original hundreds to thousands of microscopic equations can be reduced to two macroscopic equations with almost perfect agreement for the total number density and total internal energy using only one or two groups. We also obtain good prediction of the microscopic state populations using 5-10 groups in the macroscopic equations. PMID:25854230

  15. Supersonic flow of chemically reacting gas-particle mixtures. Volume 1: A theoretical analysis and development of the numerical solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penny, M. M.; Smith, S. D.; Anderson, P. G.; Sulyma, P. R.; Pearson, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical solution for chemically reacting supersonic gas-particle flows in rocket nozzles and exhaust plumes was described. The gas-particle flow solution is fully coupled in that the effects of particle drag and heat transfer between the gas and particle phases are treated. Gas and particles exchange momentum via the drag exerted on the gas by the particles. Energy is exchanged between the phases via heat transfer (convection and/or radiation). Thermochemistry calculations (chemical equilibrium, frozen or chemical kinetics) were shown to be uncoupled from the flow solution and, as such, can be solved separately. The solution to the set of governing equations is obtained by utilizing the method of characteristics. The equations cast in characteristic form are shown to be formally the same for ideal, frozen, chemical equilibrium and chemical non-equilibrium reacting gas mixtures. The particle distribution is represented in the numerical solution by a finite distribution of particle sizes.

  16. Reduced xenon diffusion for quantitative lung study--the role of SF(6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Hoffmann, D.; Sheth, S. A.; Wong, G. P.; Butler, J. P.; Patz, S.; Topulos, G. P.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    The large diffusion coefficients of gases result in significant spin motion during the application of gradient pulses that typically last a few milliseconds in most NMR experiments. In restricted environments, such as the lung, this rapid gas diffusion can lead to violations of the narrow pulse approximation, a basic assumption of the standard Stejskal-Tanner NMR method of diffusion measurement. We therefore investigated the effect of a common, biologically inert buffer gas, sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), on (129)Xe NMR and diffusion. We found that the contribution of SF(6) to (129)Xe T(1) relaxation in a 1:1 xenon/oxygen mixture is negligible up to 2 bar of SF(6) at standard temperature. We also measured the contribution of SF(6) gas to (129)Xe T(2) relaxation, and found it to scale inversely with pressure, with this contribution approximately equal to 1 s for 1 bar SF(6) pressure and standard temperature. Finally, we found the coefficient of (129)Xe diffusion through SF(6) to be approximately 4.6 x 10(-6) m(2)s(-1) for 1 bar pressure of SF(6) and standard temperature, which is only 1.2 times smaller than the (129)Xe self diffusion coefficient for 1 bar (129)Xe pressure and standard temperature. From these measurements we conclude that SF(6) will not sufficiently reduce (129)Xe diffusion to allow accurate surface-area/volume ratio measurements in human alveoli using time-dependent gas diffusion NMR.

  17. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Effects of reducing interferers in a binary gas mixture on NO2 gas adsorption using carbon nanotube networked films based chemiresistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penza, M.; Rossi, R.; Alvisi, M.; Signore, M. A.; Serra, E.

    2009-04-01

    Analysis of binary gas mixtures using chemiresistors based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) networked films has been performed for chemical detection up to a sub-ppm level. The effects of individual interfering analytes of reducing H2S and NH3 gases on oxidizing NO2 gas adsorption in CNTs tangled films are considered. The CNTs are grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technology onto inexpensive alumina substrates, coated by cobalt nanosized catalyst. Charge transfer between adsorbed gas molecules and CNT networks, characterized by a semiconducting p-type electrical transport, occurs depending on opposite trend in the sensor response to the electron-donating interfering gases (H2S, NH3) and target electron-withdrawing NO2 gas causing a compensation of the charge transport, upon given working conditions. This compensated exchange of electrical charge affects the limit of detection of the targeted NO2 gas sensed in different real-world binary gas mixtures of reducing interferers of H2S and NH3. In addition, the functionalization of the CNT films with Au nanoclusters enhanced the sensitivity of the chemiresistor and tuned the compensation of electrical charge crossover in the selected binary oxido-reducing mixtures.

  18. Effect of Non-Condensable Gas Mass Fraction on Condensation Heat Transfer for Water-Ethanol Vapor Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shixue; Utaka, Yoshio

    The condensation heat transfer characteristic curves for a ternary vapor mixture of water, ethanol and air (or nitrogen) under several ethanol concentrations and relatively low concentrations of air (or nitrogen) were measured. The effect of non-condensable gas on several different domains in the condensation curves was discussed. The effect of non-condensable gas in the domains controlled by the diffusion resistance and the filmwise condensation was not notable; whereas that in the domain dominated by the condensate resistance of dropwise mode was remarkable. Moreover, variations due to changes in non-condensable gas concentration of several characteristic points representing the curves were discussed.

  19. Kinetic Equation for Two-Particle Distribution Function in Boltzmann Gas Mixtures and Equation of Motion for Quasiparticle Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saveliev, V. L.

    2011-05-01

    Pair collisions is the main interaction process in the Boltzmann gas dynamics. By making use of exactly the same physical assumptions as was used by Ludwig Boltzmann we write the kinetic equation for two-particle distribution function of molecules in the gas mixtures. Instead of the collision integral, there are the linear scattering operator and the chaos projector in the right part of this equation. Because the scattering operator is more simple then Boltzmann collision integral this equation opens new opportunities for mathematical description of the Boltzmann gas dynamics.

  20. Preliminary results of Resistive Plate Chambers operated with eco-friendly gas mixtures for application in the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Van Auwegem, P.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Ferrini, M.; Muhammad, S.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Russo, A.; Saviano, G.; Tytgat, M.

    2016-09-01

    The operations of Resistive Plate Chambers in LHC experiments require Fluorine based (F-based) gases for optimal performance. Recent European regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. In view of the CMS experiment upgrade, several tests are ongoing to measure the performance of the detector with these new ecological gas mixtures, in terms of efficiency, streamer probability, induced charge and time resolution. Prototype chambers with readout pads and with the standard CMS electronic setup are under test. In this paper preliminary results on performance of RPCs operated with a potential eco-friendly gas candidate 1,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene, commercially known as HFO-1234ze, with CO2 and CF3I based gas mixtures are presented and discussed for the possible application in the CMS experiment.

  1. Similarity solutions of a strong shock wave propagation in a mixture of a gas and dusty particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.; Menon, S.; Fan, Z. Q.

    1980-01-01

    The similarity solutions of a strong shock wave propagation in a mixture of a gas and small solid particles have been investigated. Similarity solution exists only when the shock is very strong and the surrounding medium is of a constant density and at rest and with negligible counterpressure. The non-dimensional fundamental equations are derived and studied. The results depend on three non-dimensional parameters; i.e. (1) the ratio of the specific heats of the gas, (2) the mass concentration of the solid particles in the mixture and (3) the ratio of the density of the solid to that of initial density of the gas. Numerical solutions for various values of these parameters are presented and discussed. The speeds of the shock wave front and its location with various energy releases are given.

  2. Density functional theory of gas-liquid phase separation in dilute binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Onuki, Akira

    2016-06-01

    We examine statics and dynamics of phase-separated states of dilute binary mixtures using density functional theory. In our systems, the difference of the solvation chemical potential between liquid and gas Δ {μ\\text{s}} (the Gibbs energy of transfer) is considerably larger than the thermal energy {{k}\\text{B}}T for each solute particle and the attractive interaction among the solute particles is weaker than that among the solvent particles. In these conditions, the saturated vapor pressure increases by {{k}\\text{B}}Tn2\\ell\\exp ≤ft(Δ {μ\\text{s}}/{{k}\\text{B}}T\\right) , where n2\\ell is the solute density added in liquid. For \\exp ≤ft(Δ {μ\\text{s}}/{{k}\\text{B}}T\\right)\\gg 1 , phase separation is induced at low solute densities in liquid and the new phase remains in gaseous states, even when the liquid pressure is outside the coexistence curve of the solvent. This explains the widely observed formation of stable nanobubbles in ambient water with a dissolved gas. We calculate the density and stress profiles across planar and spherical interfaces, where the surface tension decreases with increasing interfacial solute adsorption. We realize stable solute-rich bubbles with radius about 30 nm, which minimize the free energy functional. We then study dynamics around such a bubble after a decompression of the surrounding liquid, where the bubble undergoes a damped oscillation. In addition, we present some exact and approximate expressions for the surface tension and the interfacial stress tensor.

  3. Quench gases for xenon- (and krypton-) filled proportional counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Agrawal, P. C.

    1988-01-01

    Xenon-filled proportional counters are used extensively in astronomy, particularly in the hard X-ray region. The choice of quench gas can have a significant effect on the operating characteristics of the instrument although the data necessary to make the choice are not easily obtainable. Results which detail the performance obtained from both cylindrical and parallel field geometries for a wide variety of readily available, ultrahigh or research grade purity, quench gases are presented.

  4. Analysis of siloxanes in hydrocarbon mixtures using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Seeley, Stacy K; Nartker, Steven R; Seeley, John V

    2014-09-19

    A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) method for separating siloxanes from hydrocarbons has been developed using a systematic process. First, the retention indices of a set of siloxanes and a set of hydrocarbons were determined on 6 different stationary phases. The retention indices were then used to model GC×GC separation on 15 different stationary phase pairs. The SPB-Octyl×DB-1 pair was predicted to provide the best separation of the siloxanes from the hydrocarbons. The efficacy of this stationary phase pair was experimentally tested by performing a GC×GC analysis of gasoline spiked with siloxanes and by analyzing biogas obtained from a local wastewater treatment facility. The model predictions agreed well with the experimental results. The SPB-Octyl×DB-1 stationary phase pair constrained the hydrocarbons to a narrow range of secondary retention times and fully isolated the siloxanes from the hydrocarbon band. The resulting GC×GC method allows siloxanes to be resolved from complex mixtures of hydrocarbons without requiring the use of a selective detector.

  5. Hovering flight mechanics of neotropical flower bats (Phyllostomidae: Glossophaginae) in normodense and hypodense gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Robert; Winter, York

    2002-12-01

    Existing estimates of flight energetics in glossophagine flower bats, the heaviest hovering vertebrate taxon, suggest disproportionately high expenditure of mechanical power. We determined wingbeat kinematics and mechanical power expenditure for one of the largest flower bats (Leptonycteris curasoae Martinez and Villa) during hovering flight in normodense and hypodense gas mixtures. Additional experiments examined the effects of supplemental oxygen availability on maximum flight performance. Bats failed to sustain hovering flight at normoxic air densities averaging 63% that of normodense air. Kinematic responses to hypodense aerodynamic challenge involved increases in wing positional angles and in total stroke amplitude; wingbeat frequency was unchanged. At near-failure air densities, total power expenditure assuming perfect elastic energy storage was 17-42% greater than that for hovering in normodense air, depending on the assumed value for the profile drag coefficient. Assuming a flight muscle ratio of 26%, the associated muscle-mass-specific power output at the point of near-failure varied between 90.8 W kg(-1) (profile drag coefficient of 0.02) to 175.6 W kg(-1) (profile drag coefficient of 0.2). Hyperoxia did not enhance hovering performance in hypodense air, and, with the exception of a small increase (10%) in stroke plane angle, yielded no significant change in any of the kinematic parameters studied. Revised energetic estimates suggest that mechanical power expenditure of hovering glossophagines is comparable with that in slow forward flight.

  6. Spectral Characteristics of Deuterium-, Helium- and Gas-Mixture-Discharges within PF-1000 Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tsarenko, A.; Malinowski, K.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Sadowski, M. J.; Scholz, M.; Paduch, M.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2006-01-15

    The paper reports on spectroscopic studies of high-current plasma discharges performed at different gas fillings within the large PF-1000 facility. To study visible radiation (VR) the use was made of a MECHELLE registered 900-spectrometer equipped with the CCD readout. The observations of a PF pinch column were performed at an angle of about 65 deg. to the z-axis, and the viewing field was at a distance of 40-50 mm from the electrode ends. Optical measurements were carried out at 0.5-{mu}s exposition synchronized with a chosen period of the investigated discharge. Differences in the optical spectra, recorded at various deuterium-helium mixtures, were analyzed. Intensities of HeI lines were computed for an assumed electron temperature and compared with the experiment. Estimated plasma concentration in pure-deuterium discharges amounted to 8x1018 cm-3, while that in pure helium shots was (4-7)x1017 cm-3 only. Estimates of the electron temperature, from the ratio of intensities of the chosen spectral lines and the continuum, gave values ranging from 5 eV to 50 eV. The paper presents also some spectra from 'weak shots', which show distinct impurity lines caused by different reasons.

  7. Shell Perturbations of an Acoustic Thermometer Determined from Speed of Sound in Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavioso, R. M.; Madonna Ripa, D.; Guianvarc'h, C.; Benedetto, G.; Giuliano Albo, P. A.; Cuccaro, R.; Pitre, L.; Truong, D.

    2010-09-01

    With the goal of achieving a better understanding of gas-shell coupling perturbations in the acoustic resonators used at INRiM for the determination of the Boltzmann constant, we measured the variation of their acoustic and microwave resonances induced by changing the composition of a binary He-Ar mixture which filled the cavity at constant temperature and pressure. As a consequence of the progressive dilution of a sample of initially pure He with Ar, the radial acoustic modes of the resonator spanned decreasing frequency intervals, partially overlapping, for several modes. In addition to the expected breathing mode of the shell, the results evidenced the presence of several other shell resonances at lower and higher frequencies, confirming that the elastic response of the assembled resonator significantly differs from that of a simple spherical shell. Experimental results are reported for two resonators which differ in design, dimensions, and constructing material. In spite of their being preliminary and susceptible of significant improvement, these results favor the interpretation of acoustic thermometry measurements with pure gases.

  8. Improvement in methanol production by regulating the composition of synthetic gas mixture and raw biogas.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjay K S; Mardina, Primata; Kim, Dongwook; Kim, Sang-Yong; Kalia, Vipin C; Kim, In-Won; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2016-10-01

    Raw biogas can be an alternative feedstock to pure methane (CH4) for methanol production. In this investigation, we evaluated the methanol production potential of Methylosinus sporium from raw biogas originated from an anaerobic digester. Furthermore, the roles of different gases in methanol production were investigated using synthetic gas mixtures of CH4, carbon dioxide (CO2), and hydrogen (H2). Maximum methanol production was 5.13, 4.35, 6.28, 7.16, 0.38, and 0.36mM from raw biogas, CH4:CO2, CH4:H2, CH4:CO2:H2, CO2, and CO2:H2, respectively. Supplementation of H2 into raw biogas increased methanol production up to 3.5-fold. Additionally, covalent immobilization of M. sporium on chitosan resulted in higher methanol production from raw biogas. This study provides a suitable approach to improve methanol production using low cost raw biogas as a feed containing high concentrations of H2S (0.13%). To our knowledge, this is the first report on methanol production from raw biogas, using immobilized cells of methanotrophs. PMID:27371792

  9. Dust and gas mixtures with multiple grain species - a one-fluid approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laibe, Guillaume; Price, Daniel J.

    2014-10-01

    We derive the single-fluid evolution equations describing a mixture made of a gas phase and an arbitrary number of dust phases, generalizing the approach developed by Laibe & Price. A generalization for continuous dust distributions as well as analytic approximations for strong drag regimes is also provided. This formalism lays the foundation for numerical simulations of dust populations in a wide range of astrophysical systems while avoiding limitations associated with a multiple-fluid treatment. The usefulness of the formalism is illustrated on a series of analytical problems, namely the DUSTYBOX, DUSTYSHOCK and DUSTYWAVE problems as well as the radial drift of grains and the streaming instability in protoplanetary discs. We find physical effects specific to the presence of several dust phases and multiple drag time-scales, including non-monotonic evolution of the differential velocity between phases and increased efficiency of the linear growth of the streaming instability. Interestingly, it is found that under certain conditions, large grains can migrate outwards in protoplanetary discs. This may explain the presence of small pebbles at several hundreds of astronomical units from their central star.

  10. A comparison of solar wind and estimated solar system xenon abundances - A test for solid/gas fractionation in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, Roger C.; Burnett, D. S.; Neugebauer, M.; Pepin, R. O.

    1992-01-01

    The solar Xe elemental abundance is determined here using solar wind measurements from lunar ilmenites which are normalized to Si by spacecraft data. The results are compared with estimated abundances assuming no fractionation. When corrected for solar wind/photospheric fractionation, the Xe-130 abundance given by surface layer oxidation of ilmenite from solid 71501 exposed within the last 200 m.y. is 0.24 +/- 0.09 normalized to Si = 10 exp 6. This is indistinguishable from estimates made assuming no solid/gas fractionation. Results from breccia 79035 ilmenite exposed at least 1 Gyr ago indicate that the solar wind Xe flux may have been significantly higher relative to other noble gases, perhaps due to more efficient Xe ionization. If this is true, fluxes of C and S, which have first ionization potentials similar to Xe, should also be higher in the ancient solar wind from the same time period.

  11. Characteristics of a cylindrical collector mirror for laser-produced xenon plasma soft X-rays and improvement of mirror lifetime by buffer gas

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tomoaki; Mochizuki, Takayasu; Miyamoto, Shuji; Masuda, Kazuya; Amano, Sho; Kanda, Kazuhiro

    2012-12-15

    The focusing characteristics of a ruthenium-coated cylindrical mirror were investigated on the basis of its ability to collect and focus broadband 5-17-nm soft X-rays emitted from a laser-produced plasma. Based on the plasmas spectral intensity distribution and the reflectivity function of the mirror, we defined the optimum position of the integrated cylindrical mirror at which the X-ray energy flux transported and focused through the mirror was maximum. A minimum spot diameter of 22 mm at a distance of approximately 200 mm from a soft X-ray source was confirmed. The maximum intensity of the collected soft X-rays was 1.3 mJ/cm{sup 2} at the center of the irradiation zone. Thus, the irradiation intensity was improved by approximately 27 times when compared to that of 47 {mu}J/cm{sup 2} without the mirror. The debris sputtering rate on the reflection surface of the mirror can be reduced to 1/110 by argon gas at 11 Pa, while the attenuation rate of the soft X-rays due to absorption by the buffer gas can be suppressed to less than 10% at the focal point. The focusing property of the mirror is expected to be maintained for 3000 h or longer without significant degradation for a 100 W/320 pps laser shot if the ruthenium layer is thicker than 10 {mu}m. These results suggest that a stand-alone broadband soft X-ray processing system can be realized by using laser-produced plasma soft X-rays.

  12. Characteristics of a cylindrical collector mirror for laser-produced xenon plasma soft X-rays and improvement of mirror lifetime by buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tomoaki; Mochizuki, Takayasu; Miyamoto, Shuji; Masuda, Kazuya; Amano, Sho; Kanda, Kazuhiro

    2012-12-01

    The focusing characteristics of a ruthenium-coated cylindrical mirror were investigated on the basis of its ability to collect and focus broadband 5-17-nm soft X-rays emitted from a laser-produced plasma. Based on the plasmas spectral intensity distribution and the reflectivity function of the mirror, we defined the optimum position of the integrated cylindrical mirror at which the X-ray energy flux transported and focused through the mirror was maximum. A minimum spot diameter of 22 mm at a distance of approximately 200 mm from a soft X-ray source was confirmed. The maximum intensity of the collected soft X-rays was 1.3 mJ/cm2 at the center of the irradiation zone. Thus, the irradiation intensity was improved by approximately 27 times when compared to that of 47 μJ/cm2 without the mirror. The debris sputtering rate on the reflection surface of the mirror can be reduced to 1/110 by argon gas at 11 Pa, while the attenuation rate of the soft X-rays due to absorption by the buffer gas can be suppressed to less than 10% at the focal point. The focusing property of the mirror is expected to be maintained for 3000 h or longer without significant degradation for a 100 W/320 pps laser shot if the ruthenium layer is thicker than 10 μm. These results suggest that a stand-alone broadband soft X-ray processing system can be realized by using laser-produced plasma soft X-rays.

  13. Characteristics of a cylindrical collector mirror for laser-produced xenon plasma soft X-rays and improvement of mirror lifetime by buffer gas.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tomoaki; Mochizuki, Takayasu; Miyamoto, Shuji; Masuda, Kazuya; Amano, Sho; Kanda, Kazuhiro

    2012-12-01

    The focusing characteristics of a ruthenium-coated cylindrical mirror were investigated on the basis of its ability to collect and focus broadband 5-17-nm soft X-rays emitted from a laser-produced plasma. Based on the plasmas spectral intensity distribution and the reflectivity function of the mirror, we defined the optimum position of the integrated cylindrical mirror at which the X-ray energy flux transported and focused through the mirror was maximum. A minimum spot diameter of 22 mm at a distance of approximately 200 mm from a soft X-ray source was confirmed. The maximum intensity of the collected soft X-rays was 1.3 mJ/cm(2) at the center of the irradiation zone. Thus, the irradiation intensity was improved by approximately 27 times when compared to that of 47 μJ/cm(2) without the mirror. The debris sputtering rate on the reflection surface of the mirror can be reduced to 1/110 by argon gas at 11 Pa, while the attenuation rate of the soft X-rays due to absorption by the buffer gas can be suppressed to less than 10% at the focal point. The focusing property of the mirror is expected to be maintained for 3000 h or longer without significant degradation for a 100 W/320 pps laser shot if the ruthenium layer is thicker than 10 μm. These results suggest that a stand-alone broadband soft X-ray processing system can be realized by using laser-produced plasma soft X-rays.

  14. Modeling high-pressure adsorption of gas mixtures on activated carbon and coal using a simplified local-density model.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, James E; Robinson, Robert L; Gasem, Khaled A M

    2006-11-01

    The simplified local-density (SLD) theory was investigated regarding its ability to provide accurate representations and predictions of high-pressure supercritical adsorption isotherms encountered in coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and CO2 sequestration. Attention was focused on the ability of the SLD theory to predict mixed-gas adsorption solely on the basis of information from pure gas isotherms using a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS). An extensive set of high-pressure adsorption measurements was used in this evaluation. These measurements included pure and binary mixture adsorption measurements for several gas compositions up to 14 MPa for Calgon F-400 activated carbon and three water-moistened coals. Also included were ternary measurements for the activated carbon and one coal. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO2 on dry activated carbon, the SLD-PR can predict the component mixture adsorption within about 2.2 times the experimental uncertainty on average solely on the basis of pure-component adsorption isotherms. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO2 on two of the three wet coals, the SLD-PR model can predict the component adsorption within the experimental uncertainties on average for all feed fractions (nominally molar compositions of 20/80, 40/60, 60/40, and 80/20) of the three binary gas mixture combinations, although predictions for some specific feed fractions are outside of their experimental uncertainties. PMID:17073487

  15. Recovery of methane from gas hydrates intercalated within natural sediments using CO(2) and a CO(2)/N(2) gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Koh, Dong-Yeun; Kang, Hyery; Kim, Dae-Ok; Park, Juwoon; Cha, Minjun; Lee, Huen

    2012-08-01

    The direct recovery of methane from massive methane hydrates (MHs), artificial MH-bearing clays, and natural MH-bearing sediments is demonstrated, using either CO(2) or a CO(2)/N(2) gas mixture (20 mol % of CO(2) and 80 mol % of N(2), reproducing flue gas from a power plant) for methane replacement in complex marine systems. Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) can be converted into CO(2) hydrate by a swapping mechanism. The overall process serves a dual purpose: it is a means of sustainable energy-source exploitation and greenhouse-gas sequestration. In particular, scant attention has been paid to the natural sediment clay portion in deep-sea gas hydrates, which is capable of storing a tremendous amount of NGH. The clay interlayer provides a unique chemical-physical environment for gas hydrates. Herein, for the first time, we pull out methane from intercalated methane hydrates in a clay interlayer using CO(2) and a CO(2)/N(2) gas mixture. The results of this study are expected to provide an essential physicochemical background required for large-scale NGH production under the seabed. PMID:22730158

  16. Pressure-response analysis of anesthetic gases xenon and nitrous oxide on urate oxidase: a crystallographic study.

    PubMed

    Marassio, Guillaume; Prangé, Thierry; David, Hélène N; Santos, Jana Sopkova-de Oliveira; Gabison, Laure; Delcroix, Nicolas; Abraini, Jacques H; Colloc'h, Nathalie

    2011-07-01

    The remarkably safe anesthetics xenon (Xe) and, to lesser extent, nitrous oxide (N(2)O) possess neuroprotective properties in preclinical studies. To investigate the mechanisms of pharmacological action of these gases, which are still poorly known, we performed both crystallography under a large range of gas pressure and biochemical studies on urate oxidase, a prototype of globular gas-binding proteins whose activity is modulated by inert gases. We show that Xe and N(2)O bind to, compete for, and expand the volume of a hydrophobic cavity located just behind the active site of urate oxidase and further inhibit urate oxidase enzymatic activity. By demonstrating a significant relationship between the binding and biochemical effects of Xe and N(2)O, given alone or in combination, these data from structure to function highlight the mechanisms by which chemically and metabolically inert gases can alter protein function and produce their pharmacological effects. Interestingly, the effects of a Xe:N(2)O equimolar mixture were found to be equivalent to those of Xe alone, thereby suggesting that gas mixtures containing Xe and N(2)O could be an alternative and efficient neuroprotective strategy to Xe alone, whose widespread clinical use is limited due to the cost of production and availability of this gas.

  17. COOMET.QM-S5 (COOMET project No 576/RU/12) 'Supplementary comparison of national standards in the field of analysis of gas mixtures containing CO2, CO, C3H8 in nitrogen ("automotive" gas mixtures)'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopelko, L. A.; Kolobova, A. V.; Rozhnov, M. S.; Melnyk, D. M.; Petryshyn, P. V.; Shpilnyi, S. A.; Iakubov, S. E.; Bakovec, N. V.; Kluchits, A. S.; Kipphardt, H.; Aleksandrov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the COOMET.QM-S5 comparison is founded on tightening of requirements to a control of automobile emissions (realization of environmental standards of EURO 4, EURO-5). Participating laboratories: VNIIM, BAM, BelGIM, Ukrmetrteststandart, KazInMetr. This comparison was carried out in 2013-2014. This supplementary comparison supports CMC claims for: CO2 in the range (4-16) . 10-2 mol/mol; CO in the range (0.5-5) . 10-2 mol/mol; C3H8 in the range (0.01-0.3) . 10-2 mol/mol. Results: Component CO: All laboratories identified the values of carbon monoxide mole fraction in the gas mixture within +/-0.9134%. Component CO2: All laboratories identified the values of carbon dioxide mole fraction in the gas mixture within +/-0.3042%. Component C3H8: All laboratories identified the values of propane mole fraction in the gas mixture within +/-0.443%. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Non-Stationary Hydraulic Process Occurring in the Gas Centrifuge Cascade During the Separation of Multicomponent Isotope Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. A.; Ushakov, A. A.; Sovach, V. P.

    2016-08-01

    This article presents results of development of the mathematical model of nonstationary separation processes occurring in gas centrifuge cascades for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures. This model was used for the calculation parameters of gas centrifuge cascade for separation of germanium isotopes. Comparison of obtained values with results of other authors revealed that developed mathematical model is adequate to describe nonstationary separation processes in gas centrifuge cascades for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures.

  19. Heat capacity of xenon adsorbed on nanobundle grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishko, K. A.; Sokolova, E. S.

    2016-02-01

    A model of a one-dimensional nonideal gas in an external transverse force field is used to interpret the experimentally observed thermodynamic properties of xenon deposited in grooves on the surface of carbon nanobundles. A nonideal gas model with pairwise interactions is not entirely adequate for describing dense adsorbates (at low temperatures), but makes it easy to account for the exchange of particles between the 1D adsorbate and the 3D atmosphere, which is an important factor at intermediate (on the order of 35 K for xenon) and, especially, high (˜100 K) temperatures. In this paper, we examine a 1D real gas taking only the one-dimensional Lennard-Jones interaction into account, but under exact equilibrium with respect to the number of particles between the 1D adsorbate and the 3D atmosphere of the measurement cell. The low-temperature branch of the specific heat is fitted independently by an elastic chain model so as to obtain the best agreement between theory and experiment over the widest possible region, beginning at zero temperature. The gas approximation sets in after temperatures for which the phonon specific heat of the chain essentially transforms to a one-dimensional equipartition law. Here the basic parameters of both models can be chosen so that the heat capacity C(T) of the chain transforms essentially continuously into the corresponding curve for the gas approximation. Thus, it can be expected that an adequate interpretation of the real temperature dependences of the specific heat of low-dimensionality atomic adsorbates can be obtained through a reasonable combination of the phonon and gas approximations. The main parameters of the gas approximation (such as the desorption energy) obtained by fitting the theory to experiments on the specific heat of xenon correlate well with published data.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of argon and xenon ion velocities near the sheath boundary in 3 ion species plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah; Severn, Greg; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2016-05-01

    The Bohm sheath criterion is studied with laser-induced fluorescence in three ion species plasmas using two tunable diode lasers. Krypton is added to a low pressure unmagnetized DC hot filament discharge in a mixture of argon and xenon gas confined by surface multi-dipole magnetic fields. The argon and xenon ion velocity distribution functions are measured at the sheath-presheath boundary near a negatively biased boundary plate. The potential structures of the plasma sheath and presheath are measured by an emissive probe. Results are compared with previous experiments with Ar-Xe plasmas, where the two ion species were observed to reach the sheath edge at nearly the same speed. This speed was the ion sound speed of the system, which is consistent with the generalized Bohm criterion. In such two ion species plasmas, instability enhanced collisional friction was demonstrated [Hershkowitz et al., Phys. Plasmas 18(5), 057102 (2011).] to exist which accounted for the observed results. When three ion species are present, it is demonstrated under most circumstances the ions do not fall out of the plasma at their individual Bohm velocities. It is also shown that under most circumstances the ions do not fall out of the plasma at the system sound speed. These observations are also consistent with the presence of the instabilities.

  1. Numerical Prediction of Radiation Measurements Taken in the X2 Facility for Mars and Titan Gas Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Prabhu, Dinesh; Brandis, Aaron; McIntyre, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Thermochemical relaxation behind a normal shock in Mars and Titan gas mixtures is simulated using a CFD solver, DPLR, for a hemisphere of 1 m radius; the thermochemical relaxation along the stagnation streamline is considered equivalent to the flow behind a normal shock. Flow simulations are performed for a Titan gas mixture (98% N2, 2% CH4 by volume) for shock speeds of 5.7 and 7.6 km/s and pressures ranging from 20 to 1000 Pa, and a Mars gas mixture (96% CO2, and 4% N2 by volume) for a shock speed of 8.6 km/s and freestream pressure of 13 Pa. For each case, the temperatures and number densities of chemical species obtained from the CFD flow predictions are used as an input to a line-by-line radiation code, NEQAIR. The NEQAIR code is then used to compute the spatial distribution of volumetric radiance starting from the shock front to the point where thermochemical equilibrium is nominally established. Computations of volumetric spectral radiance assume Boltzmann distributions over radiatively linked electronic states of atoms and molecules. The results of these simulations are compared against experimental data acquired in the X2 facility at the University of Queensland, Australia. The experimental measurements were taken over a spectral range of 310-450 nm where the dominant contributor to radiation is the CN violet band system. In almost all cases, the present approach of computing the spatial variation of post-shock volumetric radiance by applying NEQAIR along a stagnation line computed using a high-fidelity flow solver with good spatial resolution of the relaxation zone is shown to replicate trends in measured relaxation of radiance for both Mars and Titan gas mixtures.

  2. Low-pressure equilibrium binary argon-methane gas mixture adsorption on exfoliated graphite: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albesa, Alberto; Russell, Brice; Vicente, José Luis; Rafti, Matías

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption equilibrium measurements of pure methane, pure argon, and binary mixtures over exfoliated graphite were carried for different initial compositions, temperatures, and total pressures in the range of 0.1-1.5 Torr using the volumetric static method. Diagrams for gas and adsorbed phase compositions were constructed for the conditions explored, and isosteric heats of adsorption were calculated. Experimental results were compared with predictions obtained with Monte Carlo simulations and using the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST).

  3. Method of and apparatus for measuring the mean concentration of thoron and/or radon in a gas mixture

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Henry

    1990-01-01

    A method of and an apparatus for detecting and accurately measuring the mean concentrations of .sup.222 Rn and .sup.220 Tn in a gas mixture, such as the ambient atmosphere in a mine, is provided. The apparatus includes an alpha target member which defines at least one operative target surface and which is preferably fabricated from a single piece of an alpha particle sensitive material. At least one portion of the operative target surface is covered with an alpha particle filter. The uncovered and filter covered operative surface is exposed to the gas mixture containing the .sup.222 Rn and .sup.220 Tn. In the radioactive decay series of these isotopes the maximum kinetic energy emitted by the alpha decay of .sup.222 Rn is about 1.1 MeV less than the maximum kinetic energy emitted by the alpha decay of a .sup.220 Tn. The alpha particle filter has a predetermined mass per unit area of the covered portion of the operative target surface that prevents penetration of alpha particles which originate from .sup.222 Rn decay, but which allows passage therethrough of the maximum kinetic energy alpha particles from .sup.220 Tn decay. Thus, a count of the alpha particle tracks in the uncovered portion of the target member is proportional to the mean concentration of sum of .sup.222 Rn and .sup.220 Tn in the gas mixture, while the count of alpha tracks in the target member under the filter is proportional to the concentration of only the .sup.220 Tn in the gas mixture.

  4. Dry etching of CdTe/GaAs epilayers using CH{sub 4}H{sub 2} gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Neswal, M.; Gresslehner, K.H.; Lischka, K.

    1993-05-01

    A CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} gas mixture has been used for the dry etching of (100) and (111) oriented CdTe epilayers in a barrel reactor. The effects of various process parameters on etch rate and surface morphology were studied with special attention paid to the gas composition and the total chamber pressure as well as the crystallographic orientation of the sample. Clear evidence is found for both isotropic and preferential etching along crystalolographic planes depending on the set of etch parameters used. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Xenon porometry: a novel method for the derivation of pore size distributions.

    PubMed

    Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Lounila, Juhani; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2007-05-01

    Xenon porometry is a novel method used for characterizing porous materials by the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance of xenon gas. With the method, the diffusion of gas is slowed down by immersing the material in a medium, which can be in liquid or solid state during measurements. Because of slow diffusion, the signal of a xenon atom is characteristic of the properties of only one pore, and the composite signal of all atoms represents the distribution of properties. The method is especially applicable for determining pore size distribution because the chemical shifts of two different xenon signals (one from liquid and the other from gas pockets in solid) are dependent on pore size. Therefore, the shapes of these signals represent pore size distribution function. In addition, the porosity of the material can be determined by comparing the intensities of two signals. This article focuses on describing xenon signals observed from gas pockets in a solid medium, which has turned out to be most convenient for pore size determination. PMID:17466763

  6. Response of electrochemical oxygen sensors to inert gas-air and carbon dioxide-air mixtures: measurements and mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Walsh, P T; Gant, S E; Dowker, K P; Batt, R

    2011-02-15

    Electrochemical oxygen gas sensors are widely used for monitoring the state of inertisation of flammable atmospheres and to warn of asphyxiation risks. It is well established but not widely known by users of such oxygen sensors that the response of the sensor is affected by the nature of the diluent gas responsible for the decrease in ambient oxygen concentration. The present work investigates the response of electrochemical sensors, with either acid or alkaline electrolytes, to gas mixtures comprising air with enhanced levels of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon or helium. The measurements indicate that both types of sensors over-read the oxygen concentrations when atmospheres contain high levels of helium. Sensors with alkaline electrolytes are also shown to underestimate the severity of the hazard in atmospheres containing high levels of carbon dioxide. This deviation is greater for alkaline electrolyte sensors compared to acid electrolyte sensors. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict the response of an alkaline electrolyte, electrochemical gas sensor. Differences between predicted and measured sensor responses are less than 10% in relative terms for nearly all of the gas mixtures tested, and in many cases less than 5%. Extending the model to simulate responses of sensors with acid electrolytes would be straightforward.

  7. Influence of gas temperature on self-sustained volume discharge characteristics in working mixtures of a repetitively pulsed COIL

    SciTech Connect

    Aksinin, V I; Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Podlesnykh, S V; Firsov, K N; Antsiferov, S A; Velikanov, S D; Kalinovskii, V V; Konovalov, V V; Mikhalkin, V N; Sevryugin, I V

    2014-02-28

    The influence of gas temperature on the characteristics of a self-sustained volume discharge was studied in the working mixtures of a chemical oxygen – iodine laser with pulsed electricdischarge production of iodine atoms. In experiments, laser working mixtures were modelled by the mixture of air and iodide C{sub 2}H{sub 5}I. It was established that mixture heating is accompanied by an increase in the voltage across the discharge plasma and by a decrease in the discharge current. By varying the temperature of the mixture with the iodine content of ∼2.7% and initial pressure p=12 Torr from 22 °C to 96 °C, the current amplitude falls by ∼12%, and at the instant corresponding to a maximal current the voltage raises by ∼22%. Such a change in the discharge characteristics is explained by a higher rate of electron attachment to vibrationally excited iodide molecules at elevated temperatures. (active media)

  8. Xenon NMR measurements of permeability and tortuosity in reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruopeng; Pavlin, Tina; Rosen, Matthew Scott; Mair, Ross William; Cory, David G; Walsworth, Ronald Lee

    2005-02-01

    In this work we present measurements of permeability, effective porosity and tortuosity on a variety of rock samples using NMR/MRI of thermal and laser-polarized gas. Permeability and effective porosity are measured simultaneously using MRI to monitor the inflow of laser-polarized xenon into the rock core. Tortuosity is determined from measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient using thermal xenon in sealed samples. The initial results from a limited number of rocks indicate inverse correlations between tortuosity and both effective porosity and permeability. Further studies to widen the number of types of rocks studied may eventually aid in explaining the poorly understood connection between permeability and tortuosity of rock cores. PMID:15833638

  9. A portable gamma-ray spectrometer using compressed xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Smith, G.C.; Kane, W.R.; Lemley, J.R.

    1997-10-01

    An ionization chamber using compressed xenon has been designed and built for gamma-ray spectrometry. The device is based on signal measurement from a parallel plate detector, with the gas enclosure constructed specifically for packaging into a portable instrument; thus, appropriate engineering practices comprises two small containers that can be setup for operation in just a few minutes. Its sensitivity is 100 keV to over 1 MeV, with a resolution at 662 keV of 2.5% FWHM for uniform irradiation, and 2% FWHM for collimated irradiation, comparable to the best ever with compressed xenon. It also exhibits greater specificity that most scintillators, such as NaI. The device is insensitive to neutron damage and has a low power requirement.

  10. Rotational spectrum and molecular properties of pyridine...xenon.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shouyuan; Evangelisti, Luca; Velino, Biagio; Caminati, Walther

    2008-10-14

    The rotational spectra of six isotopologues of pyridine-xenon, two isotopes of the nitrogen atom ((14)N and (15)N) in pyridine with three isotopes of the rare gas atom ((129)Xe, (131)Xe, and (132)Xe) have been measured by pulsed jet Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The complex has a structure with the xenon atom located in the plane of symmetry perpendicular to the aromatic ring plane. Its distance from the center of mass of pyridine is 3.81 A, and it is tilted--with respect to the c principal axis of pyridine--by 7 degrees toward the N atom. The (14)N and (131)Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling constants have been determined for the isotopologues containing these nuclei. Information on the dynamics of the Xe van der Waals motions was obtained from the centrifugal distortion and from the changes in the planar moments of inertia in going from pyridine to pyridine...Xe.

  11. Tunable integration of absorption-membrane-adsorption for efficiently separating low boiling gas mixtures near normal temperature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huang; Pan, Yong; Liu, Bei; Sun, Changyu; Guo, Ping; Gao, Xueteng; Yang, Lanying; Ma, Qinglan; Chen, Guangjin

    2016-01-01

    Separation of low boiling gas mixtures is widely concerned in process industries. Now their separations heavily rely upon energy-intensive cryogenic processes. Here, we report a pseudo-absorption process for separating low boiling gas mixtures near normal temperature. In this process, absorption-membrane-adsorption is integrated by suspending suitable porous ZIF material in suitable solvent and forming selectively permeable liquid membrane around ZIF particles. Green solvents like water and glycol were used to form ZIF-8 slurry and tune the permeability of liquid membrane surrounding ZIF-8 particles. We found glycol molecules form tighter membrane while water molecules form looser membrane because of the hydrophobicity of ZIF-8. When using mixing solvents composed of glycol and water, the permeability of liquid membrane becomes tunable. It is shown that ZIF-8/water slurry always manifests remarkable higher separation selectivity than solid ZIF-8 and it could be tuned to further enhance the capture of light hydrocarbons by adding suitable quantity of glycol to water. Because of its lower viscosity and higher sorption/desorption rate, tunable ZIF-8/water-glycol slurry could be readily used as liquid absorbent to separate different kinds of low boiling gas mixtures by applying a multistage separation process in one traditional absorption tower, especially for the capture of light hydrocarbons. PMID:26892255

  12. Tunable integration of absorption-membrane-adsorption for efficiently separating low boiling gas mixtures near normal temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huang; Pan, Yong; Liu, Bei; Sun, Changyu; Guo, Ping; Gao, Xueteng; Yang, Lanying; Ma, Qinglan; Chen, Guangjin

    2016-02-19

    Separation of low boiling gas mixtures is widely concerned in process industries. Now their separations heavily rely upon energy-intensive cryogenic processes. Here, we report a pseudo-absorption process for separating low boiling gas mixtures near normal temperature. In this process, absorption-membrane-adsorption is integrated by suspending suitable porous ZIF material in suitable solvent and forming selectively permeable liquid membrane around ZIF particles. Green solvents like water and glycol were used to form ZIF-8 slurry and tune the permeability of liquid membrane surrounding ZIF-8 particles. We found glycol molecules form tighter membrane while water molecules form looser membrane because of the hydrophobicity of ZIF-8. When using mixing solvents composed of glycol and water, the permeability of liquid membrane becomes tunable. It is shown that ZIF-8/water slurry always manifests remarkable higher separation selectivity than solid ZIF-8 and it could be tuned to further enhance the capture of light hydrocarbons by adding suitable quantity of glycol to water. Because of its lower viscosity and higher sorption/desorption rate, tunable ZIF-8/water-glycol slurry could be readily used as liquid absorbent to separate different kinds of low boiling gas mixtures by applying a multistage separation process in one traditional absorption tower, especially for the capture of light hydrocarbons.

  13. Molecular dynamics investigation of separation of hydrogen sulfide from acidic gas mixtures inside metal-doped graphite micropores.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Hsing

    2015-09-21

    The separation of poisonous compounds from various process fluids has long been highly intractable, motivating the present study on the dynamic separation of H2S in acidic-gas-mixture-filled micropores. The molecular dynamics approach, coupled with the isothermal-isochoric ensemble, was used to model the molecular interactions and adsorption of H2S/CO2/CO/H2O mixtures inside metal-doped graphite slits. Due to the difference in the adsorption characteristics between the two distinct adsorbent materials, the metal dopant in the graphitic micropores leads to competitive adsorption, i.e. the Au and graphite walls compete to capture free adsorbates. The effects of competitive adsorption, coupled with changes in the gas temperature, concentration, constituent ratio and slit width on the constituent separation of mixtures were systematically studied. The molecule-wall binding energies calculated in this work (those of H2S, H2O and CO on Au walls and those of H2O, CO and CO2 on graphite walls) show good agreement with those obtained using density functional theory (DFT) and experimental results. The z-directional self-diffusivities (Dz) for adsorbates inside the slit ranged from 10(-9) to 10(-7) m(2) s(-1) as the temperature was increased from 10 to 500 K. The values are comparable with those for a typical microporous fluid (10(-8)-10(-9) m(2) s(-1) in a condensed phase and 10(-6)-10(-7) m(2) s(-1) in the gaseous state). The formation of H-bonding networks and hydrates of H2S is disadvantageous for the separation of mixtures. The results indicate that H2S can be efficiently separated from acidic gas mixtures onto the Au(111) surface by (i) reducing the mole fraction of H2S and H2O in the mixtures, (ii) raising the gas temperature to the high temperature limit (≥400 K), and (iii) lowering the slit width to below the threshold dimension (≤23.26 Å).

  14. Spectrum of carbonaceous-chondrite fission xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1976-01-01

    Estimations of the fission spectrum in xenon isotopes from the progenitor of the strange carbonaceous-chondrite xenon must take account of p-process nucleosynthesis if the latter is the source of anomalous Xe-124, 126. Sample calculations of the p-process yields illustrate the magnitude of the effect, which can greatly increase the estimated Xe-132 fission yield.

  15. Xenon fluoride solutions effective as fluorinating agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, H. H.; Quarterman, L. A.; Sheft, I.

    1967-01-01

    Solutions of xenon fluorides in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride have few disruptive effects and leave a residue consisting of gaseous xenon, which can be recovered and refluorinated. This mild agent can be used with materials which normally must be fluorinated with fluorine alone at high temperatures.

  16. Gas emissions and engine behavior when gasoline-alcohol mixtures are used.

    PubMed

    Arapatsakos, C I; Karkanis, A N; Sparis, P D

    2003-09-01

    This paper deals with the use of gasoline-methanol and gasoline-ethanol mixtures in a small four-stroke engine of internal combustion that is used for the movement of a small alternative generator. It was observed that CO and HC emissions decrease compared to gasoline when the percentage of methanol, ethanol in the fuel was increased, under different load conditions (without load conditions and under full electrical load conditions). The use of gasoline-methanol mixtures showed a higher decrease of emissions. When the mixtures of gasoline-70%methanol and gasoline-90%ethanol and 100%ethanol for which the engine malfunctioned, the rpm of the engine were not constant and the emissions were increased. It is also important that (with the existing regulation of the fuel/air ratio that refers to gasoline) the engine functioned for the case of gasoline-methanol mixtures up to a concentration of -70%methanol mixture, while for the case of gasoline-ethanol mixtures until the use of 100%ethanol. Furthermore, during the use of the mixtures of gasoline-methanol and gasoline-ethanol there was a small increase of fuel consumption when the percentage of the methanol or ethanol in the fuel was increased.

  17. Evaluation of carrier agents for hyperpolarized xenon MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, A. K.; Zhao, L.; Balamore, D.; Jolesz, F. A.; Albert, M. S.

    2000-01-01

    Several biocompatible carrier agents, in which xenon is highly soluble and has a long T(1), were tested, and injected in living rats. These included saline, Intralipid suspension, perfluorocarbon emulsion and (129)Xe gas-filled liposomes. The T(1) of (129)Xe in these compounds ranged from 47 to 116 s. Vascular injection of these carrier agents was tolerated well, encouraging their use for further experiments in live animals. In vivo spectra, obtained from gas-filled liposomes and perfluorocarbon solutions, suggest that these carrier agents have potential for use in angiography and perfusion imaging. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Excimer Emission from Pulsed Tandem Microhollow Cathode Discharges in Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byung-Joon; Rahaman, Hasibur; Nam, Sang Hoon; Iberler, Marcus; Teske, Christian; Jacoby, Joachim; Frank, Klaus

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes an extension of a basic single microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) to a tandem MHCD, i.e., two discharges in series from an anode-cathode-anode configuration. When a high-voltage pulse is superimposed with a direct current (DC) tandem MHCD, an intense excimer emission along the discharge axis in a high pressure xenon gas is generated which is two orders of magnitude higher than that of the DC tandem MHCD. In addition, the emission intensity increases to almost twice by increasing cathode thickness from 250 to 1000 µm. The emission is further enhanced by increasing the gas pressure from 400 to 800 mbar.

  19. ANALYTICAL METHOD FOR MEASURING TOTAL PROTIUM AND TOTAL DEUTERIUM IN A GAS MIXTURE CONTAINING H2, D2,AND HD VIA GAS CHAROMATOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Sessions, H

    2007-08-07

    The most common analytical method of identifying and quantifying non-radioactive isotopic species of hydrogen is mass spectrometry. A low mass, high resolution mass spectrometer with adequate sensitivity and stability to identify and quantify hydrogen isotopes in the low ppm range is an expensive, complex instrument. A new analytical technique has been developed that measures both total protium (H) and total deuterium (D) in a gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD using an inexpensive micro gas chromatograph (GC) with two molecular sieve columns. One column uses D{sub 2} as the carrier gas and the other uses H{sub 2} as the carrier gas. Laboratory tests have shown that when used in this configuration the GC can measure both total protium and total deuterium each with a detection and quantification limit of less than 20 ppm.

  20. Analysis of Trace Gas Mixtures Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Kriesel, Jason M.

    2015-07-01

    We measure and analyze mixtures of trace gases at ppb-ppm levels using an external cavity quantum cascade laser sensor with a 1-second response time. Accurate spectral fits are obtained in the presence of overlapping spectra.

  1. Prospects for Barium Tagging in Gaseous Xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D.; Rollin, E.; Smith, J.; Mommers, A.; Ackerman, N.; Aharmim, B.; Auger, M.; Barbeau, P.S.; Benitez-Medina, C.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Cook, S.; Coppens, A.; Daniels, T.; DeVoe, R.; Dobi, A.; Dolinski, M.J.; Donato, K.; Fairbank, W., Jr.; Farine, J.; Giroux, G.; /Bern U., LHEP /Carleton U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Carleton U. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /SLAC /Indiana U. /Indiana U., CEEM /Korea U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Alabama U. /Colorado State U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /SLAC /Alabama U. /SLAC /Maryland U. /Moscow, ITEP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Maryland U. /Bern U., LHEP /Laurentian U. /SLAC /Maryland U.

    2012-05-03

    Tagging events with the coincident detection of a barium ion would greatly reduce the background for a neutrino-less double beta decay search in xenon. This paper describes progress towards realizing this goal. It outlines a source that can produce large quantities of Ba++ in gas, shows that this can be extracted to vacuum, and demonstrates a mechanism by which the Ba++ can be efficiently converted to Ba+ as required for laser identification. It is clear from this study that electrospray is a convenient mechanism for producing Ba++ is gas at atmospheric pressure. It is likely that the source will perform just as effectively at higher pressures. Even though the source region has water vapour and methanol vapour at the 0.3% level, there is no evidence for molecular formation. The use of TEA offers an effective method to achieve the charge state conversion. The overall design of the ion extraction from high pressure to vacuum is very similar to the scheme proposed for the final detector and this appears to work well although the efficiency is not yet determined.

  2. Final report on EURAMET.QM-S10/1274: supplementary comparison of preparative capabilities for automotive gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Val'ková, M.; Ďurišová, Z.; Szilágyi, Z. N.; Büki, T.; Fükű, J.

    2016-01-01

    This bilateral supplementary preparative comparison involves standard gas mixtures of automotive gas containing carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and propane in nitrogen. Two laboratories (SMU, Slovakia and MKEH, Hungary) participated in this supplementary comparison. SMU was the coordinating laboratory, responsible for collecting and reporting measurement results. The participants have established facilities for automotive gas gravimetric preparation and analysis. The agreement of the results in this supplementary comparison is good. All the results with their reported uncertainties are in agreement with the reference values for the participants. SMU participated and obtained good results in the previous preparative comparison organised within EURAMET in this field. Both laboratories have existing claims for their Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMCs) for automotive gas mixtures. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  3. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, J.K.

    1989-11-14

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

  4. Xenon Gamma Detector Project Support

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier,P.E.; Forman, L.

    2008-04-01

    This project provided funding of $48,500 for part of one year to support the development of compressed xenon spectrometers at BNL. This report describes upgrades that were made to the existing detector system electronics during that period, as well as subsequent testing with check sources and Special Nuclear Materials. Previous testing of the equipment extended only up to the energy of 1.3 MeV, and did not include a spectrum of Pu-239. The new electronics allowed one-button activation of the high voltage ramp that was previously controlled by manual adjustments. Mechanical relays of the charging circuit were replaced by a tera-ohm resistor chain and an optical switch. The preamplifier and shaping amplifier were replaced by more modern custom designs. We found that the xenon purity had not been degraded since the chamber was filled 10 years earlier. The resulting spectra showed significantly better resolution than sodium iodide spectra, and could be analyzed quite effectively by methods using peak area templates.

  5. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

  6. Parameters, limits, attenuation, and suppression of detonation in mixtures of an explosive gas with chemically inert microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Fomin, P. A.; Tropin, D. A.; Chen, Z.-R.

    2012-03-01

    Chapman-Jouguet parameters and the cell size of a detonation wave in mixtures of an explosive gas with chemically inert particles have been calculated. The algorithm of calculation of the minimum mass and characteristic dimension of a particle cloud ensuring successful suppression of detonation in the gas has been proposed. The calculation results are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The influence of the initial composition of the gas on the efficiency of suppression of the detonation wave has been analyzed. The issue of the dependence of the concentration limits of detonation on the mass fraction of particles has been investigated. It has been established that the increase in the concentration of the condensed phase leads to a narrowing of the existence domain of detonation and that the propagation of the detonation wave becomes impossible when the concentration of the particles is fairly high.

  7. Optical and electrical analyses of DC positive corona discharge in N2/O2/CO2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merbahi, N.; Abahazem, A.; Dubois, D.; Eichwald, O.; Yousfi, M.

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental analysis of the electrical and optical behaviour of positive point-plane corona discharges. The measurements of the instantaneous corona current and the current-voltage characteristics are used with the imagery analyses (CCD and streak camera) to determine the streamer properties such as the streamer morphology and velocity with the primary and secondary streamer developments. These analyses are performed first in synthetic air as a function of operating parameters such the applied voltage. Then the effect of gas mixtures (several proportions of N{2}, O{2} with or without CO{2}) is analysed. When the gas concentration is varied the discharge morphology, the shape and amplitude of the corona current are significantly affected due to the variation of the gas electronegativity following its composition and concentration.

  8. Effect of hydrogen ratio on plasma parameters of N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} gas mixture glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    El-Brulsy, R. A.; Abd Al-Halim, M. A.; Abu-Hashem, A.; Rashed, U. M.; Hassouba, M. A.

    2012-05-15

    A dc plane glow discharge in a nitrogen-hydrogen (N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}) gas mixture has been operated at discharge currents of 10 and 20 mA. The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) at different hydrogen concentrations is measured. A Maxwellian EEDF is found in the positive column region, while in both cathode fall and negative glow regions, a non-Maxwellian one is observed. Langmuir electric probes are used at different axial positions, gas pressures, and hydrogen concentrations to measure the electron temperature and plasma density. The electron temperature is found to increase with increasing H{sub 2} concentration and decrease with increasing both the axial distance from the cathode and the mixture pressure. At first, with increasing distance from the cathode, the ion density decreases, while the electron density increases; then, as the anode is further approached, they remain nearly constant. At different H{sub 2} concentrations, the electron and ion densities decrease with increasing the mixture pressure. Both the electron and ion densities slightly decrease with increasing H{sub 2} concentration.

  9. On a modified Monte-Carlo method and variable soft sphere model for rarefied binary gas mixture flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourazar, S. S.; Jahangiri, P.; Aboutalebi, A.; Ganjaei, A. A.; Nourazar, M.; Khadem, J.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of new terms in the improved algorithm, the modified direct simulation Monte-Carlo (MDSMC) method, is investigated by simulating a rarefied binary gas mixture flow inside a rotating cylinder. Dalton law for the partial pressures contributed by each species of the binary gas mixture is incorporated into our simulation using the MDSMC method and the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) method. Moreover, the effect of the exponent of the cosine of deflection angle (α) in the inter-molecular collision models, the variable soft sphere (VSS) and the variable hard sphere (VHS), is investigated in our simulation. The improvement of the results of simulation is pronounced using the MDSMC method when compared with the results of the DSMC method. The results of simulation using the VSS model show some improvements on the result of simulation for the mixture temperature at radial distances close to the cylinder wall where the temperature reaches the maximum value when compared with the results using the VHS model.

  10. An atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) system for measuring ultra-low contamination by krypton in xenon dark matter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Tae Hyun

    The XENON dark matter experiment aims to detect hypothetical weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) scattering off nuclei within its liquid xenon (LXe) target. The trace 85Kr in the xenon target undergoes beta-decay with a 687 keV end point and 10.8 year halflife, which contributes background events and limits the sensitivity of the experiment. In order to achieve the desired sensitivity, the contamination by krypton is reduced to the part per trillion (ppt) level by cryogenic distillation. The conventional methods are not well suited for measuring the krypton contamination at such a low level. In this work, we have developed an atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) device to detect the ultra-low krypton concentration in the xenon target. This project was proposed to the National Science Foundation (NSF) as a Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) development [Aprile and Zelevinsky, 2009] and is funded by NSF and Columbia University. The ATTA method, originally developed at Argonne National Laboratory, uses standard laser cooling and trapping techniques, and counts single trapped atoms. Since the isotopic abundance of 85Kr in nature is 1.5 x 10-11, the 85Kr/Xe level is expected to be ˜10-23, which is beyond the capability of our method. Thus we detect the most abundant (57%) isotope 84Kr, and infer the 85Kr contamination from their known abundances. To avoid contamination by krypton, the setup is tested and optimized with 40 Ar which has a similar cooling wavelength to 84Kr. Two main challenges in this experiment are to obtain a trapping efficiency high enough to detect krypton impurities at the ppt level, and to achieve the resolution to discriminate single atoms. The device is specially designed and adjusted to meet these challenges. After achieving these criteria with argon gas, we precisely characterize the efficiency of the system using Kr-Xe mixtures with known ratios, and find that ˜90 minutes are required to trap one 84Kr atom at the 1-ppt Kr

  11. Development of traceable precision dynamic dilution method to generate dimethyl sulphide gas mixtures at sub-nanomole per mole levels for ambient measurement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Eon; Kim, Yong Doo; Kang, Ji Hwan; Heo, Gwi Suk; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Sangil

    2016-04-01

    Dimethyl sulphide (DMS) is an important compound in global atmospheric chemistry and climate change. Traceable international standards are essential for measuring accurately the long-term global trend in ambient DMS. However, developing accurate gas standards for sub-nanomole per mole (nmol/mol) mole fractions of DMS in a cylinder is challenging, because DMS is reactive and unstable. In this study, a dynamic dilution method that is traceable and precise was developed to generate sub-nmol/mol DMS gas mixtures with a dynamic dilution system based on sonic nozzles and a long-term (>5 years) stable 10 μmol/mol parent DMS primary standard gas mixtures (PSMs). The dynamic dilution system was calibrated with traceable methane PSMs, and its estimated dilution factors were used to calculate the mole fractions of the dynamically generated DMS gas mixtures. A dynamically generated DMS gas mixture and a 6 nmol/mol DMS PSM were analysed against each other by gas chromatography with flame-ionisation detection (GC/FID) to evaluate the dilution system. The mole fractions of the dynamically generated DMS gas mixture determined against a DMS PSM and calculated with the dilution factor agreed within 1% at 6 nmol/mol. In addition, the dynamically generated DMS gas mixtures at various mole fractions between 0.4 and 11.7 nmol/mol were analysed by GC/FID and evaluated for their linearity. The analytically determined mole fractions showed good linearity with the mole fractions calculated with the dilution factors. Results showed that the dynamic dilution method generates DMS gas mixtures ranging between 0.4 nmol/mol and 12 nmol/mol with relative expanded uncertainties of less than 2%. Therefore, the newly developed dynamic dilution method is a promising reference method for generating sub-nmol/mol DMS gas standards for accurate ambient measurements.

  12. A Search for Nonstandard Neutron Spin Interactions using Dual Species Xenon Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Larsen, Michael; Mirijanian, James; Fu, Changbo; Yan, Haiyang; Smith, Erick; Snow, Mike; Walker, Thad

    2012-06-01

    NMR measurements using polarized noble gases can constrain possible exotic spin-dependent interactions involving nucleons. A differential measurement insensitive to magnetic field fluctuations can be performed using a mixture of two polarized species with different ratios of nucleon spin to magnetic moment. We used the NMR cell test station at Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) (developed to evaluate dual species xenon vapor cells for the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope) to search for NMR frequency shifts of xenon-129 and xenon-131 when a non-magnetic zirconia rod is modulated near the NMR cell. We simultaneously excited both Xe isotopes and detected free-induction-decay transients. In combination with theoretical calculations of the neutron spin contribution to the nuclear angular momentum, the measurements put a new upper bound on possible monopole-dipole interactions of the neutron for ranges around 1mm. This work is supported by the NGC Internal Research and Development (IRAD) funding, the Department of Energy, and the NSF.

  13. High-pressure xenon detector development at Constellation Technology Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert A.

    2007-08-01

    Xenon-filled ionization detectors, due to their high atomic number fill gas ( Z=54), moderate densities (˜0.3-0.5 g/cm 3) and good energy resolution (2-4% at 662 keV), fill an important niche between more familiar technologies such as NaI(Tl) scintillators and germanium detectors. Until recently, difficulties with obtaining sufficient xenon purity, reducing microphonic sensitivity, and developing low-noise electronics compatible with small ionization signals have hampered the development of this nuclear detection field. Constellation Technology Corporation, whose experience with xenon detectors goes back to the mid 1990s, has made significant progress in these areas and has developed a commercial line of detectors with active volumes ranging from small (35 g Xe) to large (1400 g Xe). Current applications for Constellation's detectors are principally in the area of defense (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Advanced Spectroscopic Portals), but as awareness of this technology grows, it will surely find applications in a much expanded range of fields.

  14. The atmosphere of Mars - Detection of krypton and xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.; Biemann, K.; Biller, J. E.; Lafleur, A. L.; Rushneck, D. R.; Howarth, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Krypton and xenon have been discovered in the Martian atmosphere with the mass spectrometer on the second Viking lander. Krypton is more abundant than xenon. The relative abundances of the krypton isotopes appear normal, but the ratio of xenon-129 to xenon-132 is enhanced on Mars relative to the terrestrial value for this ratio. Some possible implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. Laser flash-photolysis and gas discharge in N2O-containing mixture: kinetic mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosarev, Ilya; Popov, Nikolay; Starikovskaia, Svetlana; Starikovskiy, Andrey; mipt Team

    2011-10-01

    The paper is devoted to further experimental and theoretical analysis of ignition by ArF laser flash-photolysis and nanosecond discharge in N2O-containing mixture has been done. Additional experiments have been made to assure that laser emission is distributed uniformly throughout the cross-section. The series of experiments was proposed and carried out to check validity of O(1D) determination in experiments on plasma assisted ignition initiated by flash-photolysis. In these experiments, ozone density in the given mixture (mixture composition and kinetics has been preliminary analyzed) was measured using UV light absorption in Hartley band. Good coincidence between experimental data and results of calculations have been obtained Temporal behavior of energy input, electric field and electric current has been measured and analyzed. These data are considered as initial conditions for numerical modeling of the discharge in O2:N2O:H2:Ar = 0.3:1:3:5 mixture. Ion-molecular reactions and reactions of active species production in Ar:H2:O2:N2O mixture were analyzed. The set of reactions to describe chemical transformation in the system due to the discharge action has been selected.

  16. Combustion of hydrogen-based mixtures in gas-fueled reciprocating engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smygalina, A. E.; Zaitchenko, V. M.; Ivanov, M. F.; Kiverin, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    The research is devoted to the possibility for application of hydrogen accumulated from renewable energy sources as a fuel for a reciprocating engine, which serves as an electrical generator drive. Hydrogen combustion in the chamber of a reciprocating engine, as a rule, occurs in a detonation mode. In order to obtain less hard modes, the present research proposes the usage of steam additions to hydrogen-air mixture or lean hydrogen-air mixtures. Mathematical simulation is used for investigation of combustion of mentioned mixtures in the combustion chamber of a reciprocating engine with a spark-plug ignition. The comparison of the usage of hydrogen-steam-air mixtures and lean hydrogen-air mixtures as fuels is given. The dependence of arising combustion modes and its quantitative characteristics on hydrogen content in combustible composition is investigated. The analysis of optimal combustion is presented, which is based on the consideration of two parameters: peak pressure in one cycle and the crankshaft angle corresponding to the achievement of the peak pressure.

  17. Dynamic mean field theory for lattice gas models of fluid mixtures confined in mesoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Edison, J R; Monson, P A

    2013-11-12

    We present the extension of dynamic mean field theory (DMFT) for fluids in porous materials (Monson, P. A. J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 128, 084701) to the case of mixtures. The theory can be used to describe the relaxation processes in the approach to equilibrium or metastable equilibrium states for fluids in pores after a change in the bulk pressure or composition. It is especially useful for studying systems where there are capillary condensation or evaporation transitions. Nucleation processes associated with these transitions are emergent features of the theory and can be visualized via the time dependence of the density distribution and composition distribution in the system. For mixtures an important component of the dynamics is relaxation of the composition distribution in the system, especially in the neighborhood of vapor-liquid interfaces. We consider two different types of mixtures, modeling hydrocarbon adsorption in carbon-like slit pores. We first present results on bulk phase equilibria of the mixtures and then the equilibrium (stable/metastable) behavior of these mixtures in a finite slit pore and an inkbottle pore. We then use DMFT to describe the evolution of the density and composition in the pore in the approach to equilibrium after changing the state of the bulk fluid via composition or pressure changes. PMID:24102541

  18. Optical characteristics and parameters of gas-discharge plasma in a mixture of mercury dibromide vapor with neon

    SciTech Connect

    Malinina, A. A. Malinin, A. N.

    2013-12-15

    Results are presented from studies of the optical characteristics and parameters of plasma of a dielectric barrier discharge in a mixture of mercury dibromide vapor with neon—the working medium of a non-coaxial exciplex gas-discharge emitter. The electron energy distribution function, the transport characteristics, the specific power losses for electron processes, the electron density and temperature, and the rate constants for the processes of elastic and inelastic electron scattering by the working mixture components are determined as functions of the reduced electric field. The rate constant of the process leading to the formation of exciplex mercury monobromide molecules is found to be 1.6 × 10{sup −14} m{sup 3}/s for a reduced electric field of E/N = 15 Td, at which the maximum emission intensity in the blue-green spectral region (λ{sub max} = 502 nm) was observed in this experiment.

  19. Optical Characteristics of a Gas Discharge Plasma Based on a Mixture of Mercury Diiodide Vapor, Nitrogen, and Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinina, A. A.; Malinin, A. N.

    2016-09-01

    The results of studies of spectral, temporal, and energy characteristics of radiation in a gas discharge plasma based on a mixture of mercury diiodide vapor with helium and nitrogen in the spectral range of 350-800 nm are presented. Plasma was produced by a barrier discharge in a device with a cylindrical aperture. The electrodes 0.2 m in length were placed at a distance of 0.015 m. The amplitude of the pump pulses, their duration, and frequency were equal to 20-30 kV, 150 ns, and 1-20 kHz, respectively. Radiation of mercury monoiodide exciplex molecules was revealed in the visible spectra region. Dependences of the plasma optical characteristics on the partial pressures of the mixture components were established.

  20. Gamma background studies for the XENON experiment using a High Purity Germanium Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angle, Jesse Isaac

    The XENON Dark Matter Experiment, deployed at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy on March 2006, is a liquid noble gas detector designed to directly detect dark matter. The detector uses a dual-phase (gas/liquid) Xenon target to search for nuclear recoils associated with nucleus-WIMP interactions. Due to the high sensitivity needed in such an experiment, it is vital to not only reduce the background but to also understand the remaining background so as to aid in the understanding of the data as well as to facilitate upgrades beyond the early Research and Development phases. Many of the components of the XENON10 detector have been screened using a High Purity Germanium Detector known as the GATOR detector. Full analysis of the screening data requires Monte Carlo simulations of the GATOR detector and the sample. Results from this screening will be presented. Using the information obtained from the screening operation, Monte Carlo simulations of the XENON10 electron recoil background will be examined and compared to the actual detector data. The success of this simulation to data comparison indicates that we have a good understanding of the XENON10 gamma background and will be able to make more informed decisions regarding the next stage of detector development. This type of analysis has aided in the selection and design of many of the materials and components being incorporated into the new XENON100 detector, the next generation detector which will be capable of improving the limit set by XENON10 by at least an order of magnitude. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http:/ /www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  1. Realization of a Strongly Interacting Bose-Fermi Mixture from a Two-Component Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shin Yongil; Schirotzek, Andre; Schunck, Christian H.; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2008-08-15

    We show the emergence of a strongly interacting Bose-Fermi mixture from a two-component Fermi mixture with population imbalance. By analyzing in situ density profiles of {sup 6}Li atoms in the BCS-BEC crossover regime, we identify a critical interaction strength, beyond which all minority atoms pair up with majority atoms and form a Bose condensate. This is the regime where the system can be effectively described as a boson-fermion mixture. We determine the dimer-fermion and dimer-dimer scattering lengths and beyond-mean-field contributions. Our study realizes a gedanken experiment of bosons immersed in a Fermi sea of one of their constituents, revealing the composite nature of the bosons.

  2. Extreme confinement of xenon by cryptophane-111 in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Akil I; Lapidus, Saul H; Kane, Christopher M; Holman, K Travis

    2015-01-26

    Solids that sorb, capture and/or store the heavier noble gases are of interest because of their potential for transformative rare gas separation/production, storage, or recovery technologies. Herein, we report the isolation, crystal structures, and thermal stabilities of a series of xenon and krypton clathrates of (±)-cryptophane-111 (111). One trigonal crystal form, Xe@111⋅y(solvent), is exceptionally stable, retaining xenon at temperatures of up to about 300 °C. The high kinetic stability is attributable not only to the high xenon affinity and cage-like nature of the host, but also to the crystal packing of the clathrate, wherein each window of the molecular container is blocked by the bridges of adjacent containers, effectively imprisoning the noble gas in the solid state. The results highlight the potential of discrete molecule materials exhibiting intrinsic microcavities or zero-dimensional pores. PMID:25504739

  3. Effect of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics in laser ignition of natural gas and air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J.; Riley, M. J. W.; Borman, A.; Dowding, C.; Kirk, A.; Bickerton, R.

    2015-03-01

    Laser induced spark ignition offers the potential for greater reliability and consistency in ignition of lean air/fuel mixtures. This increased reliability is essential for the application of gas turbines as primary or secondary reserve energy sources in smart grid systems, enabling the integration of renewable energy sources whose output is prone to fluctuation over time. This work details a study into the effect of flow velocity and temperature on minimum ignition energies in laser-induced spark ignition in an atmospheric combustion test rig, representative of a sub 15 MW industrial gas turbine (Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd., Lincoln, UK). Determination of minimum ignition energies required for a range of temperatures and flow velocities is essential for establishing an operating window in which laser-induced spark ignition can operate under realistic, engine-like start conditions. Ignition of a natural gas and air mixture at atmospheric pressure was conducted using a laser ignition system utilizing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser source operating at 532 nm wavelength and 4 ns pulse length. Analysis of the influence of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics is presented in terms of required photon flux density, a useful parameter to consider during the development laser ignition systems.

  4. Selective Adsorption of CO2 from Light Gas Mixtures Using a Structurally Dynamic Porous Coordination Polymer**

    SciTech Connect

    Kristi L. Kauffman, Jeffrey T. Culp, Andrew J. Allen, Laura Espinal, Winnie Wong-Ng, Thomas D. Brown, Angela Goodman, Mark P. Bernardo, Russel J. Pancoast, Danielle Chirdon, Christopher Matranga*

    2010-01-01

    The selective adsorption of CO{sub 2} from mixtures with N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O in a dynamic porous coordination polymer (see monomer structure) was evaluated by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, GC, and SANS. All three techniques indicate highly selective adsorption of CO{sub 2} from CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures at 30 C, with no selectivity observed for the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O system.

  5. Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals and Oil and Natural Gas Operations: Potential Environmental Contamination and Recommendations to Assess Complex Environmental Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Lin, Chung-Ho; McElroy, Jane A.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hydraulic fracturing technologies, developed over the last 65 years, have only recently been combined with horizontal drilling to unlock oil and gas reserves previously deemed inaccessible. Although these technologies have dramatically increased domestic oil and natural gas production, they have also raised concerns for the potential contamination of local water supplies with the approximately 1,000 chemicals that are used throughout the process, including many known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Objectives We discuss the need for an endocrine component to health assessments for drilling-dense regions in the context of hormonal and antihormonal activities for chemicals used. Methods We discuss the literature on a) surface and groundwater contamination by oil and gas extraction operations, and b) potential human exposure, particularly in the context of the total hormonal and antihormonal activities present in surface and groundwater from natural and anthropogenic sources; we also discuss initial analytical results and critical knowledge gaps. Discussion In light of the potential for environmental release of oil and gas chemicals that can disrupt hormone receptor systems, we recommend methods for assessing complex hormonally active environmental mixtures. Conclusions We describe a need for an endocrine-centric component for overall health assessments and provide information supporting the idea that using such a component will help explain reported adverse health trends as well as help develop recommendations for environmental impact assessments and monitoring programs. Citation Kassotis CD, Tillitt DE, Lin CH, McElroy JA, Nagel SC. 2016. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and oil and natural gas operations: potential environmental contamination and recommendations to assess complex environmental mixtures. Environ Health Perspect 124:256–264; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409535 PMID:26311476

  6. Alternative hypothesis for the origin of CCF xenon. [Carbonaceous-Chondrite-Fission xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    The relative abundances and origins of the xenon isotopes found in carbonaceous meteorites are discussed. It is proposed that carbonaceous-chondrite-fission (CCF) xenon is not caused by fission, but is the direct result of a modified r-process nucleosynthesis which produces a peak at Z = 54 and N = 82. The xenon produced in this way would have been trapped in dust grains which were subsequently incorporated in the solar system with minimal degassing.

  7. Sputtering Yields for Mixtures of Organic Materials Using Argon Gas Cluster Ions.

    PubMed

    Seah, M P; Havelund, R; Shard, A G; Gilmore, I S

    2015-10-22

    The sputtering yield volumes of binary mixtures of Irganox 1010 with either Irganox 1098 or Fmoc-pentafluoro-L-phenylalanine (FMOC) have been measured for 5 keV Ar2000(+) ions incident at 45° to the surface normal. The sputtering yields are determined from the doses to sputter through various compositions of 100 nm thick, intimately mixed, layers. Because of matrix effects, the profiles for secondary ions are distorted, and profile shifts in depth of 15 nm are observed leading to errors above 20% in the deduced sputtering yield. Secondary ions are selected to avoid this. The sputtering yield volumes for the mixtures are shown to be lower than those deduced from a linear interpolation from the pure materials. This is shown to be consistent with a simple model involving the changing energy absorbed for the sputtering of intimate mixtures. Evidence to support this comes from the secondary ion data for pairs of the different molecules. Both binary mixtures behave similarly, but matrix effects are stronger for the Irganox 1010/FMOC system.

  8. On the Equipartition of Kinetic Energy in an Ideal Gas Mixture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peliti, L.

    2007-01-01

    A refinement of an argument due to Maxwell for the equipartition of translational kinetic energy in a mixture of ideal gases with different masses is proposed. The argument is elementary, yet it may work as an illustration of the role of symmetry and independence postulates in kinetic theory. (Contains 1 figure.)

  9. Chondritic xenon in the Earth’s mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracausi, Antonio; Avice, Guillaume; Burnard, Peter G.; Füri, Evelyn; Marty, Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Noble gas isotopes are powerful tracers of the origins of planetary volatiles, and the accretion and evolution of the Earth. The compositions of magmatic gases provide insights into the evolution of the Earth’s mantle and atmosphere. Despite recent analytical progress in the study of planetary materials and mantle-derived gases, the possible dual origin of the planetary gases in the mantle and the atmosphere remains unconstrained. Evidence relating to the relationship between the volatiles within our planet and the potential cosmochemical end-members is scarce. Here we show, using high-precision analysis of magmatic gas from the Eifel volcanic area (in Germany), that the light xenon isotopes identify a chondritic primordial component that differs from the precursor of atmospheric xenon. This is consistent with an asteroidal origin for the volatiles in the Earth’s mantle, and indicates that the volatiles in the atmosphere and mantle originated from distinct cosmochemical sources. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the origin of Eifel magmatism being a deep mantle plume. The corresponding mantle source has been isolated from the convective mantle since about 4.45 billion years ago, in agreement with models that predict the early isolation of mantle domains. Xenon isotope systematics support a clear distinction between mid-ocean-ridge and continental or oceanic plume sources, with chemical heterogeneities dating back to the Earth’s accretion. The deep reservoir now sampled by the Eifel gas had a lower volatile/refractory (iodine/plutonium) composition than the shallower mantle sampled by mid-ocean-ridge volcanism, highlighting the increasing contribution of volatile-rich material during the first tens of millions of years of terrestrial accretion.

  10. Optical and electron spin resonance studies of xenon-nitrogen-helium condensates containing nitrogen and oxygen atoms.

    PubMed

    Boltnev, Roman E; Bykhalo, Igor B; Krushinskaya, Irina N; Pelmenev, Alexander A; Khmelenko, Vladimir V; Mao, Shun; Meraki, Adil; Wilde, Scott C; McColgan, Patrick T; Lee, David M

    2015-03-19

    We present the first observations of excimer XeO* molecules in molecular nitrogen films surrounding xenon cores of nanoclusters. Multishell nanoclusters form upon the fast cooling of a helium jet containing small admixtures of nitrogen and xenon by cold helium vapor (T = 1.5 K). Such nanoclusters injected into superfluid helium aggregate into porous impurity-helium condensates. Passage of helium gas with admixtures through a radio frequency discharge allows the storage of high densities of radicals stabilized in impurity-helium condensates. Intense recombination of the radicals occurs during destruction of such condensates and generates excited species observable because of optical emission. Rich spectra of xenon-oxygen complexes have been detected upon destruction of xenon-nitrogen-helium condensates. A xenon environment quenches metastable N((2)D) atoms but has a much weaker effect on the luminescence of N((2)P) atoms. Electron spin resonance spectra of N((4)S) atoms trapped in xenon-nitrogen-helium condensates have been studied. High local concentrations of nitrogen atoms (up to 10(21) cm(-3)) stabilized in xenon-nitrogen nanoclusters have been revealed.

  11. Sputter process with time-variant reactive gas mixture for the deposition of optical multilayer and gradient layer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartzsch, H.; Weber, J.; Lau, K.; Glöß, D.; Frach, P.

    2008-09-01

    Magnetron sputtering of a silicon target in a time-variant mixture of the reactive gases oxygen and nitrogen allows the deposition of optical multilayer and gradient layer systems of silicon oxinitride at one stationary sputtering station. In this paper the processes within the sputter discharge and the properties of the growing film during the change of the reactive gas composition are investigated using optical in-situ monitoring, optical plasma emission spectroscopy and plasma impedance monitoring. A time delay between the change to the reactive gas composition and the resulting change to the film composition was observed. The time delay is longer for the transition from oxide to nitride deposition then vice versa. This asymmetry is attributed to the different affinity of nitrogen and oxygen to the silicon target. Examples of deposited antireflective coatings as well as rugate filters based on silicon oxinitride multilayer and gradient layer designs are given.

  12. Biological treatment of waste gas containing mixture of monochlorobenzene (MCB) and benzene in a bench scale biofilter.

    PubMed

    Pandey, R A; Joshi, P R; Mudliar, S N; Deshmukh, S C

    2010-07-01

    The paper outlines treatment of waste gas containing monochlorobenzene (MCB) and benzene in a mixture using biofilter packed with compost and woodchips seeded with Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. The biofilter could treat waste gas containing MCB and benzene effectively with an efficiency of (99+/-5%) and (97+/-6%) at optimal empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 3 min with a loading of 57 g/m(3)/h of MCB and 2g/m(3)/h of benzene. At optimum loading of MCB and benzene, the biofilter showed total bacterial count of 13 x 10(5)CFU/g of compost, while the MCB and benzene degrading bacterial count was 71 x 10(4)CFU/g and 5 x 10(4)CFU/g compost respectively. The experimental removal efficiency of MCB and benzene were in good agreement with the model predicted value. PMID:20202831

  13. A numerical program for steady-state flow of magma-gas mixtures through vertical eruptive conduits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, Larry G.; Ghiorso, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents a model that calculates flow properties (pressure, vesicularity, and some 35 other parameters) as a function of vertical position within a volcanic conduit during a steady-state eruption. The model idealizes the magma-gas mixture as a single homogeneousfluid and calculates gas exsolution under the assumption of equilibrium conditions. These are the same assumptions on which classic conduit models (e.g. Wilson and Head, 1981) have been based. They are most appropriate when applied to eruptions of rapidly ascending magma (basaltic lava-fountain eruptions, and Plinian or sub-Plinian eruptions of intermediate or silicic magmas) that contains abundant nucleation sites (microlites, for example) for bubble growth.

  14. Quantitative analysis of CO-humidity gas mixtures with self-heated nanowires operated in pulsed mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prades, J. D.; Hernández-Ramírez, F.; Fischer, T.; Hoffmann, M.; Müller, R.; López, N.; Mathur, S.; Morante, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Self-heating effect in individual metal oxide nanowires can be used to activate their response to gases with power consumptions below tenths of microwatts. The thermal response time of these devices is extremely fast (a few milliseconds) and it makes it possible to observe the kinetics of the interactions between the gas molecules and the metal oxide. In this work we demonstrate that such effects enable an experimental methodology to improve the selectivity of metal oxide-based sensors based on the analysis of their fast response dynamics. Specifically, this work jointly analyzes the magnitude and response time of SnO2 nanowire-based sensors to carbon monoxide (CO) and humidity (H2O) mixtures, proving that a quantitative analysis of CO-H2O gas blends can be achieved by modulating their work temperature through the self-heating effect.

  15. Selective denitrification of flue gas by O3 and ethanol mixtures in a duct: Investigation of processes and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Cai, Heruijing; Zhong, Qin; Lin, Jiandong; Xiao, Junjun; Zhang, Shule; Fan, Maohong

    2016-07-01

    A novel selective denitrification process, referred as O3-ethanol oxidation method, was developed by injecting O3 and ethanol mixtures into the simulated flue gas duct. The organic radicals, generated through the ethanol oxidation by O3, can oxidize NO into NO2, and finally into important industrial raw, namely, nitrate organics or aqueous nitrate acids. The residual ethanol in the tail can be recycled. The CO3(2-), HCO3(-) and SO2 in the flue gas hardly exhibit any effect on the NOX removal. Compared to the conventional O3 oxidation method, the present method shows higher selective oxidation of NO, higher NO(X) removal and less O3 consumption as well as proves lower initial investment and operating costs with more compact equipment. PMID:26989982

  16. Mechanism for transient migration of xenon in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.-Y.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Andersson, D. A.; Stanek, C. R.; Sickafus, K. E.

    2011-04-01

    In this letter, we report recent work on atomistic modeling of diffusion migration events of the fission gas product xenon in UO2 nuclear fuel. Under nonequilibrium conditions, Xe atoms can occupy the octahedral interstitial site, in contrast to the thermodynamically most stable uranium substitutional site. A transient migration mechanism involving Xe and two oxygen atoms is identified using basin constrained molecular dynamics employing a Buckingham type interatomic potential. This mechanism is then validated using density functional theory calculations using the nudged elastic band method. An overall reduction in the migration barrier of 1.6-2.7 eV is obtained compared to vacancy-mediated diffusion on the uranium sublattice.

  17. Improved Resolution of Hydrocarbon Structures and Constitutional Isomers in Complex Mixtures Using Gas Chromatography-Vacuum Ultraviolet-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacman, Gabriel; Wilson, Kevin R.; Chan, Arthur W. H.; Worton, David R.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Nah, Theodora; Hohaus, Thorsten; Gonin, Marc; Kroll, Jesse H.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2012-01-30

    Understanding the composition of complex hydrocarbon mixtures is important for environmental studies in a variety of fields, but many prevalent compounds cannot be confidently identified using traditional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) techniques. In this study, we use vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) ionization to elucidate the structures of a traditionally “unresolved complex mixture” by separating components by GC retention time, tR, and mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, which are used to determine carbon number, NC, and the number of rings and double bonds, NDBE. Constitutional isomers are resolved on the basis of tR, enabling the most complete quantitative analysis to date of structural isomers in an environmentally relevant hydrocarbon mixture. Unknown compounds are classified in this work by carbon number, degree of saturation, presence of rings, and degree of branching, providing structural constraints. The capabilities of this analysis are explored using diesel fuel, in which constitutional isomer distribution patterns are shown to be reproducible between carbon numbers and follow predictable rules. Nearly half of the aliphatic hydrocarbon mass is shown to be branched, suggesting branching is more important in diesel fuel than previously shown. Lastly, the classification of unknown hydrocarbons and the resolution of constitutional isomers significantly improves resolution capabilities for any complex hydrocarbon mixture.

  18. Equilibrium and Transport Properties of Gas Mixtures at Low Density: Eleven Polyatomic Gases and Five Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzowski, J.; Kestin, J.; Mason, E. A.; Uribe, F. J.

    1990-09-01

    This paper uses results from statistical-mechanical theory, applied through a combination of an extended principle of corresponding states with some knowledge of intermolecular potentials, to the calculation of the transport and equilibrium properties of gas mixtures at low density. The gases involved are: N2, O2, NO, CO, CO2, N2O, CH4, CF4, SF6, C2H4, C2H6, and He, Ar, Ne, Kr, Xe. The properties included are: second virial coefficient, viscosity, diffusion, and thermal diffusion, but not thermal conductivity. The calculations are internally, thermodynamically consistent and the resulting algorithms, which are fully programmable, operate in an entirely predictive mode by means of validated combination rules. This paper is a sequel to one on the five noble gases and all their possible mixtures and a second on the above eleven polyatomic gases. The paper contains ten tables (mainly intended for the checking of computer codes) and 201 graphs of deviation and comparison plots. An additional 98 tables have been deposited with the Physics Auxiliary Publication Service (PAPS) of the AIP. The algorithms presented in this paper, together with those mentioned above, make it possible to program calculations for a wide range of low-density equilibrium and transport properties of 16 gases and of all possible multicomponent mixtures formed with them, for a total of 65,535 systems. For each system, the program would cover the full range of compositions.

  19. Transportable Xenon Laboratory (TXL-1) Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Robert C.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Willett, Jesse A.; Woods, Vincent T.

    2011-03-07

    The Transportable Xenon Laboratory Operations Manual is a guide to set up and shut down TXL, a fully contained laboratory made up of instruments to identify and measure concentrations of the radioactive isotopes of xenon by taking air samples and analyzing them. The TXL is housed in a standard-sized shipping container. TXL can be shipped to and function in any country in the world.

  20. The XENON100 Dark Matter Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tziaferi, E.

    2010-06-23

    The XENON100 experiment is searching for WIMPs, which are particles that may consist dark matter. It is located in the underground laboratory of Gran Sasso (LNGS) in Italy at a depth of {approx}3600 m.w.e.. The experiment description, its performance and the expected background based on Monte Carlo simulations and material screening along with the projected sensitivities of the experiment are presented. In addition, a brief description of the upgrade XENON100 detector is given.

  1. Reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach: The chemical reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Kustova, Elena V.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-12-09

    In this work chemically reacting mixtures of viscous flows are analyzed within the framework of Boltzmann equation. By applying a modified Chapman-Enskog method to the system of Boltzmann equations general expressions for the rates of chemical reactions and vibrational energy transitions are determined as functions of two thermodynamic forces: the velocity divergence and the affinity. As an application chemically reacting mixtures of N{sub 2} across a shock wave are studied, where the first lowest vibrational states are taken into account. Here we consider only the contributions from the first four single quantum vibrational-translational energy transitions. It is shown that the contribution to the chemical reaction rate related to the affinity is much larger than that of the velocity divergence.

  2. Combining Yb and Li: Rapid Quantum Degenerate Gas Production and Interacting Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Alaina; Roy, Richard; Bowler, Ryan; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-05-01

    We detail a readily adaptable method for optimizing evaporative cooling efficiency in optical dipole traps (ODTs), reducing the production time of quantum degenerate gases. Utilizing the time-averaged 'painting' potential of a rapidly moving laser beam, we dynamically shape the trap over the course of evaporation to produce 174 Yb Bose-Einstein condensates of (0.5-1.0) × 105 atoms in (1.6-1.8) seconds. We also report on interaction studies in the quantum degenerate Bose-Fermi 174 Yb-6 Li mixture in the BEC-BCS crossover. Additionally, we present work on photoassociation spectroscopy on 6 Li-Yb mixtures and the production of YbLi* molecules in a dual magneto-optical trap, a first step toward coherent production of ultracold 2 Σ molecules.

  3. Optical Radiation of a Gas Discharge in an Argon-Sulfur Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    General, A. A.; Kelman, V. A.; Zhmenyak, Yu. V.; Zvenigorodsky, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma luminescence spectra of longitudinal repetitively pulsed discharge in a mixture of argon-sulfur were investigated in the spectral range 300-1000 nm. The major emitting plasma components, such as S2 molecules, sulfur atoms, and ions, are formed as a result of the fragmentation of clusters and sulfur molecules, which starts at energies of ~10 eV. Plasma radiation power increases three-fold on heating the discharge tube from ~50oC to 120oC.

  4. The application of a cavity ring-down spectrometer to measurements of ambient ammonia using traceable primary standard gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicholas A.; Ferracci, Valerio; Cassidy, Nathan; Hoffnagle, John A.

    2016-08-01

    A correction for the undesirable effects of direct and indirect cross-interference from water vapour on ammonia (NH3) measurements was developed using an optical laser sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy. This correction relied on new measurements of the collisional broadening due to water vapour of two NH3 spectral lines in the near infra-red (6548.6 and 6548.8 cm-1), and on the development of novel stable primary standard gas mixtures (PSMs) of ammonia prepared by gravimetry in passivated gas cylinders at 100 μmol mol-1. The PSMs were diluted dynamically to provide calibration mixtures of dry and humidified ammonia atmospheres of known composition in the nmol mol-1 range and were employed as part of establishing a metrological traceability chain to improve the reliability and accuracy of ambient ammonia measurements. The successful implementation of this correction will allow the extension of this rapid on-line spectroscopic technique to exposure chamber validation tests under controlled conditions and ambient monitoring in the field.

  5. Experimental and simulation studies of iron oxides for geochemical fixation of CO2-SO2 gas mixtures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, Susana; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Palandri, James; Maroto-Valer, M. Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    Iron-bearing minerals are reactive phases of the subsurface environment and could potentially trap CO2–SO2gas mixtures derived from fossil fuel combustion processes by their conversion to siderite (FeCO3) and dissolved sulfate. Changes in fluid and mineral compositions resulting from reactions, involving the co-injection of SO2 with CO2 were observed both theoretically and experimentally. Experiments were conducted with a natural hematite (α-Fe2O3) sample. A high pressure-high temperature apparatus was used to simulate conditions in geologic formations deeper than 800 m, where CO2 is in the supercritical state. Solid samples were allowed to react with a NaCl–NaOH brine and SO2-bearing CO2-dominated gas mixtures. The predicted equilibrium mineral assemblage at 100 °C and 250 bar became hematite, dawsonite (NaAl(OH)2CO3), siderite (FeCO3) and quartz (SiO2). Experimentally, siderite and dawsonite, derived from the presence of kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4) in the parent material, were present in residual solids at longer reaction time intervals, which agreed well with results from the modelling work.

  6. Characterization of a GEM-based scintillation detector with He-CF4 gas mixture in clinical proton beams.

    PubMed

    Nichiporov, D; Coutinho, L; Klyachko, A V

    2016-04-21

    Accurate, high-spatial resolution dosimetry in proton therapy is a time consuming task, and may be challenging in the case of small fields, due to the lack of adequate instrumentation. The purpose of this work is to develop a novel dose imaging detector with high spatial resolution and tissue equivalent response to dose in the Bragg peak, suitable for beam commissioning and quality assurance measurements. A scintillation gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector based on a double GEM amplification structure with optical readout was filled with a He/CF4 gas mixture and evaluated in pristine and modulated proton beams of several penetration ranges. The detector's performance was characterized in terms of linearity in dose rate, spatial resolution, short- and long-term stability and tissue-equivalence of response at different energies. Depth-dose profiles measured with the GEM detector in the 115-205 MeV energy range were compared with the profiles measured under similar conditions using the PinPoint 3D small-volume ion chamber. The GEM detector filled with a He-based mixture has a nearly tissue equivalent response in the proton beam and may become an attractive and efficient tool for high-resolution 2D and 3D dose imaging in proton dosimetry, and especially in small-field applications. PMID:26992243

  7. Characterization of a GEM-based scintillation detector with He-CF4 gas mixture in clinical proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichiporov, D.; Coutinho, L.; Klyachko, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate, high-spatial resolution dosimetry in proton therapy is a time consuming task, and may be challenging in the case of small fields, due to the lack of adequate instrumentation. The purpose of this work is to develop a novel dose imaging detector with high spatial resolution and tissue equivalent response to dose in the Bragg peak, suitable for beam commissioning and quality assurance measurements. A scintillation gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector based on a double GEM amplification structure with optical readout was filled with a He/CF4 gas mixture and evaluated in pristine and modulated proton beams of several penetration ranges. The detector’s performance was characterized in terms of linearity in dose rate, spatial resolution, short- and long-term stability and tissue-equivalence of response at different energies. Depth-dose profiles measured with the GEM detector in the 115-205 MeV energy range were compared with the profiles measured under similar conditions using the PinPoint 3D small-volume ion chamber. The GEM detector filled with a He-based mixture has a nearly tissue equivalent response in the proton beam and may become an attractive and efficient tool for high-resolution 2D and 3D dose imaging in proton dosimetry, and especially in small-field applications.

  8. Effect of Non-condensable gas on Solutal Marangoni Condensation Heat Transfer Characteristics for Water-Ethanol Vapor Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shixue; Utaka, Yoshio

    The condensation heat transfer characteristic curves for ternary vapor mixture of water, ethanol and air (or nitrogen) under the ethanol mass fraction of 0.01, 0.07, 0.25, 0.45 and relatively low concentrations of air (or nitrogen) were measured.The effect of air (or nitrogen) as a non-condensable gas on several different domains in the Marangoni condensation characteristic curves was discussed. It was shown that the effect of non-condensable gas in the domains controlled by the diffusion resistance and the filmwise condensation was not notable but in the domain dominated by the condensate resistance of dropwise mode was remarkable. Moreover, the variations of the several characteristic points representing the characteristic curves caused by the change in non-condensable gas concentration were discussed. The deteriorations of the maximum heat transfer coefficient and the maximum heat flux for low ethanol concentration and low concentration of non-condensable gas, in which the excellent heat transfer characteristics were exhibited, were more remarkable.

  9. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and oil and natural gas operations: Potential environmental contamination and recommendations to assess complex environmental mixtures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Lin, Chung-Ho; McElroy, Jane A.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hydraulic fracturing technologies, developed over the last 65 years, have only recently been combined with horizontal drilling to unlock oil and gas reserves previously deemed inaccessible. While these technologies have dramatically increased domestic oil and natural gas production, they have also raised concerns for the potential contamination of local water supplies with the approximately 1,000 chemicals used throughout the process, including many known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals.Objectives: We discuss the need for an endocrine component to health assessments for drilling-dense regions in the context of hormonal and anti-hormonal activities for chemicals used.Methods: We discuss the literature on 1) surface and ground water contamination by oil and gas extraction operations, and 2) potential human exposure, particularly in context of the total hormonal and anti-hormonal activities present in surface and ground water from natural and anthropogenic sources, with initial analytical results and critical knowledge gaps discussed.Discussion: In light of the potential for environmental release of oil and gas chemicals that can disrupt hormone receptor systems, we recommend methods for assessing complex hormonally active environmental mixtures.Conclusions: We describe a need for an endocrine-centric component for overall health assessments and provide supporting information that using this may help explain reported adverse health trends as well as help develop recommendations for environmental impact assessments and monitoring programs.

  10. Measurement of Xenon Viscosity as a Function of Low Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisnik, Stanley P.

    1998-01-01

    The measurement of xenon gas viscosity at low temperatures (175-298 K) and low pressures (350 torr-760 torr) has been performed in support of Hall Thruster testing at NASA Lewis Research Center. The measurements were taken using the capillary flow technique. Viscosity measurements were repeatable to within 3%. The results in this paper are in agreement with data from Hanley and Childs and suggest that the data from Clarke and Smith is approximately 2% low. There are no noticeable pressure effects on xenon absolute viscosity for the pressure range from 350 torr to 760 torr.

  11. Analytical investigation of electrical breakdown properties in a nitrogen-SF{sub 6} mixture gas

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Byeon, Yong S.; Song, Ki B.; Choi, Eun H.; Ryu, Han-Yong; Lee, Jaimin

    2010-11-15

    The electrical breakdown properties in nitrogen gas mixed with SF{sub 6} are analytically investigated in this article by making use of the ionization and attachment coefficients of the mixed gas. The ionization coefficients of nitrogen and SF{sub 6} gas are obtained in terms of the electron temperature T{sub e} by assuming a Maxwellian distribution of the electron energy. The attachment coefficient of SF{sub 6} gas is also obtained in terms of the gas temperature T{sub e}. An algebraic equation is obtained, relating explicitly the electron breakdown temperature T{sub b} in terms of the SF{sub 6} mole fraction {chi}. It was found from this equation that the breakdown temperature T{sub b} increases from approximately 2 to 5.3 eV as the mole fraction {chi} increases from zero to unity. The breakdown temperature T{sub b} of the electrons increases very rapidly from a small value and then approaches 5.3 eV slowly as the SF{sub 6} mole fraction increases from zero to unity. This indicates that even a small mole fraction of SF{sub 6} in the gas dominates the electron behavior in the breakdown system. The breakdown electric field E{sub b} derived is almost linearly proportional to the breakdown electron temperature T{sub b}. The experimental data agree remarkably well with the theoretical results. Therefore, it is concluded that even a small fraction of SF{sub 6} gas dominates nitrogen in determining the breakdown field. In this context, nearly 25% of the SF{sub 6} mole fraction provides a reasonable enhancement of the breakdown field for practical applications.

  12. Gas engine bottoming cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as working fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsson, M.; Thorin, E.; Svedberg, G.

    1999-07-01

    Gas engines and diesel engines can be used for power generation in small-scale industrial and utility power plants. A bottoming cycle recovering heat from the exhaust gas, charge air, jacket water and lubrication oil can increase the power output of a gas or diesel engine power plant. The current study investigates ammonia-water power cycles as bottoming cycles to natural gas fired gas engines. The engines used in the calculations are 16V25SG and 18V34SG from Wartsila NSD. The configurations of the bottoming processes have been changed in order to achieve better temperature matching in the heat exchangers. The ammonia-water cycles have been compared to a simple Rankine steam cycle. All cycles have been optimized to give maximum power output. The ammonia-water bottoming cycles generate 18--54% more power than a simple Rankine steam cycle. An economic estimation of the bottoming cycles shows that the extra equipment needed for an ammonia-water cycle may be justified by the extra amount of power generated.

  13. Internal structure of shock waves in disparate mass mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Chan-Hong; De Witt, Kenneth J.; Jeng, Duen-Ren; Penko, Paul F.

    1992-01-01

    The detailed flow structure of a normal shock wave for a gas mixture is investigated using the direct-simulation Monte Carlo method. A variable diameter hard-sphere (VDHS) model is employed to investigate the effect of different viscosity temperature exponents (VTE) for each species in a gas mixture. Special attention is paid to the irregular behavior in the density profiles which was previously observed in a helium-xenon experiment. It is shown that the VTE can have substantial effects in the prediction of the structure of shock waves. The variable hard-sphere model of Bird shows good agreement, but with some limitations, with the experimental data if a common VTE is chosen properly for each case. The VDHS model shows better agreement with the experimental data without adjusting the VTE. The irregular behavior of the light-gas component in shock waves of disparate mass mixtures is observed not only in the density profile, but also in the parallel temperature profile. The strength of the shock wave, the type of molecular interactions, and the mole fraction of heavy species have substantial effects on the existence and structure of the irregularities.

  14. Internal structure of shock waves in disparate mass mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Chan-Hong; De witt, K.J.; Jeng, Duen-Ren; Penko, P.F. Toledo, University, OH )

    1992-01-01

    The detailed flow structure of a normal shock wave for a gas mixture is investigated using the direct-simulation Monte Carlo method. A variable diameter hard-sphere (VDHS) model is employed to investigate the effect of different viscosity temperature exponents (VTE) for each species in a gas mixture. Special attention is paid to the irregular behavior in the density profiles which was previously observed in a helium-xenon experiment. It is shown that the VTE can have substantial effects in the prediction of the structure of shock waves. The variable hard-sphere model of Bird shows good agreement, but with some limitations, with the experimental data if a common VTE is chosen properly for each case. The VDHS model shows better agreement with the experimental data without adjusting the VTE. The irregular behavior of the light-gas component in shock waves of disparate mass mixtures is observed not only in the density profile, but also in the parallel temperature profile. The strength of the shock wave, the type of molecular interactions, and the mole fraction of heavy species have substantial effects on the existence and structure of the irregularities. 14 refs.

  15. Design and First Results of the CoDeX Liquid-Xenon Compton-Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Brian; Cahn, Sidney; Bernard, Ethan; Boulton, Elizabeth; Destefano, Nicholas; Edwards, Blair; Hackenburg, Ariana; Horn, Markus; Larsen, Nicole; Nikkel, James; Wahl, Christopher; Gai, Moshe; McKinsey, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    CoDeX (Compton-imaging Detector in Xenon) is an R&D Compton gamma-ray imaging detector that uses 30 kg of xenon in a two-phase time projection chamber. Time projection relative to the initial scintillation signal provides the vertical interaction positions, and either PMT-sensed gas electroluminescence or a charge-sensitive amplifier quantifies the drifted ionization signal. Detector features to enable Compton imaging are a pair of instrumented wire grids added to sense the horizontal position of clouds of drifted electrons that traverse the detector. Each wire is individually amplified in the cold xenon environment. Design choices addressing the thermodynamic and xenon purity constraints of this system will be discussed. We will also discuss the mechanical designs, engineering challenges, and performance of this Compton-imaging detector.

  16. XENON dark matter searches: Results and the future

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Andrew; Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    XENON100 is a dark matter search experiment looking for elastic WIMP scattering using a 62 kg liquid target. WIMP search data from XENON100 published in 2012 has set the world's strongest limits on WIMP-nucleus spinindependent, elastic scattering. It has also set the strongest limits on WIMP-nucleus spin-dependent scattering considering neutron scattering only, and competitive limits considering proton scattering only. The successor experiment to XENON100, XENON1T, is currently under construction, with commissioning scheduled to begin in 2014. XENON1T's design goal is a 100 fold increase in sensitivity for elastic WIMP searches over XENON100.

  17. Ignition delay of a gas mixture above a liquid fuel pool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, D. N.; Sirignano, W. A.

    1991-01-01

    A computational study has been made of transient heat transfer and fluid flow of an axisymmetric two-layer gas-and-liquid system heated from above by a small hot spot (e.g., a hot wire or pilot flame) located close to the liquid surface. The gas phase is unconfined above the liquid pool. The effects of varying gravity level (0.0001 to 1 gn), liquid pool height, and heater height are investigated. Thermocapillary convection induced by the nonuniform heating of the liquid surface combines with buoyancy forces to affect the heat transfer and the transport of fuel vapor toward the heat source. At reduced gravity, gas-phase conduction is comparable to the incident radiation at the liquid surface, whereas at 1 gn, buoyant convection carries the heat upward from the heat source and, therefore, the liquid is heated primarily by radiation.

  18. Device for two-dimensional gas-phase separation and characterization of ion mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-12-12

    The present invention relates to a device for separation and characterization of gas-phase ions. The device incorporates an ion source, a field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) analyzer, an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) drift tube, and an ion detector. In one aspect of the invention, FAIMS operating voltages are electrically floated on top of the IMS drift voltage. In the other aspect, the FAIMS/IMS interface is implemented employing an electrodynamic ion funnel, including in particular an hourglass ion funnel. The present invention improves the efficiency (peak capacity) and sensitivity of gas-phase separations; the online FAIMS/IMS coupling creates a fundamentally novel two-dimensional gas-phase separation technology with high peak capacity, specificity, and exceptional throughput.

  19. Hydrogen isotope separation installation for the regeneration of tritium from gas mixtures in tritium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, B.M.; Perevezentsev, A.N.; Selivanenko, I.L.

    1994-12-31

    The advantages and disadvantages of different methods for hydrogen isotope separation are considered in terms of their applicability for tritium regeneration in a tritium facility. Due to low inventory, simplicity of operation, flexibility, and safety the methods of separation using solid phases are preferable for tritium facility. The detail consideration of the separation processes with a solid phase reveals that highest efficiency of separation should be achieved in a counter-current separation column, which allow multiplying the thermodynamic isotopic effect. Because of difficulties of the organization of a solid phase motion in a separation column this method did not found practical application for separation of hydrogen isotopic mixtures. The main efforts of a few researches groups were devoted to improve the chromatographic separation process and equipment. The detail comparison of the separation in sectioned column with that in chromatographic as well as in cryodistillation columns show that counter-current separation in a sectioned column is more effective and has other advantages when middle throughput is required. Complete regeneration of an isotopic mixture with separation into three practically pure isotopes independently from isotopic composition of feed can be provided using two sectioned separation columns. Separation installation can operate continuously as well as periodically.

  20. Properties of Gas Mixtures and Their Use in Mixed-Refrigerant Joule-Thomson Refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, E.; Gong, M.; Wu, J.; Zhou, Y.

    2004-06-01

    The Joule-Thomson (J-T) effect has been widely used for achieving low temperatures. In the past few years, much progress has been made in better understanding the working mechanism of the refrigeration method and in developing prototypes for different applications. In this talk, there are three aspects of our research work to be discussed. First, some special thermal properties of the mixtures for achieving liquid nitrogen temperature range will be presented. Secondly, some important conclusions from the optimization of various mixed-refrigerant J-T cycles such as a simple J-T cycle and an auto-cascade mixed-refrigerant J-T cycle will be presented. Moreover, an auto-cascade, mixed-refrigerant J-T refrigerator with a special mixture capable of achieving about 50K will be mentioned. Finally, various prototypes based on the mixed-refrigerant refrigeration technology will be described. These applications include miniature J-T cryocoolers for cooling infrared detectors and high-temperature superconducting devices, cryosurgical knife for medical treatment, low-temperature refrigerators for biological storage and so forth. The on-going research work and unanswered questions for this technology will be also discussed.

  1. Xenon lighting adjusted to plant requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koefferlein, M.; Doehring, T.; Payer, Hans D.; Seidlitz, H. K.

    1994-01-01

    Xenon lamps are available as low and high power lamps with relatively high efficiency and a relatively long lifetime up to several thousand hours. Different construction types of short-arc and long-arc lamps permit a good adaptation to various applications in projection and illumination techniques without substantial changes of the spectral quality. Hence, the xenon lamp was the best choice for professional technical purposes where high power at simultaneously good spectral quality of the light was required. However, technical development does not stand still. Between the luminous efficacy of xenon lamps of 25-50 lm/W and the theoretical limit for 'white light' of 250 lm/W is still much room for improvement. The present development mainly favors other lamp types, like metal halide lamps and fluorescent lamps for commercial lighting purposes. The enclosed sections deal with some of the properties of xenon lamps relevant to plant illumination; particularly the spectral aspects, the temporal characteristics of the emission, and finally the economy of xenon lamps will be addressed. Due to radiation exceeding the natural global radiation in both the ultraviolet (UV) and the infrared (IR) regions, filter techniques have to be included into the discussion referring to the requirements of plant illumination. Most of the presented results were obtained by investigations in the GSF phytotron or in the closed Phytocell chambers of the University of Erlangen. As our experiences are restricted to area plant illumination rather than spot lights our discussion will concentrate on low pressure long-arc xenon lamps which are commonly used for such plant illuminations. As the spectral properties of short-arc lamps do not differ much from those of long-arc lamps most of our conclusions will be valid for high pressure xenon lamps too. These lamps often serve as light sources for small sun simulators and for monochromators which are used for action spectroscopy of plant responses.

  2. Series operation of direct current xenon chloride excimer sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Habachi, Ahmed; Shi, Wenhui; Moselhy, Mohamed; Stark, Robert H.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2000-09-01

    Stable, direct current microhollow cathode discharges in mixtures of hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, xenon, and neon have been generated in a pressure range of 200-1150 Torr. The cathode hole diameter was 250 μm. Sustaining voltages range from 180 to 250 V at current levels of up to 5 mA. The discharges are strong sources of xenon chloride excimer emission at a wavelength of 308 nm. Internal efficiencies of approximately 3% have been reached at a pressure of 1050 Torr. The spectral radiant power at this pressure was measured as 5 mW/nm at 308 nm for a 3 mA discharge. By using a sandwich electrode configuration, consisting of five perforated, alternate layers of metal and dielectric, a tandem discharge—two discharges in series—could be generated. For an anode-cathode-anode configuration the excimer irradiance, recorded on the axis of the discharge, was twice as large as that of a single discharge. The extension of this basic tandem electrode structure to a multiple electrode configuration allows the generation of high irradiance excimer sources. Placing such a structure with a string of microhollow cathode discharge into an optical resonator promises to lead to a direct current microexcimer laser.

  3. Stirring Up an Elastic Fluid: Critical Viscosity of Xenon-2 (CVX-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Motil, Susan M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Whipped cream stays in place even when turned upside down. Yet it readily flows through the nozzle of a spray can to reach the dessert plate. This demonstrates the phenomenon of shear thinning that is important to many industrial and physical processes. Paints, film emulsions, and other complex solutions that are highly viscous under normal conditions but become thin and flow easily under shear forces. A simple fluid, such as water, does not exhibit shear thinning under normal conditions. Very close to the liquid-vapor critical point, where the distinction between liquid and vapor disappears, the fluid becomes more complex and is predicted to display shear thinning. At the critical point, xenon atoms interact over long distances in a classical model of cooperative phenomena. Physicists rely on this system to learn how long-range order arises. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of fluids. Viscosity originates from the interactions of individual molecules. It is so complicated that, except for the simplest gas, it cannot be calculated accurately from theory. Tests with critical fluids can provide key data, but are limited on Earth because critical fluids are highly compressed by gravity. CVX-2 employs a tiny metal screen vibrating between two electrodes in a bath of critical xenon. The vibrations and how they dampen are used to measure viscosity. CVX flew on STS-85 (1997), where it revealed that, close to the critical point, the xenon is partly elastic: it can 'stretch' as well as flow. For STS-107, the hardware has been enhanced to determine if critical xenon is a shear-thinning fluid.

  4. Stirring Up an Elastic Fluid: Critical Viscosity of Xenon-2 (CVX-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2002-12-01

    Whipped cream stays in place even when turned upside down. Yet it readily flows through the nozzle of a spray can to reach the dessert plate. This demonstrates the phenomenon of shear thinning that is important to many industrial and physical processes. Paints, film emulsions, and other complex solutions that are highly viscous under normal conditions but become thin and flow easily under shear forces. A simple fluid, such as water, does not exhibit shear thinning under normal conditions. Very close to the liquid-vapor critical point, where the distinction between liquid and vapor disappears, the fluid becomes more complex and is predicted to display shear thinning. At the critical point, xenon atoms interact over long distances in a classical model of cooperative phenomena. Physicists rely on this system to learn how long-range order arises. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of fluids. Viscosity originates from the interactions of individual molecules. It is so complicated that, except for the simplest gas, it cannot be calculated accurately from theory. Tests with critical fluids can provide key data, but are limited on Earth because critical fluids are highly compressed by gravity. CVX-2 employs a tiny metal screen vibrating between two electrodes in a bath of critical xenon. The vibrations and how they dampen are used to measure viscosity. CVX flew on STS-85 (1997), where it revealed that, close to the critical point, the xenon is partly elastic: it can 'stretch' as well as flow. For STS-107, the hardware has been enhanced to determine if critical xenon is a shear-thinning fluid.

  5. The influence of Bremsstrahlung induced photoionization for the streamer motion in various gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, Christoph; Chanrion, Olivier; Neubert, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Streamers, the beginning stages of electric discharges, evolve differently depending on their polarity and on the ambient gas composition. One of the well-known supporting mechanisms is "UVphotoionization" where, in air, excited nitrogen emits a UV photon subsequently ionizing oxygen. In pure nitrogen, however, this mechanism is suppressed because of the lack of oxygen; hence this mechanism strongly depends on the ambient gas medium. In this paper we introduce Bremsstrahlung induced photoionization: In the ambient electric field,electrons gain energy and produce Bremsstrahlung photons through the collision with the ambient gas molecules; similarly to "UV-photoionization", the Bremsstrahlung photons ionize the gas molecules and, as such, create electron populations detached from the initial electron patch. For the study of this process we implemented the electron-nucleus Bremsstrahlung process as well as the photoionization by individual photons into an already existing 2.5 D Monte Carlo particle code for the simulation of streamers. We initiated plasma patches of electrons and ions with varying initial electron energies and peak densities in different ambient fields in air and pure nitrogen. We will compare the temporal evolution of the electron densities as well as of the electric field with and without modelling Bremsstrahlung. In air we will test the influence of Bremsstrahlung induced photoionization against "UV-photoionization". We will show that the influence of Bremsstrahlung is negligible in air, but plays a significant role in pure nitrogen at standard temperature and pressure.

  6. A program for calculating expansion-tube flow quantities for real-gas mixtures and comparison with experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1972-01-01

    A computer program written in FORTRAN 4 language is presented which determines expansion-tube flow quantities for real test gases CO2 N2, O2, Ar, He, and H2, or mixtures of these gases, in thermochemical equilibrium. The effects of dissociation and first and second ionization are included. Flow quantities behind the incident shock into the quiescent test gas are determined from the pressure and temperature of the quiescent test gas in conjunction with: (1) incident-shock velocity, (2) static pressure immediately behind the incident shock, or (3) pressure and temperature of the driver gas (imperfect hydrogen or helium). The effect of the possible existence of a shock reflection at the secondary diaphragm of the expansion tube is included. Expansion-tube test-section flow conditions are obtained by performing an isentropic unsteady expansion from the conditions behind the incident shock or reflected shock to either the test-region velocity or the static pressure. Both a thermochemical-equilibrium expansion and a frozen expansion are included. Flow conditions immediately behind the bow shock of a model positioned at the test section are also determined. Results from the program are compared with preliminary experimental data obtained in the Langley 6-inch expansion tube.

  7. Comparison of primary standard gas mixtures: gravimetric production of carbon monoxide in nitrogen (3 μmol/mol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopelko, L. A.; Kustikov, Y. A.; Kolobova, A. V.; Pankratov, V. V.; Pankov, A. A.; Efremova, O. V.; Augusto, Cristiane R.; Fioravante, Andreia L.; Ribeiro, Claudia C.; Teixeira, Denise C. G. S.; Elias, Elizandra C. S.; Oudwater, Rutger J.; Fagundes, Fátima A.; Silva, Marceli C.

    2016-01-01

    COOMET.QM-S3 is a supplementary comparison of primary standard gas mixtures—'Carbon monoxide in Nitrogen (3 μmol/mol)'. This is a bilateral comparison between VNIIM and INMETRO and it was conducted in 2013. Carbon monoxide is a toxic gas and in concentrations higher than 3-5 μmol/mol it is hazardous to human health. Therefore, it is important for NMIs to have the capability of an accurate carbon monoxide measurements. This comparison has shown that primary standard gas mixtures of carbon monoxide in nitrogen on the level of 3 μmol/mol, prepared in VNIIM and Inmetro, do not agree—the pair-wise degree of equivalence D (0.77%) is higher than the appropriate expanded uncertainty U(D) (0.29%). Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  8. Influence of CO2-Ar Mixtures as Shielding Gas on Laser Welding of Al-Mg Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukha, Zouhair; Sánchez-Amaya, José María; González-Rovira, Leandro; Rio, Eloy Del; Blanco, Ginesa; Botana, Javier

    2013-12-01

    In this study, AA5083 samples were butt welded under a conduction regime with high-power diode laser (HPDL). Various mixtures composed of Ar and CO2 were used as a shielding gas. The influence of the shielding gas composition on the microstructure and on the properties of laser welds was analyzed. The weld beads were deeply characterized by metallographic/microstructural studies, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (X-EDS) chemical analyses, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), microhardness, and tensile strength. The corrosion resistance of laser-remelted surfaces with different CO2/Ar ratios was also estimated by means of electrochemical tests. The addition of CO2 to the shielding gas results in a better weld penetration and oxidizes the weld pool surface. This addition also promotes the migration of Mg toward the surface of weld beads and induces the formation of magnesium aluminates spinel on the welds. The best corrosion resistance result is achieved with 20 pct CO2. The overall results indicate that the addition of small percentage of CO2 to Ar leads to improvements of the mechanical and corrosion properties of the aluminum welds.

  9. Measurements of Speed of Sound in Lean and Rich Natural Gas Mixtures at Pressures up to 37 MPa Using a Specialized Rupture Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botros, K. K.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of the speed of sound in 42 different compositions of lean, medium, and rich natural-gas mixtures using a specialized high-pressure rupture tube have been conducted. The rupture tube is made of stainless steel (internal diameter = 38.1 mm and length = 42 m), and is instrumented with 13 high-frequency-response dynamic pressure transducers (Endevco) mounted very close to the rupture end and along the length of the tube to capture the pressure-time traces of the decompression wave. Tests were conducted for initial pressures ranging from 10 MPa to 37 MPa and a temperature range from -25°C to+68°C. Gas mixture compositions were controlled by mixing conventional natural-gas mixtures from an adjacent gas pipeline with richer components of alkanes. Temperature control is achieved by a heat tracer along the tube with a set point at the desired gas temperature of the particular test. Uncertainty analysis indicated that the uncertainty in the experimentally determined speed of sound in the undisturbed gas mixture at the initial pressure and temperature is on the order of 0.306 %. The measured speeds of sound were compared to predictions by five equations of state, namely; the Benedict-Webb-Rubin-Starling (BWRS), AGA-8, Peng-Robinson (PR), Redlich-Kwong-Soave (RK-Soave), and Groupe Européen de Recherches Gaziéres (GERG-2004) equations.

  10. A conservative multi-group approach to the Boltzmann equations for reactive gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M.; Rossani, A.; Spiga, G.

    2015-11-01

    Starting from a simple kinetic model for a quaternary mixture of gases undergoing a bimolecular chemical reaction, multi-group integro-differential equations are derived for the particle distribution functions of all species. The procedure takes advantage of a suitable probabilistic formulation, based on the underlying collision frequencies and transition probabilities, of the relevant reactive kinetic equations of Boltzmann type. Owing to an appropriate choice of a sufficiently large number of weight functions, it is shown that the proposed multi-group equations are able to fulfil exactly, at any order of approximation, the correct conservation laws that must be inherited from the original kinetic equations, where speed was a continuous variable. Future developments are also discussed.

  11. Discharge stabilization studies of CO laser gas mixtures in quasi-steady supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Smith, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the applicability of a double discharge stabilization scheme in conditions appropriate for high energy CO lasers in supersonic flows. A Ludwieg tube impulse flow facility and a ballasted capacitor bank provided essentially steady flow and discharge conditions (d.c.) for times longer than ten electrode length-flow transit times. Steady, arc-free, volume discharges were produced in a Mach 3 test cavity using an auxiliary discharge to stabilize the main discharge in N2 and He/CO mixture. A signigicant result is the lack of observed plasma E/N changes in response to auxiliary discharge current changes. Also, where glow discharges were obtained, the energy loading achieved was very much less than the threshold level required for laser operation.

  12. [Hypoxic gas mixture delivery due to a defective vaporiser manifold: case report, review of the literature and suggested emergency management algorithm].

    PubMed

    Berlet, T

    2014-04-01

    A case of delivery of a hypoxic gas mixture to a patient during total intravenous anesthesia is described. A progressive fall in inspiratory oxygen concentration followed by a drop in oxygen saturation below 90 % occurred during the advanced stages of a hitherto uneventful general anesthesia of a female patient undergoing anterior cervical fusion surgery. A malfunctioning defective rubber seal of a vaporizer manifold was identified as the cause of the gas leak. The leak had not been detected during the preanesthesia leak test. The problem of hypoxic gas mixtures and uncommon leaks in modern anesthesia equipment is discussed. The importance of locating a leak in the high or low pressure circuits is explained. An algorithm for the management of an unexpected decrease of inspiratory oxygen concentration or any other manifestation of a gas leak along with a systematic approach to locating the source of a gas leak is presented. PMID:24584839

  13. Direct Dark Matter search with XENON100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrigo, S. E. A.

    2016-07-01

    The XENON100 experiment is the second phase of the XENON program for the direct detection of the dark matter in the universe. The XENON100 detector is a two-phase Time Projection Chamber filled with 161 kg of ultra pure liquid xenon. The results from 224.6 live days of dark matter search with XENON100 are presented. No evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs is found, excluding spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross sections above 2 × 10-45 cm2 for a 55 GeV/c2 WIMP at 90% confidence level (C.L.). The most stringent limit is established on the spin-dependent WIMP-neutron interaction for WIMP masses above 6 GeV/c2, with a minimum cross section of 3.5 × 10-40 cm2 (90% C.L.) for a 45 GeV/c2 WIMP. The same dataset is used to search for axions and axion-like-particles. The best limits to date are set on the axion-electron coupling constant for solar axions, gAe < 7.7 × 10-12 (90% C.L.), and for axion-like-particles, gAe < 1 × 10-12 (90% C.L.) for masses between 5 and 10 keV/c2.

  14. Two-fluid dust and gas mixtures in smoothed particle hydrodynamics: a semi-implicit approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo; Bate, Matthew R.

    2014-09-01

    A method to avoid the explicit time integration of small dust grains in the two-fluid gas/dust smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) approach is proposed. By assuming a very simple exponential decay model for the relative velocity between the gas and dust components, all the effective characteristics of the drag force can be reproduced. A series of tests has been performed to compare the accuracy of the method with analytical and explicit integration results. We find that the method performs well on a wide range of tests, and can provide large speed-ups over explicit integration when the dust stopping time is small. We have also found that the method is much less dissipative than conventional explicit or implicit two-fluid SPH approaches when modelling dusty shocks.

  15. High pressure laser plasma studies. [energy pathways in He-Ar gas mixtures at low pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of a nuclear pumped laser, operating at a wavelength of 1.79 micron m on the 3d(1/2-4p(3/2) transition in argon with helium-3 as the majority gas is discussed. The energy pathways in He-Ar gas were investigated by observing the effects of varying partial pressures on the emissions of levels lying above the 4p level in argon during a pulsed afterglow. An attempt is made to determine the population mechanisms of the 3d level in pure argon by observing emission from the same transition in a high pressure plasma excited by a high energy electron beam. Both collisional radiative and dissociative recombination are discussed.

  16. Process employing CO/sub 2//CH gas mixtures for secondary exploitation of oil reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, L.; Dolleschall, S.; Nemeth, E.; Tiszai, G.; Balint, V.; Torok, J.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes a process for the secondary recovery of crude oil from subterranean reservoirs by injecting carbon dioxide-containing gas into the reservoir through at least one injection well penetrating into the reservoir until a desired volume of carbon dioxide has been added. Then, water is injected through at least one injection well to force such carbon dioxide through the reservoir, and oil is withdrawn through at least one production well at such a flow rate as to maintain a reservoir pressure of at least 100 atm. until the water breaks through into the production well. The improvement described here comprises diluting the carbon dioxide gas in the reservoir with from 5 to 35 vol. % of hydrocarbon gases at a reservoir pressure ranging from above 107 up to 250 atm.

  17. Accurate γ and MeV-electron track reconstruction with an ultra-low diffusion Xenon/TMA TPC at 10 atm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Díaz, Diego; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Camargo, M.; Cárcel, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Irastorza, I. G.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopez-March, N.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez-Lema, G.; Martínez, A.; Miller, T.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Querol, M.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Serra, L.; Shuman, D.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R.; White, J. T.; Yahlali, N.; Azevedo, C.; Aznar, F.; Calvet, D.; Castel, J.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; García, J. A.; Giomataris, I.; Gómez, H.; Iguaz, F. J.; Lagraba, A.; Le Coguie, A.; Mols, J. P.; Şahin, Ö.; Rodríguez, A.; Ruiz-Choliz, E.; Segui, L.; Tomás, A.; Veenhof, R.

    2015-12-01

    We report the performance of a 10 atm Xenon/trimethylamine time projection chamber (TPC) for the detection of X-rays (30 keV) and γ-rays (0.511-1.275 MeV) in conjunction with the accurate tracking of the associated electrons. When operated at such a high pressure and in 1%-admixtures, trimethylamine (TMA) endows Xenon with an extremely low electron diffusion (1.3 ± 0.13 mm - σ (longitudinal), 0.95 ± 0.20 mm - σ (transverse) along 1 m drift) besides forming a convenient 'Penning-Fluorescent' mixture. The TPC, that houses 1.1 kg of gas in its fiducial volume, operated continuously for 100 live-days in charge amplification mode. The readout was performed through the recently introduced microbulk Micromegas technology and the AFTER chip, providing a 3D voxelization of 8 mm × 8 mm × 1.2 mm for approximately 10 cm/MeV-long electron tracks. Resolution in energy (ε) at full width half maximum (R) inside the fiducial volume ranged from R = 14.6 % (30 keV) to R = 4.6 %(1.275 MeV). This work was developed as part of the R&D program of the NEXT collaboration for future detector upgrades in the search of the neutrino-less double beta decay (ββ 0 ν) in 136Xe, specifically those based on novel gas mixtures. Therefore we ultimately focus on the calorimetric and topological properties of the reconstructed MeV-electron tracks. In particular, the obtained energy resolution has been decomposed in its various contributions and improvements towards achieving the R = 1.4 %√{ 1 MeV / ε } levels obtained in small sensors are discussed.

  18. Oxygen/ozone as a medical gas mixture. A critical evaluation of the various methods clarifies positive and negative aspects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Besides oxygen, several other gases such as NO, CO, H2, H2S, Xe and O3 have come to age over the past few years. With regards to O3, its mechanisms of action in medicine have been clarified during the last two decades so that now a comprehensive framework for understanding and recommending ozone therapy in various pathologies is available. O3 used within the determined therapeutic window is absolutely safe and more effective than golden standard medications in numerous pathologies, like vascular diseases. However, ozone therapy is mostly in practitioners' hands and some recent developments for increasing cost effectiveness and speed of treatment are neither standardized, nor evaluated toxicologically. Hence, the aim of this article is to emphasize the need to objectively assess the pros and cons of oxygen/ozone as a medical gas mixture in the hope that ozone therapy will be accepted by orthodox medicine in the near future. PMID:22146387

  19. A new quantum gas apparatus for ultracold mixtures of K and Cs and KCs ground-state molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröbner, M.; Weinmann, P.; Meinert, F.; Lauber, K.; Kirilov, E.; Nägerl, H.-C.

    2016-10-01

    We present a new quantum gas apparatus for ultracold mixtures of K and Cs atoms and ultracold samples of KCs ground-state molecules. We demonstrate the apparatus' capabilities by producing Bose-Einstein condensates of ? and ? in a manner that will eventually allow sequential condensation within one experimental cycle, precise sample overlap and magnetic association of atoms into KCs molecules. The condensates are created independently without relying on sympathetic cooling. Our approach is universal and applicable to other species combinations when the two species show dramatically different behavior in terms of loss mechanisms and post laser cooling temperatures, i.e. species combinations that make parallel generation of quantum degenerate samples challenging. We give an outlook over the next experiments involving e.g. sample mixing, molecule formation and transport into a science chamber for high-resolution spatial imaging of novel quantum-many body phases based on K-Cs.

  20. Observations of columnal recombination in the ionization tracks of energetic heavy nuclei in an argon-methane gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedenbeck, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of ionization signals resulting from the passage of energetic heavy nuclei through a gas mixture consisting of 95 mol percent Ar plus 5 mol percent CH4, at an absolute pressure of 3 atm are presented. The measurements take place under a uniform electric field perpendicular to the ionization track. The signals were compared to the calculated energy losses, with an assumption of proportionality between energy loss rate and ionization rate. Significant deviations from proportionality are found for energy loss rate grater than about 3000 MeV sq cm/g, while fractional deviations are found to be proportional to the energy loss rate (dE/dx) exp m, where m is equal to about two. These results are attributed to the columnal recombination.