Sample records for xml document markup language

  1. An Introduction to the Extensible Markup Language (XML).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Describes Extensible Markup Language (XML), a subset of the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) that is designed to make it easy to interchange structured documents over the Internet. Topics include Document Type Definition (DTD), components of XML, the use of XML, text and non-text elements, and uses for XML-coded files. (LRW)

  2. Definition of an XML markup language for clinical laboratory procedures and comparison with generic XML markup.

    PubMed

    Saadawi, Gilan M; Harrison, James H

    2006-10-01

    Clinical laboratory procedure manuals are typically maintained as word processor files and are inefficient to store and search, require substantial effort for review and updating, and integrate poorly with other laboratory information. Electronic document management systems could improve procedure management and utility. As a first step toward building such systems, we have developed a prototype electronic format for laboratory procedures using Extensible Markup Language (XML). Representative laboratory procedures were analyzed to identify document structure and data elements. This information was used to create a markup vocabulary, CLP-ML, expressed as an XML Document Type Definition (DTD). To determine whether this markup provided advantages over generic markup, we compared procedures structured with CLP-ML or with the vocabulary of the Health Level Seven, Inc. (HL7) Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) narrative block. CLP-ML includes 124 XML tags and supports a variety of procedure types across different laboratory sections. When compared with a general-purpose markup vocabulary (CDA narrative block), CLP-ML documents were easier to edit and read, less complex structurally, and simpler to traverse for searching and retrieval. In combination with appropriate software, CLP-ML is designed to support electronic authoring, reviewing, distributing, and searching of clinical laboratory procedures from a central repository, decreasing procedure maintenance effort and increasing the utility of procedure information. A standard electronic procedure format could also allow laboratories and vendors to share procedures and procedure layouts, minimizing duplicative word processor editing. Our results suggest that laboratory-specific markup such as CLP-ML will provide greater benefit for such systems than generic markup.

  3. XML Based Markup Languages for Specific Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varde, Aparna; Rundensteiner, Elke; Fahrenholz, Sally

    A challenging area in web based support systems is the study of human activities in connection with the web, especially with reference to certain domains. This includes capturing human reasoning in information retrieval, facilitating the exchange of domain-specific knowledge through a common platform and developing tools for the analysis of data on the web from a domain expert's angle. Among the techniques and standards related to such work, we have XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This serves as a medium of communication for storing and publishing textual, numeric and other forms of data seamlessly. XML tag sets are such that they preserve semantics and simplify the understanding of stored information by users. Often domain-specific markup languages are designed using XML, with a user-centric perspective. Standardization bodies and research communities may extend these to include additional semantics of areas within and related to the domain. This chapter outlines the issues to be considered in developing domain-specific markup languages: the motivation for development, the semantic considerations, the syntactic constraints and other relevant aspects, especially taking into account human factors. Illustrating examples are provided from domains such as Medicine, Finance and Materials Science. Particular emphasis in these examples is on the Materials Markup Language MatML and the semantics of one of its areas, namely, the Heat Treating of Materials. The focus of this chapter, however, is not the design of one particular language but rather the generic issues concerning the development of domain-specific markup languages.

  4. Development of the Plate Tectonics and Seismology markup languages with XML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaie, H.; Babaei, A.

    2003-04-01

    The Extensible Markup Language (XML) and its specifications such as the XSD Schema, allow geologists to design discipline-specific vocabularies such as Seismology Markup Language (SeismML) or Plate Tectonics Markup Language (TectML). These languages make it possible to store and interchange structured geological information over the Web. Development of a geological markup language requires mapping geological concepts, such as "Earthquake" or "Plate" into a UML object model, applying a modeling and design environment. We have selected four inter-related geological concepts: earthquake, fault, plate, and orogeny, and developed four XML Schema Definitions (XSD), that define the relationships, cardinalities, hierarchies, and semantics of these concepts. In such a geological concept model, the UML object "Earthquake" is related to one or more "Wave" objects, each arriving to a seismic station at a specific "DateTime", and relating to a specific "Epicenter" object that lies at a unique "Location". The "Earthquake" object occurs along a "Segment" of a "Fault" object, which is related to a specific "Plate" object. The "Fault" has its own associations with such things as "Bend", "Step", and "Segment", and could be of any kind (e.g., "Thrust", "Transform'). The "Plate" is related to many other objects such as "MOR", "Subduction", and "Forearc", and is associated with an "Orogeny" object that relates to "Deformation" and "Strain" and several other objects. These UML objects were mapped into XML Metadata Interchange (XMI) formats, which were then converted into four XSD Schemas. The schemas were used to create and validate the XML instance documents, and to create a relational database hosting the plate tectonics and seismological data in the Microsoft Access format. The SeismML and TectML allow seismologists and structural geologists, among others, to submit and retrieve structured geological data on the Internet. A seismologist, for example, can submit peer-reviewed and

  5. A Leaner, Meaner Markup Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online & CD-ROM Review, 1997

    1997-01-01

    In 1996 a working group of the World Wide Web Consortium developed and released a simpler form of markup language, Extensible Markup Language (XML), combining the flexibility of standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) and the Web suitability of HyperText Markup Language (HTML). Reviews SGML and discusses XML's suitability for journal…

  6. XML Schema Languages: Beyond DTD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannides, Demetrios

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of XML (extensible markup language) and the traditional DTD (document type definition) format focuses on efforts of the World Wide Web Consortium's XML schema working group to develop a schema language to replace DTD that will be capable of defining the set of constraints of any possible data resource. (Contains 14 references.) (LRW)

  7. The carbohydrate sequence markup language (CabosML): an XML description of carbohydrate structures.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Norihiro; Kameyama, Akihiko; Nakaya, Shuuichi; Ito, Hiromi; Sato, Takashi; Shikanai, Toshihide; Takahashi, Yoriko; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2005-04-15

    Bioinformatics resources for glycomics are very poor as compared with those for genomics and proteomics. The complexity of carbohydrate sequences makes it difficult to define a common language to represent them, and the development of bioinformatics tools for glycomics has not progressed. In this study, we developed a carbohydrate sequence markup language (CabosML), an XML description of carbohydrate structures. The language definition (XML Schema) and an experimental database of carbohydrate structures using an XML database management system are available at http://www.phoenix.hydra.mki.co.jp/CabosDemo.html kikuchi@hydra.mki.co.jp.

  8. The Surgical Simulation and Training Markup Language (SSTML): an XML-based language for medical simulation.

    PubMed

    Bacon, James; Tardella, Neil; Pratt, Janey; Hu, John; English, James

    2006-01-01

    Under contract with the Telemedicine & Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC), Energid Technologies is developing a new XML-based language for describing surgical training exercises, the Surgical Simulation and Training Markup Language (SSTML). SSTML must represent everything from organ models (including tissue properties) to surgical procedures. SSTML is an open language (i.e., freely downloadable) that defines surgical training data through an XML schema. This article focuses on the data representation of the surgical procedures and organ modeling, as they highlight the need for a standard language and illustrate the features of SSTML. Integration of SSTML with software is also discussed.

  9. An object-oriented approach for harmonization of multimedia markup languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yih-Feng; Kuo, May-Chen; Sun, Xiaoming; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    2003-12-01

    An object-oriented methodology is proposed to harmonize several different markup languages in this research. First, we adopt the Unified Modelling Language (UML) as the data model to formalize the concept and the process of the harmonization process between the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) applications. Then, we design the Harmonization eXtensible Markup Language (HXML) based on the data model and formalize the transformation between the Document Type Definitions (DTDs) of the original XML applications and HXML. The transformation between instances is also discussed. We use the harmonization of SMIL and X3D as an example to demonstrate the proposed methodology. This methodology can be generalized to various application domains.

  10. XML: A Language To Manage the World Wide Web. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis-Tanous, Jennifer R.

    This digest provides an overview of XML (Extensible Markup Language), a markup language used to construct World Wide Web pages. Topics addressed include: (1) definition of a markup language, including comparison of XML with SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language) and HTML (HyperText Markup Language); (2) how XML works, including sample tags,…

  11. A Practical Introduction to the XML, Extensible Markup Language, by Way of Some Useful Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Robin

    2004-01-01

    XML, Extensible Markup Language, is important as a way to represent and encapsulate the structure of underlying data in a portable way that supports data exchange regardless of the physical storage of the data. This paper (and session) introduces some useful and practical aspects of XML technology for sharing information in a educational setting…

  12. Extensible Markup Language: How Might It Alter the Software Documentation Process and the Role of the Technical Communicator?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battalio, John T.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the influence that Extensible Markup Language (XML) will have on the software documentation process and subsequently on the curricula of advanced undergraduate and master's programs in technical communication. Recommends how curricula of advanced undergraduate and master's programs in technical communication ought to change in order to…

  13. XML and E-Journals: The State of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wusteman, Judith

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the introduction of the use of XML (Extensible Markup Language) in publishing electronic journals. Topics include standards, including DTDs (Document Type Definition), or document type definitions; aggregator requirements; SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language); benefits of XML for e-journals; XML metadata; the possibility of…

  14. An Electronic Finding Aid Using Extensible Markup Language (XML) and Encoded Archival Description (EAD).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, May

    2000-01-01

    Describes the development of electronic finding aids for archives at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign that used XML (extensible markup language) and EAD (encoded archival description) to enable more flexible information management and retrieval than using MARC or a relational database management system. EAD template is appended.…

  15. XML Content Finally Arrives on the Web!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funke, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Explains extensible markup language (XML) and how it differs from hypertext markup language (HTML) and standard generalized markup language (SGML). Highlights include features of XML, including better formatting of documents, better searching capabilities, multiple uses for hyperlinking, and an increase in Web applications; Web browsers; and what…

  16. XML: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, John D.

    1998-01-01

    Describes XML (extensible markup language), a new language classification submitted to the World Wide Web Consortium that is defined in terms of both SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language) and HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), specifically designed for the Internet. Limitations of PDF (Portable Document Format) files for electronic journals…

  17. Symmetric Key Services Markup Language (SKSML)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, Arshad

    Symmetric Key Services Markup Language (SKSML) is the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) being standardized by the OASIS Enterprise Key Management Infrastructure Technical Committee for requesting and receiving symmetric encryption cryptographic keys within a Symmetric Key Management System (SKMS). This protocol is designed to be used between clients and servers within an Enterprise Key Management Infrastructure (EKMI) to secure data, independent of the application and platform. Building on many security standards such as XML Signature, XML Encryption, Web Services Security and PKI, SKSML provides standards-based capability to allow any application to use symmetric encryption keys, while maintaining centralized control. This article describes the SKSML protocol and its capabilities.

  18. Astronomical Instrumentation System Markup Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbaum, Jesse M.

    2016-05-01

    The Astronomical Instrumentation System Markup Language (AISML) is an Extensible Markup Language (XML) based file format for maintaining and exchanging information about astronomical instrumentation. The factors behind the need for an AISML are first discussed followed by the reasons why XML was chosen as the format. Next it's shown how XML also provides the framework for a more precise definition of an astronomical instrument and how these instruments can be combined to form an Astronomical Instrumentation System (AIS). AISML files for several instruments as well as one for a sample AIS are provided. The files demonstrate how AISML can be utilized for various tasks from web page generation and programming interface to instrument maintenance and quality management. The advantages of widespread adoption of AISML are discussed.

  19. Developing a Markup Language for Encoding Graphic Content in Plan Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jinghuan

    2009-01-01

    While deliberating and making decisions, participants in urban development processes need easy access to the pertinent content scattered among different plans. A Planning Markup Language (PML) has been proposed to represent the underlying structure of plans in an XML-compliant way. However, PML currently covers only textual information and lacks…

  20. SuML: A Survey Markup Language for Generalized Survey Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, MW; Lober, WB; Karras, BT

    2002-01-01

    There is a need in clinical and research settings for a sophisticated, generalized, web based survey tool that supports complex logic, separation of content and presentation, and computable guidelines. There are many commercial and open source survey packages available that provide simple logic; few provide sophistication beyond “goto” statements; none support the use of guidelines. These tools are driven by databases, static web pages, and structured documents using markup languages such as eXtensible Markup Language (XML). We propose a generalized, guideline aware language and an implementation architecture using open source standards.

  1. Representing Information in Patient Reports Using Natural Language Processing and the Extensible Markup Language

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Carol; Hripcsak, George; Shagina, Lyuda; Liu, Hongfang

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To design a document model that provides reliable and efficient access to clinical information in patient reports for a broad range of clinical applications, and to implement an automated method using natural language processing that maps textual reports to a form consistent with the model. Methods: A document model that encodes structured clinical information in patient reports while retaining the original contents was designed using the extensible markup language (XML), and a document type definition (DTD) was created. An existing natural language processor (NLP) was modified to generate output consistent with the model. Two hundred reports were processed using the modified NLP system, and the XML output that was generated was validated using an XML validating parser. Results: The modified NLP system successfully processed all 200 reports. The output of one report was invalid, and 199 reports were valid XML forms consistent with the DTD. Conclusions: Natural language processing can be used to automatically create an enriched document that contains a structured component whose elements are linked to portions of the original textual report. This integrated document model provides a representation where documents containing specific information can be accurately and efficiently retrieved by querying the structured components. If manual review of the documents is desired, the salient information in the original reports can also be identified and highlighted. Using an XML model of tagging provides an additional benefit in that software tools that manipulate XML documents are readily available. PMID:9925230

  2. XML Style Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Acronyms ASCII American Standard Code for Information Interchange DAU data acquisition unit DDML data display markup language IHAL...Transfer Standard URI uniform resource identifier W3C World Wide Web Consortium XML extensible markup language XSD XML schema definition XML Style...Style Guide, RCC 125-15, July 2015 1 Introduction The next generation of telemetry systems will rely heavily on extensible markup language (XML

  3. Light at Night Markup Language (LANML): XML Technology for Light at Night Monitoring Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craine, B. L.; Craine, E. R.; Craine, E. M.; Crawford, D. L.

    2013-05-01

    Light at Night Markup Language (LANML) is a standard, based upon XML, useful in acquiring, validating, transporting, archiving and analyzing multi-dimensional light at night (LAN) datasets of any size. The LANML standard can accommodate a variety of measurement scenarios including single spot measures, static time-series, web based monitoring networks, mobile measurements, and airborne measurements. LANML is human-readable, machine-readable, and does not require a dedicated parser. In addition LANML is flexible; ensuring future extensions of the format will remain backward compatible with analysis software. The XML technology is at the heart of communicating over the internet and can be equally useful at the desktop level, making this standard particularly attractive for web based applications, educational outreach and efficient collaboration between research groups.

  4. Managing and Querying Image Annotation and Markup in XML.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fusheng; Pan, Tony; Sharma, Ashish; Saltz, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Proprietary approaches for representing annotations and image markup are serious barriers for researchers to share image data and knowledge. The Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) project is developing a standard based information model for image annotation and markup in health care and clinical trial environments. The complex hierarchical structures of AIM data model pose new challenges for managing such data in terms of performance and support of complex queries. In this paper, we present our work on managing AIM data through a native XML approach, and supporting complex image and annotation queries through native extension of XQuery language. Through integration with xService, AIM databases can now be conveniently shared through caGrid.

  5. Managing and Querying Image Annotation and Markup in XML

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fusheng; Pan, Tony; Sharma, Ashish; Saltz, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Proprietary approaches for representing annotations and image markup are serious barriers for researchers to share image data and knowledge. The Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) project is developing a standard based information model for image annotation and markup in health care and clinical trial environments. The complex hierarchical structures of AIM data model pose new challenges for managing such data in terms of performance and support of complex queries. In this paper, we present our work on managing AIM data through a native XML approach, and supporting complex image and annotation queries through native extension of XQuery language. Through integration with xService, AIM databases can now be conveniently shared through caGrid. PMID:21218167

  6. Chemical Markup, XML and the World-Wide Web. 8. Polymer Markup Language.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nico; Winter, Jerry; Murray-Rust, Peter; Rzepa, Henry S

    2008-11-01

    Polymers are among the most important classes of materials but are only inadequately supported by modern informatics. The paper discusses the reasons why polymer informatics is considerably more challenging than small molecule informatics and develops a vision for the computer-aided design of polymers, based on modern semantic web technologies. The paper then discusses the development of Polymer Markup Language (PML). PML is an extensible language, designed to support the (structural) representation of polymers and polymer-related information. PML closely interoperates with Chemical Markup Language (CML) and overcomes a number of the previously identified challenges.

  7. Development of clinical contents model markup language for electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ji-Hyun; Ahn, Sun-Ju; Kim, Yoon

    2012-09-01

    To develop dedicated markup language for clinical contents models (CCM) to facilitate the active use of CCM in electronic health record systems. Based on analysis of the structure and characteristics of CCM in the clinical domain, we designed extensible markup language (XML) based CCM markup language (CCML) schema manually. CCML faithfully reflects CCM in both the syntactic and semantic aspects. As this language is based on XML, it can be expressed and processed in computer systems and can be used in a technology-neutral way. CCML HAS THE FOLLOWING STRENGTHS: it is machine-readable and highly human-readable, it does not require a dedicated parser, and it can be applied for existing electronic health record systems.

  8. "The Wonder Years" of XML.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazan, Rich

    2000-01-01

    Surveys the current state of Extensible Markup Language (XML), a metalanguage for creating structured documents that describe their own content, and its implications for information professionals. Predicts that XML will become the common language underlying Web, word processing, and database formats. Also discusses Extensible Stylesheet Language…

  9. Development of Clinical Contents Model Markup Language for Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To develop dedicated markup language for clinical contents models (CCM) to facilitate the active use of CCM in electronic health record systems. Methods Based on analysis of the structure and characteristics of CCM in the clinical domain, we designed extensible markup language (XML) based CCM markup language (CCML) schema manually. Results CCML faithfully reflects CCM in both the syntactic and semantic aspects. As this language is based on XML, it can be expressed and processed in computer systems and can be used in a technology-neutral way. Conclusions CCML has the following strengths: it is machine-readable and highly human-readable, it does not require a dedicated parser, and it can be applied for existing electronic health record systems. PMID:23115739

  10. Ontology aided modeling of organic reaction mechanisms with flexible and fragment based XML markup procedures.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Punnaivanam; Aghila, Gnanasekaran

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism models for primary organic reactions encoding the structural fragments undergoing substitution, addition, elimination, and rearrangements are developed. In the proposed models, each and every structural component of mechanistic pathways is represented with flexible and fragment based markup technique in XML syntax. A significant feature of the system is the encoding of the electron movements along with the other components like charges, partial charges, half bonded species, lone pair electrons, free radicals, reaction arrows, etc. needed for a complete representation of reaction mechanism. The rendering of reaction schemes described with the proposed methodology is achieved with a concise XML extension language interoperating with the structure markup. The reaction scheme is visualized as 2D graphics in a browser by converting them into SVG documents enabling the desired layouts normally perceived by the chemists conventionally. An automatic representation of the complex patterns of the reaction mechanism is achieved by reusing the knowledge in chemical ontologies and developing artificial intelligence components in terms of axioms.

  11. Semi-automated XML markup of biosystematic legacy literature with the GoldenGATE editor.

    PubMed

    Sautter, Guido; Böhm, Klemens; Agosti, Donat

    2007-01-01

    Today, digitization of legacy literature is a big issue. This also applies to the domain of biosystematics, where this process has just started. Digitized biosystematics literature requires a very precise and fine grained markup in order to be useful for detailed search, data linkage and mining. However, manual markup on sentence level and below is cumbersome and time consuming. In this paper, we present and evaluate the GoldenGATE editor, which is designed for the special needs of marking up OCR output with XML. It is built in order to support the user in this process as far as possible: Its functionality ranges from easy, intuitive tagging through markup conversion to dynamic binding of configurable plug-ins provided by third parties. Our evaluation shows that marking up an OCR document using GoldenGATE is three to four times faster than with an off-the-shelf XML editor like XML-Spy. Using domain-specific NLP-based plug-ins, these numbers are even higher.

  12. Using Extensible Markup Language (XML) for the Single Source Delivery of Educational Resources by Print and Online: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Lucas

    2007-01-01

    This article seeks to provide an introduction to Extensible Markup Language (XML) by looking at its use in a single source publishing approach to the provision of teaching resources in both hardcopy and online. Using the development of the International Baccalaureate Organisation's online Economics Subject Guide as a practical example, this…

  13. ADASS Web Database XML Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barg, M. I.; Stobie, E. B.; Ferro, A. J.; O'Neil, E. J.

    In the spring of 2000, at the request of the ADASS Program Organizing Committee (POC), we began organizing information from previous ADASS conferences in an effort to create a centralized database. The beginnings of this database originated from data (invited speakers, participants, papers, etc.) extracted from HyperText Markup Language (HTML) documents from past ADASS host sites. Unfortunately, not all HTML documents are well formed and parsing them proved to be an iterative process. It was evident at the beginning that if these Web documents were organized in a standardized way, such as XML (Extensible Markup Language), the processing of this information across the Web could be automated, more efficient, and less error prone. This paper will briefly review the many programming tools available for processing XML, including Java, Perl and Python, and will explore the mapping of relational data from our MySQL database to XML.

  14. XML and its impact on content and structure in electronic health care documents.

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowski, R.; Dudeck, J.

    1999-01-01

    Worldwide information networks have the requirement that electronic documents must be easily accessible, portable, flexible and system-independent. With the development of XML (eXtensible Markup Language), the future of electronic documents, health care informatics and the Web itself are about to change. The intent of the recently formed ASTM E31.25 subcommittee, "XML DTDs for Health Care", is to develop standard electronic document representations of paper-based health care documents and forms. A goal of the subcommittee is to work together to enhance existing levels of interoperability among the various XML/SGML standardization efforts, products and systems in health care. The ASTM E31.25 subcommittee uses common practices and software standards to develop the implementation recommendations for XML documents in health care. The implementation recommendations are being developed to standardize the many different structures of documents. These recommendations are in the form of a set of standard DTDs, or document type definitions that match the electronic document requirements in the health care industry. This paper discusses recent efforts of the ASTM E31.25 subcommittee. PMID:10566338

  15. Improving Interoperability by Incorporating UnitsML Into Markup Languages

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Ismet; Dragoset, Robert A.; Olsen, Karen J.; Schaefer, Reinhold; Kramer, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    Maintaining the integrity of analytical data over time is a challenge. Years ago, data were recorded on paper that was pasted directly into a laboratory notebook. The digital age has made maintaining the integrity of data harder. Nowadays, digitized analytical data are often separated from information about how the sample was collected and prepared for analysis and how the data were acquired. The data are stored on digital media, while the related information about the data may be written in a paper notebook or stored separately in other digital files. Sometimes the connection between this “scientific meta-data” and the analytical data is lost, rendering the spectrum or chromatogram useless. We have been working with ASTM Subcommittee E13.15 on Analytical Data to create the Analytical Information Markup Language or AnIML—a new way to interchange and store spectroscopy and chromatography data based on XML (Extensible Markup Language). XML is a language for describing what data are by enclosing them in computer-useable tags. Recording the units associated with the analytical data and metadata is an essential issue for any data representation scheme that must be addressed by all domain-specific markup languages. As scientific markup languages proliferate, it is very desirable to have a single scheme for handling units to facilitate moving information between different data domains. At NIST, we have been developing a general markup language just for units that we call UnitsML. This presentation will describe how UnitsML is used and how it is being incorporated into AnIML. PMID:27134778

  16. Improving Interoperability by Incorporating UnitsML Into Markup Languages.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Ismet; Dragoset, Robert A; Olsen, Karen J; Schaefer, Reinhold; Kramer, Gary W

    2010-01-01

    Maintaining the integrity of analytical data over time is a challenge. Years ago, data were recorded on paper that was pasted directly into a laboratory notebook. The digital age has made maintaining the integrity of data harder. Nowadays, digitized analytical data are often separated from information about how the sample was collected and prepared for analysis and how the data were acquired. The data are stored on digital media, while the related information about the data may be written in a paper notebook or stored separately in other digital files. Sometimes the connection between this "scientific meta-data" and the analytical data is lost, rendering the spectrum or chromatogram useless. We have been working with ASTM Subcommittee E13.15 on Analytical Data to create the Analytical Information Markup Language or AnIML-a new way to interchange and store spectroscopy and chromatography data based on XML (Extensible Markup Language). XML is a language for describing what data are by enclosing them in computer-useable tags. Recording the units associated with the analytical data and metadata is an essential issue for any data representation scheme that must be addressed by all domain-specific markup languages. As scientific markup languages proliferate, it is very desirable to have a single scheme for handling units to facilitate moving information between different data domains. At NIST, we have been developing a general markup language just for units that we call UnitsML. This presentation will describe how UnitsML is used and how it is being incorporated into AnIML.

  17. XML at the ADC: Steps to a Next Generation Data Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaya, E.; Blackwell, J.; Gass, J.; Oliversen, N.; Schneider, G.; Thomas, B.; Cheung, C.; White, R. A.

    1999-05-01

    The eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is a document markup language that allows users to specify their own tags, to create hierarchical structures to qualify their data, and to support automatic checking of documents for structural validity. It is being intensively supported by nearly every major corporate software developer. Under the funds of a NASA AISRP proposal, the Astronomical Data Center (ADC, http://adc.gsfc.nasa.gov) is developing an infrastructure for importation, enhancement, and distribution of data and metadata using XML as the document markup language. We discuss the preliminary Document Type Definition (DTD, at http://adc.gsfc.nasa.gov/xml) which specifies the elements and their attributes in our metadata documents. This attempts to define both the metadata of an astronomical catalog and the `header' information of an astronomical table. In addition, we give an overview of the planned flow of data through automated pipelines from authors and journal presses into our XML archive and retrieval through the web via the XML-QL Query Language and eXtensible Style Language (XSL) scripts. When completed, the catalogs and journal tables at the ADC will be tightly hyperlinked to enhance data discovery. In addition one will be able to search on fragmentary information. For instance, one could query for a table by entering that the second author is so-and-so or that the third author is at such-and-such institution.

  18. How Does XML Help Libraries?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Kyle

    2002-01-01

    Discusses XML, how it has transformed the way information is managed and delivered, and its impact on libraries. Topics include how XML differs from other markup languages; the document object model (DOM); style sheets; practical applications for archival materials, interlibrary loans, digital collections, and MARC data; and future possibilities.…

  19. A standard MIGS/MIMS compliant XML Schema: toward the development of the Genomic Contextual Data Markup Language (GCDML).

    PubMed

    Kottmann, Renzo; Gray, Tanya; Murphy, Sean; Kagan, Leonid; Kravitz, Saul; Lombardot, Thierry; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2008-06-01

    The Genomic Contextual Data Markup Language (GCDML) is a core project of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) that implements the "Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence" (MIGS) specification and its extension, the "Minimum Information about a Metagenome Sequence" (MIMS). GCDML is an XML Schema for generating MIGS/MIMS compliant reports for data entry, exchange, and storage. When mature, this sample-centric, strongly-typed schema will provide a diverse set of descriptors for describing the exact origin and processing of a biological sample, from sampling to sequencing, and subsequent analysis. Here we describe the need for such a project, outline design principles required to support the project, and make an open call for participation in defining the future content of GCDML. GCDML is freely available, and can be downloaded, along with documentation, from the GSC Web site (http://gensc.org).

  20. Data Display Markup Language (DDML) Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-31

    Moreover, the tendency of T&E is towards a plug-and-play-like data acquisition system that requires standard languages and modules for data displays...Telemetry Group DOCUMENT 127-17 DATA DISPLAY MARKUP LANGUAGE (DDML) HANDBOOK DISTRIBUTION A: APPROVED FOR...DOCUMENT 127-17 DATA DISPLAY MARKUP LANGUAGE (DDML) HANDBOOK January 2017 Prepared by Telemetry Group

  1. Pathology data integration with eXtensible Markup Language.

    PubMed

    Berman, Jules J

    2005-02-01

    It is impossible to overstate the importance of XML (eXtensible Markup Language) as a data organization tool. With XML, pathologists can annotate all of their data (clinical and anatomic) in a format that can transform every pathology report into a database, without compromising narrative structure. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide an overview of XML for pathologists. Examples will demonstrate how pathologists can use XML to annotate individual data elements and to structure reports in a common format that can be merged with other XML files or queried using standard XML tools. This manuscript gives pathologists a glimpse into how XML allows pathology data to be linked to other types of biomedical data and reduces our dependence on centralized proprietary databases.

  2. Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML) Level 1 Version 2.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Frank T; Cooper, Jonathan; Le Novère, Nicolas; Nickerson, David; Waltemath, Dagmar

    2015-09-04

    The number, size and complexity of computational models of biological systems are growing at an ever increasing pace. It is imperative to build on existing studies by reusing and adapting existing models and parts thereof. The description of the structure of models is not sufficient to enable the reproduction of simulation results. One also needs to describe the procedures the models are subjected to, as recommended by the Minimum Information About a Simulation Experiment (MIASE) guidelines. This document presents Level 1 Version 2 of the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML), a computer-readable format for encoding simulation and analysis experiments to apply to computational models. SED-ML files are encoded in the Extensible Markup Language (XML) and can be used in conjunction with any XML-based model encoding format, such as CellML or SBML. A SED-ML file includes details of which models to use, how to modify them prior to executing a simulation, which simulation and analysis procedures to apply, which results to extract and how to present them. Level 1 Version 2 extends the format by allowing the encoding of repeated and chained procedures.

  3. Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML) Level 1 Version 2.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Frank T; Cooper, Jonathan; Le Novère, Nicolas; Nickerson, David; Waltemath, Dagmar

    2015-06-01

    The number, size and complexity of computational models of biological systems are growing at an ever increasing pace. It is imperative to build on existing studies by reusing and adapting existing models and parts thereof. The description of the structure of models is not sufficient to enable the reproduction of simulation results. One also needs to describe the procedures the models are subjected to, as recommended by the Minimum Information About a Simulation Experiment (MIASE) guidelines. This document presents Level 1 Version 2 of the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML), a computer-readable format for encoding simulation and analysis experiments to apply to computational models. SED-ML files are encoded in the Extensible Markup Language (XML) and can be used in conjunction with any XML-based model encoding format, such as CellML or SBML. A SED-ML file includes details of which models to use, how to modify them prior to executing a simulation, which simulation and analysis procedures to apply, which results to extract and how to present them. Level 1 Version 2 extends the format by allowing the encoding of repeated and chained procedures.

  4. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML): Language Specification for Level 3 Version 1 Core

    PubMed Central

    Hucka, Michael; Bergmann, Frank T.; Hoops, Stefan; Keating, Sarah M.; Sahle, Sven; Schaff, James C.; Smith, Lucian P.; Wilkinson, Darren J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Computational models can help researchers to interpret data, understand biological function, and make quantitative predictions. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is a file format for representing computational models in a declarative form that can be exchanged between different software systems. SBML is oriented towards describing biological processes of the sort common in research on a number of topics, including metabolic pathways, cell signaling pathways, and many others. By supporting SBML as an input/output format, different tools can all operate on an identical representation of a model, removing opportunities for translation errors and assuring a common starting point for analyses and simulations. This document provides the specification for Version 1 of SBML Level 3 Core. The specification defines the data structures prescribed by SBML as well as their encoding in XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This specification also defines validation rules that determine the validity of an SBML document, and provides many examples of models in SBML form. Other materials and software are available from the SBML project web site, http://sbml.org/. PMID:26528564

  5. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML): Language Specification for Level 3 Version 1 Core.

    PubMed

    Hucka, Michael; Bergmann, Frank T; Hoops, Stefan; Keating, Sarah M; Sahle, Sven; Schaff, James C; Smith, Lucian P; Wilkinson, Darren J

    2015-09-04

    Computational models can help researchers to interpret data, understand biological function, and make quantitative predictions. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is a file format for representing computational models in a declarative form that can be exchanged between different software systems. SBML is oriented towards describing biological processes of the sort common in research on a number of topics, including metabolic pathways, cell signaling pathways, and many others. By supporting SBML as an input/output format, different tools can all operate on an identical representation of a model, removing opportunities for translation errors and assuring a common starting point for analyses and simulations. This document provides the specification for Version 1 of SBML Level 3 Core. The specification defines the data structures prescribed by SBML as well as their encoding in XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This specification also defines validation rules that determine the validity of an SBML document, and provides many examples of models in SBML form. Other materials and software are available from the SBML project web site, http://sbml.org/.

  6. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML): Language Specification for Level 3 Version 1 Core.

    PubMed

    Hucka, Michael; Bergmann, Frank T; Hoops, Stefan; Keating, Sarah M; Sahle, Sven; Schaff, James C; Smith, Lucian P; Wilkinson, Darren J

    2015-06-01

    Computational models can help researchers to interpret data, understand biological function, and make quantitative predictions. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is a file format for representing computational models in a declarative form that can be exchanged between different software systems. SBML is oriented towards describing biological processes of the sort common in research on a number of topics, including metabolic pathways, cell signaling pathways, and many others. By supporting SBML as an input/output format, different tools can all operate on an identical representation of a model, removing opportunities for translation errors and assuring a common starting point for analyses and simulations. This document provides the specification for Version 1 of SBML Level 3 Core. The specification defines the data structures prescribed by SBML as well as their encoding in XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This specification also defines validation rules that determine the validity of an SBML document, and provides many examples of models in SBML form. Other materials and software are available from the SBML project web site, http://sbml.org/.

  7. Using XML to Separate Content from the Presentation Software in eLearning Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Paul F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper has shown how XML (extensible Markup Language) can be used to mark up content. Since XML documents, with meaningful tags, can be interpreted easily by humans as well as computers, they are ideal for the interchange of information. Because XML tags can be defined by an individual or organization, XML documents have proven useful in a…

  8. Using the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) in a regional electronic patient record for patients with malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Wolff, A C; Mludek, V; van der Haak, M; Bork, W; Bülzebruck, H; Drings, P; Schmücker, P; Wannenmacher, M; Haux, R

    2001-01-01

    Communication between different institutions which are responsible for the treatment of the same patient is of outstanding significance, especially in the field of tumor diseases. Regional electronic patient records could support the co-operation of different institutions by providing ac-cess to all necessary information whether it belongs to the own institution or to a partner. The Department of Medical Informatics, University of Heidelberg is performing a project in co-operation with the Thoraxclinic-Heidelberg and the Department of Clinical Radiology, University of Heidelberg with the goal: to define an architectural concept for interlinking the electronic patient record of the two clinical institutions to build a common virtual electronic patient record and carry out an exemplary implementation, to examine composition, structure and content of medical documents for tumor patients with the aim of defining an XML-based markup language allowing summarizing overviews and suitable granularities, and to integrate clinical practice guidelines and other external knowledge with the electronic patient record using XML-technologies to support the physician in the daily decision process. This paper will show, how a regional electronic patient record could be built on an architectural level and describe elementary steps towards a on content-oriented structuring of medical records.

  9. XML: A Publisher's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Timothy M.

    1999-01-01

    Explains eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and describes how Dow Jones Interactive is using it to improve the news-gathering and dissemination process through intranets and the World Wide Web. Discusses benefits of using XML, the relationship to HyperText Markup Language (HTML), lack of available software tools and industry support, and future…

  10. TME2/342: The Role of the EXtensible Markup Language (XML) for Future Healthcare Application Development

    PubMed Central

    Noelle, G; Dudeck, J

    1999-01-01

    Two years, since the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has published the first specification of the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) there exist some concrete tools and applications to work with XML-based data. In particular, new generation Web browsers offer great opportunities to develop new kinds of medical, web-based applications. There are several data-exchange formats in medicine, which have been established in the last years: HL-7, DICOM, EDIFACT and, in the case of Germany, xDT. Whereas communication and information exchange becomes increasingly important, the development of appropriate and necessary interfaces causes problems, rising costs and effort. It has been also recognised that it is difficult to define a standardised interchange format, for one of the major future developments in medical telematics: the electronic patient record (EPR) and its availability on the Internet. Whereas XML, especially in an industrial environment, is celebrated as a generic standard and a solution for all problems concerning e-commerce, in a medical context there are only few applications developed. Nevertheless, the medical environment is an appropriate area for building XML applications: as the information and communication management becomes increasingly important in medical businesses, the role of the Internet changes quickly from an information to a communication medium. The first XML based applications in healthcare show us the advantage for a future engagement of the healthcare industry in XML: such applications are open, easy to extend and cost-effective. Additionally, XML is much more than a simple new data interchange format: many proposals for data query (XQL), data presentation (XSL) and other extensions have been proposed to the W3C and partly realised in medical applications.

  11. SBMLeditor: effective creation of models in the Systems Biology Markup language (SBML).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Nicolas; Donizelli, Marco; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2007-03-06

    The need to build a tool to facilitate the quick creation and editing of models encoded in the Systems Biology Markup language (SBML) has been growing with the number of users and the increased complexity of the language. SBMLeditor tries to answer this need by providing a very simple, low level editor of SBML files. Users can create and remove all the necessary bits and pieces of SBML in a controlled way, that maintains the validity of the final SBML file. SBMLeditor is written in JAVA using JCompneur, a library providing interfaces to easily display an XML document as a tree. This decreases dramatically the development time for a new XML editor. The possibility to include custom dialogs for different tags allows a lot of freedom for the editing and validation of the document. In addition to Xerces, SBMLeditor uses libSBML to check the validity and consistency of SBML files. A graphical equation editor allows an easy manipulation of MathML. SBMLeditor can be used as a module of the Systems Biology Workbench. SBMLeditor contains many improvements compared to a generic XML editor, and allow users to create an SBML model quickly and without syntactic errors.

  12. XML DTD and Schemas for HDF-EOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullman, Richard; Yang, Jingli

    2008-01-01

    An Extensible Markup Language (XML) document type definition (DTD) standard for the structure and contents of HDF-EOS files and their contents, and an equivalent standard in the form of schemas, have been developed.

  13. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML): Language Specification for Level 3 Version 2 Core.

    PubMed

    Hucka, Michael; Bergmann, Frank T; Dräger, Andreas; Hoops, Stefan; Keating, Sarah M; Le Novère, Nicolas; Myers, Chris J; Olivier, Brett G; Sahle, Sven; Schaff, James C; Smith, Lucian P; Waltemath, Dagmar; Wilkinson, Darren J

    2018-03-09

    Computational models can help researchers to interpret data, understand biological functions, and make quantitative predictions. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is a file format for representing computational models in a declarative form that different software systems can exchange. SBML is oriented towards describing biological processes of the sort common in research on a number of topics, including metabolic pathways, cell signaling pathways, and many others. By supporting SBML as an input/output format, different tools can all operate on an identical representation of a model, removing opportunities for translation errors and assuring a common starting point for analyses and simulations. This document provides the specification for Version 2 of SBML Level 3 Core. The specification defines the data structures prescribed by SBML, their encoding in XML (the eXtensible Markup Language), validation rules that determine the validity of an SBML document, and examples of models in SBML form. The design of Version 2 differs from Version 1 principally in allowing new MathML constructs, making more child elements optional, and adding identifiers to all SBML elements instead of only selected elements. Other materials and software are available from the SBML project website at http://sbml.org/.

  14. Transparent ICD and DRG coding using information technology: linking and associating information sources with the eXtensible Markup Language.

    PubMed

    Hoelzer, Simon; Schweiger, Ralf K; Dudeck, Joachim

    2003-01-01

    With the introduction of ICD-10 as the standard for diagnostics, it becomes necessary to develop an electronic representation of its complete content, inherent semantics, and coding rules. The authors' design relates to the current efforts by the CEN/TC 251 to establish a European standard for hierarchical classification systems in health care. The authors have developed an electronic representation of ICD-10 with the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) that facilitates integration into current information systems and coding software, taking different languages and versions into account. In this context, XML provides a complete processing framework of related technologies and standard tools that helps develop interoperable applications. XML provides semantic markup. It allows domain-specific definition of tags and hierarchical document structure. The idea of linking and thus combining information from different sources is a valuable feature of XML. In addition, XML topic maps are used to describe relationships between different sources, or "semantically associated" parts of these sources. The issue of achieving a standardized medical vocabulary becomes more and more important with the stepwise implementation of diagnostically related groups, for example. The aim of the authors' work is to provide a transparent and open infrastructure that can be used to support clinical coding and to develop further software applications. The authors are assuming that a comprehensive representation of the content, structure, inherent semantics, and layout of medical classification systems can be achieved through a document-oriented approach.

  15. Transparent ICD and DRG Coding Using Information Technology: Linking and Associating Information Sources with the eXtensible Markup Language

    PubMed Central

    Hoelzer, Simon; Schweiger, Ralf K.; Dudeck, Joachim

    2003-01-01

    With the introduction of ICD-10 as the standard for diagnostics, it becomes necessary to develop an electronic representation of its complete content, inherent semantics, and coding rules. The authors' design relates to the current efforts by the CEN/TC 251 to establish a European standard for hierarchical classification systems in health care. The authors have developed an electronic representation of ICD-10 with the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) that facilitates integration into current information systems and coding software, taking different languages and versions into account. In this context, XML provides a complete processing framework of related technologies and standard tools that helps develop interoperable applications. XML provides semantic markup. It allows domain-specific definition of tags and hierarchical document structure. The idea of linking and thus combining information from different sources is a valuable feature of XML. In addition, XML topic maps are used to describe relationships between different sources, or “semantically associated” parts of these sources. The issue of achieving a standardized medical vocabulary becomes more and more important with the stepwise implementation of diagnostically related groups, for example. The aim of the authors' work is to provide a transparent and open infrastructure that can be used to support clinical coding and to develop further software applications. The authors are assuming that a comprehensive representation of the content, structure, inherent semantics, and layout of medical classification systems can be achieved through a document-oriented approach. PMID:12807813

  16. The development of MML (Medical Markup Language) version 3.0 as a medical document exchange format for HL7 messages.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinqiu; Takada, Akira; Tanaka, Koji; Sato, Junzo; Suzuki, Muneou; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Nakashima, Yusei; Araki, Kenji; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2004-12-01

    Medical Markup Language (MML), as a set of standards, has been developed over the last 8 years to allow the exchange of medical data between different medical information providers. MML Version 2.21 used XML as a metalanguage and was announced in 1999. In 2001, MML was updated to Version 2.3, which contained 12 modules. The latest version--Version 3.0--is based on the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA). During the development of this new version, the structure of MML Version 2.3 was analyzed, subdivided into several categories, and redefined so the information defined in MML could be described in HL7 CDA Level One. As a result of this development, it has become possible to exchange MML Version 3.0 medical documents via HL7 messages.

  17. XML Schema Guide for Primary CDR Submissions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document presents the extensible markup language (XML) schema guide for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics’ (OPPT) e-CDRweb tool. E-CDRweb is the electronic, web-based tool provided by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the submission of Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) information. This document provides the user with tips and guidance on correctly using the version 1.7 XML schema. Please note that the order of the elements must match the schema.

  18. XML syntax for clinical laboratory procedure manuals.

    PubMed

    Saadawi, Gilan; Harrison, James H

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a document type description (DTD) in Extensable Markup Language (XML) for clinical laboratory procedures. Our XML syntax can adequately structure a variety of procedure types across different laboratories and is compatible with current procedure standards. The combination of this format with an XML content management system and appropriate style sheets will allow efficient procedure maintenance, distributed access, customized display and effective searching across a large body of test information.

  19. PIML: the Pathogen Information Markup Language.

    PubMed

    He, Yongqun; Vines, Richard R; Wattam, Alice R; Abramochkin, Georgiy V; Dickerman, Allan W; Eckart, J Dana; Sobral, Bruno W S

    2005-01-01

    A vast amount of information about human, animal and plant pathogens has been acquired, stored and displayed in varied formats through different resources, both electronically and otherwise. However, there is no community standard format for organizing this information or agreement on machine-readable format(s) for data exchange, thereby hampering interoperation efforts across information systems harboring such infectious disease data. The Pathogen Information Markup Language (PIML) is a free, open, XML-based format for representing pathogen information. XSLT-based visual presentations of valid PIML documents were developed and can be accessed through the PathInfo website or as part of the interoperable web services federation known as ToolBus/PathPort. Currently, detailed PIML documents are available for 21 pathogens deemed of high priority with regard to public health and national biological defense. A dynamic query system allows simple queries as well as comparisons among these pathogens. Continuing efforts are being taken to include other groups' supporting PIML and to develop more PIML documents. All the PIML-related information is accessible from http://www.vbi.vt.edu/pathport/pathinfo/

  20. SBMLeditor: effective creation of models in the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML)

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Nicolas; Donizelli, Marco; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Background The need to build a tool to facilitate the quick creation and editing of models encoded in the Systems Biology Markup language (SBML) has been growing with the number of users and the increased complexity of the language. SBMLeditor tries to answer this need by providing a very simple, low level editor of SBML files. Users can create and remove all the necessary bits and pieces of SBML in a controlled way, that maintains the validity of the final SBML file. Results SBMLeditor is written in JAVA using JCompneur, a library providing interfaces to easily display an XML document as a tree. This decreases dramatically the development time for a new XML editor. The possibility to include custom dialogs for different tags allows a lot of freedom for the editing and validation of the document. In addition to Xerces, SBMLeditor uses libSBML to check the validity and consistency of SBML files. A graphical equation editor allows an easy manipulation of MathML. SBMLeditor can be used as a module of the Systems Biology Workbench. Conclusion SBMLeditor contains many improvements compared to a generic XML editor, and allow users to create an SBML model quickly and without syntactic errors. PMID:17341299

  1. RTML: remote telescope markup language and you

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessman, F. V.

    2001-12-01

    In order to coordinate the use of robotic and remotely operated telescopes in networks -- like Göttingen's MOnitoring NEtwork of Telescopes (MONET) -- a standard format for the exchange of observing requests and reports is needed. I describe the benefits of Remote Telescope Markup Language (RTML), an XML-based protocol originally developed by the Hands-On Universe Project, which is being used and further developed by several robotic telescope projects and firms.

  2. XML technology planning database : lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Some, Raphael R.; Neff, Jon M.

    2005-01-01

    A hierarchical Extensible Markup Language(XML) database called XCALIBR (XML Analysis LIBRary) has been developed by Millennium Program to assist in technology investment (ROI) analysis and technology Language Capability the New return on portfolio optimization. The database contains mission requirements and technology capabilities, which are related by use of an XML dictionary. The XML dictionary codifies a standardized taxonomy for space missions, systems, subsystems and technologies. In addition to being used for ROI analysis, the database is being examined for use in project planning, tracking and documentation. During the past year, the database has moved from development into alpha testing. This paper describes the lessons learned during construction and testing of the prototype database and the motivation for moving from an XML taxonomy to a standard XML-based ontology.

  3. WaterML: an XML Language for Communicating Water Observations Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, D. R.; Zaslavsky, I.; Valentine, D.

    2007-12-01

    One of the great impediments to the synthesis of water information is the plethora of formats used to publish such data. Each water agency uses its own approach. XML (eXtended Markup Languages) are generalizations of Hypertext Markup Language to communicate specific kinds of information via the internet. WaterML is an XML language for water observations data - streamflow, water quality, groundwater levels, climate, precipitation and aquatic biology data, recorded at fixed, point locations as a function of time. The Hydrologic Information System project of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc (CUAHSI) has defined WaterML and prepared a set of web service functions called WaterOneFLow that use WaterML to provide information about observation sites, the variables measured there and the values of those measurments. WaterML has been submitted to the Open GIS Consortium for harmonization with its standards for XML languages. Academic investigators at a number of testbed locations in the WATERS network are providing data in WaterML format using WaterOneFlow web services. The USGS and other federal agencies are also working with CUAHSI to similarly provide access to their data in WaterML through WaterOneFlow services.

  4. Castles Made of Sand: Building Sustainable Digitized Collections Using XML.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragon, Bart

    2003-01-01

    Describes work at the University of Virginia library to digitize special collections. Discusses the use of XML (Extensible Markup Language); providing access to original source materials; DTD (Document Type Definition); TEI (Text Encoding Initiative); metadata; XSL (Extensible Style Language); and future possibilities. (LRW)

  5. Instrument Remote Control via the Astronomical Instrument Markup Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sall, Ken; Ames, Troy; Warsaw, Craig; Koons, Lisa; Shafer, Richard

    1998-01-01

    The Instrument Remote Control (IRC) project ongoing at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Information Systems Center (ISC) supports NASA's mission by defining an adaptive intranet-based framework that provides robust interactive and distributed control and monitoring of remote instruments. An astronomical IRC architecture that combines the platform-independent processing capabilities of Java with the power of Extensible Markup Language (XML) to express hierarchical data in an equally platform-independent, as well as human readable manner, has been developed. This architecture is implemented using a variety of XML support tools and Application Programming Interfaces (API) written in Java. IRC will enable trusted astronomers from around the world to easily access infrared instruments (e.g., telescopes, cameras, and spectrometers) located in remote, inhospitable environments, such as the South Pole, a high Chilean mountaintop, or an airborne observatory aboard a Boeing 747. Using IRC's frameworks, an astronomer or other scientist can easily define the type of onboard instrument, control the instrument remotely, and return monitoring data all through the intranet. The Astronomical Instrument Markup Language (AIML) is the first implementation of the more general Instrument Markup Language (IML). The key aspects of our approach to instrument description and control applies to many domains, from medical instruments to machine assembly lines. The concepts behind AIML apply equally well to the description and control of instruments in general. IRC enables us to apply our techniques to several instruments, preferably from different observatories.

  6. Bottom-Up Evaluation of Twig Join Pattern Queries in XML Document Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yangjun

    Since the extensible markup language XML emerged as a new standard for information representation and exchange on the Internet, the problem of storing, indexing, and querying XML documents has been among the major issues of database research. In this paper, we study the twig pattern matching and discuss a new algorithm for processing ordered twig pattern queries. The time complexity of the algorithmis bounded by O(|D|·|Q| + |T|·leaf Q ) and its space overhead is by O(leaf T ·leaf Q ), where T stands for a document tree, Q for a twig pattern and D is a largest data stream associated with a node q of Q, which contains the database nodes that match the node predicate at q. leaf T (leaf Q ) represents the number of the leaf nodes of T (resp. Q). In addition, the algorithm can be adapted to an indexing environment with XB-trees being used.

  7. XML Schema Guide for Secondary CDR Submissions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document presents the extensible markup language (XML) schema guide for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics’ (OPPT) e-CDRweb tool. E-CDRweb is the electronic, web-based tool provided by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the submission of Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) information. This document provides the user with tips and guidance on correctly using the version 1.1 XML schema for the Joint Submission Form. Please note that the order of the elements must match the schema.

  8. XML under the Hood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharf, David

    2002-01-01

    Discusses XML (extensible markup language), particularly as it relates to libraries. Topics include organizing information; cataloging; metadata; similarities to HTML; organizations dealing with XML; making XML useful; a history of XML; the semantic Web; related technologies; XML at the Library of Congress; and its role in improving the…

  9. Modeling the Arden Syntax for medical decisions in XML.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sukil; Haug, Peter J; Rocha, Roberto A; Choi, Inyoung

    2008-10-01

    A new model expressing Arden Syntax with the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) was developed to increase its portability. Every example was manually parsed and reviewed until the schema and the style sheet were considered to be optimized. When the first schema was finished, several MLMs in Arden Syntax Markup Language (ArdenML) were validated against the schema. They were then transformed to HTML formats with the style sheet, during which they were compared to the original text version of their own MLM. When faults were found in the transformed MLM, the schema and/or style sheet was fixed. This cycle continued until all the examples were encoded into XML documents. The original MLMs were encoded in XML according to the proposed XML schema and reverse-parsed MLMs in ArdenML were checked using a public domain Arden Syntax checker. Two hundred seventy seven examples of MLMs were successfully transformed into XML documents using the model, and the reverse-parse yielded the original text version of MLMs. Two hundred sixty five of the 277 MLMs showed the same error patterns before and after transformation, and all 11 errors related to statement structure were resolved in XML version. The model uses two syntax checking mechanisms, first an XML validation process, and second, a syntax check using an XSL style sheet. Now that we have a schema for ArdenML, we can also begin the development of style sheets for transformation ArdenML into other languages.

  10. ArdenML: The Arden Syntax Markup Language (or Arden Syntax: It's Not Just Text Any More!)

    PubMed Central

    Sailors, R. Matthew

    2001-01-01

    It is no longer necessary to think of Arden Syntax as simply a text-based knowledge base format. The development of ArdenML (Arden Syntax Markup Language), an XML-based markup language allows structured access to most of the maintenance and library categories without the need to write or buy a compiler may lead to the development of simple commercial and freeware tools for processing Arden Syntax Medical Logic Modules (MLMs)

  11. XML in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy, Ed.

    This book presents examples of how libraries are using XML (eXtensible Markup Language) to solve problems, expand services, and improve systems. Part I contains papers on using XML in library catalog records: "Updating MARC Records with XMLMARC" (Kevin S. Clarke, Stanford University) and "Searching and Retrieving XML Records via the…

  12. Application of XML to Journal Table Archiving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaya, E. J.; Blackwell, J. H.; Gass, J. E.; Kargatis, V. E.; Schneider, G. L.; Weiland, J. L.; Borne, K. D.; White, R. A.; Cheung, C. Y.

    1998-12-01

    The Astronomical Data Center (ADC) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is a major archive for machine-readable astronomical data tables. Many ADC tables are derived from published journal articles. Article tables are reformatted to be machine-readable and documentation is crafted to facilitate proper reuse by researchers. The recent switch of journals to web based electronic format has resulted in the generation of large amounts of tabular data that could be captured into machine-readable archive format at fairly low cost. The large data flow of the tables from all major North American astronomical journals (a factor of 100 greater than the present rate at the ADC) necessitates the development of rigorous standards for the exchange of data between researchers, publishers, and the archives. We have selected a suitable markup language that can fully describe the large variety of astronomical information contained in ADC tables. The eXtensible Markup Language XML is a powerful internet-ready documentation format for data. It provides a precise and clear data description language that is both machine- and human-readable. It is rapidly becoming the standard format for business and information transactions on the internet and it is an ideal common metadata exchange format. By labelling, or "marking up", all elements of the information content, documents are created that computers can easily parse. An XML archive can easily and automatically be maintained, ingested into standard databases or custom software, and even totally restructured whenever necessary. Structuring astronomical data into XML format will enable efficient and focused search capabilities via off-the-shelf software. The ADC is investigating XML's expanded hyperlinking power to enhance connectivity within the ADC data/metadata and developing XSL display scripts to enhance display of astronomical data. The ADC XML Definition Type Document can be viewed at http://messier.gsfc.nasa.gov/dtdhtml/DTD-TREE.html

  13. Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) Level 2 Version 5: Structures and Facilities for Model Definitions

    PubMed Central

    Hucka, Michael; Bergmann, Frank T.; Dräger, Andreas; Hoops, Stefan; Keating, Sarah M.; Le Novére, Nicolas; Myers, Chris J.; Olivier, Brett G.; Sahle, Sven; Schaff, James C.; Smith, Lucian P.; Waltemath, Dagmar; Wilkinson, Darren J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Computational models can help researchers to interpret data, understand biological function, and make quantitative predictions. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is a file format for representing computational models in a declarative form that can be exchanged between different software systems. SBML is oriented towards describing biological processes of the sort common in research on a number of topics, including metabolic pathways, cell signaling pathways, and many others. By supporting SBML as an input/output format, different tools can all operate on an identical representation of a model, removing opportunities for translation errors and assuring a common starting point for analyses and simulations. This document provides the specification for Version 5 of SBML Level 2. The specification defines the data structures prescribed by SBML as well as their encoding in XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This specification also defines validation rules that determine the validity of an SBML document, and provides many examples of models in SBML form. Other materials and software are available from the SBML project web site, http://sbml.org/. PMID:26528569

  14. Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) Level 2 Version 5: Structures and Facilities for Model Definitions.

    PubMed

    Hucka, Michael; Bergmann, Frank T; Dräger, Andreas; Hoops, Stefan; Keating, Sarah M; Le Novère, Nicolas; Myers, Chris J; Olivier, Brett G; Sahle, Sven; Schaff, James C; Smith, Lucian P; Waltemath, Dagmar; Wilkinson, Darren J

    2015-09-04

    Computational models can help researchers to interpret data, understand biological function, and make quantitative predictions. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is a file format for representing computational models in a declarative form that can be exchanged between different software systems. SBML is oriented towards describing biological processes of the sort common in research on a number of topics, including metabolic pathways, cell signaling pathways, and many others. By supporting SBML as an input/output format, different tools can all operate on an identical representation of a model, removing opportunities for translation errors and assuring a common starting point for analyses and simulations. This document provides the specification for Version 5 of SBML Level 2. The specification defines the data structures prescribed by SBML as well as their encoding in XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This specification also defines validation rules that determine the validity of an SBML document, and provides many examples of models in SBML form. Other materials and software are available from the SBML project web site, http://sbml.org.

  15. Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) Level 2 Version 5: Structures and Facilities for Model Definitions.

    PubMed

    Hucka, Michael; Bergmann, Frank T; Dräger, Andreas; Hoops, Stefan; Keating, Sarah M; Le Novère, Nicolas; Myers, Chris J; Olivier, Brett G; Sahle, Sven; Schaff, James C; Smith, Lucian P; Waltemath, Dagmar; Wilkinson, Darren J

    2015-06-01

    Computational models can help researchers to interpret data, understand biological function, and make quantitative predictions. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is a file format for representing computational models in a declarative form that can be exchanged between different software systems. SBML is oriented towards describing biological processes of the sort common in research on a number of topics, including metabolic pathways, cell signaling pathways, and many others. By supporting SBML as an input/output format, different tools can all operate on an identical representation of a model, removing opportunities for translation errors and assuring a common starting point for analyses and simulations. This document provides the specification for Version 5 of SBML Level 2. The specification defines the data structures prescribed by SBML as well as their encoding in XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This specification also defines validation rules that determine the validity of an SBML document, and provides many examples of models in SBML form. Other materials and software are available from the SBML project web site, http://sbml.org/.

  16. Field Markup Language: biological field representation in XML.

    PubMed

    Chang, David; Lovell, Nigel H; Dokos, Socrates

    2007-01-01

    With an ever increasing number of biological models available on the internet, a standardized modeling framework is required to allow information to be accessed or visualized. Based on the Physiome Modeling Framework, the Field Markup Language (FML) is being developed to describe and exchange field information for biological models. In this paper, we describe the basic features of FML, its supporting application framework and its ability to incorporate CellML models to construct tissue-scale biological models. As a typical application example, we present a spatially-heterogeneous cardiac pacemaker model which utilizes both FML and CellML to describe and solve the underlying equations of electrical activation and propagation.

  17. A Survey in Indexing and Searching XML Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luk, Robert W. P.; Leong, H. V.; Dillon, Tharam S.; Chan, Alvin T. S.; Croft, W. Bruce; Allan, James

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of XML focuses on indexing techniques for XML documents, grouping them into flat-file, semistructured, and structured indexing paradigms. Highlights include searching techniques, including full text search and multistage search; search result presentations; database and information retrieval system integration; XML query languages; and…

  18. XML Flight/Ground Data Dictionary Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Jesse; Wiklow, Colette

    2007-01-01

    A computer program generates Extensible Markup Language (XML) files that effect coupling between the command- and telemetry-handling software running aboard a spacecraft and the corresponding software running in ground support systems. The XML files are produced by use of information from the flight software and from flight-system engineering. The XML files are converted to legacy ground-system data formats for command and telemetry, transformed into Web-based and printed documentation, and used in developing new ground-system data-handling software. Previously, the information about telemetry and command was scattered in various paper documents that were not synchronized. The process of searching and reading the documents was time-consuming and introduced errors. In contrast, the XML files contain all of the information in one place. XML structures can evolve in such a manner as to enable the addition, to the XML files, of the metadata necessary to track the changes and the associated documentation. The use of this software has reduced the extent of manual operations in developing a ground data system, thereby saving considerable time and removing errors that previously arose in the translation and transcription of software information from the flight to the ground system.

  19. XML — an opportunity for data standards in the geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlding, Simon W.

    2001-08-01

    Extensible markup language (XML) is a recently introduced meta-language standard on the Web. It provides the rules for development of metadata (markup) standards for information transfer in specific fields. XML allows development of markup languages that describe what information is rather than how it should be presented. This allows computer applications to process the information in intelligent ways. In contrast hypertext markup language (HTML), which fuelled the initial growth of the Web, is a metadata standard concerned exclusively with presentation of information. Besides its potential for revolutionizing Web activities, XML provides an opportunity for development of meaningful data standards in specific application fields. The rapid endorsement of XML by science, industry and e-commerce has already spawned new metadata standards in such fields as mathematics, chemistry, astronomy, multi-media and Web micro-payments. Development of XML-based data standards in the geosciences would significantly reduce the effort currently wasted on manipulating and reformatting data between different computer platforms and applications and would ensure compatibility with the new generation of Web browsers. This paper explores the evolution, benefits and status of XML and related standards in the more general context of Web activities and uses this as a platform for discussion of its potential for development of data standards in the geosciences. Some of the advantages of XML are illustrated by a simple, browser-compatible demonstration of XML functionality applied to a borehole log dataset. The XML dataset and the associated stylesheet and schema declarations are available for FTP download.

  20. Networking observers and observatories with remote telescope markup language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessman, Frederic V.; Tuparev, Georg; Allan, Alasdair

    2006-06-01

    Remote Telescope Markup Language (RTML) is an XML-based protocol for the transport of the high-level description of a set of observations to be carried out on a remote, robotic or service telescope. We describe how RTML is being used in a wide variety of contexts: the transport of service and robotic observing requests in the Hands-On Universe TM, ACP, eSTAR, and MONET networks; how RTML is easily combined with other XML protocols for more localized control of telescopes; RTML as a secondary observation report format for the IVOA's VOEvent protocol; the input format for a general-purpose observation simulator; and the observatory-independent means for carrying out request transactions for the international Heterogeneous Telescope Network (HTN).

  1. Framework and prototype for a secure XML-based electronic health records system.

    PubMed

    Steele, Robert; Gardner, William; Chandra, Darius; Dillon, Tharam S

    2007-01-01

    Security of personal medical information has always been a challenge for the advancement of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) initiatives. eXtensible Markup Language (XML), is rapidly becoming the key standard for data representation and transportation. The widespread use of XML and the prospect of its use in the Electronic Health (e-health) domain highlights the need for flexible access control models for XML data and documents. This paper presents a declarative access control model for XML data repositories that utilises an expressive XML role control model. The operational semantics of this model are illustrated by Xplorer, a user interface generation engine which supports search-browse-navigate activities on XML repositories.

  2. SBRML: a markup language for associating systems biology data with models.

    PubMed

    Dada, Joseph O; Spasić, Irena; Paton, Norman W; Mendes, Pedro

    2010-04-01

    Research in systems biology is carried out through a combination of experiments and models. Several data standards have been adopted for representing models (Systems Biology Markup Language) and various types of relevant experimental data (such as FuGE and those of the Proteomics Standards Initiative). However, until now, there has been no standard way to associate a model and its entities to the corresponding datasets, or vice versa. Such a standard would provide a means to represent computational simulation results as well as to frame experimental data in the context of a particular model. Target applications include model-driven data analysis, parameter estimation, and sharing and archiving model simulations. We propose the Systems Biology Results Markup Language (SBRML), an XML-based language that associates a model with several datasets. Each dataset is represented as a series of values associated with model variables, and their corresponding parameter values. SBRML provides a flexible way of indexing the results to model parameter values, which supports both spreadsheet-like data and multidimensional data cubes. We present and discuss several examples of SBRML usage in applications such as enzyme kinetics, microarray gene expression and various types of simulation results. The XML Schema file for SBRML is available at http://www.comp-sys-bio.org/SBRML under the Academic Free License (AFL) v3.0.

  3. Computerization of guidelines: towards a "guideline markup language".

    PubMed

    Dart, T; Xu, Y; Chatellier, G; Degoulet, P

    2001-01-01

    Medical decision making is one of the most difficult daily tasks for physicians. Guidelines have been designed to reduce variance between physicians in daily practice, to improve patient outcomes and to control costs. In fact, few physicians use guidelines in daily practice. A way to ease the use of guidelines is to implement computerised guidelines (computer reminders). We present in this paper a method of computerising guidelines. Our objectives were: 1) to propose a generic model that can be instantiated for any specific guidelines; 2) to use eXtensible Markup Language (XML) as a guideline representation language to instantiate the generic model for a specific guideline. Our model is an object representation of a clinical algorithm, it has been validated by running two different guidelines issued by a French official Agency. In spite of some limitations, we found that this model is expressive enough to represent complex guidelines devoted to diabetes and hypertension management. We conclude that XML can be used as a description format to structure guidelines and as an interface between paper-based guidelines and computer applications.

  4. Setting the Standard: XML on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlins, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Explains what XML (Extensible Markup Language) is; where to find it in a few years (everywhere from Web pages, to database management systems, to common campus applications); issues that will make XML somewhat of an experimental strategy in the near term; and the importance of decision-makers being abreast of XML trends in standards, tools…

  5. XML in an Adaptive Framework for Instrument Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Troy J.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is developing an extensible framework for instrument command and control, known as Instrument Remote Control (IRC), that combines the platform independent processing capabilities of Java with the power of the Extensible Markup Language (XML). A key aspect of the architecture is software that is driven by an instrument description, written using the Instrument Markup Language (IML). IML is an XML dialect used to describe interfaces to control and monitor the instrument, command sets and command formats, data streams, communication mechanisms, and data processing algorithms.

  6. CytometryML, an XML format based on DICOM and FCS for analytical cytology data.

    PubMed

    Leif, Robert C; Leif, Suzanne B; Leif, Stephanie H

    2003-07-01

    Flow Cytometry Standard (FCS) was initially created to standardize the software researchers use to analyze, transmit, and store data produced by flow cytometers and sorters. Because of the clinical utility of flow cytometry, it is necessary to have a standard consistent with the requirements of medical regulatory agencies. We extended the existing mapping of FCS to the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard to include list-mode data produced by flow cytometry, laser scanning cytometry, and microscopic image cytometry. FCS list-mode was mapped to the DICOM Waveform Information Object. We created a collection of Extensible Markup Language (XML) schemas to express the DICOM analytical cytologic text-based data types except for large binary objects. We also developed a cytometry markup language, CytometryML, in an open environment subject to continuous peer review. The feasibility of expressing the data contained in FCS, including list-mode in DICOM, was demonstrated; and a preliminary mapping for list-mode data in the form of XML schemas and documents was completed. DICOM permitted the creation of indices that can be used to rapidly locate in a list-mode file the cells that are members of a subset. DICOM and its coding schemes for other medical standards can be represented by XML schemas, which can be combined with other relevant XML applications, such as Mathematical Markup Language (MathML). The use of XML format based on DICOM for analytical cytology met most of the previously specified requirements and appears capable of meeting the others; therefore, the present FCS should be retired and replaced by an open, XML-based, standard CytometryML. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Telescope networking and user support via Remote Telescope Markup Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessman, Frederic V.; Pennypacker, Carlton R.; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni; Tuparev, Georg

    2004-09-01

    Remote Telescope Markup Language (RTML) is an XML-based interface/document format designed to facilitate the exchange of astronomical observing requests and results between investigators and observatories as well as within networks of observatories. While originally created to support simple imaging telescope requests (Versions 1.0-2.1), RTML Version 3.0 now supports a wide range of applications, from request preparation, exposure calculation, spectroscopy, and observation reports to remote telescope scheduling, target-of-opportunity observations and telescope network administration. The elegance of RTML is that all of this is made possible using a public XML Schema which provides a general-purpose, easily parsed, and syntax-checked medium for the exchange of astronomical and user information while not restricting or otherwise constraining the use of the information at either end. Thus, RTML can be used to connect heterogeneous systems and their users without requiring major changes in existing local resources and procedures. Projects as very different as a number of advanced amateur observatories, the global Hands-On Universe project, the MONET network (robotic imaging), the STELLA consortium (robotic spectroscopy), and the 11-m Southern African Large Telescope are now using or intending to use RTML in various forms and for various purposes.

  8. XBRL: Beyond Basic XML

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLengen, Craig Alan

    2010-01-01

    The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has recently announced a proposal that will require all public companies to report their financial data in Extensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL). XBRL is an extension of Extensible Markup Language (XML). Moving to a standard reporting format makes it easier for organizations to report the…

  9. Combining dictionary techniques with extensible markup language (XML)--requirements to a new approach towards flexible and standardized documentation.

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, U.; Tafazzoli, A. G.; Noelle, G.; Huybrechts, T.; Schweiger, R.; Wächter, W.; Dudeck, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    In oncology various international and national standards exist for the documentation of different aspects of a disease. Since elements of these standards are repeated in different contexts, a common data dictionary could support consistent representation in any context. For the construction of such a dictionary existing documents have to be worked up in a complex procedure, that considers aspects of hierarchical decomposition of documents and of domain control as well as aspects of user presentation and models of the underlying model of patient data. In contrast to other thesauri, text chunks like definitions or explanations are very important and have to be preserved, since oncologic documentation often means coding and classification on an aggregate level and the safe use of coding systems is an important precondition for comparability of data. This paper discusses the potentials of the use of XML in combination with a dictionary for the promotion and development of standard conformable applications for tumor documentation. PMID:10566311

  10. A Conversion Tool for Mathematical Expressions in Web XML Files.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohtake, Nobuyuki; Kanahori, Toshihiro

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the conversion of mathematical equations into Extensible Markup Language (XML) on the World Wide Web for individuals with visual impairments. A program is described that converts the presentation markup style to the content markup style in MathML to allow browsers to render mathematical expressions without other programs.…

  11. XML Based Scientific Data Management Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, P.; Zubair, M.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The World Wide Web consortium has developed an Extensible Markup Language (XML) to support the building of better information management infrastructures. The scientific computing community realizing the benefits of XML has designed markup languages for scientific data. In this paper, we propose a XML based scientific data management ,facility, XDMF. The project is motivated by the fact that even though a lot of scientific data is being generated, it is not being shared because of lack of standards and infrastructure support for discovering and transforming the data. The proposed data management facility can be used to discover the scientific data itself, the transformation functions, and also for applying the required transformations. We have built a prototype system of the proposed data management facility that can work on different platforms. We have implemented the system using Java, and Apache XSLT engine Xalan. To support remote data and transformation functions, we had to extend the XSLT specification and the Xalan package.

  12. EquiX-A Search and Query Language for XML.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Sara; Kanza, Yaron; Kogan, Yakov; Sagiv, Yehoshua; Nutt, Werner; Serebrenik, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    Describes EquiX, a search language for XML that combines querying with searching to query the data and the meta-data content of Web pages. Topics include search engines; a data model for XML documents; search query syntax; search query semantics; an algorithm for evaluating a query on a document; and indexing EquiX queries. (LRW)

  13. Adding XML to the MIS Curriculum: Lessons from the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, William P.; Pant, Vik; Hilken, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is a new technology that is currently being extolled by many industry experts and software vendors. Potentially it represents a platform independent language for sharing information over networks in a way that is much more seamless than with previous technologies. It is extensible in that XML serves as a "meta"…

  14. Compression of Probabilistic XML Documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldman, Irma; de Keijzer, Ander; van Keulen, Maurice

    Database techniques to store, query and manipulate data that contains uncertainty receives increasing research interest. Such UDBMSs can be classified according to their underlying data model: relational, XML, or RDF. We focus on uncertain XML DBMS with as representative example the Probabilistic XML model (PXML) of [10,9]. The size of a PXML document is obviously a factor in performance. There are PXML-specific techniques to reduce the size, such as a push down mechanism, that produces equivalent but more compact PXML documents. It can only be applied, however, where possibilities are dependent. For normal XML documents there also exist several techniques for compressing a document. Since Probabilistic XML is (a special form of) normal XML, it might benefit from these methods even more. In this paper, we show that existing compression mechanisms can be combined with PXML-specific compression techniques. We also show that best compression rates are obtained with a combination of PXML-specific technique with a rather simple generic DAG-compression technique.

  15. An XML Data Model for Inverted Image Indexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Simon W.; Leung, Clement H. C.; Tse, Philip K. C.

    2003-01-01

    The Internet world makes increasing use of XML-based technologies. In multimedia data indexing and retrieval, the MPEG-7 standard for Multimedia Description Scheme is specified using XML. The flexibility of XML allows users to define other markup semantics for special contexts, construct data-centric XML documents, exchange standardized data between computer systems, and present data in different applications. In this paper, the Inverted Image Indexing paradigm is presented and modeled using XML Schema.

  16. Adding Hierarchical Objects to Relational Database General-Purpose XML-Based Information Managements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu-Chun; Knight, Chris; La, Tracy; Maluf, David; Bell, David; Tran, Khai Peter; Gawdiak, Yuri

    2006-01-01

    NETMARK is a flexible, high-throughput software system for managing, storing, and rapid searching of unstructured and semi-structured documents. NETMARK transforms such documents from their original highly complex, constantly changing, heterogeneous data formats into well-structured, common data formats in using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and/or Extensible Markup Language (XML). The software implements an object-relational database system that combines the best practices of the relational model utilizing Structured Query Language (SQL) with those of the object-oriented, semantic database model for creating complex data. In particular, NETMARK takes advantage of the Oracle 8i object-relational database model using physical-address data types for very efficient keyword searches of records across both context and content. NETMARK also supports multiple international standards such as WEBDAV for drag-and-drop file management and SOAP for integrated information management using Web services. The document-organization and -searching capabilities afforded by NETMARK are likely to make this software attractive for use in disciplines as diverse as science, auditing, and law enforcement.

  17. Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) Representation in Predictive Model Markup Language (PMML)

    PubMed Central

    Lechevalier, D.; Ak, R.; Ferguson, M.; Law, K. H.; Lee, Y.-T. T.; Rachuri, S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes Gaussian process regression (GPR) models presented in predictive model markup language (PMML). PMML is an extensible-markup-language (XML) -based standard language used to represent data-mining and predictive analytic models, as well as pre- and post-processed data. The previous PMML version, PMML 4.2, did not provide capabilities for representing probabilistic (stochastic) machine-learning algorithms that are widely used for constructing predictive models taking the associated uncertainties into consideration. The newly released PMML version 4.3, which includes the GPR model, provides new features: confidence bounds and distribution for the predictive estimations. Both features are needed to establish the foundation for uncertainty quantification analysis. Among various probabilistic machine-learning algorithms, GPR has been widely used for approximating a target function because of its capability of representing complex input and output relationships without predefining a set of basis functions, and predicting a target output with uncertainty quantification. GPR is being employed to various manufacturing data-analytics applications, which necessitates representing this model in a standardized form for easy and rapid employment. In this paper, we present a GPR model and its representation in PMML. Furthermore, we demonstrate a prototype using a real data set in the manufacturing domain. PMID:29202125

  18. Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) Representation in Predictive Model Markup Language (PMML).

    PubMed

    Park, J; Lechevalier, D; Ak, R; Ferguson, M; Law, K H; Lee, Y-T T; Rachuri, S

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes Gaussian process regression (GPR) models presented in predictive model markup language (PMML). PMML is an extensible-markup-language (XML) -based standard language used to represent data-mining and predictive analytic models, as well as pre- and post-processed data. The previous PMML version, PMML 4.2, did not provide capabilities for representing probabilistic (stochastic) machine-learning algorithms that are widely used for constructing predictive models taking the associated uncertainties into consideration. The newly released PMML version 4.3, which includes the GPR model, provides new features: confidence bounds and distribution for the predictive estimations. Both features are needed to establish the foundation for uncertainty quantification analysis. Among various probabilistic machine-learning algorithms, GPR has been widely used for approximating a target function because of its capability of representing complex input and output relationships without predefining a set of basis functions, and predicting a target output with uncertainty quantification. GPR is being employed to various manufacturing data-analytics applications, which necessitates representing this model in a standardized form for easy and rapid employment. In this paper, we present a GPR model and its representation in PMML. Furthermore, we demonstrate a prototype using a real data set in the manufacturing domain.

  19. Integrating digital educational content created and stored within disparate software environments: an extensible markup language (XML) solution in real-world use.

    PubMed

    Frank, M S; Schultz, T; Dreyer, K

    2001-06-01

    To provide a standardized and scaleable mechanism for exchanging digital radiologic educational content between software systems that use disparate authoring, storage, and presentation technologies. Our institution uses two distinct software systems for creating educational content for radiology. Each system is used to create in-house educational content as well as commercial educational products. One system is an authoring and viewing application that facilitates the input and storage of hierarchical knowledge and associated imagery, and is capable of supporting a variety of entity relationships. This system is primarily used for the production and subsequent viewing of educational CD-ROMS. Another software system is primarily used for radiologic education on the world wide web. This system facilitates input and storage of interactive knowledge and associated imagery, delivering this content over the internet in a Socratic manner simulating in-person interaction with an expert. A subset of knowledge entities common to both systems was derived. An additional subset of knowledge entities that could be bidirectionally mapped via algorithmic transforms was also derived. An extensible markup language (XML) object model and associated lexicon were then created to represent these knowledge entities and their interactive behaviors. Forward-looking attention was exercised in the creation of the object model in order to facilitate straightforward future integration of other sources of educational content. XML generators and interpreters were written for both systems. Deriving the XML object model and lexicon was the most critical and time-consuming aspect of the project. The coding of the XML generators and interpreters required only a few hours for each environment. Subsequently, the transfer of hundreds of educational cases and thematic presentations between the systems can now be accomplished in a matter of minutes. The use of algorithmic transforms results in nearly 100

  20. Root system markup language: toward a unified root architecture description language.

    PubMed

    Lobet, Guillaume; Pound, Michael P; Diener, Julien; Pradal, Christophe; Draye, Xavier; Godin, Christophe; Javaux, Mathieu; Leitner, Daniel; Meunier, Félicien; Nacry, Philippe; Pridmore, Tony P; Schnepf, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    The number of image analysis tools supporting the extraction of architectural features of root systems has increased in recent years. These tools offer a handy set of complementary facilities, yet it is widely accepted that none of these software tools is able to extract in an efficient way the growing array of static and dynamic features for different types of images and species. We describe the Root System Markup Language (RSML), which has been designed to overcome two major challenges: (1) to enable portability of root architecture data between different software tools in an easy and interoperable manner, allowing seamless collaborative work; and (2) to provide a standard format upon which to base central repositories that will soon arise following the expanding worldwide root phenotyping effort. RSML follows the XML standard to store two- or three-dimensional image metadata, plant and root properties and geometries, continuous functions along individual root paths, and a suite of annotations at the image, plant, or root scale at one or several time points. Plant ontologies are used to describe botanical entities that are relevant at the scale of root system architecture. An XML schema describes the features and constraints of RSML, and open-source packages have been developed in several languages (R, Excel, Java, Python, and C#) to enable researchers to integrate RSML files into popular research workflow. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. TMATS/ IHAL/ DDML Schema Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-01

    task was to create a method for performing IRIG eXtensible Markup Language (XML) schema validation. As opposed to XML instance document validation...TMATS / IHAL / DDML Schema Validation, RCC 126-17, February 2017 vii Acronyms DDML Data Display Markup Language HUD heads-up display iNET...system XML eXtensible Markup Language TMATS / IHAL / DDML Schema Validation, RCC 126-17, February 2017 viii This page intentionally left blank

  2. HGML: a hypertext guideline markup language.

    PubMed Central

    Hagerty, C. G.; Pickens, D.; Kulikowski, C.; Sonnenberg, F.

    2000-01-01

    Existing text-based clinical practice guidelines can be difficult to put into practice. While a growing number of such documents have gained acceptance in the medical community and contain a wealth of valuable information, the time required to digest them is substantial. Yet the expressive power, subtlety and flexibility of natural language pose challenges when designing computer tools that will help in their application. At the same time, formal computer languages typically lack such expressiveness and the effort required to translate existing documents into these languages may be costly. We propose a method based on the mark-up concept for converting text-based clinical guidelines into a machine-operable form. This allows existing guidelines to be manipulated by machine, and viewed in different formats at various levels of detail according to the needs of the practitioner, while preserving their originally published form. PMID:11079898

  3. Bioinformatics data distribution and integration via Web Services and XML.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Yizheng

    2003-11-01

    It is widely recognized that exchange, distribution, and integration of biological data are the keys to improve bioinformatics and genome biology in post-genomic era. However, the problem of exchanging and integrating biology data is not solved satisfactorily. The eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is rapidly spreading as an emerging standard for structuring documents to exchange and integrate data on the World Wide Web (WWW). Web service is the next generation of WWW and is founded upon the open standards of W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) and IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force). This paper presents XML and Web Services technologies and their use for an appropriate solution to the problem of bioinformatics data exchange and integration.

  4. Semantic Markup for Literary Scholars: How Descriptive Markup Affects the Study and Teaching of Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, D. Grant

    2002-01-01

    Describes a qualitative study which investigated the attitudes of literary scholars towards the features of semantic markup for primary texts in XML format. Suggests that layout is a vital part of the reading process which implies that the standardization of DTDs (Document Type Definitions) should extend to styling as well. (Author/LRW)

  5. Chemical markup, XML and the World-Wide Web. 3. Toward a signed semantic chemical web of trust.

    PubMed

    Gkoutos, G V; Murray-Rust, P; Rzepa, H S; Wright, M

    2001-01-01

    We describe how a collection of documents expressed in XML-conforming languages such as CML and XHTML can be authenticated and validated against digital signatures which make use of established X.509 certificate technology. These can be associated either with specific nodes in the XML document or with the entire document. We illustrate this with two examples. An entire journal article expressed in XML has its individual components digitally signed by separate authors, and the collection is placed in an envelope and again signed. The second example involves using a software robot agent to acquire a collection of documents from a specified URL, to perform various operations and transformations on the content, including expressing molecules in CML, and to automatically sign the various components and deposit the result in a repository. We argue that these operations can used as components for building what we term an authenticated and semantic chemical web of trust.

  6. Root System Markup Language: Toward a Unified Root Architecture Description Language1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pound, Michael P.; Pradal, Christophe; Draye, Xavier; Godin, Christophe; Leitner, Daniel; Meunier, Félicien; Pridmore, Tony P.; Schnepf, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The number of image analysis tools supporting the extraction of architectural features of root systems has increased in recent years. These tools offer a handy set of complementary facilities, yet it is widely accepted that none of these software tools is able to extract in an efficient way the growing array of static and dynamic features for different types of images and species. We describe the Root System Markup Language (RSML), which has been designed to overcome two major challenges: (1) to enable portability of root architecture data between different software tools in an easy and interoperable manner, allowing seamless collaborative work; and (2) to provide a standard format upon which to base central repositories that will soon arise following the expanding worldwide root phenotyping effort. RSML follows the XML standard to store two- or three-dimensional image metadata, plant and root properties and geometries, continuous functions along individual root paths, and a suite of annotations at the image, plant, or root scale at one or several time points. Plant ontologies are used to describe botanical entities that are relevant at the scale of root system architecture. An XML schema describes the features and constraints of RSML, and open-source packages have been developed in several languages (R, Excel, Java, Python, and C#) to enable researchers to integrate RSML files into popular research workflow. PMID:25614065

  7. XML Based Scientific Data Management Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Piyush; Zubair, M.; Ziebartt, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The World Wide Web consortium has developed an Extensible Markup Language (XML) to support the building of better information management infrastructures. The scientific computing community realizing the benefits of HTML has designed markup languages for scientific data. In this paper, we propose a XML based scientific data management facility, XDMF. The project is motivated by the fact that even though a lot of scientific data is being generated, it is not being shared because of lack of standards and infrastructure support for discovering and transforming the data. The proposed data management facility can be used to discover the scientific data itself, the transformation functions, and also for applying the required transformations. We have built a prototype system of the proposed data management facility that can work on different platforms. We have implemented the system using Java, and Apache XSLT engine Xalan. To support remote data and transformation functions, we had to extend the XSLT specification and the Xalan package.

  8. 106-17 Telemetry Standards Metadata Configuration Chapter 23

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-07-01

    23-1 23.2 Metadata Description Language ...Chapter 23, July 2017 iii Acronyms HTML Hypertext Markup Language MDL Metadata Description Language PCM pulse code modulation TMATS Telemetry...Attributes Transfer Standard W3C World Wide Web Consortium XML eXtensible Markup Language XSD XML schema document Telemetry Network Standard

  9. Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML): an open format for representing quantitative biological dynamics data

    PubMed Central

    Kyoda, Koji; Tohsato, Yukako; Ho, Kenneth H. L.; Onami, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Recent progress in live-cell imaging and modeling techniques has resulted in generation of a large amount of quantitative data (from experimental measurements and computer simulations) on spatiotemporal dynamics of biological objects such as molecules, cells and organisms. Although many research groups have independently dedicated their efforts to developing software tools for visualizing and analyzing these data, these tools are often not compatible with each other because of different data formats. Results: We developed an open unified format, Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML; current version: 0.2), which provides a basic framework for representing quantitative biological dynamics data for objects ranging from molecules to cells to organisms. BDML is based on Extensible Markup Language (XML). Its advantages are machine and human readability and extensibility. BDML will improve the efficiency of development and evaluation of software tools for data visualization and analysis. Availability and implementation: A specification and a schema file for BDML are freely available online at http://ssbd.qbic.riken.jp/bdml/. Contact: sonami@riken.jp Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25414366

  10. Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML): an open format for representing quantitative biological dynamics data.

    PubMed

    Kyoda, Koji; Tohsato, Yukako; Ho, Kenneth H L; Onami, Shuichi

    2015-04-01

    Recent progress in live-cell imaging and modeling techniques has resulted in generation of a large amount of quantitative data (from experimental measurements and computer simulations) on spatiotemporal dynamics of biological objects such as molecules, cells and organisms. Although many research groups have independently dedicated their efforts to developing software tools for visualizing and analyzing these data, these tools are often not compatible with each other because of different data formats. We developed an open unified format, Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML; current version: 0.2), which provides a basic framework for representing quantitative biological dynamics data for objects ranging from molecules to cells to organisms. BDML is based on Extensible Markup Language (XML). Its advantages are machine and human readability and extensibility. BDML will improve the efficiency of development and evaluation of software tools for data visualization and analysis. A specification and a schema file for BDML are freely available online at http://ssbd.qbic.riken.jp/bdml/. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. Answer Markup Algorithms for Southeast Asian Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, George M.

    1991-01-01

    Typical markup methods for providing feedback to foreign language learners are not applicable to languages not written in a strictly linear fashion. A modification of Hart's edit markup software is described, along with a second variation based on a simple edit distance algorithm adapted to a general Southeast Asian font system. (10 references)…

  12. Experimental Applications of Automatic Test Markup Language (ATML)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansdowne, Chatwin A.; McCartney, Patrick; Gorringe, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe challenging use-cases for Automatic Test Markup Language (ATML), and evaluate solutions. The first case uses ATML Test Results to deliver active features to support test procedure development and test flow, and bridging mixed software development environments. The second case examines adding attributes to Systems Modelling Language (SysML) to create a linkage for deriving information from a model to fill in an ATML document set. Both cases are outside the original concept of operations for ATML but are typical when integrating large heterogeneous systems with modular contributions from multiple disciplines.

  13. Converting from XML to HDF-EOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullman, Richard; Bane, Bob; Yang, Jingli

    2008-01-01

    A computer program recreates an HDF-EOS file from an Extensible Markup Language (XML) representation of the contents of that file. This program is one of two programs written to enable testing of the schemas described in the immediately preceding article to determine whether the schemas capture all details of HDF-EOS files.

  14. cluML: A markup language for clustering and cluster validity assessment of microarray data.

    PubMed

    Bolshakova, Nadia; Cunningham, Pádraig

    2005-01-01

    cluML is a new markup language for microarray data clustering and cluster validity assessment. The XML-based format has been designed to address some of the limitations observed in traditional formats, such as inability to store multiple clustering (including biclustering) and validation results within a dataset. cluML is an effective tool to support biomedical knowledge representation in gene expression data analysis. Although cluML was developed for DNA microarray analysis applications, it can be effectively used for the representation of clustering and for the validation of other biomedical and physical data that has no limitations.

  15. Standard Generalized Markup Language for self-defining structured reports.

    PubMed

    Kahn, C E

    1999-01-01

    Structured reporting is the process of using standardized data elements and predetermined data-entry formats to record observations. The Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML; International Standards Organization (ISO) 8879:1986)--an open, internationally accepted standard for document interchange was used to encode medical observations acquired in an Internet-based structured reporting system. The resulting report is self-documenting: it includes a definition of its allowable data fields and values encoded as a report-specific SGML document type definition (DTD). The data-entry forms, DTD, and report document instances are based on report specifications written in a simple, SGML-based language designed for that purpose. Reporting concepts can be linked with those of external vocabularies such as the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus. The use of open standards such as SGML is an important step in the creation of open, universally comprehensible structured reports.

  16. Evaluating the Informative Quality of Documents in SGML Format from Judgements by Means of Fuzzy Linguistic Techniques Based on Computing with Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera-Viedma, Enrique; Peis, Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    Presents a fuzzy evaluation method of SGML documents based on computing with words. Topics include filtering the amount of information available on the Web to assist users in their search processes; document type definitions; linguistic modeling; user-system interaction; and use with XML and other markup languages. (Author/LRW)

  17. The XML approach to implementing space link extension service management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, W.; Welz, G. A.; Theis, G.; Yamada, T.

    2001-01-01

    A feasibility study has been conducted at JPL, ESOC, and ISAS to assess the possible applications of the eXtensible Mark-up Language (XML) capabilities to the implementation of the CCSDS Space Link Extension (SLE) Service Management function.

  18. Towards health care process description framework: an XML DTD design.

    PubMed Central

    Staccini, P.; Joubert, M.; Quaranta, J. F.; Aymard, S.; Fieschi, D.; Fieschi, M.

    2001-01-01

    The development of health care and hospital information systems has to meet users needs as well as requirements such as the tracking of all care activities and the support of quality improvement. The use of process-oriented analysis is of-value to provide analysts with: (i) a systematic description of activities; (ii) the elicitation of the useful data to perform and record care tasks; (iii) the selection of relevant decision-making support. But paper-based tools are not a very suitable way to manage and share the documentation produced during this step. The purpose of this work is to propose a method to implement the results of process analysis according to XML techniques (eXtensible Markup Language). It is based on the IDEF0 activity modeling language (Integration DEfinition for Function modeling). A hierarchical description of a process and its components has been defined through a flat XML file with a grammar of proper metadata tags. Perspectives of this method are discussed. PMID:11825265

  19. Shuttle-Data-Tape XML Translator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Osborne, Richard N.

    2005-01-01

    JSDTImport is a computer program for translating native Shuttle Data Tape (SDT) files from American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) format into databases in other formats. JSDTImport solves the problem of organizing the SDT content, affording flexibility to enable users to choose how to store the information in a database to better support client and server applications. JSDTImport can be dynamically configured by use of a simple Extensible Markup Language (XML) file. JSDTImport uses this XML file to define how each record and field will be parsed, its layout and definition, and how the resulting database will be structured. JSDTImport also includes a client application programming interface (API) layer that provides abstraction for the data-querying process. The API enables a user to specify the search criteria to apply in gathering all the data relevant to a query. The API can be used to organize the SDT content and translate into a native XML database. The XML format is structured into efficient sections, enabling excellent query performance by use of the XPath query language. Optionally, the content can be translated into a Structured Query Language (SQL) database for fast, reliable SQL queries on standard database server computers.

  20. Producing a Data Dictionary from an Extensible Markup Language (XML) Schemain the Global Force Management Data Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-01

    entity relationship (diagram) EwID Enterprise-wide Identifier FMID Force Management Identifier GFM Global Force Management HTML Hypertext Markup Language... Management Data Initiative by Frederick S Brundick Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOTICES Disclaimers The findings in this report...Schema in the Global Force Management Data Initiative by Frederick S Brundick Computing and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL Approved for public

  1. CytometryML: a markup language for analytical cytology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.; Leif, Stephanie H.; Leif, Suzanne B.

    2003-06-01

    Cytometry Markup Language, CytometryML, is a proposed new analytical cytology data standard. CytometryML is a set of XML schemas for encoding both flow cytometry and digital microscopy text based data types. CytometryML schemas reference both DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) codes and FCS keywords. These schemas provide representations for the keywords in FCS 3.0 and will soon include DICOM microscopic image data. Flow Cytometry Standard (FCS) list-mode has been mapped to the DICOM Waveform Information Object. A preliminary version of a list mode binary data type, which does not presently exist in DICOM, has been designed. This binary type is required to enhance the storage and transmission of flow cytometry and digital microscopy data. Index files based on Waveform indices will be used to rapidly locate the cells present in individual subsets. DICOM has the advantage of employing standard file types, TIF and JPEG, for Digital Microscopy. Using an XML schema based representation means that standard commercial software packages such as Excel and MathCad can be used to analyze, display, and store analytical cytometry data. Furthermore, by providing one standard for both DICOM data and analytical cytology data, it eliminates the need to create and maintain special purpose interfaces for analytical cytology data thereby integrating the data into the larger DICOM and other clinical communities. A draft version of CytometryML is available at www.newportinstruments.com.

  2. Rock.XML - Towards a library of rock physics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Erling Hugo; Hauge, Ragnar; Ulvmoen, Marit; Johansen, Tor Arne; Drottning, Åsmund

    2016-08-01

    Rock physics modelling provides tools for correlating physical properties of rocks and their constituents to the geophysical observations we measure on a larger scale. Many different theoretical and empirical models exist, to cover the range of different types of rocks. However, upon reviewing these, we see that they are all built around a few main concepts. Based on this observation, we propose a format for digitally storing the specifications for rock physics models which we have named Rock.XML. It does not only contain data about the various constituents, but also the theories and how they are used to combine these building blocks to make a representative model for a particular rock. The format is based on the Extensible Markup Language XML, making it flexible enough to handle complex models as well as scalable towards extending it with new theories and models. This technology has great advantages as far as documenting and exchanging models in an unambiguous way between people and between software. Rock.XML can become a platform for creating a library of rock physics models; making them more accessible to everyone.

  3. WITH: a system to write clinical trials using XML and RDBMS.

    PubMed Central

    Fazi, Paola; Luzi, Daniela; Manco, Mariarosaria; Ricci, Fabrizio L.; Toffoli, Giovanni; Vignetti, Marco

    2002-01-01

    The paper illustrates the system WITH (Write on Internet clinical Trials in Haematology) which supports the writing of a clinical trial (CT) document. The requirements of this system have been defined analysing the writing process of a CT and then modelling the content of its sections together with their logical and temporal relationships. The system WITH allows: a) editing the document text; b) re-using the text; and c) facilitating the cooperation and the collaborative writing. It is based on XML mark-up language, and on a RDBMS. This choice guarantees: a) process standardisation; b) process management; c) efficient delivery of information-based tasks; and d) explicit focus on process design. PMID:12463823

  4. FuGEFlow: data model and markup language for flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yu; Tchuvatkina, Olga; Spidlen, Josef; Wilkinson, Peter; Gasparetto, Maura; Jones, Andrew R; Manion, Frank J; Scheuermann, Richard H; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Brinkman, Ryan R

    2009-06-16

    Flow cytometry technology is widely used in both health care and research. The rapid expansion of flow cytometry applications has outpaced the development of data storage and analysis tools. Collaborative efforts being taken to eliminate this gap include building common vocabularies and ontologies, designing generic data models, and defining data exchange formats. The Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt) standard was recently adopted by the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. This standard guides researchers on the information that should be included in peer reviewed publications, but it is insufficient for data exchange and integration between computational systems. The Functional Genomics Experiment (FuGE) formalizes common aspects of comprehensive and high throughput experiments across different biological technologies. We have extended FuGE object model to accommodate flow cytometry data and metadata. We used the MagicDraw modelling tool to design a UML model (Flow-OM) according to the FuGE extension guidelines and the AndroMDA toolkit to transform the model to a markup language (Flow-ML). We mapped each MIFlowCyt term to either an existing FuGE class or to a new FuGEFlow class. The development environment was validated by comparing the official FuGE XSD to the schema we generated from the FuGE object model using our configuration. After the Flow-OM model was completed, the final version of the Flow-ML was generated and validated against an example MIFlowCyt compliant experiment description. The extension of FuGE for flow cytometry has resulted in a generic FuGE-compliant data model (FuGEFlow), which accommodates and links together all information required by MIFlowCyt. The FuGEFlow model can be used to build software and databases using FuGE software toolkits to facilitate automated exchange and manipulation of potentially large flow cytometry experimental data sets. Additional project documentation, including

  5. FuGEFlow: data model and markup language for flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yu; Tchuvatkina, Olga; Spidlen, Josef; Wilkinson, Peter; Gasparetto, Maura; Jones, Andrew R; Manion, Frank J; Scheuermann, Richard H; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Brinkman, Ryan R

    2009-01-01

    documentation, including reusable design patterns and a guide for setting up a development environment, was contributed back to the FuGE project. Conclusion We have shown that an extension of FuGE can be used to transform minimum information requirements in natural language to markup language in XML. Extending FuGE required significant effort, but in our experiences the benefits outweighed the costs. The FuGEFlow is expected to play a central role in describing flow cytometry experiments and ultimately facilitating data exchange including public flow cytometry repositories currently under development. PMID:19531228

  6. The tissue microarray data exchange specification: A document type definition to validate and enhance XML data

    PubMed Central

    Nohle, David G; Ayers, Leona W

    2005-01-01

    Background The Association for Pathology Informatics (API) Extensible Mark-up Language (XML) TMA Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES) proposed in April 2003 provides a community-based, open source tool for sharing tissue microarray (TMA) data in a common format. Each tissue core within an array has separate data including digital images; therefore an organized, common approach to produce, navigate and publish such data facilitates viewing, sharing and merging TMA data from different laboratories. The AIDS and Cancer Specimen Resource (ACSR) is a HIV/AIDS tissue bank consortium sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD). The ACSR offers HIV-related malignancies and uninfected control tissues in microarrays (TMA) accompanied by de-identified clinical data to approved researchers. Exporting our TMA data into the proposed API specified format offers an opportunity to evaluate the API specification in an applied setting and to explore its usefulness. Results A document type definition (DTD) that governs the allowed common data elements (CDE) in TMA DES export XML files was written, tested and evolved and is in routine use by the ACSR. This DTD defines TMA DES CDEs which are implemented in an external file that can be supplemented by internal DTD extensions for locally defined TMA data elements (LDE). Conclusion ACSR implementation of the TMA DES demonstrated the utility of the specification and allowed application of a DTD to validate the language of the API specified XML elements and to identify possible enhancements within our TMA data management application. Improvements to the specification have additionally been suggested by our experience in importing other institution's exported TMA data. Enhancements to TMA DES to remove ambiguous situations and clarify the data should be considered. Better specified identifiers and hierarchical relationships will make automatic use of the data possible. Our tool can be

  7. Representing nested semantic information in a linear string of text using XML.

    PubMed

    Krauthammer, Michael; Johnson, Stephen B; Hripcsak, George; Campbell, David A; Friedman, Carol

    2002-01-01

    XML has been widely adopted as an important data interchange language. The structure of XML enables sharing of data elements with variable degrees of nesting as long as the elements are grouped in a strict tree-like fashion. This requirement potentially restricts the usefulness of XML for marking up written text, which often includes features that do not properly nest within other features. We encountered this problem while marking up medical text with structured semantic information from a Natural Language Processor. Traditional approaches to this problem separate the structured information from the actual text mark up. This paper introduces an alternative solution, which tightly integrates the semantic structure with the text. The resulting XML markup preserves the linearity of the medical texts and can therefore be easily expanded with additional types of information.

  8. Representing nested semantic information in a linear string of text using XML.

    PubMed Central

    Krauthammer, Michael; Johnson, Stephen B.; Hripcsak, George; Campbell, David A.; Friedman, Carol

    2002-01-01

    XML has been widely adopted as an important data interchange language. The structure of XML enables sharing of data elements with variable degrees of nesting as long as the elements are grouped in a strict tree-like fashion. This requirement potentially restricts the usefulness of XML for marking up written text, which often includes features that do not properly nest within other features. We encountered this problem while marking up medical text with structured semantic information from a Natural Language Processor. Traditional approaches to this problem separate the structured information from the actual text mark up. This paper introduces an alternative solution, which tightly integrates the semantic structure with the text. The resulting XML markup preserves the linearity of the medical texts and can therefore be easily expanded with additional types of information. PMID:12463856

  9. Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML) Level 1 Version 3 (L1V3).

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Frank T; Cooper, Jonathan; König, Matthias; Moraru, Ion; Nickerson, David; Le Novère, Nicolas; Olivier, Brett G; Sahle, Sven; Smith, Lucian; Waltemath, Dagmar

    2018-03-19

    The creation of computational simulation experiments to inform modern biological research poses challenges to reproduce, annotate, archive, and share such experiments. Efforts such as SBML or CellML standardize the formal representation of computational models in various areas of biology. The Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML) describes what procedures the models are subjected to, and the details of those procedures. These standards, together with further COMBINE standards, describe models sufficiently well for the reproduction of simulation studies among users and software tools. The Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML) is an XML-based format that encodes, for a given simulation experiment, (i) which models to use; (ii) which modifications to apply to models before simulation; (iii) which simulation procedures to run on each model; (iv) how to post-process the data; and (v) how these results should be plotted and reported. SED-ML Level 1 Version 1 (L1V1) implemented support for the encoding of basic time course simulations. SED-ML L1V2 added support for more complex types of simulations, specifically repeated tasks and chained simulation procedures. SED-ML L1V3 extends L1V2 by means to describe which datasets and subsets thereof to use within a simulation experiment.

  10. Clustering XML Documents Using Frequent Subtrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutty, Sangeetha; Tran, Tien; Nayak, Richi; Li, Yuefeng

    This paper presents an experimental study conducted over the INEX 2008 Document Mining Challenge corpus using both the structure and the content of XML documents for clustering them. The concise common substructures known as the closed frequent subtrees are generated using the structural information of the XML documents. The closed frequent subtrees are then used to extract the constrained content from the documents. A matrix containing the term distribution of the documents in the dataset is developed using the extracted constrained content. The k-way clustering algorithm is applied to the matrix to obtain the required clusters. In spite of the large number of documents in the INEX 2008 Wikipedia dataset, the proposed frequent subtree-based clustering approach was successful in clustering the documents. This approach significantly reduces the dimensionality of the terms used for clustering without much loss in accuracy.

  11. XML technologies for the Omaha System: a data model, a Java tool and several case studies supporting home healthcare.

    PubMed

    Vittorini, Pierpaolo; Tarquinio, Antonietta; di Orio, Ferdinando

    2009-03-01

    The eXtensible markup language (XML) is a metalanguage which is useful to represent and exchange data between heterogeneous systems. XML may enable healthcare practitioners to document, monitor, evaluate, and archive medical information and services into distributed computer environments. Therefore, the most recent proposals on electronic health records (EHRs) are usually based on XML documents. Since none of the existing nomenclatures were specifically developed for use in automated clinical information systems, but were adapted to such use, numerous current EHRs are organized as a sequence of events, each represented through codes taken from international classification systems. In nursing, a hierarchically organized problem-solving approach is followed, which hardly couples with the sequential organization of such EHRs. Therefore, the paper presents an XML data model for the Omaha System taxonomy, which is one of the most important international nomenclatures used in the home healthcare nursing context. Such a data model represents the formal definition of EHRs specifically developed for nursing practice. Furthermore, the paper delineates a Java application prototype which is able to manage such documents, shows the possibility to transform such documents into readable web pages, and reports several case studies, one currently managed by the home care service of a Health Center in Central Italy.

  12. Chemical Markup, XML, and the World Wide Web. 7. CMLSpect, an XML vocabulary for spectral data.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Stefan; Helmus, Tobias; Lancashire, Robert J; Murray-Rust, Peter; Rzepa, Henry S; Steinbeck, Christoph; Willighagen, Egon L

    2007-01-01

    CMLSpect is an extension of Chemical Markup Language (CML) for managing spectral and other analytical data. It is designed to be flexible enough to contain a wide variety of spectral data. The paper describes the CMLElements used and gives practical examples for common types of spectra. In addition it demonstrates how different views of the data can be expressed and what problems still exist.

  13. Histoimmunogenetics Markup Language 1.0: Reporting next generation sequencing-based HLA and KIR genotyping.

    PubMed

    Milius, Robert P; Heuer, Michael; Valiga, Daniel; Doroschak, Kathryn J; Kennedy, Caleb J; Bolon, Yung-Tsi; Schneider, Joel; Pollack, Jane; Kim, Hwa Ran; Cereb, Nezih; Hollenbach, Jill A; Mack, Steven J; Maiers, Martin

    2015-12-01

    We present an electronic format for exchanging data for HLA and KIR genotyping with extensions for next-generation sequencing (NGS). This format addresses NGS data exchange by refining the Histoimmunogenetics Markup Language (HML) to conform to the proposed Minimum Information for Reporting Immunogenomic NGS Genotyping (MIRING) reporting guidelines (miring.immunogenomics.org). Our refinements of HML include two major additions. First, NGS is supported by new XML structures to capture additional NGS data and metadata required to produce a genotyping result, including analysis-dependent (dynamic) and method-dependent (static) components. A full genotype, consensus sequence, and the surrounding metadata are included directly, while the raw sequence reads and platform documentation are externally referenced. Second, genotype ambiguity is fully represented by integrating Genotype List Strings, which use a hierarchical set of delimiters to represent allele and genotype ambiguity in a complete and accurate fashion. HML also continues to enable the transmission of legacy methods (e.g. site-specific oligonucleotide, sequence-specific priming, and Sequence Based Typing (SBT)), adding features such as allowing multiple group-specific sequencing primers, and fully leveraging techniques that combine multiple methods to obtain a single result, such as SBT integrated with NGS. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of Markup Language for Medical Record Charting: A Charting Language.

    PubMed

    Jung, Won-Mo; Chae, Younbyoung; Jang, Bo-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays a lot of trials for collecting electronic medical records (EMRs) exist. However, structuring data format for EMR is an especially labour-intensive task for practitioners. Here we propose a new mark-up language for medical record charting (called Charting Language), which borrows useful properties from programming languages. Thus, with Charting Language, the text data described in dynamic situation can be easily used to extract information.

  15. Standardized Semantic Markup for Reference Terminologies, Thesauri and Coding Systems: Benefits for distributed E-Health Applications.

    PubMed

    Hoelzer, Simon; Schweiger, Ralf K; Liu, Raymond; Rudolf, Dirk; Rieger, Joerg; Dudeck, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    With the introduction of the ICD-10 as the standard for diagnosis, the development of an electronic representation of its complete content, inherent semantics and coding rules is necessary. Our concept refers to current efforts of the CEN/TC 251 to establish a European standard for hierarchical classification systems in healthcare. We have developed an electronic representation of the ICD-10 with the extensible Markup Language (XML) that facilitates the integration in current information systems or coding software taking into account different languages and versions. In this context, XML offers a complete framework of related technologies and standard tools for processing that helps to develop interoperable applications.

  16. An Expressive and Efficient Language for XML Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinenyanga, Taurai Tapiwa; Kushmerick, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    Discusses XML and information retrieval and describes a query language, ELIXIR (expressive and efficient language for XML information retrieval), with a textual similarity operator that can be used for similarity joins. Explains the algorithm for answering ELIXIR queries to generate intermediate relational data. (Author/LRW)

  17. A distributed computing system for magnetic resonance imaging: Java-based processing and binding of XML.

    PubMed

    de Beer, R; Graveron-Demilly, D; Nastase, S; van Ormondt, D

    2004-03-01

    Recently we have developed a Java-based heterogeneous distributed computing system for the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is a software system for embedding the various image reconstruction algorithms that we have created for handling MRI data sets with sparse sampling distributions. Since these data sets may result from multi-dimensional MRI measurements our system has to control the storage and manipulation of large amounts of data. In this paper we describe how we have employed the extensible markup language (XML) to realize this data handling in a highly structured way. To that end we have used Java packages, recently released by Sun Microsystems, to process XML documents and to compile pieces of XML code into Java classes. We have effectuated a flexible storage and manipulation approach for all kinds of data within the MRI system, such as data describing and containing multi-dimensional MRI measurements, data configuring image reconstruction methods and data representing and visualizing the various services of the system. We have found that the object-oriented approach, possible with the Java programming environment, combined with the XML technology is a convenient way of describing and handling various data streams in heterogeneous distributed computing systems.

  18. XML, Ontologies, and Their Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunjiang; Shen, Bairong

    2016-01-01

    The development of information technology has resulted in its penetration into every area of clinical research. Various clinical systems have been developed, which produce increasing volumes of clinical data. However, saving, exchanging, querying, and exploiting these data are challenging issues. The development of Extensible Markup Language (XML) has allowed the generation of flexible information formats to facilitate the electronic sharing of structured data via networks, and it has been used widely for clinical data processing. In particular, XML is very useful in the fields of data standardization, data exchange, and data integration. Moreover, ontologies have been attracting increased attention in various clinical fields in recent years. An ontology is the basic level of a knowledge representation scheme, and various ontology repositories have been developed, such as Gene Ontology and BioPortal. The creation of these standardized repositories greatly facilitates clinical research in related fields. In this chapter, we discuss the basic concepts of XML and ontologies, as well as their clinical applications.

  19. SGML-Based Markup for Literary Texts: Two Problems and Some Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, David; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Identifies the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) as the best basis for a markup standard for encoding literary texts. Outlines solutions to problems using SGML and discusses the problem of maintaining multiple views of a document. Examines several ways of reducing the burden of markups. (GEA)

  20. Speed up of XML parsers with PHP language implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Bozhidar; Georgieva, Adriana

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, authors introduce PHP5's XML implementation and show how to read, parse, and write a short and uncomplicated XML file using Simple XML in a PHP environment. The possibilities for mutual work of PHP5 language and XML standard are described. The details of parsing process with Simple XML are also cleared. A practical project PHP-XML-MySQL presents the advantages of XML implementation in PHP modules. This approach allows comparatively simple search of XML hierarchical data by means of PHP software tools. The proposed project includes database, which can be extended with new data and new XML parsing functions.

  1. Reproducible computational biology experiments with SED-ML - The Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The increasing use of computational simulation experiments to inform modern biological research creates new challenges to annotate, archive, share and reproduce such experiments. The recently published Minimum Information About a Simulation Experiment (MIASE) proposes a minimal set of information that should be provided to allow the reproduction of simulation experiments among users and software tools. Results In this article, we present the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML). SED-ML encodes in a computer-readable exchange format the information required by MIASE to enable reproduction of simulation experiments. It has been developed as a community project and it is defined in a detailed technical specification and additionally provides an XML schema. The version of SED-ML described in this publication is Level 1 Version 1. It covers the description of the most frequent type of simulation experiments in the area, namely time course simulations. SED-ML documents specify which models to use in an experiment, modifications to apply on the models before using them, which simulation procedures to run on each model, what analysis results to output, and how the results should be presented. These descriptions are independent of the underlying model implementation. SED-ML is a software-independent format for encoding the description of simulation experiments; it is not specific to particular simulation tools. Here, we demonstrate that with the growing software support for SED-ML we can effectively exchange executable simulation descriptions. Conclusions With SED-ML, software can exchange simulation experiment descriptions, enabling the validation and reuse of simulation experiments in different tools. Authors of papers reporting simulation experiments can make their simulation protocols available for other scientists to reproduce the results. Because SED-ML is agnostic about exact modeling language(s) used, experiments covering models from

  2. Reproducible computational biology experiments with SED-ML--the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language.

    PubMed

    Waltemath, Dagmar; Adams, Richard; Bergmann, Frank T; Hucka, Michael; Kolpakov, Fedor; Miller, Andrew K; Moraru, Ion I; Nickerson, David; Sahle, Sven; Snoep, Jacky L; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    The increasing use of computational simulation experiments to inform modern biological research creates new challenges to annotate, archive, share and reproduce such experiments. The recently published Minimum Information About a Simulation Experiment (MIASE) proposes a minimal set of information that should be provided to allow the reproduction of simulation experiments among users and software tools. In this article, we present the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML). SED-ML encodes in a computer-readable exchange format the information required by MIASE to enable reproduction of simulation experiments. It has been developed as a community project and it is defined in a detailed technical specification and additionally provides an XML schema. The version of SED-ML described in this publication is Level 1 Version 1. It covers the description of the most frequent type of simulation experiments in the area, namely time course simulations. SED-ML documents specify which models to use in an experiment, modifications to apply on the models before using them, which simulation procedures to run on each model, what analysis results to output, and how the results should be presented. These descriptions are independent of the underlying model implementation. SED-ML is a software-independent format for encoding the description of simulation experiments; it is not specific to particular simulation tools. Here, we demonstrate that with the growing software support for SED-ML we can effectively exchange executable simulation descriptions. With SED-ML, software can exchange simulation experiment descriptions, enabling the validation and reuse of simulation experiments in different tools. Authors of papers reporting simulation experiments can make their simulation protocols available for other scientists to reproduce the results. Because SED-ML is agnostic about exact modeling language(s) used, experiments covering models from different fields of research

  3. QuakeML - An XML Schema for Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyss, A.; Schorlemmer, D.; Maraini, S.; Baer, M.; Wiemer, S.

    2004-12-01

    We propose an extensible format-definition for seismic data (QuakeML). Sharing data and seismic information efficiently is one of the most important issues for research and observational seismology in the future. The eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is playing an increasingly important role in the exchange of a variety of data. Due to its extensible definition capabilities, its wide acceptance and the existing large number of utilities and libraries for XML, a structured representation of various types of seismological data should in our opinion be developed by defining a 'QuakeML' standard. Here we present the QuakeML definitions for parameter databases and further efforts, e.g. a central QuakeML catalog database and a web portal for exchanging codes and stylesheets.

  4. The National Cancer Informatics Program (NCIP) Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) Foundation model.

    PubMed

    Mongkolwat, Pattanasak; Kleper, Vladimir; Talbot, Skip; Rubin, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge contained within in vivo imaging annotated by human experts or computer programs is typically stored as unstructured text and separated from other associated information. The National Cancer Informatics Program (NCIP) Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) Foundation information model is an evolution of the National Institute of Health's (NIH) National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Cancer Bioinformatics Grid (caBIG®) AIM model. The model applies to various image types created by various techniques and disciplines. It has evolved in response to the feedback and changing demands from the imaging community at NCI. The foundation model serves as a base for other imaging disciplines that want to extend the type of information the model collects. The model captures physical entities and their characteristics, imaging observation entities and their characteristics, markups (two- and three-dimensional), AIM statements, calculations, image source, inferences, annotation role, task context or workflow, audit trail, AIM creator details, equipment used to create AIM instances, subject demographics, and adjudication observations. An AIM instance can be stored as a Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) structured reporting (SR) object or Extensible Markup Language (XML) document for further processing and analysis. An AIM instance consists of one or more annotations and associated markups of a single finding along with other ancillary information in the AIM model. An annotation describes information about the meaning of pixel data in an image. A markup is a graphical drawing placed on the image that depicts a region of interest. This paper describes fundamental AIM concepts and how to use and extend AIM for various imaging disciplines.

  5. Utilizing the Structure and Content Information for XML Document Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Tien; Kutty, Sangeetha; Nayak, Richi

    This paper reports on the experiments and results of a clustering approach used in the INEX 2008 document mining challenge. The clustering approach utilizes both the structure and content information of the Wikipedia XML document collection. A latent semantic kernel (LSK) is used to measure the semantic similarity between XML documents based on their content features. The construction of a latent semantic kernel involves the computing of singular vector decomposition (SVD). On a large feature space matrix, the computation of SVD is very expensive in terms of time and memory requirements. Thus in this clustering approach, the dimension of the document space of a term-document matrix is reduced before performing SVD. The document space reduction is based on the common structural information of the Wikipedia XML document collection. The proposed clustering approach has shown to be effective on the Wikipedia collection in the INEX 2008 document mining challenge.

  6. Semantically Interoperable XML Data

    PubMed Central

    Vergara-Niedermayr, Cristobal; Wang, Fusheng; Pan, Tony; Kurc, Tahsin; Saltz, Joel

    2013-01-01

    XML is ubiquitously used as an information exchange platform for web-based applications in healthcare, life sciences, and many other domains. Proliferating XML data are now managed through latest native XML database technologies. XML data sources conforming to common XML schemas could be shared and integrated with syntactic interoperability. Semantic interoperability can be achieved through semantic annotations of data models using common data elements linked to concepts from ontologies. In this paper, we present a framework and software system to support the development of semantic interoperable XML based data sources that can be shared through a Grid infrastructure. We also present our work on supporting semantic validated XML data through semantic annotations for XML Schema, semantic validation and semantic authoring of XML data. We demonstrate the use of the system for a biomedical database of medical image annotations and markups. PMID:25298789

  7. Two-dimensional electrophoretic profiling of normal human kidney glomerulus proteome and construction of an extensible markup language (XML)-based database.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Kenji; Kamiie, Junichi; Sato, Masao; Okuizumi, Seiji; Kenmochi, Akihisa; Kamijo, Ken'ichi; Nabetani, Takuji; Tsugita, Akira; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Ying; Yaoita, Eishin; Osawa, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2005-03-01

    To contribute to physiology and pathophysiology of the glomerulus of human kidney, we have launched a proteomic study of human glomerulus, and compiled a profile of proteins expressed in the glomerulus of normal human kidney by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and identification with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and/or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Kidney cortices with normal appearance were obtained from patients under surgical nephrectomy due to renal tumor, and glomeruli were highly purified by a standard sieving method followed by picking-up under a phase-contrast microscope. The glomerular proteins were separated by 2-DE with 24 cm immobilized pH gradient strips in the 3-10 range in the first dimension and 26 x 20 cm sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels of 12.5% in the second dimension. Gels were silver-stained, and valid spots were processed for identification through an integrated robotic system that consisted of a spot picker, an in-gel digester, and a MALDI-TOF MS and / or a LC-MS/MS. From 2-DE gel images of glomeruli of four subjects with no apparent pathologic manifestations, a synthetic gel image of normal glomerular proteins was created. The synthetic gel image contained 1713 valid spots, of which 1559 spots were commonly observed in the respective 2-DE gels. Among the 1559 spots, 347 protein spots, representing 212 proteins, have so far been identified, and used for the construction of an extensible markup language (XML)-based database. The database is deposited on a web site (http://www.sw.nec.co.jp/bio/rd/hgldb/index.html) in a form accessible to researchers to contribute to proteomic studies of human glomerulus in health and disease.

  8. Using XML and Java for Astronomical Instrument Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koons, L.; Ames, T.; Evans, R.; Warsaw, C.; Sall, K.

    1999-12-01

    Traditionally, instrument command and control systems have been highly specialized, consisting mostly of custom code that is difficult to develop, maintain, and extend. Such solutions are initially very costly and are inflexible to subsequent engineering change requests. Instrument description is too tightly coupled with details of implementation. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and AppNet, Inc. are developing a very general and highly extensible framework that applies to virtually any kind of instrument that can be controlled by a computer (e.g., telescopes, microscopes and printers). A key aspect of the object-oriented architecture, implemented in Java, involves software that is driven by an instrument description. The Astronomical Instrument Markup Language (AIML) is a domain-specific implementation of the more generalized Instrument Markup Language (IML). The software architecture combines the platform-independent processing capabilities of Java with the vendor-independent data description syntax of Extensible Markup Language (XML), a human-readable and machine-understandable way to describe structured data. IML is used to describe command sets (including parameters, datatypes, and constraints) and their associated formats, telemetry, and communication mechanisms. The software uses this description to present graphical user interfaces to control and monitor the instrument. Recent efforts have extended to command procedures (scripting) and representation of data pipeline inputs, outputs, and connections. Near future efforts are likely to include an XML description of data visualizations, as well as the potential use of XSL (Extensible Stylesheet Language) to permit astronomers to customize the user interface on several levels: per user, instrument, subsystem, or observatory-wide. Our initial prototyping effort was targeted for HAWC (High-resolution Airborne Wideband Camera), a first-light instrument of SOFIA (the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

  9. Querying and Ranking XML Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlieder, Torsten; Meuss, Holger

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of XML, information retrieval, precision, and recall focuses on a retrieval technique that adopts the similarity measure of the vector space model, incorporates the document structure, and supports structured queries. Topics include a query model based on tree matching; structured queries and term-based ranking; and term frequency and…

  10. Flight Dynamic Model Exchange using XML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Hildreth, Bruce L.

    2002-01-01

    The AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technical Committee has worked for several years to develop a standard by which the information needed to develop physics-based models of aircraft can be specified. The purpose of this standard is to provide a well-defined set of information, definitions, data tables and axis systems so that cooperating organizations can transfer a model from one simulation facility to another with maximum efficiency. This paper proposes using an application of the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) to implement the AIAA simulation standard. The motivation and justification for using a standard such as XML is discussed. Necessary data elements to be supported are outlined. An example of an aerodynamic model as an XML file is given. This example includes definition of independent and dependent variables for function tables, definition of key variables used to define the model, and axis systems used. The final steps necessary for implementation of the standard are presented. Software to take an XML-defined model and import/export it to/from a given simulation facility is discussed, but not demonstrated. That would be the next step in final implementation of standards for physics-based aircraft dynamic models.

  11. TumorML: Concept and requirements of an in silico cancer modelling markup language.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David; Cooper, Jonathan; McKeever, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the initial groundwork carried out as part of the European Commission funded Transatlantic Tumor Model Repositories project, to develop a new markup language for computational cancer modelling, TumorML. In this paper we describe the motivations for such a language, arguing that current state-of-the-art biomodelling languages are not suited to the cancer modelling domain. We go on to describe the work that needs to be done to develop TumorML, the conceptual design, and a description of what existing markup languages will be used to compose the language specification.

  12. An XML-based interchange format for genotype-phenotype data.

    PubMed

    Whirl-Carrillo, M; Woon, M; Thorn, C F; Klein, T E; Altman, R B

    2008-02-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput genotyping and phenotyping have accelerated the creation of pharmacogenomic data. Consequently, the community requires standard formats to exchange large amounts of diverse information. To facilitate the transfer of pharmacogenomics data between databases and analysis packages, we have created a standard XML (eXtensible Markup Language) schema that describes both genotype and phenotype data as well as associated metadata. The schema accommodates information regarding genes, drugs, diseases, experimental methods, genomic/RNA/protein sequences, subjects, subject groups, and literature. The Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics Knowledge Base (PharmGKB; www.pharmgkb.org) has used this XML schema for more than 5 years to accept and process submissions containing more than 1,814,139 SNPs on 20,797 subjects using 8,975 assays. Although developed in the context of pharmacogenomics, the schema is of general utility for exchange of genotype and phenotype data. We have written syntactic and semantic validators to check documents using this format. The schema and code for validation is available to the community at http://www.pharmgkb.org/schema/index.html (last accessed: 8 October 2007). (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Designing Multimedia for the Hypertext Markup Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwier, Richard A.; Misanchuk, Earl R.

    Dynamic discussions have begun to emerge concerning style of presentation on world wide web sites. Some hypertext markup language (HTML) designers seek an intimate and chatty ambience, while others want to project a more professional image. Evaluators see many sites as overdecorated and indecipherable. This paper offers suggestions on selecting…

  14. Using XML Configuration-Driven Development to Create a Customizable Ground Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Brent; DeMore, Martha

    2009-01-01

    The Mission data Processing and Control Subsystem (MPCS) is being developed as a multi-mission Ground Data System with the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) as the first fully supported mission. MPCS is a fully featured, Java-based Ground Data System (GDS) for telecommand and telemetry processing based on Configuration-Driven Development (CDD). The eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is the ideal language for CDD because it is easily readable and editable by all levels of users and is also backed by a World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) standard and numerous powerful processing tools that make it uniquely flexible. The CDD approach adopted by MPCS minimizes changes to compiled code by using XML to create a series of configuration files that provide both coarse and fine grained control over all aspects of GDS operation.

  15. Issues and solutions for storage, retrieval, and searching of MPEG-7 documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Chi; Lo, Ming-Ling; Smith, John R.

    2000-10-01

    The ongoing MPEG-7 standardization activity aims at creating a standard for describing multimedia content in order to facilitate the interpretation of the associated information content. Attempting to address a broad range of applications, MPEG-7 has defined a flexible framework consisting of Descriptors, Description Schemes, and Description Definition Language. Descriptors and Description Schemes describe features, structure and semantics of multimedia objects. They are written in the Description Definition Language (DDL). In the most recent revision, DDL applies XML (Extensible Markup Language) Schema with MPEG-7 extensions. DDL has constructs that support inclusion, inheritance, reference, enumeration, choice, sequence, and abstract type of Description Schemes and Descriptors. In order to enable multimedia systems to use MPEG-7, a number of important problems in storing, retrieving and searching MPEG-7 documents need to be solved. This paper reports on initial finding on issues and solutions of storing and accessing MPEG-7 documents. In particular, we discuss the benefits of using a virtual document management framework based on XML Access Server (XAS) in order to bridge the MPEG-7 multimedia applications and database systems. The need arises partly because MPEG-7 descriptions need customized storage schema, indexing and search engines. We also discuss issues arising in managing dependence and cross-description scheme search.

  16. Genomic Sequence Variation Markup Language (GSVML).

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Jun; Kimura, Michio; Hiroi, Kaei; Ido, Keisuke; Yang, Woosung; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    With the aim of making good use of internationally accumulated genomic sequence variation data, which is increasing rapidly due to the explosive amount of genomic research at present, the development of an interoperable data exchange format and its international standardization are necessary. Genomic Sequence Variation Markup Language (GSVML) will focus on genomic sequence variation data and human health applications, such as gene based medicine or pharmacogenomics. We developed GSVML through eight steps, based on case analysis and domain investigations. By focusing on the design scope to human health applications and genomic sequence variation, we attempted to eliminate ambiguity and to ensure practicability. We intended to satisfy the requirements derived from the use case analysis of human-based clinical genomic applications. Based on database investigations, we attempted to minimize the redundancy of the data format, while maximizing the data covering range. We also attempted to ensure communication and interface ability with other Markup Languages, for exchange of omics data among various omics researchers or facilities. The interface ability with developing clinical standards, such as the Health Level Seven Genotype Information model, was analyzed. We developed the human health-oriented GSVML comprising variation data, direct annotation, and indirect annotation categories; the variation data category is required, while the direct and indirect annotation categories are optional. The annotation categories contain omics and clinical information, and have internal relationships. For designing, we examined 6 cases for three criteria as human health application and 15 data elements for three criteria as data formats for genomic sequence variation data exchange. The data format of five international SNP databases and six Markup Languages and the interface ability to the Health Level Seven Genotype Model in terms of 317 items were investigated. GSVML was developed as

  17. Internet-based data interchange with XML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, Karl; Schmidt, Thomas

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, a complete concept for Internet Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) - a well-known buzzword in the area of logistics and supply chain management to enable the automation of the interactions between companies and their partners - using XML (eXtensible Markup Language) will be proposed. This approach is based on Internet and XML, because the implementation of traditional EDI (e.g. EDIFACT, ANSI X.12) is mostly too costly for small and medium sized enterprises, which want to integrate their suppliers and customers in a supply chain. The paper will also present the results of the implementation of a prototype for such a system, which has been developed for an industrial partner to improve the current situation of parts delivery. The main functions of this system are an early warning system to detect problems during the parts delivery process as early as possible, and a transport following system to pursue the transportation.

  18. Prototype Development: Context-Driven Dynamic XML Ophthalmologic Data Capture Application

    PubMed Central

    Schwei, Kelsey M; Kadolph, Christopher; Finamore, Joseph; Cancel, Efrain; McCarty, Catherine A; Okorie, Asha; Thomas, Kate L; Allen Pacheco, Jennifer; Pathak, Jyotishman; Ellis, Stephen B; Denny, Joshua C; Rasmussen, Luke V; Tromp, Gerard; Williams, Marc S; Vrabec, Tamara R; Brilliant, Murray H

    2017-01-01

    Background The capture and integration of structured ophthalmologic data into electronic health records (EHRs) has historically been a challenge. However, the importance of this activity for patient care and research is critical. Objective The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype of a context-driven dynamic extensible markup language (XML) ophthalmologic data capture application for research and clinical care that could be easily integrated into an EHR system. Methods Stakeholders in the medical, research, and informatics fields were interviewed and surveyed to determine data and system requirements for ophthalmologic data capture. On the basis of these requirements, an ophthalmology data capture application was developed to collect and store discrete data elements with important graphical information. Results The context-driven data entry application supports several features, including ink-over drawing capability for documenting eye abnormalities, context-based Web controls that guide data entry based on preestablished dependencies, and an adaptable database or XML schema that stores Web form specifications and allows for immediate changes in form layout or content. The application utilizes Web services to enable data integration with a variety of EHRs for retrieval and storage of patient data. Conclusions This paper describes the development process used to create a context-driven dynamic XML data capture application for optometry and ophthalmology. The list of ophthalmologic data elements identified as important for care and research can be used as a baseline list for future ophthalmologic data collection activities. PMID:28903894

  19. Using XML and Java for Astronomical Instrumentation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Troy; Koons, Lisa; Sall, Ken; Warsaw, Craig

    2000-01-01

    Traditionally, instrument command and control systems have been highly specialized, consisting mostly of custom code that is difficult to develop, maintain, and extend. Such solutions are initially very costly and are inflexible to subsequent engineering change requests, increasing software maintenance costs. Instrument description is too tightly coupled with details of implementation. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is developing a general and highly extensible framework that applies to any kind of instrument that can be controlled by a computer. The software architecture combines the platform independent processing capabilities of Java with the power of the Extensible Markup Language (XML), a human readable and machine understandable way to describe structured data. A key aspect of the object-oriented architecture is software that is driven by an instrument description, written using the Instrument Markup Language (IML). ]ML is used to describe graphical user interfaces to control and monitor the instrument, command sets and command formats, data streams, and communication mechanisms. Although the current effort is targeted for the High-resolution Airborne Wideband Camera, a first-light instrument of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, the framework is designed to be generic and extensible so that it can be applied to any instrument.

  20. From data to analysis: linking NWChem and Avogadro with the syntax and semantics of Chemical Markup Language

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    De Jong, Wibe A.; Walker, Andrew M.; Hanwell, Marcus D.

    Background Multidisciplinary integrated research requires the ability to couple the diverse sets of data obtained from a range of complex experiments and computer simulations. Integrating data requires semantically rich information. In this paper the generation of semantically rich data from the NWChem computational chemistry software is discussed within the Chemical Markup Language (CML) framework. Results The NWChem computational chemistry software has been modified and coupled to the FoX library to write CML compliant XML data files. The FoX library was expanded to represent the lexical input files used by the computational chemistry software. Conclusions The production of CML compliant XMLmore » files for the computational chemistry software NWChem can be relatively easily accomplished using the FoX library. A unified computational chemistry or CompChem convention and dictionary needs to be developed through a community-based effort. The long-term goal is to enable a researcher to do Google-style chemistry and physics searches.« less

  1. The Biological Connection Markup Language: a SBGN-compliant format for visualization, filtering and analysis of biological pathways.

    PubMed

    Beltrame, Luca; Calura, Enrica; Popovici, Razvan R; Rizzetto, Lisa; Guedez, Damariz Rivero; Donato, Michele; Romualdi, Chiara; Draghici, Sorin; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2011-08-01

    Many models and analysis of signaling pathways have been proposed. However, neither of them takes into account that a biological pathway is not a fixed system, but instead it depends on the organism, tissue and cell type as well as on physiological, pathological and experimental conditions. The Biological Connection Markup Language (BCML) is a format to describe, annotate and visualize pathways. BCML is able to store multiple information, permitting a selective view of the pathway as it exists and/or behave in specific organisms, tissues and cells. Furthermore, BCML can be automatically converted into data formats suitable for analysis and into a fully SBGN-compliant graphical representation, making it an important tool that can be used by both computational biologists and 'wet lab' scientists. The XML schema and the BCML software suite are freely available under the LGPL for download at http://bcml.dc-atlas.net. They are implemented in Java and supported on MS Windows, Linux and OS X.

  2. XML-Based Generator of C++ Code for Integration With GUIs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Hook; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    An open source computer program has been developed to satisfy a need for simplified organization of structured input data for scientific simulation programs. Typically, such input data are parsed in from a flat American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) text file into computational data structures. Also typically, when a graphical user interface (GUI) is used, there is a need to completely duplicate the input information while providing it to a user in a more structured form. Heretofore, the duplication of the input information has entailed duplication of software efforts and increases in susceptibility to software errors because of the concomitant need to maintain two independent input-handling mechanisms. The present program implements a method in which the input data for a simulation program are completely specified in an Extensible Markup Language (XML)-based text file. The key benefit for XML is storing input data in a structured manner. More importantly, XML allows not just storing of data but also describing what each of the data items are. That XML file contains information useful for rendering the data by other applications. It also then generates data structures in the C++ language that are to be used in the simulation program. In this method, all input data are specified in one place only, and it is easy to integrate the data structures into both the simulation program and the GUI. XML-to-C is useful in two ways: 1. As an executable, it generates the corresponding C++ classes and 2. As a library, it automatically fills the objects with the input data values.

  3. Standardization of XML Database Exchanges and the James Webb Space Telescope Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Edd, Jonathan; Detter, Ryan; Jones, Ron; Fatig, Curtis C.

    2007-01-01

    Personnel from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project have been working with various standard communities such the Object Management Group (OMG) and the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) to assist in the definition of a common extensible Markup Language (XML) for database exchange format. The CCSDS and OMG standards are intended for the exchange of core command and telemetry information, not for all database information needed to exercise a NASA space mission. The mission-specific database, containing all the information needed for a space mission, is translated from/to the standard using a translator. The standard is meant to provide a system that encompasses 90% of the information needed for command and telemetry processing. This paper will discuss standardization of the XML database exchange format, tools used, and the JWST experience, as well as future work with XML standard groups both commercial and government.

  4. The SGML standardization framework and the introduction of XML.

    PubMed

    Fierz, W; Grütter, R

    2000-01-01

    Extensible Markup Language (XML) is on its way to becoming a global standard for the representation, exchange, and presentation of information on the World Wide Web (WWW). More than that, XML is creating a standardization framework, in terms of an open network of meta-standards and mediators that allows for the definition of further conventions and agreements in specific business domains. Such an approach is particularly needed in the healthcare domain; XML promises to especially suit the particularities of patient records and their lifelong storage, retrieval, and exchange. At a time when change rather than steadiness is becoming the faithful feature of our society, standardization frameworks which support a diversified growth of specifications that are appropriate to the actual needs of the users are becoming more and more important; and efforts should be made to encourage this new attempt at standardization to grow in a fruitful direction. Thus, the introduction of XML reflects a standardization process which is neither exclusively based on an acknowledged standardization authority, nor a pure market standard. Instead, a consortium of companies, academic institutions, and public bodies has agreed on a common recommendation based on an existing standardization framework. The consortium's process of agreeing to a standardization framework will doubtlessly be successful in the case of XML, and it is suggested that it should be considered as a generic model for standardization processes in the future.

  5. An XML-Based Mission Command Language for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    P. XML: How To Program . Prentice Hall, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, 2001 Digital Signature Activity Statement, W3C www.w3.org/Signature...languages because it does not directly specify how information is to be presented, but rather defines the structure (and thus semantics) of the...command and control (C2) aspects of using XML to increase the utility of AUVs. XML programming will be addressed. Current mine warfare doctrine will be

  6. Applying Analogical Reasoning Techniques for Teaching XML Document Querying Skills in Database Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitri, Michel

    2012-01-01

    XML has become the most ubiquitous format for exchange of data between applications running on the Internet. Most Web Services provide their information to clients in the form of XML. The ability to process complex XML documents in order to extract relevant information is becoming as important a skill for IS students to master as querying…

  7. Construction of a nasopharyngeal carcinoma 2D/MS repository with Open Source XML database--Xindice.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Li, Maoyu; Xiao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Jianling; Chen, Zhuchu

    2006-01-11

    Many proteomics initiatives require integration of all information with uniformcriteria from collection of samples and data display to publication of experimental results. The integration and exchanging of these data of different formats and structure imposes a great challenge to us. The XML technology presents a promise in handling this task due to its simplicity and flexibility. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the most common cancers in southern China and Southeast Asia, which has marked geographic and racial differences in incidence. Although there are some cancer proteome databases now, there is still no NPC proteome database. The raw NPC proteome experiment data were captured into one XML document with Human Proteome Markup Language (HUP-ML) editor and imported into native XML database Xindice. The 2D/MS repository of NPC proteome was constructed with Apache, PHP and Xindice to provide access to the database via Internet. On our website, two methods, keyword query and click query, were provided at the same time to access the entries of the NPC proteome database. Our 2D/MS repository can be used to share the raw NPC proteomics data that are generated from gel-based proteomics experiments. The database, as well as the PHP source codes for constructing users' own proteome repository, can be accessed at http://www.xyproteomics.org/.

  8. CLAIM (CLinical Accounting InforMation)--an XML-based data exchange standard for connecting electronic medical record systems to patient accounting systems.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinqiu; Takada, Akira; Tanaka, Koji; Sato, Junzo; Suzuki, Muneou; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Daimon, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Nakashima, Yusei; Araki, Kenji; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2005-08-01

    With the evolving and diverse electronic medical record (EMR) systems, there appears to be an ever greater need to link EMR systems and patient accounting systems with a standardized data exchange format. To this end, the CLinical Accounting InforMation (CLAIM) data exchange standard was developed. CLAIM is subordinate to the Medical Markup Language (MML) standard, which allows the exchange of medical data among different medical institutions. CLAIM uses eXtensible Markup Language (XML) as a meta-language. The current version, 2.1, inherited the basic structure of MML 2.x and contains two modules including information related to registration, appointment, procedure and charging. CLAIM 2.1 was implemented successfully in Japan in 2001. Consequently, it was confirmed that CLAIM could be used as an effective data exchange format between EMR systems and patient accounting systems.

  9. Applying Semantic Web Concepts to Support Net-Centric Warfare Using the Tactical Assessment Markup Language (TAML)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    SPARQL SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language SQL Structured Query Language SUMO Suggested Upper Merged Ontology SW... Query optimization algorithms are implemented in the Pellet reasoner in order to ensure querying a knowledge base is efficient . These algorithms...memory as a treelike structure in order for the data to be queried . XML Query (XQuery) is the standard language used when querying XML

  10. At-sea demonstration of RF sensor tasking using XML over a worldwide network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, Robert L.; Lee, Tom; Dumas, Diane; Raggo, Barbara

    2003-07-01

    As part of an At-Sea Demonstration for Space and Naval Warfare Command (SPAWAR, PMW-189), a prototype RF sensor for signal acquisition and direction finding queried and received tasking via a secure worldwide Automated Data Network System (ADNS). Using extended mark-up language (XML) constructs, both mission and signal tasking were available for push and pull Battlespace management. XML tasking was received by the USS Cape St George (CG-71) during an exercise along the Gulf Coast of the US from a test facility at SPAWAR, San Diego, CA. Although only one ship was used in the demonstration, the intent of the software initiative was to show that a network of different RF sensors on different platforms with different capabilitis could be tasked by a common web agent. A sensor software agent interpreted the XML task to match the sensor's capability. Future improvements will focus on enlarging the domain of mission tasking and incorporate report management.

  11. Generating Systems Biology Markup Language Models from the Synthetic Biology Open Language.

    PubMed

    Roehner, Nicholas; Zhang, Zhen; Nguyen, Tramy; Myers, Chris J

    2015-08-21

    In the context of synthetic biology, model generation is the automated process of constructing biochemical models based on genetic designs. This paper discusses the use cases for model generation in genetic design automation (GDA) software tools and introduces the foundational concepts of standards and model annotation that make this process useful. Finally, this paper presents an implementation of model generation in the GDA software tool iBioSim and provides an example of generating a Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) model from a design of a 4-input AND sensor written in the Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL).

  12. The XSD-Builder Specification Language—Toward a Semantic View of XML Schema Definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Joseph; Cheung, San Kuen

    In the present database market, XML database model is a main structure for the forthcoming database system in the Internet environment. As a conceptual schema of XML database, XML Model has its limitation on presenting its data semantics. System analyst has no toolset for modeling and analyzing XML system. We apply XML Tree Model (shown in Figure 2) as a conceptual schema of XML database to model and analyze the structure of an XML database. It is important not only for visualizing, specifying, and documenting structural models, but also for constructing executable systems. The tree model represents inter-relationship among elements inside different logical schema such as XML Schema Definition (XSD), DTD, Schematron, XDR, SOX, and DSD (shown in Figure 1, an explanation of the terms in the figure are shown in Table 1). The XSD-Builder consists of XML Tree Model, source language, translator, and XSD. The source language is called XSD-Source which is mainly for providing an environment with concept of user friendliness while writing an XSD. The source language will consequently be translated by XSD-Translator. Output of XSD-Translator is an XSD which is our target and is called as an object language.

  13. The SGML Standardization Framework and the Introduction of XML

    PubMed Central

    Grütter, Rolf

    2000-01-01

    Extensible Markup Language (XML) is on its way to becoming a global standard for the representation, exchange, and presentation of information on the World Wide Web (WWW). More than that, XML is creating a standardization framework, in terms of an open network of meta-standards and mediators that allows for the definition of further conventions and agreements in specific business domains. Such an approach is particularly needed in the healthcare domain; XML promises to especially suit the particularities of patient records and their lifelong storage, retrieval, and exchange. At a time when change rather than steadiness is becoming the faithful feature of our society, standardization frameworks which support a diversified growth of specifications that are appropriate to the actual needs of the users are becoming more and more important; and efforts should be made to encourage this new attempt at standardization to grow in a fruitful direction. Thus, the introduction of XML reflects a standardization process which is neither exclusively based on an acknowledged standardization authority, nor a pure market standard. Instead, a consortium of companies, academic institutions, and public bodies has agreed on a common recommendation based on an existing standardization framework. The consortium's process of agreeing to a standardization framework will doubtlessly be successful in the case of XML, and it is suggested that it should be considered as a generic model for standardization processes in the future. PMID:11720931

  14. Information persistence using XML database technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Thomas A.; Lipa, Brian E. G.; Macera, Anthony R.; Staskevich, Gennady R.

    2005-05-01

    The Joint Battlespace Infosphere (JBI) Information Management (IM) services provide information exchange and persistence capabilities that support tailored, dynamic, and timely access to required information, enabling near real-time planning, control, and execution for DoD decision making. JBI IM services will be built on a substrate of network centric core enterprise services and when transitioned, will establish an interoperable information space that aggregates, integrates, fuses, and intelligently disseminates relevant information to support effective warfighter business processes. This virtual information space provides individual users with information tailored to their specific functional responsibilities and provides a highly tailored repository of, or access to, information that is designed to support a specific Community of Interest (COI), geographic area or mission. Critical to effective operation of JBI IM services is the implementation of repositories, where data, represented as information, is represented and persisted for quick and easy retrieval. This paper will address information representation, persistence and retrieval using existing database technologies to manage structured data in Extensible Markup Language (XML) format as well as unstructured data in an IM services-oriented environment. Three basic categories of database technologies will be compared and contrasted: Relational, XML-Enabled, and Native XML. These technologies have diverse properties such as maturity, performance, query language specifications, indexing, and retrieval methods. We will describe our application of these evolving technologies within the context of a JBI Reference Implementation (RI) by providing some hopefully insightful anecdotes and lessons learned along the way. This paper will also outline future directions, promising technologies and emerging COTS products that can offer more powerful information management representations, better persistence mechanisms and

  15. Evaluation of ISO EN 13606 as a result of its implementation in XML

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shanghua; Hassan, Taher; Kalra, Dipak

    2013-01-01

    The five parts of the ISO EN 13606 standard define a means by which health-care records can be exchanged between computer systems. Starting within the European standardisation process, it has now become internationally ratified in ISO. However, ISO standards do not require that a reference implementation be provided, and in order for ISO EN 13606 to deliver the expected benefits, it must be provided not as a document, but as an operational system that is not vendor specific. This article describes the evolution of an Extensible Markup Language (XML) Schema through three iterations, each of which emphasised one particular approach to delivering an executable equivalent to the printed standard. Developing these operational versions and incorporating feedback from users of these demonstrated where implementation compromises were needed and exposed defects in the standard. These are discussed herein. They may require a future technical revision to ISO EN 13606 to resolve the issues identified. PMID:23995217

  16. Integrating personalized medical test contents with XML and XSL-FO.

    PubMed

    Toddenroth, Dennis; Dugas, Martin; Frankewitsch, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    In 2004 the adoption of a modular curriculum at the medical faculty in Muenster led to the introduction of centralized examinations based on multiple-choice questions (MCQs). We report on how organizational challenges of realizing faculty-wide personalized tests were addressed by implementation of a specialized software module to automatically generate test sheets from individual test registrations and MCQ contents. Key steps of the presented method for preparing personalized test sheets are (1) the compilation of relevant item contents and graphical media from a relational database with database queries, (2) the creation of Extensible Markup Language (XML) intermediates, and (3) the transformation into paginated documents. The software module by use of an open source print formatter consistently produced high-quality test sheets, while the blending of vectorized textual contents and pixel graphics resulted in efficient output file sizes. Concomitantly the module permitted an individual randomization of item sequences to prevent illicit collusion. The automatic generation of personalized MCQ test sheets is feasible using freely available open source software libraries, and can be efficiently deployed on a faculty-wide scale.

  17. Running MONET and SALT with Remote Telescope Markup Language 3.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessman, F. V.; Romero, E.

    2003-05-01

    Complex robotic and service observations in heterogenous networks of telescopes require a common telescopic lingua franca for the description and transport of observing requests and results. Building upon the experience gained within the Hands-On Universe (HOU) and advanced amateur communities with Remote Telescope Markup Language (RTML) Version 2.1 (http://sunra.lbl.gov/rtml), we have implemented a revised RTML syntax (Version 3.0) which is fully capable of - running the two 1.2m MONET robotic telescopes for a very inhomogeneous clientel from 3 research institutions and high school classes all over the world; - connecting MONET to the HOU telescope network; - connecting MONET as a trigger to the 11m SALT telescope; - providing all the objects needed to perform and document internet-based user support, ranging all the way from proposal submission and time-allocation to observation reports.

  18. Geospatial Visualization of Scientific Data Through Keyhole Markup Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernecke, J.; Bailey, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    The development of virtual globes has provided a fun and innovative tool for exploring the surface of the Earth. However, it has been the paralleling maturation of Keyhole Markup Language (KML) that has created a new medium and perspective through which to visualize scientific datasets. Originally created by Keyhole Inc., and then acquired by Google in 2004, in 2007 KML was given over to the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). It became an OGC international standard on 14 April 2008, and has subsequently been adopted by all major geobrowser developers (e.g., Google, Microsoft, ESRI, NASA) and many smaller ones (e.g., Earthbrowser). By making KML a standard at a relatively young stage in its evolution, developers of the language are seeking to avoid the issues that plagued the early World Wide Web and development of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). The popularity and utility of Google Earth, in particular, has been enhanced by KML features such as the Smithsonian volcano layer and the dynamic weather layers. Through KML, users can view real-time earthquake locations (USGS), view animations of polar sea-ice coverage (NSIDC), or read about the daily activities of chimpanzees (Jane Goodall Institute). Perhaps even more powerful is the fact that any users can create, edit, and share their own KML, with no or relatively little knowledge of manipulating computer code. We present an overview of the best current scientific uses of KML and a guide to how scientists can learn to use KML themselves.

  19. Chemical markup, XML, and the World Wide Web. 5. Applications of chemical metadata in RSS aggregators.

    PubMed

    Murray-Rust, Peter; Rzepa, Henry S; Williamson, Mark J; Willighagen, Egon L

    2004-01-01

    Examples of the use of the RSS 1.0 (RDF Site Summary) specification together with CML (Chemical Markup Language) to create a metadata based alerting service termed CMLRSS for molecular content are presented. CMLRSS can be viewed either using generic software or with modular opensource chemical viewers and editors enhanced with CMLRSS modules. We discuss the more automated use of CMLRSS as a component of a World Wide Molecular Matrix of semantically rich chemical information.

  20. An Overview of Genomic Sequence Variation Markup Language (GSVML)

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Jun; Hiroi, Kaei; Ido, Keisuke; Yang, Woosung; Kimura, Michio

    2006-01-01

    Internationally accumulated genomic sequence variation data on human requires the interoperable data exchanging format. We developed the GSVML as the data exchanging format. The GSVML is human health oriented and has three categories. Analyses on the use case in human health domain and the investigation on the databases and markup languages were conducted. An interface ability to Health Level Seven Genotype Model was examined. GSVML provides a sharable platform for both clinical and research applications.

  1. Using XML and Java Technologies for Astronomical Instrument Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Troy; Case, Lynne; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, instrument command and control systems have been highly specialized, consisting mostly of custom code that is difficult to develop, maintain, and extend. Such solutions are initially very costly and are inflexible to subsequent engineering change requests, increasing software maintenance costs. Instrument description is too tightly coupled with details of implementation. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, under the Instrument Remote Control (IRC) project, is developing a general and highly extensible framework that applies to any kind of instrument that can be controlled by a computer. The software architecture combines the platform independent processing capabilities of Java with the power of the Extensible Markup Language (XML), a human readable and machine understandable way to describe structured data. A key aspect of the object-oriented architecture is that the software is driven by an instrument description, written using the Instrument Markup Language (IML), a dialect of XML. IML is used to describe the command sets and command formats of the instrument, communication mechanisms, format of the data coming from the instrument, and characteristics of the graphical user interface to control and monitor the instrument. The IRC framework allows the users to define a data analysis pipeline which converts data coming out of the instrument. The data can be used in visualizations in order for the user to assess the data in real-time, if necessary. The data analysis pipeline algorithms can be supplied by the user in a variety of forms or programming languages. Although the current integration effort is targeted for the High-resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter and Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE), first-light instruments of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), the framework is designed to be generic and extensible so that it can be applied to any instrument. Plans are underway to test the framework

  2. Collaborative business process support in eHealth: integrating IHE profiles through ebXML business process specification language.

    PubMed

    Dogac, Asuman; Kabak, Yildiray; Namli, Tuncay; Okcan, Alper

    2008-11-01

    Integrating healthcare enterprise (IHE) specifies integration profiles describing selected real world use cases to facilitate the interoperability of healthcare information resources. While realizing a complex real-world scenario, IHE profiles are combined by grouping the related IHE actors. Grouping IHE actors implies that the associated business processes (IHE profiles) that the actors are involved must be combined, that is, the choreography of the resulting collaborative business process must be determined by deciding on the execution sequence of transactions coming from different profiles. There are many IHE profiles and each user or vendor may support a different set of IHE profiles that fits to its business need. However, determining the precedence of all the involved transactions manually for each possible combination of the profiles is a very tedious task. In this paper, we describe how to obtain the overall business process automatically when IHE actors are grouped. For this purpose, we represent the IHE profiles through a standard, machine-processable language, namely, Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS) ebusiness eXtensible Markup Language (ebXML) Business Process Specification (ebBP) Language. We define the precedence rules among the transactions of the IHE profiles, again, in a machine-processable way. Then, through a graphical tool, we allow users to select the actors to be grouped and automatically produce the overall business process in a machine-processable format.

  3. SBML-PET: a Systems Biology Markup Language-based parameter estimation tool.

    PubMed

    Zi, Zhike; Klipp, Edda

    2006-11-01

    The estimation of model parameters from experimental data remains a bottleneck for a major breakthrough in systems biology. We present a Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) based Parameter Estimation Tool (SBML-PET). The tool is designed to enable parameter estimation for biological models including signaling pathways, gene regulation networks and metabolic pathways. SBML-PET supports import and export of the models in the SBML format. It can estimate the parameters by fitting a variety of experimental data from different experimental conditions. SBML-PET has a unique feature of supporting event definition in the SMBL model. SBML models can also be simulated in SBML-PET. Stochastic Ranking Evolution Strategy (SRES) is incorporated in SBML-PET for parameter estimation jobs. A classic ODE Solver called ODEPACK is used to solve the Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE) system. http://sysbio.molgen.mpg.de/SBML-PET/. The website also contains detailed documentation for SBML-PET.

  4. A Converter from the Systems Biology Markup Language to the Synthetic Biology Open Language.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tramy; Roehner, Nicholas; Zundel, Zach; Myers, Chris J

    2016-06-17

    Standards are important to synthetic biology because they enable exchange and reproducibility of genetic designs. This paper describes a procedure for converting between two standards: the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) and the Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL). SBML is a standard for behavioral models of biological systems at the molecular level. SBOL describes structural and basic qualitative behavioral aspects of a biological design. Converting SBML to SBOL enables a consistent connection between behavioral and structural information for a biological design. The conversion process described in this paper leverages Systems Biology Ontology (SBO) annotations to enable inference of a designs qualitative function.

  5. ccML, a new mark-up language to improve ISO/EN 13606-based electronic health record extracts practical edition.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-de-Madariaga, Ricardo; Muñoz, Adolfo; Cáceres, Jesús; Somolinos, Roberto; Pascual, Mario; Martínez, Ignacio; Salvador, Carlos H; Monteagudo, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce a new language called ccML, designed to provide convenient pragmatic information to applications using the ISO/EN13606 reference model (RM), such as electronic health record (EHR) extracts editors. EHR extracts are presently built using the syntactic and semantic information provided in the RM and constrained by archetypes. The ccML extra information enables the automation of the medico-legal context information edition, which is over 70% of the total in an extract, without modifying the RM information. ccML is defined using a W3C XML schema file. Valid ccML files complement the RM with additional pragmatics information. The ccML language grammar is defined using formal language theory as a single-type tree grammar. The new language is tested using an EHR extracts editor application as proof-of-concept system. Seven ccML PVCodes (predefined value codes) are introduced in this grammar to cope with different realistic EHR edition situations. These seven PVCodes have different interpretation strategies, from direct look up in the ccML file itself, to more complex searches in archetypes or system precomputation. The possibility to declare generic types in ccML gives rise to ambiguity during interpretation. The criterion used to overcome ambiguity is that specificity should prevail over generality. The opposite would make the individual specific element declarations useless. A new mark-up language ccML is introduced that opens up the possibility of providing applications using the ISO/EN13606 RM with the necessary pragmatics information to be practical and realistic.

  6. Prototype Development: Context-Driven Dynamic XML Ophthalmologic Data Capture Application.

    PubMed

    Peissig, Peggy; Schwei, Kelsey M; Kadolph, Christopher; Finamore, Joseph; Cancel, Efrain; McCarty, Catherine A; Okorie, Asha; Thomas, Kate L; Allen Pacheco, Jennifer; Pathak, Jyotishman; Ellis, Stephen B; Denny, Joshua C; Rasmussen, Luke V; Tromp, Gerard; Williams, Marc S; Vrabec, Tamara R; Brilliant, Murray H

    2017-09-13

    The capture and integration of structured ophthalmologic data into electronic health records (EHRs) has historically been a challenge. However, the importance of this activity for patient care and research is critical. The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype of a context-driven dynamic extensible markup language (XML) ophthalmologic data capture application for research and clinical care that could be easily integrated into an EHR system. Stakeholders in the medical, research, and informatics fields were interviewed and surveyed to determine data and system requirements for ophthalmologic data capture. On the basis of these requirements, an ophthalmology data capture application was developed to collect and store discrete data elements with important graphical information. The context-driven data entry application supports several features, including ink-over drawing capability for documenting eye abnormalities, context-based Web controls that guide data entry based on preestablished dependencies, and an adaptable database or XML schema that stores Web form specifications and allows for immediate changes in form layout or content. The application utilizes Web services to enable data integration with a variety of EHRs for retrieval and storage of patient data. This paper describes the development process used to create a context-driven dynamic XML data capture application for optometry and ophthalmology. The list of ophthalmologic data elements identified as important for care and research can be used as a baseline list for future ophthalmologic data collection activities. ©Peggy Peissig, Kelsey M Schwei, Christopher Kadolph, Joseph Finamore, Efrain Cancel, Catherine A McCarty, Asha Okorie, Kate L Thomas, Jennifer Allen Pacheco, Jyotishman Pathak, Stephen B Ellis, Joshua C Denny, Luke V Rasmussen, Gerard Tromp, Marc S Williams, Tamara R Vrabec, Murray H Brilliant. Originally published in JMIR Medical Informatics (http://medinform.jmir.org), 13.09.2017.

  7. Informatics in radiology: automated structured reporting of imaging findings using the AIM standard and XML.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Stefan L; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative and descriptive imaging data are a vital component of the radiology report and are frequently of paramount importance to the ordering physician. Unfortunately, current methods of recording these data in the report are both inefficient and error prone. In addition, the free-text, unstructured format of a radiology report makes aggregate analysis of data from multiple reports difficult or even impossible without manual intervention. A structured reporting work flow has been developed that allows quantitative data created at an advanced imaging workstation to be seamlessly integrated into the radiology report with minimal radiologist intervention. As an intermediary step between the workstation and the reporting software, quantitative and descriptive data are converted into an extensible markup language (XML) file in a standardized format specified by the Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) project of the National Institutes of Health Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid. The AIM standard was created to allow image annotation data to be stored in a uniform machine-readable format. These XML files containing imaging data can also be stored on a local database for data mining and analysis. This structured work flow solution has the potential to improve radiologist efficiency, reduce errors, and facilitate storage of quantitative and descriptive imaging data for research. Copyright © RSNA, 2011.

  8. An XML-Based Knowledge Management System of Port Information for U.S. Coast Guard Cutters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    using DTDs was not chosen. XML Schema performs many of the same functions as SQL type schemas, but differ by the unique structure of XML documents...to access data from content files within the developed system. XPath is not equivalent to SQL . While XPath is very powerful at reaching into an XML...document and finding nodes or node sets, it is not a complete query language. For operations like joins, unions, intersections, etc., SQL is far

  9. Telemetry Attributes Transfer Standard (TMATS) Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Example ......................... 6-1 Appendix A. Extensible Markup Language TMATS Differences ...................................... A-1 Appendix B...return-to-zero - level TG Telemetry Group TM telemetry TMATS Telemetry Attributes Transfer Standard XML eXtensible Markup Language Telemetry... Markup Language) format. The initial version of a standard 1 Range Commanders Council. Telemetry

  10. The Biological Connection Markup Language: a SBGN-compliant format for visualization, filtering and analysis of biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rizzetto, Lisa; Guedez, Damariz Rivero; Donato, Michele; Romualdi, Chiara; Draghici, Sorin; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Many models and analysis of signaling pathways have been proposed. However, neither of them takes into account that a biological pathway is not a fixed system, but instead it depends on the organism, tissue and cell type as well as on physiological, pathological and experimental conditions. Results: The Biological Connection Markup Language (BCML) is a format to describe, annotate and visualize pathways. BCML is able to store multiple information, permitting a selective view of the pathway as it exists and/or behave in specific organisms, tissues and cells. Furthermore, BCML can be automatically converted into data formats suitable for analysis and into a fully SBGN-compliant graphical representation, making it an important tool that can be used by both computational biologists and ‘wet lab’ scientists. Availability and implementation: The XML schema and the BCML software suite are freely available under the LGPL for download at http://bcml.dc-atlas.net. They are implemented in Java and supported on MS Windows, Linux and OS X. Contact: duccio.cavalieri@unifi.it; sorin@wayne.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21653523

  11. ART-ML: a new markup language for modelling and representation of biological processes in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Karvounis, E C; Exarchos, T P; Fotiou, E; Sakellarios, A I; Iliopoulou, D; Koutsouris, D; Fotiadis, D I

    2013-01-01

    With an ever increasing number of biological models available on the internet, a standardized modelling framework is required to allow information to be accessed and visualized. In this paper we propose a novel Extensible Markup Language (XML) based format called ART-ML that aims at supporting the interoperability and the reuse of models of geometry, blood flow, plaque progression and stent modelling, exported by any cardiovascular disease modelling software. ART-ML has been developed and tested using ARTool. ARTool is a platform for the automatic processing of various image modalities of coronary and carotid arteries. The images and their content are fused to develop morphological models of the arteries in 3D representations. All the above described procedures integrate disparate data formats, protocols and tools. ART-ML proposes a representation way, expanding ARTool, for interpretability of the individual resources, creating a standard unified model for the description of data and, consequently, a format for their exchange and representation that is machine independent. More specifically, ARTool platform incorporates efficient algorithms which are able to perform blood flow simulations and atherosclerotic plaque evolution modelling. Integration of data layers between different modules within ARTool are based upon the interchange of information included in the ART-ML model repository. ART-ML provides a markup representation that enables the representation and management of embedded models within the cardiovascular disease modelling platform, the storage and interchange of well-defined information. The corresponding ART-ML model incorporates all relevant information regarding geometry, blood flow, plaque progression and stent modelling procedures. All created models are stored in a model repository database which is accessible to the research community using efficient web interfaces, enabling the interoperability of any cardiovascular disease modelling software

  12. Comparing Emerging XML Based Formats from a Multi-discipline Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, D. M.; Reich, L. I.; Nikhinson, S.

    2002-12-01

    This paper analyzes the similarity and differences among several examples of an emerging generation of Scientific Data Formats that are based on XML technologies. Some of the factors evaluated include the goals of these efforts, the data models, and XML technologies used, and the maturity of currently available software. This paper then investigates the practicality of developing a single set of structural data objects and basic scientific concepts, such as units, that could be used across discipline boundaries and extended by disciplines and missions to create Scientific Data Formats for their communities. This analysis is partly based on an effort sponsored by the ESDIS office at GSFC to compare the Earth Science Markup Language (ESML) and the eXtensible Data Format( XDF), two members of this new generation of XML based Data Description Languages that have been developed by NASA funded efforts in recent years. This paper adds FITSML and potentially CDFML to the list of XML based Scientific Data Formats discussed. This paper draws heavily a Formats Evolution Process Committee (http://ssdoo.gsfc.nasa.gov/nost/fep/) draft white paper primarily developed by Lou Reich, Mike Folk and Don Sawyer to assist the Space Science community in understanding Scientific Data Formats. One of primary conclusions of that paper is that a scientific data format object model should be examined along two basic axes. The first is the complexity of the computer/mathematical data types supported and the second is the level of scientific domain specialization incorporated. This paper also discusses several of the issues that affect the decision on whether to implement a discipline or project specific Scientific Data Format as a formal extension of a general purpose Scientific Data Format or to implement the APIs independently.

  13. phyloXML: XML for evolutionary biology and comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mira V; Zmasek, Christian M

    2009-01-01

    Background Evolutionary trees are central to a wide range of biological studies. In many of these studies, tree nodes and branches need to be associated (or annotated) with various attributes. For example, in studies concerned with organismal relationships, tree nodes are associated with taxonomic names, whereas tree branches have lengths and oftentimes support values. Gene trees used in comparative genomics or phylogenomics are usually annotated with taxonomic information, genome-related data, such as gene names and functional annotations, as well as events such as gene duplications, speciations, or exon shufflings, combined with information related to the evolutionary tree itself. The data standards currently used for evolutionary trees have limited capacities to incorporate such annotations of different data types. Results We developed a XML language, named phyloXML, for describing evolutionary trees, as well as various associated data items. PhyloXML provides elements for commonly used items, such as branch lengths, support values, taxonomic names, and gene names and identifiers. By using "property" elements, phyloXML can be adapted to novel and unforeseen use cases. We also developed various software tools for reading, writing, conversion, and visualization of phyloXML formatted data. Conclusion PhyloXML is an XML language defined by a complete schema in XSD that allows storing and exchanging the structures of evolutionary trees as well as associated data. More information about phyloXML itself, the XSD schema, as well as tools implementing and supporting phyloXML, is available at . PMID:19860910

  14. Distribution of immunodeficiency fact files with XML--from Web to WAP.

    PubMed

    Väliaho, Jouni; Riikonen, Pentti; Vihinen, Mauno

    2005-06-26

    Although biomedical information is growing rapidly, it is difficult to find and retrieve validated data especially for rare hereditary diseases. There is an increased need for services capable of integrating and validating information as well as proving it in a logically organized structure. A XML-based language enables creation of open source databases for storage, maintenance and delivery for different platforms. Here we present a new data model called fact file and an XML-based specification Inherited Disease Markup Language (IDML), that were developed to facilitate disease information integration, storage and exchange. The data model was applied to primary immunodeficiencies, but it can be used for any hereditary disease. Fact files integrate biomedical, genetic and clinical information related to hereditary diseases. IDML and fact files were used to build a comprehensive Web and WAP accessible knowledge base ImmunoDeficiency Resource (IDR) available at http://bioinf.uta.fi/idr/. A fact file is a user oriented user interface, which serves as a starting point to explore information on hereditary diseases. The IDML enables the seamless integration and presentation of genetic and disease information resources in the Internet. IDML can be used to build information services for all kinds of inherited diseases. The open source specification and related programs are available at http://bioinf.uta.fi/idml/.

  15. ccML, a new mark-up language to improve ISO/EN 13606-based electronic health record extracts practical edition

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-de-Madariaga, Ricardo; Muñoz, Adolfo; Cáceres, Jesús; Somolinos, Roberto; Pascual, Mario; Martínez, Ignacio; Salvador, Carlos H; Monteagudo, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this paper is to introduce a new language called ccML, designed to provide convenient pragmatic information to applications using the ISO/EN13606 reference model (RM), such as electronic health record (EHR) extracts editors. EHR extracts are presently built using the syntactic and semantic information provided in the RM and constrained by archetypes. The ccML extra information enables the automation of the medico-legal context information edition, which is over 70% of the total in an extract, without modifying the RM information. Materials and Methods ccML is defined using a W3C XML schema file. Valid ccML files complement the RM with additional pragmatics information. The ccML language grammar is defined using formal language theory as a single-type tree grammar. The new language is tested using an EHR extracts editor application as proof-of-concept system. Results Seven ccML PVCodes (predefined value codes) are introduced in this grammar to cope with different realistic EHR edition situations. These seven PVCodes have different interpretation strategies, from direct look up in the ccML file itself, to more complex searches in archetypes or system precomputation. Discussion The possibility to declare generic types in ccML gives rise to ambiguity during interpretation. The criterion used to overcome ambiguity is that specificity should prevail over generality. The opposite would make the individual specific element declarations useless. Conclusion A new mark-up language ccML is introduced that opens up the possibility of providing applications using the ISO/EN13606 RM with the necessary pragmatics information to be practical and realistic. PMID:23019241

  16. From data to analysis: linking NWChem and Avogadro with the syntax and semantics of Chemical Markup Language.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Wibe A; Walker, Andrew M; Hanwell, Marcus D

    2013-05-24

    Multidisciplinary integrated research requires the ability to couple the diverse sets of data obtained from a range of complex experiments and computer simulations. Integrating data requires semantically rich information. In this paper an end-to-end use of semantically rich data in computational chemistry is demonstrated utilizing the Chemical Markup Language (CML) framework. Semantically rich data is generated by the NWChem computational chemistry software with the FoX library and utilized by the Avogadro molecular editor for analysis and visualization. The NWChem computational chemistry software has been modified and coupled to the FoX library to write CML compliant XML data files. The FoX library was expanded to represent the lexical input files and molecular orbitals used by the computational chemistry software. Draft dictionary entries and a format for molecular orbitals within CML CompChem were developed. The Avogadro application was extended to read in CML data, and display molecular geometry and electronic structure in the GUI allowing for an end-to-end solution where Avogadro can create input structures, generate input files, NWChem can run the calculation and Avogadro can then read in and analyse the CML output produced. The developments outlined in this paper will be made available in future releases of NWChem, FoX, and Avogadro. The production of CML compliant XML files for computational chemistry software such as NWChem can be accomplished relatively easily using the FoX library. The CML data can be read in by a newly developed reader in Avogadro and analysed or visualized in various ways. A community-based effort is needed to further develop the CML CompChem convention and dictionary. This will enable the long-term goal of allowing a researcher to run simple "Google-style" searches of chemistry and physics and have the results of computational calculations returned in a comprehensible form alongside articles from the published literature.

  17. AllerML: Markup Language for Allergens

    PubMed Central

    Ivanciuc, Ovidiu; Gendel, Steven M.; Power, Trevor D.; Schein, Catherine H.; Braun, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Many concerns have been raised about the potential allergenicity of novel, recombinant proteins into food crops. Guidelines, proposed by WHO/FAO and EFSA, include the use of bioinformatics screening to assess the risk of potential allergenicity or cross-reactivities of all proteins introduced, for example, to improve nutritional value or promote crop resistance. However, there are no universally accepted standards that can be used to encode data on the biology of allergens to facilitate using data from multiple databases in this screening. Therefore, we developed AllerML a markup language for allergens to assist in the automated exchange of information between databases and in the integration of the bioinformatics tools that are used to investigate allergenicity and cross-reactivity. As proof of concept, AllerML was implemented using the Structural Database of Allergenic Proteins (SDAP; http://fermi.utmb.edu/SDAP/) database. General implementation of AllerML will promote automatic flow of validated data that will aid in allergy research and regulatory analysis. PMID:21420460

  18. Descriptive Metadata: Emerging Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahronheim, Judith R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses metadata, digital resources, cross-disciplinary activity, and standards. Highlights include Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML); Extensible Markup Language (XML); Dublin Core; Resource Description Framework (RDF); Text Encoding Initiative (TEI); Encoded Archival Description (EAD); art and cultural-heritage metadata initiatives;…

  19. James Webb Space Telescope XML Database: From the Beginning to Today

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Edd, Jonathan; Fatig, Curtis C.

    2005-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project has been defining, developing, and exercising the use of a common eXtensible Markup Language (XML) for the command and telemetry (C&T) database structure. JWST is the first large NASA space mission to use XML for databases. The JWST project started developing the concepts for the C&T database in 2002. The database will need to last at least 20 years since it will be used beginning with flight software development, continuing through Observatory integration and test (I&T) and through operations. Also, a database tool kit has been provided to the 18 various flight software development laboratories located in the United States, Europe, and Canada that allows the local users to create their own databases. Recently the JWST Project has been working with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Object Management Group (OMG) XML Telemetry and Command Exchange (XTCE) personnel to provide all the information needed by JWST and JPL for exchanging database information using a XML standard structure. The lack of standardization requires custom ingest scripts for each ground system segment, increasing the cost of the total system. Providing a non-proprietary standard of the telemetry and command database definition formation will allow dissimilar systems to communicate without the need for expensive mission specific database tools and testing of the systems after the database translation. The various ground system components that would benefit from a standardized database are the telemetry and command systems, archives, simulators, and trending tools. JWST has exchanged the XML database with the Eclipse, EPOCH, ASIST ground systems, Portable spacecraft simulator (PSS), a front-end system, and Integrated Trending and Plotting System (ITPS) successfully. This paper will discuss how JWST decided to use XML, the barriers to a new concept, experiences utilizing the XML structure, exchanging databases with other users, and issues that have

  20. ART-ML - a novel XML format for the biological procedures modeling and the representation of blood flow simulation.

    PubMed

    Karvounis, E C; Tsakanikas, V D; Fotiou, E; Fotiadis, D I

    2010-01-01

    The paper proposes a novel Extensible Markup Language (XML) based format called ART-ML that aims at supporting the interoperability and the reuse of models of blood flow, mass transport and plaque formation, exported by ARTool. ARTool is a platform for the automatic processing of various image modalities of coronary and carotid arteries. The images and their content are fused to develop morphological models of the arteries in easy to handle 3D representations. The platform incorporates efficient algorithms which are able to perform blood flow simulation. In addition atherosclerotic plaque development is estimated taking into account morphological, flow and genetic factors. ART-ML provides a XML format that enables the representation and management of embedded models within the ARTool platform and the storage and interchange of well-defined information. This approach influences in the model creation, model exchange, model reuse and result evaluation.

  1. AllerML: markup language for allergens.

    PubMed

    Ivanciuc, Ovidiu; Gendel, Steven M; Power, Trevor D; Schein, Catherine H; Braun, Werner

    2011-06-01

    Many concerns have been raised about the potential allergenicity of novel, recombinant proteins into food crops. Guidelines, proposed by WHO/FAO and EFSA, include the use of bioinformatics screening to assess the risk of potential allergenicity or cross-reactivities of all proteins introduced, for example, to improve nutritional value or promote crop resistance. However, there are no universally accepted standards that can be used to encode data on the biology of allergens to facilitate using data from multiple databases in this screening. Therefore, we developed AllerML a markup language for allergens to assist in the automated exchange of information between databases and in the integration of the bioinformatics tools that are used to investigate allergenicity and cross-reactivity. As proof of concept, AllerML was implemented using the Structural Database of Allergenic Proteins (SDAP; http://fermi.utmb.edu/SDAP/) database. General implementation of AllerML will promote automatic flow of validated data that will aid in allergy research and regulatory analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Earth Science Markup Language: Transitioning From Design to Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Karen; Graves, Sara; Ramachandran, Rahul

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of the proposed Earth Science Markup Language (ESML) research is to transition from design to application. The resulting schema and prototype software will foster community acceptance for the "define once, use anywhere" concept central to ESML. Supporting goals include: 1. Refinement of the ESML schema and software libraries in cooperation with the user community. 2. Application of the ESML schema and software libraries to a variety of Earth science data sets and analysis tools. 3. Development of supporting prototype software for enhanced ease of use. 4. Cooperation with standards bodies in order to assure ESML is aligned with related metadata standards as appropriate. 5. Widespread publication of the ESML approach, schema, and software.

  3. Collaborative Planning of Robotic Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Backes, Paul; Powell, Mark; Vona, Marsette; Steinke, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The Science Activity Planner (SAP) software system includes an uplink-planning component, which enables collaborative planning of activities to be undertaken by an exploratory robot on a remote planet or on Earth. Included in the uplink-planning component is the SAP-Uplink Browser, which enables users to load multiple spacecraft activity plans into a single window, compare them, and merge them. The uplink-planning component includes a subcomponent that implements the Rover Markup Language Activity Planning format (RML-AP), based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML) format that enables the representation, within a single document, of planned spacecraft and robotic activities together with the scientific reasons for the activities. Each such document is highly parseable and can be validated easily. Another subcomponent of the uplink-planning component is the Activity Dictionary Markup Language (ADML), which eliminates the need for two mission activity dictionaries - one in a human-readable format and one in a machine-readable format. Style sheets that have been developed along with the ADML format enable users to edit one dictionary in a user-friendly environment without compromising

  4. HepML, an XML-based format for describing simulated data in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, S.; Dudko, L.; Kekelidze, D.; Sherstnev, A.

    2010-10-01

    energy physics is divided into several stages. Various programs exist for these stages. In this article we are interested in interfacing different Monte Carlo event generators via data files, in particular, Matrix Element (ME) generators and Showering and Hadronization (SH) generators. There is a widely accepted format for data files for such interfaces - Les Houches Event Format (LHEF). Although information kept in an LHEF file is enough for proper working of SH generators, it is insufficient for understanding how events in the LHEF file have been prepared and which physical model has been applied. In this paper we propose an extension of the format for keeping additional information available in generators. We propose to add a new information block, marked up with XML tags, to the LHEF file. This block describes events in the file in more detail. In particular, it stores information about a physical model, kinematical cuts, generator, etc. This helps to make LHEF files self-documented. Certainly, HepML can be applied in more general context, not in LHEF files only. Solution method: In order to overcome drawbacks of the original LHEF accord we propose to add a new information block of HepML tags. HepML is an XML-based markup language. We designed several XML Schemas for all tags in the language. Any HepML document should follow rules of the Schemas. The language is equipped with a library for operation with HepML tags and documents. This C++ library, called libhepml, consists of classes for HepML objects, which represent a HepML document in computer memory, parsing classes, serializating classes, and some auxiliary classes. Restrictions: The software is adapted for solving problems, described in the article. There are no additional restrictions. Running time: Tests have been done on a computer with Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Solo, 1.4 GHz. Parsing of a HepML file: 6 ms (size of the HepML files is 12.5 Kb) Writing of a HepML block to file: 14 ms (file size 12.5 Kb) Merging of

  5. From data to analysis: linking NWChem and Avogadro with the syntax and semantics of Chemical Markup Language

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multidisciplinary integrated research requires the ability to couple the diverse sets of data obtained from a range of complex experiments and computer simulations. Integrating data requires semantically rich information. In this paper an end-to-end use of semantically rich data in computational chemistry is demonstrated utilizing the Chemical Markup Language (CML) framework. Semantically rich data is generated by the NWChem computational chemistry software with the FoX library and utilized by the Avogadro molecular editor for analysis and visualization. Results The NWChem computational chemistry software has been modified and coupled to the FoX library to write CML compliant XML data files. The FoX library was expanded to represent the lexical input files and molecular orbitals used by the computational chemistry software. Draft dictionary entries and a format for molecular orbitals within CML CompChem were developed. The Avogadro application was extended to read in CML data, and display molecular geometry and electronic structure in the GUI allowing for an end-to-end solution where Avogadro can create input structures, generate input files, NWChem can run the calculation and Avogadro can then read in and analyse the CML output produced. The developments outlined in this paper will be made available in future releases of NWChem, FoX, and Avogadro. Conclusions The production of CML compliant XML files for computational chemistry software such as NWChem can be accomplished relatively easily using the FoX library. The CML data can be read in by a newly developed reader in Avogadro and analysed or visualized in various ways. A community-based effort is needed to further develop the CML CompChem convention and dictionary. This will enable the long-term goal of allowing a researcher to run simple “Google-style” searches of chemistry and physics and have the results of computational calculations returned in a comprehensible form alongside articles from the

  6. Overview of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) (SIGs IA, USE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Janet

    2000-01-01

    Provides an overview of a planned session to describe the work of the World Wide Web Consortium, including technical specifications for HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), XML (Extensible Markup Language), CSS (Cascading Style Sheets), and over 20 other Web standards that address graphics, multimedia, privacy, metadata, and other technologies. (LRW)

  7. DDML Schema Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-08

    Data Display Markup Language HUD heads-up display IRIG Inter-Range Instrumentation Group RCC Range Commanders Council SVG Scalable Vector Graphics...T&E test and evaluation TMATS Telemetry Attributes Transfer Standard XML eXtensible Markup Language DDML Schema Validation, RCC 126-16, February...2016 viii This page intentionally left blank. DDML Schema Validation, RCC 126-16, February 2016 1 1. Introduction This Data Display Markup

  8. Gene Fusion Markup Language: a prototype for exchanging gene fusion data.

    PubMed

    Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Shanmugam, Achiraman; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2012-10-16

    An avalanche of next generation sequencing (NGS) studies has generated an unprecedented amount of genomic structural variation data. These studies have also identified many novel gene fusion candidates with more detailed resolution than previously achieved. However, in the excitement and necessity of publishing the observations from this recently developed cutting-edge technology, no community standardization approach has arisen to organize and represent the data with the essential attributes in an interchangeable manner. As transcriptome studies have been widely used for gene fusion discoveries, the current non-standard mode of data representation could potentially impede data accessibility, critical analyses, and further discoveries in the near future. Here we propose a prototype, Gene Fusion Markup Language (GFML) as an initiative to provide a standard format for organizing and representing the significant features of gene fusion data. GFML will offer the advantage of representing the data in a machine-readable format to enable data exchange, automated analysis interpretation, and independent verification. As this database-independent exchange initiative evolves it will further facilitate the formation of related databases, repositories, and analysis tools. The GFML prototype is made available at http://code.google.com/p/gfml-prototype/. The Gene Fusion Markup Language (GFML) presented here could facilitate the development of a standard format for organizing, integrating and representing the significant features of gene fusion data in an inter-operable and query-able fashion that will enable biologically intuitive access to gene fusion findings and expedite functional characterization. A similar model is envisaged for other NGS data analyses.

  9. Gene Fusion Markup Language: a prototype for exchanging gene fusion data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An avalanche of next generation sequencing (NGS) studies has generated an unprecedented amount of genomic structural variation data. These studies have also identified many novel gene fusion candidates with more detailed resolution than previously achieved. However, in the excitement and necessity of publishing the observations from this recently developed cutting-edge technology, no community standardization approach has arisen to organize and represent the data with the essential attributes in an interchangeable manner. As transcriptome studies have been widely used for gene fusion discoveries, the current non-standard mode of data representation could potentially impede data accessibility, critical analyses, and further discoveries in the near future. Results Here we propose a prototype, Gene Fusion Markup Language (GFML) as an initiative to provide a standard format for organizing and representing the significant features of gene fusion data. GFML will offer the advantage of representing the data in a machine-readable format to enable data exchange, automated analysis interpretation, and independent verification. As this database-independent exchange initiative evolves it will further facilitate the formation of related databases, repositories, and analysis tools. The GFML prototype is made available at http://code.google.com/p/gfml-prototype/. Conclusion The Gene Fusion Markup Language (GFML) presented here could facilitate the development of a standard format for organizing, integrating and representing the significant features of gene fusion data in an inter-operable and query-able fashion that will enable biologically intuitive access to gene fusion findings and expedite functional characterization. A similar model is envisaged for other NGS data analyses. PMID:23072312

  10. The application of geography markup language (GML) to the geological sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Ron

    2005-11-01

    GML 3.0 became an adopted specification of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) in January 2003, and is rapidly emerging as the world standard for the encoding, transport and storage of all forms of geographic information. This paper looks at the application of GML to one of the more challenging areas of automated geography, namely the geological sciences. Specific features of GML of interest to geologists are discussed and then illustrated through a series of geological case studies. We conclude the paper with a discussion of anticipated geological web services that GML will enable. GML is written in XML and makes use of XML Schema for extensibility. It can be used both to represent or model geographic objects and to transport them across the Internet. In this way it serves as the foundation for all manner of geographic web services. Unlike vertical application grammars such as LandXML, GML was intended to define geographic application languages, and hence is applicable to any geographic domain including forestry, environmental sciences, geology and oceanography. This paper provides a review of the basic features of GML that are fundamental to the geological sciences including geometry, coverages, observations, reference systems and temporality. These constructs are then employed in a series of simple geological case studies including structural geological description, surficial geology, representation of geological time scales, mineral occurrences, geohazards and geochemical reconnaissance.

  11. An Introduction to the Resource Description Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Explains the Resource Description Framework (RDF), an infrastructure developed under the World Wide Web Consortium that enables the encoding, exchange, and reuse of structured metadata. It is an application of Extended Markup Language (XML), which is a subset of Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML), and helps with expressing semantics.…

  12. RUBE: an XML-based architecture for 3D process modeling and model fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishwick, Paul A.

    2002-07-01

    Information fusion is a critical problem for science and engineering. There is a need to fuse information content specified as either data or model. We frame our work in terms of fusing dynamic and geometric models, to create an immersive environment where these models can be juxtaposed in 3D, within the same interface. The method by which this is accomplished fits well into other eXtensible Markup Language (XML) approaches to fusion in general. The task of modeling lies at the heart of the human-computer interface, joining the human to the system under study through a variety of sensory modalities. I overview modeling as a key concern for the Defense Department and the Air Force, and then follow with a discussion of past, current, and future work. Past work began with a package with C and has progressed, in current work, to an implementation in XML. Our current work is defined within the RUBE architecture, which is detailed in subsequent papers devoted to key components. We have built RUBE as a next generation modeling framework using our prior software, with research opportunities in immersive 3D and tangible user interfaces.

  13. An XML-Based Manipulation and Query Language for Rule-Based Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Essam; Höpfner, Hagen

    Rules are utilized to assist in the monitoring process that is required in activities, such as disease management and customer relationship management. These rules are specified according to the application best practices. Most of research efforts emphasize on the specification and execution of these rules. Few research efforts focus on managing these rules as one object that has a management life-cycle. This paper presents our manipulation and query language that is developed to facilitate the maintenance of this object during its life-cycle and to query the information contained in this object. This language is based on an XML-based model. Furthermore, we evaluate the model and language using a prototype system applied to a clinical case study.

  14. The Essen Learning Model--A Step towards a Representation of Learning Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bick, Markus; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Veith, Patrick

    The importance of the Extensible Markup Language (XML) technology family in the field of Computer Assisted Learning (CAL) can not be denied. The Instructional Management Systems Project (IMS), for example, provides a learning resource XML binding specification. Considering this specification and other implementations using XML to represent…

  15. DAVE-ML Utility Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    DAVEtools is a set of Java archives that embodies tools for manipulating flight-dynamics models that have been encoded in dynamic aerospace vehicle exchange markup language (DAVE-ML). [DAVE-ML is an application program, written in Extensible Markup Language (XML), for encoding complete computational models of the dynamics of aircraft and spacecraft.

  16. NeXML: rich, extensible, and verifiable representation of comparative data and metadata.

    PubMed

    Vos, Rutger A; Balhoff, James P; Caravas, Jason A; Holder, Mark T; Lapp, Hilmar; Maddison, Wayne P; Midford, Peter E; Priyam, Anurag; Sukumaran, Jeet; Xia, Xuhua; Stoltzfus, Arlin

    2012-07-01

    In scientific research, integration and synthesis require a common understanding of where data come from, how much they can be trusted, and what they may be used for. To make such an understanding computer-accessible requires standards for exchanging richly annotated data. The challenges of conveying reusable data are particularly acute in regard to evolutionary comparative analysis, which comprises an ever-expanding list of data types, methods, research aims, and subdisciplines. To facilitate interoperability in evolutionary comparative analysis, we present NeXML, an XML standard (inspired by the current standard, NEXUS) that supports exchange of richly annotated comparative data. NeXML defines syntax for operational taxonomic units, character-state matrices, and phylogenetic trees and networks. Documents can be validated unambiguously. Importantly, any data element can be annotated, to an arbitrary degree of richness, using a system that is both flexible and rigorous. We describe how the use of NeXML by the TreeBASE and Phenoscape projects satisfies user needs that cannot be satisfied with other available file formats. By relying on XML Schema Definition, the design of NeXML facilitates the development and deployment of software for processing, transforming, and querying documents. The adoption of NeXML for practical use is facilitated by the availability of (1) an online manual with code samples and a reference to all defined elements and attributes, (2) programming toolkits in most of the languages used commonly in evolutionary informatics, and (3) input-output support in several widely used software applications. An active, open, community-based development process enables future revision and expansion of NeXML.

  17. Querying XML Data with SPARQL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikakis, Nikos; Gioldasis, Nektarios; Tsinaraki, Chrisa; Christodoulakis, Stavros

    SPARQL is today the standard access language for Semantic Web data. In the recent years XML databases have also acquired industrial importance due to the widespread applicability of XML in the Web. In this paper we present a framework that bridges the heterogeneity gap and creates an interoperable environment where SPARQL queries are used to access XML databases. Our approach assumes that fairly generic mappings between ontology constructs and XML Schema constructs have been automatically derived or manually specified. The mappings are used to automatically translate SPARQL queries to semantically equivalent XQuery queries which are used to access the XML databases. We present the algorithms and the implementation of SPARQL2XQuery framework, which is used for answering SPARQL queries over XML databases.

  18. Extensions to the Dynamic Aerospace Vehicle Exchange Markup Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brian, Geoffrey J.; Jackson, E. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The Dynamic Aerospace Vehicle Exchange Markup Language (DAVE-ML) is a syntactical language for exchanging flight vehicle dynamic model data. It provides a framework for encoding entire flight vehicle dynamic model data packages for exchange and/or long-term archiving. Version 2.0.1 of DAVE-ML provides much of the functionality envisioned for exchanging aerospace vehicle data; however, it is limited in only supporting scalar time-independent data. Additional functionality is required to support vector and matrix data, abstracting sub-system models, detailing dynamics system models (both discrete and continuous), and defining a dynamic data format (such as time sequenced data) for validation of dynamics system models and vehicle simulation packages. Extensions to DAVE-ML have been proposed to manage data as vectors and n-dimensional matrices, and record dynamic data in a compatible form. These capabilities will improve the clarity of data being exchanged, simplify the naming of parameters, and permit static and dynamic data to be stored using a common syntax within a single file; thereby enhancing the framework provided by DAVE-ML for exchanging entire flight vehicle dynamic simulation models.

  19. A Novel Navigation Paradigm for XML Repositories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azagury, Alain; Factor, Michael E.; Maarek, Yoelle S.; Mandler, Benny

    2002-01-01

    Discusses data exchange over the Internet and describes the architecture and implementation of an XML document repository that promotes a navigation paradigm for XML documents based on content and context. Topics include information retrieval and semistructured documents; and file systems as information storage infrastructure, particularly XMLFS.…

  20. XML Reconstruction View Selection in XML Databases: Complexity Analysis and Approximation Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebotko, Artem; Fu, Bin

    Query evaluation in an XML database requires reconstructing XML subtrees rooted at nodes found by an XML query. Since XML subtree reconstruction can be expensive, one approach to improve query response time is to use reconstruction views - materialized XML subtrees of an XML document, whose nodes are frequently accessed by XML queries. For this approach to be efficient, the principal requirement is a framework for view selection. In this work, we are the first to formalize and study the problem of XML reconstruction view selection. The input is a tree T, in which every node i has a size c i and profit p i , and the size limitation C. The target is to find a subset of subtrees rooted at nodes i 1, ⋯ , i k respectively such that c_{i_1}+\\cdots +c_{i_k}le C, and p_{i_1}+\\cdots +p_{i_k} is maximal. Furthermore, there is no overlap between any two subtrees selected in the solution. We prove that this problem is NP-hard and present a fully polynomial-time approximation scheme (FPTAS) as a solution.

  1. NeXML: Rich, Extensible, and Verifiable Representation of Comparative Data and Metadata

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Rutger A.; Balhoff, James P.; Caravas, Jason A.; Holder, Mark T.; Lapp, Hilmar; Maddison, Wayne P.; Midford, Peter E.; Priyam, Anurag; Sukumaran, Jeet; Xia, Xuhua; Stoltzfus, Arlin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In scientific research, integration and synthesis require a common understanding of where data come from, how much they can be trusted, and what they may be used for. To make such an understanding computer-accessible requires standards for exchanging richly annotated data. The challenges of conveying reusable data are particularly acute in regard to evolutionary comparative analysis, which comprises an ever-expanding list of data types, methods, research aims, and subdisciplines. To facilitate interoperability in evolutionary comparative analysis, we present NeXML, an XML standard (inspired by the current standard, NEXUS) that supports exchange of richly annotated comparative data. NeXML defines syntax for operational taxonomic units, character-state matrices, and phylogenetic trees and networks. Documents can be validated unambiguously. Importantly, any data element can be annotated, to an arbitrary degree of richness, using a system that is both flexible and rigorous. We describe how the use of NeXML by the TreeBASE and Phenoscape projects satisfies user needs that cannot be satisfied with other available file formats. By relying on XML Schema Definition, the design of NeXML facilitates the development and deployment of software for processing, transforming, and querying documents. The adoption of NeXML for practical use is facilitated by the availability of (1) an online manual with code samples and a reference to all defined elements and attributes, (2) programming toolkits in most of the languages used commonly in evolutionary informatics, and (3) input–output support in several widely used software applications. An active, open, community-based development process enables future revision and expansion of NeXML. PMID:22357728

  2. Nassi-Schneiderman Diagram in HTML Based on AML

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menyhárt, László

    2013-01-01

    In an earlier work I defined an extension of XML called Algorithm Markup Language (AML) for easy and understandable coding in an IDE which supports XML editing (e.g. NetBeans). The AML extension contains annotations and native language (English or Hungarian) tag names used when coding our algorithm. This paper presents a drawing tool with which…

  3. An enhanced security solution for electronic medical records based on AES hybrid technique with SOAP/XML and SHA-1.

    PubMed

    Kiah, M L Mat; Nabi, Mohamed S; Zaidan, B B; Zaidan, A A

    2013-10-01

    This study aims to provide security solutions for implementing electronic medical records (EMRs). E-Health organizations could utilize the proposed method and implement recommended solutions in medical/health systems. Majority of the required security features of EMRs were noted. The methods used were tested against each of these security features. In implementing the system, the combination that satisfied all of the security features of EMRs was selected. Secure implementation and management of EMRs facilitate the safeguarding of the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of e-health organization systems. Health practitioners, patients, and visitors can use the information system facilities safely and with confidence anytime and anywhere. After critically reviewing security and data transmission methods, a new hybrid method was proposed to be implemented on EMR systems. This method will enhance the robustness, security, and integration of EMR systems. The hybrid of simple object access protocol/extensible markup language (XML) with advanced encryption standard and secure hash algorithm version 1 has achieved the security requirements of an EMR system with the capability of integrating with other systems through the design of XML messages.

  4. Value of XML in the implementation of clinical practice guidelines--the issue of content retrieval and presentation.

    PubMed

    Hoelzer, S; Schweiger, R K; Boettcher, H A; Tafazzoli, A G; Dudeck, J

    2001-01-01

    that preserves the original cohesiveness. The lack of structure limits the automatic identification and extraction of the information contained in these resources. For this reason, we have chosen a document-based approach using eXtensible Markup Language (XML) with its schema definition and related technologies. XML empowers the applications for in-context searching. In addition it allows the same content to be represented in different ways. Our XML reference clinical data model for guidelines has been realized with the XML schema definition. The schema is used for structuring new text-based guidelines and updating existing documents. It is also used to establish search strategies on the document base. We hypothesize that enabling the physicians to query the available CPGs easily, and to get access to selected and specific information at the point of care will foster increased use. Based on current evidence we are confident that it will have substantial impact on the care provided, and will improve health outcomes.

  5. XML Encoding of Features Describing Rule-Based Modeling of Reaction Networks with Multi-Component Molecular Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Blinov, Michael L.; Moraru, Ion I.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-state molecules and multi-component complexes are commonly involved in cellular signaling. Accounting for molecules that have multiple potential states, such as a protein that may be phosphorylated on multiple residues, and molecules that combine to form heterogeneous complexes located among multiple compartments, generates an effect of combinatorial complexity. Models involving relatively few signaling molecules can include thousands of distinct chemical species. Several software tools (StochSim, BioNetGen) are already available to deal with combinatorial complexity. Such tools need information standards if models are to be shared, jointly evaluated and developed. Here we discuss XML conventions that can be adopted for modeling biochemical reaction networks described by user-specified reaction rules. These could form a basis for possible future extensions of the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML). PMID:21464833

  6. Common Data Format: New XML and Conversion Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, D. B.; Liu, M. H.; McGuire, R. E.

    2002-12-01

    Common Data Format (CDF) is a self-describing platform-independent data format for storing, accessing, and manipulating scalar and multidimensional scientific data sets. Significant benefit has accrued to specific science communities from their use of standard formats within those communities. Examples include the International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) community in using CDF for traditional space physics data (fields, particles and plasma, waves, and images), the worldwide astronomical community in using FITS (Flexible Image Transport System) for solar data (primarily spectral images), the NASA Planetary community in using Planetary Data System (PDS) Labels, and the earth science community in using Hierarchical Data Format (HDF). Scientific progress in solar-terrestrial physics continues to be impeded by the multiplicity of available standards for data formats and dearth of general data format translators. As a result, scientists today spend a significant amount of time translating data into the format they are familiar with for their research. To minimize this unnecessary data translation time and to allow more research time, the CDF office located at GSFC National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) has developed HDF-to-CDF and FITS-to-CDF translators, and employed the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) technology to facilitate and promote data interoperability within the space science community. We will present the current status of the CDF work including the conversion tools that have been recently developed, conversion tools that are planned in the near future, share some of the XML experiences, and use the discussion to gain community feedback to our planned future work.

  7. C3I and Modelling and Simulation (M&S) Interoperability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    customised Open Source products. The technical implementation is based on the use of the eXtendend Markup Language (XML) and Python . XML is developed...to structure, store and send information. The language is focus on the description of data. Python is a portable, interpreted, object-oriented...programming language. A huge variety of usable Open Source Projects were issued by the Python Community. 3.1 Phase 1: Feasibility Studies Phase 1 was

  8. Pharmacometrics Markup Language (PharmML): Opening New Perspectives for Model Exchange in Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Swat, M J; Moodie, S; Wimalaratne, S M; Kristensen, N R; Lavielle, M; Mari, A; Magni, P; Smith, M K; Bizzotto, R; Pasotti, L; Mezzalana, E; Comets, E; Sarr, C; Terranova, N; Blaudez, E; Chan, P; Chard, J; Chatel, K; Chenel, M; Edwards, D; Franklin, C; Giorgino, T; Glont, M; Girard, P; Grenon, P; Harling, K; Hooker, A C; Kaye, R; Keizer, R; Kloft, C; Kok, J N; Kokash, N; Laibe, C; Laveille, C; Lestini, G; Mentré, F; Munafo, A; Nordgren, R; Nyberg, H B; Parra-Guillen, Z P; Plan, E; Ribba, B; Smith, G; Trocóniz, I F; Yvon, F; Milligan, P A; Harnisch, L; Karlsson, M; Hermjakob, H; Le Novère, N

    2015-06-01

    The lack of a common exchange format for mathematical models in pharmacometrics has been a long-standing problem. Such a format has the potential to increase productivity and analysis quality, simplify the handling of complex workflows, ensure reproducibility of research, and facilitate the reuse of existing model resources. Pharmacometrics Markup Language (PharmML), currently under development by the Drug Disease Model Resources (DDMoRe) consortium, is intended to become an exchange standard in pharmacometrics by providing means to encode models, trial designs, and modeling steps.

  9. Pharmacometrics Markup Language (PharmML): Opening New Perspectives for Model Exchange in Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Swat, MJ; Moodie, S; Wimalaratne, SM; Kristensen, NR; Lavielle, M; Mari, A; Magni, P; Smith, MK; Bizzotto, R; Pasotti, L; Mezzalana, E; Comets, E; Sarr, C; Terranova, N; Blaudez, E; Chan, P; Chard, J; Chatel, K; Chenel, M; Edwards, D; Franklin, C; Giorgino, T; Glont, M; Girard, P; Grenon, P; Harling, K; Hooker, AC; Kaye, R; Keizer, R; Kloft, C; Kok, JN; Kokash, N; Laibe, C; Laveille, C; Lestini, G; Mentré, F; Munafo, A; Nordgren, R; Nyberg, HB; Parra-Guillen, ZP; Plan, E; Ribba, B; Smith, G; Trocóniz, IF; Yvon, F; Milligan, PA; Harnisch, L; Karlsson, M; Hermjakob, H; Le Novère, N

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a common exchange format for mathematical models in pharmacometrics has been a long-standing problem. Such a format has the potential to increase productivity and analysis quality, simplify the handling of complex workflows, ensure reproducibility of research, and facilitate the reuse of existing model resources. Pharmacometrics Markup Language (PharmML), currently under development by the Drug Disease Model Resources (DDMoRe) consortium, is intended to become an exchange standard in pharmacometrics by providing means to encode models, trial designs, and modeling steps. PMID:26225259

  10. Making journals accessible to the visually impaired: the future is near

    PubMed Central

    GARDNER, John; BULATOV, Vladimir; KELLY, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The American Physical Society (APS) has been a leader in using markup languages for publishing. ViewPlus has led development of innovative technologies for graphical information accessibility by people with print disabilities. APS, ViewPlus, and other collaborators in the Enhanced Reading Project are working together to develop the necessary technology and infrastructure for APS to publish its journals in the DAISY (Digital Accessible Information SYstem) eXtended Markup Language (XML) format, in which all text, math, and figures would be accessible to people who are blind or have other print disabilities. The first APS DAISY XML publications are targeted for late 2010. PMID:20676358

  11. The inclusion of an online journal in PubMed central - a difficult path.

    PubMed

    Grech, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The indexing of a journal in a prominent database (such as PubMed) is an important imprimatur. Journals accepted for inclusion in PubMed Central (PMC) are automatically indexed in PubMed but must provide the entire contents of their publications as XML-tagged (Extensible Markup Language) data files compliant with PubMed's document type definition (DTD). This paper describes the various attempts that the journal Images in Paediatric Cardiology made in its efforts to convert the journal contents (including all of the extant backlog) to PMC-compliant XML for archiving and indexing in PubMed after the journal was accepted for inclusion by the database.

  12. Report of Official foreign Travel to Spain April 17-29, 1999. (in English;)

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Mason, j.d.

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has moved rapidly toward electronic production, management, and dissemination of scientific and technical information. The World-Wide Web (WWW) has become a primary means of information dissemination. Electronic commerce (EC) is becoming the preferred means of procurement. DOE, like other government agencies, depends on and encourages the use of international standards in data communications. Like most government agencies, DOE has expressed a preference for openly developed standards in preference to proprietary designs promoted as "standards" by vendors. In particular, there is a preference for standards developed by organizations such as the International Organization for Standardization (ISO)more » and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) that use open, public processes to develop their standards. Among the most widely adopted international standards is the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML, ISO 8879:1986, FIPS 152), which DOE has selected as the basis of its electronic management of documents. Besides the official commitment, which has resulted in several specialized projects, DOE makes heavy use of coding derived from SGML, and its use is likely to increase in the future. Most documents on the WWW are coded in HTML ("Hypertext Markup Language"), which is an application of SGML. The World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C), with the backing of major software houses like Microsoft, Adobe, and Netscape, is promoting XML ("eXtensible Markup Language"), a class of SGML applications, for the future of the WWW and the basis for EC. W3C has announced its intention of discontinuing future development of HTML and replacing it with XHTML, an application of XML. In support of DOE's use of these standards, I have served since 1985 as Chairman of the international committee responsible for SGML and related standards, ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34 (SC34) and its predecessor organizations. During my April 1999 trip, I convened the spring 1999

  13. Interexaminer variation of minutia markup on latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Ulery, Bradford T; Hicklin, R Austin; Roberts, Maria Antonia; Buscaglia, JoAnn

    2016-07-01

    Latent print examiners often differ in the number of minutiae they mark during analysis of a latent, and also during comparison of a latent with an exemplar. Differences in minutia counts understate interexaminer variability: examiners' markups may have similar minutia counts but differ greatly in which specific minutiae were marked. We assessed variability in minutia markup among 170 volunteer latent print examiners. Each provided detailed markup documenting their examinations of 22 latent-exemplar pairs of prints randomly assigned from a pool of 320 pairs. An average of 12 examiners marked each latent. The primary factors associated with minutia reproducibility were clarity, which regions of the prints examiners chose to mark, and agreement on value or comparison determinations. In clear areas (where the examiner was "certain of the location, presence, and absence of all minutiae"), median reproducibility was 82%; in unclear areas, median reproducibility was 46%. Differing interpretations regarding which regions should be marked (e.g., when there is ambiguity in the continuity of a print) contributed to variability in minutia markup: especially in unclear areas, marked minutiae were often far from the nearest minutia marked by a majority of examiners. Low reproducibility was also associated with differences in value or comparison determinations. Lack of standardization in minutia markup and unfamiliarity with test procedures presumably contribute to the variability we observed. We have identified factors accounting for interexaminer variability; implementing standards for detailed markup as part of documentation and focusing future training efforts on these factors may help to facilitate transparency and reduce subjectivity in the examination process. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Lapin Data Interchange Among Database, Analysis and Display Programs Using XML-Based Text Files

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of grant NCC3-966 was to investigate and evaluate the interchange of application-specific data among multiple programs each carrying out part of the analysis and design task. This has been carried out previously by creating a custom program to read data produced by one application and then write that data to a file whose format is specific to the second application that needs all or part of that data. In this investigation, data of interest is described using the XML markup language that allows the data to be stored in a text-string. Software to transform output data of a task into an XML-string and software to read an XML string and extract all or a portion of the data needed for another application is used to link two independent applications together as part of an overall design effort. This approach was initially used with a standard analysis program, Lapin, along with standard applications a standard spreadsheet program, a relational database program, and a conventional dialog and display program to demonstrate the successful sharing of data among independent programs. Most of the effort beyond that demonstration has been concentrated on the inclusion of more complex display programs. Specifically, a custom-written windowing program organized around dialogs to control the interactions have been combined with an independent CAD program (Open Cascade) that supports sophisticated display of CAD elements such as lines, spline curves, and surfaces and turbine-blade data produced by an independent blade design program (UD0300).

  15. HDF-EOS Web Server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullman, Richard; Bane, Bob; Yang, Jingli

    2008-01-01

    A shell script has been written as a means of automatically making HDF-EOS-formatted data sets available via the World Wide Web. ("HDF-EOS" and variants thereof are defined in the first of the two immediately preceding articles.) The shell script chains together some software tools developed by the Data Usability Group at Goddard Space Flight Center to perform the following actions: Extract metadata in Object Definition Language (ODL) from an HDF-EOS file, Convert the metadata from ODL to Extensible Markup Language (XML), Reformat the XML metadata into human-readable Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), Publish the HTML metadata and the original HDF-EOS file to a Web server and an Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol (OPeN-DAP) server computer, and Reformat the XML metadata and submit the resulting file to the EOS Clearinghouse, which is a Web-based metadata clearinghouse that facilitates searching for, and exchange of, Earth-Science data.

  16. Report of Official Foreign Travel to France May 8-27, 1998

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    mason, j d

    1998-06-11

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has moved ever more rapidly towards electronic production, management, and dissemination of scientific and technical information. The World-Wide Web (WWW) has become a primary means of information dissemination. Electronic commerce (EC) is becoming the preferred means of procurement. DOE, like other government agencies, depends on and encourages the use of international standards in data communications. Among the most widely adopted standards is the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML, ISO 8879:1986, FIPS 152), which DOE has selected as the basis of its electronic management of documents. Besides the official commitment, which has resulted in several specializedmore » projects, DOE makes heavy use of coding derived from SGML, and its use is likely to increase in the future. Most documents on the WWW are coded in HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), which is an application of SGML. The World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C), with the backing of major software houses like Microsoft, Adobe, and Netscape, is promoting XML (eXtensible Markup Language), a class of SGML applications, for the future of the WWW and the basis for EC. In support of DOE's use of these standards, I have served since 1985 as Convenor of the international committee responsible for SGML and related standards, ISO/IEC JTC1/WG4 (WG4). During this trip I convened the spring 1998 meeting of WG4 in Paris, France. I also attended a major conference on the use of SGML and XML. At the close of the conference, I chaired a workshop of standards developers looking at ways of improving online searching of electronic documents. Note: Since the end of the meetings in France, JTC1 has raised the level of WG4 to a full Subcommittee; its designator is now ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34. WG4 maintains and continues to enhance several standards. In addition to SGML, which is the basis of HTML and XML, WG4 also works on the Document Style Semantics and Specification Language (DSSSL), which is the

  17. Software Development Of XML Parser Based On Algebraic Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Bozhidar; Georgieva, Adriana

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, is presented one software development and implementation of an algebraic method for XML data processing, which accelerates XML parsing process. Therefore, the proposed in this article nontraditional approach for fast XML navigation with algebraic tools contributes to advanced efforts in the making of an easier user-friendly API for XML transformations. Here the proposed software for XML documents processing (parser) is easy to use and can manage files with strictly defined data structure. The purpose of the presented algorithm is to offer a new approach for search and restructuring hierarchical XML data. This approach permits fast XML documents processing, using algebraic model developed in details in previous works of the same authors. So proposed parsing mechanism is easy accessible to the web consumer who is able to control XML file processing, to search different elements (tags) in it, to delete and to add a new XML content as well. The presented various tests show higher rapidity and low consumption of resources in comparison with some existing commercial parsers.

  18. Indexing Temporal XML Using FIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Tiankun; Wang, Xinjun; Zhou, Yingchun

    XML has become an important criterion for description and exchange of information. It is of practical significance to introduce the temporal information on this basis, because time has penetrated into all walks of life as an important property information .Such kind of database can track document history and recover information to state of any time before, and is called Temporal XML database. We advise a new feature vector on the basis of FIX which is a feature-based XML index, and build an index on temporal XML database using B+ tree, donated TFIX. We also put forward a new query algorithm upon it for temporal query. Our experiments proved that this index has better performance over other kinds of XML indexes. The index can satisfy all TXPath queries with depth up to K(>0).

  19. The semantics of Chemical Markup Language (CML) for computational chemistry : CompChem.

    PubMed

    Phadungsukanan, Weerapong; Kraft, Markus; Townsend, Joe A; Murray-Rust, Peter

    2012-08-07

    : This paper introduces a subdomain chemistry format for storing computational chemistry data called CompChem. It has been developed based on the design, concepts and methodologies of Chemical Markup Language (CML) by adding computational chemistry semantics on top of the CML Schema. The format allows a wide range of ab initio quantum chemistry calculations of individual molecules to be stored. These calculations include, for example, single point energy calculation, molecular geometry optimization, and vibrational frequency analysis. The paper also describes the supporting infrastructure, such as processing software, dictionaries, validation tools and database repositories. In addition, some of the challenges and difficulties in developing common computational chemistry dictionaries are discussed. The uses of CompChem are illustrated by two practical applications.

  20. The semantics of Chemical Markup Language (CML) for computational chemistry : CompChem

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a subdomain chemistry format for storing computational chemistry data called CompChem. It has been developed based on the design, concepts and methodologies of Chemical Markup Language (CML) by adding computational chemistry semantics on top of the CML Schema. The format allows a wide range of ab initio quantum chemistry calculations of individual molecules to be stored. These calculations include, for example, single point energy calculation, molecular geometry optimization, and vibrational frequency analysis. The paper also describes the supporting infrastructure, such as processing software, dictionaries, validation tools and database repositories. In addition, some of the challenges and difficulties in developing common computational chemistry dictionaries are discussed. The uses of CompChem are illustrated by two practical applications. PMID:22870956

  1. Web Browser Trends and Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin-Jones, Bob

    2000-01-01

    Discusses Web browsers and how their capabilities have been expanded, support for Web browsing on different devices (cell phones, palmtop computers, TV sets), and browser support for the next-generation Web authoring language, XML ("extensible markup language"). (Author/VWL)

  2. Clinical map document based on XML (cMDX): document architecture with mapping feature for reporting and analysing prostate cancer in radical prostatectomy specimens.

    PubMed

    Eminaga, Okyaz; Hinkelammert, Reemt; Semjonow, Axel; Neumann, Joerg; Abbas, Mahmoud; Koepke, Thomas; Bettendorf, Olaf; Eltze, Elke; Dugas, Martin

    2010-11-15

    The pathology report of radical prostatectomy specimens plays an important role in clinical decisions and the prognostic evaluation in Prostate Cancer (PCa). The anatomical schema is a helpful tool to document PCa extension for clinical and research purposes. To achieve electronic documentation and analysis, an appropriate documentation model for anatomical schemas is needed. For this purpose we developed cMDX. The document architecture of cMDX was designed according to Open Packaging Conventions by separating the whole data into template data and patient data. Analogue custom XML elements were considered to harmonize the graphical representation (e.g. tumour extension) with the textual data (e.g. histological patterns). The graphical documentation was based on the four-layer visualization model that forms the interaction between different custom XML elements. Sensible personal data were encrypted with a 256-bit cryptographic algorithm to avoid misuse. In order to assess the clinical value, we retrospectively analysed the tumour extension in 255 patients after radical prostatectomy. The pathology report with cMDX can represent pathological findings of the prostate in schematic styles. Such reports can be integrated into the hospital information system. "cMDX" documents can be converted into different data formats like text, graphics and PDF. Supplementary tools like cMDX Editor and an analyser tool were implemented. The graphical analysis of 255 prostatectomy specimens showed that PCa were mostly localized in the peripheral zone (Mean: 73% ± 25). 54% of PCa showed a multifocal growth pattern. cMDX can be used for routine histopathological reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens and provide data for scientific analysis.

  3. The Cadmio XML healthcare record.

    PubMed

    Barbera, Francesco; Ferri, Fernando; Ricci, Fabrizio L; Sottile, Pier Angelo

    2002-01-01

    The management of clinical data is a complex task. Patient related information reported in patient folders is a set of heterogeneous and structured data accessed by different users having different goals (in local or geographical networks). XML language provides a mechanism for describing, manipulating, and visualising structured data in web-based applications. XML ensures that the structured data is managed in a uniform and transparent manner independently from the applications and their providers guaranteeing some interoperability. Extracting data from the healthcare record and structuring them according to XML makes the data available through browsers. The MIC/MIE model (Medical Information Category/Medical Information Elements), which allows the definition and management of healthcare records and used in CADMIO, a HISA based project, is described in this paper, using XML for allowing the data to be visualised through web browsers.

  4. Lapin Data Interchange Among Database, Analysis and Display Programs Using XML-Based Text Files

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate and evaluate the interchange of application- specific data among multiple programs each carrying out part of the analysis and design task. This has been carried out previously by creating a custom program to read data produced by one application and then write that data to a file whose format is specific to the second application that needs all or part of that data. In this investigation, data of interest is described using the XML markup language that allows the data to be stored in a text-string. Software to transform output data of a task into an XML-string and software to read an XML string and extract all or a portion of the data needed for another application is used to link two independent applications together as part of an overall design effort. This approach was initially used with a standard analysis program, Lapin, along with standard applications a standard spreadsheet program, a relational database program, and a conventional dialog and display program to demonstrate the successful sharing of data among independent programs. See Engineering Analysis Using a Web-Based Protocol by J.D. Schoeffler and R.W. Claus, NASA TM-2002-211981, October 2002. Most of the effort beyond that demonstration has been concentrated on the inclusion of more complex display programs. Specifically, a custom-written windowing program organized around dialogs to control the interactions have been combined with an independent CAD program (Open Cascade) that supports sophisticated display of CAD elements such as lines, spline curves, and surfaces and turbine-blade data produced by an independent blade design program (UD0300).

  5. New NED XML/VOtable Services and Client Interface Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevunova, O.; Good, J.; Mazzarella, J.; Berriman, G. B.; Madore, B.

    2005-12-01

    The NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) provides data and cross-identifications for over 7 million extragalactic objects fused from thousands of survey catalogs and journal articles. The data cover all frequencies from radio through gamma rays and include positions, redshifts, photometry and spectral energy distributions (SEDs), sizes, and images. NED services have traditionally supplied data in HTML format for connections from Web browsers, and a custom ASCII data structure for connections by remote computer programs written in the C programming language. We describe new services that provide responses from NED queries in XML documents compliant with the international virtual observatory VOtable protocol. The XML/VOtable services support cone searches, all-sky searches based on object attributes (survey names, cross-IDs, redshifts, flux densities), and requests for detailed object data. Initial services have been inserted into the NVO registry, and others will follow soon. The first client application is a Style Sheet specification for rendering NED VOtable query results in Web browsers that support XML. The second prototype application is a Java applet that allows users to compare multiple SEDs. The new XML/VOtable output mode will also simplify the integration of data from NED into visualization and analysis packages, software agents, and other virtual observatory applications. We show an example SED from NED plotted using VOPlot. The NED website is: http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu.

  6. Teaching XBRL to Graduate Business Students: A Hands-On Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinsker, Robert

    2004-01-01

    EXtensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL) is a non-proprietary, computer language that has many uses. Known primarily as the Extensible Markup Language (XML) for business reporting, XBRL allows entities to report their business information (i.e., financial statements, announcements, etc.) on the Internet and communicate with other entities'…

  7. Clinical map document based on XML (cMDX): document architecture with mapping feature for reporting and analysing prostate cancer in radical prostatectomy specimens

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The pathology report of radical prostatectomy specimens plays an important role in clinical decisions and the prognostic evaluation in Prostate Cancer (PCa). The anatomical schema is a helpful tool to document PCa extension for clinical and research purposes. To achieve electronic documentation and analysis, an appropriate documentation model for anatomical schemas is needed. For this purpose we developed cMDX. Methods The document architecture of cMDX was designed according to Open Packaging Conventions by separating the whole data into template data and patient data. Analogue custom XML elements were considered to harmonize the graphical representation (e.g. tumour extension) with the textual data (e.g. histological patterns). The graphical documentation was based on the four-layer visualization model that forms the interaction between different custom XML elements. Sensible personal data were encrypted with a 256-bit cryptographic algorithm to avoid misuse. In order to assess the clinical value, we retrospectively analysed the tumour extension in 255 patients after radical prostatectomy. Results The pathology report with cMDX can represent pathological findings of the prostate in schematic styles. Such reports can be integrated into the hospital information system. "cMDX" documents can be converted into different data formats like text, graphics and PDF. Supplementary tools like cMDX Editor and an analyser tool were implemented. The graphical analysis of 255 prostatectomy specimens showed that PCa were mostly localized in the peripheral zone (Mean: 73% ± 25). 54% of PCa showed a multifocal growth pattern. Conclusions cMDX can be used for routine histopathological reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens and provide data for scientific analysis. PMID:21078179

  8. TOMML: A Rule Language for Structured Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirstea, Horatiu; Moreau, Pierre-Etienne; Reilles, Antoine

    We present the TOM language that extends JAVA with the purpose of providing high level constructs inspired by the rewriting community. TOM bridges thus the gap between a general purpose language and high level specifications based on rewriting. This approach was motivated by the promotion of rule based techniques and their integration in large scale applications. Powerful matching capabilities along with a rich strategy language are among TOM's strong features that make it easy to use and competitive with respect to other rule based languages. TOM is thus a natural choice for querying and transforming structured data and in particular XML documents [1]. We present here its main XML oriented features and illustrate its use on several examples.

  9. Importing MAGE-ML format microarray data into BioConductor.

    PubMed

    Durinck, Steffen; Allemeersch, Joke; Carey, Vincent J; Moreau, Yves; De Moor, Bart

    2004-12-12

    The microarray gene expression markup language (MAGE-ML) is a widely used XML (eXtensible Markup Language) standard for describing and exchanging information about microarray experiments. It can describe microarray designs, microarray experiment designs, gene expression data and data analysis results. We describe RMAGEML, a new Bioconductor package that provides a link between cDNA microarray data stored in MAGE-ML format and the Bioconductor framework for preprocessing, visualization and analysis of microarray experiments. http://www.bioconductor.org. Open Source.

  10. XML: James Webb Space Telescope Database Issues, Lessons, and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detter, Ryan; Mooney, Michael; Fatig, Curtis

    2003-01-01

    This paper will present the current concept using extensible Markup Language (XML) as the underlying structure for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) database. The purpose of using XML is to provide a JWST database, independent of any portion of the ground system, yet still compatible with the various systems using a variety of different structures. The testing of the JWST Flight Software (FSW) started in 2002, yet the launch is scheduled for 2011 with a planned 5-year mission and a 5-year follow on option. The initial database and ground system elements, including the commands, telemetry, and ground system tools will be used for 19 years, plus post mission activities. During the Integration and Test (I&T) phases of the JWST development, 24 distinct laboratories, each geographically dispersed, will have local database tools with an XML database. Each of these laboratories database tools will be used for the exporting and importing of data both locally and to a central database system, inputting data to the database certification process, and providing various reports. A centralized certified database repository will be maintained by the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. One of the challenges for the database is to be flexible enough to allow for the upgrade, addition or changing of individual items without effecting the entire ground system. Also, using XML should allow for the altering of the import and export formats needed by the various elements, tracking the verification/validation of each database item, allow many organizations to provide database inputs, and the merging of the many existing database processes into one central database structure throughout the JWST program. Many National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) projects have attempted to take advantage of open source and commercial technology. Often this causes a greater reliance on the use of Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS), which is often limiting

  11. The Implications of Well-Formedness on Web-Based Educational Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohler, James L.

    Within all institutions, Web developers are beginning to utilize technologies that make sites more than static information resources. Databases such as XML (Extensible Markup Language) and XSL (Extensible Stylesheet Language) are key technologies that promise to extend the Web beyond the "information storehouse" paradigm and provide…

  12. The medical simulation markup language - simplifying the biomechanical modeling workflow.

    PubMed

    Suwelack, Stefan; Stoll, Markus; Schalck, Sebastian; Schoch, Nicolai; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Bendl, Rolf; Heuveline, Vincent; Speidel, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Modeling and simulation of the human body by means of continuum mechanics has become an important tool in diagnostics, computer-assisted interventions and training. This modeling approach seeks to construct patient-specific biomechanical models from tomographic data. Usually many different tools such as segmentation and meshing algorithms are involved in this workflow. In this paper we present a generalized and flexible description for biomechanical models. The unique feature of the new modeling language is that it not only describes the final biomechanical simulation, but also the workflow how the biomechanical model is constructed from tomographic data. In this way, the MSML can act as a middleware between all tools used in the modeling pipeline. The MSML thus greatly facilitates the prototyping of medical simulation workflows for clinical and research purposes. In this paper, we not only detail the XML-based modeling scheme, but also present a concrete implementation. Different examples highlight the flexibility, robustness and ease-of-use of the approach.

  13. Embedding the shapes of regions of interest into a Clinical Document Architecture document.

    PubMed

    Minh, Nguyen Hai; Yi, Byoung-Kee; Kim, Il Kon; Song, Joon Hyun; Binh, Pham Viet

    2015-03-01

    Sharing a medical image visually annotated by a region of interest with a remotely located specialist for consultation is a good practice. It may, however, require a special-purpose (and most likely expensive) system to send and view them, which is an unfeasible solution in developing countries such as Vietnam. In this study, we design and implement interoperable methods based on the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture and the eXtensible Markup Language Stylesheet Language for Transformation standards to seamlessly exchange and visually present the shapes of regions of interest using web browsers. We also propose a new integration architecture for a Clinical Document Architecture generator that enables embedding of regions of interest and simultaneous auto-generation of corresponding style sheets. Using the Clinical Document Architecture document and style sheet, a sender can transmit clinical documents and medical images together with coordinate values of regions of interest to recipients. Recipients can easily view the documents and display embedded regions of interest by rendering them in their web browser of choice. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Data on the interexaminer variation of minutia markup on latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Ulery, Bradford T; Hicklin, R Austin; Roberts, Maria Antonia; Buscaglia, JoAnn

    2016-09-01

    The data in this article supports the research paper entitled "Interexaminer variation of minutia markup on latent fingerprints" [1]. The data in this article describes the variability in minutia markup during both analysis of the latents and comparison between latents and exemplars. The data was collected in the "White Box Latent Print Examiner Study," in which each of 170 volunteer latent print examiners provided detailed markup documenting their examinations of latent-exemplar pairs of prints randomly assigned from a pool of 320 pairs. Each examiner examined 22 latent-exemplar pairs; an average of 12 examiners marked each latent.

  15. An adaptable XML based approach for scientific data management and integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fusheng; Thiel, Florian; Furrer, Daniel; Vergara-Niedermayr, Cristobal; Qin, Chen; Hackenberg, Georg; Bourgue, Pierre-Emmanuel; Kaltschmidt, David; Wang, Mo

    2008-03-01

    Increased complexity of scientific research poses new challenges to scientific data management. Meanwhile, scientific collaboration is becoming increasing important, which relies on integrating and sharing data from distributed institutions. We develop SciPort, a Web-based platform on supporting scientific data management and integration based on a central server based distributed architecture, where researchers can easily collect, publish, and share their complex scientific data across multi-institutions. SciPort provides an XML based general approach to model complex scientific data by representing them as XML documents. The documents capture not only hierarchical structured data, but also images and raw data through references. In addition, SciPort provides an XML based hierarchical organization of the overall data space to make it convenient for quick browsing. To provide generalization, schemas and hierarchies are customizable with XML-based definitions, thus it is possible to quickly adapt the system to different applications. While each institution can manage documents on a Local SciPort Server independently, selected documents can be published to a Central Server to form a global view of shared data across all sites. By storing documents in a native XML database, SciPort provides high schema extensibility and supports comprehensive queries through XQuery. By providing a unified and effective means for data modeling, data access and customization with XML, SciPort provides a flexible and powerful platform for sharing scientific data for scientific research communities, and has been successfully used in both biomedical research and clinical trials.

  16. An Adaptable XML Based Approach for Scientific Data Management and Integration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fusheng; Thiel, Florian; Furrer, Daniel; Vergara-Niedermayr, Cristobal; Qin, Chen; Hackenberg, Georg; Bourgue, Pierre-Emmanuel; Kaltschmidt, David; Wang, Mo

    2008-02-20

    Increased complexity of scientific research poses new challenges to scientific data management. Meanwhile, scientific collaboration is becoming increasing important, which relies on integrating and sharing data from distributed institutions. We develop SciPort, a Web-based platform on supporting scientific data management and integration based on a central server based distributed architecture, where researchers can easily collect, publish, and share their complex scientific data across multi-institutions. SciPort provides an XML based general approach to model complex scientific data by representing them as XML documents. The documents capture not only hierarchical structured data, but also images and raw data through references. In addition, SciPort provides an XML based hierarchical organization of the overall data space to make it convenient for quick browsing. To provide generalization, schemas and hierarchies are customizable with XML-based definitions, thus it is possible to quickly adapt the system to different applications. While each institution can manage documents on a Local SciPort Server independently, selected documents can be published to a Central Server to form a global view of shared data across all sites. By storing documents in a native XML database, SciPort provides high schema extensibility and supports comprehensive queries through XQuery. By providing a unified and effective means for data modeling, data access and customization with XML, SciPort provides a flexible and powerful platform for sharing scientific data for scientific research communities, and has been successfully used in both biomedical research and clinical trials.

  17. Operational Monitoring of Volcanoes Using Keyhole Markup Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehn, J.; Bailey, J. E.; Webley, P.

    2007-12-01

    Volcanoes are some of the most geologically powerful, dynamic, visually appealing structures on the Earth's landscape. Volcanic eruptions are hard to predict, difficult to quantify and impossible to prevent, making effective monitoring a difficult proposition. In Alaska, volcanoes are an intrinsic part of the culture, with over 100 volcanoes and volcanic fields that have been active in historic time monitored by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). Observations and research are performed using a suite of methods and tools in the fields of remote sensing, seismology, geodesy and geology, producing large volumes of geospatial data. Keyhole Markup Language (KML) offers a context in which these different, and in the past disparate, data can be displayed simultaneously. Dynamic links keep these data current, allowing it to be used in an operational capacity. KML is used to display information from the aviation color codes and activity alert levels for volcanoes to locations of thermal anomalies, earthquake locations and ash plume modeling. The dynamic refresh and time primitive are used to display volcano webcam and satellite image overlays in near real-time. In addition a virtual globe browser using KML, such as Google Earth, provides an interface to further information using the hyperlink, rich- text and flash-embedding abilities supported within object description balloons. By merging these data sets in an easy to use interface, a virtual globe browser provides a better tool for scientists and emergency managers alike to mitigate volcanic crises.

  18. Automating testbed documentation and database access using World Wide Web (WWW) tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Charles; Auernheimer, Brent; Lee, Young H.

    1994-01-01

    A method for providing uniform transparent access to disparate distributed information systems was demonstrated. A prototype testing interface was developed to access documentation and information using publicly available hypermedia tools. The prototype gives testers a uniform, platform-independent user interface to on-line documentation, user manuals, and mission-specific test and operations data. Mosaic was the common user interface, and HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) provided hypertext capability.

  19. Compressing Aviation Data in XML Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Hemil; Lau, Derek; Kulkarni, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    Design, operations and maintenance activities in aviation involve analysis of variety of aviation data. This data is typically in disparate formats making it difficult to use with different software packages. Use of a self-describing and extensible standard called XML provides a solution to this interoperability problem. XML provides a standardized language for describing the contents of an information stream, performing the same kind of definitional role for Web content as a database schema performs for relational databases. XML data can be easily customized for display using Extensible Style Sheets (XSL). While self-describing nature of XML makes it easy to reuse, it also increases the size of data significantly. Therefore, transfemng a dataset in XML form can decrease throughput and increase data transfer time significantly. It also increases storage requirements significantly. A natural solution to the problem is to compress the data using suitable algorithm and transfer it in the compressed form. We found that XML-specific compressors such as Xmill and XMLPPM generally outperform traditional compressors. However, optimal use of Xmill requires of discovery of optimal options to use while running Xmill. This, in turn, depends on the nature of data used. Manual disc0ver.y of optimal setting can require an engineer to experiment for weeks. We have devised an XML compression advisory tool that can analyze sample data files and recommend what compression tool would work the best for this data and what are the optimal settings to be used with a XML compression tool.

  20. An exponentiation method for XML element retrieval.

    PubMed

    Wichaiwong, Tanakorn

    2014-01-01

    XML document is now widely used for modelling and storing structured documents. The structure is very rich and carries important information about contents and their relationships, for example, e-Commerce. XML data-centric collections require query terms allowing users to specify constraints on the document structure; mapping structure queries and assigning the weight are significant for the set of possibly relevant documents with respect to structural conditions. In this paper, we present an extension to the MEXIR search system that supports the combination of structural and content queries in the form of content-and-structure queries, which we call the Exponentiation function. It has been shown the structural information improve the effectiveness of the search system up to 52.60% over the baseline BM25 at MAP.

  1. Software design and documentation language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleine, H.

    1977-01-01

    A communications medium to support the design and documentation of complex software applications is studied. The medium also provides the following: (1) a processor which can convert design specifications into an intelligible, informative machine reproducible document; (2) a design and documentation language with forms and syntax that are simple, unrestrictive, and communicative; and (3) methodology for effective use of the language and processor.

  2. KAT: A Flexible XML-based Knowledge Authoring Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, Nathan C.; Rocha, Roberto A.; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Bradshaw, Richard L.; Hanna, Timothy P.; Roemer, Lorrie K.

    2005-01-01

    As part of an enterprise effort to develop new clinical information systems at Intermountain Health Care, the authors have built a knowledge authoring tool that facilitates the development and refinement of medical knowledge content. At present, users of the application can compose order sets and an assortment of other structured clinical knowledge documents based on XML schemas. The flexible nature of the application allows the immediate authoring of new types of documents once an appropriate XML schema and accompanying Web form have been developed and stored in a shared repository. The need for a knowledge acquisition tool stems largely from the desire for medical practitioners to be able to write their own content for use within clinical applications. We hypothesize that medical knowledge content for clinical use can be successfully created and maintained through XML-based document frameworks containing structured and coded knowledge. PMID:15802477

  3. SBML-PET-MPI: a parallel parameter estimation tool for Systems Biology Markup Language based models.

    PubMed

    Zi, Zhike

    2011-04-01

    Parameter estimation is crucial for the modeling and dynamic analysis of biological systems. However, implementing parameter estimation is time consuming and computationally demanding. Here, we introduced a parallel parameter estimation tool for Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML)-based models (SBML-PET-MPI). SBML-PET-MPI allows the user to perform parameter estimation and parameter uncertainty analysis by collectively fitting multiple experimental datasets. The tool is developed and parallelized using the message passing interface (MPI) protocol, which provides good scalability with the number of processors. SBML-PET-MPI is freely available for non-commercial use at http://www.bioss.uni-freiburg.de/cms/sbml-pet-mpi.html or http://sites.google.com/site/sbmlpetmpi/.

  4. Progress on an implementation of MIFlowCyt in XML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.; Leif, Stephanie H.

    2015-03-01

    Introduction: The International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) Data Standards Task Force (DSTF) has created a standard for the Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt 1.0). The CytometryML schemas, are based in part upon the Flow Cytometry Standard and Digital Imaging and Communication (DICOM) standards. CytometryML has and will be extended and adapted to include MIFlowCyt, as well as to serve as a common standard for flow and image cytometry (digital microscopy). Methods: The MIFlowCyt data-types were created, as is the rest of CytometryML, in the XML Schema Definition Language (XSD1.1). Individual major elements of the MIFlowCyt schema were translated into XML and filled with reasonable data. A small section of the code was formatted with HTML formatting elements. Results: The differences in the amount of detail to be recorded for 1) users of standard techniques including data analysts and 2) others, such as method and device creators, laboratory and other managers, engineers, and regulatory specialists required that separate data-types be created to describe the instrument configuration and components. A very substantial part of the MIFlowCyt element that describes the Experimental Overview part of the MIFlowCyt and substantial parts of several other major elements have been developed. Conclusions: The future use of structured XML tags and web technology should facilitate searching of experimental information, its presentation, and inclusion in structured research, clinical, and regulatory documents, as well as demonstrate in publications adherence to the MIFlowCyt standard. The use of CytometryML together with XML technology should also result in the textual and numeric data being published using web technology without any change in composition. Preliminary testing indicates that CytometryML XML pages can be directly formatted with the combination of HTML

  5. SBML-SAT: a systems biology markup language (SBML) based sensitivity analysis tool

    PubMed Central

    Zi, Zhike; Zheng, Yanan; Rundell, Ann E; Klipp, Edda

    2008-01-01

    Background It has long been recognized that sensitivity analysis plays a key role in modeling and analyzing cellular and biochemical processes. Systems biology markup language (SBML) has become a well-known platform for coding and sharing mathematical models of such processes. However, current SBML compatible software tools are limited in their ability to perform global sensitivity analyses of these models. Results This work introduces a freely downloadable, software package, SBML-SAT, which implements algorithms for simulation, steady state analysis, robustness analysis and local and global sensitivity analysis for SBML models. This software tool extends current capabilities through its execution of global sensitivity analyses using multi-parametric sensitivity analysis, partial rank correlation coefficient, SOBOL's method, and weighted average of local sensitivity analyses in addition to its ability to handle systems with discontinuous events and intuitive graphical user interface. Conclusion SBML-SAT provides the community of systems biologists a new tool for the analysis of their SBML models of biochemical and cellular processes. PMID:18706080

  6. SBML-SAT: a systems biology markup language (SBML) based sensitivity analysis tool.

    PubMed

    Zi, Zhike; Zheng, Yanan; Rundell, Ann E; Klipp, Edda

    2008-08-15

    It has long been recognized that sensitivity analysis plays a key role in modeling and analyzing cellular and biochemical processes. Systems biology markup language (SBML) has become a well-known platform for coding and sharing mathematical models of such processes. However, current SBML compatible software tools are limited in their ability to perform global sensitivity analyses of these models. This work introduces a freely downloadable, software package, SBML-SAT, which implements algorithms for simulation, steady state analysis, robustness analysis and local and global sensitivity analysis for SBML models. This software tool extends current capabilities through its execution of global sensitivity analyses using multi-parametric sensitivity analysis, partial rank correlation coefficient, SOBOL's method, and weighted average of local sensitivity analyses in addition to its ability to handle systems with discontinuous events and intuitive graphical user interface. SBML-SAT provides the community of systems biologists a new tool for the analysis of their SBML models of biochemical and cellular processes.

  7. The gel electrophoresis markup language (GelML) from the Proteomics Standards Initiative.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Frank; Hoogland, Christine; Martinez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Medina-Aunon, J Alberto; Albar, Juan Pablo; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Wipat, Anil; Hermjakob, Henning; Almeida, Jonas S; Stanislaus, Romesh; Paton, Norman W; Jones, Andrew R

    2010-09-01

    The Human Proteome Organisation's Proteomics Standards Initiative has developed the GelML (gel electrophoresis markup language) data exchange format for representing gel electrophoresis experiments performed in proteomics investigations. The format closely follows the reporting guidelines for gel electrophoresis, which are part of the Minimum Information About a Proteomics Experiment (MIAPE) set of modules. GelML supports the capture of metadata (such as experimental protocols) and data (such as gel images) resulting from gel electrophoresis so that laboratories can be compliant with the MIAPE Gel Electrophoresis guidelines, while allowing such data sets to be exchanged or downloaded from public repositories. The format is sufficiently flexible to capture data from a broad range of experimental processes, and complements other PSI formats for MS data and the results of protein and peptide identifications to capture entire gel-based proteome workflows. GelML has resulted from the open standardisation process of PSI consisting of both public consultation and anonymous review of the specifications.

  8. Software for Better Documentation of Other Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinedo, John

    2003-01-01

    The Literate Programming Extraction Engine is a Practical Extraction and Reporting Language- (PERL-)based computer program that facilitates and simplifies the implementation of a concept of self-documented literate programming in a fashion tailored to the typical needs of scientists. The advantage for the programmer is that documentation and source code are written side-by-side in the same file, reducing the likelihood that the documentation will be inconsistent with the code and improving the verification that the code performs its intended functions. The advantage for the user is the knowledge that the documentation matches the software because they come from the same file. This program unifies the documentation process for a variety of programming languages, including C, C++, and several versions of FORTRAN. This program can process the documentation in any markup language, and incorporates the LaTeX typesetting software. The program includes sample Makefile scripts for automating both the code-compilation (when appropriate) and documentation-generation processes into a single command-line statement. Also included are macro instructions for the Emacs display-editor software, making it easy for a programmer to toggle between editing in a code or a documentation mode.

  9. An Exponentiation Method for XML Element Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    XML document is now widely used for modelling and storing structured documents. The structure is very rich and carries important information about contents and their relationships, for example, e-Commerce. XML data-centric collections require query terms allowing users to specify constraints on the document structure; mapping structure queries and assigning the weight are significant for the set of possibly relevant documents with respect to structural conditions. In this paper, we present an extension to the MEXIR search system that supports the combination of structural and content queries in the form of content-and-structure queries, which we call the Exponentiation function. It has been shown the structural information improve the effectiveness of the search system up to 52.60% over the baseline BM25 at MAP. PMID:24696643

  10. Techniques for integrating ‐omics data

    PubMed Central

    Akula, Siva Prasad; Miriyala, Raghava Naidu; Thota, Hanuman; Rao, Allam Appa; Gedela, Srinubabu

    2009-01-01

    The challenge for -omics research is to tackle the problem of fragmentation of knowledge by integrating several sources of heterogeneous information into a coherent entity. It is widely recognized that successful data integration is one of the keys to improve productivity for stored data. Through proper data integration tools and algorithms, researchers may correlate relationships that enable them to make better and faster decisions. The need for data integration is essential for present ‐omics community, because ‐omics data is currently spread world wide in wide variety of formats. These formats can be integrated and migrated across platforms through different techniques and one of the important techniques often used is XML. XML is used to provide a document markup language that is easier to learn, retrieve, store and transmit. It is semantically richer than HTML. Here, we describe bio warehousing, database federation, controlled vocabularies and highlighting the XML application to store, migrate and validate -omics data. PMID:19255651

  11. Techniques for integrating -omics data.

    PubMed

    Akula, Siva Prasad; Miriyala, Raghava Naidu; Thota, Hanuman; Rao, Allam Appa; Gedela, Srinubabu

    2009-01-01

    The challenge for -omics research is to tackle the problem of fragmentation of knowledge by integrating several sources of heterogeneous information into a coherent entity. It is widely recognized that successful data integration is one of the keys to improve productivity for stored data. Through proper data integration tools and algorithms, researchers may correlate relationships that enable them to make better and faster decisions. The need for data integration is essential for present -omics community, because -omics data is currently spread world wide in wide variety of formats. These formats can be integrated and migrated across platforms through different techniques and one of the important techniques often used is XML. XML is used to provide a document markup language that is easier to learn, retrieve, store and transmit. It is semantically richer than HTML. Here, we describe bio warehousing, database federation, controlled vocabularies and highlighting the XML application to store, migrate and validate -omics data.

  12. Integrating and visualizing primary data from prospective and legacy taxonomic literature

    PubMed Central

    Agosti, Donat; Penev, Lyubomir; Sautter, Guido; Georgiev, Teodor; Catapano, Terry; Patterson, David; King, David; Pereira, Serrano; Vos, Rutger Aldo; Sierra, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Specimen data in taxonomic literature are among the highest quality primary biodiversity data. Innovative cybertaxonomic journals are using workflows that maintain data structure and disseminate electronic content to aggregators and other users; such structure is lost in traditional taxonomic publishing. Legacy taxonomic literature is a vast repository of knowledge about biodiversity. Currently, access to that resource is cumbersome, especially for non-specialist data consumers. Markup is a mechanism that makes this content more accessible, and is especially suited to machine analysis. Fine-grained XML (Extensible Markup Language) markup was applied to all (37) open-access articles published in the journal Zootaxa containing treatments on spiders (Order: Araneae). The markup approach was optimized to extract primary specimen data from legacy publications. These data were combined with data from articles containing treatments on spiders published in Biodiversity Data Journal where XML structure is part of the routine publication process. A series of charts was developed to visualize the content of specimen data in XML-tagged taxonomic treatments, either singly or in aggregate. The data can be filtered by several fields (including journal, taxon, institutional collection, collecting country, collector, author, article and treatment) to query particular aspects of the data. We demonstrate here that XML markup using GoldenGATE can address the challenge presented by unstructured legacy data, can extract structured primary biodiversity data which can be aggregated with and jointly queried with data from other Darwin Core-compatible sources, and show how visualization of these data can communicate key information contained in biodiversity literature. We complement recent studies on aspects of biodiversity knowledge using XML structured data to explore 1) the time lag between species discovry and description, and 2) the prevelence of rarity in species descriptions

  13. Automated Test Methods for XML Metadata

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-12-28

    Group under RCC Task TG-147. This document (Volume VI of the RCC Document 118 series) describes procedures used for evaluating XML metadata documents...including TMATS, MDL, IHAL, and DDML documents. These documents contain specifications or descriptions of artifacts and systems of importance to...the collection and management of telemetry data. The methods defined in this report provide a means of evaluating the suitability of such a metadata

  14. Schema for Spacecraft-Command Dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, Sharon; Garcia, Celina; Maxwell, Scott; Wright, Jesse

    2008-01-01

    An Extensible Markup Language (XML) schema was developed as a means of defining and describing a structure for capturing spacecraft command- definition and tracking information in a single location in a form readable by both engineers and software used to generate software for flight and ground systems. A structure defined within this schema is then used as the basis for creating an XML file that contains command definitions.

  15. Spreadsheets for Analyzing and Optimizing Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Some, Raphael R.; Agrawal, Anil K.; Czikmantory, Akos J.; Weisbin, Charles R.; Hua, Hook; Neff, Jon M.; Cowdin, Mark A.; Lewis, Brian S.; Iroz, Juana; Ross, Rick

    2009-01-01

    XCALIBR (XML Capability Analysis LIBRary) is a set of Extensible Markup Language (XML) database and spreadsheet- based analysis software tools designed to assist in technology-return-on-investment analysis and optimization of technology portfolios pertaining to outer-space missions. XCALIBR is also being examined for use in planning, tracking, and documentation of projects. An XCALIBR database contains information on mission requirements and technological capabilities, which are related by use of an XML taxonomy. XCALIBR incorporates a standardized interface for exporting data and analysis templates to an Excel spreadsheet. Unique features of XCALIBR include the following: It is inherently hierarchical by virtue of its XML basis. The XML taxonomy codifies a comprehensive data structure and data dictionary that includes performance metrics for spacecraft, sensors, and spacecraft systems other than sensors. The taxonomy contains >700 nodes representing all levels, from system through subsystem to individual parts. All entries are searchable and machine readable. There is an intuitive Web-based user interface. The software automatically matches technologies to mission requirements. The software automatically generates, and makes the required entries in, an Excel return-on-investment analysis software tool. The results of an analysis are presented in both tabular and graphical displays.

  16. A methodology to annotate systems biology markup language models with the synthetic biology open language.

    PubMed

    Roehner, Nicholas; Myers, Chris J

    2014-02-21

    Recently, we have begun to witness the potential of synthetic biology, noted here in the form of bacteria and yeast that have been genetically engineered to produce biofuels, manufacture drug precursors, and even invade tumor cells. The success of these projects, however, has often failed in translation and application to new projects, a problem exacerbated by a lack of engineering standards that combine descriptions of the structure and function of DNA. To address this need, this paper describes a methodology to connect the systems biology markup language (SBML) to the synthetic biology open language (SBOL), existing standards that describe biochemical models and DNA components, respectively. Our methodology involves first annotating SBML model elements such as species and reactions with SBOL DNA components. A graph is then constructed from the model, with vertices corresponding to elements within the model and edges corresponding to the cause-and-effect relationships between these elements. Lastly, the graph is traversed to assemble the annotating DNA components into a composite DNA component, which is used to annotate the model itself and can be referenced by other composite models and DNA components. In this way, our methodology can be used to build up a hierarchical library of models annotated with DNA components. Such a library is a useful input to any future genetic technology mapping algorithm that would automate the process of composing DNA components to satisfy a behavioral specification. Our methodology for SBML-to-SBOL annotation is implemented in the latest version of our genetic design automation (GDA) software tool, iBioSim.

  17. User-Friendly Interface Developed for a Web-Based Service for SpaceCAL Emulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liszka, Kathy J.; Holtz, Allen P.

    2004-01-01

    A team at the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a Space Communications Architecture Laboratory (SpaceCAL) for protocol development activities for coordinated satellite missions. SpaceCAL will provide a multiuser, distributed system to emulate space-based Internet architectures, backbone networks, formation clusters, and constellations. As part of a new effort in 2003, building blocks are being defined for an open distributed system to make the satellite emulation test bed accessible through an Internet connection. The first step in creating a Web-based service to control the emulation remotely is providing a user-friendly interface for encoding the data into a well-formed and complete Extensible Markup Language (XML) document. XML provides coding that allows data to be transferred between dissimilar systems. Scenario specifications include control parameters, network routes, interface bandwidths, delay, and bit error rate. Specifications for all satellite, instruments, and ground stations in a given scenario are also included in the XML document. For the SpaceCAL emulation, the XML document can be created using XForms, a Webbased forms language for data collection. Contrary to older forms technology, the interactive user interface makes the science prevalent, not the data representation. Required versus optional input fields, default values, automatic calculations, data validation, and reuse will help researchers quickly and accurately define missions. XForms can apply any XML schema defined for the test mission to validate data before forwarding it to the emulation facility. New instrument definitions, facilities, and mission types can be added to the existing schema. The first prototype user interface incorporates components for interactive input and form processing. Internet address, data rate, and the location of the facility are implemented with basic form controls with default values provided for convenience and efficiency using basic XForms operations

  18. MXA: a customizable HDF5-based data format for multi-dimensional data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M.; Simmons, J. P.; De Graef, M.

    2010-09-01

    A new digital file format is proposed for the long-term archival storage of experimental data sets generated by serial sectioning instruments. The format is known as the multi-dimensional eXtensible Archive (MXA) format and is based on the public domain Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5). The MXA data model, its description by means of an eXtensible Markup Language (XML) file with associated Document Type Definition (DTD) are described in detail. The public domain MXA package is available through a dedicated web site (mxa.web.cmu.edu), along with implementation details and example data files.

  19. Software design and documentation language, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleine, H.

    1979-01-01

    The Software Design and Documentation Language (SDDL) developed to provide an effective communications medium to support the design and documentation of complex software applications is described. Features of the system include: (1) a processor which can convert design specifications into an intelligible, informative machine-reproducible document; (2) a design and documentation language with forms and syntax that are simple, unrestrictive, and communicative; and (3) methodology for effective use of the language and processor. The SDDL processor is written in the SIMSCRIPT II programming language and is implemented on the UNIVAC 1108, the IBM 360/370, and Control Data machines.

  20. Wing Classification in the Virtual Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William H.

    1999-01-01

    The Virtual Research Center (VRC) is a Web site that hosts a database of documents organized to allow teams of scientists and engineers to store and maintain documents. A number of other workgroup-related capabilities are provided. My tasks as a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellow included developing a scheme for classifying the workgroups using the VRC using the various Divisions within NASA Enterprises. To this end I developed a plan to use several CGI Perl scripts to gather classification information from the leaders of the workgroups, and to display all the workgroups within a specified classification. I designed, implemented, and partially tested scripts which can be used to do the classification. I was also asked to consider directions for future development of the VRC. I think that the VRC can use XML to advantage. XML is a markup language with designer tags that can be used to build meaning into documents. An investigation as to how CORBA, an object-oriented object request broker included with JDK 1.2, might be used also seems justified.

  1. The field representation language.

    PubMed

    Tsafnat, Guy

    2008-02-01

    The complexity of quantitative biomedical models, and the rate at which they are published, is increasing to a point where managing the information has become all but impossible without automation. International efforts are underway to standardise representation languages for a number of mathematical entities that represent a wide variety of physiological systems. This paper presents the Field Representation Language (FRL), a portable representation of values that change over space and/or time. FRL is an extensible mark-up language (XML) derivative with support for large numeric data sets in Hierarchical Data Format version 5 (HDF5). Components of FRL can be reused through unified resource identifiers (URI) that point to external resources such as custom basis functions, boundary geometries and numerical data. To demonstrate the use of FRL as an interchange we present three models that study hyperthermia cancer treatment: a fractal model of liver tumour microvasculature; a probabilistic model simulating the deposition of magnetic microspheres throughout it; and a finite element model of hyperthermic treatment. The microsphere distribution field was used to compute the heat generation rate field around the tumour. We used FRL to convey results from the microsphere simulation to the treatment model. FRL facilitated the conversion of the coordinate systems and approximated the integral over regions of the microsphere deposition field.

  2. A two-way interface between limited Systems Biology Markup Language and R.

    PubMed

    Radivoyevitch, Tomas

    2004-12-07

    Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is gaining broad usage as a standard for representing dynamical systems as data structures. The open source statistical programming environment R is widely used by biostatisticians involved in microarray analyses. An interface between SBML and R does not exist, though one might be useful to R users interested in SBML, and SBML users interested in R. A model structure that parallels SBML to a limited degree is defined in R. An interface between this structure and SBML is provided through two function definitions: write.SBML() which maps this R model structure to SBML level 2, and read.SBML() which maps a limited range of SBML level 2 files back to R. A published model of purine metabolism is provided in this SBML-like format and used to test the interface. The model reproduces published time course responses before and after its mapping through SBML. List infrastructure preexisting in R makes it well-suited for manipulating SBML models. Further developments of this SBML-R interface seem to be warranted.

  3. A two-way interface between limited Systems Biology Markup Language and R

    PubMed Central

    Radivoyevitch, Tomas

    2004-01-01

    Background Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is gaining broad usage as a standard for representing dynamical systems as data structures. The open source statistical programming environment R is widely used by biostatisticians involved in microarray analyses. An interface between SBML and R does not exist, though one might be useful to R users interested in SBML, and SBML users interested in R. Results A model structure that parallels SBML to a limited degree is defined in R. An interface between this structure and SBML is provided through two function definitions: write.SBML() which maps this R model structure to SBML level 2, and read.SBML() which maps a limited range of SBML level 2 files back to R. A published model of purine metabolism is provided in this SBML-like format and used to test the interface. The model reproduces published time course responses before and after its mapping through SBML. Conclusions List infrastructure preexisting in R makes it well-suited for manipulating SBML models. Further developments of this SBML-R interface seem to be warranted. PMID:15585059

  4. ScotlandsPlaces XML: Bespoke XML or XML Mapping?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamer, Ashley; Gillick, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate web services (in the form of parameterised URLs), specifically in the context of the ScotlandsPlaces project. This involves cross-domain querying, data retrieval and display via the development of a bespoke XML standard rather than existing XML formats and mapping between them.…

  5. A New Method of Viewing Attachment Document of eMail on Various Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Heeae; Seo, Changwoo; Lim, Yonghwan

    As the computing power of the mobile devices is improving rapidly, many kinds of web services are also available in mobile devices just as Email service. Mobile Mail Service began early, but this service is mostly limited in some specified mobile devices such as Smart Phone. That is a limitation that users have to purchase specified phone to be benefited from Mobile Mail Service. In this paper, it uses DIDL (digital item declaration language) markup type defined in MPEG-21 and MobileGate Server, and solved this problem. DIDL could be converted to other markup types which are displayed by mobile devices. By transforming PC Web Mail contents including attachment document to DIDL markup through MobileGate Server, the Mobile Mail Service could be available for all kinds of mobile devices.

  6. The E-Book: Pipe Dream or Potential Disaster?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, David

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the development of electronic books and considers marketing and distribution, rights management, and technical standards. Economic and institutional relationships, copyrights, Extensible Markup Language (XML), access to content, free access versus fees, preservation versus loss of control over long-term storage and access, and trusted…

  7. Changes in latent fingerprint examiners' markup between analysis and comparison.

    PubMed

    Ulery, Bradford T; Hicklin, R Austin; Roberts, Maria Antonia; Buscaglia, JoAnn

    2015-02-01

    After the initial analysis of a latent print, an examiner will sometimes revise the assessment during comparison with an exemplar. Changes between analysis and comparison may indicate that the initial analysis of the latent was inadequate, or that confirmation bias may have affected the comparison. 170 volunteer latent print examiners, each randomly assigned 22 pairs of prints from a pool of 320 total pairs, provided detailed markup documenting their interpretations of the prints and the bases for their comparison conclusions. We describe changes in value assessments and markup of features and clarity. When examiners individualized, they almost always added or deleted minutiae (90.3% of individualizations); every examiner revised at least some markups. For inconclusive and exclusion determinations, changes were less common, and features were added more frequently when the image pair was mated (same source). Even when individualizations were based on eight or fewer corresponding minutiae, in most cases some of those minutiae had been added during comparison. One erroneous individualization was observed: the markup changes were notably extreme, and almost all of the corresponding minutiae had been added during comparison. Latents assessed to be of value for exclusion only (VEO) during analysis were often individualized when compared to a mated exemplar (26%); in our previous work, where examiners were not required to provide markup of features, VEO individualizations were much less common (1.8%). Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Report of Official Foreign Travel to Germany, May 16-June 1, 2001

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    J. D. Mason

    2001-06-18

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and associated agencies have moved rapidly toward electronic production, management, and dissemination of scientific and technical information. The World-Wide Web (WWW) has become a primary means of information dissemination. Electronic commerce (EC) is becoming the preferred means of procurement. DOE, like other government agencies, depends on and encourages the use of international standards in data communications. Like most government agencies, DOE has expressed a preference for openly developed standards over proprietary designs promoted as ''standards'' by vendors. In particular, there is a preference for standards developed by organizations such as the International Organization for Standardizationmore » (ISO) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) that use open, public processes to develop their standards. Among the most widely adopted international standards is the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML, ISO 8879:1986, FIPS 152), to which DOE long ago made a commitment. Besides the official commitment, which has resulted in several specialized projects, DOE makes heavy use of coding derived from SGML: Most documents on the WWW are coded in HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), which is an application of SGML. The World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C), with the backing of major software houses like Adobe, IBM, Microsoft, Netscape, Oracle, and Sun, is promoting XML (eXtensible Markup Language), a class of SGML applications, for the future of the WWW and the basis for EC. In support of DOE's use of these standards, I have served since 1985 as Chairman of the international committee responsible for SGML and related standards, ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34 (SC34) and its predecessor organizations. During my May 2001 trip, I chaired the spring 2001 meeting of SC34 in Berlin, Germany. I also attended XML Europe 2001, a major conference on the use of SGML and XML sponsored by the Graphic Communications Association (GCA), and chaired a

  9. Applying Data Mining Principles to Library Data Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Explains how libraries can use data mining techniques for more effective data collection. Highlights include three phases: data selection and acquisition; data preparation and processing, including a discussion of the use of XML (extensible markup language); and data interpretation and integration, including database management systems. (LRW)

  10. Designing and Managing Your Digital Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Discusses digital libraries and Web site design issues. Highlights include accessibility issues, including standards, markup languages like HTML and XML, and metadata; building virtual communities; the use of Web portals for customized delivery of information; quality assurance tools, including data mining; and determining user needs, including…

  11. 16 CFR 803.8 - Foreign language documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Foreign language documents. 803.8 Section... language documents. (a) Whenever at the time of filing a Notification and Report Form there is an English language outline, summary, extract or verbatim translation of any information or of all or portions of any...

  12. Cytometry metadata in XML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.; Leif, Stephanie H.

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: The International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) has created a standard for the Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt 1.0). CytometryML will serve as a common metadata standard for flow and image cytometry (digital microscopy). Methods: The MIFlowCyt data-types were created, as is the rest of CytometryML, in the XML Schema Definition Language (XSD1.1). The datatypes are primarily based on the Flow Cytometry and the Digital Imaging and Communication (DICOM) standards. A small section of the code was formatted with standard HTML formatting elements (p, h1, h2, etc.). Results:1) The part of MIFlowCyt that describes the Experimental Overview including the specimen and substantial parts of several other major elements has been implemented as CytometryML XML schemas (www.cytometryml.org). 2) The feasibility of using MIFlowCyt to provide the combination of an overview, table of contents, and/or an index of a scientific paper or a report has been demonstrated. Previously, a sample electronic publication, EPUB, was created that could contain both MIFlowCyt metadata as well as the binary data. Conclusions: The use of CytometryML technology together with XHTML5 and CSS permits the metadata to be directly formatted and together with the binary data to be stored in an EPUB container. This will facilitate: formatting, data- mining, presentation, data verification, and inclusion in structured research, clinical, and regulatory documents, as well as demonstrate a publication's adherence to the MIFlowCyt standard, promote interoperability and should also result in the textual and numeric data being published using web technology without any change in composition.

  13. 46 CFR 201.6 - Documents in foreign languages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Documents in foreign languages. 201.6 Section 201.6... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Information (Rule 1) § 201.6 Documents in foreign languages. Every document, exhibit, or other paper written in a language other than English and filed with the Administration or...

  14. 46 CFR 502.7 - Documents in foreign languages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Documents in foreign languages. 502.7 Section 502.7... General Information § 502.7 Documents in foreign languages. Every document, exhibit, or other paper written in a language other than English and filed with the Commission or offered in evidence in any...

  15. 46 CFR 201.6 - Documents in foreign languages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Documents in foreign languages. 201.6 Section 201.6... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Information (Rule 1) § 201.6 Documents in foreign languages. Every document, exhibit, or other paper written in a language other than English and filed with the Administration or...

  16. 47 CFR 1.355 - Documents in foreign language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Documents in foreign language. 1.355 Section 1... Proceedings Evidence § 1.355 Documents in foreign language. Every document, exhibit, or other paper written in a language other than English, which shall be filed in any proceeding, or in response to any order...

  17. Generating GraphML XML Files for Graph Visualization of Architectures and Event Traces for the Monterey Phoenix Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Thesis Advisor: Mikhail Auguston Second Reader: Terry Norbraten THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved...Language (GraphML). MPGrapher compiles well- formed XML files that conform to the yEd GraphML schema. These files will be opened and analyzed using...ABSTRACT UU NSN 7540-01-280-5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239-18 ii THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK iii Approved

  18. Using a Combination of UML, C2RM, XML, and Metadata Registries to Support Long-Term Development/Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Authenticat’n (XCBF) Authorizat’n (XACML) (SAML) Privacy (P3P) Digital Rights Management (XrML) Content Mngmnt (DASL) (WebDAV) Content Syndicat’n...Registry/ Repository BPSS eCommerce XML/EDI Universal Business Language (UBL) Internet & Computing Human Resources (HR-XML) Semantic KEY XML SPECIFICATIONS

  19. A Courseware to Script Animated Pedagogical Agents in Instructional Material for Elementary Students in English Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Zeng-Wei; Chen, Yen-Lin; Lan, Chien-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Animated agents are virtual characters who demonstrate facial expressions, gestures, movements, and speech to facilitate students' engagement in the learning environment. Our research developed a courseware that supports a XML-based markup language and an authoring tool for teachers to script animated pedagogical agents in teaching materials. The…

  20. Accessing Electronic Theses: Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2000-01-01

    Describes various ways by which universities provide access to their electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs), discussing UMI (University Microfilms International), XML (eXtensible Markup Language), and other formats. Discusses key leaders--national and international--in the ETD effort. Outlines the two main methods for locating ETDs. Presents a…

  1. Gstruct: a system for extracting schemas from GML documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Zhu, Fubao; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2008-10-01

    Geography Markup Language (GML) becomes the de facto standard for geographic information representation on the internet. GML schema provides a way to define the structure, content, and semantic of GML documents. It contains useful structural information of GML documents and plays an important role in storing, querying and analyzing GML data. However, GML schema is not mandatory, and it is common that a GML document contains no schema. In this paper, we present Gstruct, a tool for GML schema extraction. Gstruct finds the features in the input GML documents, identifies geometry datatypes as well as simple datatypes, then integrates all these features and eliminates improper components to output the optimal schema. Experiments demonstrate that Gstruct is effective in extracting semantically meaningful schemas from GML documents.

  2. A Priority Fuzzy Logic Extension of the XQuery Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škrbić, Srdjan; Wettayaprasit, Wiphada; Saeueng, Pannipa

    2011-09-01

    In recent years there have been significant research findings in flexible XML querying techniques using fuzzy set theory. Many types of fuzzy extensions to XML data model and XML query languages have been proposed. In this paper, we introduce priority fuzzy logic extensions to XQuery language. Describing these extensions we introduce a new query language. Moreover, we describe a way to implement an interpreter for this language using an existing XML native database.

  3. Automated Text Markup for Information Retrieval from an Electronic Textbook of Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Kehler, Andrew; Kim, David K.; Yu, Victor L.; Fagan, Lawrence M.

    1998-01-01

    The information needs of practicing clinicians frequently require textbook or journal searches. Making these sources available in electronic form improves the speed of these searches, but precision (i.e., the fraction of relevant to total documents retrieved) remains low. Improving the traditional keyword search by transforming search terms into canonical concepts does not improve search precision greatly. Kim et al. have designed and built a prototype system (MYCIN II) for computer-based information retrieval from a forthcoming electronic textbook of infectious disease. The system requires manual indexing by experts in the form of complex text markup. However, this mark-up process is time consuming (about 3 person-hours to generate, review, and transcribe the index for each of 218 chapters). We have designed and implemented a system to semiautomate the markup process. The system, information extraction for semiautomated indexing of documents (ISAID), uses query models and existing information-extraction tools to provide support for any user, including the author of the source material, to mark up tertiary information sources quickly and accurately.

  4. Integration of HTML documents into an XML-based knowledge repository.

    PubMed

    Roemer, Lorrie K; Rocha, Roberto A; Del Fiol, Guilherme

    2005-01-01

    The Emergency Patient Instruction Generator (EPIG) is an electronic content compiler / viewer / editor developed by Intermountain Health Care. The content is vendor-licensed HTML patient discharge instructions. This work describes the process by which discharge instructions where converted from ASCII-encoded HTML to XML, then loaded to a database for use by EPIG.

  5. Automated software system for checking the structure and format of ACM SIG documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Arsalan Rahman; Sah, Melike

    2017-04-01

    Microsoft (MS) Office Word is one of the most commonly used software tools for creating documents. MS Word 2007 and above uses XML to represent the structure of MS Word documents. Metadata about the documents are automatically created using Office Open XML (OOXML) syntax. We develop a new framework, which is called ADFCS (Automated Document Format Checking System) that takes the advantage of the OOXML metadata, in order to extract semantic information from MS Office Word documents. In particular, we develop a new ontology for Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Special Interested Group (SIG) documents for representing the structure and format of these documents by using OWL (Web Ontology Language). Then, the metadata is extracted automatically in RDF (Resource Description Framework) according to this ontology using the developed software. Finally, we generate extensive rules in order to infer whether the documents are formatted according to ACM SIG standards. This paper, introduces ACM SIG ontology, metadata extraction process, inference engine, ADFCS online user interface, system evaluation and user study evaluations.

  6. The Graphical Representation of the Digital Astronaut Physiology Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briers, Demarcus

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes my internship project with the NASA Digital Astronaut Project to analyze the Digital Astronaut (DA) physiology backbone model. The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) applies integrated physiology models to support space biomedical operations, and to assist NASA researchers in closing knowledge gaps related to human physiologic responses to space flight. The DA physiology backbone is a set of integrated physiological equations and functions that model the interacting systems of the human body. The current release of the model is HumMod (Human Model) version 1.5 and was developed over forty years at the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC). The physiology equations and functions are scripted in an XML schema specifically designed for physiology modeling by Dr. Thomas G. Coleman at UMMC. Currently it is difficult to examine the physiology backbone without being knowledgeable of the XML schema. While investigating and documenting the tags and algorithms used in the XML schema, I proposed a standard methodology for a graphical representation. This standard methodology may be used to transcribe graphical representations from the DA physiology backbone. In turn, the graphical representations can allow examination of the physiological functions and equations without the need to be familiar with the computer programming languages or markup languages used by DA modeling software.

  7. SED-ED, a workflow editor for computational biology experiments written in SED-ML.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard R

    2012-04-15

    The simulation experiment description markup language (SED-ML) is a new community data standard to encode computational biology experiments in a computer-readable XML format. Its widespread adoption will require the development of software support to work with SED-ML files. Here, we describe a software tool, SED-ED, to view, edit, validate and annotate SED-ML documents while shielding end-users from the underlying XML representation. SED-ED supports modellers who wish to create, understand and further develop a simulation description provided in SED-ML format. SED-ED is available as a standalone Java application, as an Eclipse plug-in and as an SBSI (www.sbsi.ed.ac.uk) plug-in, all under an MIT open-source license. Source code is at https://sed-ed-sedmleditor.googlecode.com/svn. The application itself is available from https://sourceforge.net/projects/jlibsedml/files/SED-ED/.

  8. Language Documentation in the Americas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franchetto, Bruna; Rice, Keren

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, the documentation of endangered languages has advanced greatly in the Americas. In this paper we survey the role that international funding programs have played in advancing documentation in this part of the world, with a particular focus on the growth of documentation in Brazil, and we examine some of the major opportunities…

  9. Integration of HTML Documents into an XML-Based Knowledge Repository

    PubMed Central

    Roemer, Lorrie K; Rocha, Roberto A; Del Fiol, Guilherme

    2005-01-01

    The Emergency Patient Instruction Generator (EPIG) is an electronic content compiler/viewer/editor developed by Intermountain Health Care. The content is vendor-licensed HTML patient discharge instructions. This work describes the process by which discharge instructions where converted from ASCII-encoded HTML to XML, then loaded to a database for use by EPIG. PMID:16779384

  10. XML Files

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page, please enable JavaScript. MedlinePlus produces XML data sets that you are welcome to download and use. If you have questions about the MedlinePlus XML files, please contact us . For additional sources of MedlinePlus data in XML format, visit our Web service page, ...

  11. Dealing with Diversity in Computational Cancer Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David; McKeever, Steve; Stamatakos, Georgios; Dionysiou, Dimitra; Graf, Norbert; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Marias, Konstantinos; Wang, Zhihui; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the need for interconnecting computational cancer models from different sources and scales within clinically relevant scenarios to increase the accuracy of the models and speed up their clinical adaptation, validation, and eventual translation. We briefly review current interoperability efforts drawing upon our experiences with the development of in silico models for predictive oncology within a number of European Commission Virtual Physiological Human initiative projects on cancer. A clinically relevant scenario, addressing brain tumor modeling that illustrates the need for coupling models from different sources and levels of complexity, is described. General approaches to enabling interoperability using XML-based markup languages for biological modeling are reviewed, concluding with a discussion on efforts towards developing cancer-specific XML markup to couple multiple component models for predictive in silico oncology. PMID:23700360

  12. Specifics on a XML Data Format for Scientific Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaya, E.; Thomas, B.; Cheung, C.

    An XML-based data format for interchange and archiving of scientific data would benefit in many ways from the features standardized in XML. Foremost of these features is the world-wide acceptance and adoption of XML. Applications, such as browsers, XQL and XSQL advanced query, XML editing, or CSS or XSLT transformation, that are coming out of industry and academia can be easily adopted and provide startling new benefits and features. We have designed a prototype of a core format for holding, in a very general way, parameters, tables, scalar and vector fields, atlases, animations and complex combinations of these. This eXtensible Data Format (XDF) makes use of XML functionalities such as: self-validation of document structure, default values for attributes, XLink hyperlinks, entity replacements, internal referencing, inheritance, and XSLT transformation. An API is available to aid in detailed assembly, extraction, and manipulation. Conversion tools to and from FITS and other existing data formats are under development. In the future, we hope to provide object oriented interfaces to C++, Java, Python, IDL, Mathematica, Maple, and various databases. http://xml.gsfc.nasa.gov/XDF

  13. X-PAT: a multiplatform patient referral data management system for small healthcare institution requirements.

    PubMed

    Masseroli, Marco; Marchente, Mario

    2008-07-01

    We present X-PAT, a platform-independent software prototype that is able to manage patient referral multimedia data in an intranet network scenario according to the specific control procedures of a healthcare institution. It is a self-developed storage framework based on a file system, implemented in eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and PHP Hypertext Preprocessor Language, and addressed to the requirements of limited-dimension healthcare entities (small hospitals, private medical centers, outpatient clinics, and laboratories). In X-PAT, healthcare data descriptions, stored in a novel Referral Base Management System (RBMS) according to Health Level 7 Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 (CDA R2) standard, can be easily applied to the specific data and organizational procedures of a particular healthcare working environment thanks also to the use of standard clinical terminology. Managed data, centralized on a server, are structured in the RBMS schema using a flexible patient record and CDA healthcare referral document structures based on XML technology. A novel search engine allows defining and performing queries on stored data, whose rapid execution is ensured by expandable RBMS indexing structures. Healthcare personnel can interface the X-PAT system, according to applied state-of-the-art privacy and security measures, through friendly and intuitive Web pages that facilitate user acceptance.

  14. Searchers Net Treasure in Monterey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Irene E.

    1999-01-01

    Reports on Web keyword searching, metadata, Dublin Core, Extensible Markup Language (XML), metasearch engines (metasearch engines search several Web indexes and/or directories and/or Usenet and/or specific Web sites), and the Year 2000 (Y2K) dilemma, all topics discussed at the second annual Internet Librarian Conference sponsored by Information…

  15. A Simple XML Producer-Consumer Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Warren; Gunter, Dan; Quesnel, Darcy

    2000-01-01

    This document describes a simple XML-based protocol that can be used for producers of events to communicate with consumers of events. The protocol described here is not meant to be the most efficient protocol, the most logical protocol, or the best protocol in any way. This protocol was defined quickly and it's intent is to give us a reasonable protocol that we can implement relatively easily and then use to gain experience in distributed event services. This experience will help us evaluate proposals for event representations, XML-based encoding of information, and communication protocols. The next section of this document describes how we represent events in this protocol and then defines the two events that we choose to use for our initial experiments. These definitions are made by example so that they are informal and easy to understand. The following section then proceeds to define the producer-consumer protocol we have agreed upon for our initial experiments.

  16. Developing and integrating an adverse drug reaction reporting system with the hospital information system.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Satoshi; Ohe, Kazuhiko; Mochizuki, Mayumi; Ueda, Shiro

    2002-01-01

    We have developed an adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting system integrating it with Hospital Information System (HIS) of the University of Tokyo Hospital. Since this system is designed with JAVA, it is portable without re-compiling to any operating systems on which JAVA virtual machines work. In this system, we implemented an automatic data filling function using XML-based (extended Markup Language) files generated by HIS. This new specification would decrease the time needed for physicians and pharmacists to fill the spontaneous ADR reports. By clicking a button, the report is sent to the text database through Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) electronic mails. The destination of the report mail can be changed arbitrarily by administrators, which adds this system more flexibility for practical operation. Although we tried our best to use the SGML-based (Standard Generalized Markup Language) ICH M2 guideline to follow the global standard of the case report, we eventually adopted XML as the output report format. This is because we found some problems in handling two bytes characters with ICH guideline and XML has a lot of useful features. According to our pilot survey conducted at the University of Tokyo Hospital, many physicians answered that our idea, integrating ADR reporting system to HIS, would increase the ADR reporting numbers.

  17. Internet Economics IV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    components, and B2B /B2C aspects of those in a technical and economic snapshot. Talk number six discusses the trade-off between quality and cost, which...web services have been defined. The fifth talk summarizes key aspects of XML (Extended Markup Language), Web Services and their components, and B2B ...Internet is Run: A Worldwide Perspective 69 Christoph Pauls 5 XML, Web Services and B2C/ B2B : A Technical and Economical Snap- shot 87 Matthias Pitt 6

  18. Development of a Google-based search engine for data mining radiology reports.

    PubMed

    Erinjeri, Joseph P; Picus, Daniel; Prior, Fred W; Rubin, David A; Koppel, Paul

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a secure, Google-based data-mining tool for radiology reports using free and open source technologies and to explore its use within an academic radiology department. A Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant data repository, search engine and user interface were created to facilitate treatment, operations, and reviews preparatory to research. The Institutional Review Board waived review of the project, and informed consent was not required. Comprising 7.9 GB of disk space, 2.9 million text reports were downloaded from our radiology information system to a fileserver. Extensible markup language (XML) representations of the reports were indexed using Google Desktop Enterprise search engine software. A hypertext markup language (HTML) form allowed users to submit queries to Google Desktop, and Google's XML response was interpreted by a practical extraction and report language (PERL) script, presenting ranked results in a web browser window. The query, reason for search, results, and documents visited were logged to maintain HIPAA compliance. Indexing averaged approximately 25,000 reports per hour. Keyword search of a common term like "pneumothorax" yielded the first ten most relevant results of 705,550 total results in 1.36 s. Keyword search of a rare term like "hemangioendothelioma" yielded the first ten most relevant results of 167 total results in 0.23 s; retrieval of all 167 results took 0.26 s. Data mining tools for radiology reports will improve the productivity of academic radiologists in clinical, educational, research, and administrative tasks. By leveraging existing knowledge of Google's interface, radiologists can quickly perform useful searches.

  19. Systematic reconstruction of TRANSPATH data into Cell System Markup Language

    PubMed Central

    Nagasaki, Masao; Saito, Ayumu; Li, Chen; Jeong, Euna; Miyano, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    Background Many biological repositories store information based on experimental study of the biological processes within a cell, such as protein-protein interactions, metabolic pathways, signal transduction pathways, or regulations of transcription factors and miRNA. Unfortunately, it is difficult to directly use such information when generating simulation-based models. Thus, modeling rules for encoding biological knowledge into system-dynamics-oriented standardized formats would be very useful for fully understanding cellular dynamics at the system level. Results We selected the TRANSPATH database, a manually curated high-quality pathway database, which provides a plentiful source of cellular events in humans, mice, and rats, collected from over 31,500 publications. In this work, we have developed 16 modeling rules based on hybrid functional Petri net with extension (HFPNe), which is suitable for graphical representing and simulating biological processes. In the modeling rules, each Petri net element is incorporated with Cell System Ontology to enable semantic interoperability of models. As a formal ontology for biological pathway modeling with dynamics, CSO also defines biological terminology and corresponding icons. By combining HFPNe with the CSO features, it is possible to make TRANSPATH data to simulation-based and semantically valid models. The results are encoded into a biological pathway format, Cell System Markup Language (CSML), which eases the exchange and integration of biological data and models. Conclusion By using the 16 modeling rules, 97% of the reactions in TRANSPATH are converted into simulation-based models represented in CSML. This reconstruction demonstrates that it is possible to use our rules to generate quantitative models from static pathway descriptions. PMID:18570683

  20. Systematic reconstruction of TRANSPATH data into cell system markup language.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, Masao; Saito, Ayumu; Li, Chen; Jeong, Euna; Miyano, Satoru

    2008-06-23

    Many biological repositories store information based on experimental study of the biological processes within a cell, such as protein-protein interactions, metabolic pathways, signal transduction pathways, or regulations of transcription factors and miRNA. Unfortunately, it is difficult to directly use such information when generating simulation-based models. Thus, modeling rules for encoding biological knowledge into system-dynamics-oriented standardized formats would be very useful for fully understanding cellular dynamics at the system level. We selected the TRANSPATH database, a manually curated high-quality pathway database, which provides a plentiful source of cellular events in humans, mice, and rats, collected from over 31,500 publications. In this work, we have developed 16 modeling rules based on hybrid functional Petri net with extension (HFPNe), which is suitable for graphical representing and simulating biological processes. In the modeling rules, each Petri net element is incorporated with Cell System Ontology to enable semantic interoperability of models. As a formal ontology for biological pathway modeling with dynamics, CSO also defines biological terminology and corresponding icons. By combining HFPNe with the CSO features, it is possible to make TRANSPATH data to simulation-based and semantically valid models. The results are encoded into a biological pathway format, Cell System Markup Language (CSML), which eases the exchange and integration of biological data and models. By using the 16 modeling rules, 97% of the reactions in TRANSPATH are converted into simulation-based models represented in CSML. This reconstruction demonstrates that it is possible to use our rules to generate quantitative models from static pathway descriptions.

  1. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) Level 3 Package: Layout, Version 1 Core.

    PubMed

    Gauges, Ralph; Rost, Ursula; Sahle, Sven; Wengler, Katja; Bergmann, Frank T

    2015-06-01

    Many software tools provide facilities for depicting reaction network diagrams in a visual form. Two aspects of such a visual diagram can be distinguished: the layout (i.e.: the positioning and connections) of the elements in the diagram, and the graphical form of the elements (for example, the glyphs used for symbols, the properties of the lines connecting them, and so on). For software tools that also read and write models in SBML (Systems Biology Markup Language) format, a common need is to store the network diagram together with the SBML representation of the model. This in turn raises the question of how to encode the layout and the rendering of these diagrams. The SBML Level 3 Version 1 Core specification does not provide a mechanism for explicitly encoding diagrams, but it does provide a mechanism for SBML packages to extend the Core specification and add additional syntactical constructs. The Layout package for SBML Level 3 adds the necessary features to SBML so that diagram layouts can be encoded in SBML files, and a companion package called SBML Rendering specifies how the graphical rendering of elements can be encoded. The SBML Layout package is based on the principle that reaction network diagrams should be described as representations of entities such as species and reactions (with direct links to the underlying SBML elements), and not as arbitrary drawings or graphs; for this reason, existing languages for the description of vector drawings (such as SVG) or general graphs (such as GraphML) cannot be used.

  2. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) Level 3 Package: Layout, Version 1 Core.

    PubMed

    Gauges, Ralph; Rost, Ursula; Sahle, Sven; Wengler, Katja; Bergmann, Frank Thomas

    2015-09-04

    Many software tools provide facilities for depicting reaction network diagrams in a visual form. Two aspects of such a visual diagram can be distinguished: the layout (i.e.: the positioning and connections) of the elements in the diagram, and the graphical form of the elements (for example, the glyphs used for symbols, the properties of the lines connecting them, and so on). For software tools that also read and write models in SBML (Systems Biology Markup Language) format, a common need is to store the network diagram together with the SBML representation of the model. This in turn raises the question of how to encode the layout and the rendering of these diagrams. The SBML Level 3 Version 1 Core specification does not provide a mechanism for explicitly encoding diagrams, but it does provide a mechanism for SBML packages to extend the Core specification and add additional syntactical constructs. The Layout package for SBML Level 3 adds the necessary features to SBML so that diagram layouts can be encoded in SBML files, and a companion package called SBML Rendering specifies how the graphical rendering of elements can be encoded. The SBML Layout package is based on the principle that reaction network diagrams should be described as representations of entities such as species and reactions (with direct links to the underlying SBML elements), and not as arbitrary drawings or graphs; for this reason, existing languages for the description of vector drawings (such as SVG) or general graphs (such as GraphML) cannot be used.

  3. Dynamic XML-based exchange of relational data: application to the Human Brain Project.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhengming; Kadiyska, Yana; Li, Hao; Suciu, Dan; Brinkley, James F

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses an approach to exporting relational data in XML format for data exchange over the web. We describe the first real-world application of SilkRoute, a middleware program that dynamically converts existing relational data to a user-defined XML DTD. The application, called XBrain, wraps SilkRoute in a Java Server Pages framework, thus permitting a web-based XQuery interface to a legacy relational database. The application is demonstrated as a query interface to the University of Washington Brain Project's Language Map Experiment Management System, which is used to manage data about language organization in the brain.

  4. Efficient Analysis of Systems Biology Markup Language Models of Cellular Populations Using Arrays.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Leandro; Myers, Chris J

    2016-08-19

    The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) has been widely used for modeling biological systems. Although SBML has been successful in representing a wide variety of biochemical models, the core standard lacks the structure for representing large complex regular systems in a standard way, such as whole-cell and cellular population models. These models require a large number of variables to represent certain aspects of these types of models, such as the chromosome in the whole-cell model and the many identical cell models in a cellular population. While SBML core is not designed to handle these types of models efficiently, the proposed SBML arrays package can represent such regular structures more easily. However, in order to take full advantage of the package, analysis needs to be aware of the arrays structure. When expanding the array constructs within a model, some of the advantages of using arrays are lost. This paper describes a more efficient way to simulate arrayed models. To illustrate the proposed method, this paper uses a population of repressilator and genetic toggle switch circuits as examples. Results show that there are memory benefits using this approach with a modest cost in runtime.

  5. DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hurst, Aaron M.

    A data structure based on an eXtensible Markup Language (XML) hierarchy according to experimental nuclear structure data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) is presented. A Python-coded translator has been developed to interpret the standard one-card records of the ENSDF datasets, together with their associated quantities defined according to field position, and generate corresponding representative XML output. The quantities belonging to this mixed-record format are described in the ENSDF manual. Of the 16 ENSDF records in total, XML output has been successfully generated for 15 records. An XML-translation for the Comment Record is yet to be implemented; thismore » will be considered in a separate phase of the overall translation effort. Continuation records, not yet implemented, will also be treated in a future phase of this work. Several examples are presented in this document to illustrate the XML schema and methods for handling the various ENSDF data types. However, the proposed nomenclature for the XML elements and attributes need not necessarily be considered as a fixed set of constructs. Indeed, better conventions may be suggested and a consensus can be achieved amongst the various groups of people interested in this project. The main purpose here is to present an initial phase of the translation effort to demonstrate the feasibility of interpreting ENSDF datasets and creating a representative XML-structured hierarchy for data storage.« less

  6. 16 CFR 803.8 - Foreign language documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... language documents. (a) Whenever at the time of filing a Notification and Report Form there is an English... English language versions shall be filed along with the foreign language information or materials. (b... for additional information or documentary material shall be submitted with verbatim English language...

  7. XML and Bibliographic Data: The TVS (Transport, Validation and Services) Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Carvalho, Joaquim; Cordeiro, Maria Ines

    This paper discusses the role of XML in library information systems at three major levels: as are presentation language that enables the transport of bibliographic data in a way that is technologically independent and universally understood across systems and domains; as a language that enables the specification of complex validation rules…

  8. The XBabelPhish MAGE-ML and XML translator.

    PubMed

    Maier, Don; Wymore, Farrell; Sherlock, Gavin; Ball, Catherine A

    2008-01-18

    MAGE-ML has been promoted as a standard format for describing microarray experiments and the data they produce. Two characteristics of the MAGE-ML format compromise its use as a universal standard: First, MAGE-ML files are exceptionally large - too large to be easily read by most people, and often too large to be read by most software programs. Second, the MAGE-ML standard permits many ways of representing the same information. As a result, different producers of MAGE-ML create different documents describing the same experiment and its data. Recognizing all the variants is an unwieldy software engineering task, resulting in software packages that can read and process MAGE-ML from some, but not all producers. This Tower of MAGE-ML Babel bars the unencumbered exchange of microarray experiment descriptions couched in MAGE-ML. We have developed XBabelPhish - an XQuery-based technology for translating one MAGE-ML variant into another. XBabelPhish's use is not restricted to translating MAGE-ML documents. It can transform XML files independent of their DTD, XML schema, or semantic content. Moreover, it is designed to work on very large (> 200 Mb.) files, which are common in the world of MAGE-ML. XBabelPhish provides a way to inter-translate MAGE-ML variants for improved interchange of microarray experiment information. More generally, it can be used to transform most XML files, including very large ones that exceed the capacity of most XML tools.

  9. An Efficient G-XML Data Management Method using XML Spatial Index for Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamada, Takashi; Momma, Kei; Seo, Kazuo; Hijikata, Yoshinori; Nishida, Shogo

    This paper presents an efficient G-XML data management method for mobile devices. G-XML is XML based encoding for the transport of geographic information. Mobile devices, such as PDA and mobile-phone, performance trail desktop machines, so some techniques are needed for processing G-XML data on mobile devices. In this method, XML-format spatial index file is used to improve an initial display time of G-XML data. This index file contains XML pointer of each feature in G-XML data and classifies these features by multi-dimensional data structures. From the experimental result, we can prove this method speed up about 3-7 times an initial display time of G-XML data on mobile devices.

  10. Restructuring an EHR system and the Medical Markup Language (MML) standard to improve interoperability by archetype technology.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shinji; Kume, Naoto; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In 2001, we developed an EHR system for regional healthcare information inter-exchange and to provide individual patient data to patients. This system was adopted in three regions in Japan. We also developed a Medical Markup Language (MML) standard for inter- and intra-hospital communications. The system was built on a legacy platform, however, and had not been appropriately maintained or updated to meet clinical requirements. To improve future maintenance costs, we reconstructed the EHR system using archetype technology on the Ruby on Rails platform, and generated MML equivalent forms from archetypes. The system was deployed as a cloud-based system for preliminary use as a regional EHR. The system now has the capability to catch up with new requirements, maintaining semantic interoperability with archetype technology. It is also more flexible than the legacy EHR system.

  11. Hospital markup and operation outcomes in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gani, Faiz; Ejaz, Aslam; Makary, Martin A; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2016-07-01

    Although the price hospitals charge for operations has broad financial implications, hospital pricing is not subject to regulation. We sought to characterize national variation in hospital price markup for major cardiothoracic and gastrointestinal operations and to evaluate perioperative outcomes of hospitals relative to hospital price markup. All hospitals in which a patient underwent a cardiothoracic or gastrointestinal procedure were identified using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 2012. Markup ratios (ratio of charges to costs) for the total cost of hospitalization were compared across hospitals. Risk-adjusted morbidity, failure-to-rescue, and mortality were calculated using multivariable, hierarchical logistic regression. Among the 3,498 hospitals identified, markup ratios ranged from 0.5-12.2, with a median markup ratio of 2.8 (interquartile range 2.7-3.9). For the 888 hospitals with extreme markup (greatest markup ratio quartile: markup ratio >3.9), the median markup ratio was 4.9 (interquartile range 4.3-6.0), with 10% of these hospitals billing more than 7 times the Medicare-allowable costs (markup ratio ≥7.25). Extreme markup hospitals were more often large (46.3% vs 33.8%, P < .001), urban, nonteaching centers (57.0% vs 37.9%, P < .001), and located in the Southern (46.4% vs 32.8%, P < .001) or Western (27.8% vs 17.6%, P < .001) regions of the United States. Of the 639 investor-owned, for-profit hospitals, 401 hospitals (62.8%) had an extreme markup ratio compared with 19.3% (n = 452) and 6.8% (n = 35) of nonprofit and government hospitals, respectively. Perioperative morbidity (32.7% vs 26.4%, P < .001) was greater at extreme markup hospitals. There is wide variation in hospital markup for cardiothoracic and gastrointestinal procedures, with approximately a quarter of hospital charges being 4 times greater than the actual cost of hospitalization. Hospitals with an extreme markup had greater perioperative morbidity. Copyright © 2016

  12. Taming Log Files from Game/Simulation-Based Assessments: Data Models and Data Analysis Tools. Research Report. ETS RR-16-10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hao, Jiangang; Smith, Lawrence; Mislevy, Robert; von Davier, Alina; Bauer, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Extracting information efficiently from game/simulation-based assessment (G/SBA) logs requires two things: a well-structured log file and a set of analysis methods. In this report, we propose a generic data model specified as an extensible markup language (XML) schema for the log files of G/SBAs. We also propose a set of analysis methods for…

  13. 17 CFR 232.306 - Foreign language documents and symbols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Foreign language documents and... § 232.306 Foreign language documents and symbols. (a) All electronic filings and submissions must be in the English language, except as otherwise provided by paragraph (d) of this section. If a filing or...

  14. 17 CFR 232.306 - Foreign language documents and symbols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Foreign language documents and... § 232.306 Foreign language documents and symbols. (a) All electronic filings and submissions must be in the English language, except as otherwise provided by paragraph (d) of this section. If a filing or...

  15. 17 CFR 232.306 - Foreign language documents and symbols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Foreign language documents and... § 232.306 Foreign language documents and symbols. (a) All electronic filings and submissions must be in the English language, except as otherwise provided by paragraph (d) of this section. If a filing or...

  16. Incorporating Feature-Based Annotations into Automatically Generated Knowledge Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, L. I.; Lederman, J. I.; Aldridge, K. D.

    2006-12-01

    Earth Science Markup Language (ESML) is efficient and effective in representing scientific data in an XML- based formalism. However, features of the data being represented are not accounted for in ESML. Such features might derive from events (e.g., a gap in data collection due to instrument servicing), identifications (e.g., a scientifically interesting area/volume in an image), or some other source. In order to account for features in an ESML context, we consider them from the perspective of annotation, i.e., the addition of information to existing documents without changing the originals. Although it is possible to extend ESML to incorporate feature-based annotations internally (e.g., by extending the XML schema for ESML), there are a number of complicating factors that we identify. Rather than pursuing the ESML-extension approach, we focus on an external representation for feature-based annotations via XML Pointer Language (XPointer). In previous work (Lumb &Aldridge, HPCS 2006, IEEE, doi:10.1109/HPCS.2006.26), we have shown that it is possible to extract relationships from ESML-based representations, and capture the results in the Resource Description Format (RDF). Thus we explore and report on this same requirement for XPointer-based annotations of ESML representations. As in our past efforts, the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) allows us to illustrate with a real-world example this approach for introducing annotations into automatically generated knowledge representations.

  17. The future application of GML database in GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yuejin; Cheng, Yushu; Jing, Lianwen

    2006-10-01

    In 2004, the Geography Markup Language (GML) Implementation Specification (version 3.1.1) was published by Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc. Now more and more applications in geospatial data sharing and interoperability depend on GML. The primary purpose of designing GML is for exchange and transportation of geo-information by standard modeling and encoding of geography phenomena. However, the problems of how to organize and access lots of GML data effectively arise in applications. The research on GML database focuses on these problems. The effective storage of GML data is a hot topic in GIS communities today. GML Database Management System (GDBMS) mainly deals with the problem of storage and management of GML data. Now two types of XML database, namely Native XML Database, and XML-Enabled Database are classified. Since GML is an application of the XML standard to geographic data, the XML database system can also be used for the management of GML. In this paper, we review the status of the art of XML database, including storage, index and query languages, management systems and so on, then move on to the GML database. At the end, the future prospect of GML database in GIS application is presented.

  18. Documenting and Researching Endangered Languages: The Pangloss Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michailovsky, Boyd; Mazaudon, Martine; Michaud, Alexis; Guillaume, Séverine; François, Alexandre; Adamou, Evangelia

    2014-01-01

    The Pangloss Collection is a language archive developed since 1994 at the Langues et Civilisations à Tradition Orale (LACITO) research group of the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS). It contributes to the documentation and study of the world's languages by providing free access to documents of connected, spontaneous…

  19. A Journey in Standard Development: The Core Manufacturing Simulation Data (CMSD) Information Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-Tsun Tina

    2015-01-01

    This report documents a journey "from research to an approved standard" of a NIST-led standard development activity. That standard, Core Manufacturing Simulation Data (CMSD) information model, provides neutral structures for the efficient exchange of manufacturing data in a simulation environment. The model was standardized under the auspices of the international Simulation Interoperability Standards Organization (SISO). NIST started the research in 2001 and initiated the standardization effort in 2004. The CMSD standard was published in two SISO Products. In the first Product, the information model was defined in the Unified Modeling Language (UML) and published in 2010 as SISO-STD-008-2010. In the second Product, the information model was defined in Extensible Markup Language (XML) and published in 2013 as SISO-STD-008-01-2012. Both SISO-STD-008-2010 and SISO-STD-008-01-2012 are intended to be used together.

  20. Future perspectives - proposal for Oxford Physiome Project.

    PubMed

    Oku, Yoshitaka

    2010-01-01

    The Physiome Project is an effort to understand living creatures using "analysis by synthesis" strategy, i.e., by reproducing their behaviors. In order to achieve its goal, sharing developed models between different computer languages and application programs to incorporate into integrated models is critical. To date, several XML-based markup languages has been developed for this purpose. However, source codes written with XML-based languages are very difficult to read and edit using text editors. An alternative way is to use an object-oriented meta-language, which can be translated to different computer languages and transplanted to different application programs. Object-oriented languages are suitable for describing structural organization by hierarchical classes and taking advantage of statistical properties to reduce the number of parameter while keeping the complexity of behaviors. Using object-oriented languages to describe each element and posting it to a public domain should be the next step to build up integrated models of the respiratory control system.

  1. Evolving a lingua franca and associated software infrastructure for computational systems biology: the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) project.

    PubMed

    Hucka, M; Finney, A; Bornstein, B J; Keating, S M; Shapiro, B E; Matthews, J; Kovitz, B L; Schilstra, M J; Funahashi, A; Doyle, J C; Kitano, H

    2004-06-01

    Biologists are increasingly recognising that computational modelling is crucial for making sense of the vast quantities of complex experimental data that are now being collected. The systems biology field needs agreed-upon information standards if models are to be shared, evaluated and developed cooperatively. Over the last four years, our team has been developing the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) in collaboration with an international community of modellers and software developers. SBML has become a de facto standard format for representing formal, quantitative and qualitative models at the level of biochemical reactions and regulatory networks. In this article, we summarise the current and upcoming versions of SBML and our efforts at developing software infrastructure for supporting and broadening its use. We also provide a brief overview of the many SBML-compatible software tools available today.

  2. Automatic Configuration of Programmable Logic Controller Emulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    25 11 Example tree generated using UPGMA [Edw13] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 12 Example sequence alignment for two... UPGMA Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean URL uniform resource locator VM virtual machine XML Extensible Markup Language xx List of...appearance in the ses- sion, and then they are clustered again using Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean ( UPGMA ) with a distance matrix based

  3. The evolution of the CUAHSI Water Markup Language (WaterML)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavsky, I.; Valentine, D.; Maidment, D.; Tarboton, D. G.; Whiteaker, T.; Hooper, R.; Kirschtel, D.; Rodriguez, M.

    2009-04-01

    The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS, his.cuahsi.org) uses web services as the core data exchange mechanism which provides programmatic connection between many heterogeneous sources of hydrologic data and a variety of online and desktop client applications. The service message schema follows the CUAHSI Water Markup Language (WaterML) 1.x specification (see OGC Discussion Paper 07-041r1). Data sources that can be queried via WaterML-compliant water data services include national and international repositories such as USGS NWIS (National Water Information System), USEPA STORET (Storage & Retrieval), USDA SNOTEL (Snowpack Telemetry), NCDC ISH and ISD(Integrated Surface Hourly and Daily Data), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), and DAYMET (Daily Surface Weather Data and Climatological Summaries). Besides government data sources, CUAHSI HIS provides access to a growing number of academic hydrologic observation networks. These networks are registered by researchers associated with 11 hydrologic observatory testbeds around the US, and other research, government and commercial groups wishing to join the emerging CUAHSI Water Data Federation. The Hydrologic Information Server (HIS Server) software stack deployed at NSF-supported hydrologic observatory sites and other universities around the country, supports a hydrologic data publication workflow which includes the following steps: (1) observational data are loaded from static files or streamed from sensors into a local instance of an Observations Data Model (ODM) database; (2) a generic web service template is configured for the new ODM instance to expose the data as a WaterML-compliant water data service, and (3) the new water data service is registered at the HISCentral registry (hiscentral.cuahsi.org), its metadata are harvested and semantically tagged using concepts from a hydrologic ontology. As a result, the new service is indexed in the CUAHSI central metadata catalog, and becomes

  4. Interactive, Secure Web-enabled Aircraft Engine Simulation Using XML Databinding Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Risheng; Afjeh, Abdollah A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the detailed design of an XML databinding framework for aircraft engine simulation. The framework provides an object interface to access and use engine data. while at the same time preserving the meaning of the original data. The Language independent representation of engine component data enables users to move around XML data using HTTP through disparate networks. The application of this framework is demonstrated via a web-based turbofan propulsion system simulation using the World Wide Web (WWW). A Java Servlet based web component architecture is used for rendering XML engine data into HTML format and dealing with input events from the user, which allows users to interact with simulation data from a web browser. The simulation data can also be saved to a local disk for archiving or to restart the simulation at a later time.

  5. Personalising e-learning modules: targeting Rasmussen levels using XML.

    PubMed

    Renard, J M; Leroy, S; Camus, H; Picavet, M; Beuscart, R

    2003-01-01

    The development of Internet technologies has made it possible to increase the number and the diversity of on-line resources for teachers and students. Initiatives like the French-speaking Virtual Medical University Project (UMVF) try to organise the access to these resources. But both teachers and students are working on a partly redundant subset of knowledge. From the analysis of some French courses we propose a model for knowledge organisation derived from Rasmussen's stepladder. In the context of decision-making Rasmussen has identified skill-based, rule-based and knowledge-based levels for the mental process. In the medical context of problem-solving, we apply these three levels to the definition of three students levels: beginners, intermediate-level learners, experts. Based on our model, we build a representation of the hierarchical structure of data using XML language. We use XSLT Transformation Language in order to filter relevant data according to student level and to propose an appropriate display on students' terminal. The model and the XML implementation we define help to design tools for building personalised e-learning modules.

  6. A browser-based tool for conversion between Fortran NAMELIST and XML/HTML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, O.

    A browser-based tool for conversion between Fortran NAMELIST and XML/HTML is presented. It runs on an HTML5 compliant browser and generates reusable XML files to aid interoperability. It also provides a graphical interface for editing and annotating variables in NAMELIST, hence serves as a primitive code documentation environment. Although the tool is not comprehensive, it could be viewed as a test bed for integrating legacy codes into modern systems.

  7. Proof of Concept Integration of a Single-Level Service-Oriented Architecture into a Multi-Domain Secure Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Machine [29]. OC4J applications support Java Servlets , Web services, and the following J2EE specific standards: Extensible Markup Language (XML...IMAP Internet Message Access Protocol IP Internet Protocol IT Information Technology xviii J2EE Java Enterprise Environment JSR 168 Java ...LDAP), World Wide Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDav), Java Specification Request 168 (JSR 168), and Web Services for Remote

  8. ForConX: A forcefield conversion tool based on XML.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Volker; Diddens, Diddo; Bernardes, Carlos E S; Golub, Benjamin; Dequidt, Alain; Zeindlhofer, Veronika; Sega, Marcello; Schröder, Christian

    2017-04-05

    The force field conversion from one MD program to another one is exhausting and error-prone. Although single conversion tools from one MD program to another exist not every combination and both directions of conversion are available for the favorite MD programs Amber, Charmm, Dl-Poly, Gromacs, and Lammps. We present here a general tool for the force field conversion on the basis of an XML document. The force field is converted to and from this XML structure facilitating the implementation of new MD programs for the conversion. Furthermore, the XML structure is human readable and can be manipulated before continuing the conversion. We report, as testcases, the conversions of topologies for acetonitrile, dimethylformamide, and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate comprising also Urey-Bradley and Ryckaert-Bellemans potentials. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A markup language for electrocardiogram data acquisition and analysis (ecgML)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiying; Azuaje, Francisco; Jung, Benjamin; Black, Norman

    2003-01-01

    Background The storage and distribution of electrocardiogram data is based on different formats. There is a need to promote the development of standards for their exchange and analysis. Such models should be platform-/ system- and application-independent, flexible and open to every member of the scientific community. Methods A minimum set of information for the representation and storage of electrocardiogram signals has been synthesised from existing recommendations. This specification is encoded into an XML-vocabulary. The model may aid in a flexible exchange and analysis of electrocardiogram information. Results Based on advantages of XML technologies, ecgML has the ability to present a system-, application- and format-independent solution for representation and exchange of electrocardiogram data. The distinction between the proposal developed by the U.S Food and Drug Administration and ecgML model is given. A series of tools, which aim to facilitate ecgML-based applications, are presented. Conclusions The models proposed here can facilitate the generation of a data format, which opens ways for better and clearer interpretation by both humans and machines. Its structured and transparent organisation will allow researchers to expand and test its capabilities in different application domains. The specification and programs for this protocol are publicly available. PMID:12735790

  10. Language and Program for Documenting Software Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleine, H.; Zepko, T. M.

    1986-01-01

    Software Design and Documentation Language (SDDL) provides effective communication medium to support design and documentation of complex software applications. SDDL supports communication among all members of software design team and provides for production of informative documentation on design effort. Use of SDDL-generated document to analyze design makes it possible to eliminate many errors not detected until coding and testing attempted. SDDL processor program translates designer's creative thinking into effective document for communication. Processor performs as many automatic functions as possible, freeing designer's energy for creative effort. SDDL processor program written in PASCAL.

  11. XWeB: The XML Warehouse Benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahboubi, Hadj; Darmont, Jérôme

    With the emergence of XML as a standard for representing business data, new decision support applications are being developed. These XML data warehouses aim at supporting On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) operations that manipulate irregular XML data. To ensure feasibility of these new tools, important performance issues must be addressed. Performance is customarily assessed with the help of benchmarks. However, decision support benchmarks do not currently support XML features. In this paper, we introduce the XML Warehouse Benchmark (XWeB), which aims at filling this gap. XWeB derives from the relational decision support benchmark TPC-H. It is mainly composed of a test data warehouse that is based on a unified reference model for XML warehouses and that features XML-specific structures, and its associate XQuery decision support workload. XWeB's usage is illustrated by experiments on several XML database management systems.

  12. The caBIG annotation and image Markup project.

    PubMed

    Channin, David S; Mongkolwat, Pattanasak; Kleper, Vladimir; Sepukar, Kastubh; Rubin, Daniel L

    2010-04-01

    Image annotation and markup are at the core of medical interpretation in both the clinical and the research setting. Digital medical images are managed with the DICOM standard format. While DICOM contains a large amount of meta-data about whom, where, and how the image was acquired, DICOM says little about the content or meaning of the pixel data. An image annotation is the explanatory or descriptive information about the pixel data of an image that is generated by a human or machine observer. An image markup is the graphical symbols placed over the image to depict an annotation. While DICOM is the standard for medical image acquisition, manipulation, transmission, storage, and display, there are no standards for image annotation and markup. Many systems expect annotation to be reported verbally, while markups are stored in graphical overlays or proprietary formats. This makes it difficult to extract and compute with both of them. The goal of the Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) project is to develop a mechanism, for modeling, capturing, and serializing image annotation and markup data that can be adopted as a standard by the medical imaging community. The AIM project produces both human- and machine-readable artifacts. This paper describes the AIM information model, schemas, software libraries, and tools so as to prepare researchers and developers for their use of AIM.

  13. An Approach to Dynamic Service Management in Pervasive Computing Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    standard interface to them that is easily accessible by any user. This paper outlines the design of Centaurus , an infrastructure for presenting...based on Extensi- ble Markup Language (XML) for communication, giving the system a uniform and easily adaptable interface. Centaurus defines a...easy and automatic usage. This is the vision that guides our re- search on the Centaurus system. We define a SmartSpace as a dynamic environment that

  14. New publicly available chemical query language, CSRML, to support chemotype representations for application to data mining and modeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chihae; Tarkhov, Aleksey; Marusczyk, Jörg; Bienfait, Bruno; Gasteiger, Johann; Kleinoeder, Thomas; Magdziarz, Tomasz; Sacher, Oliver; Schwab, Christof H; Schwoebel, Johannes; Terfloth, Lothar; Arvidson, Kirk; Richard, Ann; Worth, Andrew; Rathman, James

    2015-03-23

    Chemotypes are a new approach for representing molecules, chemical substructures and patterns, reaction rules, and reactions. Chemotypes are capable of integrating types of information beyond what is possible using current representation methods (e.g., SMARTS patterns) or reaction transformations (e.g., SMIRKS, reaction SMILES). Chemotypes are expressed in the XML-based Chemical Subgraphs and Reactions Markup Language (CSRML), and can be encoded not only with connectivity and topology but also with properties of atoms, bonds, electronic systems, or molecules. CSRML has been developed in parallel with a public set of chemotypes, i.e., the ToxPrint chemotypes, which are designed to provide excellent coverage of environmental, regulatory, and commercial-use chemical space, as well as to represent chemical patterns and properties especially relevant to various toxicity concerns. A software application, ChemoTyper has also been developed and made publicly available in order to enable chemotype searching and fingerprinting against a target structure set. The public ChemoTyper houses the ToxPrint chemotype CSRML dictionary, as well as reference implementation so that the query specifications may be adopted by other chemical structure knowledge systems. The full specifications of the XML-based CSRML standard used to express chemotypes are publicly available to facilitate and encourage the exchange of structural knowledge.

  15. BIRD: Bio-Image Referral Database. Design and implementation of a new web based and patient multimedia data focused system for effective medical diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Pinciroli, Francesco; Masseroli, Marco; Acerbo, Livio A; Bonacina, Stefano; Ferrari, Roberto; Marchente, Mario

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a low cost software platform prototype supporting health care personnel in retrieving patient referral multimedia data. These information are centralized in a server machine and structured by using a flexible eXtensible Markup Language (XML) Bio-Image Referral Database (BIRD). Data are distributed on demand to requesting client in an Intranet network and transformed via eXtensible Stylesheet Language (XSL) to be visualized in an uniform way on market browsers. The core server operation software has been developed in PHP Hypertext Preprocessor scripting language, which is very versatile and useful for crafting a dynamic Web environment.

  16. Concept-based query language approach to enterprise information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Timo; Junkkari, Marko; Järvelin, Kalervo

    2014-01-01

    In enterprise information systems (EISs) it is necessary to model, integrate and compute very diverse data. In advanced EISs the stored data often are based both on structured (e.g. relational) and semi-structured (e.g. XML) data models. In addition, the ad hoc information needs of end-users may require the manipulation of data-oriented (structural), behavioural and deductive aspects of data. Contemporary languages capable of treating this kind of diversity suit only persons with good programming skills. In this paper we present a concept-oriented query language approach to manipulate this diversity so that the programming skill requirements are considerably reduced. In our query language, the features which need technical knowledge are hidden in application-specific concepts and structures. Therefore, users need not be aware of the underlying technology. Application-specific concepts and structures are represented by the modelling primitives of the extended RDOOM (relational deductive object-oriented modelling) which contains primitives for all crucial real world relationships (is-a relationship, part-of relationship, association), XML documents and views. Our query language also supports intensional and extensional-intensional queries, in addition to conventional extensional queries. In its query formulation, the end-user combines available application-specific concepts and structures through shared variables.

  17. First Steps to Endangered Language Documentation: The Kalasha Language, a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mela-Athanasopoulou, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The present paper based on extensive fieldwork D conducted on Kalasha, an endangered language spoken in the three small valleys in Chitral District of Northwestern Pakistan, exposes a spontaneous dialogue-based elicitation of linguistic material used for the description and documentation of the language. After a brief display of the basic typology…

  18. Documenting Variation in (Endangered) Heritage Languages: How and Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes to recently expanded interest in documenting variable as well as categorical patterns of endangered languages. It describes approaches, tools and curricular developments that have benefitted from involving students who are heritage language community members, key to expanding variationist focus to a wider range of languages.…

  19. An electronic specimen collection protocol schema (eSCPS). Document architecture for specimen management and the exchange of specimen collection protocols between biobanking information systems.

    PubMed

    Eminaga, O; Semjonow, A; Oezguer, E; Herden, J; Akbarov, I; Tok, A; Engelmann, U; Wille, S

    2014-01-01

    The integrity of collection protocols in biobanking is essential for a high-quality sample preparation process. However, there is not currently a well-defined universal method for integrating collection protocols in the biobanking information system (BIMS). Therefore, an electronic schema of the collection protocol that is based on Extensible Markup Language (XML) is required to maintain the integrity and enable the exchange of collection protocols. The development and implementation of an electronic specimen collection protocol schema (eSCPS) was performed at two institutions (Muenster and Cologne) in three stages. First, we analyzed the infrastructure that was already established at both the biorepository and the hospital information systems of these institutions and determined the requirements for the sufficient preparation of specimens and documentation. Second, we designed an eSCPS according to these requirements. Finally, a prospective study was conducted to implement and evaluate the novel schema in the current BIMS. We designed an eSCPS that provides all of the relevant information about collection protocols. Ten electronic collection protocols were generated using the supplementary Protocol Editor tool, and these protocols were successfully implemented in the existing BIMS. Moreover, an electronic list of collection protocols for the current studies being performed at each institution was included, new collection protocols were added, and the existing protocols were redesigned to be modifiable. The documentation time was significantly reduced after implementing the eSCPS (5 ± 2 min vs. 7 ± 3 min; p = 0.0002). The eSCPS improves the integrity and facilitates the exchange of specimen collection protocols in the existing open-source BIMS.

  20. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata.

    PubMed

    Lyttleton, Oliver; Wright, Alexander; Treanor, Darren; Lewis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES) is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs.

  1. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata

    PubMed Central

    Lyttleton, Oliver; Wright, Alexander; Treanor, Darren; Lewis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES) is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. Materials and Methods: We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. Results: We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. Conclusions: All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs. PMID:21969921

  2. Application of XML in DICOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Xiaozhen; Yao, Zhihong

    2005-04-01

    As a standard of communication and storage for medical digital images, DICOM has been playing a very important role in integration of hospital information. In DICOM, tags are expressed by numbers, and only standard data elements can be shared by looking up Data Dictionary while private tags can not. As such, a DICOM file's readability and extensibility is limited. In addition, reading DICOM files needs special software. In our research, we introduced XML into DICOM, defining an XML-based DICOM special transfer format, XML-DCM, a DICOM storage format, X-DCM, as well as developing a program package to realize format interchange among DICOM, XML-DCM, and X-DCM. XML-DCM is based on the DICOM structure while replacing numeric tags with accessible XML character string tags. The merits are as following: a) every character string tag of XML-DCM has explicit meaning, so users can understand standard data elements and those private data elements easily without looking up the Data Dictionary. In this way, the readability and data sharing of DICOM files are greatly improved; b) According to requirements, users can set new character string tags with explicit meaning to their own system to extend the capacity of data elements; c) User can read the medical image and associated information conveniently through IE, ultimately enlarging the scope of data sharing. The application of storage format X-DCM will reduce data redundancy and save storage memory. The result of practical application shows that XML-DCM does favor integration and share of medical image data among different systems or devices.

  3. Report of official foreign travel to France, June 7--20, 2000

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    J.D. Mason

    2000-07-11

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has moved rapidly toward electronic production, management, and dissemination of scientific and technical information. The World-Wide Web (WWW) has become a primary means of information dissemination. Electronic commerce (EC) is becoming the preferred means of procurement. DOE, like other government agencies, depends on and encourages the use of international standards in data communications. Like most government agencies, DOE has expressed a preference for openly developed standards over proprietary designs promoted as ``standards'' by vendors. In particular, there is a preference for standards developed by organizations such as the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and themore » American National Standards Institute (ANSI) that use open, public processes to develop their standards. Among the most widely adopted international standards is the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML, ISO 8879:1986, FIPS 152), to which DOE long ago made a commitment. Besides the official commitment, which has resulted in several specialized projects, DOE makes heavy use of coding derived from SGML: Most documents on the WWW are coded in HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), which is an application of SGML. The World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C), with the backing of major software houses like Adobe, IBM, Microsoft, Netscape, Oracle, and Sun, is promoting XML (eXtensible Markup Language), a class of SGML applications, for the future of the WWW and the basis for EC. In support of DOE's use of these standards, the authors has served since 1985 as Chairman of the international committee responsible for SGML and related standards, ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34 (SC34) and its predecessor organizations. During his June 2000 trip, he chaired the spring 2000 meeting of SC34 in Paris, France. He also attended a major conference on the use of SGML and XML and led a meeting of the International SGML/XML Users' Group (ISUG). In addition to the widespread use of

  4. Information object definition-based unified modeling language representation of DICOM structured reporting: a case study of transcoding DICOM to XML.

    PubMed

    Tirado-Ramos, Alfredo; Hu, Jingkun; Lee, K P

    2002-01-01

    Supplement 23 to DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications for Medicine), Structured Reporting, is a specification that supports a semantically rich representation of image and waveform content, enabling experts to share image and related patient information. DICOM SR supports the representation of textual and coded data linked to images and waveforms. Nevertheless, the medical information technology community needs models that work as bridges between the DICOM relational model and open object-oriented technologies. The authors assert that representations of the DICOM Structured Reporting standard, using object-oriented modeling languages such as the Unified Modeling Language, can provide a high-level reference view of the semantically rich framework of DICOM and its complex structures. They have produced an object-oriented model to represent the DICOM SR standard and have derived XML-exchangeable representations of this model using World Wide Web Consortium specifications. They expect the model to benefit developers and system architects who are interested in developing applications that are compliant with the DICOM SR specification.

  5. Java Application Shell: A Framework for Piecing Together Java Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Philip; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This session describes the architecture of Java Application Shell (JAS), a Swing-based framework for developing interactive Java applications. Java Application Shell is being developed by Commerce One, Inc. for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Code 588. The purpose of JAS is to provide a framework for the development of Java applications, providing features that enable the development process to be more efficient, consistent and flexible. Fundamentally, JAS is based upon an architecture where an application is considered a collection of 'plugins'. In turn, a plug-in is a collection of Swing actions defined using XML and packaged in a jar file. Plug-ins may be local to the host platform or remotely-accessible through HTTP. Local and remote plugins are automatically discovered by JAS upon application startup; plugins may also be loaded dynamically without having to re-start the application. Using Extensible Markup Language (XML) to define actions, as opposed to hardcoding them in application logic, allows easier customization of application-specific operations by separating application logic from presentation. Through XML, a developer defines an action that may appear on any number of menus, toolbars, and buttons. Actions maintain and propagate enable/disable states and specify icons, tool-tips, titles, etc. Furthermore, JAS allows actions to be implemented using various scripting languages through the use of IBM's Bean Scripting Framework. Scripted action implementation is seamless to the end-user. In addition to action implementation, scripts may be used for application and unit-level testing. In the case of application-level testing, JAS has hooks to assist a script in simulating end-user input. JAS also provides property and user preference management, JavaHelp, Undo/Redo, Multi-Document Interface, Single-Document Interface, printing, and logging. Finally, Jini technology has also been included into the framework by means of a Jini services browser and the

  6. An XML-based Generic Tool for Information Retrieval in Solar Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, Isabelle F.; Legay, Eric; Linsolas, Romain

    This paper presents the current architecture of the `Solar Web Project' now in its development phase. This tool will provide scientists interested in solar data with a single web-based interface for browsing distributed and heterogeneous catalogs of solar observations. The main goal is to have a generic application that can be easily extended to new sets of data or to new missions with a low level of maintenance. It is developed with Java and XML is used as a powerful configuration language. The server, independent of any database scheme, can communicate with a client (the user interface) and several local or remote archive access systems (such as existing web pages, ftp sites or SQL databases). Archive access systems are externally described in XML files. The user interface is also dynamically generated from an XML file containing the window building rules and a simplified database description. This project is developed at MEDOC (Multi-Experiment Data and Operations Centre), located at the Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (Orsay, France). Successful tests have been conducted with other solar archive access systems.

  7. From Documenting to Revitalizing an Endangered Language: Where Do Applied Linguists Fit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Susan D.; Tucker, Benjamin V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the distance between documenting and revitalizing endangered languages and indicates critical points at which applied linguistics can play a role. We look at language documentation, language revitalization and their relationship. We then provide some examples from our own work. We see the lack of applied linguistics as a…

  8. Design and implementation of CUAHSI WaterML and WaterOneFlow Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, D. W.; Zaslavsky, I.; Whitenack, T.; Maidment, D.

    2007-12-01

    WaterOneFlow is a term for a group of web services created by and for the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) community. CUAHSI web services facilitate the retrieval of hydrologic observations information from online data sources using the SOAP protocol. CUAHSI Water Markup Language (below referred to as WaterML) is an XML schema defining the format of messages returned by the WaterOneFlow web services. \

  9. An Aircraft Lifecycle Approach for the Cost-Benefit Analysis of Prognostics and Condition-Based Maintenance-Based on Discrete-Event Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-02

    MPD. This manufacturer documentation contains maintenance tasks with specification of intervals and required man-hours that are to be carried out...failures, without consideration of false alarms and missed failures (see also section 4.1.3). The task redundancy rate is the percentage of preventive...Prognostics and Health Management ROI return on investment RUL remaining useful life TCG task code group SB Service Bulletin XML Extensible Markup

  10. XTCE GOVSAT Tool Suite 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, J. Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The XTCE GOVSAT software suite contains three tools: validation, search, and reporting. The Extensible Markup Language (XML) Telemetric and Command Exchange (XTCE) GOVSAT Tool Suite is written in Java for manipulating XTCE XML files. XTCE is a Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) and Object Management Group (OMG) specification for describing the format and information in telemetry and command packet streams. These descriptions are files that are used to configure real-time telemetry and command systems for mission operations. XTCE s purpose is to exchange database information between different systems. XTCE GOVSAT consists of rules for narrowing the use of XTCE for missions. The Validation Tool is used to syntax check GOVSAT XML files. The Search Tool is used to search (i.e. command and telemetry mnemonics) the GOVSAT XML files and view the results. Finally, the Reporting Tool is used to create command and telemetry reports. These reports can be displayed or printed for use by the operations team.

  11. Space Communications Emulation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Chante A.

    2004-01-01

    Establishing space communication between ground facilities and other satellites is a painstaking task that requires many precise calculations dealing with relay time, atmospheric conditions, and satellite positions, to name a few. The Space Communications Emulation Facility (SCEF) team here at NASA is developing a facility that will approximately emulate the conditions in space that impact space communication. The emulation facility is comprised of a 32 node distributed cluster of computers; each node representing a satellite or ground station. The objective of the satellites is to observe the topography of the Earth (water, vegetation, land, and ice) and relay this information back to the ground stations. Software originally designed by the University of Kansas, labeled the Emulation Manager, controls the interaction of the satellites and ground stations, as well as handling the recording of data. The Emulation Manager is installed on a Linux Operating System, employing both Java and C++ programming codes. The emulation scenarios are written in extensible Markup Language, XML. XML documents are designed to store, carry, and exchange data. With XML documents data can be exchanged between incompatible systems, which makes it ideal for this project because Linux, MAC and Windows Operating Systems are all used. Unfortunately, XML documents cannot display data like HTML documents. Therefore, the SCEF team uses XML Schema Definition (XSD) or just schema to describe the structure of an XML document. Schemas are very important because they have the capability to validate the correctness of data, define restrictions on data, define data formats, and convert data between different data types, among other things. At this time, in order for the Emulation Manager to open and run an XML emulation scenario file, the user must first establish a link between the schema file and the directory under which the XML scenario files are saved. This procedure takes place on the command

  12. Towards the XML schema measurement based on mapping between XML and OO domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakić, Gordana; Budimac, Zoran; Heričko, Marjan; Pušnik, Maja

    2017-07-01

    Measuring quality of IT solutions is a priority in software engineering. Although numerous metrics for measuring object-oriented code already exist, measuring quality of UML models or XML Schemas is still developing. One of the research questions in the overall research leaded by ideas described in this paper is whether we can apply already defined object-oriented design metrics on XML schemas based on predefined mappings. In this paper, basic ideas for mentioned mapping are presented. This mapping is prerequisite for setting the future approach to XML schema quality measuring with object-oriented metrics.

  13. Benefits to the Simulation Training Community of a New ANSI Standard for the Exchange of Aero Simulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildreth, Bruce L.; Jackson, E. Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The American Institute of Aeronautics Astronautics (AIAA) Modeling and Simulation Technical Committee is in final preparation of a new standard for the exchange of flight dynamics models. The standard will become an ANSI standard and is under consideration for submission to ISO for acceptance by the international community. The standard has some a spects that should provide benefits to the simulation training community. Use of the new standard by the training simulation community will reduce development, maintenance and technical refresh investment on each device. Furthermore, it will significantly lower the cost of performing model updates to improve fidelity or expand the envelope of the training device. Higher flight fidelity should result in better transfer of training, a direct benefit to the pilots under instruction. Costs of adopting the standard are minimal and should be paid back within the cost of the first use for that training device. The standard achie ves these advantages by making it easier to update the aerodynamic model. It provides a standard format for the model in a custom eXtensible Markup Language (XML) grammar, the Dynamic Aerospace Vehicle Exchange Markup Language (DAVE-ML). It employs an existing XML grammar, MathML, to describe the aerodynamic model in an input data file, eliminating the requirement for actual software compilation. The major components of the aero model become simply an input data file, and updates are simply new XML input files. It includes naming and axis system conventions to further simplify the exchange of information.

  14. Applying language technology to nursing documents: pros and cons with a focus on ethics.

    PubMed

    Suominen, Hanna; Lehtikunnas, Tuija; Back, Barbro; Karsten, Helena; Salakoski, Tapio; Salanterä, Sanna

    2007-10-01

    The present study discusses ethics in building and using applications based on natural language processing in electronic nursing documentation. Specifically, we first focus on the question of how patient confidentiality can be ensured in developing language technology for the nursing documentation domain. Then, we identify and theoretically analyze the ethical outcomes which arise when using natural language processing to support clinical judgement and decision-making. In total, we put forward and justify 10 claims related to ethics in applying language technology to nursing documents. A review of recent scientific articles related to ethics in electronic patient records or in the utilization of large databases was conducted. Then, the results were compared with ethical guidelines for nurses and the Finnish legislation covering health care and processing of personal data. Finally, the practical experiences of the authors in applying the methods of natural language processing to nursing documents were appended. Patient records supplemented with natural language processing capabilities may help nurses give better, more efficient and more individualized care for their patients. In addition, language technology may facilitate patients' possibility to receive truthful information about their health and improve the nature of narratives. Because of these benefits, research about the use of language technology in narratives should be encouraged. In contrast, privacy-sensitive health care documentation brings specific ethical concerns and difficulties to the natural language processing of nursing documents. Therefore, when developing natural language processing tools, patient confidentiality must be ensured. While using the tools, health care personnel should always be responsible for the clinical judgement and decision-making. One should also consider that the use of language technology in nursing narratives may threaten patients' rights by using documentation collected

  15. Improved Identification of Noun Phrases in Clinical Radiology Reports Using a High-Performance Statistical Natural Language Parser Augmented with the UMLS Specialist Lexicon

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yang; Lowe, Henry J.; Klein, Dan; Cucina, Russell J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a method of extracting noun phrases with full phrase structures from a set of clinical radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and to investigate the effects of using the UMLS® Specialist Lexicon to improve noun phrase identification within clinical radiology documents. Design: The noun phrase identification (NPI) module is composed of a sentence boundary detector, a statistical natural language parser trained on a nonmedical domain, and a noun phrase (NP) tagger. The NPI module processed a set of 100 XML-represented clinical radiology reports in Health Level 7 (HL7)® Clinical Document Architecture (CDA)–compatible format. Computed output was compared with manual markups made by four physicians and one author for maximal (longest) NP and those made by one author for base (simple) NP, respectively. An extended lexicon of biomedical terms was created from the UMLS Specialist Lexicon and used to improve NPI performance. Results: The test set was 50 randomly selected reports. The sentence boundary detector achieved 99.0% precision and 98.6% recall. The overall maximal NPI precision and recall were 78.9% and 81.5% before using the UMLS Specialist Lexicon and 82.1% and 84.6% after. The overall base NPI precision and recall were 88.2% and 86.8% before using the UMLS Specialist Lexicon and 93.1% and 92.6% after, reducing false-positives by 31.1% and false-negatives by 34.3%. Conclusion: The sentence boundary detector performs excellently. After the adaptation using the UMLS Specialist Lexicon, the statistical parser's NPI performance on radiology reports increased to levels comparable to the parser's native performance in its newswire training domain and to that reported by other researchers in the general nonmedical domain. PMID:15684131

  16. Improved identification of noun phrases in clinical radiology reports using a high-performance statistical natural language parser augmented with the UMLS specialist lexicon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang; Lowe, Henry J; Klein, Dan; Cucina, Russell J

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a method of extracting noun phrases with full phrase structures from a set of clinical radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and to investigate the effects of using the UMLS(R) Specialist Lexicon to improve noun phrase identification within clinical radiology documents. The noun phrase identification (NPI) module is composed of a sentence boundary detector, a statistical natural language parser trained on a nonmedical domain, and a noun phrase (NP) tagger. The NPI module processed a set of 100 XML-represented clinical radiology reports in Health Level 7 (HL7)(R) Clinical Document Architecture (CDA)-compatible format. Computed output was compared with manual markups made by four physicians and one author for maximal (longest) NP and those made by one author for base (simple) NP, respectively. An extended lexicon of biomedical terms was created from the UMLS Specialist Lexicon and used to improve NPI performance. The test set was 50 randomly selected reports. The sentence boundary detector achieved 99.0% precision and 98.6% recall. The overall maximal NPI precision and recall were 78.9% and 81.5% before using the UMLS Specialist Lexicon and 82.1% and 84.6% after. The overall base NPI precision and recall were 88.2% and 86.8% before using the UMLS Specialist Lexicon and 93.1% and 92.6% after, reducing false-positives by 31.1% and false-negatives by 34.3%. The sentence boundary detector performs excellently. After the adaptation using the UMLS Specialist Lexicon, the statistical parser's NPI performance on radiology reports increased to levels comparable to the parser's native performance in its newswire training domain and to that reported by other researchers in the general nonmedical domain.

  17. Instrument Remote Control Application Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Troy; Hostetter, Carl F.

    2006-01-01

    The Instrument Remote Control (IRC) architecture is a flexible, platform-independent application framework that is well suited for the control and monitoring of remote devices and sensors. IRC enables significant savings in development costs by utilizing extensible Markup Language (XML) descriptions to configure the framework for a specific application. The Instrument Markup Language (IML) is used to describe the commands used by an instrument, the data streams produced, the rules for formatting commands and parsing the data, and the method of communication. Often no custom code is needed to communicate with a new instrument or device. An IRC instance can advertise and publish a description about a device or subscribe to another device's description on a network. This simple capability of dynamically publishing and subscribing to interfaces enables a very flexible, self-adapting architecture for monitoring and control of complex instruments in diverse environments.

  18. Beyond the Ancestral Code: Towards a Model for Sociolinguistic Language Documentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Tucker; Good, Jeff; Mitchell, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Most language documentation efforts focus on capturing lexico-grammatical information on individual languages. Comparatively little effort has been devoted to considering a language's sociolinguistic contexts. In parts of the world characterized by high degrees of multilingualism, questions surrounding the factors involved in language choice and…

  19. Integrating Language Documentation, Language Preservation, and Linguistic Research: Working with the Kokamas from the Amazon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallejos, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This paper highlights the role of speech community members on a series of interconnected projects to document, study and maintain Kokama, a deeply endangered language from the Peruvian Amazon. The remaining fluent speakers of the language are mostly older than 60 years of age, are spread out across various small villages, and speak the language in…

  20. HDF-EOS 5 Validator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullman, Richard; Bane, Bob; Yang, Jingli

    2008-01-01

    A computer program partly automates the task of determining whether an HDF-EOS 5 file is valid in that it conforms to specifications for such characteristics as attribute names, dimensionality of data products, and ranges of legal data values. ["HDF-EOS" and variants thereof are defined in "Converting EOS Data From HDF-EOS to netCDF" (GSC-15007-1), which is the first of several preceding articles in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs.] Previously, validity of a file was determined in a tedious and error-prone process in which a person examined human-readable dumps of data-file-format information. The present software helps a user to encode the specifications for an HDFEOS 5 file, and then inspects the file for conformity with the specifications: First, the user writes the specifications in Extensible Markup Language (XML) by use of a document type definition (DTD) that is part of the program. Next, the portion of the program (denoted the validator) that performs the inspection is executed, using, as inputs, the specifications in XML and the HDF-EOS 5 file to be validated. Finally, the user examines the output of the validator.

  1. Spectra, chromatograms, Metadata: mzML-the standard data format for mass spectrometer output.

    PubMed

    Turewicz, Michael; Deutsch, Eric W

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes Mass Spectrometry Markup Language (mzML), an XML-based and vendor-neutral standard data format for storage and exchange of mass spectrometer output like raw spectra and peak lists. It is intended to replace its two precursor data formats (mzData and mzXML), which had been developed independently a few years earlier. Hence, with the release of mzML, the problem of having two different formats for the same purposes is solved, and with it the duplicated effort of maintaining and supporting two data formats. The new format has been developed by a broad-based consortium of major instrument vendors, software vendors, and academic researchers under the aegis of the Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO), Proteomics Standards Initiative (PSI), with full participation of the main developers of the precursor formats. This comprehensive approach helped mzML to become a generally accepted standard. Furthermore, the collaborative development insured that mzML has adopted the best features of its precursor formats. In this chapter, we discuss mzML's development history, its design principles and use cases, as well as its main building components. We also present the available documentation, an example file, and validation software for mzML.

  2. Integration of clinical practice guidelines into a distributed regional electronic patient record for tumour-patients using XML: a means for standardization of the treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Mludek, V; Wolff, A C; Drings, P; van der Haak, M; Haux, R; Wannenmacher, M; Zierhut, D

    2001-01-01

    With the rising efforts to guarantee a high quality treatment in medicine and to reduce the costs in the health care system, Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) have developed into a very important reference in medicine. CPGs are especially useful for the standardization of multi-professional treatment processes like the care for patients with malignant diseases. The Tumour-Centre Heidelberg/Mannheim (Germany) leads a project to build up a regional, virtual distributed Electronic Patient Record (EPR) for patients with malignant diseases in the Rhein-Neckar-Area. Aims of the first stages of the project are the introduction of the distributed EPR to two co-operating pilot-clinics. In this context we intend to provide access for medical professionals not only to the data of the jointly treated patients, but also to relevant existing CPGs and other medical knowledge sources like Medline and Cochrane-Library. Knowledge and Patient data should be interlinked to offer patient-specific views on the CPG-information. As all professions have different information needs, this views should be presented individualized according to the demands of the users. We analysed three relevant CPGs and defined a meta-structure that will be refined to a common meta-structure for CPGs in Oncology. CPGs as well as structured patient-documents will be implemented in the Extensible Markup Language (XML), as this platform-independent technology seems to suit our needs for data exchange and presentation purposes best. The implementation process will be accompanied tightly with evaluations to gain experience for further expansions of the EPR. The vision of the project is, that by integrating CPGs in a shared distributed EPR, the way towards standardized treatment processes in a local, but multi-professional setting, and the efforts to guarantee a high quality treatment in Oncology can sufficiently be supported.

  3. On Logic and Standards for Structuring Documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyers, David M.; Jones, Andrew J. I.; Kimbrough, Steven O.

    The advent of XML has been widely seized upon as an opportunity to develop document representation standards that lend themselves to automated processing. This is a welcome development and much good has come of it. That said, present standardization efforts may be criticized on a number of counts. We explore two issues associated with document XML standardization efforts. We label them (i) the dynamic point and (ii) the logical point. Our dynamic point is that in many cases experience has shown that the search for a final, or even reasonably permanent, document representation standard is futile. The case is especially strong for electronic data interchange (EDI). Our logical point is that formalization into symbolic logic is materially helpful for understanding and designing dynamic document standards.

  4. Variation in markup of general surgical procedures by hospital market concentration.

    PubMed

    Cerullo, Marcelo; Chen, Sophia Y; Dillhoff, Mary; Schmidt, Carl R; Canner, Joseph K; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2018-04-01

    Increasing hospital market concentration (with concomitantly decreasing hospital market competition) may be associated with rising hospital prices. Hospital markup - the relative increase in price over costs - has been associated with greater hospital market concentration. Patients undergoing a cardiothoracic or gastrointestinal procedure in the 2008-2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) were identified and linked to Hospital Market Structure Files. The association between market concentration, hospital markup and hospital for-profit status was assessed using mixed-effects log-linear models. A weighted total of 1,181,936 patients were identified. In highly concentrated markets, private for-profit status was associated with an 80.8% higher markup compared to public/private not-for-profit status (95%CI: +69.5% - +96.9%; p < 0.001). However, private for-profit status in highly concentrated markets was associated with only a 62.9% higher markup compared to public/private not-for-profit status in unconcentrated markets (95%CI: +45.4% - +81.1%; p < 0.001). Hospital for-profit status modified the association between hospitals' market concentration and markup. Government and private not-for-profit hospitals employed lower markups in more concentrated markets, whereas private for-profit hospitals employed higher markups in more concentrated markets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prices and mark-ups on antimalarials: evidence from nationally representative studies in six malaria-endemic countries

    PubMed Central

    Palafox, Benjamin; Patouillard, Edith; Tougher, Sarah; Goodman, Catherine; Hanson, Kara; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Torres Rueda, Sergio; Kiefer, Sabine; O’Connell, Kate; Zinsou, Cyprien; Phok, Sochea; Akulayi, Louis; Arogundade, Ekundayo; Buyungo, Peter; Mpasela, Felton; Poyer, Stephen; Chavasse, Desmond

    2016-01-01

    The private for-profit sector is an important source of treatment for malaria. However, private patients face high prices for the recommended treatment for uncomplicated malaria, artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs), which makes them more likely to receive cheaper, less effective non-artemisinin therapies (nATs). This study seeks to better understand consumer antimalarial prices by documenting and exploring the pricing behaviour of retailers and wholesalers. Using data collected in 2009–10, we present survey estimates of antimalarial retail prices, and wholesale- and retail-level price mark-ups from six countries (Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia), along with qualitative findings on factors affecting pricing decisions. Retail prices were lowest for nATs, followed by ACTs and artemisinin monotherapies (AMTs). Retailers applied the highest percentage mark-ups on nATs (range: 40% in Nigeria to 100% in Cambodia and Zambia), whereas mark-ups on ACTs (range: 22% in Nigeria to 71% in Zambia) and AMTs (range: 22% in Nigeria to 50% in Uganda) were similar in magnitude, but lower than those applied to nATs. Wholesale mark-ups were generally lower than those at retail level, and were similar across antimalarial categories in most countries. When setting prices wholesalers and retailers commonly considered supplier prices, prevailing market prices, product availability, product characteristics and the costs related to transporting goods, staff salaries and maintaining a property. Price discounts were regularly used to encourage sales and were sometimes used by wholesalers to reward long-term customers. Pricing constraints existed only in Benin where wholesaler and retailer mark-ups are regulated; however, unlicensed drug vendors based in open-air markets did not adhere to the pricing regime. These findings indicate that mark-ups on antimalarials are reasonable. Therefore, improving ACT affordability would be most readily

  6. Alternatives to relational database: comparison of NoSQL and XML approaches for clinical data storage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ken Ka-Yin; Tang, Wai-Choi; Choi, Kup-Sze

    2013-04-01

    Clinical data are dynamic in nature, often arranged hierarchically and stored as free text and numbers. Effective management of clinical data and the transformation of the data into structured format for data analysis are therefore challenging issues in electronic health records development. Despite the popularity of relational databases, the scalability of the NoSQL database model and the document-centric data structure of XML databases appear to be promising features for effective clinical data management. In this paper, three database approaches--NoSQL, XML-enabled and native XML--are investigated to evaluate their suitability for structured clinical data. The database query performance is reported, together with our experience in the databases development. The results show that NoSQL database is the best choice for query speed, whereas XML databases are advantageous in terms of scalability, flexibility and extensibility, which are essential to cope with the characteristics of clinical data. While NoSQL and XML technologies are relatively new compared to the conventional relational database, both of them demonstrate potential to become a key database technology for clinical data management as the technology further advances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Balancing medicine prices and business sustainability: analyses of pharmacy costs, revenues and profit shed light on retail medicine mark-ups in rural Kyrgyzstan

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    public-private partnership, resource-sharing models. Medicine prices and mark-ups must be interpreted with consideration for regional costs of business. Mark-ups vary dramatically across medicines. Some mark-ups appear "excessive" but are likely necessary for pharmacy viability. Pharmacy financial data is available in remote settings and can be used towards determination of "reasonable" medicine price goals. Health systems researchers must document the positive and negative financial experiences of pharmacy initiatives to inform future projects and advance access to medicines goals. PMID:20626904

  8. Balancing medicine prices and business sustainability: analyses of pharmacy costs, revenues and profit shed light on retail medicine mark-ups in rural Kyrgyzstan.

    PubMed

    Waning, Brenda; Maddix, Jason; Soucy, Lyne

    2010-07-13

    -sharing models. Medicine prices and mark-ups must be interpreted with consideration for regional costs of business. Mark-ups vary dramatically across medicines. Some mark-ups appear "excessive" but are likely necessary for pharmacy viability. Pharmacy financial data is available in remote settings and can be used towards determination of "reasonable" medicine price goals. Health systems researchers must document the positive and negative financial experiences of pharmacy initiatives to inform future projects and advance access to medicines goals.

  9. Common data model for natural language processing based on two existing standard information models: CDA+GrAF.

    PubMed

    Meystre, Stéphane M; Lee, Sanghoon; Jung, Chai Young; Chevrier, Raphaël D

    2012-08-01

    An increasing need for collaboration and resources sharing in the Natural Language Processing (NLP) research and development community motivates efforts to create and share a common data model and a common terminology for all information annotated and extracted from clinical text. We have combined two existing standards: the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA), and the ISO Graph Annotation Format (GrAF; in development), to develop such a data model entitled "CDA+GrAF". We experimented with several methods to combine these existing standards, and eventually selected a method wrapping separate CDA and GrAF parts in a common standoff annotation (i.e., separate from the annotated text) XML document. Two use cases, clinical document sections, and the 2010 i2b2/VA NLP Challenge (i.e., problems, tests, and treatments, with their assertions and relations), were used to create examples of such standoff annotation documents, and were successfully validated with the XML schemata provided with both standards. We developed a tool to automatically translate annotation documents from the 2010 i2b2/VA NLP Challenge format to GrAF, and automatically generated 50 annotation documents using this tool, all successfully validated. Finally, we adapted the XSL stylesheet provided with HL7 CDA to allow viewing annotation XML documents in a web browser, and plan to adapt existing tools for translating annotation documents between CDA+GrAF and the UIMA and GATE frameworks. This common data model may ease directly comparing NLP tools and applications, combining their output, transforming and "translating" annotations between different NLP applications, and eventually "plug-and-play" of different modules in NLP applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. GeoGML - a Mark-up Language for 4-dimensional geomorphic objects and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwner, M.-O.

    2009-04-01

    We developed an use-oriented GML3 based data model that enables researchers to share 4-dimensional information about landforms and their process related interaction. Using the Unified Modelling Language it is implemented as a GML3-based application schema available on the Internet. As the science of the land's surface Geomorphology investigates landforms, their change, and the processes causing this change. The main problem of comparing research results in geomorphology is that the objects under investigation are composed of 3-dimensional geometries that change in time due to processes of material fluxes, e. g. soil erosion or mass movements. They have internal properties, e. g. soil texture or bulk density, that determine the effectiveness of these processes but are under change as well. Worldwide geographical data can be shared over the Internet using Web Feature Services. The precondition is the development of a semantic model or ontology based on international standards like GML3 as an implementation of the ISO 109107 and others. Here we present a GML3-based Mark-up Language or application schema for geomorphic purposes that fulfils the following requirements: First, an object-oriented view of landforms with a true 3-dimensional geometric data format was established. Second, the internal structure and attributes of landforms can be stored. Third, the interaction of processes and landforms is represented. Fourth, the change of all these mentioned attributes over time was considered. The presented application schema is available on the Internet and therefore a first step to enable researchers to share information using an OGC's Web feature service. In this vein comparing modelling results of landscape evolution with results of other scientist's observations is possible. Compared to prevalent data concepts the model presented makes it possible to store information about landforms, their geometry and the characteristics in more detail. It allows to represent the 3D

  11. Converting CSV Files to RKSML Files

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trebi-Ollennu, Ashitey; Liebersbach, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A computer program converts, into a format suitable for processing on Earth, files of downlinked telemetric data pertaining to the operation of the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD), which is a robot arm on either of the Mars Explorer Rovers (MERs). The raw downlinked data files are in comma-separated- value (CSV) format. The present program converts the files into Rover Kinematics State Markup Language (RKSML), which is an Extensible Markup Language (XML) format that facilitates representation of operations of the IDD and enables analysis of the operations by means of the Rover Sequencing Validation Program (RSVP), which is used to build sequences of commanded operations for the MERs. After conversion by means of the present program, the downlinked data can be processed by RSVP, enabling the MER downlink operations team to play back the actual IDD activity represented by the telemetric data against the planned IDD activity. Thus, the present program enhances the diagnosis of anomalies that manifest themselves as differences between actual and planned IDD activities.

  12. SDDL- SOFTWARE DESIGN AND DOCUMENTATION LANGUAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleine, H.

    1994-01-01

    Effective, efficient communication is an essential element of the software development process. The Software Design and Documentation Language (SDDL) provides an effective communication medium to support the design and documentation of complex software applications. SDDL supports communication between all the members of a software design team and provides for the production of informative documentation on the design effort. Even when an entire development task is performed by a single individual, it is important to explicitly express and document communication between the various aspects of the design effort including concept development, program specification, program development, and program maintenance. SDDL ensures that accurate documentation will be available throughout the entire software life cycle. SDDL offers an extremely valuable capability for the design and documentation of complex programming efforts ranging from scientific and engineering applications to data management and business sytems. Throughout the development of a software design, the SDDL generated Software Design Document always represents the definitive word on the current status of the ongoing, dynamic design development process. The document is easily updated and readily accessible in a familiar, informative form to all members of the development team. This makes the Software Design Document an effective instrument for reconciling misunderstandings and disagreements in the development of design specifications, engineering support concepts, and the software design itself. Using the SDDL generated document to analyze the design makes it possible to eliminate many errors that might not be detected until coding and testing is attempted. As a project management aid, the Software Design Document is useful for monitoring progress and for recording task responsibilities. SDDL is a combination of language, processor, and methodology. The SDDL syntax consists of keywords to invoke design structures

  13. QuakeML: XML for Seismological Data Exchange and Resource Metadata Description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euchner, F.; Schorlemmer, D.; Becker, J.; Heinloo, A.; Kästli, P.; Saul, J.; Weber, B.; QuakeML Working Group

    2007-12-01

    QuakeML is an XML-based data exchange format for seismology that is under development. Current collaborators are from ETH, GFZ, USC, USGS, IRIS DMC, EMSC, ORFEUS, and ISTI. QuakeML development was motivated by the lack of a widely accepted and well-documented data format that is applicable to a broad range of fields in seismology. The development team brings together expertise from communities dealing with analysis and creation of earthquake catalogs, distribution of seismic bulletins, and real-time processing of seismic data. Efforts to merge QuakeML with existing XML dialects are under way. The first release of QuakeML will cover a basic description of seismic events including picks, arrivals, amplitudes, magnitudes, origins, focal mechanisms, and moment tensors. Further extensions are in progress or planned, e.g., for macroseismic information, location probability density functions, slip distributions, and ground motion information. The QuakeML language definition is supplemented by a concept to provide resource metadata and facilitate metadata exchange between distributed data providers. For that purpose, we introduce unique, location-independent identifiers of seismological resources. As an application of QuakeML, ETH Zurich currently develops a Python-based seismicity analysis toolkit as a contribution to CSEP (Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability). We follow a collaborative and transparent development approach along the lines of the procedures of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). QuakeML currently is in working draft status. The standard description will be subjected to a public Request for Comments (RFC) process and eventually reach the status of a recommendation. QuakeML can be found at http://www.quakeml.org.

  14. Conversion of Radiology Reporting Templates to the MRRT Standard.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Charles E; Genereaux, Brad; Langlotz, Curtis P

    2015-10-01

    In 2013, the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) Radiology workgroup developed the Management of Radiology Report Templates (MRRT) profile, which defines both the format of radiology reporting templates using an extension of Hypertext Markup Language version 5 (HTML5), and the transportation mechanism to query, retrieve, and store these templates. Of 200 English-language report templates published by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), initially encoded as text and in an XML schema language, 168 have been converted successfully into MRRT using a combination of automated processes and manual editing; conversion of the remaining 32 templates is in progress. The automated conversion process applied Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) scripts, an XML parsing engine, and a Java servlet. The templates were validated for proper HTML5 and MRRT syntax using web-based services. The MRRT templates allow radiologists to share best-practice templates across organizations and have been uploaded to the template library to supersede the prior XML-format templates. By using MRRT transactions and MRRT-format templates, radiologists will be able to directly import and apply templates from the RSNA Report Template Library in their own MRRT-compatible vendor systems. The availability of MRRT-format reporting templates will stimulate adoption of the MRRT standard and is expected to advance the sharing and use of templates to improve the quality of radiology reports.

  15. RGG: A general GUI Framework for R scripts

    PubMed Central

    Visne, Ilhami; Dilaveroglu, Erkan; Vierlinger, Klemens; Lauss, Martin; Yildiz, Ahmet; Weinhaeusel, Andreas; Noehammer, Christa; Leisch, Friedrich; Kriegner, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Background R is the leading open source statistics software with a vast number of biostatistical and bioinformatical analysis packages. To exploit the advantages of R, extensive scripting/programming skills are required. Results We have developed a software tool called R GUI Generator (RGG) which enables the easy generation of Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) for the programming language R by adding a few Extensible Markup Language (XML) – tags. RGG consists of an XML-based GUI definition language and a Java-based GUI engine. GUIs are generated in runtime from defined GUI tags that are embedded into the R script. User-GUI input is returned to the R code and replaces the XML-tags. RGG files can be developed using any text editor. The current version of RGG is available as a stand-alone software (RGGRunner) and as a plug-in for JGR. Conclusion RGG is a general GUI framework for R that has the potential to introduce R statistics (R packages, built-in functions and scripts) to users with limited programming skills and helps to bridge the gap between R developers and GUI-dependent users. RGG aims to abstract the GUI development from individual GUI toolkits by using an XML-based GUI definition language. Thus RGG can be easily integrated in any software. The RGG project further includes the development of a web-based repository for RGG-GUIs. RGG is an open source project licensed under the Lesser General Public License (LGPL) and can be downloaded freely at PMID:19254356

  16. δ-dependency for privacy-preserving XML data publishing.

    PubMed

    Landberg, Anders H; Nguyen, Kinh; Pardede, Eric; Rahayu, J Wenny

    2014-08-01

    An ever increasing amount of medical data such as electronic health records, is being collected, stored, shared and managed in large online health information systems and electronic medical record systems (EMR) (Williams et al., 2001; Virtanen, 2009; Huang and Liou, 2007) [1-3]. From such rich collections, data is often published in the form of census and statistical data sets for the purpose of knowledge sharing and enabling medical research. This brings with it an increasing need for protecting individual people privacy, and it becomes an issue of great importance especially when information about patients is exposed to the public. While the concept of data privacy has been comprehensively studied for relational data, models and algorithms addressing the distinct differences and complex structure of XML data are yet to be explored. Currently, the common compromise method is to convert private XML data into relational data for publication. This ad hoc approach results in significant loss of useful semantic information previously carried in the private XML data. Health data often has very complex structure, which is best expressed in XML. In fact, XML is the standard format for exchanging (e.g. HL7 version 3(1)) and publishing health information. Lack of means to deal directly with data in XML format is inevitably a serious drawback. In this paper we propose a novel privacy protection model for XML, and an algorithm for implementing this model. We provide general rules, both for transforming a private XML schema into a published XML schema, and for mapping private XML data to the new privacy-protected published XML data. In addition, we propose a new privacy property, δ-dependency, which can be applied to both relational and XML data, and that takes into consideration the hierarchical nature of sensitive data (as opposed to "quasi-identifiers"). Lastly, we provide an implementation of our model, algorithm and privacy property, and perform an experimental analysis

  17. A unified approach for development of Urdu Corpus for OCR and demographic purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Prakash; Nain, Neeta; Ahmed, Mushtaq

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the development of an Urdu handwritten text image Corpus and application of Corpus linguistics in the field of OCR and information retrieval from handwritten document. Compared to other language scripts, Urdu script is little bit complicated for data entry. To enter a single character it requires a combination of multiple keys entry. Here, a mixed approach is proposed and demonstrated for building Urdu Corpus for OCR and Demographic data collection. Demographic part of database could be used to train a system to fetch the data automatically, which will be helpful to simplify existing manual data-processing task involved in the field of data collection such as input forms like Passport, Ration Card, Voting Card, AADHAR, Driving licence, Indian Railway Reservation, Census data etc. This would increase the participation of Urdu language community in understanding and taking benefit of the Government schemes. To make availability and applicability of database in a vast area of corpus linguistics, we propose a methodology for data collection, mark-up, digital transcription, and XML metadata information for benchmarking.

  18. Electronic Procedures for Medical Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Electronic procedures are replacing text-based documents for recording the steps in performing medical operations aboard the International Space Station. S&K Aerospace, LLC, has developed a content-based electronic system-based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML) standard-that separates text from formatting standards and tags items contained in procedures so they can be recognized by other electronic systems. For example, to change a standard format, electronic procedures are changed in a single batch process, and the entire body of procedures will have the new format. Procedures can be quickly searched to determine which are affected by software and hardware changes. Similarly, procedures are easily shared with other electronic systems. The system also enables real-time data capture and automatic bookmarking of current procedure steps. In Phase II of the project, S&K Aerospace developed a Procedure Representation Language (PRL) and tools to support the creation and maintenance of electronic procedures for medical operations. The goal is to develop these tools in such a way that new advances can be inserted easily, leading to an eventual medical decision support system.

  19. A Space Surveillance Ontology: Captured in an XML Schema

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    characterization in a way most appropriate to a sub- domain. 6. The commercial market is embracing XML, and the military can take advantage of this significant...the space surveillance ontology effort to two key efforts: the Defense Information Infrastructure Common Operating Environment (DII COE) XML...strongly believe XML schemas will supplant them. Some of the advantages that XML schemas provide over DTDs include: • Strong data typing: The XML Schema

  20. imzML: Imaging Mass Spectrometry Markup Language: A common data format for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Römpp, Andreas; Schramm, Thorsten; Hester, Alfons; Klinkert, Ivo; Both, Jean-Pierre; Heeren, Ron M A; Stöckli, Markus; Spengler, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is the method of scanning a sample of interest and generating an "image" of the intensity distribution of a specific analyte. The data sets consist of a large number of mass spectra which are usually acquired with identical settings. Existing data formats are not sufficient to describe an MS imaging experiment completely. The data format imzML was developed to allow the flexible and efficient exchange of MS imaging data between different instruments and data analysis software.For this purpose, the MS imaging data is divided in two separate files. The mass spectral data is stored in a binary file to ensure efficient storage. All metadata (e.g., instrumental parameters, sample details) are stored in an XML file which is based on the standard data format mzML developed by HUPO-PSI. The original mzML controlled vocabulary was extended to include specific parameters of imaging mass spectrometry (such as x/y position and spatial resolution). The two files (XML and binary) are connected by offset values in the XML file and are unambiguously linked by a universally unique identifier. The resulting datasets are comparable in size to the raw data and the separate metadata file allows flexible handling of large datasets.Several imaging MS software tools already support imzML. This allows choosing from a (growing) number of processing tools. One is no longer limited to proprietary software, but is able to use the processing software which is best suited for a specific question or application. On the other hand, measurements from different instruments can be compared within one software application using identical settings for data processing. All necessary information for evaluating and implementing imzML can be found at http://www.imzML.org .

  1. Prices and mark-ups on antimalarials: evidence from nationally representative studies in six malaria-endemic countries.

    PubMed

    Palafox, Benjamin; Patouillard, Edith; Tougher, Sarah; Goodman, Catherine; Hanson, Kara; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Torres Rueda, Sergio; Kiefer, Sabine; O'Connell, Kate; Zinsou, Cyprien; Phok, Sochea; Akulayi, Louis; Arogundade, Ekundayo; Buyungo, Peter; Mpasela, Felton; Poyer, Stephen; Chavasse, Desmond

    2016-03-01

    The private for-profit sector is an important source of treatment for malaria. However, private patients face high prices for the recommended treatment for uncomplicated malaria, artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs), which makes them more likely to receive cheaper, less effective non-artemisinin therapies (nATs). This study seeks to better understand consumer antimalarial prices by documenting and exploring the pricing behaviour of retailers and wholesalers. Using data collected in 2009-10, we present survey estimates of antimalarial retail prices, and wholesale- and retail-level price mark-ups from six countries (Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia), along with qualitative findings on factors affecting pricing decisions. Retail prices were lowest for nATs, followed by ACTs and artemisinin monotherapies (AMTs). Retailers applied the highest percentage mark-ups on nATs (range: 40% in Nigeria to 100% in Cambodia and Zambia), whereas mark-ups on ACTs (range: 22% in Nigeria to 71% in Zambia) and AMTs (range: 22% in Nigeria to 50% in Uganda) were similar in magnitude, but lower than those applied to nATs. Wholesale mark-ups were generally lower than those at retail level, and were similar across antimalarial categories in most countries. When setting prices wholesalers and retailers commonly considered supplier prices, prevailing market prices, product availability, product characteristics and the costs related to transporting goods, staff salaries and maintaining a property. Price discounts were regularly used to encourage sales and were sometimes used by wholesalers to reward long-term customers. Pricing constraints existed only in Benin where wholesaler and retailer mark-ups are regulated; however, unlicensed drug vendors based in open-air markets did not adhere to the pricing regime. These findings indicate that mark-ups on antimalarials are reasonable. Therefore, improving ACT affordability would be most readily

  2. A Content Markup Language for Data Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noviello, C.; Acampa, P.; Mango Furnari, M.

    Network content delivery and documents sharing is possible using a variety of technologies, such as distributed databases, service-oriented applications, and so forth. The development of such systems is a complex job, because document life cycle involves a strong cooperation between domain experts and software developers. Furthermore, the emerging software methodologies, such as the service-oriented architecture and knowledge organization (e.g., semantic web) did not really solve the problems faced in a real distributed and cooperating settlement. In this chapter the authors' efforts to design and deploy a distribute and cooperating content management system are described. The main features of the system are a user configurable document type definition and a management middleware layer. It allows CMS developers to orchestrate the composition of specialized software components around the structure of a document. In this chapter are also reported some of the experiences gained on deploying the developed framework in a cultural heritage dissemination settlement.

  3. QRev—Software for computation and quality assurance of acoustic doppler current profiler moving-boat streamflow measurements—Technical manual for version 2.8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.

    2016-06-21

    The software program, QRev applies common and consistent computational algorithms combined with automated filtering and quality assessment of the data to improve the quality and efficiency of streamflow measurements and helps ensure that U.S. Geological Survey streamflow measurements are consistent, accurate, and independent of the manufacturer of the instrument used to make the measurement. Software from different manufacturers uses different algorithms for various aspects of the data processing and discharge computation. The algorithms used by QRev to filter data, interpolate data, and compute discharge are documented and compared to the algorithms used in the manufacturers’ software. QRev applies consistent algorithms and creates a data structure that is independent of the data source. QRev saves an extensible markup language (XML) file that can be imported into databases or electronic field notes software. This report is the technical manual for version 2.8 of QRev.

  4. An XML-based system for the flexible classification and retrieval of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Ganslandt, T.; Mueller, M. L.; Krieglstein, C. F.; Senninger, N.; Prokosch, H. U.

    2002-01-01

    Beneficial effects of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have not yet reached expectations due to limited routine adoption. Electronic distribution and reminder systems have the potential to overcome implementation barriers. Existing electronic CPG repositories like the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) provide individual access but lack standardized computer-readable interfaces necessary for automated guideline retrieval. The aim of this paper was to facilitate automated context-based selection and presentation of CPGs. Using attributes from the NGC classification scheme, an XML-based metadata repository was successfully implemented, providing document storage, classification and retrieval functionality. Semi-automated extraction of attributes was implemented for the import of XML guideline documents using XPath. A hospital information system interface was exemplarily implemented for diagnosis-based guideline invocation. Limitations of the implemented system are discussed and possible future work is outlined. Integration of standardized computer-readable search interfaces into existing CPG repositories is proposed. PMID:12463831

  5. Engineering Analysis Using a Web-based Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, James D.; Claus, Russell W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of a web-based framework for engineering analysis. A one-dimensional, high-speed analysis code called LAPIN was used in this study, but the approach can be generalized to any engineering analysis tool. The web-based framework enables users to store, retrieve, and execute an engineering analysis from a standard web-browser. We review the encapsulation of the engineering data into the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and various design considerations in the storage and retrieval of application data.

  6. The use of geospatial web services for exchanging utilities data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuczyńska, Joanna

    2013-04-01

    Geographic information technologies and related geo-information systems currently play an important role in the management of public administration in Poland. One of these tasks is to maintain and update Geodetic Evidence of Public Utilities (GESUT), part of the National Geodetic and Cartographic Resource, which contains an important for many institutions information of technical infrastructure. It requires an active exchange of data between the Geodesy and Cartography Documentation Centers and institutions, which administrate transmission lines. The administrator of public utilities, is legally obliged to provide information about utilities to GESUT. The aim of the research work was to develop a universal data exchange methodology, which can be implemented on a variety of hardware and software platforms. This methodology use Unified Modeling Language (UML), eXtensible Markup Language (XML), and Geography Markup Language (GML). The proposed methodology is based on the two different strategies: Model Driven Architecture (MDA) and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). Used solutions are consistent with the INSPIRE Directive and ISO 19100 series standards for geographic information. On the basis of analysis of the input data structures, conceptual models were built for both databases. Models were written in the universal modeling language: UML. Combined model that defines a common data structure was also built. This model was transformed into developed for the exchange of geographic information GML standard. The structure of the document describing the data that may be exchanged is defined in the .xsd file. Network services were selected and implemented in the system designed for data exchange based on open source tools. Methodology was implemented and tested. Data in the agreed data structure and metadata were set up on the server. Data access was provided by geospatial network services: data searching possibilities by Catalog Service for the Web (CSW), data

  7. Data Archival and Retrieval Enhancement (DARE) Metadata Modeling and Its User Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyon, Jason J.; Borgen, Rosana B.

    1996-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) has acquired terabytes of valuable data which need to be archived and effectively distributed to the entire nuclear weapons effects community and others...This paper describes the DARE (Data Archival and Retrieval Enhancement) metadata model and explains how it is used as a source for generating HyperText Markup Language (HTML)or Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) documents for access through web browsers such as Netscape.

  8. Documenting and Maintaining Native American Languages for the 21st Century: The Indiana University Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Douglas R.; Kushner, Julia; Hooper, Wallace; Flavin, Francis; Yellow Bird, Delilah; Ditmar, Selena

    This document compiles five short papers that describe the history and implementation of the Arikara Language Project and the Nakoda Language Project, the development of computer tools for language documentation, and the creation of curriculum materials for these and other projects. These papers are: "Genesis of the Project" (Douglas R.…

  9. Mapping DICOM to OpenDocument format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Cong; Yao, Zhihong

    2009-02-01

    In order to enhance the readability, extensibility and sharing of DICOM files, we have introduced XML into DICOM file system (SPIE Volume 5748)[1] and the multilayer tree structure into DICOM (SPIE Volume 6145)[2]. In this paper, we proposed mapping DICOM to ODF(OpenDocument Format), for it is also based on XML. As a result, the new format realizes the separation of content(including text content and image) and display style. Meanwhile, since OpenDocument files take the format of a ZIP compressed archive, the new kind of DICOM files can benefit from ZIP's lossless compression to reduce file size. Moreover, this open format can also guarantee long-term access to data without legal or technical barriers, making medical images accessible to various fields.

  10. MorphoSaurus--design and evaluation of an interlingua-based, cross-language document retrieval engine for the medical domain.

    PubMed

    Markó, K; Schulz, S; Hahn, U

    2005-01-01

    We propose an interlingua-based indexing approach to account for the particular challenges that arise in the design and implementation of cross-language document retrieval systems for the medical domain. Documents, as well as queries, are mapped to a language-independent conceptual layer on which retrieval operations are performed. We contrast this approach with the direct translation of German queries to English ones which, subsequently, are matched against English documents. We evaluate both approaches, interlingua-based and direct translation, on a large medical document collection, the OHSUMED corpus. A substantial benefit for interlingua-based document retrieval using German queries on English texts is found, which amounts to 93% of the (monolingual) English baseline. Most state-of-the-art cross-language information retrieval systems translate user queries to the language(s) of the target documents. In contra-distinction to this approach, translating both documents and user queries into a language-independent, concept-like representation format is more beneficial to enhance cross-language retrieval performance.

  11. Language Learning in the Public Eye: An Analysis of Newspapers and Official Documents in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Suzanne; Santos, Denise

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the issue of low levels of motivation for foreign language learning in England by exploring how language learning is conceptualised by different key voices in that country through the examination of written data: policy documents and reports on the UK's language needs, curriculum documents and press articles. The extent to…

  12. Experimental Evaluation of Processing Time for the Synchronization of XML-Based Business Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameling, Michael; Wolf, Bernhard; Springer, Thomas; Schill, Alexander

    Business objects (BOs) are data containers for complex data structures used in business applications such as Supply Chain Management and Customer Relationship Management. Due to the replication of application logic, multiple copies of BOs are created which have to be synchronized and updated. This is a complex and time consuming task because BOs rigorously vary in their structure according to the distribution, number and size of elements. Since BOs are internally represented as XML documents, the parsing of XML is one major cost factor which has to be considered for minimizing the processing time during synchronization. The prediction of the parsing time for BOs is an significant property for the selection of an efficient synchronization mechanism. In this paper, we present a method to evaluate the influence of the structure of BOs on their parsing time. The results of our experimental evaluation incorporating four different XML parsers examine the dependencies between the distribution of elements and the parsing time. Finally, a general cost model will be validated and simplified according to the results of the experimental setup.

  13. The Service Environment for Enhanced Knowledge and Research (SEEKR) Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, T. A.; Walker, R. J.; Weigel, R. S.; Narock, T. W.; McGuire, R. E.; Candey, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Service Environment for Enhanced Knowledge and Research (SEEKR) Framework is a configurable service oriented framework to enable the discovery, access and analysis of data shared in a community. The SEEKR framework integrates many existing independent services through the use of web technologies and standard metadata. Services are hosted on systems by using an application server and are callable by using REpresentational State Transfer (REST) protocols. Messages and metadata are transferred with eXtensible Markup Language (XML) encoding which conform to a published XML schema. Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) metadata is central to utilizing the services. Resources (data, documents, software, etc.) are described with SPASE and the associated Resource Identifier is used to access and exchange resources. The configurable options for the service can be set by using a web interface. Services are packaged as web application resource (WAR) files for direct deployment on application services such as Tomcat or Jetty. We discuss the composition of the SEEKR framework, how new services can be integrated and the steps necessary to deploying the framework. The SEEKR Framework emerged from NASA's Virtual Magnetospheric Observatory (VMO) and other systems and we present an overview of these systems from a SEEKR Framework perspective.

  14. Method for gathering and summarizing internet information

    DOEpatents

    Potok, Thomas E.; Elmore, Mark Thomas; Reed, Joel Wesley; Treadwell, Jim N.; Samatova, Nagiza Faridovna

    2010-04-06

    A computer method of gathering and summarizing large amounts of information comprises collecting information from a plurality of information sources (14, 51) according to respective maps (52) of the information sources (14), converting the collected information from a storage format to XML-language documents (26, 53) and storing the XML-language documents in a storage medium, searching for documents (55) according to a search query (13) having at least one term and identifying the documents (26) found in the search, and displaying the documents as nodes (33) of a tree structure (32) having links (34) and nodes (33) so as to indicate similarity of the documents to each other.

  15. System for gathering and summarizing internet information

    DOEpatents

    Potok, Thomas E.; Elmore, Mark Thomas; Reed, Joel Wesley; Treadwell, Jim N.; Samatova, Nagiza Faridovna

    2006-07-04

    A computer method of gathering and summarizing large amounts of information comprises collecting information from a plurality of information sources (14, 51) according to respective maps (52) of the information sources (14), converting the collected information from a storage format to XML-language documents (26, 53) and storing the XML-language documents in a storage medium, searching for documents (55) according to a search query (13) having at least one term and identifying the documents (26) found in the search, and displaying the documents as nodes (33) of a tree structure (32) having links (34) and nodes (33) so as to indicate similarity of the documents to each other.

  16. Method for gathering and summarizing internet information

    DOEpatents

    Potok, Thomas E [Oak Ridge, TN; Elmore, Mark Thomas [Oak Ridge, TN; Reed, Joel Wesley [Knoxville, TN; Treadwell, Jim N [Louisville, TN; Samatova, Nagiza Faridovna [Oak Ridge, TN

    2008-01-01

    A computer method of gathering and summarizing large amounts of information comprises collecting information from a plurality of information sources (14, 51) according to respective maps (52) of the information sources (14), converting the collected information from a storage format to XML-language documents (26, 53) and storing the XML-language documents in a storage medium, searching for documents (55) according to a search query (13) having at least one term and identifying the documents (26) found in the search, and displaying the documents as nodes (33) of a tree structure (32) having links (34) and nodes (33) so as to indicate similarity of the documents to each other.

  17. Software design and documentation language: User's guide for SDDL release 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zepko, T. M.

    1981-01-01

    The changes introduced in the PASCAL implementation of the software design and documentation language are described. These changes include a number of new capabilities, plus some changes to make the language more consistent and easier to use. Incompatibilities with earlier versions are limited to certain of the directive statements.

  18. Partial Automation of Requirements Tracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Jane; Dekhtyar, Alex; Sundaram, Senthil; Vadlamudi, Sravanthi

    2006-01-01

    Requirements Tracing on Target (RETRO) is software for after-the-fact tracing of textual requirements to support independent verification and validation of software. RETRO applies one of three user-selectable information-retrieval techniques: (1) term frequency/inverse document frequency (TF/IDF) vector retrieval, (2) TF/IDF vector retrieval with simple thesaurus, or (3) keyword extraction. One component of RETRO is the graphical user interface (GUI) for use in initiating a requirements-tracing project (a pair of artifacts to be traced to each other, such as a requirements spec and a design spec). Once the artifacts have been specified and the IR technique chosen, another component constructs a representation of the artifact elements and stores it on disk. Next, the IR technique is used to produce a first list of candidate links (potential matches between the two artifact levels). This list, encoded in Extensible Markup Language (XML), is optionally processed by a filtering component designed to make the list somewhat smaller without sacrificing accuracy. Through the GUI, the user examines a number of links and returns decisions (yes, these are links; no, these are not links). Coded in XML, these decisions are provided to a "feedback processor" component that prepares the data for the next application of the IR technique. The feedback reduces the incidence of erroneous candidate links. Unlike related prior software, RETRO does not require the user to assign keywords, and automatically builds a document index.

  19. A quality assessment tool for markup-based clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shalom, Erez; Shahar, Yuval; Taieb-Maimon, Meirav; Lunenfeld, Eitan

    2008-11-06

    We introduce a tool for quality assessment of procedural and declarative knowledge. We developed this tool for evaluating the specification of mark-up-based clinical GLs. Using this graphical tool, the expert physician and knowledge engineer collaborate to perform scoring, using pre-defined scoring scale, each of the knowledge roles of the mark-ups, comparing it to a gold standard. The tool enables scoring the mark-ups simultaneously at different sites by different users at different locations.

  20. Application of whole slide image markup and annotation for pathologist knowledge capture.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Walter S; Foster, Kirk W; Hinrichs, Steven H

    2013-01-01

    The ability to transfer image markup and annotation data from one scanned image of a slide to a newly acquired image of the same slide within a single vendor platform was investigated. The goal was to study the ability to use image markup and annotation data files as a mechanism to capture and retain pathologist knowledge without retaining the entire whole slide image (WSI) file. Accepted mathematical principles were investigated as a method to overcome variations in scans of the same glass slide and to accurately associate image markup and annotation data across different WSI of the same glass slide. Trilateration was used to link fixed points within the image and slide to the placement of markups and annotations of the image in a metadata file. Variation in markup and annotation placement between WSI of the same glass slide was reduced from over 80 μ to less than 4 μ in the x-axis and from 17 μ to 6 μ in the y-axis (P < 0.025). This methodology allows for the creation of a highly reproducible image library of histopathology images and interpretations for educational and research use.

  1. Application of whole slide image markup and annotation for pathologist knowledge capture

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Walter S.; Foster, Kirk W.; Hinrichs, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The ability to transfer image markup and annotation data from one scanned image of a slide to a newly acquired image of the same slide within a single vendor platform was investigated. The goal was to study the ability to use image markup and annotation data files as a mechanism to capture and retain pathologist knowledge without retaining the entire whole slide image (WSI) file. Methods: Accepted mathematical principles were investigated as a method to overcome variations in scans of the same glass slide and to accurately associate image markup and annotation data across different WSI of the same glass slide. Trilateration was used to link fixed points within the image and slide to the placement of markups and annotations of the image in a metadata file. Results: Variation in markup and annotation placement between WSI of the same glass slide was reduced from over 80 μ to less than 4 μ in the x-axis and from 17 μ to 6 μ in the y-axis (P < 0.025). Conclusion: This methodology allows for the creation of a highly reproducible image library of histopathology images and interpretations for educational and research use. PMID:23599902

  2. iBIOMES Lite: Summarizing Biomolecular Simulation Data in Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    As the amount of data generated by biomolecular simulations dramatically increases, new tools need to be developed to help manage this data at the individual investigator or small research group level. In this paper, we introduce iBIOMES Lite, a lightweight tool for biomolecular simulation data indexing and summarization. The main goal of iBIOMES Lite is to provide a simple interface to summarize computational experiments in a setting where the user might have limited privileges and limited access to IT resources. A command-line interface allows the user to summarize, publish, and search local simulation data sets. Published data sets are accessible via static hypertext markup language (HTML) pages that summarize the simulation protocols and also display data analysis graphically. The publication process is customized via extensible markup language (XML) descriptors while the HTML summary template is customized through extensible stylesheet language (XSL). iBIOMES Lite was tested on different platforms and at several national computing centers using various data sets generated through classical and quantum molecular dynamics, quantum chemistry, and QM/MM. The associated parsers currently support AMBER, GROMACS, Gaussian, and NWChem data set publication. The code is available at https://github.com/jcvthibault/ibiomes. PMID:24830957

  3. Enhancement of CLAIM (clinical accounting information) for a localized Chinese version.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinqiu; Takada, Akira; Niu, Tie; He, Miao; Tanaka, Koji; Sato, Junzo; Suzuki, Muneou; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Daimon, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Nakashima, Yusei; Araki, Kenji; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2005-10-01

    CLinical Accounting InforMation (CLAIM) is a standard for the exchange of data between patient accounting systems and electronic medical record (EMR) systems. It uses eXtensible Markup Language (XML) as a meta-language and was developed in Japan. CLAIM is subordinate to the Medical Markup Language (MML) standard, which allows the exchange of medical data between different medical institutions. It has inherited the basic structure of MML 2.x and the current version, version 2.1, contains two modules and nine data definition tables. In China, no data exchange standard yet exists that links EMR systems to accounting systems. Taking advantage of CLAIM's flexibility, we created a localized Chinese version based on CLAIM 2.1. Since Chinese receipt systems differ from those of Japan, some information such as prescription formats, etc. are also different from those in Japan. Two CLAIM modules were re-engineered and six data definition tables were either added or redefined. The Chinese version of CLAIM takes local needs into account, and consequently it is now possible to transfer data between the patient accounting systems and EMR systems of Chinese medical institutions effectively.

  4. Collaboration in the Context of Teaching, Scholarship, and Language Revitalization: Experience from the Chatino Language Documentation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Emiliana; Woodbury, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe our own experience of linguist-community collaboration over the last ten years in our Chatino Language Documentation Project, focused on the Chatino languages (Otomanguean; Oaxaca, Mexico). We relate episodes in the emergence and evolution of the collaboration between ourselves, and of the collaboration among ourselves and the Chatino…

  5. XML-based data model and architecture for a knowledge-based grid-enabled problem-solving environment for high-throughput biological imaging.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wamiq M; Lenz, Dominik; Liu, Jia; Paul Robinson, J; Ghafoor, Arif

    2008-03-01

    High-throughput biological imaging uses automated imaging devices to collect a large number of microscopic images for analysis of biological systems and validation of scientific hypotheses. Efficient manipulation of these datasets for knowledge discovery requires high-performance computational resources, efficient storage, and automated tools for extracting and sharing such knowledge among different research sites. Newly emerging grid technologies provide powerful means for exploiting the full potential of these imaging techniques. Efficient utilization of grid resources requires the development of knowledge-based tools and services that combine domain knowledge with analysis algorithms. In this paper, we first investigate how grid infrastructure can facilitate high-throughput biological imaging research, and present an architecture for providing knowledge-based grid services for this field. We identify two levels of knowledge-based services. The first level provides tools for extracting spatiotemporal knowledge from image sets and the second level provides high-level knowledge management and reasoning services. We then present cellular imaging markup language, an extensible markup language-based language for modeling of biological images and representation of spatiotemporal knowledge. This scheme can be used for spatiotemporal event composition, matching, and automated knowledge extraction and representation for large biological imaging datasets. We demonstrate the expressive power of this formalism by means of different examples and extensive experimental results.

  6. SU-E-T-327: The Update of a XML Composing Tool for TrueBeam Developer Mode

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Yan, Y; Mao, W; Jiang, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To introduce a major upgrade of a novel XML beam composing tool to scientists and engineers who strive to translate certain capabilities of TrueBeam Developer Mode to future clinical benefits of radiation therapy. Methods: TrueBeam Developer Mode provides the users with a test bed for unconventional plans utilizing certain unique features not accessible at the clinical mode. To access the full set of capabilities, a XML beam definition file accommodating all parameters including kV/MV imaging triggers in the plan can be locally loaded at this mode, however it is difficult and laborious to compose one in a text editor.more » In this study, a stand-along interactive XML beam composing application, TrueBeam TeachMod, was developed on Windows platforms to assist users in making their unique plans in a WYSWYG manner. A conventional plan can be imported in a DICOM RT object as the start of the beam editing process in which trajectories of all axes of a TrueBeam machine can be modified to the intended values at any control point. TeachMod also includes libraries of predefined imaging and treatment procedures to further expedite the process. Results: The TeachMod application is a major of the TeachMod module within DICOManTX. It fully supports TrueBeam 2.0. Trajectories of all axes including all MLC leaves can be graphically rendered and edited as needed. The time for XML beam composing has been reduced to a negligible amount regardless the complexity of the plan. A good understanding of XML language and TrueBeam schema is not required though preferred. Conclusion: Creating XML beams manually in a text editor will be a lengthy error-prone process for sophisticated plans. A XML beam composing tool is highly desirable for R and D activities. It will bridge the gap between scopes of TrueBeam capabilities and their clinical application potentials.« less

  7. Data Integration Using SOAP in the VSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, K. Q.; Bogart, R. S.; Davey, A.; Dimitoglou, G.; Gurman, J. B.; Hill, F.; Martens, P. C.; Wampler, S.

    2003-05-01

    The Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO) project has implemented a time interval search for all four participating data archives. The back-end query services are implemented as web services, and are accessible via SOAP. SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) defines an RPC (Remote Procedure Call) mechanism that employs HTTP as its transport and encodes the client-server interactions (request and response messages) in XML (eXtensible Markup Language) documents. In addition to its core function of identifying relevant datasets in the local archive, the SOAP server at each data provider acts as a "wrapper" that maps descriptions in an abstract data model to those in the provider-specific data model, and vice versa. It is in this way that VSO integrates heterogeneous data services and allows access to them using a common interface. Our experience with SOAP has been fruitful. It has proven to be a better alternative to traditional web access methods, namely POST and GET, because of its flexibility and interoperability.

  8. Building VoiceXML-Based Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    basketball games. The Busline systems were pri- y developed using an early implementation of VoiceXML he NBA Update Line was developed using VoiceXML...traveling in and out of Pittsburgh’s rsity neighborhood. The second project is the NBA Up- Line, which provides callers with real-time information NBA ... NBA UPDATE LINE The target user of this system is a fairly knowledgeable basket- ball fan; the system must therefore be able to provide detailed

  9. Leveraging Small-Lexicon Language Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-31

    shown in Figure 1. This “easy to use” XML build (from a lexicon.xml file) bakes in source and language metadata, shows both raw (“copper”) and...requires it (e.g. used as standoff annotation), or some or all metadata can be baked into each and every set. Please let us know if a custom...interpretations are plausible, they are pipe-separated: bake #v#1|toast#v#1. • several word classes have been added (with all items numbered #1): d

  10. Internet Patient Records: new techniques

    PubMed Central

    Moehrs, Sascha; Anedda, Paolo; Tuveri, Massimiliano; Zanetti, Gianluigi

    2001-01-01

    Background The ease by which the Internet is able to distribute information to geographically-distant users on a wide variety of computers makes it an obvious candidate for a technological solution for electronic patient record systems. Indeed, second-generation Internet technologies such as the ones described in this article - XML (eXtensible Markup Language), XSL (eXtensible Style Language), DOM (Document Object Model), CSS (Cascading Style Sheet), JavaScript, and JavaBeans - may significantly reduce the complexity of the development of distributed healthcare systems. Objective The demonstration of an experimental Electronic Patient Record (EPR) system built from those technologies that can support viewing of medical imaging exams and graphically-rich clinical reporting tools, while conforming to the newly emerging XML standard for digital documents. In particular, we aim to promote rapid prototyping of new reports by clinical specialists. Methods We have built a prototype EPR client, InfoDOM, that runs in both the popular web browsers. In this second version it receives each EPR as an XML record served via the secure SSL (Secure Socket Layer) protocol. JavaBean software components manipulate the XML to store it and then to transform it into a variety of useful clinical views. First a web page summary for the patient is produced. From that web page other JavaBeans can be launched. In particular, we have developed a medical imaging exam Viewer and a clinical Reporter bean parameterized appropriately for the particular patient and exam in question. Both present particular views of the XML data. The Viewer reads image sequences from a patient-specified network URL on a PACS (Picture Archiving and Communications System) server and presents them in a user-controllable animated sequence, while the Reporter provides a configurable anatomical map of the site of the pathology, from which individual "reportlets" can be launched. The specification of these reportlets is

  11. Implementation of a standards-based anaesthesia record compliant with the health level 7 (HL7) clinical document architecture (CDA).

    PubMed

    Hurrell, M J; Monk, T G; Nicol, A; Norton, A N; Reich, D L; Walsh, J L

    2012-08-01

    With the increasing use of anaesthesia information management systems (AIMS) there is the opportunity for different institutions to aggregate and share information both nationally and internationally. Potential uses of such aggregated data include outcomes research, benchmarking and improvement in clinical practice and patient safety. However, these goals can only be achieved if data contained in records from different sources are truly comparable and there is semantic inter-operability. This paper describes the development of a standard terminology for anaesthesia and also a Domain Analysis Model and implementation guide to facilitate a standard representation of AIMS records as extensible markup language documents that are compliant with the Health Level 7 Version 3 clinical document architecture. A representation of vital signs that is compliant with the International Standards Organization 11073 standard is also discussed.

  12. The tissue micro-array data exchange specification: a web based experience browsing imported data

    PubMed Central

    Nohle, David G; Hackman, Barbara A; Ayers, Leona W

    2005-01-01

    Background The AIDS and Cancer Specimen Resource (ACSR) is an HIV/AIDS tissue bank consortium sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD). The ACSR offers to approved researchers HIV infected biologic samples and uninfected control tissues including tissue cores in micro-arrays (TMA) accompanied by de-identified clinical data. Researchers interested in the type and quality of TMA tissue cores and the associated clinical data need an efficient method for viewing available TMA materials. Because each of the tissue samples within a TMA has separate data including a core tissue digital image and clinical data, an organized, standard approach to producing, navigating and publishing such data is necessary. The Association for Pathology Informatics (API) extensible mark-up language (XML) TMA data exchange specification (TMA DES) proposed in April 2003 provides a common format for TMA data. Exporting TMA data into the proposed format offers an opportunity to implement the API TMA DES. Using our public BrowseTMA tool, we created a web site that organizes and cross references TMA lists, digital "virtual slide" images, TMA DES export data, linked legends and clinical details for researchers. Microsoft Excel® and Microsoft Word® are used to convert tabular clinical data and produce an XML file in the TMA DES format. The BrowseTMA tool contains Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) scripts that convert XML data into Hyper-Text Mark-up Language (HTML) web pages with hyperlinks automatically added to allow rapid navigation. Results Block lists, virtual slide images, legends, clinical details and exports have been placed on the ACSR web site for 14 blocks with 1623 cores of 2.0, 1.0 and 0.6 mm sizes. Our virtual microscope can be used to view and annotate these TMA images. Researchers can readily navigate from TMA block lists to TMA legends and to clinical details for a selected tissue core. Exports for 11

  13. Creation of structured documentation templates using Natural Language Processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Vipul; Turchin, Alexander; Morin, Laura; Chang, Frank; Li, Qi; Hongsermeier, Tonya

    2006-01-01

    Structured Clinical Documentation is a fundamental component of the healthcare enterprise, linking both clinical (e.g., electronic health record, clinical decision support) and administrative functions (e.g., evaluation and management coding, billing). One of the challenges in creating good quality documentation templates has been the inability to address specialized clinical disciplines and adapt to local clinical practices. A one-size-fits-all approach leads to poor adoption and inefficiencies in the documentation process. On the other hand, the cost associated with manual generation of documentation templates is significant. Consequently there is a need for at least partial automation of the template generation process. We propose an approach and methodology for the creation of structured documentation templates for diabetes using Natural Language Processing (NLP).

  14. Three Speakers, Four Dialects: Documenting Variation in an Endangered Amazonian Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skilton, Amalia

    2017-01-01

    This paper offers a case study on dialect contact in Máíhiki (Tukanoan, Peru), with the goal of illustrating how documentation of variation can contribute to a general language documentation project. I begin by describing the facts of variation in one dialectally diverse Máíhiki-speaking community. I then argue that the outcomes of dialect mixing…

  15. Get It Together: Integrating Data with XML.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ron

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the use of XML for data integration to move data across different platforms, including across the Internet, from a variety of sources. Topics include flexibility; standards; organizing databases; unstructured data and the use of meta tags to encode it with XML information; cost effectiveness; and eliminating client software licenses.…

  16. 17 CFR 232.306 - Foreign language documents and symbols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Foreign language documents and symbols. 232.306 Section 232.306 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION....14d-102), or Schedule 14D-9F (§ 240.14d-103). (e) Foreign currency denominations must be expressed in...

  17. 17 CFR 232.306 - Foreign language documents and symbols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Foreign language documents and symbols. 232.306 Section 232.306 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION....14d-102), or Schedule 14D-9F (§ 240.14d-103). (e) Foreign currency denominations must be expressed in...

  18. A comparison of database systems for XML-type data.

    PubMed

    Risse, Judith E; Leunissen, Jack A M

    2010-01-01

    In the field of bioinformatics interchangeable data formats based on XML are widely used. XML-type data is also at the core of most web services. With the increasing amount of data stored in XML comes the need for storing and accessing the data. In this paper we analyse the suitability of different database systems for storing and querying large datasets in general and Medline in particular. All reviewed database systems perform well when tested with small to medium sized datasets, however when the full Medline dataset is queried a large variation in query times is observed. There is not one system that is vastly superior to the others in this comparison and, depending on the database size and the query requirements, different systems are most suitable. The best all-round solution is the Oracle 11~g database system using the new binary storage option. Alias-i's Lingpipe is a more lightweight, customizable and sufficiently fast solution. It does however require more initial configuration steps. For data with a changing XML structure Sedna and BaseX as native XML database systems or MySQL with an XML-type column are suitable.

  19. Building Tone Resources for Second Language Learners from Phonetic Documentation: Cherokee Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirata-Edds, Tracy; Herrick, Dylan

    2017-01-01

    Lexical tone is a linguistic feature which can present difficulties for second language learners wanting to revitalize their heritage language. This is true not only from the standpoint of understanding and pronunciation, but also because tone is often under-documented and resources are limited or too technical to be useful to community members.…

  20. Design and implementation of an internet-based electrical engineering laboratory.

    PubMed

    He, Zhenlei; Shen, Zhangbiao; Zhu, Shanan

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes an internet-based electrical engineering laboratory (IEE-Lab) with virtual and physical experiments at Zhejiang University. In order to synthesize the advantages of both experiment styles, the IEE-Lab is come up with Client/Server/Application framework and combines the virtual and physical experiments. The design and workflow of IEE-Lab are introduced. The analog electronic experiment is taken as an example to show Flex plug-in design, data communication based on XML (Extensible Markup Language), experiment simulation modeled by Modelica and control terminals' design. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. XML Translator for Interface Descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boroson, Elizabeth R.

    2009-01-01

    A computer program defines an XML schema for specifying the interface to a generic FPGA from the perspective of software that will interact with the device. This XML interface description is then translated into header files for C, Verilog, and VHDL. User interface definition input is checked via both the provided XML schema and the translator module to ensure consistency and accuracy. Currently, programming used on both sides of an interface is inconsistent. This makes it hard to find and fix errors. By using a common schema, both sides are forced to use the same structure by using the same framework and toolset. This makes for easy identification of problems, which leads to the ability to formulate a solution. The toolset contains constants that allow a programmer to use each register, and to access each field in the register. Once programming is complete, the translator is run as part of the make process, which ensures that whenever an interface is changed, all of the code that uses the header files describing it is recompiled.

  2. Force-directed visualization for conceptual data models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battigaglia, Andrew; Sutter, Noah

    2017-03-01

    Conceptual data models are increasingly stored in an eXtensible Markup Language (XML) format because of its portability between different systems and the ability of databases to use this format for storing data. However, when attempting to capture business or design needs, an organized graphical format is preferred in order to facilitate communication to receive as much input as possible from users and subject-matter experts. Existing methods of achieving this conversion suffer from problems of not being specific enough to capture all of the needs of conceptual data modeling and not being able to handle a large number of relationships between entities. This paper describes an implementation for a modeling solution to clearly illustrate conceptual data models stored in XML formats in well organized and structured diagrams. A force layout with several different parameters is applied to the diagram to create both compact and easily traversable relationships between entities.

  3. MRML: an extensible communication protocol for interoperability and benchmarking of multimedia information retrieval systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Wolfgang; Mueller, Henning; Marchand-Maillet, Stephane; Pun, Thierry; Squire, David M.; Pecenovic, Zoran; Giess, Christoph; de Vries, Arjen P.

    2000-10-01

    While in the area of relational databases interoperability is ensured by common communication protocols (e.g. ODBC/JDBC using SQL), Content Based Image Retrieval Systems (CBIRS) and other multimedia retrieval systems are lacking both a common query language and a common communication protocol. Besides its obvious short term convenience, interoperability of systems is crucial for the exchange and analysis of user data. In this paper, we present and describe an extensible XML-based query markup language, called MRML (Multimedia Retrieval markup Language). MRML is primarily designed so as to ensure interoperability between different content-based multimedia retrieval systems. Further, MRML allows researchers to preserve their freedom in extending their system as needed. MRML encapsulates multimedia queries in a way that enable multimedia (MM) query languages, MM content descriptions, MM query engines, and MM user interfaces to grow independently from each other, reaching a maximum of interoperability while ensuring a maximum of freedom for the developer. For benefitting from this, only a few simple design principles have to be respected when extending MRML for one's fprivate needs. The design of extensions withing the MRML framework will be described in detail in the paper. MRML has been implemented and tested for the CBIRS Viper, using the user interface Snake Charmer. Both are part of the GNU project and can be downloaded at our site.

  4. Plain Language in Environmental Policy Documents: An Assessment of Reader Comprehension and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Natasha; McDavid, Justin; Derthick, Katie; Dowell, Randy; Spyridakis, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Several government agencies are seeking quality improvement in environmental policy documents by asking for the implementation of Plain Language (PL) guidelines. Our mixed-methods research examines whether the application of certain PL guidelines affects the comprehension and perceptions of readers of environmental policy documents. Results show…

  5. Development and Evaluation of a Thai Learning System on the Web Using Natural Language Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dansuwan, Suyada; Nishina, Kikuko; Akahori, Kanji; Shimizu, Yasutaka

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Thai Learning System, which is designed to help learners acquire the Thai word order system. The system facilitates the lessons on the Web using HyperText Markup Language and Perl programming, which interfaces with natural language processing by means of Prolog. (Author/VWL)

  6. An effective XML based name mapping mechanism within StoRM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corso, E.; Forti, A.; Ghiselli, A.; Magnoni, L.; Zappi, R.

    2008-07-01

    In a Grid environment the naming capability allows users to refer to specific data resources in a physical storage system using a high level logical identifier. This logical identifier is typically organized in a file system like structure, a hierarchical tree of names. Storage Resource Manager (SRM) services map the logical identifier to the physical location of data evaluating a set of parameters as the desired quality of services and the VOMS attributes specified in the requests. StoRM is a SRM service developed by INFN and ICTP-EGRID to manage file and space on standard POSIX and high performing parallel and cluster file systems. An upcoming requirement in the Grid data scenario is the orthogonality of the logical name and the physical location of data, in order to refer, with the same identifier, to different copies of data archived in various storage areas with different quality of service. The mapping mechanism proposed in StoRM is based on a XML document that represents the different storage components managed by the service, the storage areas defined by the site administrator, the quality of service they provide and the Virtual Organization that want to use the storage area. An appropriate directory tree is realized in each storage component reflecting the XML schema. In this scenario StoRM is able to identify the physical location of a requested data evaluating the logical identifier and the specified attributes following the XML schema, without querying any database service. This paper presents the namespace schema defined, the different entities represented and the technical details of the StoRM implementation.

  7. Why SGML? Why Now?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcoux, Yves; Sevigny, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Defines Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML), a format for electronic documents that provides documentary information for efficient accessibility, dissemination, and preservation. Compares SGML to Open Document Architecture (ODA) based on standards by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), and describes the principles and…

  8. Method and system to discover and recommend interesting documents

    DOEpatents

    Potok, Thomas Eugene; Steed, Chad Allen; Patton, Robert Matthew

    2017-01-31

    Disclosed are several examples of systems that can read millions of news feeds per day about topics (e.g., your customers, competitors, markets, and partners), and provide a small set of the most relevant items to read to keep current with the overwhelming amount of information currently available. Topics of interest can be chosen by the user of the system for use as seeds. The seeds can be vectorized and compared with the target documents to determine their similarity. The similarities can be sorted from highest to lowest so that the most similar seed and target documents are at the top of the list. This output can be produced in XML format so that an RSS Reader can format the XML. This allows for easy Internet access to these recommendations.

  9. Listening for Competence through Documentation: Assessing Children with Language Delays Using Digital Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez, Stephanie Cox; Daniels, Karen J.

    2009-01-01

    This case study uses documentation as a tool for formative assessment to interpret the learning of twin boys with significantly delayed language skills. Reggio-inspired documentation (the act of collecting, interpreting, and reflecting on traces of learning from video, images, and observation notes) focused on the unfolding of the boys' nonverbal…

  10. Semantic e-Science: From Microformats to Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, L. I.; Freemantle, J. R.; Aldridge, K. D.

    2009-05-01

    A platform has been developed to transform semi-structured ASCII data into a representation based on the eXtensible Markup Language (XML). A subsequent transformation allows the XML-based representation to be rendered in the Resource Description Format (RDF). Editorial metadata, expressed as external annotations (via XML Pointer Language), also survives this transformation process (e.g., Lumb et al., http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cageo.2008.03.009). Because the XML-to-RDF transformation uses XSLT (eXtensible Stylesheet Language Transformations), semantic microformats ultimately encode the scientific data (Lumb & Aldridge, http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/HPCS.2006.26). In building the relationship-centric representation in RDF, a Semantic Model of the scientific data is extracted. The systematic enhancement in the expressivity and richness of the scientific data results in representations of knowledge that are readily understood and manipulated by intelligent software agents. Thus scientists are able to draw upon various resources within and beyond their discipline to use in their scientific applications. Since the resulting Semantic Models are independent conceptualizations of the science itself, the representation of scientific knowledge and interaction with the same can stimulate insight from different perspectives. Using the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) for the purpose of illustration, the introduction of GGP microformats enable a Semantic Model for the GGP that can be semantically queried (e.g., via SPARQL, http://www.w3.org/TR/rdf-sparql-query). Although the present implementation uses the Open Source Redland RDF Libraries (http://librdf.org/), the approach is generalizable to other platforms and to projects other than the GGP (e.g., Baker et al., Informatics and the 2007-2008 Electronic Geophysical Year, Eos Trans. Am. Geophys. Un., 89(48), 485-486, 2008).

  11. Improving the Interoperability of Disaster Models: a Case Study of Proposing Fireml for Forest Fire Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, W.; Wang, F.; Meng, Q.; Li, Z.; Liu, B.; Zheng, X.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a new standardized data format named Fire Markup Language (FireML), extended by the Geography Markup Language (GML) of OGC, to elaborate upon the fire hazard model. The proposed FireML is able to standardize the input and output documents of a fire model for effectively communicating with different disaster management systems to ensure a good interoperability. To demonstrate the usage of FireML and testify its feasibility, an adopted forest fire spread model being compatible with FireML is described. And a 3DGIS disaster management system is developed to simulate the dynamic procedure of forest fire spread with the defined FireML documents. The proposed approach will enlighten ones who work on other disaster models' standardization work.

  12. Adaptive Hypermedia Educational System Based on XML Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baek, Yeongtae; Wang, Changjong; Lee, Sehoon

    This paper proposes an adaptive hypermedia educational system using XML technologies, such as XML, XSL, XSLT, and XLink. Adaptive systems are capable of altering the presentation of the content of the hypermedia on the basis of a dynamic understanding of the individual user. The user profile can be collected in a user model, while the knowledge…

  13. MaROS Strategic Relay Planning and Coordination Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Relay Operations Service (MaROS) is designed to provide planning and analysis tools in support of ongoing Mars Network relay operations. Strategic relay planning requires coordination between lander and orbiter mission ground data system (GDS) teams to schedule and execute relay communications passes. MaROS centralizes this process, correlating all data relevant to relay coordination to provide a cohesive picture of the relay state. Service users interact with the system through thin-layer command line and web user interface client applications. Users provide and utilize data such as lander view periods of orbiters, Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna tracks, and reports of relay pass performance. Users upload and download relevant relay data via formally defined and documented file structures including some described in Extensible Markup Language (XML). Clients interface with the system via an http-based Representational State Transfer (ReST) pattern using Javascript Object Notation (JSON) formats. This paper will provide a general overview of the service architecture and detail the software interfaces and considerations for interface design.

  14. A BPMN solution for chaining OGC services to quality assure location-based crowdsourced data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meek, Sam; Jackson, Mike; Leibovici, Didier G.

    2016-02-01

    The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Processing Service (WPS) standard enables access to a centralized repository of processes and services from compliant clients. A crucial part of the standard includes the provision to chain disparate processes and services to form a reusable workflow. To date this has been realized by methods such as embedding XML requests, using Business Process Execution Language (BPEL) engines and other external orchestration engines. Although these allow the user to define tasks and data artifacts as web services, they are often considered inflexible and complicated, often due to vendor specific solutions and inaccessible documentation. This paper introduces a new method of flexible service chaining using the standard Business Process Markup Notation (BPMN). A prototype system has been developed upon an existing open source BPMN suite to illustrate the advantages of the approach. The motivation for the software design is qualification of crowdsourced data for use in policy-making. The software is tested as part of a project that seeks to qualify, assure, and add value to crowdsourced data in a biological monitoring use case.

  15. [Study of sharing platform of web-based enhanced extracorporeal counterpulsation hemodynamic waveform data].

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingbo; Hu, Ding; Yu, Donglan; Zheng, Zhensheng; Wang, Kuijian

    2011-12-01

    Enhanced extracorporeal counterpulsation (EECP) information consists of both text and hemodynamic waveform data. At present EECP text information has been successfully managed through Web browser, while the management and sharing of hemodynamic waveform data through Internet has not been solved yet. In order to manage EECP information completely, based on the in-depth analysis of EECP hemodynamic waveform file of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format and its disadvantages in Internet sharing, we proposed the use of the extensible markup language (XML), which is currently the Internet popular data exchange standard, as the storage specification for the sharing of EECP waveform data. Then we designed a web-based sharing system of EECP hemodynamic waveform data via ASP. NET 2.0 platform. Meanwhile, we specifically introduced the four main system function modules and their implement methods, including DICOM to XML conversion module, EECP waveform data management module, retrieval and display of EECP waveform module and the security mechanism of the system.

  16. Gmz: a Gml Compression Model for Webgis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, A.; Rajan, K. S.

    2017-09-01

    Geography markup language (GML) is an XML specification for expressing geographical features. Defined by Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), it is widely used for storage and transmission of maps over the Internet. XML schemas provide the convenience to define custom features profiles in GML for specific needs as seen in widely popular cityGML, simple features profile, coverage, etc. Simple features profile (SFP) is a simpler subset of GML profile with support for point, line and polygon geometries. SFP has been constructed to make sure it covers most commonly used GML geometries. Web Feature Service (WFS) serves query results in SFP by default. But it falls short of being an ideal choice due to its high verbosity and size-heavy nature, which provides immense scope for compression. GMZ is a lossless compression model developed to work for SFP compliant GML files. Our experiments indicate GMZ achieves reasonably good compression ratios and can be useful in WebGIS based applications.

  17. Tumor taxonomy for the developmental lineage classification of neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Jules J

    2004-01-01

    Background The new "Developmental lineage classification of neoplasms" was described in a prior publication. The classification is simple (the entire hierarchy is described with just 39 classifiers), comprehensive (providing a place for every tumor of man), and consistent with recent attempts to characterize tumors by cytogenetic and molecular features. A taxonomy is a list of the instances that populate a classification. The taxonomy of neoplasia attempts to list every known term for every known tumor of man. Methods The taxonomy provides each concept with a unique code and groups synonymous terms under the same concept. A Perl script validated successive drafts of the taxonomy ensuring that: 1) each term occurs only once in the taxonomy; 2) each term occurs in only one tumor class; 3) each concept code occurs in one and only one hierarchical position in the classification; and 4) the file containing the classification and taxonomy is a well-formed XML (eXtensible Markup Language) document. Results The taxonomy currently contains 122,632 different terms encompassing 5,376 neoplasm concepts. Each concept has, on average, 23 synonyms. The taxonomy populates "The developmental lineage classification of neoplasms," and is available as an XML file, currently 9+ Megabytes in length. A representation of the classification/taxonomy listing each term followed by its code, followed by its full ancestry, is available as a flat-file, 19+ Megabytes in length. The taxonomy is the largest nomenclature of neoplasms, with more than twice the number of neoplasm names found in other medical nomenclatures, including the 2004 version of the Unified Medical Language System, the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terminology, the National Cancer Institute's Thesaurus, and the International Classification of Diseases Oncolology version. Conclusions This manuscript describes a comprehensive taxonomy of neoplasia that collects synonymous terms under a unique code number and

  18. The CMIP5 Model Documentation Questionnaire: Development of a Metadata Retrieval System for the METAFOR Common Information Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, Charlotte; Lawrence, Bryan; Moine, Marie-Pierre; Ford, Rupert; Devine, Gerry

    2010-05-01

    The EU METAFOR Project (http://metaforclimate.eu) has created a web-based model documentation questionnaire to collect metadata from the modelling groups that are running simulations in support of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project - 5 (CMIP5). The CMIP5 model documentation questionnaire will retrieve information about the details of the models used, how the simulations were carried out, how the simulations conformed to the CMIP5 experiment requirements and details of the hardware used to perform the simulations. The metadata collected by the CMIP5 questionnaire will allow CMIP5 data to be compared in a scientifically meaningful way. This paper describes the life-cycle of the CMIP5 questionnaire development which starts with relatively unstructured input from domain specialists and ends with formal XML documents that comply with the METAFOR Common Information Model (CIM). Each development step is associated with a specific tool. (1) Mind maps are used to capture information requirements from domain experts and build a controlled vocabulary, (2) a python parser processes the XML files generated by the mind maps, (3) Django (python) is used to generate the dynamic structure and content of the web based questionnaire from processed xml and the METAFOR CIM, (4) Python parsers ensure that information entered into the CMIP5 questionnaire is output as CIM compliant xml, (5) CIM compliant output allows automatic information capture tools to harvest questionnaire content into databases such as the Earth System Grid (ESG) metadata catalogue. This paper will focus on how Django (python) and XML input files are used to generate the structure and content of the CMIP5 questionnaire. It will also address how the choice of development tools listed above provided a framework that enabled working scientists (who we would never ordinarily get to interact with UML and XML) to be part the iterative development process and ensure that the CMIP5 model documentation questionnaire

  19. Home Page, Sweet Home Page: Creating a Web Presence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcigno, Kathleen; Green, Tim

    1995-01-01

    Focuses primarily on design issues and practical concerns involved in creating World Wide Web documents for use within an organization. Concerns for those developing Web home pages are: learning HyperText Markup Language (HTML); defining customer group; allocating staff resources for maintenance of documents; providing feedback mechanism for…

  20. ERIC Documents on Foreign Language Teaching and Linguistics: List Number 15. CAL-ERIC/CLL Series on Languages and Linguistics, No. 38.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Peter, Comp.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This is the fifteenth in a series of catalogues of ERIC documents of interest to teachers and researchers in foreign languages and linguistics. The documents cited in the present list appeared in "Resources in Education" from January through June 1975. Titles are listed under the following headings and subheadings: (1) general: administration,…

  1. Convergence of Health Level Seven Version 2 Messages to Semantic Web Technologies for Software-Intensive Systems in Telemedicine Trauma Care

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Timothy Wayne; Cavalini, Luciana Tricai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To present the technical background and the development of a procedure that enriches the semantics of Health Level Seven version 2 (HL7v2) messages for software-intensive systems in telemedicine trauma care. Methods This study followed a multilevel model-driven approach for the development of semantically interoperable health information systems. The Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) ABCDE protocol was adopted as the use case. A prototype application embedded the semantics into an HL7v2 message as an eXtensible Markup Language (XML) file, which was validated against an XML schema that defines constraints on a common reference model. This message was exchanged with a second prototype application, developed on the Mirth middleware, which was also used to parse and validate both the original and the hybrid messages. Results Both versions of the data instance (one pure XML, one embedded in the HL7v2 message) were equally validated and the RDF-based semantics recovered by the receiving side of the prototype from the shared XML schema. Conclusions This study demonstrated the semantic enrichment of HL7v2 messages for intensive-software telemedicine systems for trauma care, by validating components of extracts generated in various computing environments. The adoption of the method proposed in this study ensures the compliance of the HL7v2 standard in Semantic Web technologies. PMID:26893947

  2. Convergence of Health Level Seven Version 2 Messages to Semantic Web Technologies for Software-Intensive Systems in Telemedicine Trauma Care.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Pedro Monteiro; Cook, Timothy Wayne; Cavalini, Luciana Tricai

    2016-01-01

    To present the technical background and the development of a procedure that enriches the semantics of Health Level Seven version 2 (HL7v2) messages for software-intensive systems in telemedicine trauma care. This study followed a multilevel model-driven approach for the development of semantically interoperable health information systems. The Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) ABCDE protocol was adopted as the use case. A prototype application embedded the semantics into an HL7v2 message as an eXtensible Markup Language (XML) file, which was validated against an XML schema that defines constraints on a common reference model. This message was exchanged with a second prototype application, developed on the Mirth middleware, which was also used to parse and validate both the original and the hybrid messages. Both versions of the data instance (one pure XML, one embedded in the HL7v2 message) were equally validated and the RDF-based semantics recovered by the receiving side of the prototype from the shared XML schema. This study demonstrated the semantic enrichment of HL7v2 messages for intensive-software telemedicine systems for trauma care, by validating components of extracts generated in various computing environments. The adoption of the method proposed in this study ensures the compliance of the HL7v2 standard in Semantic Web technologies.

  3. Automation and integration of components for generalized semantic markup of electronic medical texts.

    PubMed

    Dugan, J M; Berrios, D C; Liu, X; Kim, D K; Kaizer, H; Fagan, L M

    1999-01-01

    Our group has built an information retrieval system based on a complex semantic markup of medical textbooks. We describe the construction of a set of web-based knowledge-acquisition tools that expedites the collection and maintenance of the concepts required for text markup and the search interface required for information retrieval from the marked text. In the text markup system, domain experts (DEs) identify sections of text that contain one or more elements from a finite set of concepts. End users can then query the text using a predefined set of questions, each of which identifies a subset of complementary concepts. The search process matches that subset of concepts to relevant points in the text. The current process requires that the DE invest significant time to generate the required concepts and questions. We propose a new system--called ACQUIRE (Acquisition of Concepts and Queries in an Integrated Retrieval Environment)--that assists a DE in two essential tasks in the text-markup process. First, it helps her to develop, edit, and maintain the concept model: the set of concepts with which she marks the text. Second, ACQUIRE helps her to develop a query model: the set of specific questions that end users can later use to search the marked text. The DE incorporates concepts from the concept model when she creates the questions in the query model. The major benefit of the ACQUIRE system is a reduction in the time and effort required for the text-markup process. We compared the process of concept- and query-model creation using ACQUIRE to the process used in previous work by rebuilding two existing models that we previously constructed manually. We observed a significant decrease in the time required to build and maintain the concept and query models.

  4. Automation and integration of components for generalized semantic markup of electronic medical texts.

    PubMed Central

    Dugan, J. M.; Berrios, D. C.; Liu, X.; Kim, D. K.; Kaizer, H.; Fagan, L. M.

    1999-01-01

    Our group has built an information retrieval system based on a complex semantic markup of medical textbooks. We describe the construction of a set of web-based knowledge-acquisition tools that expedites the collection and maintenance of the concepts required for text markup and the search interface required for information retrieval from the marked text. In the text markup system, domain experts (DEs) identify sections of text that contain one or more elements from a finite set of concepts. End users can then query the text using a predefined set of questions, each of which identifies a subset of complementary concepts. The search process matches that subset of concepts to relevant points in the text. The current process requires that the DE invest significant time to generate the required concepts and questions. We propose a new system--called ACQUIRE (Acquisition of Concepts and Queries in an Integrated Retrieval Environment)--that assists a DE in two essential tasks in the text-markup process. First, it helps her to develop, edit, and maintain the concept model: the set of concepts with which she marks the text. Second, ACQUIRE helps her to develop a query model: the set of specific questions that end users can later use to search the marked text. The DE incorporates concepts from the concept model when she creates the questions in the query model. The major benefit of the ACQUIRE system is a reduction in the time and effort required for the text-markup process. We compared the process of concept- and query-model creation using ACQUIRE to the process used in previous work by rebuilding two existing models that we previously constructed manually. We observed a significant decrease in the time required to build and maintain the concept and query models. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:10566457

  5. Data Manipulation in an XML-Based Digital Image Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Naicheng

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To help to clarify the role of XML tools and standards in supporting transition and migration towards a fully XML-based environment for managing access to information. Design/methodology/approach: The Ching Digital Image Library, built on a three-tier architecture, is used as a source of examples to illustrate a number of methods of data…

  6. ERIC Documents on Foreign Language Teaching and Linguistics: List No. 17. CAL-ERIC/CLL Series on Languages and Linguistics, No. 54.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Peter A., Comp.; McLane, Kathleen, Comp.

    1977-01-01

    This is the seventeenth in a series of catalogues of documents in the ERIC system that are of interest to teachers and researchers in foreign languages and linguistics. The documents cited in the present list appeared in the monthly ERIC abstract journal "Resources in Education" from January through June, 1976. The list is compiled from all of the…

  7. ERIC Documents on Foreign Language Teaching and Linguistics: List Number 16. CAL-ERIC/CLL Series on Languages and Linguistics, Number 42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Peter A., Comp.; McLane, Kathleen, Comp.

    1976-01-01

    This is the sixteenth in a series of catalogues of documents of interest to teachers and researchers in foreign languages and linguistics that have been processed into the ERIC system. The documents cited in the present list appeared in the monthly ERIC abstract journal "Resources in Education" (RIE) from July through December 1975. The list is…

  8. ERIC Documents on Foreign Language Teaching and Linguistics: List No. 18. CAL-ERIC/CLL Series on Languages and Linguistics, No. 57.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLane, Kathleen, Comp.; Omaggio, Alice, Comp.

    1977-01-01

    This is the eighteenth in a series of catalogues of documents in the ERIC system that are of interest to teachers and researchers in foreign languages and linguistics. The documents cited in the present list appeared in the monthly ERIC abstract journal "Resources in Education" (RIE) from July through December 1976. The list is compiled from all…

  9. XML-Based SHINE Knowledge Base Interchange Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Tikidjian, Raffi

    2008-01-01

    The SHINE Knowledge Base Interchange Language software has been designed to more efficiently send new knowledge bases to spacecraft that have been embedded with the Spacecraft Health Inference Engine (SHINE) tool. The intention of the behavioral model is to capture most of the information generally associated with a spacecraft functional model, while specifically addressing the needs of execution within SHINE and Livingstone. As such, it has some constructs that are based on one or the other.

  10. Using XML and XSLT for flexible elicitation of mental-health risk knowledge.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, C D; Ahmed, A; Adams, A E

    2007-03-01

    Current tools for assessing risks associated with mental-health problems require assessors to make high-level judgements based on clinical experience. This paper describes how new technologies can enhance qualitative research methods to identify lower-level cues underlying these judgements, which can be collected by people without a specialist mental-health background. Content analysis of interviews with 46 multidisciplinary mental-health experts exposed the cues and their interrelationships, which were represented by a mind map using software that stores maps as XML. All 46 mind maps were integrated into a single XML knowledge structure and analysed by a Lisp program to generate quantitative information about the numbers of experts associated with each part of it. The knowledge was refined by the experts, using software developed in Flash to record their collective views within the XML itself. These views specified how the XML should be transformed by XSLT, a technology for rendering XML, which resulted in a validated hierarchical knowledge structure associating patient cues with risks. Changing knowledge elicitation requirements were accommodated by flexible transformations of XML data using XSLT, which also facilitated generation of multiple data-gathering tools suiting different assessment circumstances and levels of mental-health knowledge.

  11. The Phonology and Morphology of Kubeo: The Documentation, Theory, and Description of an Amazonian Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chacon, Thiago Costa

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation offers a detailed account of the phonology, morphophonology and elements of the morphosyntax of Kubeo, a language from the Eastern Tukanoan family, spoken in the Northwest Amazon. The dissertation is itself an experiment of how language documentation and empowering of the native speaker community can be combined with academic…

  12. Revenue-Generating Language Programs at Canadian Post-Secondary Institutions: Emerging Themes from a Documentation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine; Goddard, J. Tim

    2008-01-01

    This presentation identifies emerging themes in a study combining documentation analysis (Atkinson & Coffey, 2004) and interviews that examine policy statements, promotional materials and various institutional documents from selected English as a Second Language (ESL) programs at one Canadian University. It looks at how and why ESL programs…

  13. Distributed framework for dyanmic telescope and instrument control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, Troy J.; Case, Lynne

    2003-02-01

    Traditionally, instrument command and control systems have been developed specifically for a single instrument. Such solutions are frequently expensive and are inflexible to support the next instrument development effort. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is developing an extensible framework, known as Instrument Remote Control (IRC) that applies to any kind of instrument that can be controlled by a computer. IRC combines the platform independent processing capabilities of Java with the power of the Extensible Markup Language (XML). A key aspect of the architecture is software that is driven by an instrument description, written using the Instrument Markup Language (IML). IML is an XML dialect used to describe graphical user interfaces to control and monitor the instrument, command sets and command formats, data streams, communication mechanisms, and data processing algorithms. The IRC framework provides the ability to communicate to components anywhere on a network using the JXTA protocol for dynamic discovery of distributed components. JXTA (see http://www.jxta.org) is a generalized protocol that allows any devices connected by a network to communicate in a peer-to-peer manner. IRC uses JXTA to advertise a devices IML and discover devices of interest on the network. Devices can join or leave the network and thus join or leave the instrument control environment of IRC. Currently, several astronomical instruments are working with the IRC development team to develop custom components for IRC to control their instruments. These instruments include: High resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC), a first light instrument for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA); Submillimeter And Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE), a Principal Investigator instrument for SOFIA; and Fabry-Perot Interferometer Bolometer Research Experiment (FIBRE), a prototype of the SAFIRE instrument, used at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). Most recently, we have been

  14. Automated document analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jeffrey D.; Dietzel, Robert; Hartnett, David

    2002-08-01

    A software application has been developed to aid law enforcement and government intelligence gathering organizations in the translation and analysis of foreign language documents with potential intelligence content. The Automated Document Analysis System (ADAS) provides the capability to search (data or text mine) documents in English and the most commonly encountered foreign languages, including Arabic. Hardcopy documents are scanned by a high-speed scanner and are optical character recognized (OCR). Documents obtained in an electronic format bypass the OCR and are copied directly to a working directory. For translation and analysis, the script and the language of the documents are first determined. If the document is not in English, the document is machine translated to English. The documents are searched for keywords and key features in either the native language or translated English. The user can quickly review the document to determine if it has any intelligence content and whether detailed, verbatim human translation is required. The documents and document content are cataloged for potential future analysis. The system allows non-linguists to evaluate foreign language documents and allows for the quick analysis of a large quantity of documents. All document processing can be performed manually or automatically on a single document or a batch of documents.

  15. Tolerance and UQ4SIM: Nimble Uncertainty Documentation and Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil

    2008-01-01

    Ultimately, scientific numerical models need quantified output uncertainties so that modeling can evolve to better match reality. Documenting model input uncertainties and variabilities is a necessary first step toward that goal. Without known input parameter uncertainties, model sensitivities are all one can determine, and without code verification, output uncertainties are simply not reliable. The basic premise of uncertainty markup is to craft a tolerance and tagging mini-language that offers a natural, unobtrusive presentation and does not depend on parsing each type of input file format. Each file is marked up with tolerances and optionally, associated tags that serve to label the parameters and their uncertainties. The evolution of such a language, often called a Domain Specific Language or DSL, is given in [1], but in final form it parallels tolerances specified on an engineering drawing, e.g., 1 +/- 0.5, 5 +/- 10%, 2 +/- 10 where % signifies percent and o signifies order of magnitude. Tags, necessary for error propagation, can be added by placing a quotation-mark-delimited tag after the tolerance, e.g., 0.7 +/- 20% 'T_effective'. In addition, tolerances might have different underlying distributions, e.g., Uniform, Normal, or Triangular, or the tolerances may merely be intervals due to lack of knowledge (uncertainty). Finally, to address pragmatic considerations such as older models that require specific number-field formats, C-style format specifiers can be appended to the tolerance like so, 1.35 +/- 10U_3.2f. As an example of use, consider figure 1, where a chemical reaction input file is has been marked up to include tolerances and tags per table 1. Not only does the technique provide a natural method of specifying tolerances, but it also servers as in situ documentation of model uncertainties. This tolerance language comes with a utility to strip the tolerances (and tags), to provide a path to the nominal model parameter file. And, as shown in [1

  16. Interoperability, Data Control and Battlespace Visualization using XML, XSLT and X3D

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    26 Rosenthal, Arnon, Seligman , Len and Costello, Roger, XML, Databases, and Interoperability, Federal Database Colloquium, AFCEA, San Diego...79 Rosenthal, Arnon, Seligman , Len and Costello, Roger, “XML, Databases, and Interoperability”, Federal Database Colloquium, AFCEA, San Diego, 1999... Linda , Mastering XML, Premium Edition, SYBEX, 2001 Wooldridge, Michael , An Introduction to MultiAgent Systems, Wiley, 2002 PAPERS Abernathy, M

  17. An XML-based method for astronomy software designing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Mingxue; Aili, Yusupu; Zhang, Jin

    XML-based method for standardization of software designing is introduced and analyzed and successfully applied to renovating the hardware and software of the digital clock at Urumqi Astronomical Station. Basic strategy for eliciting time information from the new digital clock of FT206 in the antenna control program is introduced. By FT206, the need to compute how many centuries passed since a certain day with sophisticated formulas is eliminated and it is no longer necessary to set right UT time for the computer holding control over antenna because the information about year, month, day are all deduced from Julian day dwelling in FT206, rather than from computer time. With XML-based method and standard for software designing, various existing designing methods are unified, communications and collaborations between developers are facilitated, and thus Internet-based mode of developing software becomes possible. The trend of development of XML-based designing method is predicted.

  18. Representing Human Expertise by the OWL Web Ontology Language to Support Knowledge Engineering in Decision Support Systems.

    PubMed

    Ramzan, Asia; Wang, Hai; Buckingham, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) often base their knowledge and advice on human expertise. Knowledge representation needs to be in a format that can be easily understood by human users as well as supporting ongoing knowledge engineering, including evolution and consistency of knowledge. This paper reports on the development of an ontology specification for managing knowledge engineering in a CDSS for assessing and managing risks associated with mental-health problems. The Galatean Risk and Safety Tool, GRiST, represents mental-health expertise in the form of a psychological model of classification. The hierarchical structure was directly represented in the machine using an XML document. Functionality of the model and knowledge management were controlled using attributes in the XML nodes, with an accompanying paper manual for specifying how end-user tools should behave when interfacing with the XML. This paper explains the advantages of using the web-ontology language, OWL, as the specification, details some of the issues and problems encountered in translating the psychological model to OWL, and shows how OWL benefits knowledge engineering. The conclusions are that OWL can have an important role in managing complex knowledge domains for systems based on human expertise without impeding the end-users' understanding of the knowledge base. The generic classification model underpinning GRiST makes it applicable to many decision domains and the accompanying OWL specification facilitates its implementation.

  19. A Discourse Based Approach to the Language Documentation of Local Ecological Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odango, Emerson Lopez

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a discourse-based approach to the language documentation of local ecological knowledge (LEK). The knowledge, skills, beliefs, cultural worldviews, and ideologies that shape the way a community interacts with its environment can be examined through the discourse in which LEK emerges. 'Discourse-based' refers to two components:…

  20. Model tool to describe chemical structures in XML format utilizing structural fragments and chemical ontology.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Punnaivanam; Alain, Krief; Aghila, Gnanasekaran

    2010-05-24

    We have developed a model structure-editing tool, ChemEd, programmed in JAVA, which allows drawing chemical structures on a graphical user interface (GUI) by selecting appropriate structural fragments defined in a fragment library. The terms representing the structural fragments are organized in fragment ontology to provide a conceptual support. ChemEd describes the chemical structure in an XML document (ChemFul) with rich semantics explicitly encoding the details of the chemical bonding, the hybridization status, and the electron environment around each atom. The document can be further processed through suitable algorithms and with the support of external chemical ontologies to generate understandable reports about the functional groups present in the structure and their specific environment.

  1. Ontario Hydro and SGML.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockley, Ann

    1993-01-01

    Describes how an analysis of Ontario Hydro's conversion of 20,000 pages of paper manuals to online documentation established the scope of the project, provided a set of design criteria, and recommended the use of Standard Generalized Markup Language to create the new documentation and the purchase of the "Dinatext" program to produce it.…

  2. Word add-in for ontology recognition: semantic enrichment of scientific literature.

    PubMed

    Fink, J Lynn; Fernicola, Pablo; Chandran, Rahul; Parastatidis, Savas; Wade, Alex; Naim, Oscar; Quinn, Gregory B; Bourne, Philip E

    2010-02-24

    In the current era of scientific research, efficient communication of information is paramount. As such, the nature of scholarly and scientific communication is changing; cyberinfrastructure is now absolutely necessary and new media are allowing information and knowledge to be more interactive and immediate. One approach to making knowledge more accessible is the addition of machine-readable semantic data to scholarly articles. The Word add-in presented here will assist authors in this effort by automatically recognizing and highlighting words or phrases that are likely information-rich, allowing authors to associate semantic data with those words or phrases, and to embed that data in the document as XML. The add-in and source code are publicly available at http://www.codeplex.com/UCSDBioLit. The Word add-in for ontology term recognition makes it possible for an author to add semantic data to a document as it is being written and it encodes these data using XML tags that are effectively a standard in life sciences literature. Allowing authors to mark-up their own work will help increase the amount and quality of machine-readable literature metadata.

  3. Word add-in for ontology recognition: semantic enrichment of scientific literature

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the current era of scientific research, efficient communication of information is paramount. As such, the nature of scholarly and scientific communication is changing; cyberinfrastructure is now absolutely necessary and new media are allowing information and knowledge to be more interactive and immediate. One approach to making knowledge more accessible is the addition of machine-readable semantic data to scholarly articles. Results The Word add-in presented here will assist authors in this effort by automatically recognizing and highlighting words or phrases that are likely information-rich, allowing authors to associate semantic data with those words or phrases, and to embed that data in the document as XML. The add-in and source code are publicly available at http://www.codeplex.com/UCSDBioLit. Conclusions The Word add-in for ontology term recognition makes it possible for an author to add semantic data to a document as it is being written and it encodes these data using XML tags that are effectively a standard in life sciences literature. Allowing authors to mark-up their own work will help increase the amount and quality of machine-readable literature metadata. PMID:20181245

  4. The markup is the model: reasoning about systems biology models in the Semantic Web era.

    PubMed

    Kell, Douglas B; Mendes, Pedro

    2008-06-07

    Metabolic control analysis, co-invented by Reinhart Heinrich, is a formalism for the analysis of biochemical networks, and is a highly important intellectual forerunner of modern systems biology. Exchanging ideas and exchanging models are part of the international activities of science and scientists, and the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) allows one to perform the latter with great facility. Encoding such models in SBML allows their distributed analysis using loosely coupled workflows, and with the advent of the Internet the various software modules that one might use to analyze biochemical models can reside on entirely different computers and even on different continents. Optimization is at the core of many scientific and biotechnological activities, and Reinhart made many major contributions in this area, stimulating our own activities in the use of the methods of evolutionary computing for optimization.

  5. ForTrilinos Design Document

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Young, Mitchell T.; Johnson, Seth R.; Prokopenko, Andrey V.

    With the development of a Fortran Interface to Trilinos, ForTrilinos, modelers using modern Fortran will beable to provide their codes the capability to use solvers and other capabilities on exascale machines via astraightforward infrastructure that accesses Trilinos. This document outlines what Fortrilinos does andexplains briefly how it works. We show it provides a general access to packages via an entry point and usesan xml file from fortran code. With the first release, ForTrilinos will enable Teuchos to take xml parameterlists from Fortran code and set up data structures. It will provide access to linear solvers and eigensolvers.Several examples are providedmore » to illustrate the capabilities in practice. We explain what the user shouldhave already with their code and what Trilinos provides and returns to the Fortran code. We provideinformation about the build process for ForTrilinos, with a practical example. In future releases, nonlinearsolvers, time iteration, advanced preconditioning techniques, and inversion of control (IoC), to enablecallbacks to Fortran routines, will be available.« less

  6. Information Retrieval System for Japanese Standard Disease-Code Master Using XML Web Service

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Kenji; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2003-01-01

    Information retrieval system of Japanese Standard Disease-Code Master Using XML Web Service is developed. XML Web Service is a new distributed processing system by standard internet technologies. With seamless remote method invocation of XML Web Service, users are able to get the latest disease code master information from their rich desktop applications or internet web sites, which refer to this service. PMID:14728364

  7. An application of software design and documentation language. [Galileo spacecraft command and data subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callender, E. D.; Clarkson, T. B.; Frasier, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    The software design and documentation language (SDDL) is a general purpose processor to support a lanugage for the description of any system, structure, concept, or procedure that may be presented from the viewpoint of a collection of hierarchical entities linked together by means of binary connections. The language comprises a set of rules of syntax, primitive construct classes (module, block, and module invocation), and language control directives. The result is a language with a fixed grammar, variable alphabet and punctuation, and an extendable vocabulary. The application of SDDL to the detailed software design of the Command Data Subsystem for the Galileo Spacecraft is discussed. A set of constructs was developed and applied. These constructs are evaluated and examples of their application are considered.

  8. A Bag of Concepts Approach for Biomedical Document Classification Using Wikipedia Knowledge*. Spanish-English Cross-language Case Study.

    PubMed

    Mouriño-García, Marcos A; Pérez-Rodríguez, Roberto; Anido-Rifón, Luis E

    2017-10-26

    The ability to efficiently review the existing literature is essential for the rapid progress of research. This paper describes a classifier of text documents, represented as vectors in spaces of Wikipedia concepts, and analyses its suitability for classification of Spanish biomedical documents when only English documents are available for training. We propose the cross-language concept matching (CLCM) technique, which relies on Wikipedia interlanguage links to convert concept vectors from the Spanish to the English space. The performance of the classifier is compared to several baselines: a classifier based on machine translation, a classifier that represents documents after performing Explicit Semantic Analysis (ESA), and a classifier that uses a domain-specific semantic annotator (MetaMap). The corpus used for the experiments (Cross-Language UVigoMED) was purpose-built for this study, and it is composed of 12,832 English and 2,184 Spanish MEDLINE abstracts. The performance of our approach is superior to any other state-of-the art classifier in the benchmark, with performance increases up to: 124% over classical machine translation, 332% over MetaMap, and 60 times over the classifier based on ESA. The results have statistical significance, showing p-values < 0.0001. Using knowledge mined from Wikipedia to represent documents as vectors in a space of Wikipedia concepts and translating vectors between language-specific concept spaces, a cross-language classifier can be built, and it performs better than several state-of-the-art classifiers.

  9. XML-based approaches for the integration of heterogeneous bio-molecular data.

    PubMed

    Mesiti, Marco; Jiménez-Ruiz, Ernesto; Sanz, Ismael; Berlanga-Llavori, Rafael; Perlasca, Paolo; Valentini, Giorgio; Manset, David

    2009-10-15

    The today's public database infrastructure spans a very large collection of heterogeneous biological data, opening new opportunities for molecular biology, bio-medical and bioinformatics research, but raising also new problems for their integration and computational processing. In this paper we survey the most interesting and novel approaches for the representation, integration and management of different kinds of biological data by exploiting XML and the related recommendations and approaches. Moreover, we present new and interesting cutting edge approaches for the appropriate management of heterogeneous biological data represented through XML. XML has succeeded in the integration of heterogeneous biomolecular information, and has established itself as the syntactic glue for biological data sources. Nevertheless, a large variety of XML-based data formats have been proposed, thus resulting in a difficult effective integration of bioinformatics data schemes. The adoption of a few semantic-rich standard formats is urgent to achieve a seamless integration of the current biological resources.

  10. A New Publicly Available Chemical Query Language, CSRML ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A new XML-based query language, CSRML, has been developed for representing chemical substructures, molecules, reaction rules, and reactions. CSRML queries are capable of integrating additional forms of information beyond the simple substructure (e.g., SMARTS) or reaction transformation (e.g., SMIRKS, reaction SMILES) queries currently in use. Chemotypes, a term used to represent advanced CSRML queries for repeated application can be encoded not only with connectivity and topology, but also with properties of atoms, bonds, electronic systems, or molecules. The CSRML language has been developed in parallel with a public set of chemotypes, i.e., the ToxPrint chemotypes, which are designed to provide excellent coverage of environmental, regulatory and commercial use chemical space, as well as to represent features and frameworks believed to be especially relevant to toxicity concerns. A software application, ChemoTyper, has also been developed and made publicly available to enable chemotype searching and fingerprinting against a target structure set. The public ChemoTyper houses the ToxPrint chemotype CSRML dictionary, as well as reference implementation so that the query specifications may be adopted by other chemical structure knowledge systems. The full specifications of the XML standard used in CSRML-based chemotypes are publicly available to facilitate and encourage the exchange of structural knowledge. Paper details specifications for a new XML-based query lan

  11. Querying archetype-based EHRs by search ontology-based XPath engineering.

    PubMed

    Kropf, Stefan; Uciteli, Alexandr; Schierle, Katrin; Krücken, Peter; Denecke, Kerstin; Herre, Heinrich

    2018-05-11

    Legacy data and new structured data can be stored in a standardized format as XML-based EHRs on XML databases. Querying documents on these databases is crucial for answering research questions. Instead of using free text searches, that lead to false positive results, the precision can be increased by constraining the search to certain parts of documents. A search ontology-based specification of queries on XML documents defines search concepts and relates them to parts in the XML document structure. Such query specification method is practically introduced and evaluated by applying concrete research questions formulated in natural language on a data collection for information retrieval purposes. The search is performed by search ontology-based XPath engineering that reuses ontologies and XML-related W3C standards. The key result is that the specification of research questions can be supported by the usage of search ontology-based XPath engineering. A deeper recognition of entities and a semantic understanding of the content is necessary for a further improvement of precision and recall. Key limitation is that the application of the introduced process requires skills in ontology and software development. In future, the time consuming ontology development could be overcome by implementing a new clinical role: the clinical ontologist. The introduced Search Ontology XML extension connects Search Terms to certain parts in XML documents and enables an ontology-based definition of queries. Search ontology-based XPath engineering can support research question answering by the specification of complex XPath expressions without deep syntax knowledge about XPaths.

  12. Chroni - an Android Application for Geochronologists to Access Archived Sample Analyses from the NSF-Funded Geochron.Org Data Repository.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettles, J. J.; Bowring, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    NSF requires data management plans as part of funding proposals and geochronologists, among other scientists, are archiving their data and results to the public cloud archives managed by the NSF-funded Integrated Earth Data Applications, or IEDA. GeoChron is a database for geochronology housed within IEDA. The software application U-Pb_Redux developed at the Cyber Infrastructure Research and Development Lab for the Earth Sciences (CIRDLES.org) at the College of Charleston provides seamless connectivity to GeoChron for uranium-lead (U-Pb) geochronologists to automatically upload and retrieve their data and results. U-Pb_Redux also manages publication-quality documents including report tables and graphs. CHRONI is a lightweight mobile application for Android devices that provides easy access to these archived data and results. With CHRONI, U-Pb geochronologists can view archived data and analyses downloaded from the Geochron database, or any other location, in a customizable format. CHRONI uses the same extensible markup language (XML) schema and documents used by U-Pb_Redux and GeoChron. Report Settings are special XML files that can be customized in U-Pb_Redux, stored in the cloud, and then accessed and used in CHRONI to create the same customized data display on the mobile device. In addition to providing geologists effortless and mobile access to archived data and analyses, CHRONI allows users to manage their GeoChron credentials, quickly download private and public files via a specified IEDA International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) or URL, and view specialized graphics associated with particular IGSNs. Future versions of CHRONI will be developed to support iOS compatible devices. CHRONI is an open source project under the Apache 2 license and is hosted at https://github.com/CIRDLES/CHRONI. We encourage community participation in its continued development.

  13. jmzIdentML API: A Java interface to the mzIdentML standard for peptide and protein identification data.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Florian; Krishna, Ritesh; Ghali, Fawaz; Ríos, Daniel; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Jones, Andrew R

    2012-03-01

    We present a Java application programming interface (API), jmzIdentML, for the Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO) Proteomics Standards Initiative (PSI) mzIdentML standard for peptide and protein identification data. The API combines the power of Java Architecture of XML Binding (JAXB) and an XPath-based random-access indexer to allow a fast and efficient mapping of extensible markup language (XML) elements to Java objects. The internal references in the mzIdentML files are resolved in an on-demand manner, where the whole file is accessed as a random-access swap file, and only the relevant piece of XMLis selected for mapping to its corresponding Java object. The APIis highly efficient in its memory usage and can handle files of arbitrary sizes. The APIfollows the official release of the mzIdentML (version 1.1) specifications and is available in the public domain under a permissive licence at http://www.code.google.com/p/jmzidentml/. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Automating Data Submission to a National Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Work, T. T.; Chandler, C. L.; Groman, R. C.; Allison, M. D.; Gegg, S. R.; Biological; Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office

    2010-12-01

    In late 2006, the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) funded the Biological and Chemical Oceanographic Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) to work closely with investigators to manage oceanographic data generated from their research projects. One of the final data management tasks is to ensure that the data are permanently archived at the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) or other appropriate national archiving facility. In the past, BCO-DMO submitted data to NODC as an email with attachments including a PDF file (a manually completed metadata record) and one or more data files. This method is no longer feasible given the rate at which data sets are contributed to BCO-DMO. Working with collaborators at NODC, a more streamlined and automated workflow was developed to keep up with the increased volume of data that must be archived at NODC. We will describe our new workflow; a semi-automated approach for contributing data to NODC that includes a Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) compliant Extensible Markup Language (XML) metadata file accompanied by comma-delimited data files. The FGDC XML file is populated from information stored in a MySQL database. A crosswalk described by an Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) is used to transform the XML formatted MySQL result set to a FGDC compliant XML metadata file. To ensure data integrity, the MD5 algorithm is used to generate a checksum and manifest of the files submitted to NODC for permanent archive. The revised system supports preparation of detailed, standards-compliant metadata that facilitate data sharing and enable accurate reuse of multidisciplinary information. The approach is generic enough to be adapted for use by other data management groups.

  15. An introduction to the Semantic Web for health sciences librarians.

    PubMed

    Robu, Ioana; Robu, Valentin; Thirion, Benoit

    2006-04-01

    The paper (1) introduces health sciences librarians to the main concepts and principles of the Semantic Web (SW) and (2) briefly reviews a number of projects on the handling of biomedical information that uses SW technology. The paper is structured into two main parts. "Semantic Web Technology" provides a high-level description, with examples, of the main standards and concepts: extensible markup language (XML), Resource Description Framework (RDF), RDF Schema (RDFS), ontologies, and their utility in information retrieval, concluding with mention of more advanced SW languages and their characteristics. "Semantic Web Applications and Research Projects in the Biomedical Field" is a brief review of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), Generalised Architecture for Languages, Encyclopedias and Nomenclatures in Medicine (GALEN), HealthCyberMap, LinkBase, and the thesaurus of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The paper also mentions other benefits and by-products of the SW, citing projects related to them. Some of the problems facing the SW vision are presented, especially the ways in which the librarians' expertise in organizing knowledge and in structuring information may contribute to SW projects.

  16. Harmonised information exchange between decentralised food composition database systems.

    PubMed

    Pakkala, H; Christensen, T; de Victoria, I Martínez; Presser, K; Kadvan, A

    2010-11-01

    The main aim of the European Food Information Resource (EuroFIR) project is to develop and disseminate a comprehensive, coherent and validated data bank for the distribution of food composition data (FCD). This can only be accomplished by harmonising food description and data documentation and by the use of standardised thesauri. The data bank is implemented through a network of local FCD storages (usually national) under the control and responsibility of the local (national) EuroFIR partner. The implementation of the system based on the EuroFIR specifications is under development. The data interchange happens through the EuroFIR Web Services interface, allowing the partners to implement their system using methods and software suitable for the local computer environment. The implementation uses common international standards, such as Simple Object Access Protocol, Web Service Description Language and Extensible Markup Language (XML). A specifically constructed EuroFIR search facility (eSearch) was designed for end users. The EuroFIR eSearch facility compiles queries using a specifically designed Food Data Query Language and sends a request to those network nodes linked to the EuroFIR Web Services that will most likely have the requested information. The retrieved FCD are compiled into a specifically designed data interchange format (the EuroFIR Food Data Transport Package) in XML, which is sent back to the EuroFIR eSearch facility as the query response. The same request-response operation happens in all the nodes that have been selected in the EuroFIR eSearch facility for a certain task. Finally, the FCD are combined by the EuroFIR eSearch facility and delivered to the food compiler. The implementation of FCD interchange using decentralised computer systems instead of traditional data-centre models has several advantages. First of all, the local partners have more control over their FCD, which will increase commitment and improve quality. Second, a multicentred

  17. FNV: light-weight flash-based network and pathway viewer.

    PubMed

    Dannenfelser, Ruth; Lachmann, Alexander; Szenk, Mariola; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2011-04-15

    Network diagrams are commonly used to visualize biochemical pathways by displaying the relationships between genes, proteins, mRNAs, microRNAs, metabolites, regulatory DNA elements, diseases, viruses and drugs. While there are several currently available web-based pathway viewers, there is still room for improvement. To this end, we have developed a flash-based network viewer (FNV) for the visualization of small to moderately sized biological networks and pathways. Written in Adobe ActionScript 3.0, the viewer accepts simple Extensible Markup Language (XML) formatted input files to display pathways in vector graphics on any web-page providing flexible layout options, interactivity with the user through tool tips, hyperlinks and the ability to rearrange nodes on the screen. FNV was utilized as a component in several web-based systems, namely Genes2Networks, Lists2Networks, KEA, ChEA and PathwayGenerator. In addition, FVN can be used to embed pathways inside pdf files for the communication of pathways in soft publication materials. FNV is available for use and download along with the supporting documentation and sample networks at http://www.maayanlab.net/FNV. avi.maayan@mssm.edu.

  18. The semantics of Chemical Markup Language (CML): dictionaries and conventions.

    PubMed

    Murray-Rust, Peter; Townsend, Joe A; Adams, Sam E; Phadungsukanan, Weerapong; Thomas, Jens

    2011-10-14

    The semantic architecture of CML consists of conventions, dictionaries and units. The conventions conform to a top-level specification and each convention can constrain compliant documents through machine-processing (validation). Dictionaries conform to a dictionary specification which also imposes machine validation on the dictionaries. Each dictionary can also be used to validate data in a CML document, and provide human-readable descriptions. An additional set of conventions and dictionaries are used to support scientific units. All conventions, dictionaries and dictionary elements are identifiable and addressable through unique URIs.

  19. The semantics of Chemical Markup Language (CML): dictionaries and conventions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The semantic architecture of CML consists of conventions, dictionaries and units. The conventions conform to a top-level specification and each convention can constrain compliant documents through machine-processing (validation). Dictionaries conform to a dictionary specification which also imposes machine validation on the dictionaries. Each dictionary can also be used to validate data in a CML document, and provide human-readable descriptions. An additional set of conventions and dictionaries are used to support scientific units. All conventions, dictionaries and dictionary elements are identifiable and addressable through unique URIs. PMID:21999509

  20. ElVisML: an open data format for the exchange and storage of electrophysiological data in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Torsten; Peters, Tobias; Jägle, Herbert; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2018-02-01

    The ISCEV standards and recommendations for electrophysiological recordings in ophthalmology define a set of protocols with stimulus parameters, acquisition settings, and recording conditions, to unify the data and enable comparability of results across centers. Up to now, however, there are no standards to define the storage and exchange of such electrophysiological recordings. The aim of this study was to develop an open standard data format for the exchange and storage of visual electrophysiological data (ElVisML). We first surveyed existing data formats for biomedical signals and examined their suitability for electrophysiological data in ophthalmology. We then compared the suitability of text-based and binary formats, as well as encoding in Extensible Markup Language (XML) and character/comma-separated values. The results of the methodological consideration led to the development of ElVisML with an XML-encoded text-based format. This allows referential integrity, extensibility, the storing of accompanying units, as well as ensuring confidentiality and integrity of the data. A visualization of ElVisML documents (ElVisWeb) has additionally been developed, which facilitates the exchange of recordings on mailing lists and allows open access to data along with published articles. The open data format ElVisML ensures the quality, validity, and integrity of electrophysiological data transmission and storage as well as providing manufacturer-independent access and long-term archiving in a future-proof format. Standardization of the format of such neurophysiology data would promote the development of new techniques and open software for the use of neurophysiological data in both clinic and research.