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Sample records for xt-ads core design

  1. NUCLEAR REACTOR CORE DESIGN

    DOEpatents

    Mahlmeister, J.E.; Peck, W.S.; Haberer, W.V.; Williams, A.C.

    1960-03-22

    An improved core design for a sodium-cooled, graphitemoderated nuclear reactor is described. The improved reactor core comprises a number of blocks of moderator material, each block being in the shape of a regular prism. A number of channels, extending the length of each block, are disposed around the periphery. When several blocks are placed in contact to form the reactor core, the channels in adjacent blocks correspond with each other to form closed conduits extending the length of the core. Fuel element clusters are disposed in these closed conduits, and liquid coolant is forced through the annulus between the fuel cluster and the inner surface of the conduit. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the moderator blocks are in the form of hexagonal prisms with longitudinal channels cut into the corners of the hexagon. The main advantage of an "edge-loaded" moderator block is that fewer thermal neutrons are absorbed by the moderator cladding, as compared with a conventional centrally loaded moderator block.

  2. Automated Core Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2005-07-15

    Multistate searching methods are a subfield of distributed artificial intelligence that aims to provide both principles for construction of complex systems involving multiple states and mechanisms for coordination of independent agents' actions. This paper proposes a multistate searching algorithm with reinforcement learning for the automatic core design of a boiling water reactor. The characteristics of this algorithm are that the coupling structure and the coupling operation suitable for the assigned problem are assumed and an optimal solution is obtained by mutual interference in multistate transitions using multiagents. Calculations in an actual plant confirmed that the proposed algorithm increased the convergence ability of the optimization process.

  3. Simplifier cut core inductor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    Advantages of specifying C cores and cut toroids fabricated from grain oriented silicon steels for use in high frequency power converters and pulse width modulated switching regulators are discussed. A method for rating cores assigns to each core a number which is the product of its window and core cross section area, called 'Area Product A sub p.' A correlation between the A sub p numbers and current density for a given temperature rise was developed. Also, straight line relationships were developed for A sub p and volume, A sub p and surface area, and A sub p and weight. These relationships can be used to simplify and standardize the process of inductor design. They also make it possible to design inductors of small bulk and volume or to optimize efficiency.

  4. Simplified cut core inductor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    Although filter inductor designers have routinely tended to specify molypermalloy powder cores for use in high frequency power converters and pulse-width modulated switching regulators, there are sigificant advantages in specifying C cores and cut toroids fabricated from grain oriented silicon steels which should not be overlooked. Such steel cores can develop flux densities of 1.6 tesla, with useful linearity to 1.2 tesla, whereas molypermalloy cores carrying d.c. current have useful flux density capabilities only to about 0.3 tesla. The use of silicon steel cores thus makes it possible to design more compact cores, and therefore inductors of reduced volume, or conversely to provide greater load capacity in inductors of a given volume. Information is available which makes it possible to obtain quick and close approximations of significant parameters such as size, weight and temperature rise for silicon steel cores for breadboarding. Graphs, nomographs and tables are presented for this purpose, but more complete mathematical derivations of some of the important parameters are also included for a more rigorous treatment.

  5. A Core Curriculum Designed for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carfagna, Rosemarie

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the Ursuline Studies Program, a new core curriculum at Ursuline College designed to improve women's learning and intellectual and ethical development. Describes the program's emphasis on analysis and synthesis, effective communication, social interaction, value-based decision making, response to beauty, problem solving, and social…

  6. Energy Efficient Engine core design and performance report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, E. Marshall

    1982-01-01

    The Energy Efficient Engine (E3) is a NASA program to develop fuel saving technology for future large transport aircraft engines. Testing of the General Electric E3 core showed that the core component performance and core system performance necessary to meet the program goals can be achieved. The E3 core design and test results are described.

  7. Core design and performance of small inherently safe LMRs

    SciTech Connect

    Orechwa, Y.; Khalil, H.; Turski, R.B.; Fujita, E.K.

    1986-01-01

    Oxide and metal-fueled core designs at the 900 MWt level and constrained by a requirement for interchangeability are described. The physics parameters of the two cores studied here indicate that metal-fueled cores display attractive economic and safety features and are more flexible than are oxide cores in adapting to currently-changing deployment scenarios.

  8. New Designs for NMR Core Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluemich, B.; Anferova, S.; Talnishnikh, E.; Arnold, J.; Clauser, C.

    2006-12-01

    Within the last ten years, mobile magnetic resonance has moved from the oil field to many new areas of application. While the focus of mobile NMR in the past was on single-sided or inside-out NMR, the advent of tube-shaped Halbach magnets has introduced the conventional outside-in NMR concept to mobile NMR where the object is inside a magnet. Our Halbach magnet is constructed from small magnet blocks at light weight and low cost with a magnetic field sufficiently homogeneous. To automatize NMR measurements, the Halbach magnet is mounted on a sliding table to scan long core sections without human interaction. In homogeneous magnetic fields, the longitudinal relaxation time T1 and even the transverse relaxation time T2 are proportional to the pore diameters of rocks. Hence, the T1 and T2 signals map the pore-size distribution of the studied rock cores. For fully saturated samples the integral of the distribution curve is proportional to porosity. The porosity values from NMR measurements with the Halbach magnet are used to estimate permability. The Halbach magnet can be used for certain sample geometries in combination with exchangeable radio frequency (rf) coils with different diameters from 24 mm up to 80 mm. To measure standard Ocean Drilling Program (ODP)/Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) cores, which have a standard diameter of 60 mm and are split lengthwise after recovery, we use a surface figure-8 rf coil with an inner diameter of 60 mm. Besides 1D T2 measurements, we perform relaxation-relaxation correlation experiments, where T1 and T2 are measured in parallel. In this way, the influence of diffusion on the shape of the T2 distribution function is probed. A gradient coil system was designed to perform Pulsed Field Gradients (PFG) experiments. As the gradient coils restrict the axial access to the magnet, only cylindrical core plugs with 20 mm in diameter can be analysed by PFG NMR methods. The homogeneity of the magnetic field in the sensitive volume

  9. Learn from the Core--Design from the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ockerse, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The current objective, object-oriented approach to design is questioned along with design education viewed as a job-oriented endeavor. Instead relational knowledge and experience in a holistic sense, both tacit and explicit, are valued along with an appreciation of the unique character of the student. A new paradigm for design education is…

  10. DIRSIG 5: core design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, Adam A.; Brown, Scott D.

    2012-06-01

    The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model has been developed at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) for over two decades. The last major update of the model, DIRSIG 4, built on an established, first-principles, multi- and hyper-spectral scene simulation tool. It introduced a modern and flexible software architecture to support new sensor modalities and more complex and dynamic scenes. Since that time, the needs of the user community have grown and diversified in tandem with the computational capabilities of modern hardware. Faced with a desire to model more complex, multi-component systems that are beyond the original intent and capabilities of an aging software design, a new version of DIRSIG, version 5, is being introduced to the community. This paper describes the core of DIRSIG 5 that is responsible for linking the disparate sensor, scene, and environmental models together, spatially, temporally, and parametrically. The spatial relationships are governed by a planet-centric universe model encompassing a whole globe digital elevation and optical property model, the scene model(s), globally varying atmospheric models, and a space model. Temporal relationships are driven by a formal modeling and simulation architecture based on approaches used in engineering and biological sciences to model highly dynamic and interactive systems. Finally, the parametric interfaces are described by a universal data model that facilitates scripting, inter-dependent properties and user interface construction. The design of these components will be presented along with specific module implementation details. These simulation tools will be used to demonstrate some of the new capabilities and applications of DIRSIG 5.

  11. Design considerations for an air core magnetic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1992-01-01

    Equations for the force produced by an air core electromagnet on a permanent magnet core as a function of the coil height, coil inner and outer radii, and core displacement are developed. The magnetization vector of the permanent magnet core is assumed to be aligned with the central axis of the electromagnet and the forces which are produced lie along the same axis. Variations in force due to changes in electromagnet parameters and core displacement are investigated and parameter plots which should be useful for coil design are presented.

  12. Development of an LMR core design using metallic fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Orechwa, Y.; Yang, S.T.

    1986-01-01

    The design and performance of a metal fueled LMR core at the 900 MWth power level is described. Performance measures of preliminary driver and blanket fuel pin designs are calculated with the developmental fuel performance code LIFE-metal. The robustness of the designs to changes in design parameters is shown with respect to plenum length, cladding thickness and cladding temperature.

  13. Design, synthesis and applications of core-shell, hollow core, and nanorattle multifunctional nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Habila, Mohamed A.; Labis, Joselito Puzon; Alothman, Zeid A.; Alhoshan, Mansour; Elzatahry, Ahmed A.; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    With the evolution of nanoscience and nanotechnology, studies have been focused on manipulating nanoparticle properties through the control of their size, composition, and morphology. As nanomaterial research has progressed, the foremost focus has gradually shifted from synthesis, morphology control, and characterization of properties to the investigation of function and the utility of integrating these materials and chemical sciences with the physical, biological, and medical fields, which therefore necessitates the development of novel materials that are capable of performing multiple tasks and functions. The construction of multifunctional nanomaterials that integrate two or more functions into a single geometry has been achieved through the surface-coating technique, which created a new class of substances designated as core-shell nanoparticles. Core-shell materials have growing and expanding applications due to the multifunctionality that is achieved through the formation of multiple shells as well as the manipulation of core/shell materials. Moreover, core removal from core-shell-based structures offers excellent opportunities to construct multifunctional hollow core architectures that possess huge storage capacities, low densities, and tunable optical properties. Furthermore, the fabrication of nanomaterials that have the combined properties of a core-shell structure with that of a hollow one has resulted in the creation of a new and important class of substances, known as the rattle core-shell nanoparticles, or nanorattles. The design strategies of these new multifunctional nanostructures (core-shell, hollow core, and nanorattle) are discussed in the first part of this review. In the second part, different synthesis and fabrication approaches for multifunctional core-shell, hollow core-shell and rattle core-shell architectures are highlighted. Finally, in the last part of the article, the versatile and diverse applications of these nanoarchitectures in

  14. Hydrogen exchange, core modules, and new designed proteins.

    PubMed

    Carulla, Natàlia; Barany, George; Woodward, Clare

    2002-12-10

    A strategy for design of new proteins that mimic folding properties of native proteins is based on peptides modeled on the slow exchange cores of natural proteins. We have synthesized peptides, called core modules, that correspond to the elements of secondary structure that carry the very slowest exchanging amides in a protein. The expectation is that, if soluble in water, core modules will form conformational ensembles that favor native-like structure. Core modules modeled on natural bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor have been shown by NMR studies to meet this expectation. The next step toward production of a native state mimic is to further shift the conformational bias of a core module toward more ordered structure by promoting module-module interactions that are mutually stabilizing. For this, two core modules were incorporated into a single molecule by means of a long cross-link. From a panel of several two-module peptides, one very promising lead emerged; it is called BetaCore. BetaCore is monomeric in water and forms a new fold composed of a four-stranded, antiparallel beta-sheet. The single, dominant conformation of BetaCore is characterized by various NMR experiments. Here we compare the individual core module to the two-module BetaCore and discuss the progressive stabilization of intramodule structure and the formation of new intermodule interactions.

  15. Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Namekawa, Azuma; Yoda, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper, it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result, it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part, an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled, metal fuel, 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature, pressure drop, linear heat rate, and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding, fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CADLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

  16. Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core

    SciTech Connect

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Namekawa, Azuma; Yoda, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2012-06-06

    The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper, it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result, it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part, an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled, metal fuel, 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature, pressure drop, linear heat rate, and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding, fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CANDLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

  17. Fuel and Core Design Experiences in Cofrentes NPP

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Delgado, L.; Lopez-Carbonell, M.T.; Gomez-Bernal, I.

    2002-07-01

    The electricity market deregulation in Spain is increasing the need for innovations in nuclear power generation, which can be achieved in the fuel area by improving fuel and core designs and by introducing vendors competition. Iberdrola has developed the GIRALDA methodology for design and licensing of Cofrentes reloads, and has introduced mixed cores with fuel from different vendors. The application of GIRALDA is giving satisfactory results, and is showing its capability to adequately reproduce the core behaviour. The nuclear design team is acquiring an invaluable experience and a deep knowledge of the core, very useful to support cycle operation. Continuous improvements are expected for the future in design strategies as well as in the application of new technologies to redesign the methodology processes. (authors)

  18. Computer-assisted design of flux-cored wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubtsov, Yu N.; Zorin, I. V.; Sokolov, G. N.; Antonov, A. A.; Artem'ev, A. A.; Lysak, V. I.

    2017-02-01

    The algorithm and description of the AlMe-WireLaB software for the computer-assisted design of flux-cored wires are introduced. The software functionality is illustrated with the selection of the components for the flux-cored wire, ensuring the acquisition of the deposited metal of the Fe-Cr-C-Mo-Ni-Ti-B system. It is demonstrated that the developed software enables the technologically reliable flux-cored wire to be designed for surfacing, resulting in a metal of an ordered composition.

  19. Performance and design considerations in metal fueled cores. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Orechwa, Y.; Khalil, H.; Turski, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    To focus future metal fuel development requirements a study was performed to quantify the relationship between some critical core design parameters. The fuel studied was U-Pu-Zr alloy. Of interest are performance parameters, such as peak Pu enrichment, burnup swing, fast fluence, breeding ratio, and their relation to core parameters such as reactor size, degree of core heterogeneity, pin diameter, and linear heat rating. These performance parameters, while numericaly different from those of ceramic fuels, were found to exhibit the same qualitative dependence on the key design variables.

  20. Automated Design and Optimization of Pebble-bed Reactor Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; William K. Terry

    2010-07-01

    We present a conceptual design approach for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors using recirculating pebble-bed cores. The design approach employs PEBBED, a reactor physics code specifically designed to solve for and analyze the asymptotic burnup state of pebble-bed reactors, in conjunction with a genetic algorithm to obtain a core that maximizes a fitness value that is a function of user-specified parameters. The uniqueness of the asymptotic core state and the small number of independent parameters that define it suggest that core geometry and fuel cycle can be efficiently optimized toward a specified objective. PEBBED exploits a novel representation of the distribution of pebbles that enables efficient coupling of the burnup and neutron diffusion solvers. With this method, even complex pebble recirculation schemes can be expressed in terms of a few parameters that are amenable to modern optimization techniques. With PEBBED, the user chooses the type and range of core physics parameters that represent the design space. A set of traits, each with acceptable and preferred values expressed by a simple fitness function, is used to evaluate the candidate reactor cores. The stochastic search algorithm automatically drives the generation of core parameters toward the optimal core as defined by the user. The optimized design can then be modeled and analyzed in greater detail using higher resolution and more computationally demanding tools to confirm the desired characteristics. For this study, the design of pebble-bed high temperature reactor concepts subjected to demanding physical constraints demonstrated the efficacy of the PEBBED algorithm.

  1. Current advances in precious metal core-shell catalyst design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; He, Beibei; Hu, Zhiyu; Zeng, Zhigang; Han, Sheng

    2014-08-01

    Precious metal nanoparticles are commonly used as the main active components of various catalysts. Given their high cost, limited quantity, and easy loss of catalytic activity under severe conditions, precious metals should be used in catalysts at low volumes and be protected from damaging environments. Accordingly, reducing the amount of precious metals without compromising their catalytic performance is difficult, particularly under challenging conditions. As multifunctional materials, core-shell nanoparticles are highly important owing to their wide range of applications in chemistry, physics, biology, and environmental areas. Compared with their single-component counterparts and other composites, core-shell nanoparticles offer a new active interface and a potential synergistic effect between the core and shell, making these materials highly attractive in catalytic application. On one hand, when a precious metal is used as the shell material, the catalytic activity can be greatly improved because of the increased surface area and the closed interfacial interaction between the core and the shell. On the other hand, when a precious metal is applied as the core material, the catalytic stability can be remarkably improved because of the protection conferred by the shell material. Therefore, a reasonable design of the core-shell catalyst for target applications must be developed. We summarize the latest advances in the fabrications, properties, and applications of core-shell nanoparticles in this paper. The current research trends of these core-shell catalysts are also highlighted.

  2. Influence Of Low Boron Core Design On PWR Transient Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov Papukchiev, Angel; Yubo Liu; Schaefer, Anselm

    2006-07-01

    In conventional pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs, the concentration of boron in primary coolant is limited by the requirement of having a negative moderator density coefficient. As high boron concentrations have significant impact on reactivity feedback properties, design changes to reduce boron concentration in the reactor coolant are of general interest in view of improving PWR inherent safety. In the framework of an investigation into the feasibility of low boron design, a PWR core configuration based on fuel with higher gadolinium (Gd) content has been developed which permits to reduce the natural boron concentration at begin of cycle (BOC) by approx. 50% compared to current German PWR technology. For the assessment of the potential safety advantages, a Loss-of-Feedwater Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS LOFW) has been simulated with the system code ATHLET for two PWR core designs: a low boron design and a standard core design. The most significant difference in the transient performance of both designs is the total primary fluid mass released through the pressurizer (PRZ) valves. It is reduced by a factor of four for the low boron reactor, indicating its improved density reactivity feedback. (authors)

  3. Shield Design for a Space Based Vapor Core Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2002-07-01

    Innovative shielding strategies were sought to reduce the mass of the required shielding for a space based vapor core reactor system with magnetohydrodynamic energy conversion. Gamma-rays directly resultant from fission were found to play no role in the dose rate, while secondary gamma-rays from fission neutron interactions were the dominant contributor to the dose rate. Hydrogen containing materials such as polyethylene were utilized to provide shielding of both radiation from the reactor complex and also solar and galactic cosmic radiation. This shield design was found to contribute 0.125 kg/kWe to the baseline vapor core reactor system specific mass. (authors)

  4. Pebble-bed core design option for VHTRs - Core configuration flexibility and potential applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, M. L.; Tsvetkov, P. V.

    2006-07-01

    Gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been receiving specific attention for Generation IV possibilities due to desired characteristics such as relatively low cost, short construction period, and inherent safety. Attractive inherent characteristics include an inert, single phase helium coolant, refractory coated fuel with high temperature capability and low fission product release, and graphite moderator with high temperature stability and long response times. The passively safe design has a relatively low power density, annular core, large negative temperature coefficient, and passive decay heat removal system. The objective of the U.S. DOE NERI Project is to assess the possibility, advantages and limitations of VHTRs with fuel loadings containing minor actinides. This paper presents the analysis of pebble-bed core configurations. Whole-core 3D models for pebble-bed design with multi-heterogeneity treatments in SCALE 5.0 are developed to compare computational results with experiments. Obtained results are in agreement with the available HTR-10 data. Actinide fueled VHTR configurations reveal promising performance. With an optimized pebble-bed model, the spectrum shifting abilities become more apparent. Effects of altered moderator to fuel ratio, Dancoff factor, and core and reflector configurations are investigated. This effort is anticipated to contribute to a facilitated development of new fuel cycles in support of future operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. (authors)

  5. Design of the Core 2-4 GHz Betatron Equalizer

    SciTech Connect

    Deibele, C.; /Fermilab

    2000-01-01

    The core betatron equalizer in the Accumulator in the Antiproton Source at Fermilab needed to be upgraded. The performance could be rated as only circa 650 MHz when the system was a 2 GHz system. The old equalizer did not correct for the strong phase mismatch for the relatively strong gain of the system slightly below 2 GHz. The design corrects this phase mismatch and is relatively well matched both in and out of band.

  6. Core compressor exit stage study. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdsall, E. A.; Canal, E., Jr.; Lyons, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of aspect ratio on the performance of core compressor exit stages was demonstrated using two three stage, highly loaded, core compressors. Aspect ratio was identified as having a strong influence on compressors endwall loss. Both compressors simulated the last three stages of an advanced eight stage core compressor and were designed with the same 0.915 hub/tip ratio, 4.30 kg/sec (9.47 1bm/sec) inlet corrected flow, and 167 m/sec (547 ft/sec) corrected mean wheel speed. The first compressor had an aspect ratio of 0.81 and an overall pressure ratio of 1.357 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.3% with an average diffusion factor or 0.529. The aspect ratio of the second compressor was 1.22 with an overall pressure ratio of 1.324 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.7% with an average diffusion factor of 0.491.

  7. System design description for GCFR-core flow test loop

    SciTech Connect

    Huntley, W.R.; Grindell, A.G.

    1980-12-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop is a high-pressure, high-temperature, out-of-reactor helium circulation system that is being constructed to permit detailed study of the thermomechanical and thermal performance at prototypic steady-state and transient operating conditions of simulated segments of core assemblies for a GCFR Demonstration Plant, as designed by General Atomic Company. It will also permit the expermental verification of predictive analytical models of the GCFR core assemblies needed to reduce operational and safety uncertainties of the GCFR. Full-sized blanket assemblies and segments of fuel rod and control rod fuel assemblies will be simulated with test bundles of electrically powered fuel rod or blanket rod simulators. The loop will provide the steady-state and margin test requirements of bundle power and heat removal, and of helium coolant flow rate, pressure, and temperature for test bundles having up to 91 rods; these requirements set the maximum power, coolant helium flow, and thermal requirements for the loop. However, the size of the test vessel that contains the test bundles will be determined by the bundles that simulate a full-sized GCFR blanket assembly. The loop will also provide for power and coolant transients to simulate transient operation of GCFR core assemblies, including the capability for rapid helium depressurization to simulate the depressurization class of GCFR accidents. In addition, the loop can be used as an out-of-reactor test bed for characterizing in-reactor test bundle configurations.

  8. Preliminary design study of advanced multistage axial flow core compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.; Koch, C. C.; Smith, L. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary design study was conducted to identify an advanced core compressor for use in new high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines to be introduced into commercial service in the 1980's. An evaluation of anticipated compressor and related component 1985 state-of-the-art technology was conducted. A parametric screening study covering a large number of compressor designs was conducted to determine the influence of the major compressor design features on efficiency, weight, cost, blade life, aircraft direct operating cost, and fuel usage. The trends observed in the parametric screening study were used to develop three high-efficiency, high-economic-payoff compressor designs. These three compressors were studied in greater detail to better evaluate their aerodynamic and mechanical feasibility.

  9. Design of MR brake featuring tapered inner magnetic core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jung Woo; Oh, Jong-Soek; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    In this work, a new type of MR brake featuring tapered inner magnetic core is proposed and its braking performance is numerically evaluated. In order to achieve high braking torque with restricted size and weight of MR brake system, tapered inner magnetic core is designed and expands the area that the magnetic flux is passing by MR fluid-filled gap. The mathematical braking torque model of the proposed MR brake is derived based on the field-dependent Bingham rheological model of MR fluid. Finite element analysis is carried out to identify electromagnetic characteristics of the conventional and the proposed MR brake configuration. To demonstrate the superiority of the proposed MR brake, the braking torque of the proposed MR brake is numerically evaluated and compared with that of conventional MR brake model.

  10. Core damage frequency (reactor design) perspectives based on IPE results

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, A.L.; Dingman, S.E.; Forester, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    This paper provides perspectives gained from reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals covering 108 nuclear power plant units. Variability both within and among reactor types is examined to provide perspectives regarding plant-specific design and operational features, and C, modeling assumptions that play a significant role in the estimates of core damage frequencies in the IPEs. Human actions found to be important in boiling water reactors (BWRs) and in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are presented and the events most frequently found important are discussed.

  11. The synthesis, design and applications of lanthanide cored complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Gregory David

    Novel luminescent materials based on lanthanide cored complexes have been designed and synthesized. The complexes consist of a beta-diketone ligand chelated to a lanthanide metal such as europium or gadolinium. A series of beta-diketone ligands were designed and synthesized. The ligands consist of a polycyclic aromatic sensitizer, phenanthrene, and a second functional group. The second groups consisted of another unit of phenanthrene, a dendritic structure, or a fluorinated alkyl chain. The europium complexes have been incorporated into organic light emitting devices that have a major emission at 615 nm and a maximum brightness of 300 cd/m2. The gadolinium complexes were used to dope into the resulting organic light emitting devices to help improve the efficiency of the device. The use of the gadolinium complexes results in a 25 fold increase in efficiency.

  12. Design rules for core/shell nanowire resonant emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Da-Som; Kim, Sun-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    We study design principles to boost the extraction of light from core/shell GaN nanowire optical emitters. A full-vectorial electromagnetic simulation reveals that the extraction efficiency of an emitter within a nanowire cavity depends strongly on its position; the efficiency becomes maximized as the emitter's location approaches the center of the structure. The total extraction of light is sinusoidally modulated by the nanowire diameter, which is directly correlated with optical resonances. The introduction of a conformal dielectric coating on a nanowire leads to a dramatic enhancement in the extraction efficiency, which results from an increase in side emission owing to an optical antenna effect. A simple high-refractive-index dielectric coating approximately doubles the total extraction efficiency of a nanowire LED. These numerical findings will be valuable in providing strategies for high-efficiency nanowire-based optical emitters.

  13. Design Core Commonalities: A Study of the College of Design at Iowa State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venes, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive study asks what a group of rather diverse disciplines have in common. It involves a cross-disciplinary examination of an entire college, the College of Design at Iowa State University. This research was intended to provide a sense of direction in developing and assessing possible core content. The reasoning was that material…

  14. Core design for use with precision composite reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Christopher C. (Inventor); Jacoy, Paul J. (Inventor); Schmitigal, Wesley P. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A uniformly flexible core, and method for manufacturing the same, is disclosed for use between the face plates of a sandwich structure. The core is made of a plurality of thin corrugated strips, the corrugations being defined by a plurality of peaks and valleys connected to one another by a plurality of diagonal risers. The corrugated strips are orthogonally criss-crossed to form the core. The core is particularly suitable for use with high accuracy spherically curved sandwich structures because undesirable stresses in the curved face plates are minimized due to the uniform flexibility characteristics of the core in both the X and Y directions. The core is self venting because of the open geometry of the corrugations. The core can be made from any suitable composite, metal, or polymer. Thermal expansion problems in sandwich structures may be minimized by making the core from the same composite materials that are selected in the manufacture of the curved face plates because of their low coefficients of thermal expansion. Where the strips are made of a composite material, the core may be constructed by first cutting an already cured corrugated sheet into a plurality of corrugated strips and then secondarily bonding the strips to one another or, alternatively, by lying a plurality of uncured strips orthogonally over one another in a suitable jig and then curing and bonding the entire plurality of strips to one another in a single operation.

  15. Feasibility study on nuclear core design for soluble boron free small modular reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie Hah, Chang Joo; Ju, Cho Sung

    2015-04-29

    A feasibility study on nuclear core design of soluble boron free (SBF) core for small size (150MWth) small modular reactor (SMR) was investigated. The purpose of this study was to design a once through cycle SMR core, where it can be used to supply electricity to a remote isolated area. PWR fuel assembly design with 17×17 arrangement, with 264 fuel rods per assembly was adopted as the basis design. The computer code CASMO-3/MASTER was used for the search of SBF core and fuel assembly analysis for SMR design. A low critical boron concentration (CBC) below 200 ppm core with 4.7 years once through cycle length was achieved using 57 fuel assemblies having 170 cm of active height. Core reactivity controlled using mainly 512 number of 4 wt% and 960 12 wt% Gd rods.

  16. Novel design of hollow-core multi clad fiber for long haul optical communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palodiya, Vikram; Raghuwanshi, Sanjeev K.

    2016-09-01

    We have described a dispersion characteristics of hollow-core multi-clad index profiles, which include a hollow core. The designs satisfy the most important requirements for applications in long haul communication. This design fiber shows zero dispersion at 1550 nm can be obtained for the fundamental air core mode over a wide wavelength range by introducing the partial reflector layer around the core, optimizing expanded core size and silica cladding thickness. Also analyze dispersion compensating properties of these fibers. This unique structure of the fundamental air core mode is presented by the introduction of partial reflector cladding around the core. The potential applications of hollow-core multi clad fibers in long-haul optical communication system.

  17. Characteristics of photonic crystal fibers designed with an annular core using a single material.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuguang; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Agrawal, Govind P

    2013-05-01

    We propose a kind of photonic crystal fiber (PCF) designed with an annular core and fabricated using a single material. Characteristics of such fibers, including the mode field distributions of both the core and cladding modes, the effective mode area of the fundamental core mode, and the dispersion profile, are investigated using the finite element method. The coupling between the fundamental mode and an excited core mode or cladding mode is discussed in order to apply the proposed design in mode-coupling devices. Results show that such a PCF may be suitable for both optical communications and optical sensing technologies.

  18. Modified anchor shaped post core design for primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, R; Baroudi, Kusai; Reddy, K Bala Kasi; Praveen, B H; Kumar, V Sumanth; Amit, S

    2014-01-01

    Restoring severely damaged primary anterior teeth is challenging to pedodontist. Many materials are tried as a post core but each one of them has its own drawbacks. This a case report describing a technique to restore severely damaged primary anterior teeth with a modified anchor shaped post. This technique is not only simple and inexpensive but also produces better retention.

  19. Modified Anchor Shaped Post Core Design for Primary Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, R.; Baroudi, Kusai; Reddy, K. Bala Kasi; Praveen, B. H.; Kumar, V. Sumanth; Amit, S.

    2014-01-01

    Restoring severely damaged primary anterior teeth is challenging to pedodontist. Many materials are tried as a post core but each one of them has its own drawbacks. This a case report describing a technique to restore severely damaged primary anterior teeth with a modified anchor shaped post. This technique is not only simple and inexpensive but also produces better retention. PMID:25379294

  20. Core Curriculum Analysis: A Tool for Educational Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levander, Lena M.; Mikkola, Minna

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the outcome of a dimensional core curriculum analysis. The analysis process was an integral part of an educational development project, which aimed to compact and clarify the curricula of the degree programmes. The task was also in line with the harmonising of the degree structures as part of the Bologna process within higher…

  1. Teaching to the Common Core by Design, Not Accident

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Vicki; Wong, Carina

    2012-01-01

    The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has created tools and supports intended to help teachers adapt to the Common Core State Standards in English language arts and mathematics. The tools seek to find the right balance between encouraging teachers' creativity and giving them enough guidance to ensure quality. They are the product of two years of…

  2. Optimization of burnable poison design for Pu incineration in fully fertile free PWR core

    SciTech Connect

    Fridman, E.; Shwageraus, E.; Galperin, A.

    2006-07-01

    The design challenges of the fertile-free based fuel (FFF) can be addressed by careful and elaborate use of burnable poisons (BP). Practical fully FFF core design for PWR reactor has been reported in the past [1]. However, the burnable poison option used in the design resulted in significant end of cycle reactivity penalty due to incomplete BP depletion. Consequently, excessive Pu loading were required to maintain the target fuel cycle length, which in turn decreased the Pu burning efficiency. A systematic evaluation of commercially available BP materials in all configurations currently used in PWRs is the main objective of this work. The BP materials considered are Boron, Gd, Er, and Hf. The BP geometries were based on Wet Annular Burnable Absorber (WABA), Integral Fuel Burnable Absorber (IFBA), and Homogeneous poison/fuel mixtures. Several most promising combinations of BP designs were selected for the full core 3D simulation. All major core performance parameters for the analyzed cases are very close to those of a standard PWR with conventional UO{sub 2} fuel including possibility of reactivity control, power peaking factors, and cycle length. The MTC of all FFF cores was found at the full power conditions at all times and very close to that of the UO{sub 2} core. The Doppler coefficient of the FFF cores is also negative but somewhat lower in magnitude compared to UO{sub 2} core. The soluble boron worth of the FFF cores was calculated to be lower than that of the UO{sub 2} core by about a factor of two, which still allows the core reactivity control with acceptable soluble boron concentrations. The main conclusion of this work is that judicial application of burnable poisons for fertile free fuel has a potential to produce a core design with performance characteristics close to those of the reference PWR core with conventional UO{sub 2} fuel. (authors)

  3. Multipurpose Advanced 'inherently' Safe Reactor (MARS): Core design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Golfier, H.; Poinot, C.; Delpech, M.; Mignot, G.

    2006-07-01

    In the year 2005, in collaboration with CEA, the University of Rome 'La Sapienza' investigated a new core model with the aim at increasing the performances of the reference one, by extending the burn-up to 60 GWD/t in the case of multi-loading strategy and investigating the characteristics and limitations of a 'once-through' option, in order to enhance the proliferation resistance. In the first part of this paper, the objectives of this study and the methods of calculation are briefly described, while in the second part the calculation results are presented. (authors)

  4. Designing, Leading and Managing the Transition to the Common Core: A Strategy Guidebook for Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brentt; Vargo, Merrill

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core provides districts an opportunity to renew their focus on teaching and learning. But it also poses a number of design and implementation challenges for school districts. The "Leadership and Design Cycles" described in this guidebook offers an evidenced-based and structured process for leaders to design and implement…

  5. Design and Evaluation of an Enhanced In-Vessel Core Catcher

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe

    2004-06-01

    An enhanced in-vessel core catcher is being designed and evaluated as part of a joint United States (U.S.) - Korean International Nuclear Engineering Research Initiative (INERI) investigating methods to insure In-Vessel Retention (IVR) of core materials that may relocate under severe accident conditions in advanced reactors. To reduce cost and simplify manufacture and installation, this new core catcher design consists of several interlocking sections that are machined to fit together when inserted into the lower head. If needed, the core catcher can be manufactured with holes to accommodate lower head penetrations. Each section of the core catcher consists of two material layers with an option to add a third layer (if deemed necessary): a base material, which has the capability to support and contain the mass of core materials that may relocate during a severe accident; an oxide coating material on top of the base material, which resists interactions with high-temperature core materials; and an optional coating on the bottom side of the base material to prevent any potential oxidation of the base material during the lifetime of the reactor. This paper summarizes the status of core catcher design and evaluation efforts, including analyses, materials interaction tests, and prototypic testing efforts.

  6. Design and Testing of an Active Core for Sandwich Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    some degrees of unimorph from the design. In the experiment, the current prototype, which is made of polycarbonate material and Nitinol spring...such as Nitinol , is chosen due to its greater shape memory strain (8.5%), practical fabrication technique, and is relatively in- expansive. 2.2... Nitinol and its volume fractions are 5%, 7.5%, and 10% of the total design domain. The artificial stiffness implemented at the top and bottom right hand

  7. Core and Refueling Design Studies for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Ilas, Dan; Varma, Venugopal Koikal; Cisneros, Anselmo T; Kelly, Ryan P; Gehin, Jess C

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central generating station type [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. This report presents the current status of ongoing design studies of the core, in-vessel structures, and refueling options for the AHTR. The AHTR design remains at the notional level of maturity as important material, structural, neutronic, and hydraulic issues remain to be addressed. The present design space exploration, however, indicates that reasonable options exist for the AHTR core, primary heat transport path, and fuel cycle provided that materials and systems technologies develop as anticipated. An illustration of the current AHTR core, reactor vessel, and nearby structures is shown in Fig. ES1. The AHTR core design concept is based upon 252 hexagonal, plate fuel assemblies configured to form a roughly cylindrical core. The core has a fueled height of 5.5 m with 25 cm of reflector above and below the core. The fuel assembly hexagons are {approx}45 cm across the flats. Each fuel assembly contains 18 plates that are 23.9 cm wide and 2.55 cm thick. The reactor vessel has an exterior diameter of 10.48 m and a height of 17.7 m. A row of replaceable graphite reflector prismatic blocks surrounds the core radially. A more complete reactor configuration description is provided in Section 2 of this report. The AHTR core design space exploration was performed under a set of constraints. Only low enrichment (<20%) uranium fuel was considered. The coated particle fuel and matrix materials were derived from those being developed and demonstrated under the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) advanced gas reactor program. The coated particle volumetric packing fraction was restricted to at most 40%. The pressure

  8. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  9. Design/Operations review of core sampling trucks and associated equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, H.P.

    1996-03-11

    A systematic review of the design and operations of the core sampling trucks was commissioned by Characterization Equipment Engineering of the Westinghouse Hanford Company in October 1995. The review team reviewed the design documents, specifications, operating procedure, training manuals and safety analysis reports. The review process, findings and corrective actions are summarized in this supporting document.

  10. Designing the Molybdopterin Core through Regioselective Coupling of Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Pimkov, Igor V; Serli-Mitasev, Barbara; Peterson, Antoinette A; Ratvasky, Stephen C; Hammann, Bernd; Basu, Partha

    2015-11-16

    Molybdopterin is an essential cofactor for all forms of life. The cofactor is composed of a pterin moiety appended to a dithiolene-functionalized pyran ring, and through the dithiolene moiety it binds metal ions. Different synthetic strategies for dithiolene-functionalized pyran precursors that have been designed and synthesized are discussed. These precursors also harbor 1,2-diketone or osone functionality that has been condensed with 1,2-diaminobenzene or other heterocycles resulting in several quinoxaline or pterin derivatives. Use of additives improves the regioselectivity of the complexes. The molecules have been characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR and IR spectroscopies, as well as by mass spectrometry. In addition, several compounds have been crystallographically characterized. The geometries of the synthesized molecules are more planar than the geometry of the cofactor found in proteins.

  11. Suspended core subwavelength fibers: towards practical designs for low-loss terahertz guidance.

    PubMed

    Rozé, Mathieu; Ung, Bora; Mazhorova, Anna; Walther, Markus; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2011-05-09

    In this work we report two designs of subwavelength fibers packaged for practical terahertz wave guiding. We describe fabrication, modeling and characterization of microstructured polymer fibers featuring a subwavelength-size core suspended in the middle of a large porous outer cladding. This design allows convenient handling of the subwavelength fibers without distorting their modal profile. Additionally, the air-tight porous cladding serves as a natural enclosure for the fiber core, thus avoiding the need for a bulky external enclosure for humidity-purged atmosphere. Fibers of 5 mm and 3 mm in outer diameters with a 150 µm suspended solid core and a 900 µm suspended porous core respectively, were obtained by utilizing a combination of drilling and stacking techniques. Characterization of the fiber optical properties and the subwavelength imaging of the guided modes were performed using a terahertz near-field microscopy setup. Near-field imaging of the modal profiles at the fiber output confirmed the effectively single-mode behavior of such waveguides. The suspended core fibers exhibit transmission from 0.10 THz to 0.27 THz (larger core), and from 0.25 THz to 0.51 THz (smaller core). Due to the large fraction of power that is guided in the holey cladding, fiber propagation losses as low as 0.02 cm(-1) are demonstrated specifically for the small core fiber. Low-loss guidance combined with the core isolated from environmental perturbations make these all-dielectric fibers suitable for practical terahertz imaging and sensing applications.

  12. Design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system to ensure limitation of core damage. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Deane, N.A.; Atcheson, D.B.

    1981-09-01

    Safety-based functional requirements and design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system (SASS) are derived in accordance with LOA-2 success criteria and reliability goals. The design basis transients have been defined and evaluated for the CDS Phase II design, which is a 2550 MWt mixed oxide heterogeneous core reactor. A partial set of reactor responses for selected transients is provided as a function of SASS characteristics such as reactivity worth, trip points, and insertion times.

  13. Design and pilot evaluation of the RAH-66 Comanche Core AFCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogler, Donald L., Jr.; Keller, James F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the design and pilot evaluation of the Core Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS) for the Reconnaissance/Attack Helicopter (RAH-66) Comanche. During the period from November 1991 through February 1992, the RAH-66 Comanche control laws were evaluated through a structured pilot acceptance test using a motion base simulator. Design requirements, descriptions of the control law design, and handling qualities data collected from ADS-33 maneuvers are presented.

  14. Design and realization of the IP control core in field controllers for LAMOST spectroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianing; Han, Zhongyi; Zeng, Yizhong; Dai, Songxin; Hu, Zhongwen; Zhu, Yongtian; Wang, Lei; Hou, Yonghui

    2010-07-01

    The China-made telescope, LAMOST, consists of 16 spectroscopes to detect stellar spectra via 4000 optical fibers. In each spectroscope, many movable parts work in phase. Those parts are real-time controlled and managed by field controllers based on FPGA. This paper mainly introduces how to use DSP Builder module library in MATLAB / Simulink to construct the IP control core on FPGA chip. This method can also be used to design the control core of PID arithmetic, to carry out arithmetic simulation and generate VHDL language file, as well as to integrate it into SOPC developing environment so as to repeatedly use. In this way, the design period of the control system may be shortened and design process simplified. Finally due to the reversibility and programmability of the IP control core ,a system on a chip for field controllers of spectroscope is realized, which meets astronomical control requirements, providing an effective scheme for embedded system in astronomical instrument applications.

  15. Analysis of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels with a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Raj, Sai V.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2004-01-01

    The quest for cheap, low density and high performance materials in the design of aircraft and rotorcraft engine fan and propeller blades poses immense challenges to the materials and structural design engineers. The present study investigates the use of a sandwich foam fan blade mae up of solid face sheets and a metal foam core. The face sheets and the metal foam core material were an aerospace grade precipitation hardened 17-4 PH stainless steel with high strength and high toughness. The resulting structures possesses a high stiffness while being lighter than a similar solid construction. The material properties of 17-4 PH metal foam are reviewed briefly to describe the characteristics of sandwich structure for a fan blade application. A vibration analysis for natural frequencies and a detailed stress analysis on the 17-4 PH sandwich foam blade design for different combinations of kin thickness and core volume are presented with a comparison to a solid titanium blade.

  16. Core Noise: Implications of Emerging N+3 Designs and Acoustic Technology Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a summary of the core-noise implications of NASA's primary N+3 aircraft concepts. These concepts are the MIT/P&W D8.5 Double Bubble design, the Boeing/GE SUGAR Volt hybrid gas-turbine/electric engine concept, the NASA N3-X Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion aircraft, and the NASA TBW-XN Truss-Braced Wing concept. The first two are future concepts for the Boeing 737/Airbus A320 US transcontinental mission of 180 passengers and a maximum range of 3000 nm. The last two are future concepts for the Boeing 777 transpacific mission of 350 passengers and a 7500 nm range. Sections of the presentation cover: turbofan design trends on the N+1.5 time frame and the already emerging importance of core noise; the NASA N+3 concepts and associated core-noise challenges; the historical trends for the engine bypass ratio (BPR), overall pressure ratio (OPR), and combustor exit temperature; and brief discussion of a noise research roadmap being developed to address the core-noise challenges identified for the N+3 concepts. The N+3 conceptual aircraft have (i) ultra-high bypass ratios, in the rage of 18 - 30, accomplished by either having a small-size, high-power-density core, an hybrid design which allows for an increased fan size, or by utilizing a turboelectric distributed propulsion design; and (ii) very high OPR in the 50 - 70 range. These trends will elevate the overall importance of turbomachinery core noise. The N+3 conceptual designs specify the need for the development and application of advanced liners and passive and active control strategies to reduce the core noise. Current engineering prediction of core noise uses semi-empirical methods based on older turbofan engines, with (at best) updates for more recent designs. The models have not seen the same level of development and maturity as those for fan and jet noise and are grossly inadequate for the designs considered for the N+3 time frame. An aggressive program for the development of updated noise

  17. PWR core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for thorium-uranium breeding recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, G.; Liu, C.; Si, S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper was focused on core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle in current PWRs, without any major change to the fuel lattice and the core internals, but substituting the UOX pellet with Thorium-based pellet. The fuel cycle analysis indicates that Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle is technically feasible in current PWRs. A 4-loop, 193-assembly PWR core utilizing 17 x 17 fuel assemblies (FAs) was taken as the model core. Two mixed cores were investigated respectively loaded with mixed reactor grade Plutonium-Thorium (PuThOX) FAs and mixed reactor grade {sup 233}U-Thorium (U{sub 3}ThOX) FAs on the basis of reference full Uranium oxide (UOX) equilibrium-cycle core. The UOX/PuThOX mixed core consists of 121 UOX FAs and 72 PuThOX FAs. The reactor grade {sup 233}U extracted from burnt PuThOX fuel was used to fabrication of U{sub 3}ThOX for starting Thorium-. Uranium breeding recycle. In UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core, the well designed U{sub 3}ThOX FAs with 1.94 w/o fissile uranium (mainly {sup 233}U) were located on the periphery of core as a blanket region. U{sub 3}ThOX FAs remained in-core for 6 cycles with the discharged burnup achieving 28 GWD/tHM. Compared with initially loading, the fissile material inventory in U{sub 3}ThOX fuel has increased by 7% via 1-year cooling after discharge. 157 UOX fuel assemblies were located in the inner of UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core refueling with 64 FAs at each cycle. The designed UOX/PuThOX and UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core satisfied related nuclear design criteria. The full core performance analyses have shown that mixed core with PuThOX loading has similar impacts as MOX on several neutronic characteristic parameters, such as reduced differential boron worth, higher critical boron concentration, more negative moderator temperature coefficient, reduced control rod worth, reduced shutdown margin, etc.; while mixed core with U{sub 3}ThOX loading on the periphery of core has no

  18. The Design and Performance of IceCube DeepCore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatikos, M.

    2012-01-01

    The IceCube neutrino observatory in operation at the South Pole, Antarctica, comprises three distinct components: a large buried array for ultrahigh energy neutrino detection, a surface air shower array, and a new buried component called DeepCore. DeepCore was designed to lower the IceCube neutrino energy threshold by over an order of magnitude, to energies as low as about 10 GeV. DeepCore is situated primarily 2100 m below the surface of the icecap at the South Pole, at the bottom center of the existing IceCube array, and began taking pbysics data in May 2010. Its location takes advantage of the exceptionally clear ice at those depths and allows it to use the surrounding IceCube detector as a highly efficient active veto against the principal background of downward-going muons produced in cosmic-ray air showers. DeepCore has a module density roughly five times higher than that of the standard IceCube array, and uses photomultiplier tubes with a new photocathode featuring a quantum efficiency about 35% higher than standard IceCube PMTs. Taken together, these features of DeepCore will increase IceCube's sensitivity to neutrinos from WIMP dark matter annihilations, atmospheric neutrino oscillations, galactic supernova neutrinos, and point sources of neutrinos in the northern and southern skies. In this paper we describe the design and initial performance of DeepCore.

  19. Design and Performance of South Ukraine Nuclear Power Plant Mixed Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullayev, A. M.; Baydulin, V.; Zhukov, A. I.; Latorre, Richard

    2011-09-24

    In 2010, 42 Westinghouse fuel assemblies (WFAs) were loaded into the core of South Ukraine Nuclear Power Plant (SUNPP) Unit 3 after four successful cycles with 6 Westinghouse Lead Test Assemblies. The scope of safety substantiating documents required for the regulatory approval of this mixed core was extended considerably, particularly with development and implementation of new methodologies and 3-D kinetic codes. Additional verification for all employed codes was also performed. Despite the inherent hydraulic non-uniformity of a mixed core, it was possible to demonstrate that all design and operating restrictions for three different types of fuel (TVS-M, TVSA and WFA) loaded in the core were conservatively met. This paper provides the main results from the first year of operation of the core loaded with 42 WFAs, the predicted parameters for the transition and equilibrium cycles with WFAs, comparisons of predicted versus measured core parameters, as well as the acceptable margin evaluation results for reactivity accidents using the 3-D kinetic codes. To date WFA design parameters have been confirmed by operation experience.

  20. Verification of JUPITER Standard Analysis Method for Upgrading Joyo MK-III Core Design and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Shigetaka; Ito, Chikara; Sekine, Takashi; Aoyama, Takafumi

    In the experimental fast reactor Joyo, loading of irradiation test rigs causes a decrease in excess reactivity because the rigs contain less fissile materials than the driver fuel. In order to carry out duty operation cycles using as many irradiation rigs as possible, it is necessary to upgrade the core performance to increase its excess reactivity and irradiation capacity. Core modification plans have been considered, such as the installation of advanced radial reflectors and reduction of the number of control rods. To implement such core modifications, it is first necessary to improve the prediction accuracy in core design and to optimize safety margins. In the present study, verification of the JUPITER fast reactor standard analysis method was conducted through a comparison between the calculated and the measured Joyo MK-III core characteristics, and it was concluded that the accuracy for a small sodium-cooled fast reactor with a hard neutron spectrum was within 5 % of unity. It was shown that, the performance of the irradiation bed core could be upgraded by the improvement of the prediction accuracy of the core characteristics and optimization of safety margins.

  1. Designing with advanced composites; Report on the European Core Conference, 1st, Zurich, Switzerland, Oct. 20, 21, 1988, Conference Papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The present conference discusses the development history of sandwich panel construction, production methods and quality assurance for Nomex sandwich panel core papers, the manufacture of honeycomb cores, state-of-the-art design methods for honeycomb-core panels, the Airbus A320 airliner's CFRP rudder structure, and the design tradeoffs encountered in honeycomb-core structures' design. Also discussed are sandwich-construction aircraft cabin interiors meeting new FAA regulations, the use of Nomex honeycomb cores in composite structures, a low-cost manufacturing technique for sandwich structures, and the Starship sandwich panel-incorporating airframe primary structure.

  2. Modeling and design of a reload PWR core for a 48-month fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, M.V.; Driscoll, M.J.; Todreas, N.E.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this research was to use state-of-the-art nuclear and fuel performance packages to evaluate the feasibility and costs of a 48 calendar month core in existing pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs, considering the full range of practical design and economic considerations. The driving force behind this research is the desire to make nuclear power more economically competitive with fossil fuel options by expanding the scope for achievement of higher capacity factors. Using CASMO/SIMULATE, a core design with fuel enriched to 7{sup w}/{sub o} U{sup 235} for a single batch loaded, 48-month fuel cycle has been developed. This core achieves an ultra-long cycle length without exceeding current fuel burnup limits. The design uses two different types of burnable poisons. Gadolinium in the form of gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) mixed with the UO{sub 2} of selected pins is sued to hold down initial reactivity and to control flux peaking throughout the life of the core. A zirconium di-boride (ZrB{sub 2}) integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) coating on the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-UO{sub 2} fuel pellets is added to reduce the critical soluble boron concentration in the reactor coolant to within acceptable limits. Fuel performance issues of concern to this design are also outlined and areas which will require further research are highlighted.

  3. Use of Solid Hydride Fuel for Improved long-Life LWR Core Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E

    2006-04-30

    The primary objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of improving the performance of PWR and BWR cores by using solid hydride fuels instead of the commonly used oxide fuel. The primary measure of performance considered is the bus-bar cost of electricity (COE). Additional performance measures considered are safety, fuel bundle design simplicity – in particular for BWR’s, and plutonium incineration capability. It was found that hydride fuel can safely operate in PWR’s and BWR’s without restricting the linear heat generation rate of these reactors relative to that attainable with oxide fuel. A couple of promising applications of hydride fuel in PWR’s and BWR’s were identified: (1) Eliminating dedicated water moderator volumes in BWR cores thus enabling to significantly increase the cooled fuel rods surface area as well as the coolant flow cross section area in a given volume fuel bundle while significantly reducing the heterogeneity of BWR fuel bundles thus achieving flatter pin-by-pin power distribution. The net result is a possibility to significantly increase the core power density – on the order of 30% and, possibly, more, while greatly simplifying the fuel bundle design. Implementation of the above modifications is, though, not straightforward; it requires a design of completely different control system that could probably be implemented only in newly designed plants. It also requires increasing the coolant pressure drop across the core. (2) Recycling plutonium in PWR’s more effectively than is possible with oxide fuel by virtue of a couple of unique features of hydride fuel – reduced inventory of U-238 and increased inventory of hydrogen. As a result, the hydride fuelled core achieves nearly double the average discharge burnup and the fraction of the loaded Pu it incinerates in one pass is double that of the MOX fuel. The fissile fraction of the Pu in the discharged hydride fuel is only ~2/3 that of the MOX fuel and the

  4. What makes a protein a protein? Hydrophobic core designs that specify stability and structural properties.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, M.; Balasubramanian, S.; Fleming, K. G.; Nagi, A. D.; O'Brien, R.; Sturtevant, J. M.; Regan, L.

    1996-01-01

    Here we describe how the systematic redesign of a protein's hydrophobic core alters its structure and stability. We have repacked the hydrophobic core of the four-helix-bundle protein, Rop, with altered packing patterns and various side chain shapes and sizes. Several designs reproduce the structure and native-like properties of the wild-type, while increasing the thermal stability. Other designs, either with similar sizes but different shapes, or with decreased sizes of the packing residues, destabilize the protein. Finally, overpacking the core with the larger side chains causes a loss of native-like structure. These results allow us to further define the roles of tight residue packing and the burial of hydrophobic surface area in the construction of native-like proteins. PMID:8844848

  5. Narrative Plus: Designing and Implementing the Common Core State Standards with the Gift Essay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler-Olcott, Kelly; Zeleznik, John

    2013-01-01

    The authors of this article describe their inquiry into implementation of the writing-focused Common Core State Standards in a co-taught English 9 class in an urban school. They describe instructional moves designed to increase student success with an assignment called the Gift Essay, with particular focus on planning and other organizational…

  6. An Assessment Program Designed To Improve Communication Instruction through a Competency-Based Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitken, Joan E.; Neer, Michael R.

    This paper provides an example procedure used to design and install a program of assessment to improve communication instruction through a competency-based core curriculum at a mid-sized, urban university. The paper models the various steps in the process, and includes specific tests, forms, memos, course description, sources, and procedures which…

  7. Spring design for use in the core of a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Willard, Jr., H. James

    1993-01-01

    A spring design particularly suitable for use in the core of a nuclear reactor includes one surface having a first material oriented in a longitudinal direction, and another surface having a second material oriented in a transverse direction. The respective surfaces exhibit different amounts of irraditation induced strain.

  8. Designing high frequency ac inductors using ferrite and Molypermalloy Powder Cores (MPP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.; Wagner, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    The major considerations in the design of high frequency ac inductors are reviewed. Two methods for designing the inductor: the area product method and the core geometry method, are presented. The two major effects of the inductor air gap, fringing flux power loss and increase of inductance, are discussed. Equations for the inductor design and a step-by-step design procedure are given. The use of a lumped air gap or a distributed air gap are discussed and a comparison of the losses resulting from these gaps, together with experimental results are presented.

  9. Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qvist, Staffan Alexander

    In light of the scientific evidence for changes in the climate caused by greenhouse-gas emissions from human activities, the world is in ever more desperate need of new, inexhaustible, safe and clean primary energy sources. A viable solution to this problem is the widespread adoption of nuclear breeder reactor technology. Innovative breeder reactor concepts using liquid-metal coolants such as sodium or lead will be able to utilize the waste produced by the current light water reactor fuel cycle to power the entire world for several centuries to come. Breed & burn (B&B) type fast reactor cores can unlock the energy potential of readily available fertile material such as depleted uranium without the need for chemical reprocessing. Using B&B technology, nuclear waste generation, uranium mining needs and proliferation concerns can be greatly reduced, and after a transitional period, enrichment facilities may no longer be needed. In this dissertation, new passively operating safety systems for fast reactors cores are presented. New analysis and optimization methods for B&B core design have been developed, along with a comprehensive computer code that couples neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and structural mechanics and enables a completely automated and optimized fast reactor core design process. In addition, an experiment that expands the knowledge-base of corrosion issues of lead-based coolants in nuclear reactors was designed and built. The motivation behind the work presented in this thesis is to help facilitate the widespread adoption of safe and efficient fast reactor technology.

  10. Fuel and Core Design for Long Operating Cycle Simplified BWR (LSBWR)

    SciTech Connect

    Noriyuki Yoshida; Kouji Hiraiwa; Mikihide Nakamaru; Hideaki Heki

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes an innovative core concept currently being developed for long operating cycle simplified BWR (LSBWR). The LSBWR adopts the long cycle operation (15 years) for the elimination of the fuel pool and the refueling machines and for the capacity usage ratio improvement. To achieve long cycle operation, a combination of enriched gadolinium and 0.7- times sized small bundle with peripheral-positioned gadolinium rod is adopted as a key design concept. A nuclear design for fuel bundle has been determined based on three dimensional nuclear and thermal hydraulic calculation. A core performance has been evaluated based on this bundle design and thermal performance and reactivity characteristics indicated preferable value. (authors)

  11. Effective Domain Partitioning for Multi-Clock Domain IP Core Wrapper Design under Power Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Thomas Edison; Yoneda, Tomokazu; Zhao, Danella; Fujiwara, Hideo

    The rapid advancement of VLSI technology has made it possible for chip designers and manufacturers to embed the components of a whole system onto a single chip, called System-on-Chip or SoC. SoCs make use of pre-designed modules, called IP-cores, which provide faster design time and quicker time-to-market. Furthermore, SoCs that operate at multiple clock domains and very low power requirements are being utilized in the latest communications, networking and signal processing devices. As a result, the testing of SoCs and multi-clock domain embedded cores under power constraints has been rapidly gaining importance. In this research, a novel method for designing power-aware test wrappers for embedded cores with multiple clock domains is presented. By effectively partitioning the various clock domains, we are able to increase the solution space of possible test schedules for the core. Since previous methods were limited to concurrently testing all the clock domains, we effectively remove this limitation by making use of bandwidth conversion, multiple shift frequencies and properly gating the clock signals to control the shift activity of various core logic elements. The combination of the above techniques gains us greater flexibility when determining an optimal test schedule under very tight power constraints. Furthermore, since it is computationally intensive to search the entire expanded solution space for the possible test schedules, we propose a heuristic 3-D bin packing algorithm to determine the optimal wrapper architecture and test schedule while minimizing the test time under power and bandwidth constraints.

  12. Design and testing of coring bits on drilling lunar rock simulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Jiang, Shengyuan; Tang, Dewei; Xu, Bo; Ma, Chao; Zhang, Hui; Qin, Hongwei; Deng, Zongquan

    2017-02-01

    Coring bits are widely utilized in the sampling of celestial bodies, and their drilling behaviors directly affect the sampling results and drilling security. This paper introduces a lunar regolith coring bit (LRCB), which is a key component of sampling tools for lunar rock breaking during the lunar soil sampling process. We establish the interaction model between the drill bit and rock at a small cutting depth, and the two main influential parameters (forward and outward rake angles) of LRCB on drilling loads are determined. We perform the parameter screening task of LRCB with the aim to minimize the weight on bit (WOB). We verify the drilling load performances of LRCB after optimization, and the higher penetrations per revolution (PPR) are, the larger drilling loads we gained. Besides, we perform lunar soil drilling simulations to estimate the efficiency on chip conveying and sample coring of LRCB. The results of the simulation and test are basically consistent on coring efficiency, and the chip removal efficiency of LRCB is slightly lower than HIT-H bit from simulation. This work proposes a method for the design of coring bits in subsequent extraterrestrial explorations.

  13. Design and optimization of 32-core rod/trench assisted square-lattice structured single-mode multi-core fiber.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xueqin; Tu, Jiajing; Zhou, Xian; Long, Keping; Saitoh, Kunimasa

    2017-03-06

    We propose and design a kind of heterogeneous rod-assisted and trench-assisted multi-core fiber (Hetero-RA-TA-MCF) with 32 cores arranged in square-lattice structure (SLS), and then we introduce the design method for Hetero-RA-TA-MCF. Simulation results show that the Hetero-RA-TA-32-Core-Fiber achieves average effective area (Aeff) of about 74 μm2, low crosstalk (XT) of about -31 dB/100km, threshold value of bending radius (Rpk) of 7.0 cm, relative core multiplicity factor (RCMF) of 8.74, and cable cutoff wavelength (λcc) of less than 1.53 μm.

  14. Insert Design and Manufacturing for Foam-Core Composite Sandwich Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lares, Alan

    Sandwich structures have been used in the aerospace industry for many years. The high strength to weight ratios that are possible with sandwich constructions makes them desirable for airframe applications. While sandwich structures are effective at handling distributed loads such as aerodynamic forces, they are prone to damage from concentrated loads at joints or due to impact. This is due to the relatively thin face-sheets and soft core materials typically found in sandwich structures. Carleton University's Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Project Team has designed and manufactured a UAV (GeoSury II Prototype) which features an all composite sandwich structure fuselage structure. The purpose of the aircraft is to conduct geomagnetic surveys. The GeoSury II Prototype serves as the test bed for many areas of research in advancing UAV technologies. Those areas of research include: low cost composite materials manufacturing, geomagnetic data acquisition, obstacle detection, autonomous operations and magnetic signature control. In this thesis work a methodology for designing and manufacturing inserts for foam-core sandwich structures was developed. The results of this research work enables a designer wishing to design a foam-core sandwich airframe structure, a means of quickly manufacturing optimized inserts for the safe introduction of discrete loads into the airframe. The previous GeoSury II Prototype insert designs (v.1 & v.2) were performance tested to establish a benchmark with which to compare future insert designs. Several designs and materials were considered for the new v.3 inserts. A plug and sleeve design was selected, due to its ability to effectively transfer the required loads to the sandwich structure. The insert material was chosen to be epoxy, reinforced with chopped carbon fibre. This material was chosen for its combination of strength, low mass and also compatibility with the face-sheet material. The v.3 insert assembly is 60% lighter than the

  15. Advanced Core Design And Fuel Management For Pebble-Bed Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; William K. Terry

    2004-10-01

    A method for designing and optimizing recirculating pebble-bed reactor cores is presented. At the heart of the method is a new reactor physics computer code, PEBBED, which accurately and efficiently computes the neutronic and material properties of the asymptotic (equilibrium) fuel cycle. This core state is shown to be unique for a given core geometry, power level, discharge burnup, and fuel circulation policy. Fuel circulation in the pebble-bed can be described in terms of a few well?defined parameters and expressed as a recirculation matrix. The implementation of a few heat?transfer relations suitable for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors allows for the rapid estimation of thermal properties critical for safe operation. Thus, modeling and design optimization of a given pebble-bed core can be performed quickly and efficiently via the manipulation of a limited number key parameters. Automation of the optimization process is achieved by manipulation of these parameters using a genetic algorithm. The end result is an economical, passively safe, proliferation-resistant nuclear power plant.

  16. Design and optimization of 3-mode×12-core dual-ring structured few-mode multi-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jiajing; Long, Keping; Saitoh, Kunimasa

    2016-12-01

    We adopt dual-ring structure (DRS) for the core arrangement of 3-mode (LP01, LP11a and LP11b)×12-core few-mode multi-core fiber (FM-MCF) and then introduce the design method for this DRS-FM-MCF. After investigating the characteristics such as differential mode delay (DMD), inter-core crosstalk (XT), threshold value of bending radius (Rpk), relative core multiplicity factor (RCMF) and cable cutoff wavelength (λcc), we present an optimized scheme for this DRS-FM-MCF. For the optimized DRS-FM-MCF, | DMD | is ≤ 100 ps / km over C+L band, the maximum XT at wavelength (λ) of 1625 nm achieves -33 dB/100 km, maximum Rpk is 11.03 cm, RCMF (LP01, LP11a and LP11b) reaches 25.49 and maximum λcc is ≤ 1530 nm. Compared with one-ring structure (ORS), DRS has much more space to enlarge core pitch (Λ) so that lower XT can be achieved. Furthermore, DRS has less confinement degree on mode than square-lattice structure (SLS) if Λ and cladding diameter (Dcl) are set at similar values. It means that it is easier for DRS to make sure λcc would not be larger than the lower limit of C+L bands. In this paper, DRS is proved as a suitable core arrangement for 3-mode×12-core FM-MCF.

  17. Advanced neutron source reactor conceptual safety analysis report, three-element-core design: Chapter 15, accident analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.C.J.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L.; Harrington, R.M.

    1996-02-01

    In order to utilize reduced enrichment fuel, the three-element-core design for the Advanced Neutron Source has been proposed. The proposed core configuration consists of inner, middle, and outer elements, with the middle element offset axially beneath the inner and outer elements, which are axially aligned. The three-element-core RELAP5 model assumes that the reactor hardware is changed only within the core region, so that the loop piping, heat exchangers, and pumps remain as assumed for the two-element-core configuration. To assess the impact of changes in the core region configuration and the thermal-hydraulic steady-state conditions, the safety analysis has been updated. This report gives the safety margins for the loss-of-off-site power and pressure-boundary fault accidents based on the RELAP5 results. AU margins are greater for the three-element-core simulations than those calculated for the two-element core.

  18. Design and analysis of large-core single-mode windmill single crystal sapphire optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yujie; Hill, Cary; Liu, Bo; Yu, Zhihao; Xuan, Haifeng; Homa, Daniel; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary

    2016-06-01

    We present a large-core single-mode “windmill” single crystal sapphire optical fiber (SCSF) design, which exhibits single-mode operation by stripping off the higher-order modes (HOMs) while maintaining the fundamental mode. The “windmill” SCSF design was analyzed using the finite element analysis method, in which all the HOMs are leaky. The numerical simulation results show single-mode operation in the spectral range from 0.4 to 2 μm in the windmill SCSF, with an effective core diameter as large as 14 μm. Such fiber is expected to improve the performance of many of the current sapphire fiber optic sensor structures.

  19. Preliminary design report for SCDAP/RELAP5 lower core plate model

    SciTech Connect

    Coryell, E.W.; Griffin, F.P.

    1998-07-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code is a best-estimate analysis tool for performing nuclear reactor severe accident simulations. Under primary sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is responsible for overall maintenance of this code and for improvements for pressurized water reactor (PWR) applications. Since 1991, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been improving SCDAP/RELAP5 for boiling water reactor (BWR) applications. The RELAP5 portion of the code performs the thermal-hydraulic calculations for both normal and severe accident conditions. The structures within the reactor vessel and coolant system can be represented with either RELAP5 heat structures or SCDAP/RELAP5 severe accident structures. The RELAP5 heat structures are limited to normal operating conditions (i.e., no structural oxidation, melting, or relocation), while the SCDAP portion of the code is capable of representing structural degradation and core damage progression that can occur under severe accident conditions. DCDAP/RELAP5 currently assumes that molten material which leaves the core region falls into the lower vessel head without interaction with structural materials. The objective of this design report is to describe the modifications required for SCDAP/RELAP5 to treat the thermal response of the structures in the core plate region as molten material relocates downward from the core, through the core plate region, and into the lower plenum. This has been a joint task between INEEL and ORNL, with INEEL focusing on PWR-specific design, and ORNL focusing upon the BWR-specific aspects. Chapter 2 describes the structures in the core plate region that must be represented by the proposed model. Chapter 3 presents the available information about the damage progression that is anticipated to occur in the core plate region during a severe accident, including typical SCDAP/RELAP5 simulation results. Chapter 4 provides a

  20. Energy Efficient Engine integrated core/low spool design and performance report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, E. Marshall

    1985-01-01

    The Energy Efficient Engine (E3) is a NASA program to create fuel saving technology for future transport aircraft engines. The E3 technology advancements were demonstrated to operate reliably and achieve goal performance in tests of the Integrated Core/Low Spool vehicle. The first build of this undeveloped technology research engine set a record for low fuel consumption. Its design and detailed test results are herein presented.

  1. Design, synthesis and photochemical properties of the first examples of iminosugar clusters based on fluorescent cores

    PubMed Central

    Lepage, Mathieu L; Mirloup, Antoine; Ripoll, Manon; Stauffert, Fabien; Bodlenner, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Summary The synthesis and photophysical properties of the first examples of iminosugar clusters based on a BODIPY or a pyrene core are reported. The tri- and tetravalent systems designed as molecular probes and synthesized by way of Cu(I)-catalysed azide–alkyne cycloadditions are fluorescent analogues of potent pharmacological chaperones/correctors recently reported in the field of Gaucher disease and cystic fibrosis, two rare genetic diseases caused by protein misfolding. PMID:26124868

  2. System Design for a Nuclear Electric Spacecraft Utilizing Out-of-core Thermionic Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, W. C.; Phillips, W. M.; Hsieh, T.

    1976-01-01

    Basic guidelines are presented for a nuclear space power system which utilizes heat pipes to transport thermal power from a fast nuclear reactor to an out of core thermionic converter array. Design parameters are discussed for the nuclear reactor, heat pipes, thermionic converters, shields (neutron and gamma), waste heat rejection systems, and the electrical bus bar-cable system required to transport the high current/low voltage power to the processing equipment. Dimensions are compatible with shuttle payload bay constraints.

  3. Evaluation for 4S core nuclear design method through integration of benchmark data

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, A.; Tsuboi, Y.; Moriki, Y.; Kawashima, M.

    2012-07-01

    The 4S is a sodium-cooled small fast reactor which is reflector-controlled for operation through core lifetime about 30 years. The nuclear design method has been selected to treat neutron leakage with high accuracy. It consists of a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, discrete ordinate transport codes and JENDL-3.3. These two types of neutronic analysis codes are used for the design in a complementary manner. The accuracy of the codes has been evaluated by analysis of benchmark critical experiments and the experimental reactor data. The measured data used for the evaluation is critical experimental data of the FCA XXIII as a physics mockup assembly of the 4S core, FCA XVI, FCA XIX, ZPR, and data of experimental reactor JOYO MK-1. Evaluated characteristics are criticality, reflector reactivity worth, power distribution, absorber reactivity worth, and sodium void worth. A multi-component bias method was applied, especially to improve the accuracy of sodium void reactivity worth. As the result, it has been confirmed that the 4S core nuclear design method provides good accuracy, and typical bias factors and their uncertainties are determined. (authors)

  4. Design manufacture and test of a cryo-stable Offner relay using aluminum foam core optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, Ryan S.; Content, David A.

    2001-12-01

    Aluminum foam core optics have the desirable characteristics of being lightweight, cryo-stable, and low cost. The availability of high quality aluminum foam and a bare aluminum super-polishing process have allowed high performance foam core optics made entirely of aluminum to be produced. Mirrors with integral mounts were designed for minimum surface error induced by self-weight deflection, thermal gradients, and mounting stresses. The design of the optics was extensively optimized using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and Geometric Element Analysis (GEA) to determine the effects of design parameters on mirror performance under the anticipated operating environments. A unique manufacturing process was developed to accommodate the aluminum brazing process used to install the aluminum foam while maintaining dimensional stability. Aluminum foam core optics have the additional advantage of being fabricated from a common aerospace structural material. An Offner relay using all aluminum optics and structure will be manufactured and tested with the goal of demonstrating that an all aluminum optical system can be aligned at room temperature and maintain alignment at cryogenic temperatures due to near zero CTE mismatch between all system components. If successful, an all aluminum Offner relay has potential uses for NGST, specifically in the testing of micro-mirror arrays.

  5. Lunar in-core thermionic nuclear reactor power system conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Gallup, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual design of a lunar in-core thermionic reactor power system. The concept consists of a thermionic reactor located in a lunar excavation with surface mounted waste heat radiators. The system was integrated with a proposed lunar base concept representative of recent NASA Space Exploration Initiative studies. The reference mission is a permanently-inhabited lunar base requiring a 550 kWe, 7 year life central power station. Performance parameters and assumptions were based on the Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) Verification Program. Five design cases were analyzed ranging from conservative to advanced. The cases were selected to provide sensitivity effects on the achievement of TFE program goals.

  6. Lunar in-core thermionic nuclear reactor power system conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, L.S. ); Schmitz, P.C. ); Gallup, D.R. )

    1991-01-05

    This paper presents a conceptual design of a lunar in-core thermionic reactor power system. The concept consists of a thermionic reactor located in a lunar excavation with surface mounted waste heat radiators. The system was integrated with a proposed lunar base concept representative of recent NASA Space Explortion Initiative studies. The reference mission is a permanently-inhabited lunar base requiring a 550 kWe, 7 year life central power station. Performance parameters and assumptions were based on the Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) Verification Program. Five design cases were analyzed ranging from conservative to advanced. The cases were selected to provide sensitivity effects on the achievement of TFE program goals.

  7. Design and performance of a pulse transformer based on Fe-based nanocrystalline core.

    PubMed

    Yi, Liu; Xibo, Feng; Lin, Fuchang

    2011-08-01

    A dry-type pulse transformer based on Fe-based nanocrystalline core with a load of 0.88 nF, output voltage of more than 65 kV, and winding ratio of 46 is designed and constructed. The dynamic characteristics of Fe-based nanocrystalline core under the impulse with the pulse width of several microseconds were studied. The pulse width and incremental flux density have an important effect on the pulse permeability, so the pulse permeability is measured under a certain pulse width and incremental flux density. The minimal volume of the toroidal pulse transformer core is determined by the coupling coefficient, the capacitors of the resonant charging circuit, incremental flux density, and pulse permeability. The factors of the charging time, ratio, and energy transmission efficiency in the resonant charging circuit based on magnetic core-type pulse transformer are analyzed. Experimental results of the pulse transformer are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation. When the primary capacitor is 3.17 μF and charge voltage is 1.8 kV, a voltage across the secondary capacitor of 0.88 nF with peak value of 68.5 kV, rise time (10%-90%) of 1.80 μs is obtained.

  8. General strategy for designing core-shell nanostructured materials for high-power lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Shen, Laifa; Li, Hongsen; Uchaker, Evan; Zhang, Xiaogang; Cao, Guozhong

    2012-11-14

    Because of its extreme safety and outstanding cycle life, Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) has been regarded as one of the most promising anode materials for next-generation high-power lithium-ion batteries. Nevertheless, Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) suffers from poor electronic conductivity. Here, we develop a novel strategy for the fabrication of Li(4)Ti(5)O(12)/carbon core-shell electrodes using metal oxyacetyl acetonate as titania and single-source carbon. Importantly, this novel approach is simple and general, with which we have successfully produce nanosized particles of an olivine-type LiMPO(4) (M = Fe, Mn, and Co) core with a uniform carbon shell, one of the leading cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Metal acetylacetonates first decompose with carbon coating the particles, which is followed by a solid state reaction in the limited reaction area inside the carbon shell to produce the LTO/C (LMPO(4)/C) core-shell nanostructure. The optimum design of the core-shell nanostructures permits fast kinetics for both transported Li(+) ions and electrons, enabling high-power performance.

  9. Design and operation of the core topography data acquisition system for TMI-2

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, L S; Brown, H L

    1984-05-01

    Development of effective procedures for recovery from the 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island 2 nuclear station requires a detailed and quantitative description of the postaccident configuration of the core. This report describes the techniques, equipment, and procedures used for making precise ultrasonic, sonar-like measurements of the cavity left in the upper core region as a result of the accident and details the primary results of the measurements. The system developed for the measurements uses computer techniques for the command and control of remote mechanical and electronic equipment, and for data acquisition and reduction. The system was designed, fabricated, and tested; procedures developed; and personnel trained in 4-1/2 months. The primary results are detailed topographic maps of the cavity. A variety of visual aids was developed to supplement the maps and aid in interpreting companion videotape surveys. The measurements reveal a cavity of 9.3 m/sup 3/, approximately 26% of the total core volume. The cavity occupies most of the full diameter of the core to an average depth of about 1.5 m and approaches 2 m in places.

  10. Helmholtz design for noise transmission attenuation on a chamber core composite cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deyu; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    2002-11-01

    This work explores the feasibility of using Helmholtz resonators to attenuate a subscale ChamberCore cylinder noise transmission. The ChamberCore cylindrical composite is an innovative new sandwich-type structure. It consists of an outer skin, an inner skin, and linking ribs. There are wedge-cross-section chambers along the axis direction between the outer and inner skins. These chambers provide a potential for the acoustic Helmholtz resonator design in order to reduce the noise transmission, which is dominated by the internal acoustic cavity. In this experimental work, the sound transmission behavior of the ChamberCore fairing is investigated and divided into four interesting frequency regions: the stiffness-controlled zone, cavity resonance-controlled zone, coincidence-controlled zone, and mass-controlled zone. It is found that the noise transmission in the low-frequency band is controlled by the structural stiffness and cavity resonances, where the acoustic Helmholtz design method has the potential to improve the noise transmission.

  11. Low-Enriched Fuel Design Concept for the Prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, James W

    2007-05-01

    A new non-TRISO fuel and clad design concept is proposed for the prismatic, heliumcooled Very High Temperature Reactor core. The new concept could substantially reduce the current 10-20 wt% TRISO uranium enrichments down to 4-6 wt% for both initial and reload cores. The proposed fuel form would be a high-temperature, high-density uranium ceramic, for example UO2, configured into very small diameter cylindrical rods. The small diameter fuel rods significantly increase core reactivity through improved neutron moderation and fuel lumping. Although a high-temperature clad system for the concept remains to be developed, recent success in tube fabrication and preliminary irradiation testing of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding for light water reactor applications offers good potential for this application, and for future development of other carbide clad designs. A high-temperature ceramic fuel, together with a high-temperature clad material, could also lead to higher thermal safety margins during both normal and transient reactor conditions relative to TRISO fuel. The calculated neutronic results show that the lowenrichment, small diameter fuel rods and low thermal neutron absorbing clad retain the strong negative Doppler fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity that ensures inherent safe operation of the VHTR, and depletion studies demonstrate that an 18-month power cycle can be achieved with the lower enrichment fuel.

  12. Design of a boiling water reactor equilibrium core using thorium-uranium fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, J-L.; Nunez-Carrera, A.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Martin-del-Campo, C.

    2004-10-06

    In this paper the design of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using thorium is presented; a heterogeneous blanket-seed core arrangement concept was adopted. The design was developed in three steps: in the first step two different assemblies were designed based on the integrated blanket-seed concept, they are the blanket-dummy assembly and the blanket-seed assembly. The integrated blanketseed concept comes from the fact that the blanket and the seed rods are located in the same assembly, and are burned-out in a once-through cycle. In the second step, a core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of 365 effective full power days in a standard BWR with a reload of 104 fuel assemblies designed with an average 235U enrichment of 7.5 w/o in the seed sub-lattice. The main operating parameters, like power, linear heat generation rate and void distributions were obtained as well as the shutdown margin. It was observed that the analyzed parameters behave like those obtained in a standard BWR. The shutdown margin design criterion was fulfilled by addition of a burnable poison region in the assembly. In the third step an in-house code was developed to evaluate the thorium equilibrium core under transient conditions. A stability analysis was also performed. Regarding the stability analysis, five operational states were analyzed; four of them define the traditional instability region corner of the power-flow map and the fifth one is the operational state for the full power condition. The frequency and the boiling length were calculated for each operational state. The frequency of the analyzed operational states was similar to that reported for BWRs; these are close to the unstable region that occurs due to the density wave oscillation phenomena in some nuclear power plants. Four transient analyses were also performed: manual SCRAM, recirculation pumps trip, main steam isolation valves closure and loss of feed water. The results of these transients are

  13. Dosimetric comparison of four new design {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy sources: Optimal design using silver and copper rod cores

    SciTech Connect

    Hosseini, S. Hamed; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Ataeinia, Vahideh

    2009-07-15

    Four new brachytherapy sources, IRA1-{sup 103}Pd, IRA2-{sup 103}Pd, IRA3-{sup 103}Pd, and IRA4-{sup 103}Pd, have been developed at Agricultural, Medical, and Industrial Research School and are designed for permanent implant application. With the goal of determining an optimal design for a {sup 103}Pd source, this article compares the dosimetric properties of these sources with reference to the authors' earlier IRA-{sup 103}Pd source. The four new sources differ in end cap configuration and thickness and in the core material, silver or copper, that carries the adsorbed {sup 103}Pd. Dosimetric data derived from the authors' Monte Carlo simulation results are reported in accordance with the updated AAPM Task Group No. 43 report (TG-43U1). For each source, the authors obtained detailed results for the dose rate constant {Lambda}, the radial dose function g(r), the anisotropy function F(r,{theta}), and the anisotropy factor {phi}{sub an}(r). In this study, the optimal source IRA3-{sup 103}Pd provides the most isotropic dose distribution in water with the dose rate constant of 0.678({+-}0.1%) cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}. The IRA3-{sup 103}Pd design has a silver rod core combined with thin-wall, concave end caps. Finally, the authors compared the results for their optimal source with published results for those of other source manufacturers.

  14. ACT-CCREC Core Research Program: Study Questions and Design. ACT Working Paper Series. WP-2015-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruce, Ty M.

    2015-01-01

    This report provides a non-technical overview of the guiding research questions and research design for the ACT-led core research program conducted on behalf of the GEAR UP College and Career Readiness Evaluation Consortium (CCREC). The core research program is a longitudinal study of the effectiveness of 14 GEAR UP state grants on the academic…

  15. Analysis of Advanced Fuel Assemblies and Core Designs for the Current and Next Generations of LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Ragusa, Jean; Vierow, Karen

    2011-09-01

    The objective of the project is to design and analyze advanced fuel assemblies for use in current and future light water reactors and to assess their ability to reduce the inventory of transuranic elements, while preserving operational safety. The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel can delay or avoid the need for a second geological repository in the US. Current light water reactor fuel assembly designs under investigation could reduce the plutonium inventory of reprocessed fuel. Nevertheless, these designs are not effective in stabilizing or reducing the inventory of minor actinides. In the course of this project, we developed and analyzed advanced fuel assembly designs with improved thermal transmutation capability regarding transuranic elements and especially minor actinides. These designs will be intended for use in thermal spectrum (e.g., current and future fleet of light water reactors in the US). We investigated various fuel types, namely high burn-up advanced mixed oxides and inert matrix fuels, in various geometrical designs that are compliant with the core internals of current and future light water reactors. Neutronic/thermal hydraulic effects were included. Transmutation efficiency and safety parameters were used to rank and down-select the various designs.

  16. Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. Appendix A: Designing High School Mathematics Courses Based on the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for Mathematics are organized by grade level in Grades K-8. At the high school level, the standards are organized by conceptual category (number and quantity, algebra, functions, geometry, modeling and probability and statistics), showing the body of knowledge students should learn in each category to be…

  17. Preliminary core design studies for the advanced burner reactor over a wide range of conversion ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E. A.; Yang, W. S.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-05-05

    A consistent set of designs for 1000 MWt commercial-scale sodium-cooled Advance Burner Reactors (ABR) have been developed for both metal and oxide-fueled cores with conversion ratios from breakeven (CR=1.0) to fertile-free (CR=0.0). These designs are expected to satisfy thermal and irradiation damage limits based on the currently available data. The very low conversion ratio designs require fuel that is beyond the current fuel database, which is anticipated to be qualified by and for the Advanced Burned Test Reactor. Safety and kinetic parameters were calculated, but a safety analysis was not performed. Development of these designs was required to achieve the primary goal of this study, which was to generate representative fuel cycle mass flows for system studies of ABRs as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). There are slight variations with conversion ratio but the basic ABR configuration consists of 144 fuel assemblies and between 9 and 22 primary control assemblies for both the metal and oxide-fueled cores. Preliminary design studies indicated that it is feasible to design the ABR to accommodate a wide range of conversion ratio by employing different assembly designs and including sufficient control assemblies to accommodate the large reactivity swing at low conversion ratios. The assemblies are designed to fit within the same geometry, but the size and number of fuel pins within each assembly are significantly different in order to achieve the target conversion ratio while still satisfying thermal limits. Current irradiation experience would allow for a conversion ratio of somewhat below 0.75. The fuel qualification for the first ABR should expand this experience to allow for much lower conversion ratios and higher bunrups. The current designs were based on assumptions about the performance of high and very high enrichment fuel, which results in significant uncertainty about the details of the designs. However, the basic fuel cycle performance

  18. CORE ANALYSIS, DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION OF A DEEP-BURN PEBBLE BED REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-05-01

    Achieving a high burnup in the Deep-Burn pebble bed reactor design, while remaining within the limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback, is challenging. The high content of Pu and Minor Actinides in the Deep-Burn fuel significantly impacts the thermal neutron energy spectrum. This can result in power and temperature peaking in the pebble bed core in locally thermalized regions near the graphite reflectors. Furthermore, the interplay of the Pu resonances of the neutron absorption cross sections at low-lying energies can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator at certain operating conditions. To investigate the aforementioned effects a code system using existing codes has been developed for neutronic, thermal-hydraulic and fuel depletion analysis of Deep-Burn pebble bed reactors. A core analysis of a Deep-Burn Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (400 MWth) design has been performed for two Deep-Burn fuel types and possible improvements of the design with regard to power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback are identified.

  19. Design of a Resistively Heated Thermal Hydraulic Simulator for Nuclear Rocket Reactor Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Wang, Ten-See; Anghaie, Samim

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary design study is presented for a non-nuclear test facility which uses ohmic heating to replicate the thermal hydraulic characteristics of solid core nuclear reactor fuel element passages. The basis for this testing capability is a recently commissioned nuclear thermal rocket environments simulator, which uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects. Initially, the baseline test fixture for this non-nuclear environments simulator was configured for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of small cylindrical material specimens as a low cost means of evaluating material compatibility. It became evident, however, that additional functionality enhancements were needed to permit a critical examination of thermal hydraulic effects in fuel element passages. Thus, a design configuration was conceived whereby a short tubular material specimen, representing a fuel element passage segment, is surrounded by a backside resistive tungsten heater element and mounted within a self-contained module that inserts directly into the baseline test fixture assembly. With this configuration, it becomes possible to create an inward directed radial thermal gradient within the tubular material specimen such that the wall-to-gas heat flux characteristics of a typical fuel element passage are effectively simulated. The results of a preliminary engineering study for this innovative concept are fully summarized, including high-fidelity multi-physics thermal hydraulic simulations and detailed design features.

  20. Design of a Vector-Vorticity Dynamical Core on a Hexagonal Grid (Hex-VVDC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konor, C. S.; Heikes, R. P.; Jung, J.; Randall, D.; Arakawa, A.

    2009-05-01

    We are developing a Global Cloud-Resolving Model (GCRM) based on the vector-vorticity dynamical core (VVDC) that predicts three-dimensional vorticity. The VVDC in an anelastic framework has been originally designed by Jung and Arakawa and used in a Cartesian grid. As the first step in developing the GCRM, we have constructed an intermediate model with the VVDC using a hexagonal grid on a planar quasi-rectangular horizontal domain, which we call the hexagonal VVDC (Hex-VVDC). The purpose of developing the Hex-VVDC is to test and verify the discretization of equations of the VVDC on a hexagonal grid before applying them to the geodesic hexagon/pentagon grid that will be used for the GCRM. It is found that having twice as many as cell walls and three times as many as cell corners than the cell centers in a hexagonal grid produces a computational mode in horizontal and vertical components of vorticity and horizontal velocity fields, which the dynamics cannot control. We have designed a special scheme to treat this computational mode. With this treatment, the Hex-VVDC seems to work well. Currently, we are performing further tests with the Hex-VVDC and also continuing the application of the dynamical core to the geodesic hexagon/pentagon grid. In this presentation, we will discuss the computational design of the Hex-VVDC and show simulated results primarily focusing on vertical transports of vorticity and momentum by convection.

  1. Efficient Design and Analysis of Lightweight Reinforced Core Sandwich and PRSEUS Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Lucking, Ryan C.; Collier, Craig S.; Ainsworth, James J.; Toubia, Elias A.

    2012-01-01

    Design, analysis, and sizing methods for two novel structural panel concepts have been developed and incorporated into the HyperSizer Structural Sizing Software. Reinforced Core Sandwich (RCS) panels consist of a foam core with reinforcing composite webs connecting composite facesheets. Boeing s Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) panels use a pultruded unidirectional composite rod to provide axial stiffness along with integrated transverse frames and stitching. Both of these structural concepts are ovencured and have shown great promise applications in lightweight structures, but have suffered from the lack of efficient sizing capabilities similar to those that exist for honeycomb sandwich, foam sandwich, hat stiffened, and other, more traditional concepts. Now, with accurate design methods for RCS and PRSEUS panels available in HyperSizer, these concepts can be traded and used in designs as is done with the more traditional structural concepts. The methods developed to enable sizing of RCS and PRSEUS are outlined, as are results showing the validity and utility of the methods. Applications include several large NASA heavy lift launch vehicle structures.

  2. Fuel performance models for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core design

    SciTech Connect

    Stansfield, O.M.; Simon, W.A.; Baxter, A.M.

    1983-09-01

    Mechanistic fuel performance models are used in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core design and licensing to predict failure and fission product release. Fuel particles manufactured with defective or missing SiC, IPyC, or fuel dispersion in the buffer fail at a level of less than 5 x 10/sup -4/ fraction. These failed particles primarily release metallic fission products because the OPyC remains intact on 90% of the particles and retains gaseous isotopes. The predicted failure of particles using performance models appears to be conservative relative to operating reactor experience.

  3. An intrinsically safe facility for forefront research and training on nuclear technologies — Core design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viberti, C. M.; Ricco, G.

    2014-04-01

    The core of a subcritical, low-power research reactor in a lead matrix has been designed using the MCNPX code. The main parameters, like geometry, material composition in the fuel assembly and reflector size, have been optimized for a k eff ˜ 0.95 and a thermal power around 200 Kw. A 70 Mev, 1 mA proton beam incident on a beryllium target has been assumed as neutron source and the corresponding thermal power distribution and neutron fluxes in the reactor have been simulated.

  4. Calculation of Design Parameters for an Equilibrium LEU Core in the NBSR

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

    2011-09-30

    A plan is being developed for the conversion of the NIST research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Previously, the design of the LEU fuel had been determined in order to provide the users of the NBSR with the same cycle length as exists for the current HEU fueled reactor. The fuel composition at different points within an equilibrium fuel cycle had also been determined. In the present study, neutronics parameters have been calculated for these times in the fuel cycle for both the existing HEU and the proposed LEU equilibrium cores. The results showed differences between the HEU and LEU cores that would not lead to any significant changes in the safety analysis for the converted core. In general the changes were reasonable except that the figure-of-merit for neutrons that can be used by experimentalists shows there will be a 10% reduction in performance. The calculations included kinetics parameters, reactivity coefficients, reactivity worths of control elements and abnormal configurations, and power distributions.

  5. A single aromatic core mutation converts a designed "primitive" protein from halophile to mesophile folding.

    PubMed

    Longo, Liam M; Tenorio, Connie A; Kumru, Ozan S; Middaugh, C Russell; Blaber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The halophile environment has a number of compelling aspects with regard to the origin of structured polypeptides (i.e., proteogenesis) and, instead of a curious niche that living systems adapted into, the halophile environment is emerging as a candidate "cradle" for proteogenesis. In this viewpoint, a subsequent halophile-to-mesophile transition was a key step in early evolution. Several lines of evidence indicate that aromatic amino acids were a late addition to the codon table and not part of the original "prebiotic" set comprising the earliest polypeptides. We test the hypothesis that the availability of aromatic amino acids could facilitate a halophile-to-mesophile transition by hydrophobic core-packing enhancement. The effects of aromatic amino acid substitutions were evaluated in the core of a "primitive" designed protein enriched for the 10 prebiotic amino acids (A,D,E,G,I,L,P,S,T,V)-having an exclusively prebiotic core and requiring halophilic conditions for folding. The results indicate that a single aromatic amino acid substitution is capable of eliminating the requirement of halophile conditions for folding of a "primitive" polypeptide. Thus, the availability of aromatic amino acids could have facilitated a critical halophile-to-mesophile protein folding adaptation-identifying a selective advantage for the incorporation of aromatic amino acids into the codon table.

  6. Gigawatt, Closed Cycle, Vapor Core-Mhd Space Power System Conceptual Design Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Rhee, Hyop S.; Koester, J. Kent; Goodman, Julius; Maya, Issac

    1988-04-01

    A conceptual design study for a closed cycle gigawatt electric space power system has been conducted. The closed cycle static operation reduces power system interaction effects upon the space craft. This system utilizes a very high temperature (5500 K) plasma core reactor and a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power conversion subsystem to provide a power density of about 8 kWe/kg (0.13 kg/kWe) for several kilo-seconds. Uranium vapor is the fuel. Candidate working fluids are metal vapors such as lithium or calcium. The system is based on a Rankine cycle to minimize the electromagnetic pumping power requirement. The fission fragment induced nonequilibrium ionization in the plasma in the MHD power duct provides the plasma electric conductivity for gigawatt power generation. Waste heat is rejected utilizing lithium heat pipes at temperatures just below 2000 K, thus minimizing the radiator area requirement. Key technology issues are identified, including the containment of the 5500 K 'sun-liken plasma at 4 to 0 MPa In a reflector moderated, gas/vapor filled cavity core reactor. A promising scheme to protect the refractory metal reactor inner wall is presented, together with a heating load analysis in the wall. This scheme utilizes an ablating film of liquid lithium/calcium that evaporates into the cavity core to become the working fluid of the cycle.

  7. Impact of a Core Ferrule Design on Fracture Resistance of Teeth Restored with Cast Post and Core

    PubMed Central

    Chaaban, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the influence of a contra bevel on the fracture resistance of teeth restored with cast post and core. Materials and Methods. Sixty plastic analogues of an upper incisor were endodontically treated and prepared with 6° internal taper and 2 mm of ferrule in order to receive a cast post and core. The prepared samples were divided into two groups (n = 30); the first group serves as control while the second group was prepared with an external 30° bevel on the buccal and lingual walls. All samples crowned were exposed to a compressive load at 130° to their long axis until fractures occurred. Fracture resistance loads were recorded and failure modes were also observed. Mann-Whitney test was carried out to compare the two groups. Results. Mean failure loads for the groups were, respectively, 1038.69 N (SD ±243.52 N) and 1078.89 N (SD ±352.21 N). Statistically, there was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.7675 > 0.05). Conclusion. In the presence of a ferrule and a crown in the anterior teeth, adding a secondary ferrule to the cast post and core will not increase the resistance to fracture. PMID:27419202

  8. Active learning: effects of core training design elements on self-regulatory processes, learning, and adaptability.

    PubMed

    Bell, Bradford S; Kozlowski, Steve W J

    2008-03-01

    This article describes a comprehensive examination of the cognitive, motivational, and emotional processes underlying active learning approaches; their effects on learning and transfer; and the core training design elements (exploration, training frame, emotion control) and individual differences (cognitive ability, trait goal orientation, trait anxiety) that shape these processes. Participants (N = 350) were trained to operate a complex, computer-based simulation. Exploratory learning and error-encouragement framing had a positive effect on adaptive transfer performance and interacted with cognitive ability and dispositional goal orientation to influence trainees' metacognition and state goal orientation. Trainees who received the emotion-control strategy had lower levels of state anxiety. Implications for development of an integrated theory of active learning, learner-centered design, and research extensions are discussed.

  9. Weapons-Grade Plutonium-Thorium PWR Assembly Design and Core Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dziadosz, David; Ake, Timothy N.; Saglam, Mehmet; Sapyta, Joe J.

    2004-07-15

    A light water reactor (LWR) fuel assembly design consisting of a blend of weapons-grade plutonium and natural thorium oxides was examined. The design meets current thermal-hydraulic and safety criteria. Such an assembly would have enough reactivity to achieve three cycles of operation. The pin power distribution indicates a fairly level distribution across the assembly, avoiding hot spots near guide tubes, corners, and other sections where excessive power would create significant loss to thermal-hydraulic margins.This work examined a number of physics and core safety analysis parameters that impact the operation and safety of power reactors. Such parameters as moderator coefficients of reactivity, Doppler coefficients, soluble boron worth, control rod worth, prompt neutron lifetime, and delayed-neutron fractions were considered. These in turn were used to examine reactor behavior during a number of operational conditions, transients, and accidents. Such conditions as shutdown from power with one rod stuck out, steam-line break accident, feedwater line break, loss of coolant flow, locked rotor accidents, control rod ejection accidents, and anticipated transients without scram (ATWSs) were examined.The analysis of selected reactor transients demonstrated that it is feasible to license and safely operate a reactor fueled with plutonium-thorium blended fuel. In most cases analyzed, the thorium mixture had less-severe consequences than those for a core comprising low-enriched uranium fuel. In the analyzed cases where the consequences were more severe, they were still within acceptable limits. The ATWS accident condition requires more analysis.

  10. Small Launch Vehicle Design Approaches: Clustered Cores Compared with Multi-Stage Inline Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Eric D.; Beers, Benjamin; Esther, Elizabeth; Philips, Alan; Threet, Grady E., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to better define small launch vehicle design options two approaches were investigated from the small launch vehicle trade space. The primary focus was to evaluate a clustered common core design against a purpose built inline vehicle. Both designs focused on liquid oxygen (LOX) and rocket propellant grade kerosene (RP-1) stages with the terminal stage later evaluated as a LOX/methane (CH4) stage. A series of performance optimization runs were done in order to minimize gross liftoff weight (GLOW) including alternative thrust levels, delivery altitude for payload, vehicle length to diameter ratio, alternative engine feed systems, re-evaluation of mass growth allowances, passive versus active guidance systems, and rail and tower launch methods. Additionally manufacturability, cost, and operations also play a large role in the benefits and detriments for each design. Presented here is the Advanced Concepts Office's Earth to Orbit Launch Team methodology and high level discussion of the performance trades and trends of both small launch vehicle solutions along with design philosophies that shaped both concepts. Without putting forth a decree stating one approach is better than the other; this discussion is meant to educate the community at large and let the reader determine which architecture is truly the most economical; since each path has such a unique set of limitations and potential payoffs.

  11. Development of Optimized Core Design and Analysis Methods for High Power Density BWRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirvan, Koroush

    Increasing the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy is vital to its future. Improving the economics of BWRs is the main goal of this work, focusing on designing cores with higher power density, to reduce the BWR capital cost. Generally, the core power density in BWRs is limited by the thermal Critical Power of its assemblies, below which heat removal can be accomplished with low fuel and cladding temperatures. The present study investigates both increases in the heat transfer area between ~he fuel and coolant and changes in operating parameters to achieve higher power levels while meeting the appropriate thermal as well as materials and neutronic constraints. A scoping study is conducted under the constraints of using fuel with cylindrical geometry, traditional materials and enrichments below 5% to enhance its licensability. The reactor vessel diameter is limited to the largest proposed thus far. The BWR with High power Density (BWR-HD) is found to have a power level of 5000 MWth, equivalent to 26% uprated ABWR, resulting into 20% cheaper O&M and Capital costs. This is achieved by utilizing the same number of assemblies, but with wider 16x16 assemblies and 50% shorter active fuel than that of the ABWR. The fuel rod diameter and pitch are reduced to just over 45% of the ABWR values. Traditional cruciform form control rods are used, which restricts the assembly span to less than 1.2 times the current GE14 design due to limitation on shutdown margin. Thus, it is possible to increase the power density and specific power by 65%, while maintaining the nominal ABWR Minimum Critical Power Ratio (MCPR) margin. The plant systems outside the vessel are assumed to be the same as the ABWR-Il design, utilizing a combination of active and passive safety systems. Safety analyses applied a void reactivity coefficient calculated by SIMULA TE-3 for an equilibrium cycle core that showed a 15% less negative coefficient for the BWR-HD compared to the ABWR. The feedwater

  12. Optimal design at inner core of the shaped pyramidal truss structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Uk; Yang, Dong-Yol

    2013-12-16

    Sandwich material is a type of composite material with lightweight, high strength, good dynamic properties and high bending stiffness-to-weight ratio. This can be found well such structures in the nature (for example, internal structure of bones, plants, etc.). New trend which prefers eco-friendly products and energy efficiency is emerging in industries recently. Demand for materials with high strength and light weight is also increasing. In line with these trends, researches about manufacturing methods of sandwich material have been actively conducted. In this study, a sandwich structure named as “Shaped Pyramidal Truss Structure” is proposed to improve mechanical strength and to apply a manufacturing process suitable for massive production. The new sandwich structure was designed to enhance compressive strength by changing the cross-sectional shape at the central portion of the core. As the next step, optimization of the shape was required. Optimization technique used here was the SZGA(Successive Zooming Genetic Algorithm), which is one of GA(Genetic Algorithm) methods gradually reducing the area of design variable. The objective function was defined as moment of inertia of the cross-sectional shape of the strut. The control points of cubic Bezier curve, which was assumed to be the shape of the cross section, were used as design variables. By using FEM simulation, it was found that the structure exhibited superior mechanical properties compared to the simple design of the prior art.

  13. America's Next Great Ship: Space Launch System Core Stage Transitioning from Design to Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birkenstock, Benjamin; Kauer, Roy

    2014-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Program is essential to achieving the Nation's and NASA's goal of human exploration and scientific investigation of the solar system. As a multi-element program with emphasis on safety, affordability, and sustainability, SLS is becoming America's next great ship of exploration. The SLS Core Stage includes avionics, main propulsion system, pressure vessels, thrust vector control, and structures. Boeing manufactures and assembles the SLS core stage at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans, LA, a historical production center for Saturn V and Space Shuttle programs. As the transition from design to manufacturing progresses, the importance of a well-executed manufacturing, assembly, and operation (MA&O) plan is crucial to meeting performance objectives. Boeing employs classic techniques such as critical path analysis and facility requirements definition as well as innovative approaches such as Constraint Based Scheduling (CBS) and Cirtical Chain Project Management (CCPM) theory to provide a comprehensive suite of project management tools to manage the health of the baseline plan on both a macro (overall project) and micro level (factory areas). These tools coordinate data from multiple business systems and provide a robust network to support Material & Capacity Requirements Planning (MRP/CRP) and priorities. Coupled with these tools and a highly skilled workforce, Boeing is orchestrating the parallel buildup of five major sub assemblies throughout the factory. Boeing and NASA are transforming MAF to host state of the art processes, equipment and tooling, the most prominent of which is the Vertical Assembly Center (VAC), the largest weld tool in the world. In concert, a global supply chain is delivering a range of structural elements and component parts necessary to enable an on-time delivery of the integrated Core Stage. SLS is on plan to launch humanity into the next phase of space exploration.

  14. Melt spreading code assessment, modifications, and application to the EPR core catcher design.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T .; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-30

    The Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) is under consideration by various utilities in the United States to provide base load electrical production, and as a result the design is undergoing a certification review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The severe accident design philosophy for this reactor is based upon the fact that the projected power rating results in a narrow margin for in-vessel melt retention by external cooling of the reactor vessel. As a result, the design addresses ex-vessel core melt stabilization using a mitigation strategy that includes: (1) an external core melt retention system to temporarily hold core melt released from the vessel; (2) a layer of 'sacrificial' material that is admixed with the melt while in the core melt retention system; (3) a melt plug in the lower part of the retention system that, when failed, provides a pathway for the mixture to spread to a large core spreading chamber; and finally, (4) cooling and stabilization of the spread melt by controlled top and bottom flooding. The overall concept is illustrated in Figure 1.1. The melt spreading process relies heavily on inertial flow of a low-viscosity admixed melt to a segmented spreading chamber, and assumes that the melt mass will be distributed to a uniform height in the chamber. The spreading phenomenon thus needs to be modeled properly in order to adequately assess the EPR design. The MELTSPREAD code, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, can model segmented, and both uniform and nonuniform spreading. The NRC is thus utilizing MELTSPREAD to evaluate melt spreading in the EPR design. MELTSPREAD was originally developed to support resolution of the Mark I containment shell vulnerability issue. Following closure of this issue, development of MELTSPREAD ceased in the early 1990's, at which time the melt spreading database upon which the code had been validated was rather limited. In particular, the database that was utilized for initial validation consisted

  15. Chemical and colloidal stability of carboxylated core-shell magnetite nanoparticles designed for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Szekeres, Márta; Tóth, Ildikó Y; Illés, Erzsébet; Hajdú, Angéla; Zupkó, István; Farkas, Katalin; Oszlánczi, Gábor; Tiszlavicz, László; Tombácz, Etelka

    2013-07-12

    Despite the large efforts to prepare super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) for biomedical applications, the number of FDA or EMA approved formulations is few. It is not known commonly that the approved formulations in many instances have already been withdrawn or discontinued by the producers; at present, hardly any approved formulations are produced and marketed. Literature survey reveals that there is a lack for a commonly accepted physicochemical practice in designing and qualifying formulations before they enter in vitro and in vivo biological testing. Such a standard procedure would exclude inadequate formulations from clinical trials thus improving their outcome. Here we present a straightforward route to assess eligibility of carboxylated MNPs for biomedical tests applied for a series of our core-shell products, i.e., citric acid, gallic acid, poly(acrylic acid) and poly(acrylic acid-co-maleic acid) coated MNPs. The discussion is based on physicochemical studies (carboxylate adsorption/desorption, FTIR-ATR, iron dissolution, zeta potential, particle size, coagulation kinetics and magnetization measurements) and involves in vitro and in vivo tests. Our procedure can serve as an example to construct adequate physico-chemical selection strategies for preparation of other types of core-shell nanoparticles as well.

  16. Novel design of dual-core microstructured fiber with enhanced longitudinal strain sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostkiewicz, Lukasz; Tenderenda, T.; Napierala, M.; Szymański, M.; Murawski, M.; Mergo, P.; Lesiak, P.; Marc, P.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.; Nasilowski, T.

    2014-05-01

    Constantly refined technology of manufacturing increasingly complex photonic crystal fibers (PCF) leads to new optical fiber sensor concepts. The ways of enhancing the influence of external factors (such as hydrostatic pressure, temperature, acceleration) on the fiber propagating conditions are commonly investigated in literature. On the other hand longitudinal strain analysis, due to the calculation difficulties caused by the three dimensional computation, are somehow neglected. In this paper we show results of such a 3D numerical simulation and report methods of tuning the fiber strain sensitivity by changing the fiber microstructure and core doping level. Furthermore our approach allows to control whether the modes' effective refractive index is increasing or decreasing with strain, with the possibility of achieving zero strain sensitivity with specific fiber geometries. The presented numerical analysis is compared with experimental results of the fabricated fibers characterization. Basing on the aforementioned methodology we propose a novel dual-core fiber design with significantly increased sensitivity to longitudinal strain for optical fiber sensor applications. Furthermore the reported fiber satisfies all conditions necessary for commercial applications like good mode matching with standard single-mode fiber, low confinement loss and ease of manufacturing with the stack-and-draw technique. Such fiber may serve as an integrated Mach-Zehnder interferometer when highly coherent source is used. With the optimization of single mode transmission to 850 nm, we propose a VCSEL source to be used in order to achieve a low-cost, reliable and compact strain sensing transducer.

  17. Design Review Report for formal review of safety class features of exhauster system for rotary mode core sampling

    SciTech Connect

    JANICEK, G.P.

    2000-06-08

    Report documenting Formal Design Review conducted on portable exhausters used to support rotary mode core sampling of Hanford underground radioactive waste tanks with focus on Safety Class design features and control requirements for flammable gas environment operation and air discharge permitting compliance.

  18. PVDF core-free actuator for Braille displays: design, fabrication process, and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levard, Thomas; Diglio, Paul J.; Lu, Sheng-Guo; Gorny, Lee J.; Rahn, Christopher D.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2011-04-01

    Refreshable Braille displays require many, small diameter actuators to move the pins. The electrostrictive P(VDF-TrFECFE) terpolymer can provide the high strain and actuation force under modest electric fields that are required of this application. In this paper, we develop core-free tubular actuators and integrate them into a 3 × 2 Braille cell. The films are solution cast, stretched to 6 μm thick, electroded, laminated into a bilayer, rolled into a 2 mm diameter tube, bonded, and provided with top and bottom contacts. Experimental testing of 17 actuators demonstrates significant strains (up to 4%). A novel Braille cell is designed and fabricated using six of these actuators.

  19. Design of the low-loss wide bandwidth hollow-core terahertz inhibited coupling fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Yang, Bo; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Weiwei

    2015-05-01

    A multi-perspective numerical analysis of propagation loss in inhibited coupling fibers (ICFs) in terahertz (THz) band is presented. It is shown that the core boundary strut shape is a critical factor affecting the confinement loss. The simulation results demonstrate that the closer to a circular arc the struts, the lower the confinement loss. Furthermore, the strut thickness and the material refractive index determine the frequencies and the bandwidths of the low loss region. With the decrease of the strut thickness and material refractive index, the low loss region will be shifted toward the higher frequency, and the widths of low loss regions will be broadened. Besides, when material absorption is considered in simulation, the ICFs averaged propagation loss is still about three orders of magnitude lower than the material absorption loss itself. The conclusions could give valuable guidance for the design and fabrication of THz ICFs.

  20. Phononic band gap design in honeycomb lattice with combinations of auxetic and conventional core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sushovan; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel design of a honeycomb lattice geometry that uses a seamless combination of conventional and auxetic cores, i.e. elements showing positive and negative Poisson’s ratio. The design is aimed at tuning and improving the band structure of periodic cellular structures. The proposed cellular configurations show a significantly wide band gap at much lower frequencies compared to their pure counterparts, while still retaining their major dynamic features. Different topologies involving both auxetic inclusions in a conventional lattice and conversely hexagonal cellular inclusions in auxetic butterfly lattices are presented. For all these cases the impact of the varying degree of auxeticity on the band structure is evaluated. The proposed cellular designs may offer significant advantages in tuning high-frequency bandgap behaviour, which is relevant to phononics applications. The configurations shown in this paper may be made iso-volumetric and iso-weight to a given regular hexagonal topology, making possible to adapt the hybrid lattices to existing sandwich structures with fixed dimensions and weights. This work also features a comparative study of the wave speeds corresponding to different configurations vis-a vis those of a regular honeycomb to highlight the superior behaviour of the combined hybrid lattice.

  1. Physics implications of oxide and metal fuel on the design of small LMFBR cores

    SciTech Connect

    Orechwa, Y.; Khalil, H.

    1984-09-17

    Slower growth projections in the demand for electricity and advances in metal fuel technology have shifted some of the emphasis in fast reactor development in the US from large oxide cores to small cores and also renewed interest in metal fuel. Cores constrained by diameter and fuel burnup exhibit many similar neutronic performance characteristics. However, some parameters such as reactivity coefficients, for example, are very different. The physics parameters of the four cores studied suggest that metal fueled cores, although less developed than oxide cores, are more flexible in adapting to currently changing deployment scenarios.

  2. Parameter Design and Optimal Control of an Open Core Flywheel Energy Storage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, D.; Anand, D. K.; Kirk, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    In low earth orbit (LEO) satellite applications spacecraft power is provided by photovoltaic cells and batteries. To overcome battery shortcomings the University of Maryland, working in cooperation with NASA/GSFC and NASA/LeRC, has developed a magnetically suspended flywheel for energy storage applications. The system is referred to as an Open Core Composite Flywheel (OCCF) energy storage system. Successful application of flywheel energy storage requires integration of several technologies, viz. bearings, rotor design, motor/generator, power conditioning, and system control. In this paper we present a parameter design method which has been developed for analyzing the linear SISO model of the magnetic bearing controller for the OCCF. The objective of this continued research is to principally analyze the magnetic bearing system for nonlinear effects in order to increase the region of stability, as determined by high speed and large air gap control. This is achieved by four tasks: (1) physical modeling, design, prototyping, and testing of an improved magnetically suspended flywheel energy storage system, (2) identification of problems that limit performance and their corresponding solutions, (3) development of a design methodology for magnetic bearings, and (4) design of an optimal controller for future high speed applications. Both nonlinear SISO and MIMO models of the magnetic system were built to study limit cycle oscillations and power amplifier saturation phenomenon observed in experiments. The nonlinear models include the inductance of EM coils, the power amplifier saturation, and the physical limitation of the flywheel movement as discussed earlier. The control program EASY5 is used to study the nonlinear SISO and MIMO models. Our results have shown that the characteristics and frequency responses of the magnetic bearing system obtained from modeling are comparable to those obtained experimentally. Although magnetic saturation is shown in the bearings, there

  3. MIC-SVM: Designing A Highly Efficient Support Vector Machine For Advanced Modern Multi-Core and Many-Core Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    You, Yang; Song, Shuaiwen; Fu, Haohuan; Marquez, Andres; Mehri Dehanavi, Maryam; Barker, Kevin J.; Cameron, Kirk; Randles, Amanda; Yang, Guangwen

    2014-08-16

    Support Vector Machine (SVM) has been widely used in data-mining and Big Data applications as modern commercial databases start to attach an increasing importance to the analytic capabilities. In recent years, SVM was adapted to the field of High Performance Computing for power/performance prediction, auto-tuning, and runtime scheduling. However, even at the risk of losing prediction accuracy due to insufficient runtime information, researchers can only afford to apply offline model training to avoid significant runtime training overhead. To address the challenges above, we designed and implemented MICSVM, a highly efficient parallel SVM for x86 based multi-core and many core architectures, such as the Intel Ivy Bridge CPUs and Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor (MIC).

  4. Design and analysis of a refractive index sensor based on dual-core large-mode-area fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakshi, Koppole; Rastogi, Vipul; Kumar, Ajeet

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel co-axial dual core large-mode-area (LMA) fiber design for refractive index sensing. In a dual-core fiber there is resonant coupling between the two cores, which is strongly affected by the refractive index (RI) of the outermost region. The transmittance of the fiber, therefore, varies sharply with the refractive index of surrounding medium. This characteristic of the proposed structure has been utilized to design a RI sensor. We have analyzed the structure by using the transfer matrix method. Our numerical results show that the proposed sensor is highly sensitive with the resolution of 2.0 × 10-6 around nex = 1.44376. Effect of design parameters on sensitivity of the proposed sensor has also been investigated.

  5. Design and analysis of large-effective-area heterogeneous trench-assisted multi-core fiber.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jiajing; Saitoh, Kunimasa; Koshiba, Masanori; Takenaga, Katsuhiro; Matsuo, Shoichiro

    2012-07-02

    Based on the overlap integral of electromagnetic fields in neighboring cores, a calculating method is proposed for obtaining the coupling coefficient between two adjacent trench-assisted non-identical cores. And a kind of heterogeneous trench-assisted multi-core fiber (Hetero-TA-MCF) with 12 cores is proposed to achieve large effective area (A(eff)) and high density of cores. As bending radius becomes larger than 50 mm, the crosstalk value at 1550-nm wavelength of the Hetero-TA-MCF is about -42 dB after 100-km propagation and the A(eff) of this Hetero-TA-MCF can reach 100 µm(2).

  6. Mixed enrichment core design for the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, C.W.; Verghese, K.; Huo, Y.G.

    1997-12-01

    The North Carolina State University PULSTAR Reactor license was renewed for an additional 20 years of operation on April 30, 1997. The relicensing period added additional years to the facility operating time through the end of the second license period, increasing the excess reactivity needs as projected in 1988. In 1995, the Nuclear Reactor Program developed a strategic plan that addressed the future maintenance, development, and utilization of the facility. Goals resulting from this plan included increased academic utilization of the facility in accordance with its role as a university research facility, and increased industrial service use in accordance with the mission of a land grant university. The strategic plan was accepted, and it is the intent of the College of Engineering to operate the PULSTAR Reactor as a going concern through at least the end of the current license period. In order to reach the next relicensing review without prejudice due to low excess reactivity, it is desired to maintain sufficient excess reactivity so that, if relicensed again, the facility could continue to operate without affecting users until new fuel assistance was provided. During the NC State University license renewal, the operation of the PULSTAR Reactor at the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY Buffalo) was terminated. At that time, the SUNY Buffalo facility had about 240 unused PULSTAR Reactor fuel pins with 6% enrichment. The objective of the work reported here was to develop a mixed enrichment core design for the NC State University PULSTAR reactor which would: (1) demonstrate that 6% enriched SUNY buffalo fuel could be used in the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor within the existing technical specification safety limits for core physics parameters; (2) show that use of this fuel could permit operating the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor to 2017 with increased utilization; and (3) assure that the decision whether or not to relicense the facility would

  7. Enhancing the Practicum Experience for Pre-service Chemistry Teachers Through Collaborative CoRe Design with Mentor Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, Anne; Berry, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports findings from an ongoing study exploring how the Content Representation (CoRe) design can be used as a tool to help chemistry student teachers begin acquiring the professional knowledge required to become expert chemistry teachers. Phase 2 of the study, reported in this paper, investigated how collaboration with school-based mentors (associate teachers) on teaching practice (practicum) might impact on this process and student teachers' development of their pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The collaboration involved identifying and discussing pedagogical issues related to a practicum-teaching topic using a student teacher's draft CoRe as a starting point and ongoing focus for the professional dialogue. Practicum offered an opportunity for aspects of student teachers' PCK, as embodied in their draft CoRes, to be explored and expanded upon in classroom programmes with the support and input of associate teachers. The findings were influenced by different contextual factors; however, the student teachers found their CoRes to be very useful frameworks for engaging in focussed professional dialogue with their teaching mentors. They valued the expertise, currency of knowledge and mentoring of their associates and reported positively about the contribution this support made to their PCK development via the CoRe design process and the transformation of the CoRe into classroom teaching.

  8. The design and implementation of the parallel out-of-core ScaLAPACK LU, QR and Cholesky factorization routines

    SciTech Connect

    D`Azevedo, E.F.; Dongarra, J.J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of three core factorization routines--LU, QR and Cholesky--included in the out-of-core extension of ScaLAPACK. These routines allow the factorization and solution of a dense system that is too large to fit entirely in physical memory. An image of the full matrix is maintained on disk and the factorization routines transfer sub-matrices into memory. The left-looking column-oriented variant of the factorization algorithm is implemented to reduce the disk I/O traffic. The routines are implemented using a portable I/O interface and utilize high performance ScaLAPACK factorization routines as in-core computational kernels. The authors present the details of the implementation for the out-of-core ScaLAPACK factorization routines, as well as performance and scalability results on the Intel Paragon.

  9. Amphiphilic Nanoparticles Repress Macrophage Atherogenesis: Novel Core/Shell Designs for Scavenger Receptor Targeting and Down-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, an inflammatory lipid-rich plaque disease is perpetuated by the unregulated scavenger-receptor-mediated uptake of oxidized lipoproteins (oxLDL) in macrophages. Current treatments lack the ability to directly inhibit oxLDL accumulation and foam cell conversion within diseased arteries. In this work, we harness nanotechnology to design and fabricate a new class of nanoparticles (NPs) based on hydrophobic mucic acid cores and amphiphilic shells with the ability to inhibit the uncontrolled uptake of modified lipids in human macrophages. Our results indicate that tailored NP core and shell formulations repress oxLDL internalization via dual complementary mechanisms. Specifically, the most atheroprotective molecules in the NP cores competitively reduced NP-mediated uptake to scavenger receptor A (SRA) and also down-regulated the surface expression of SRA and CD36. Thus, nanoparticles can be designed to switch activated, lipid-scavenging macrophages to antiatherogenic phenotypes, which could be the basis for future antiatherosclerotic therapeutics. PMID:24972372

  10. Design of Pt-shell nanoparticles with alloy cores for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Iyyamperumal, Ravikumar; Yancey, David F; Crooks, Richard M; Henkelman, Graeme

    2013-10-22

    We report that the oxygen binding energy of alloy-core@Pt nanoparticles can be linearly tuned by varying the alloy-core composition. Using this tuning mechanism, we are able to predict optimal compositions for different alloy-core@Pt nanoparticles. Subsequent electrochemical measurements of ORR activities of AuPd@Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) are in a good agreement with the theoretical prediction that the peak of activity is achieved for a 28% Au/72% Pd alloy core supporting a Pt shell. Importantly, these findings represent an unusual case of first-principles theory leading to nearly perfect agreement with experimental results.

  11. Modular Approach to Launch Vehicle Design Based on a Common Core Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Dennis M.; Threet, Grady E., Jr.; Philips, Alan D.; Waters, Eric D.; Baysinger, Mike

    2010-01-01

    With a heavy lift launch vehicle as the centerpiece of our nation's next exploration architecture's infrastructure, the Advanced Concepts Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center initiated a study to examine the utilization of elements derived from a heavy lift launch vehicle for other potential launch vehicle applications. The premise of this study is to take a vehicle concept, which has been optimized for Lunar Exploration, and utilize the core stage with other existing or near existing stages and boosters to determine lift capabilities for alternative missions. This approach not only yields a vehicle matrix with a wide array of capabilities, but also produces an evolutionary pathway to a vehicle family based on a minimum development and production cost approach to a launch vehicle system architecture, instead of a purely performance driven approach. The upper stages and solid rocket booster selected for this study were chosen to reflect a cross-section of: modified existing assets in the form of a modified Delta IV upper stage and Castor-type boosters; potential near term launch vehicle component designs including an Ares I upper stage and 5-segment boosters; and longer lead vehicle components such as a Shuttle External Tank diameter upper stage. The results of this approach to a modular launch system are given in this paper.

  12. Measurements of the impedance matrix of a thermoacoustic core: applications to the design of thermoacoustic engines.

    PubMed

    Bannwart, Flávio C; Penelet, Guillaume; Lotton, Pierrick; Dalmont, Jean-Pierre

    2013-05-01

    The successful design of a thermoacoustic engine depends on the appropriate description of the processes involved inside the thermoacoustic core (TAC). This is a difficult task when considering the complexity of both the heat transfer phenomena and the geometry of the porous material wherein the thermoacoustic amplification process occurs. An attempt to getting round this difficulty consists in measuring the TAC transfer matrix under various heating conditions, the measured transfer matrices being exploited afterward into analytical models describing the complete apparatus. In this paper, a method based on impedance measurements is put forward, which allows the accurate measurement of the TAC transfer matrix, contrarily to the classical two-load method. Four different materials are tested, each one playing as the porous element allotted inside the TAC, which is submitted to different temperature gradients to promote thermoacoustic amplification. The experimental results are applied to the modeling of basic standing-wave and traveling-wave engines, allowing the prediction of the engine operating frequency and thermoacoustic amplification gain, as well as the optimum choice of the components surrounding the TAC.

  13. Core Design Characteristics of the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High Temperature Demonstration Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicholas R; Qualls, A L; Betzler, Benjamin R; Carbajo, Juan J; Greenwood, Michael Scott; Hale, Richard Edward; Harrison, Thomas J; Powers, Jeffrey J; Robb, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactors (FHRs) are a promising reactor technology option with significant knowledge gaps to implementation. One potential approach to address those technology gaps is via a small-scale demonstration reactor with the goal of increasing the technology readiness level (TRL) of the overall system for the longer term. The objective of this paper is to outline a notional concept for such a system, and to address how the proposed concept would advance the TRL of FHR concepts. Development of the proposed FHR Demonstration Reactor (DR) will enable commercial FHR deployment through disruptive and rapid technology development and demonstration. The FHR DR will close remaining gaps to commercial viability. Lower risk technologies are included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. Important capabilities that will be demonstrated by building and operating the FHR DR include core design methodologies; fabrication and operation of high temperature reactors; salt procurement, handling, maintenance, and ultimate disposal; salt chemistry control to maximize vessel life; tritium management; heat exchanger performance; pump performance; and reactivity control. The FHR DR is considered part of a broader set of FHR technology development and demonstration efforts, some of which are already underway. Nonreactor test efforts (e.g., heated salt loops or loops using simulant fluids) can demonstrate many technologies necessary for commercial deployment of FHRs. The FHR DR, however, fulfills a crucial role in FHR technology development by advancing the technical maturity and readiness level of the system as a whole.

  14. Enhancing the Practicum Experience for Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers through Collaborative CoRe Design with Mentor Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Anne; Berry, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports findings from an ongoing study exploring how the Content Representation (CoRe) design can be used as a tool to help chemistry student teachers begin acquiring the professional knowledge required to become expert chemistry teachers. Phase 2 of the study, reported in this paper, investigated how collaboration with school-based…

  15. Design and Performance Improvements of the Prototype Open Core Flywheel Energy Storage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, D.; Anand, D. K. (Editor); Kirk, J. A. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    A prototype magnetically suspended composite flywheel energy storage (FES) system is operating at the University of Maryland. This system, designed for spacecraft applications, incorporates recent advances in the technologies of composite materials, magnetic suspension, and permanent magnet brushless motor/generator. The current system is referred to as an Open Core Composite Flywheel (OCCF) energy storage system. This paper will present design improvements for enhanced and robust performance. Initially, when the OCCF prototype was spun above its first critical frequency of 4,500 RPM, the rotor movement would exceed the space available in the magnetic suspension gap and touchdown on the backup mechanical bearings would occur. On some occasions it was observed that, after touchdown, the rotor was unable to re-suspend as the speed decreased. Additionally, it was observed that the rotor would exhibit unstable oscillations when the control system was initially turned on. Our analysis suggested that the following problems existed: (1) The linear operating range of the magnetic bearings was limited due to electrical and magnetic saturation; (2) The inductance of the magnetic bearings was affecting the transient response of the system; (3) The flywheel was confined to a small movement because mechanical components could not be held to a tight tolerance; and (4) The location of the touchdown bearing magnifies the motion at the pole faces of the magnetic bearings when the linear range is crucial. In order to correct these problems an improved design of the flywheel energy storage system was undertaken. The magnetic bearings were re-designed to achieve a large linear operating range and to withstand load disturbances of at least 1 g. The external position transducers were replaced by a unique design which were resistant to magnetic field noise and allowed cancellation of the radial growth of the flywheel at high speeds. A central rod was utilized to ensure the concentricity

  16. The Practical Turn in Teacher Education: Designing a Preparation Sequence for Core Practice Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Fred; Westbroek, Hanna; Doyle, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Amid calls for more practice-based teacher education, this article presents a concrete illustration of a practice-based bridging strategy for preparing high school biology teachers to enact open-inquiry labs. Open-inquiry labs were considered a core practice frame that served as a context for identifying core practices and for giving coherence to…

  17. A finite element study of teeth restored with post and core: Effect of design, material, and ferrule

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Viram; Bhargava, Akshay; Parkash, Hari; Chittaranjan, B.; Kumar, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different postdesigns and materials are available; however, no consensus exists regarding superiority for stress distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and material of post with or without ferrule on stress distribution using finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 three-dimensional (3D) axisymmetric models of postretained central incisors were made: Six with ferrule design and six without it. Three of these six models had tapered posts, and three had parallel posts. The materials tested were titanium post with a composite resin core, nickel chromium cast post and core, and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) post with a composite resin core. The stress analysis was done using ANSYS software. The load of 100 N at an angle of 45΀ was applied 2 mm cervical to incisal edge on the palatal surface and results were analyzed using 3D von Mises criteria. Results: The highest amount of stress was in the cervical region. Overall, the stress in the tapered postsystem was more than the parallel one. FRC post and composite resin core recorded minimal stresses within the post but the stresses transmitted to cervical dentin were more as compared to other systems. Minimal stresses in cervical dentine were observed where the remaining coronal dentin was strengthen by ferrule. Conclusion: A rigid material with high modulus of elasticity for post and core system creates most uniform stress distribution pattern. Ferrule provides uniform distribution of stresses and decreases the cervical stresses. PMID:27274343

  18. Advanced MOX Core Design Study of Sodium Cooled Reactors in Current Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Niwa, H.

    2002-07-01

    The Sodium cooled MOX core design studies are performed with the target burnup of 150 GWd/t and measures against the recriticality issues in core disruptive accidents (CDAs). Four types of core are comparatively studied in viewpoints of core performance and reliability. Result shows that all the types of core satisfy the target and that the homogeneous core with axial blanket partial elimination subassembly is the most superior concept in case the effectiveness of measures against recriticality issues by the axial blanket partial elimination is assured. (authors)

  19. The influence of various core designs on stress distribution in the veneered zirconia crown: a finite element analysis study

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Seung-Ryong; Kim, Sung-Hun; Yoo, Seung-Hyun; Jeong, Se-Chul; Lee, Jai-Bong; Yeo, In-Sung

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate various core designs on stress distribution within zirconia crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three-dimensional finite element models, representing mandibular molars, comprising a prepared tooth, cement layer, zirconia core, and veneer porcelain were designed by computer software. The shoulder (1 mm in width) variations in core were incremental increases of 1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm in proximal and lingual height, and buccal height respectively. To simulate masticatory force, loads of 280 N were applied from three directions (vertical, at a 45° angle, and horizontal). To simulate maximum bite force, a load of 700 N was applied vertically to the crowns. Maximum principal stress (MPS) was determined for each model, loading condition, and position. RESULTS In the maximum bite force simulation test, the MPSs on all crowns observed around the shoulder region and loading points. The compressive stresses were located in the shoulder region of the veneer-zirconia interface and at the occlusal region. In the test simulating masticatory force, the MPS was concentrated around the loading points, and the compressive stresses were located at the 3 mm height lingual shoulder region, when the load was applied horizontally. MPS increased in the shoulder region as the shoulder height increased. CONCLUSION This study suggested that reinforced shoulder play an essential role in the success of the zirconia restoration, and veneer fracture due to occlusal loading can be prevented by proper core design, such as shoulder. PMID:23755346

  20. Design study of an air pump and integral lift engine ALF-504 using the Lycoming 502 core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, D.

    1972-01-01

    Design studies were conducted for an integral lift fan engine utilizing the Lycoming 502 fan core with the final MQT power turbine. The fan is designed for a 12.5 bypass ratio and 1.25:1 pressure ratio, and provides supercharging for the core. Maximum sea level static thrust is 8370 pounds with a specific fuel consumption of 0.302 lb/hr-lb. The dry engine weight without starter is 1419 pounds including full-length duct and sound-attenuating rings. The engine envelope including duct treatment but not localized accessory protrusion is 53.25 inches in diameter and 59.2 inches long from exhaust nozzle exit to fan inlet flange. Detailed analyses include fan aerodynamics, fan and reduction gear mechanical design, fan dynamic analysis, engine noise analysis, engine performance, and weight analysis.

  1. Strategies for nanoplasmonic core-satellite biomolecular sensors: Theory-based Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Benjamin M.; Waldeisen, John R.; Wang, Tim; Lee, Luke P.

    2009-11-01

    We present a systematic theoretical study of core-satellite gold nanoparticle assemblies using the Generalized Multiparticle Mie formalism. We consider the importance of satellite number, satellite radius, the core radius, and the satellite distance, and we present approaches to optimize spectral shift due to satellite attachment or release. This provides clear strategies for improving the sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio for molecular detection, enabling simple colorimetric assays. We quantify the performance of these strategies by introducing a figure of merit. In addition, we provide an improved understanding of the nanoplasmonic interactions that govern the optical response of core-satellite nanoassemblies.

  2. Strategies for nanoplasmonic core-satellite biomolecular sensors: Theory-based Design.

    PubMed

    Ross, Benjamin M; Waldeisen, John R; Wang, Tim; Lee, Luke P

    2009-11-09

    We present a systematic theoretical study of core-satellite gold nanoparticle assemblies using the Generalized Multiparticle Mie formalism. We consider the importance of satellite number, satellite radius, the core radius, and the satellite distance, and we present approaches to optimize spectral shift due to satellite attachment or release. This provides clear strategies for improving the sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio for molecular detection, enabling simple colorimetric assays. We quantify the performance of these strategies by introducing a figure of merit. In addition, we provide an improved understanding of the nanoplasmonic interactions that govern the optical response of core-satellite nanoassemblies.

  3. Thermal/mechanical simulation and laboratory fatigue testing of an alternative yttria tetragonal zirconia polycrystal core-veneer all-ceramic layered crown design.

    PubMed

    Bonfante, Estevam A; Rafferty, Brian; Zavanelli, Ricardo A; Silva, Nelson R F A; Rekow, Elizabeth D; Thompson, Van P; Coelho, Paulo G

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the stress levels at the core layer and the veneer layer of zirconia crowns (comprising an alternative core design vs. a standard core design) under mechanical/thermal simulation, and subjected simulated models to laboratory mouth-motion fatigue. The dimensions of a mandibular first molar were imported into computer-aided design (CAD) software and a tooth preparation was modeled. A crown was designed using the space between the original tooth and the prepared tooth. The alternative core presented an additional lingual shoulder that lowered the veneer bulk of the cusps. Finite element analyses evaluated the residual maximum principal stresses fields at the core and veneer of both designs under loading and when cooled from 900 degrees C to 25 degrees C. Crowns were fabricated and mouth-motion fatigued, generating master Weibull curves and reliability data. Thermal modeling showed low residual stress fields throughout the bulk of the cusps for both groups. Mechanical simulation depicted a shift in stress levels to the core of the alternative design compared with the standard design. Significantly higher reliability was found for the alternative core. Regardless of the alternative configuration, thermal and mechanical computer simulations showed stress in the alternative core design comparable and higher to that of the standard configuration, respectively. Such a mechanical scenario probably led to the higher reliability of the alternative design under fatigue.

  4. Design and fabrication of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for high-power ultrashort pulse transportation and pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Peng, Xiang; Alharbi, M; Dutin, C Fourcade; Bradley, T D; Gérôme, F; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy; Benabid, F

    2012-08-01

    We report on the recent design and fabrication of kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for the purpose of high-power ultrashort pulse transportation. The fabricated seven-cell three-ring hypocycloid-shaped large core fiber exhibits an up-to-date lowest attenuation (among all kagome fibers) of 40 dB/km over a broadband transmission centered at 1500 nm. We show that the large core size, low attenuation, broadband transmission, single-mode guidance, and low dispersion make it an ideal host for high-power laser beam transportation. By filling the fiber with helium gas, a 74 μJ, 850 fs, and 40 kHz repetition rate ultrashort pulse at 1550 nm has been faithfully delivered at the fiber output with little propagation pulse distortion. Compression of a 105 μJ laser pulse from 850 fs down to 300 fs has been achieved by operating the fiber in ambient air.

  5. Universal Design for Learning: speech-language pathologists and their teams making the common core curriculum accessible.

    PubMed

    Staskowski, Maureen; Hardin, Susan; Klein, Mike; Wozniak, Carrie

    2012-05-01

    The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework was named in the supporting documents for the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) as a means of helping all students, especially those with disabilities, to meet and exceed the rigorous expectations. This article will describe the principles of UDL, show how educational teams use the framework to design instruction to teach the CCSS with examples from science and English language arts, and finally explore how the implementation of UDL provides an opportunity for speech-language pathologists to play a critical role in school improvement and instructional design and support.

  6. Design of a Modular E-Core Flux Concentrating Axial Flux Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, Tausif; Sozer, Yilmaz; Husain, Iqbal; Muljadi, Eduard

    2015-09-02

    In this paper a novel E-Core axial flux machine is proposed. The machine has a double stator-single rotor configuration with flux concentrating ferrite magnets, and pole windings across each leg of an E-Core stator. E-Core stators with the proposed flux-concentrating rotor arrangement result in better magnet utilization and higher torque density. The machine also has a modular structure facilitating simpler construction. This paper presents a single phase and a three-phase version of the E-Core machine. Case study for a 1.1 kW, 400 rpm machine for both the single phase and three-phase axial flux machine is presented. The results are verified through 3D finite element analysis.

  7. Suspended nanowires: fabrication, design and characterization of fibers with nanoscale cores.

    PubMed

    Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Warren-Smith, Stephen C; Monro, Tanya M

    2009-02-16

    We report a new approach for the fabrication of nanowires: the direct drawing of optical fibers with air suspended nanoscale cores. The fibers were made from lead silicate glass using the extrusion technique for preform and jacket tube fabrication. Fibers with core diameters in the range of 420-720 nm and practical outer diameters of 110-200 microm were produced, the smallest core sizes produced to date within optical fibers without tapering. We explored the impact of the core size on the effective mode area and propagation loss of these suspended nanowires relative to circular nanowires reported to date. As for circular nanowires, the propagation loss of these suspended nanowires is dominated by surface roughness induced scattering.

  8. Design of polyelectrolyte core-shells with DNA to control TMPyP binding.

    PubMed

    Serra, Vanda Vaz; Teixeira, Raquel; Andrade, Suzana M; Costa, Sílvia M B

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of DNA with 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-N-methylpyridiniumyl)porphyrin (TMPyP) in polyelectrolyte core-shells obtained via layer by layer adsorption of poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate), PSS, and poly(allylamine hydrochloride), PAH, polyelectrolytes was followed by steady state, time resolved fluorescence and by Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). Our results show that DNA adsorption onto polyelectrolyte core-shell changes the TMPyP interaction within PSS/PAH core-shells structure and increase significantly the TMPyP uptake. Specific DNA/TMPyP interactions are also altered by DNA adsorption favouring porphyrin intercalation onto GC pair rich regions. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra reveal that DNA undergoes important conformational changes upon adsorption onto the core-shell surface, which are reverted upon TMPyP encapsulation.

  9. Modeling of the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling Response to Beyond Design Basis Operations - Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Kyle; Cardoni, Jeffrey N.; Wilson, Chisom Shawn; Morrow, Charles; Osborn, Douglas; Gauntt, Randall O.

    2015-12-01

    Efforts are being pursued to develop and qualify a system-level model of a reactor core isolation (RCIC) steam-turbine-driven pump. The model is being developed with the intent of employing it to inform the design of experimental configurations for full-scale RCIC testing. The model is expected to be especially valuable in sizing equipment needed in the testing. An additional intent is to use the model in understanding more fully how RCIC apparently managed to operate far removed from its design envelope in the Fukushima Daiichi Unit 2 accident. RCIC modeling is proceeding along two avenues that are expected to complement each other well. The first avenue is the continued development of the system-level RCIC model that will serve in simulating a full reactor system or full experimental configuration of which a RCIC system is part. The model reasonably represents a RCIC system today, especially given design operating conditions, but lacks specifics that are likely important in representing the off-design conditions a RCIC system might experience in an emergency situation such as a loss of all electrical power. A known specific lacking in the system model, for example, is the efficiency at which a flashing slug of water (as opposed to a concentrated jet of steam) could propel the rotating drive wheel of a RCIC turbine. To address this specific, the second avenue is being pursued wherein computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of such a jet are being carried out. The results of the CFD analyses will thus complement and inform the system modeling. The system modeling will, in turn, complement the CFD analysis by providing the system information needed to impose appropriate boundary conditions on the CFD simulations. The system model will be used to inform the selection of configurations and equipment best suitable of supporting planned RCIC experimental testing. Preliminary investigations with the RCIC model indicate that liquid water ingestion by the turbine

  10. Core thermal response and hydrogen generation of the N Reactor hydrogen mitigation design basis accident

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.D.; Lombardo, N.J.; Heard, F.J.; Ogden, D.M.; Quapp, W.J.

    1988-04-01

    Calculations were performed to determine core heatup, core damage, and subsequent hydrogen production of a hypothetical loss-of-cooling accident at the Department of Energy's N Reactor. The thermal transient response of the reactor core was solved using the TRUMP-BD computer program. Estimates of whole-core thermal damage and hydrogen production were made by weighting the results of multiple half-length pressure tube simulations at various power levels. The Baker-Just and Wilson parabolic rate equations for the metal-water chemical reactions modeled the key phenomena of chemical energy and hydrogen evolution. Unlimited steam was assumed available for continuous oxidation of exposed Zircaloy-2 surfaces and for uranium metal with fuel cladding beyond the failure temperature (1038 C). Intact fuel geometry was modeled. Maximum fuel temperatures (1181 C) in the cooled central regions of the core were predicted to occur one-half hour into the accident scenario. Maximum fuel temperatures of 1447 C occurred in the core GSCS-regions at the end of the 10-h transient. After 10-h 26% of the fuel inventory was predicted to have failed. Peak hydrogen evolution equaled 42 g/s, while 10-h integrated hydrogen evolution equaled 167 kg. 12 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Verification of the CENTRM Module for Adaptation of the SCALE Code to NGNP Prismatic and PBR Core Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapol, Barry; Maldonado, Ivan

    2014-01-23

    The generation of multigroup cross sections lies at the heart of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) core design, whether the prismatic (block) or pebble-bed type. The design process, generally performed in three steps, is quite involved and its execution is crucial to proper reactor physics analyses. The primary purpose of this project is to develop the CENTRM cross-section processing module of the SCALE code package for application to prismatic or pebble-bed core designs. The team will include a detailed outline of the entire processing procedure for application of CENTRM in a final report complete with demonstration. In addition, they will conduct a thorough verification of the CENTRM code, which has yet to be performed. The tasks for this project are to: Thoroughly test the panel algorithm for neutron slowing down; Develop the panel algorithm for multi-materials; Establish a multigroup convergence 1D transport acceleration algorithm in the panel formalism; Verify CENTRM in 1D plane geometry; Create and test the corresponding transport/panel algorithm in spherical and cylindrical geometries; and, Apply the verified CENTRM code to current VHTR core design configurations for an infinite lattice, including assessing effectiveness of Dancoff corrections to simulate TRISO particle heterogeneity.

  12. Thermal Hydraulics Design and Analysis Methodology for a Solid-Core Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Canabal, Francisco; Chen, Yen-Sen; Cheng, Gary; Ito, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion is a leading candidate for in-space propulsion for human Mars missions. This chapter describes a thermal hydraulics design and analysis methodology developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in support of the nuclear thermal propulsion development effort. The objective of this campaign is to bridge the design methods in the Rover/NERVA era, with a modern computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer methodology, to predict thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments of a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine the Small Engine, designed in the 1960s. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based, all speeds, chemically reacting, computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer platform, while formulations of flow and heat transfer through porous and solid media were implemented to describe those of hydrogen flow channels inside the solid24 core. Design analyses of a single flow element and the entire solid-core thrust chamber of the Small Engine were performed and the results are presented herein

  13. A Methodology for Selecting High Thermal-Hydraulic Performance Fuel Configurations for Tightly Packed Epithermal Core Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Antonino; Todreas, Neil E.

    2002-07-15

    Cylindrical fuel pins with wires are the design of choice for tightly packed fuel arrays. However, it is important to investigate novel fuel configurations in order to increase the thermal margins. Hence, new fuel designs have been studied for the epithermal option of the light water-cooled IRIS core. These designs are also of potential use in other tightly packed, epithermal advanced core designs.First, design equations have been used to determine number, height, and size of the principal features (clad, gap, fuel cross-sectional area) of the novel fuel configurations under investigation. Then, performance indices have been introduced to relate fuel geometrical characteristics to selected thermal-hydraulic parameters, such as pressure drop, critical heat flux (CHF), fuel centerline temperature, and clad surface temperature and stress distribution. Finally, variously shaped fuel configurations, including cylindrical, triangular, square, and hexagonal, have been ranked according to the performance indicators.The hexagonal fuel pins, both twisted and straight, proved to be good solutions for the epithermal tight core of the light water-cooled IRIS reactor, with performances comparable to those of the cylindrical fuel with wires. In particular, for water-to-fuel ratios {approx}0.33, the twisted hexagonal shape is the preferable design with a reduction of the total pressure drop by 16% and an increase of the CHF margin by 200%, compared to the traditional cylindrical pins with grids. Furthermore, the straight hexagonal shape allows flatter subchannel velocity profiles, wall shear stress, and wall temperature distributions. However, geometric constraints unfortunately do not allow application of the twisted hexagonal shape for smaller water-to-fuel ratios, which is a design regime of more favorable epithermal neutronics performance. In this regime, the cylindrical pins with wires are the solution of choice.

  14. Design of a Modular E-Core Flux Concentrating Axial Flux Machine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, Tausif; Sozer, Yilmaz; Husain, Iqbal; Muljadi, Eduard

    2015-08-24

    In this paper a novel E-Core axial flux machine is proposed. The machine has a double-stator, single-rotor configuration with flux-concentrating ferrite magnets and pole windings across each leg of an E-Core stator. E-Core stators with the proposed flux-concentrating rotor arrangement result in better magnet utilization and higher torque density. The machine also has a modular structure facilitating simpler construction. This paper presents a single-phase and a three-phase version of the E-Core machine. Case studies for a 1.1-kW, 400-rpm machine for both the single-phase and three-phase axial flux machines are presented. The results are verified through 3D finite element analysis. facilitating simpler construction. This paper presents a single-phase and a three-phase version of the E-Core machine. Case studies for a 1.1-kW, 400-rpm machine for both the single-phase and three-phase axial flux machines are presented. The results are verified through 3D finite element analysis.

  15. High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Francesco Venneri; Chang-Keun Jo; Jae-Man Noh; Yonghee Kim; Claudio Filippone; Jonghwa Chang; Chris Hamilton; Young-Min Kim; Ji-Su Jun; Moon-Sung Cho; Hong-Sik Lim; MIchael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Vincent Descotes; Brian Boer

    2010-09-01

    The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450

  16. Design and analysis of nanowire p-type MOSFET coaxially having silicon core and germanium peripheral channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Eunseon; Cho, Seongjae

    2016-11-01

    In this work, a nanowire p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (PMOSFET) coaxially having a Si core and a Ge peripheral channel is designed and characterized by device simulations. Owing to the high hole mobility of Ge, the device can be utilized for high-speed CMOS integrated circuits, with the effective confinement of mobile holes in Ge by the large valence band offset between Si and Ge. Source/drain doping concentrations and the ratio between the Si core and Ge channel thicknesses are determined. On the basis of the design results, the channel length is aggressively scaled down by evaluating the primary DC parameters in order to confirm device scalability and low-power applicability in sub-10-nm technology nodes.

  17. Optimized design and predicted performance of a deep ocean 50 m piston coring system

    SciTech Connect

    Karnes, C. H.; Burchett, S. N.; Dzwilewski, P. T.

    1980-01-01

    Calculational techniques are described which were developed or adapted for the purpose of analyzing the mechanical response of a proposed piston coring system capable of recovering high quality 50 m long cores. The analysis includes the effects of barrel geometry on the mass required to penetrate 50 m of an assumed sediment, the effects of non-vertical entry and pullout on the stresses within the barrel, and the effects of steel cable or parachute piston restraints on the resulting core sample distortion. The results show that a wall thickness of 50 mm in the upper section is necessary to survive an entry of up to 1.5/sup 0/ from vertical or a recovery angle of up to 5/sup 0/. They also show that a mass of 15,400 kg and a pullout force of 330 kN are required. It is shown that active piston control is necessary to eliminate piston motion during penetration.

  18. Influence of fibre design and curvature on crosstalk in multi-core fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Egorova, O N; Astapovich, M S; Semjonov, S L; Dianov, E M; Melnikov, L A; Salganskii, M Yu; Mishkin, S N; Nishchev, K N

    2016-03-31

    We have studied the influence of cross-sectional structure and bends on optical cross-talk in a multicore fibre. A reduced refractive index layer produced between the cores of such fibre with a small centre-to-centre spacing between neighbouring cores (27 μm) reduces optical cross-talk by 20 dB. The cross-talk level achieved, 30 dB per kilometre of the length of the multicore fibre, is acceptable for a number of applications where relatively small lengths of fibre are needed. Moreover, a significant decrease in optical cross-talk has been ensured by reducing the winding diameter of multicore fibres with identical cores. (fiber optics)

  19. Design and fabrication of a metal core PVDF fiber for an air flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yixiang; Liu, Rongrong; Huang, Xiaomei; Hong, Jin; Huang, Huiyu; Hui, Shen

    2015-10-01

    To track prey or avoid predators, many arthropods can detect variations in airflow and pressure gradients using an array of very thin and sensitive filiform hairs. In this study, metal core piezoelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) fibers were prepared to mimic such hair sensors. The flexibility of the fibers was very good, which was helpful for overcoming the typical brittleness of piezoelectric ceramic fibers. At the same time, the diameter of the fibers was very small (down to 50 μm in diameter). In order to mimic the insects’ hairs to the maximum extent, which was expected to greatly improve the sensitivity of such PVDF fiber-based sensors, a feasible process to prepare and extract electrodes on the surface of the fibers had to be developed. Compared with stainless steel filament-core fibers, the molybdenum filament-core PVDF fibers were easy to stretch. The molybdenum filament was then covered by a cylindrical PVDF layer with a diameter of 400 μm. One half of the longitudinal surface of the fibers was spray-coated with a conductive silver adhesive. The metal core was then used as one electrode, and the conductive silver adhesive was used as the other electrode. After polarization, a single metal-core PVDF fiber could be used as an airflow sensor. The surface structure and the sections of the PVDF fiber were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The results of the mechanical stretching tests showed that the metal core greatly enhanced the mechanical properties of the PVDF fibers. X-ray diffraction revealed that the greater the stretching ratio, the higher the α-to-β-phase conversion rate during the preparation of the PVDF fibers. A single metal-core PVDF fiber was used as a bionic airflow sensor, and a mechanical model of this sensor was derived. The airflow sensing capability of the PVDF fiber was experimentally confirmed in a miniature wind tunnel. The results showed that a cantilevered metal-core PVDF fiber is capable of detecting the range

  20. Fifth-Grade Students' Digital Retellings and the Common Core: Modal Use and Design Intentionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Bridget; Robinson, Kristin H.; Lovvorn, Jason F.; Smith, Blaine E.; Alvey, Tara; Mo, Elaine; Uccelli, Paola; Proctor, C. Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Multimodal composing is part of the Common Core vision of the twenty-first-century student. Two descriptive studies were conducted of fifth-grade students' digital folktale retellings. Study 1 analyzed 83 retellings in relation to the types and frequencies of modal use, such as image, sound, movement, and written text, as well as their retelling…

  1. Can Cognitive Writing Models Inform the Design of the Common Core State Standards?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, John R.; Olinghouse, Natalie G.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we compare the Common Core State Standards in Writing to the Hayes cognitive model of writing, adapted to describe the performance of young and developing writers. Based on the comparison, we propose the inclusion of standards for motivation, goal setting, writing strategies, and attention by writers to the text they have just…

  2. Common Core by Design: A Whole Systems Approach to CCSS Implementation. Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pivot Learning Partners, 2013

    2013-01-01

    With the adoption of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and the new English Language Development (ELD) standards, California has embarked on its third wave of major curriculum reform, continuing a process that began with the initial round of curriculum frameworks in the 1980s and that continued with the adoption of the California State…

  3. Designing a VH-mode core/L-mode edge discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Staebler, G.M.; Hinton, F.L.; Wiley, J.C.

    1995-12-01

    An operating mode with a very high confinement core like the VH-mode but a very low power flow to the divertor plates and low edge particle confinement like an L-mode would be beneficial. For a large tokamak like the proposed ITER, the power density at the separatrix is not that far above the scaled H-mode power threshold so not much of the power can be radiated inside of the separatrix without causing a return to L-mode. The thicker scrape-off layer of an L-mode increases the radiating volume of the scrape-off layer and helps shield impurities from the core. This is especially important if the first wall is metallic. In this paper an H-mode transport model based on E x B velocity shear suppression of turbulence will be used to show that it is possible to have a strongly radiating mantle near the separatrix, which keeps the edge in L-mode, while having a VH-mode core with a broad region of suppressed turbulence. The existing results of enhanced L-mode confinement during impurity injection on a number of tokamaks will be surveyed. The operating conditions which will most likely result in the further improvement of the core confinement by control of the heating, fueling, and torque profiles will be identified.

  4. Novel bending-resistant design of two-layer low-index trench fiber with parabolic-profile core.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiang; Kang, Zexin; Wang, Jing; Liu, Chao; Jian, Shuisheng

    2014-07-28

    A novel design, two-layer low-index trench fiber with parabolic-profile core, is proposed and investigated numerically in this paper. Based on scalar FD-BPM algorithm, the excellent performance over other types of structures and great potential in mode area enlargement are demonstrated. The effective mode area of our design (D = 100μm) is approximately 890 μm2. Both the high order mode (HOM) suppression and bending resistance of our design are better than that of Multi-Trench Fiber (MTF). The mode loss ratio and effective mode area are independent on the bending radius. Due to the circular symmetry of our proposed configuration design, the bending property is not varied with the changing of bending directions.

  5. Possible Methods to Estimate Core Location in a Beyond-Design-Basis Accident at a GE BWR with a Mark I Containment Stucture

    SciTech Connect

    Walston, S; Rowland, M; Campbell, K

    2011-07-27

    It is difficult to track to the location of a melted core in a GE BWR with Mark I containment during a beyond-design-basis accident. The Cooper Nuclear Station provided a baseline of normal material distributions and shielding configurations for the GE BWR with Mark I containment. Starting with source terms for a design-basis accident, methods and remote observation points were investigated to allow tracking of a melted core during a beyond-design-basis accident. The design of the GE BWR with Mark-I containment highlights an amazing poverty of expectations regarding a common mode failure of all reactor core cooling systems resulting in a beyond-design-basis accident from the simple loss of electric power. This design is shown in Figure 1. The station blackout accident scenario has been consistently identified as the leading contributor to calculated probabilities for core damage. While NRC-approved models and calculations provide guidance for indirect methods to assess core damage during a beyond-design-basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), there appears to be no established method to track the location of the core directly should the LOCA include a degree of fuel melt. We came to the conclusion that - starting with detailed calculations which estimate the release and movement of gaseous and soluble fission products from the fuel - selected dose readings in specific rooms of the reactor building should allow the location of the core to be verified.

  6. Thermal hydraulic method for whole core design analysis of an HTGR

    SciTech Connect

    Huning, A. J.; Garimella, S.

    2013-07-01

    A new thermal hydraulic method and initial results are presented for core-wide steady state analysis of prismatic High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR). The method allows for the complete solution of temperature and coolant mass flow distribution by solving quasi-steady energy balances for the discretized core. Assembly blocks are discretized into unit cells for which the average temperature of each unit cell is determined. Convective heat removal is coupled to the unit cell energy balances by a 1-D axial flow model. The flow model uses established correlations for friction factor and Nusselt number. Bypass flow is explicitly calculated by using an initial guess for mass flow distribution and determining the exit pressure of each flow channel. The mass flow distribution is updated until a uniform core exit pressure condition is reached. Results are obtained for the MHTGR-350 with emphasis on the change in thermal hydraulic parameters due to various steady state power profiles and bypass gap widths. Steady state temperature distribution and its variations are discussed. (authors)

  7. SCC500: next-generation infrared imaging camera core products with highly flexible architecture for unique camera designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Roy N.; Grealish, Kevin; Kacir, Tom; Arsenault, Barry; Murphy, Robert H.; Miller, Scott

    2003-09-01

    A new 4th generation MicroIR architecture is introduced as the latest in the highly successful Standard Camera Core (SCC) series by BAE SYSTEMS to offer an infrared imaging engine with greatly reduced size, weight, power, and cost. The advanced SCC500 architecture provides great flexibility in configuration to include multiple resolutions, an industry standard Real Time Operating System (RTOS) for customer specific software application plug-ins, and a highly modular construction for unique physical and interface options. These microbolometer based camera cores offer outstanding and reliable performance over an extended operating temperature range to meet the demanding requirements of real-world environments. A highly integrated lens and shutter is included in the new SCC500 product enabling easy, drop-in camera designs for quick time-to-market product introductions.

  8. A Monte Carlo model system for core analysis and epithermal neutron beam design at the Washington State University Radiation Center

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.D. Jr.

    1996-05-01

    The Monte Carlo Model System (MCMS) for the Washington State University (WSU) Radiation Center provides a means through which core criticality and power distributions can be calculated, as well as providing a method for neutron and photon transport necessary for BNCT epithermal neutron beam design. The computational code used in this Model System is MCNP4A. The geometric capability of this Monte Carlo code allows the WSU system to be modeled very accurately. A working knowledge of the MCNP4A neutron transport code increases the flexibility of the Model System and is recommended, however, the eigenvalue/power density problems can be run with little direct knowledge of MCNP4A. Neutron and photon particle transport require more experience with the MCNP4A code. The Model System consists of two coupled subsystems; the Core Analysis and Source Plane Generator Model (CASP), and the BeamPort Shell Particle Transport Model (BSPT). The CASP Model incorporates the S({alpha}, {beta}) thermal treatment, and is run as a criticality problem yielding, the system eigenvalue (k{sub eff}), the core power distribution, and an implicit surface source for subsequent particle transport in the BSPT Model. The BSPT Model uses the source plane generated by a CASP run to transport particles through the thermal column beamport. The user can create filter arrangements in the beamport and then calculate characteristics necessary for assessing the BNCT potential of the given filter want. Examples of the characteristics to be calculated are: neutron fluxes, neutron currents, fast neutron KERMAs and gamma KERMAs. The MCMS is a useful tool for the WSU system. Those unfamiliar with the MCNP4A code can use the MCMS transparently for core analysis, while more experienced users will find the particle transport capabilities very powerful for BNCT filter design.

  9. Design of Super-Paramagnetic Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Enhanced Performance of Inverted Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Johny; Boudouris, Bryan W; Barrero, César A; Jaramillo, Franklin

    2015-11-18

    Controlling the nature and transfer of excited states in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices is of critical concern due to the fact that exciton transport and separation can dictate the final performance of the system. One effective method to accomplish improved charge separation in organic electronic materials is to control the spin state of the photogenerated charge-carrying species. To this end, nanoparticles with unique iron oxide (Fe3O4) cores and zinc oxide (ZnO) shells were synthesized in a controlled manner. Then, the structural and magnetic properties of these core-shell nanoparticles (Fe3O4@ZnO) were tuned to ensure superior performance when they were incorporated into the active layers of OPV devices. Specifically, small loadings of the core-shell nanoparticles were blended with the previously well-characterized OPV active layer of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). Upon addition of the core-shell nanoparticles, the performance of the OPV devices was increased up to 25% relative to P3HT-PCBM active layer devices that contained no nanoparticles; this increase was a direct result of an increase in the short-circuit current densities of the devices. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the increase in photocurrent was not due to enhanced absorption of the active layer due to the presence of the Fe3O4@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles. In fact, this increase in device performance occurred because of the presence of the superparamagnetic Fe3O4 in the core of the nanoparticles as incorporation of ZnO only nanoparticles did not alter the device performance. Importantly, however, the ZnO shell of the nanoparticles mitigated the negative optical effect of Fe3O4, which have been observed previously. This allowed the core-shell nanoparticles to outperform bare Fe3O4 nanoparticles when the single-layer nanoparticles were incorporated into the active layer of OPV devices. As such, the new materials described here present a

  10. Vibration Characteristics Determined for Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels With a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Min, James B.; Raj, Sai V.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is to provide fan materials that are safer, weigh less, and cost less than the currently used titanium alloy or polymer matrix composite fans. The proposed material system is a sandwich fan construction made up of thin solid face sheets and a lightweight metal foam core. The stiffness of the sandwich structure is increased by separating the two face sheets by the foam layer. The resulting structure has a high stiffness and lighter weight in comparison to the solid facesheet material alone. The face sheets carry the applied in-plane and bending loads (ref. 1). The metal foam core must resist the transverse shear and transverse normal loads, as well as keep the facings supported and working as a single unit. Metal foams have ranges of mechanical properties, such as light weight, impact resistance, and vibration suppression (ref. 2), which makes them more suitable for use in lightweight fan structures. Metal foams have been available for decades (refs. 3 and 4), but the difficulties in the original processes and high costs have prevented their widespread use. However, advances in production techniques and cost reduction have created a new interest in this class of materials (ref. 5). The material chosen for the face sheet and the metal foam for this study was the aerospace-grade stainless steel 17-4PH. This steel was chosen because of its attractive mechanical properties and the ease with which it can be made through the powder metallurgy process (ref. 6). The advantages of a metal foam core, in comparison to a typical honeycomb core, are material isotropy and the ease of forming complex geometries, such as fan blades. A section of a 17-4PH sandwich structure is shown in the following photograph. Part of process of designing any blade is to determine the natural frequencies of the particular blade shape. A designer needs to predict the resonance frequencies of a new blade design to properly identify a useful

  11. Space Station Furnace Facility Core. Requirements definition and conceptual design study. Volume 2: Technical report. Appendix 6: Technical summary reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) is a modular facility for materials research in the microgravity environment of the Space Station Freedom (SSF). The SSFF is designed for crystal growth and solidification research in the fields of electronic and photonic materials, metals and alloys, and glasses and ceramics and will allow for experimental determination of the role of gravitational forces in the solidification process. The facility will provide a capability for basic scientific research and will evaluate the commercial viability of low-gravity processing of selected technologically important materials. The facility is designed to support a complement of furnace modules as outlined in the Science Capabilities Requirements Document (SCRD). The SSFF is a three rack facility that provides the functions, interfaces, and equipment necessary for the processing of the furnaces and consists of two main parts: the SSFF Core Rack and the two Experiment Racks. The facility is designed to accommodate two experimenter-provided furnace modules housed within the two experiment racks, and is designed to operate these two furnace modules simultaneously. The SCRD specifies a wide range of furnace requirements and serves as the basis for the SSFF conceptual design. SSFF will support automated processing during the man-tended operations and is also designed for crew interface during the permanently manned configuration. The facility is modular in design and facilitates changes as required, so the SSFF is adept to modifications, maintenance, reconfiguration, and technology evolution.

  12. Impact of the Cooling Equipment on the Key Design Parameters of a Core-Form Power Transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orosz, Tamás; Tamus, Zoltán Ádám

    2016-12-01

    The first step in the transformer design process is to find the active part's key design parameters. This is a non-linear mathematical optimisation task, which becomes more complex if the economic conditions are considered by the capitalisation of the losses. Geometric programming combined with the method of branch and bound can be an effective and accurate tool for this task even in the case of core-form power transformers, when formulating the short-circuit impedance in the required form is problematic. Most of the preliminary design methods consider only the active part of the transformer and the capitalised costs in order to determine the optimal key design parameters. In this paper, an extension of this meta-heuristic transformer optimisation model, which takes the cost of the insulating oil and the cooling equipment into consideration, is presented. Moreover, the impact of the new variables on the optimal key design parameters of a transformer design is examined and compared with the previous algorithm in two different economic scenarios. Significant difference can be found between the optimal set of key-design parameters if these new factors are considered.

  13. Design of triangular core LMA-PCF with low-bending loss and low non-linearity for laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Sumaiya; Khandokar, Md. Rezwanul Haque; Khan, Muhammad Abdul Goffar

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we characterize the design of a simple large-mode area photonic crystal fiber (LMA-PCF) with low bending loss and low non-linearity. The finite element method (FEM) with perfectly matched boundary layer (PML) is used to investigate the guiding properties. According to simulation the characterized four ring fluorine doped triangular core LMA-PCF achieves 1500 μm2 effective mode area with a low bending loss of 10-5dB/km at the wavelength of 1.064 μm and at a bending radius of 40 cm which is suitable for high power fiber laser.

  14. GPU Based General-Purpose Parallel computing to Solve Nuclear Reactor In-Core fuel Management Design and Operation Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prayudhatama, D.; Waris, A.; Kurniasih, N.; Kurniadi, R.

    2010-06-01

    In-core fuel management study is a crucial activity in nuclear power plant design and operation. Its common problem is to find an optimum arrangement of fuel assemblies inside the reactor core. Main objective for this activity is to reduce the cost of generating electricity, which can be done by altering several physical properties of the nuclear reactor without violating any of the constraints imposed by operational and safety considerations. This research try to address the problem of nuclear fuel arrangement problem, which is, leads to the multi-objective optimization problem. However, the calculation of the reactor core physical properties itself is a heavy computation, which became obstacle in solving the optimization problem by using genetic algorithm optimization. This research tends to address that problem by using the emerging General Purpose Computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) techniques implemented by C language for CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) parallel programming. By using this parallel programming technique, we develop parallelized nuclear reactor fitness calculation, which is involving numerical finite difference computation. This paper describes current prototype of the parallel algorithm code we have developed on CUDA, that performs one hundreds finite difference calculation for nuclear reactor fitness evaluation in parallel by using GPU G9 Hardware Series developed by NVIDIA.

  15. GPU Based General-Purpose Parallel computing to Solve Nuclear Reactor In-Core fuel Management Design and Operation Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Prayudhatama, D.; Waris, A.; Kurniasih, N.; Kurniadi, R.

    2010-06-22

    In-core fuel management study is a crucial activity in nuclear power plant design and operation. Its common problem is to find an optimum arrangement of fuel assemblies inside the reactor core. Main objective for this activity is to reduce the cost of generating electricity, which can be done by altering several physical properties of the nuclear reactor without violating any of the constraints imposed by operational and safety considerations. This research try to address the problem of nuclear fuel arrangement problem, which is, leads to the multi-objective optimization problem. However, the calculation of the reactor core physical properties itself is a heavy computation, which became obstacle in solving the optimization problem by using genetic algorithm optimization.This research tends to address that problem by using the emerging General Purpose Computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) techniques implemented by C language for CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) parallel programming. By using this parallel programming technique, we develop parallelized nuclear reactor fitness calculation, which is involving numerical finite difference computation. This paper describes current prototype of the parallel algorithm code we have developed on CUDA, that performs one hundreds finite difference calculation for nuclear reactor fitness evaluation in parallel by using GPU G9 Hardware Series developed by NVIDIA.

  16. A single aromatic core mutation converts a designed “primitive” protein from halophile to mesophile folding

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Liam M; Tenorio, Connie A; Kumru, Ozan S; Middaugh, C Russell; Blaber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The halophile environment has a number of compelling aspects with regard to the origin of structured polypeptides (i.e., proteogenesis) and, instead of a curious niche that living systems adapted into, the halophile environment is emerging as a candidate “cradle” for proteogenesis. In this viewpoint, a subsequent halophile-to-mesophile transition was a key step in early evolution. Several lines of evidence indicate that aromatic amino acids were a late addition to the codon table and not part of the original “prebiotic” set comprising the earliest polypeptides. We test the hypothesis that the availability of aromatic amino acids could facilitate a halophile-to-mesophile transition by hydrophobic core-packing enhancement. The effects of aromatic amino acid substitutions were evaluated in the core of a “primitive” designed protein enriched for the 10 prebiotic amino acids (A,D,E,G,I,L,P,S,T,V)—having an exclusively prebiotic core and requiring halophilic conditions for folding. The results indicate that a single aromatic amino acid substitution is capable of eliminating the requirement of halophile conditions for folding of a “primitive” polypeptide. Thus, the availability of aromatic amino acids could have facilitated a critical halophile-to-mesophile protein folding adaptation—identifying a selective advantage for the incorporation of aromatic amino acids into the codon table. PMID:25297559

  17. Single-crystal metal--organic microtubes self-assembled from designed D3 symmetrical nanoclusters with a capped triple-helix pentanuclear M5O6 core.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sisi; Zhu, Miaoli; Lu, Liping; Guo, Maolin

    2007-12-07

    Single-crystal metal-organic microtubular architectures have been fabricated from designed D(3) symmetrical nano clusters with a capped triple-helix pentanuclear M(5)O(6) core under hydrothermal conditions.

  18. 77 FR 36611 - Core Principles and Other Requirements for Designated Contract Markets

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... and Other Requirements for Designated Contract Markets; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77... Contract Markets AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Commodity... practices, which apply to the designation and operation of contract markets, implement the Dodd-Frank...

  19. 78 FR 32988 - Core Principles and Other Requirements for Designated Contract Markets; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... Markets; Correction AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY... Other Requirements for Designated Contract Markets by inserting a missing instruction to add Appendix C... and Other Requirements for Designated Contract Markets (77 FR 36612, June 19, 2012). The final...

  20. Staying True to the Core: Designing the Future Academic Library Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2014, the practice of user experience design in academic libraries continues to evolve. It is typically applied in the context of interactions with digital interfaces. Some academic librarians are applying user experience approaches more broadly to design both environments and services with human-centered strategies. As the competition for the…

  1. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-09-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge

  2. Design, Syntheses, and Characterization of a Sterically Encumbered Dioxo Molybdenum (VI) Core

    PubMed Central

    Sengar, Raghvendra S.; Basu, Partha

    2007-01-01

    Dioxo-MoVI complexes of general formula Tp*MoO2(p-SC6H4Dn) (6a-6c) (where Tp* = hydrotris(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate and Dn= dendritic unit) have been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. 1H NMR spectra of the metal complexes indicate that the Cs local symmetry about the metal core does not change by the incorporation of dendritic functionality at the thiophenolato ring. Electrochemical data show ∼20 mV change in the redox potential in the complexes with dendritic ligands suggesting a very small perturbation in the redox orbital, which is also supported by small changes in the electronic spectra. The peak-to peak separation (ΔEp) increases from 125 mV in 6(a) to 240 mV in 6(c), suggesting sluggish electron transfer in molecules with larger dendritic ligands. PMID:18425212

  3. Conceptual Design and Feasibility of Foil Bearings for Rotorcraft Engines: Hot Core Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in gas foil bearing technology have led to numerous advanced high-speed rotating system concepts, many of which have become either commercial products or experimental test articles. Examples include oil-free microturbines, motors, generators and turbochargers. The driving forces for integrating gas foil bearings into these high-speed systems are the benefits promised by removing the oil lubrication system. Elimination of the oil system leads to reduced emissions, increased reliability, and decreased maintenance costs. Another benefit is reduced power plant weight. For rotorcraft applications, this would be a major advantage, as every pound removed from the propulsion system results in a payload benefit.. Implementing foil gas bearings throughout a rotorcraft gas turbine engine is an important long-term goal that requires overcoming numerous technological hurdles. Adequate thrust bearing load capacity and potentially large gearbox applied radial loads are among them. However, by replacing the turbine end, or hot section, rolling element bearing with a gas foil bearing many of the above benefits can be realized. To this end, engine manufacturers are beginning to explore the possibilities of hot section gas foil bearings in propulsion engines. This overview presents a logical follow-on activity by analyzing a conceptual rotorcraft engine to determine the feasibility of a foil bearing supported core. Using a combination of rotordynamic analyses and a load capacity model, it is shown to be reasonable to consider a gas foil bearing core section. In addition, system level foil bearing testing capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented along with analysis work being conducted under NRA Cooperative Agreements.

  4. Fracture stability of anterior zirconia crowns with different core designs and veneered using the layering or the press-over technique.

    PubMed

    Eisenburger, Michael; Mache, Tobias; Borchers, Lothar; Stiesch, Meike

    2011-06-01

    In the current in vitro study, the fracture stability of anterior crowns with zirconia cores of different designs was investigated after applying different veneering techniques. Four groups of zirconia cores (n = 10 in each group) were produced using a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) process. Cores with a standard cervical design were veneered using the layering technique (CCL) or the press-over technique (CCP). Further cores were designed with a porcelain shoulder, where the cervical margin of the zirconia core was reduced by 1 mm. These cores were also veneered using the layering technique (PSL) or the press-over technique (PSP). All crowns were cemented onto metal teeth and loaded until fracture in a universal testing machine. Chipping or fracture of the core was found to occur for CCL at 919±265 N (mean ±SD), for CCP at 798±226 N, for PSL at 739±184 N, and for PSP at 734±209 N. anova did not show significant differences between the four groups. For CCL and CCP, fracture lines ran in a mesio-distal orientation. For PSL and PSP, fracture lines ran into the porcelain shoulder. In summary, the use of a porcelain shoulder can be recommended with zirconia crowns in combination with either the layering or the press-over veneering technique.

  5. Design of solid-core microstructured optical fiber with steering-wheel air cladding for optimal evanescent-field sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yinian; Du, Henry; Bise, Ryan

    2006-04-17

    We present the design of a solid-core microstructured optical fiber with steering-wheel pattern of large holes in cladding as platform for evanescent-field sensing. Both geometry and optical properties of the fiber are numerical computed and analyzed in consideration of manufacturability using sol-gel casting technique as well as by evaluating a triangular lattice of holes with three rings in the design structure so that effective parameters can be established using effective step-index model. We predict less than 0.7 dB/m confinement loss at 850 nm, 29%, 13.7%, and 7.2% of light intensity overlap in air holes at 1500 nm, 1000 nm, and 850 nm wavelength, respectively, in such fiber. With the low loss and high mode-field overlap, the steering-wheel structured fiber is well suited for evanescent-field sensing and detection of chemical and biological species.

  6. Design of the Core Stage Inter-Tank Umbilical {CSITU) Compliance Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Kurt R.

    2013-01-01

    Project Goals: a) Design the compliance mechanism for the CSITU system to a 30% level -3D models completed in Pro/Engineer -Relevant design analysis b) Must meet all system requirements and establish basis for proceeding with detailed design. Tasks to be completed: A design that meets requirements for the 30% design review, 01/16/2013. Umbilical arms provide commodities to the launch vehicle prior to T-0. Commodities can range anywhere from hydraulics, pneumatics, cryogenic, electrical, ECS, etc ... Umbilicals commonly employ truss structures to deliver commodities to vehicle. Common configurations include: -Tilt-up -Swing Arm -Hose Drape -Drop Arm Umbilical arms will be mounted to Mobile Launch Platform. SLS currently has 9 T-0 umbilical arms. The compliance refers to the ability of the umbilical to adjust to minor changes in vehicle location. The compliance mechanism refers to the mechanism on the ground support equipment {GSE) that compensates for these changes. For the CSITU, these minor changes, or vehicle excursions, can be up to +4 in. Excursions refer to movements of the vehicle caused by wind loads and thermal expansion. It is ideal to have significant vertical compliance so a passive secondary release mechanism may be implemented.

  7. Design and characterization of antimicrobial usnic acid loaded-core/shell magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Taresco, Vincenzo; Francolini, Iolanda; Padella, Franco; Bellusci, Mariangela; Boni, Adriano; Innocenti, Claudia; Martinelli, Andrea; D'Ilario, Lucio; Piozzi, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    The application of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in medicine is considered much promising especially because they can be handled and directed to specific body sites by external magnetic fields. MNPs have been investigated in magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermia and drug targeting. In this study, properly functionalized core/shell MNPs with antimicrobial properties were developed to be used for the prevention and treatment of medical device-related infections. Particularly, surface-engineered manganese iron oxide MNPs, produced by a micro-emulsion method, were coated with two different polymers and loaded with usnic acid (UA), a dibenzofuran natural extract possessing antimicrobial activity. Between the two polymer coatings, the one based on an intrinsically antimicrobial cationic polyacrylamide (pAcDED) resulted to be able to provide MNPs with proper magnetic properties and basic groups for UA loading. Thanks to the establishment of acid-base interactions, pAcDED-coated MNPs were able to load and release significant drug amounts resulting in good antimicrobial properties versus Staphylococcus epidermidis (MIC = 0.1 mg/mL). The use of pAcDED having intrinsic antimicrobial activity as MNP coating in combination with UA likely contributed to obtain an enhanced antimicrobial effect. The developed drug-loaded MNPs could be injected in the patient soon after device implantation to prevent biofilm formation, or, later, in presence of signs of infection to treat the biofilm grown on the device surfaces.

  8. Final design of an air core, compulsator driven, 0. 60 caliber railgun system

    SciTech Connect

    Kitzmiller, J.R.; Faidley, R.W.; Fuller, R.L.; Headifen, G.R.; Pratap, S.B.; Spann, M.L.; Thelen, R.F. . Center for Electromechanics)

    1991-01-01

    The Center for Electromechanics at The University of Texas at Austin (CEM-UT), is currently in the manufacturing phase of a laboratory based small caliber electromagnetic (EM) launcher and compulsator power supply. The objective of the 29-month program is to develop a compact, lightweight test bed capable of accelerating 32-g masses to 2 km/s at a rate of 10 Hz. Both the power supply and launcher feature significant component design advances which will allow the system to operate at considerably higher energy and power densities than previously demonstrated. The 750-kg compulsator will generate 2.2 kV and the Silicon- controlled rectifier (SCR) switch will commutate 386-kA pulses into the 1.6-m long, 0.60 caliber augmented solid armature railgun. This paper describes the final design and predicted operating characteristics of the compulsator system. Overall system performance parameters are reported, including results from the optimization code used to aid in the design of the compulsator system. A system design overview is presented with emphasis on new materials and state-of-the-art machine components to be used for the first time in a compulsator.

  9. Design Tools for Accelerating Development and Usage of Multi-Core Computing Platforms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    have been captured by TDL. For example, TDP includes a transformation that converts SDF (synchronous dataflow) representations into equivalent...homogeneous SDF (HSDF) representations based on the algorithm introduced in [Lee 1987]. Such a transformation can in general expose additional...concurrency that is not represented explicitly in the original SDF graph. Compared to other design tools for representation and transformation of dataflow

  10. Optimum core design studies for long-life small modular boiling water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odeh, Faisal Yousef

    Manufacturers of small turbojet engines continue to design and build smaller turbojets. The engines are often used by hobbyists in scale jet airplanes, or by educators to teach the fundamentals of a turbojet. These applications often do not study the effects of placing the engine within an aircraft. The performance of the engine placed within an aircraft can be critical to any aircraft's mission. It will also assist in the design of an optimized unmanned jet designed to fly at high speeds or high altitudes. After designing and building a test cell for a small turbojet engine, a comprehensive experimental study was conducted on the performance of a 45-N class turbojet. The performance of the engine was characterized through various measurements such as thrust, exhaust gas temperature (EGT), fuel consumption, and the temperature and velocity of the exhaust. Using these parameters the small turbojet was studied for use in an unmanned aircraft. Using fluctuating outdoor conditions, the effects of the ambient temperature, pressure, and humidity were tested and correlated to any performance changes. When an engine is installed within the fuselage, it leads to more complex integration, and therefore possible performance changes. The proper fuselage inlet size was determined through static experimentation with a mockup fuselage attached to the engine. If the engine is placed near the center of the aircraft, the hot exhaust must also be directed out of the fuselage using an ejector/thrust tube. In theory, an ejector can be used to augment a small amount of additional thrust through air entrainment. The ejector installation distance behind the engine was varied and tested at full throttle, but the change in thrust was minimal. After the integration methods were tested and optimized, the techniques were used to help build two student designed remote controlled jets. Using jets, the performance of the engine was studied in flight, and after multiple flights the data showed

  11. Novel design of honeycombs using a seamless combination of auxetic and conventional cores toward phononic band gap engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sushovan; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2015-04-01

    A novel design for the geometric configuration of honeycombs using a seamless combination of auxetic and conventional cores-elements with negative and positive Possion ratios respectively, has been presented. The proposed design has been shown to generate a superior band gap property while retaining all major advantages of a purely conventional or purely auxetic honeycomb structure. Seamless combination ensures that joint cardinality is also retained. Several configurations involving different degree of auxeticity and different proportions auxetic and conventional elements have been analyzed. It has been shown that the preferred configurations open up wide and clean band gap at a significantly lower frequency ranges compared to their pure counterparts. In view of existence of band gaps being desired feature for the phononic applications, reported results might be appealing. Use of such design may enable superior vibration control as well. Proposed configurations can be made isovolumic and iso-weight giving designers a fairer ground of applying such configurations without significantly changing size and weight criteria.

  12. OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out

  13. ITER Core Imaging X-Ray Spectrometer Conceptual Design and Performance Assessment - Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P; Wen, J; Dunn, J; Morris, K

    2011-01-02

    During Phase 2 of our study of the CIXS conceptual design we have tackled additional important issues that are unique to the ITER environment. These include the thermal control of the crystal and detector enclosures located in an environment with a 100-250 C ambient temperature, tritium containment, and the range of crystal and detector movement based on the need for spectral adjustments and the desire to make measurements of colder plasmas. In addressing these issues we have selected a ''Dewar''-type enclosure for the crystals and detectors. Applying realistic view factors for radiant heat and making allowance for conduction we have made engineering studies of this enclosure and showed that the cooling requirements can be solved and the temperature can be kept sufficiently constant without compromising the specification parameters of the CIXS. We have chosen a minimum 3 mm combined thickness of the six beryllium windows needed in a Dewar-type enclosure and showed that a single window of 0.5 mm thickness satisfies tritium containment requirements. For measuring the temperature in cooler ITER plasmas, we have chosen to use the K-shell lines of Fe24+. Iron is the preferred choice because its radiation can be analyzed with the identical CIXS settings used for analyzing the tungsten radiation, i.e., essentially no adjustments besides a simple crystal rotation need to be made. We have, however, included an xy{theta}-drive motor arrangement in our design for fine adjustments and full rotation of the crystal mounts.

  14. Design of 9.271-pressure-ratio 5-stage core compressor and overall performance for first 3 stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinke, Ronald J.

    1986-01-01

    Overall aerodynamic design information is given for all five stages of an axial flow core compressor (74A) having a 9.271 pressure ratio and 29.710 kg/sec flow. For the inlet stage group (first three stages), detailed blade element design information and experimental overall performance are given. At rotor 1 inlet tip speed was 430.291 m/sec, and hub to tip radius ratio was 0.488. A low number of blades per row was achieved by the use of low-aspect-ratio blading of moderate solidity. The high reaction stages have about equal energy addition. Radial energy varied to give constant total pressure at the rotor exit. The blade element profile and shock losses and the incidence and deviation angles were based on relevant experimental data. Blade shapes are mostly double circular arc. Analysis by a three-dimensional Euler code verified the experimentally measured high flow at design speed and IGV-stator setting angles. An optimization code gave an optimal IGV-stator reset schedule for higher measured efficiency at all speeds.

  15. Design of photonic band gap fibers with suppressed higher-order modes: Towards the development of effectively single mode large hollow-core fiber platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Kunimasa; Florous, Nikolaos J.; Murao, Tadashi; Koshiba, Masanori

    2006-08-01

    The objective of the present investigation is to propose and theoretically demonstrate the effective suppression of higher-order modes in large-hollow-core photonic band gap fibers (PBGFs), mainly for low-loss data transmission platforms and/or high power delivery systems. The proposed design strategy is based on the index-matching mechanism of central air-core modes with defected outer core modes. By incorporating several air-cores in the cladding of the PBGF with 6-fold symmetry it is possible to resonantly couple the light corresponding to higher-order modes into the outer core, thus significantly increasing the leakage losses of the higher-order modes in comparison to the fundamental mode, thus making our proposed design to operate in an effectively single mode fashion with polarization independent propagation characteristics. The validation of the procedure is ensured with a detailed PBGF analysis based on an accurate finite element modal solver. Extensive numerical results show that the leakage losses of the higher-order modes can be enhanced in a level of at least 2 orders of magnitude in comparison to those of the fundamental mode. Our investigation is expected to remove an essential obstacle in the development of large-core single-mode hollow-core fibers, thus enabling them to surpass the attenuation of conventional fibers.

  16. Design of photonic band gap fibers with suppressed higher-order modes: towards the development of effectively single mode large hollow-core fiber platforms.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kunimasa; Florous, Nikolaos J; Murao, Tadashi; Koshiba, Masanori

    2006-08-07

    The objective of the present investigation is to propose and theoretically demonstrate the effective suppression of higher-order modes in large-hollow-core photonic band gap fibers (PBGFs), mainly for low-loss data transmission platforms and/or high power delivery systems. The proposed design strategy is based on the index-matching mechanism of central air-core modes with defected outer core modes. By incorporating several air-cores in the cladding of the PBGF with 6-fold symmetry it is possible to resonantly couple the light corresponding to higher-order modes into the outer core, thus significantly increasing the leakage losses of the higher-order modes in comparison to the fundamental mode, thus making our proposed design to operate in an effectively single mode fashion with polarization independent propagation characteristics. The validation of the procedure is ensured with a detailed PBGF analysis based on an accurate finite element modal solver. Extensive numerical results show that the leakage losses of the higher-order modes can be enhanced in a level of at least 2 orders of magnitude in comparison to those of the fundamental mode. Our investigation is expected to remove an essential obstacle in the development of large-core single-mode hollow-core fibers, thus enabling them to surpass the attenuation of conventional fibers.

  17. Design of inhibitors of the HIV-1 integrase core domain using virtual screening

    PubMed Central

    Regon, Preetom; Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Rai, Ashok Kumar; Bordoloi, Manabjyoti; Bezbaruah, Rajib Lochan

    2014-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The integrase (IN) enzyme of HIV interacts with several cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Thus, it represents an appropriate target for antiretroviral drugs (ARVs). We performed virtual screening of database compounds and designed analogues using Elvitegravir (EVG) as a standard compound. The 378 screened compounds were retrieved from ZINC, ChemSpider, PubChem, and ChemBank Chemical Databases based on chemical similarity and literature searches related to the structure of EVG. The Physiochemical properties, Bioactivity, Toxicity and Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion of Molecules (ADME) of these compounds were predicted and docking Experiments were conducted using Molegro Virtual Docker software. The docking and ADME suggested very significant results in regard to EVG. The MolDock and Rerank scores were used to analyze the results. The compounds ZINC26507991 (-84.22), Analogue 9 (-68.49), ZINC20731658 (-66.79), ZINC00210363 (-43.44) showed better binding orientation with IN receptor model with respect to EVG (182.52). The ZINC26507991 has showed significant ADME result. PMID:24616558

  18. High Level Analysis, Design and Validation of Distributed Mobile Systems with CoreASM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahbod, R.; Glässer, U.; Jackson, P. J.; Vajihollahi, M.

    System design is a creative activity calling for abstract models that facilitate reasoning about the key system attributes (desired requirements and resulting properties) so as to ensure these attributes are properly established prior to actually building a system. We explore here the practical side of using the abstract state machine (ASM) formalism in combination with the CoreASM open source tool environment for high-level design and experimental validation of complex distributed systems. Emphasizing the early phases of the design process, a guiding principle is to support freedom of experimentation by minimizing the need for encoding. CoreASM has been developed and tested building on a broad scope of applications, spanning computational criminology, maritime surveillance and situation analysis. We critically reexamine here the CoreASM project in light of three different application scenarios.

  19. Optical designs of reflection and refraction collection optics for a JT-60SA core Thomson scattering system.

    PubMed

    Tojo, H; Hatae, T; Hamano, T; Sakuma, T; Itami, K

    2013-09-01

    Collection optics for core measurements in a JT-60SA Thomson scattering system were designed. The collection optics will be installed in a limited space and have a wide field of view and wide wavelength range. Two types of the optics are therefore suggested: refraction and reflection types. The reflection system, with a large primary mirror, avoids large chromatic aberrations. Because the size limit of the primary mirror and vignetting due to the secondary mirror affect the total collection throughput, conditions that provide the high throughput are found through an optimization. A refraction system with four lenses forming an Ernostar system is also employed. The use of high-refractive-index glass materials enhances the freedom of the lens curvatures, resulting in suppression of the spherical and coma aberration. Moreover, sufficient throughput can be achieved, even with smaller lenses than that of a previous design given in [H. Tojo, T. Hatae, T. Sakuma, T. Hamano, K. Itami, Y. Aida, S. Suitoh, and D. Fujie, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10D539 (2010)]. The optical resolutions of the reflection and refraction systems are both sufficient for understanding the spatial structures in plasma. In particular, the spot sizes at the image of the optics are evaluated as ~0.3 mm and ~0.4 mm, respectively. The throughput for the two systems, including the pupil size and transmissivity, are also compared. The results show that good measurement accuracy (<10%) even at high electron temperatures (<30 keV) can be expected in the refraction system.

  20. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  1. Design and Development of a Run-Time Monitor for Multi-Core Architectures in Cloud Computing

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mikyung; Kang, Dong-In; Crago, Stephen P.; Park, Gyung-Leen; Lee, Junghoon

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new information technology trend that moves computing and data away from desktops and portable PCs into large data centers. The basic principle of cloud computing is to deliver applications as services over the Internet as well as infrastructure. A cloud is a type of parallel and distributed system consisting of a collection of inter-connected and virtualized computers that are dynamically provisioned and presented as one or more unified computing resources. The large-scale distributed applications on a cloud require adaptive service-based software, which has the capability of monitoring system status changes, analyzing the monitored information, and adapting its service configuration while considering tradeoffs among multiple QoS features simultaneously. In this paper, we design and develop a Run-Time Monitor (RTM) which is a system software to monitor the application behavior at run-time, analyze the collected information, and optimize cloud computing resources for multi-core architectures. RTM monitors application software through library instrumentation as well as underlying hardware through a performance counter optimizing its computing configuration based on the analyzed data. PMID:22163811

  2. Design and development of a run-time monitor for multi-core architectures in cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mikyung; Kang, Dong-In; Crago, Stephen P; Park, Gyung-Leen; Lee, Junghoon

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new information technology trend that moves computing and data away from desktops and portable PCs into large data centers. The basic principle of cloud computing is to deliver applications as services over the Internet as well as infrastructure. A cloud is a type of parallel and distributed system consisting of a collection of inter-connected and virtualized computers that are dynamically provisioned and presented as one or more unified computing resources. The large-scale distributed applications on a cloud require adaptive service-based software, which has the capability of monitoring system status changes, analyzing the monitored information, and adapting its service configuration while considering tradeoffs among multiple QoS features simultaneously. In this paper, we design and develop a Run-Time Monitor (RTM) which is a system software to monitor the application behavior at run-time, analyze the collected information, and optimize cloud computing resources for multi-core architectures. RTM monitors application software through library instrumentation as well as underlying hardware through a performance counter optimizing its computing configuration based on the analyzed data.

  3. Optical designs of reflection and refraction collection optics for a JT-60SA core Thomson scattering system

    SciTech Connect

    Tojo, H.; Hatae, T.; Hamano, T.; Sakuma, T.; Itami, K.

    2013-09-15

    Collection optics for core measurements in a JT-60SA Thomson scattering system were designed. The collection optics will be installed in a limited space and have a wide field of view and wide wavelength range. Two types of the optics are therefore suggested: refraction and reflection types. The reflection system, with a large primary mirror, avoids large chromatic aberrations. Because the size limit of the primary mirror and vignetting due to the secondary mirror affect the total collection throughput, conditions that provide the high throughput are found through an optimization. A refraction system with four lenses forming an Ernostar system is also employed. The use of high-refractive-index glass materials enhances the freedom of the lens curvatures, resulting in suppression of the spherical and coma aberration. Moreover, sufficient throughput can be achieved, even with smaller lenses than that of a previous design given in [H. Tojo, T. Hatae, T. Sakuma, T. Hamano, K. Itami, Y. Aida, S. Suitoh, and D. Fujie, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10D539 (2010)]. The optical resolutions of the reflection and refraction systems are both sufficient for understanding the spatial structures in plasma. In particular, the spot sizes at the image of the optics are evaluated as ∼0.3 mm and ∼0.4 mm, respectively. The throughput for the two systems, including the pupil size and transmissivity, are also compared. The results show that good measurement accuracy (<10%) even at high electron temperatures (<30 keV) can be expected in the refraction system.

  4. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Under-The-Wing (UTW) boiler plate nacelle and core exhaust nozzle design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The mechanical design of the boiler plate nacelle and core exhaust nozzle for the QCSEE under the wing engine is presented. The nacelle, which features interchangeable hard-wall and acoustic panels, is to be utilized in the initial engine testing to establish acoustic requirements for the subsequent composite nacelle as well as in the QCSEE over the wing engine configuration.

  5. Tech Prep Degree: Preparing Tomorrow's Workforce. Design, Development and Implementation of a TECH PREP Core Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quad-City/Tri-County Vocational Regions, East Moline, IL.

    A four-stage project was undertaken to develop an exemplary tech prep core program to serve students in the Quad-City/Tri-County Vo Tech Regions school districts and Black Hawk Community College (BHCC) in Illinois. A core group planning committee consisting of education and business/industry representatives used the DACUM (Developing a Curriculum)…

  6. Core sample extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, James; Cobb, Billy; Hart, Steve; Leaptrotte, Jeff; Milhollin, James; Pernik, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The problem of retrieving and storing core samples from a hole drilled on the lunar surface is addressed. The total depth of the hole in question is 50 meters with a maximum diameter of 100 millimeters. The core sample itself has a diameter of 60 millimeters and will be two meters in length. It is therefore necessary to retrieve and store 25 core samples per hole. The design utilizes a control system that will stop the mechanism at a certain depth, a cam-linkage system that will fracture the core, and a storage system that will save and catalogue the cores to be extracted. The Rod Changer and Storage Design Group will provide the necessary tooling to get into the hole as well as to the core. The mechanical design for the cam-linkage system as well as the conceptual design of the storage device are described.

  7. Architecture, Design and Implementation of RC64, a Many-Core High-Performance DSP for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginosar, Ran; Aviely, Peleg; Liran, Tuvia; Alon, Dov; Dobkin, Reuven; Goldberg, Michael

    2013-08-01

    RC64, a novel 64-core many-core signal processing chip targets DSP performance of 12.8 GIPS, 100 GOPS and 12.8 single precision GFLOS while dissipating only 3 Watts. RC64 employs advanced DSP cores, a multi-bank shared memory and a hardware scheduler, supports DDR2 memory and communicates over five proprietary 6.4 Gbps channels. The programming model employs sequential fine-grain tasks and a separate task map to define task dependencies. RC64 is implemented as a 200 MHz ASIC on Tower 130nm CMOS technology, assembled in hermetically sealed ceramic QFP package and qualified to the highest space standards.

  8. A new type of porous graphite foams and their integrated composites with oxide/polymer core/shell nanowires for supercapacitors: structural design, fabrication, and full supercapacitor demonstrations.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xinhui; Chao, Dongliang; Fan, Zhanxi; Guan, Cao; Cao, Xiehong; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2014-03-12

    We attempt to meet the general design requirements for high-performance supercapacitor electrodes by combining the strategies of lightweight substrate, porous nanostructure design, and conductivity modification. We fabricate a new type of 3D porous and thin graphite foams (GF) and use as the light and conductive substrates for the growth of metal oxide core/shell nanowire arrays to form integrated electrodes. The nanowire core is Co3O4, and the shell is a composite of conducting polymer (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), PEDOT) and metal oxide (MnO2). To show the advantage of this integrated electrode design (viz., GF + Co3O4/PEDOT-MnO2 core/shell nanowire arrays), three other different less-integrated electrodes are also prepared for comparison. Full supercapacitor devices based on the GF + Co3O4/PEDOT-MnO2 as positive electrodes exhibit the best performance compared to other three counterparts due to an optimal design of structure and a synergistic effect.

  9. Use of data obtained from core tests in the design and operation of spent brine injection wells in geopressured or geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jorda, R.M.

    1980-03-01

    The effects of formation characteristics on injection well performance are reviewed. Use of data acquired from cores taken from injection horizons to predict injectivity is described. And methods for utilizing data from bench scale testing of brine and core samples to optimize injection well design are presented. Currently available methods and equipment provide data which enable the optimum design of injection wells through analysis of cores taken from injection zones. These methods also provide a means of identifying and correcting well injection problems. Methods described in this report are: bulk density measurement; porosity measurement; pore size distribution analysis; permeability measurement; formation grain size distribution analysis; core description (lithology) and composition; amount, type and distribution of clays and shales; connate water analysis; consolidatability of friable reservoir rocks; grain and pore characterization by scanning electron microscopy; grain and pore characterization by thin section analysis; permeability damage and enhancement tests; distribution of water-borne particles in porous media; and reservoir matrix acidizing effectiveness. The precise methods of obtaining this information are described, and their use in the engineering of injection wells is illustrated by examples, where applicable. (MHR)

  10. Design and evaluation of hydrophobic coated buoyant core as floating drug delivery system for sustained release of cisapride

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Shery; Nair, Anroop B; Patil, Pandurang N

    2010-01-01

    An inert hydrophobic buoyant coated–core was developed as floating drug delivery system (FDDS) for sustained release of cisapride using direct compression technology. Core contained low density, porous ethyl cellulose, which was coated with an impermeable, insoluble hydrophobic coating polymer such as rosin. It was further seal coated with low viscosity hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC E15) to minimize moisture permeation and better adhesion with an outer drug layer. It was found that stable buoyant core was sufficient to float the tablet more than 8 h without the aid of sodium bicarbonate and citric acid. Sustained release of cisapride was achieved with HPMC K4M in the outer drug layer. The floating lag time required for these novel FDDS was found to be zero, however it is likely that the porosity or density of the core is critical for floatability of these tablets. The in vitro release pattern of these tablets in simulated gastric fluid showed the constant and controlled release for prolonged time. It can be concluded that the hydrophobic coated buoyant core could be used as FDDS for gastroretentive delivery system of cisapride or other suitable drugs. PMID:24825997

  11. High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor With Results from FY-2011 Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Pope

    2011-10-01

    The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450

  12. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Primm, R. T.; Ellis, R. J.; Gehin, J. C.; Clarno, K. T.; Williams, K. A.; Moses, D. L.

    2006-11-01

    Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics studies show that, for equivalent operating power [85 MW(t)], a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel cycle based on uranium-10 wt % molybdenum (U-10Mo) metal foil with radially, “continuously graded” fuel meat thickness results in a 15% reduction in peak thermal flux in the beryllium reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as compared to the current highly enriched uranium (HEU) cycle. The uranium-235 content of the LEU core is almost twice the amount of the HEU core when the length of the fuel cycle is kept the same for both fuels. Because the uranium-238 content of an LEU core is a factor of 4 greater than the uranium-235 content, the LEU HFIR core would weigh 30% more than the HEU core. A minimum U-10Mo foil thickness of 84 μm is required to compensate for power peaking in the LEU core although this value could be increased significantly without much penalty. The maximum U-10Mo foil thickness is 457μm. Annual plutonium production from fueling the HFIR with LEU is predicted to be 2 kg. For dispersion fuels, the operating power for HFIR would be reduced considerably below 85 MW due to thermal considerations and due to the requirement of a 26-d fuel cycle. If an acceptable fuel can be developed, it is estimated that $140 M would be required to implement the conversion of the HFIR site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from an HEU fuel cycle to an LEU fuel cycle. To complete the conversion by fiscal year 2014 would require that all fuel development and qualification be completed by the end of fiscal year 2009. Technological development areas that could increase the operating power of HFIR are identified as areas for study in the future.

  13. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  14. Surface design of core-shell superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles drives record relaxivity values in functional MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Maity, Dipak; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Sedenkova, Veronika; Tucek, Jiri; Safarova, Klara; Polakova, Katerina; Tomankova, Katerina; Diwoky, Clemens; Stollberger, Rudolf; Machala, Libor; Zboril, Radek

    2012-12-04

    Core-shell hydrophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, surface functionalized with either terephthalic acid or 2-amino terephthalic acid, showed large negative MRI contrast ability, validating the advantage of using low molecular weight and π-conjugated canopies for engineering functional nanostructures with superior performances.

  15. Basil Seed Inspired Design for a Monodisperse Core-Shell Sn@C Hybrid Confined in a Carbon Matrix for Enhanced Lithium-Storage Performance.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jinwen; Liu, Bing; Cao, Minhua

    2016-12-19

    Tin anode materials have attracted much attention owing to their high theoretical capacity, although rapid capacity fade is commonly observed mainly because of structural degradation resulting from volume expansion. Herein, we report a versatile strategy based on a basil seed inspired design for constructing a monodisperse core-shell Sn@C hybrid confined in a carbon matrix (Sn basil seeds). Analogous to the structure of basil seeds soaked in water, Sn basil seeds are used to tackle the volume expansion problem in lithium-ion batteries. Monodisperse Sn cores are encapsulated by a thick carbon layer, which thus lowers the electrolyte contact area. The obtained Sn basil seeds are closely packed to construct a framework that supplies fast electron transport and provides a reinforced mechanical backbone. As a consequence, an ensemble of this hybrid network shows significantly enhanced lithium-storage performance with a high capacity of 870 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 0.4 A g(-1) over 600 cycles. After the intense cycling, the Sn cores transform into ultrafine nanocrystals with sizes of 3-6 nm. The structural and morphological evolution of the Sn cores can reasonably explain the gradual increase in the capacity and the long-term cycling ability of our Sn basil seeds.

  16. Designing 3D interconnected continuous nanoporous Co/CoO core-shell nanostructure electrodes for a high-performance pseudocapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Chen; Zhou, Qin; Qu, Gan; Chen, Xinqi; Wang, Hai; Sun, Daming; Wang, Bixiao; Xu, Lifeng; Tang, Yiwen

    2017-02-01

    A high-performance supercapacitor electrode is designed and fabricated with the 3D interconnected continuous nanoporous Co/CoO core-shell hybrid nanostructure grown on nickel foam. The Co/CoO core-shell hybrid nanostructures are obtained via a hydrothermal method, followed by high-temperature annealing in hydrogen atmosphere, and finally placed in air at 50 °C for 1 h. The Co/CoO core-shell nanostructure assembled by a conductive metal-core and a CoO shell, brings low resistance, high specific capacitance of 5.632 F cm-2 and good capability stability (81.5% capacitance retention after 6000 cycles). An asymmetric supercapacitor device built by the Co/CoO (positive electrode) and activated carbon (negative electrode) can deliver a working voltage of 1.7 V and display a high energy density of 0.002 67 Wh cm-2 at a power density of 0.001 62 W cm-2, which is far superior to that of a supercapacitor at a similar power density.

  17. Modeling and design of a new core-moderator assembly and neutron beam ports for the Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucar, Dundar

    This study is for modeling and designing a new reactor core-moderator assembly and new neutron beam ports that aimed to expand utilization of a new beam hall of the Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR). The PSBR is a part of the Radiation Science and Engineering Facility (RSEC) and is a TRIGA MARK III type research reactor with a movable core placed in a large pool and is capable to produce 1MW output. This reactor is a pool-type reactor with pulsing capability up to 2000 MW for 10-20 msec. There are seven beam ports currently installed to the reactor. The PSBR's existing core design limits the experimental capability of the facility, as only two of the seven available neutron beam ports are usable. The finalized design features an optimized result in light of the data obtained from neutronic and thermal-hydraulics analyses as well as geometrical constraints. A new core-moderator assembly was introduced to overcome the limitations of the existing PSBR design, specifically maximizing number of available neutron beam ports and mitigating the hydrogen gamma contamination of the neutron beam channeled in the beam ports. A crescent-shaped moderator is favored in the new PSBR design since it enables simultaneous use of five new neutron beam ports in the facility. Furthermore, the crescent shape sanctions a coupling of the core and moderator, which reduces the hydrogen gamma contamination significantly in the new beam ports. A coupled MURE and MCNP5 code optimization analysis was performed to calculate the optimum design parameters for the new PSBR. Thermal-hydraulics analysis of the new design was achieved using ANSYS Fluent CFD code. In the current form, the PSBR is cooled by natural convection of the pool water. The driving force for the natural circulation of the fluid is the heat generation within the fuel rods. The convective heat data was generated at the reactor's different operating powers by using TRIGSIMS, the fuel management code of the PSBR core. In the CFD

  18. The role of plastic β-hairpin and weak hydrophobic core in the stability and unfolding of a full sequence design protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hongxing; Duan, Yong

    2004-12-01

    In this study, the thermal stability of a designed α/β protein FSD (full sequence design) was studied by explicit solvent simulations at three moderate temperatures, 273 K, 300 K, and 330 K. The average properties of the ten trajectories at each temperature were analyzed. The thermal unfolding, as judged by backbone root-mean-square deviation and percentage of native contacts, was displayed with increased sampling outside of the native basin as the temperature was raised. The positional fluctuation of the hairpin residues was significantly higher than that of the helix residues at all three temperatures. The hairpin segment displayed certain plasticity even at 273 K. Apart from the terminal residues, the highest fluctuation was shown in the turn residues 7-9. Secondary structure analysis manifested the structural heterogeneity of the hairpin segment. It was also revealed by the simulation that the hydrophobic core was vulnerable to thermal denaturation. Consistent with the experiment, the I7Y mutation in the double mutant FSD-EY (FSD with mutations Q1E and I7Y) dramatically increased the protein stability in the simulation, suggesting that the plasticity of the hairpin can be partially compensated by a stronger hydrophobic core. As for the unfolding pathway, the breathing of the hydrophobic core and the separation of the two secondary structure elements (α helix and β hairpin) was the initiation step of the unfolding. The loss of global contacts from the separation further destabilized the hairpin structure and also led to the unwinding of the helix.

  19. Recent developments in pressure coring

    SciTech Connect

    McFall, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The current rapid growth in the number of enhanced oil and gas recovery projects has created a strong demand for reservoir data such as true residual oil saturations. The companies providing pressure coring services have moved to fill this need. Two recent developments have emerged with the potential of significantly improving the present performance of pressure coring. Coring bits utilizing synthetic diamond cutters have demonstrated coring rates of one-foot per minute while improving core recovery. It is also apparent that cores of a near-unconsolidated nature are more easily recovered. In addition, a special low invasion fluid that is placed in the core retriever has demonstrated reduced core washing by the drilling mud and a decrease in the complexity of preparing cores for analysis. This paper describes the design, laboratory, and field testing efforts that led to these coring improvements. Also, experience in utilizing these developments while recovering over 100 cores is discussed.

  20. Improved hollow-core photonic crystal fiber design for delivery of nanosecond pulses in laser micromachining applications.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Jonathan D; Couny, Francois; Russell, Phillip St J; Jones, Julian D C; Knight, Jonathan C; Hand, Duncan P

    2005-07-20

    We report the delivery of high-energy nanosecond pulses (approximately 65 ns pulse width) from a high-repetition-rate (up to 100 kHz) Q-switched Nd:YAG laser through the fundamental mode of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) at 1064 nm. The guided mode in the HC-PCF has a low overlap with the glass, allowing delivery of pulses with energies above those attainable with other fibers. Energies greater than 0.5 mJ were delivered in a single spatial mode through the hollow-core fiber, providing the pulse energy and high beam quality required for micromachining of metals. Practical micromachining of a metal sheet by fiber delivery has been demonstrated.

  1. Design and characterization of core-shell mPEG-PLGA composite microparticles for development of cell-scaffold constructs.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yanhong; Gallego, Monica Ramos; Nielsen, Lene Feldskov; Jorgensen, Lene; Møller, Eva Horn; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2013-09-01

    Appropriate scaffolds capable of providing suitable biological and structural guidance are of great importance to generate cell-scaffold constructs for cell-based tissue engineering. The aim of the present study was to develop composite microparticles with a structure to provide functionality as a combined drug delivery/scaffold system. Composite microparticles were produced by incorporating either alginate/dermatan sulfate (Alg/DS) or alginate/chitosan/dermatan sulfate (Alg/CS/DS) particles in mPEG-PLGA microparticles using coaxial ultrasonic atomization. The encapsulation and distribution of Alg/DS or Alg/CS/DS particles in the mPEG-PLGA microparticles were significantly dependent on the operating conditions, including the flow rate ratio (Qout/Qin) and the viscosity of the polymer solutions (Vout, Vin) between the outer and the inner feeding channels. The core-shell composite microparticles containing the Alg/DS particles or the Alg/CS/DS particles displayed 40% and 65% DS release in 10 days, respectively, as compared to the DS directly loaded microparticles showing 90% DS release during the same time interval. The release profiles of DS correlate with the cell proliferation of fibroblasts, i.e. more sustainable cell growth was induced by the DS released from the core-shell composite microparticles comprising Alg/CS/DS particles. After seeding fibroblasts onto the composite microparticles, excellent cell adhesion was observed, and a successful assembly of the cell-scaffold constructs was induced within 7 days. Therefore, the present study demonstrates a novel strategy for fabrication of core-shell composite microparticles comprising additional particulate drug carriers in the core, which provides controlled delivery of DS and favorable cell biocompatibility; an approach to potentially achieve cell-based tissue regeneration.

  2. Design of a porous cored hexagonal photonic crystal fiber based optical sensor with high relative sensitivity for lower operating wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Shuvo; Chowdhury, Sawrab; Ahmed, Kawsar; Asaduzzaman, Sayed

    2017-03-01

    In this article, highly sensitive and low confinement loss enriching micro structured photonic crystal fiber (PCF) has been suggested as an optical sensor. The proposed PCF is porous cored hexagonal (P-HPCF) where cladding contains five layers with circular air holes and core vicinity is formed by two layered elliptical air holes. Two fundamental propagation characteristics such as the relative sensitivity and confinement loss of the proposed P-HPCF have been numerically scrutinized by the full vectorial finite element method (FEM) simulation procedure. The optimized values are modified with different geometrical parameters like diameters of circular or elliptical air holes, pitches of the core, and cladding region over a spacious assortment of wavelength from 0.8 µm to 1.8 µm. All pretending results exhibit that the relative sensitivity is enlarged according to decrement of wavelength of the transmission band (O+E+S+C+L+U). In addition, all useable liquids reveal the maximum sensitivity of 57.00%, 57.18%, and 57.27% for n=1.33, 1.354, and 1.366 respectively by lower band. Moreover, effective area, nonlinear coefficient, frequency, propagation constant, total electric energy, total magnetic energy, and wave number in free space of the proposed P-HPCF have been reported recently.

  3. Design and overall performance of four highly loaded, high speed inlet stages for an advanced high-pressure-ratio core compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, L.; Moore, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The detailed design and overall performances of four inlet stages for an advanced core compressor are presented. These four stages represent two levels of design total pressure ratio (1.82 and 2.05), two levels of rotor aspect ratio (1.19 and 1.63), and two levels of stator aspect ratio (1.26 and 1.78). The individual stages were tested over the stable operating flow range at 70, 90, and 100 percent of design speeds. The performances of the low aspect ratio configurations were substantially better than those of the high aspect ratio configurations. The two low aspect ratio configurations achieved peak efficiencies of 0.876 and 0.872 and corresponding stage efficiencies of 0.845 and 0.840. The high aspect ratio configurations achieved peak ratio efficiencies of 0.851 and 0.849 and corresponding stage efficiencies of 0.821 and 0.831.

  4. Fuel and Core Design Options to Overcome the Heavy Metal Loading Limit and Improve Performance and Safety of Liquid Salt Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, Bojan; Maldonado, Ivan

    2016-04-14

    The research performed in this project addressed the issue of low heavy metal loading and the resulting reduced cycle length with increased refueling frequency, inherent to all FHR designs with solid, non-movable fuel based on TRISO particles. Studies performed here focused on AHTR type of reactor design with plate (“plank”) fuel. Proposal to FY12 NEUP entitled “Fuel and Core Design Options to Overcome the Heavy Metal Loading Limit and Improve Performance and Safety of Liquid Salt Cooled Reactors” was selected for award, and the 3-year project started in August 2012. A 4-month NCE was granted and the project completed on December 31, 2015. The project was performed by Georgia Tech (Prof. Bojan Petrovic, PI) and University of Tennessee (Prof. Ivan Maldonado, Co-PI), with a total funding of $758,000 over 3 years. In addition to two Co-PIs, the project directly engaged 6 graduate students (at doctoral or MS level) and 2 postdoctoral researchers. Additionally, through senior design projects and graduate advanced design projects, another 23 undergraduate and 12 graduate students were exposed to and trained in the salt reactor technology. We see this as one of the important indicators of the project’s success and effectiveness. In the process, 1 journal article was published (with 3 journal articles in preparation), together with 8 peer-reviewed full conference papers, 8 peer-reviewed extended abstracts, as well as 1 doctoral dissertation and 2 master theses. The work included both development of models and methodologies needed to adequately analyze this type of reactor, fuel, and its fuel cycle, as well as extensive analyses and optimization of the fuel and core design.

  5. Coronary CT angiography using 64 detector rows: methods and design of the multi-centre trial CORE-64

    PubMed Central

    Vavere, Andrea L.; Rochitte, Carlos E.; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; de Roos, Albert; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Lemos, Pedro A.; Bush, David E.; Lardo, Albert C.; Texter, John; Brinker, Jeffery; Cox, Christopher; Clouse, Melvin E.; Lima, João A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) for the noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenoses is a promising candidate for widespread clinical application because of its noninvasive nature and high sensitivity and negative predictive value as found in several previous studies using 16 to 64 simultaneous detector rows. A multi-centre study of CT coronary angiography using 16 simultaneous detector rows has shown that 16-slice CT is limited by a high number of nondiagnostic cases and a high false-positive rate. A recent meta-analysis indicated a significant interaction between the size of the study sample and the diagnostic odds ratios suggestive of small study bias, highlighting the importance of evaluating MSCT using 64 simultaneous detector rows in a multi-centre approach with a larger sample size. In this manuscript we detail the objectives and methods of the prospective “CORE-64” trial (“Coronary Evaluation Using Multidetector Spiral Computed Tomography Angiography using 64 Detectors”). This multi-centre trialwas unique in that it assessed the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in nine centres worldwide in comparison to conventional coronary angiography. In conclusion, the multi-centre, multi-institutional and multi-continental trial CORE-64 has great potential to ultimately assess the per-patient diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography using 64 simultaneous detector rows. PMID:18998142

  6. Core-shell designs of photoluminescent nanodiamonds with porous silica coatings for bioimaging and drug delivery II: application.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Neeraj; Näreoja, Tuomas; von Haartman, Eva; Karaman, Didem Şen; Jiang, Hua; Koho, Sami; Dolenko, Tatiana A; Hänninen, Pekka E; Vlasov, Denis I; Ralchenko, Victor G; Hosomi, Satoru; Vlasov, Igor I; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Rosenholm, Jessica M

    2013-05-07

    Recent advances within materials science and its interdisciplinary applications in biomedicine have emphasized the potential of using a single multifunctional composite material for concurrent drug delivery and biomedical imaging. Here we present a novel composite material consisting of a photoluminescent nanodiamond (ND) core with a porous silica (SiO2) shell. This novel multifunctional probe serves as an alternative nanomaterial to address the existing problems with delivery and subsequent tracing of the particles. Whereas the unique optical properties of ND allows for long-term live cell imaging and tracking of cellular processes, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have proven to be efficient drug carriers. The advantages of both ND and MSNs were hereby integrated in the new composite material, ND@MSN. The optical properties provided by the ND core rendered the nanocomposite suitable for microscopy imaging in fluorescence and reflectance mode, as well as super-resolution microscopy as a STED label; whereas the porous silica coating provided efficient intracellular delivery capacity, especially in surface-functionalized form. This study serves as a demonstration how this novel nanomaterial can be exploited for both bioimaging and drug delivery for future theranostic applications.

  7. Core compressor exit stage study. Volume 5: Design and performance report for the Rotor C/Stator B configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    Rear stage blading designs that have lower losses in their endwall boundary layer regions were developed. The design of rotor-C and the performance results for rotor-C running with stator B are described. A low speed research compressor is utilized as the principal investigative tool. Four identical stages of blading are used to obtained data in a true multistage environment.

  8. Proposed Design and Operation of a Heat Pipe Reactor using the Sandia National Laboratories Annular Core Test Facility and Existing UZrH Fuel Pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Pandya, Tara; Peters, Curtis

    2005-02-01

    Heat Pipe Reactors (HPR) for space power conversion systems offer a number of advantages not easily provided by other systems. They require no pumping, their design easily deals with freezing and thawing of the liquid metal, and they can provide substantial levels of redundancy. Nevertheless, no reactor has ever been operated and cooled with heat pipes, and the startup and other operational characteristics of these systems remain largely unknown. Signification deviations from normal reactor heat removal mechanisms exist, because the heat pipes have fundamental heat removal limits due to sonic flow issues at low temperatures. This paper proposes an early prototypic test of a Heat Pipe Reactor (using existing 20% enriched nuclear fuel pins) to determine the operational characteristics of the HPR. The proposed design is similar in design to the HOMER and SAFE-300 HPR designs (Elliot, Lipinski, and Poston, 2003; Houts, et. al, 2003). However, this reactor uses existing UZrH fuel pins that are coupled to potassium heat pipes modules. The prototype reactor would be located in the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor Facility where the fuel pins currently reside. The proposed reactor would use the heat pipes to transport the heat from the UZrH fuel pins to a water pool above the core, and the heat transport to the water pool would be controlled by adjusting the pressure and gas type within a small annulus around each heat pipe. The reactor would operate as a self-critical assembly at power levels up to 200 kWth. Because the nuclear heated HPR test uses existing fuel and because it would be performed in an existing facility with the appropriate safety authorization basis, the test could be performed rapidly and inexpensively. This approach makes it possible to validate the operation of a HPR and also measure the feedback mechanisms for a typical HPR design. A test of this nature would be the world's first operating Heat Pipe Reactor. This reactor is therefore called "HPR-1".

  9. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual report for FY 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Freels, James D; Ilas, Germina; Miller, James Henry; Primm, Trent; Sease, John D; Guida, Tracey; Jolly, Brian C

    2010-02-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2009 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Studies are reported of the application of a silicon coating to surrogates for spheres of uranium-molybdenum alloy. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. A description of the progress in developing a finite element thermal hydraulics model of the LEU core is provided.

  10. Biomimetic Mussel Adhesive Inspired Anchor to Design ZnO@Poly(3-Hexylthiophene) Hybrid Core@Corona Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Awada, Hussein; Mezzasalma, Leila; Blanc, Sylvie; Flahaut, Delphine; Dagron-Lartigau, Christine; Lyskawa, Joël; Woisel, Patrice; Bousquet, Antoine; Billon, Laurent

    2015-08-01

    The functionalization of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles by poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) brush is completed by the combination of a mussel inspired biomimetic anchoring group and Huisgen cyclo-addition "click chemistry." Herein, the direct coupling of an azide modified catechol derivative with an alkyne end-functionalized P3HT is described. This macromolecular binding agent is used to access core@corona ZnO@P3HT with a stable and homogeneous conjugated organic corona. Preliminary photoluminescence measurement proves an efficient electron transfer from the donor P3HT to the acceptor ZnO nanoparticles upon grafting, thus demonstrating the potential of such a combination in organic electronics.

  11. Design of multifunctionalized γ-Fe2O3@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles for enzymes immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgelin, Thomas; Maurice, Vincent; Malezieux, Bernard; Siaugue, Jean-Michel; Cabuil, Valerie

    2010-02-01

    This article deals with the first covalent grafting of an enzyme on twice functionalized γ-Fe2O3@SiO2 core-shell magnetic nanoparticles. First, amino-PEG functionalized nanoparticles were synthesized in order to comply with non-toxic platforms that would be stable in high concentration and would exhibit chemical groups to allow further coupling with biomolecules. This approach produces a colloidal suspension of covalently grafted enzymes that remains stable for months and mimics the enzyme-substrate interactions in solution. Secondly, nanoparticles synthesis and enzyme coupling process were reported and the catalytic properties of bound enzymes were measured and compared with that of the free one. These new materials appear to be useful tools for enzymatic catalysis research and may be extended to other biomolecules. Furthermore, magnetic properties of these materials open the way to separation, purification, and transport under magnetic field.

  12. Diagnostic performance of combined noninvasive coronary angiography and myocardial perfusion imaging using 320 row detector computed tomography: design and implementation of the CORE320 multicenter, multinational diagnostic study.

    PubMed

    Vavere, Andrea L; Simon, Gregory G; George, Richard T; Rochitte, Carlos E; Arai, Andrew E; Miller, Julie M; Di Carli, Marcello; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Zadeh, Armin A; Dewey, Marc; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Laham, Roger; Rybicki, Frank J; Schuijf, Joanne D; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; Kuribyashi, Sachio; Sakuma, Hajime; Nomura, Cesar; Yaw, Tan Swee; Kofoed, Klaus F; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Clouse, Melvin E; Brinker, Jeffrey; Cox, Christopher; Lima, Joao A C

    2011-01-01

    Multidetector coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) is a promising modality for widespread clinical application because of its noninvasive nature and high diagnostic accuracy as found in previous studies using 64 to 320 simultaneous detector rows. It is, however, limited in its ability to detect myocardial ischemia. In this article, we describe the design of the CORE320 study ("Combined coronary atherosclerosis and myocardial perfusion evaluation using 320 detector row computed tomography"). This prospective, multicenter, multinational study is unique in that it is designed to assess the diagnostic performance of combined 320-row CTA and myocardial CT perfusion imaging (CTP) in comparison with the combination of invasive coronary angiography and single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI). The trial is being performed at 16 medical centers located in 8 countries worldwide. CT has the potential to assess both anatomy and physiology in a single imaging session. The co-primary aim of the CORE320 study is to define the per-patient diagnostic accuracy of the combination of coronary CTA and myocardial CTP to detect physiologically significant coronary artery disease compared with (1) the combination of conventional coronary angiography and SPECT-MPI and (2) conventional coronary angiography alone. If successful, the technology could revolutionize the management of patients with symptomatic CAD.

  13. The fast-spectrum transmutation experimental facility FASTEF: Main design achievements (Part 1: Core and primary system) within the FP7-CDT collaborative project of the European Commission

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruyn, D.; Fernandez, R.; Mansani, L.; Woaye-Hune, A.; Sarotto, M.; Bubelis, E.

    2012-07-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is the flexible experimental accelerator-driven system (ADS) in development at SCK CEN in replacement of its material testing reactor BR2. SCK CEN in association with 17 European partners from industry, research centres and academia, responded to the FP7 (Seventh Framework Programme) call from the European Commission to establish a Central Design Team (CDT) for the design of a Fast Spectrum Transmutation Experimental Facility (FASTEF) able to demonstrate efficient transmutation and associated technology through a system working in subcritical and/or critical mode. The project has started on April 01, 2009 for a period of three years. In this paper, we present the latest configuration of the reactor core and primary system. The FASTEF facility has evolved quite a lot since the intermediate reporting done at the ICAPP'10 and ICAPP'11 conferences 1 2. If it remains a small-scale facility, the core power amounts now up to 100 MWth in critical mode. In a companion paper 3, we present the concept of the reactor building and the plant layout. (authors)

  14. Preparation, Characterization, and Optimization of Folic Acid-Chitosan-Methotrexate Core-Shell Nanoparticles by Box-Behnken Design for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Naghibi Beidokhti, Hamid Reza; Ghaffarzadegan, Reza; Mirzakhanlouei, Sasan; Ghazizadeh, Leila; Dorkoosh, Farid Abedin

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the combined influence of independent variables in the preparation of folic acid-chitosan-methotrexate nanoparticles (FA-Chi-MTX NPs). These NPs were designed and prepared for targeted drug delivery in tumor. The NPs of each batch were prepared by coaxial electrospray atomization method and evaluated for particle size (PS) and particle size distribution (PSD). The independent variables were selected to be concentration of FA-chitosan, ratio of shell solution flow rate to core solution flow rate, and applied voltage. The process design of experiments (DOE) was obtained with three factors in three levels by Design expert software. Box-Behnken design was used to select 15 batches of experiments randomly. The chemical structure of FA-chitosan was examined by FTIR. The NPs of each batch were collected separately, and morphologies of NPs were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The captured pictures of all batches were analyzed by ImageJ software. Mean PS and PSD were calculated for each batch. Polynomial equation was produced for each response. The FE-SEM results showed the mean diameter of the core-shell NPs was around 304 nm, and nearly 30% of the produced NPs are in the desirable range. Optimum formulations were selected. The validation of DOE optimization results showed errors around 2.5 and 2.3% for PS and PSD, respectively. Moreover, the feasibility of using prepared NPs to target tumor extracellular pH was shown, as drug release was greater in the pH of endosome (acidic medium). Finally, our results proved that FA-Chi-MTX NPs were active against the human epithelial cervical cancer (HeLa) cells.

  15. Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

    2012-09-01

    Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace

  16. An Overview of Demise Calculations, Conceptual Design Studies, and Hydrazine Compatibility Testing for the GPM Core Spacecraft Propellant Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Robert H.; Moore, N. R.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an ongoing Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) project whose basic objective is to improve global precipitation measurements. It has been decided that the GPM spacecraft is to be a "design for demise" spacecraft. This requirement resulted in the need for a propellant tank that would also demise or ablate to an appropriate degree upon re-entry. This paper will describe GSFC-performed spacecraft and tankage demise analyses, vendor conceptual design studies, and vendor performed hydrazine compatibility and wettability tests performed on 6061 and 2219 aluminum alloys.

  17. Collaboration by Design: Integrating Core Pedagogical Content and Special Education Methods Courses in a Preservice Secondary Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Timothy J.; Andres, Debra K.; McKeeman, Leah A.; Lane, Jessica J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article the authors describe a collaboratively designed secondary teacher education program focused on the preparation of preservice general education teachers to work effectively with children who have diverse learning needs in inclusive classrooms. The focus of the article is on the collaborative development and initial evaluation of the…

  18. Pharmacokinetics of core-polymerized, boron-conjugated micelles designed for boron neutron capture therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Sumitani, Shogo; Oishi, Motoi; Yaguchi, Tatsuya; Murotani, Hiroki; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Suzuki, Minoru; Ono, Koji; Yanagie, Hironobu; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2012-05-01

    Core-polymerized and boron-conjugated micelles (PM micelles) were prepared by free radical copolymerization of a PEG-b-PLA block copolymer bearing an acetal group and a methacryloyl group (acetal-PEG-b-PLA-MA), with 1-(4-vinylbenzyl)-closo-carborane (VB-carborane), and the utility of these micelles as a tumor-targeted boron delivery system was investigated for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Non-polymerized micelles (NPM micelles) that incorporated VB-carborane physically showed significant leakage of VB-carborane (ca. 50%) after 12 h incubation with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) at 37 °C. On the other hand, no leakage from the PM micelles was observed even after 48 h of incubation. To clarify the pharmacokinetics of the micelles, (125)I (radioisotope)-labeled PM and NPM micelles were administered to colon-26 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. The (125)I-labeled PM micelles showed prolonged blood circulation (area under the concentration curve (AUC): 943.4) than the (125)I-labeled NPM micelles (AUC: 495.1), whereas tumor accumulation was similar for both types of micelles (AUC(PM micelle): 249.6, AUC(NPM micelle): 201.1). In contrast, the tumor accumulation of boron species in the PM micelles (AUC: 268.6) was 7-fold higher than the NPM micelles (AUC: 37.1), determined by ICP-AES. Thermal neutron irradiation yielded tumor growth suppression in the tumor-bearing mice treated with the PM micelles without reduction in body weight. On the basis of these data, the PM micelles represent a promising approach to the creation of boron carrier for BNCT.

  19. Influence of core design, production technique, and material selection on fracture behavior of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal fixed dental prostheses produced using different multilayer techniques: split-file, over-pressing, and manually built-up veneers

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Deyar Jallal Hadi; Linderoth, Ewa H; Wennerberg, Ann; Vult Von Steyern, Per

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate and compare the fracture strength and fracture mode in eleven groups of currently, the most commonly used multilayer three-unit all-ceramic yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with respect to the choice of core material, veneering material area, manufacturing technique, design of connectors, and radii of curvature of FDP cores. Materials and methods A total of 110 three-unit Y-TZP FDP cores with one intermediate pontic were made. The FDP cores in groups 1–7 were made with a split-file design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain, computer-aided design-on veneers, and over-pressed veneers. Groups 8–11 consisted of FDPs with a state-of-the-art design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain. All the FDP cores were subjected to simulated aging and finally loaded to fracture. Results There was a significant difference (P<0.05) between the core designs, but not between the different types of Y-TZP materials. The split-file designs with VITABLOCS® (1,806±165 N) and e.max® ZirPress (1,854±115 N) and the state-of-the-art design with VITA VM® 9 (1,849±150 N) demonstrated the highest mean fracture values. Conclusion The shape of a split-file designed all-ceramic reconstruction calls for a different dimension protocol, compared to traditionally shaped ones, as the split-file design leads to sharp approximal indentations acting as fractural impressions, thus decreasing the overall strength. The design of a framework is a crucial factor for the load bearing capacity of an all-ceramic FDP. The state-of-the-art design is preferable since the split-file designed cores call for a cross-sectional connector area at least 42% larger, to have the same load bearing capacity as the state-of-the-art designed cores. All veneering materials and techniques tested in the study, split-file, over-press, built-up porcelains, and glass–ceramics are, with a great safety margin, sufficient for clinical use

  20. Micro coring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, David; Brooks, Marshall; Chen, Paul; Dwelle, Paul; Fischer, Ben

    1989-01-01

    A micro-coring apparatus for lunar exploration applications, that is compatible with the other components of the Walking Mobile Platform, was designed. The primary purpose of core sampling is to gain an understanding of the geological composition and properties of the prescribed environment. This procedure has been used extensively for Earth studies and in limited applications during lunar explorations. The corer is described and analyzed for effectiveness.

  1. Functionalized porous silica&maghemite core-shell nanoparticles for applications in medicine: design, synthesis, and immunotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zasońska, Beata A.; Líšková, Aurélia; Kuricová, Miroslava; Tulinská, Jana; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Čiampor, Fedor; Vávra, Ivo; Dušinská, Mária; Ilavská, Silvia; Horváthová, Mira; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine cytotoxicity and effect of silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on immune response, in particular lymphocyte proliferative activity, phagocytic activity, and leukocyte respiratory burst and in vitro production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and 8 (IL-8), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Methods Maghemite was prepared by coprecipitation of iron salts with ammonia, oxidation with NaOCl and modified by tetramethyl orthosilicate and aminosilanes. Particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cytotoxicity and lymphocyte proliferative activity were assessed using [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA of proliferating human peripheral blood cells. Phagocytic activity and leukocyte respiratory burst were measured by flow cytometry; cytokine levels in cell supernatants were determined by ELISA. Results γ-Fe2O3&SiO2-NH2 MNPs were 13 nm in size. According to TEM, they were localized in the cell cytoplasm and extracellular space. Neither cytotoxic effect nor significant differences in T-lymphocyte and T-dependent B-cell proliferative response were found at particle concentrations 0.12-75 μg/cm2 after 24, 48, and 72 h incubation. Significantly increased production of IL-6 and 8, and GM-CSF cytokines was observed in the cells treated with 3, 15, and 75 µg of particles/cm2 for 48 h and stimulated with pokeweed mitogen (PHA). No significant changes in TNF-α and IFN-γ production were observed. MNPs did not affect phagocytic activity of monocytes and granulocytes when added to cells for 24 and 48 h. Phagocytic respiratory burst was significantly enhanced in the cultures exposed to 75 µg MNPs/cm2 for 48 h. Conclusions The cytotoxicity and in vitro immunotoxicity were found to be minimal in the newly developed porous core-shell γ-Fe2

  2. A Briefing on Concept Design and Operation for the Core Instrumentation Subsystem at the National Training Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-29

    TARGET LIST MAINTENANCE I TARGET GROUP LIST MAINTENANCE I INDIRECT FIRE MISSION MAINTENANCE/PROCESSING PRE-PLANNED TARGET LIST * 1,000 TARGETS - 500...LOC TGTNR 7GT LOC AANNN AANNNNNNNN AANNN AANNNNNNNN AANNN MANNNNNNNN AANNN AANNNNNNNN TARGET GROUP LIST * 50 GROUPS I EACH GROUP: - FORCE - GROUP...DESIGNATION - UP TO 10 TARGETS TARGET GROUP DISPLAY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 a 0 0 00 0’ GROUP OF TARGETS 2-123 0O "M4 vY MAN: FORCE DLlE FOR OR OPFOR GROUP DESIG

  3. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Irciniastatin Analogues: Simplification of the Tetrahydropyran Core and the C(11) Substituents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of irciniastatin A (1) analogues, achieved by removal of three synthetically challenging structural units, as well as by functional group manipulation of the C(11) substituent of both irciniastatins A and B (1 and 2), has been achieved. To this end, we first designed a convergent synthetic route toward the diminutive analogue (+)-C(8)-desmethoxy-C(11)-deoxy-C(12)-didesmethylirciniastatin (6). Key transformations include an acid-catalyzed 6-exo-tet pyran cyclization, a chiral Lewis acid mediated aldol reaction, and a facile amide union. The absolute configuration of 6 was confirmed via spectroscopic analysis (CD spectrum, HSQC, COSY, and ROESY NMR experiments). Structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies of 6 demonstrate that the absence of the three native structural units permits access to analogues possessing cytotoxic activity in the nanomolar range. Second, manipulation of the C(11) position, employing late-stage synthetic intermediates from our irciniastatin syntheses, provides an additional five analogues (7–11). Biological evaluation of these analogues indicates a high functional group tolerance at position C(11). PMID:26879056

  4. Transient climate simulations of the deglaciation 21-9 thousand years before present; PMIP4 Core experiment design and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovic, Ruza; Gregoire, Lauren; Kageyama, Masa; Roche, Didier; Valdes, Paul; Burke, Andrea; Drummond, Rosemarie; Peltier, W. Richard; Tarasov, Lev

    2016-04-01

    The last deglaciation, which marked the transition between the last glacial and present interglacial periods, was punctuated by a series of rapid (centennial and decadal) climate changes. Numerical climate models are useful for investigating mechanisms that underpin the events, especially now that some of the complex models can be run for multiple millennia. We have set up a Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP) working group to coordinate efforts to run transient simulations of the last deglaciation, and to facilitate the dissemination of expertise between modellers and those engaged with reconstructing the climate of the last 21 thousand years. Here, we present the design of a coordinated Core simulation over the period 21-9 thousand years before present (ka) with time varying orbital forcing, greenhouse gases, ice sheets, and other geographical changes. A choice of two ice sheet reconstructions is given. Additional focussed simulations will also be coordinated on an ad-hoc basis by the working group, for example to investigate the effect of ice sheet and iceberg meltwater, and the uncertainty in other forcings. Some of these focussed simulations will concentrate on shorter durations around specific events to allow the more computationally expensive models to take part. Ivanovic, R. F., Gregoire, L. J., Kageyama, M., Roche, D. M., Valdes, P. J., Burke, A., Drummond, R., Peltier, W. R., and Tarasov, L.: Transient climate simulations of the deglaciation 21-9 thousand years before present; PMIP4 Core experiment design and boundary conditions, Geosci. Model Dev. Discuss., 8, 9045-9102, doi:10.5194/gmdd-8-9045-2015, 2015.

  5. DESIGN STUDY FOR A LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM CORE FOR THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR, ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, David Howard; Freels, James D; Ilas, Germina; Jolly, Brian C; Miller, James Henry; Primm, Trent; Renfro, David G; Sease, John D; Pinkston, Daniel

    2011-02-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2010 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current level. Studies are reported of support to a thermal hydraulic test loop design, the implementation of finite element, thermal hydraulic analysis capability, and infrastructure tasks at HFIR to upgrade the facility for operation at 100 MW. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. Continuing development in the definition of the fuel fabrication process is described.

  6. Influence of adhesive systems on bond strength between fiber posts and composite resin cores in a pull-out test design.

    PubMed

    Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Schirrmeister, Jörg Fabian; Altenburger, Markus Jörg; Agrafioti, Anastasia; Kielbassa, Andrej Michael

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of post surface conditioning with adhesive systems on tensile bond strength between two composite resin core systems and FRP posts (ER DentinPost). Forty-eight posts were trimmed at the coronal part, and the upper part of 3 mm was covered with a standardized composite resin core build-up. Twenty-four posts were treated with the respective adhesive systems. Four groups were formed: G1 - ClearfilCore; G2 - Clearfil New Bond + ClearfilCore; G3 - MultiCore Flow; and G4 - AdheSE + MultiCore Flow. Mean (SD) bond strengths in MPa were 7.53 (0.89) for ClearfilCore and 8.08 (0.93) for New Bond + ClearfilCore; 5.80 (0.39) for MultiCore Flow and 5.92 (0.43) for AdheSE + MultiCore Flow. ClearfilCore achieved significantly higher bond strengths than MultiCore Flow (two-way ANOVA; p<0.0001). In conclusion, composite resin core materials exerted a significant influence on tensile bond strength, while adhesive systems did not significantly affect the results.

  7. Quality by design approach for the separation of naproxcinod and its related substances by fused core particle technology column.

    PubMed

    Inugala, Ugandar Reddy; Pothuraju, Nageswara Rao; Vangala, Ranga Reddy

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a rapid, novel, stability-indicating gradient reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method and associated system suitability parameters for the analysis of naproxcinod in the presence of its related substances and degradents using a quality-by-design approach. All of the factors that affect the separation of naproxcinod and its impurities and their mutual interactions were investigated and robustness of the method was ensured. The method was developed using an Ascentis Express C8 150 × 4.6 mm, 2.7 µm column with a mobile phase containing a gradient mixture of two solvents. The eluted compounds were monitored at 230 nm, the run time was 20 min within which naproxcinod and its eight impurities were satisfactorily separated. Naproxcinod was subjected to the stress conditions of oxidative, acid, base, hydrolytic, thermal and photolytic degradation. Naproxcinod was found to degrade significantly in acidic and basic conditions and to be stable in thermal, photolytic, oxidative and aqueous degradation conditions. The degradation products were satisfactorily resolved from the primary peak and its impurities, proving the stability-indicating power of the method. The developed method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonization guidelines with respect to specificity, linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, accuracy, precision and robustness.

  8. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  9. Multiple target drug cocktail design for attacking the core network markers of four cancers using ligand-based and structure-based virtual screening methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Computer-aided drug design has a long history of being applied to discover new molecules to treat various cancers, but it has always been focused on single targets. The development of systems biology has let scientists reveal more hidden mechanisms of cancers, but attempts to apply systems biology to cancer therapies remain at preliminary stages. Our lab has successfully developed various systems biology models for several cancers. Based on these achievements, we present the first attempt to combine multiple-target therapy with systems biology. Methods In our previous study, we identified 28 significant proteins--i.e., common core network markers--of four types of cancers as house-keeping proteins of these cancers. In this study, we ranked these proteins by summing their carcinogenesis relevance values (CRVs) across the four cancers, and then performed docking and pharmacophore modeling to do virtual screening on the NCI database for anti-cancer drugs. We also performed pathway analysis on these proteins using Panther and MetaCore to reveal more mechanisms of these cancer house-keeping proteins. Results We designed several approaches to discover targets for multiple-target cocktail therapies. In the first one, we identified the top 20 drugs for each of the 28 cancer house-keeping proteins, and analyzed the docking pose to further understand the interaction mechanisms of these drugs. After screening for duplicates, we found that 13 of these drugs could target 11 proteins simultaneously. In the second approach, we chose the top 5 proteins with the highest summed CRVs and used them as the drug targets. We built a pharmacophore and applied it to do virtual screening against the Life-Chemical library for anti-cancer drugs. Based on these results, wet-lab bio-scientists could freely investigate combinations of these drugs for multiple-target therapy for cancers, in contrast to the traditional single target therapy. Conclusions Combination of systems biology

  10. Design of single-winding energy-storage reactors for dc-to-dc converters using air-gapped magnetic-core structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohri, A. K.; Wilson, T. G.; Owen, H. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is presented for designing air-gapped energy-storage reactors for nine different dc-to-dc converters resulting from combinations of three single-winding power stages for voltage stepup, current stepup and voltage stepup/current stepup and three controllers with control laws that impose constant-frequency, constant transistor on-time and constant transistor off-time operation. The analysis, based on the energy-transfer requirement of the reactor, leads to a simple relationship for the required minimum volume of the air gap. Determination of this minimum air gap volume then permits the selection of either an air gap or a cross-sectional core area. Having picked one parameter, the minimum value of the other immediately leads to selection of the physical magnetic structure. Other analytically derived equations are used to obtain values for the required turns, the inductance, and the maximum rms winding current. The design procedure is applicable to a wide range of magnetic material characteristics and physical configurations for the air-gapped magnetic structure.

  11. Validation of a Computational Model for the SLS Core Stage Oxygen Tank Diffuser Concept and the Low Profile Diffuser - An Advanced Development Design for the SLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodnick, Jacob; Richardson, Brian; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    The Low Profile Diffuser (LPD) project originated as an award from the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Development (ADO) office to the Main Propulsion Systems Branch (ER22). The task was created to develop and test an LPD concept that could produce comparable performance to a larger, traditionally designed, ullage gas diffuser while occupying a smaller volume envelope. Historically, ullage gas diffusers have been large, bulky devices that occupy a significant portion of the propellant tank, decreasing the tank volume available for propellant. Ullage pressurization of spacecraft propellant tanks is required to prevent boil-off of cryogenic propellants and to provide a positive pressure for propellant extraction. To achieve this, ullage gas diffusers must slow hot, high-pressure gas entering a propellant tank from supersonic speeds to only a few meters per second. Decreasing the incoming gas velocity is typically accomplished through expansion to larger areas within the diffuser which has traditionally led to large diffuser lengths. The Fluid Dynamics Branch (ER42) developed and applied advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis methods in order to mature the LPD design from and initial concept to an optimized test prototype and to provide extremely accurate pre-test predictions of diffuser performance. Additionally, the diffuser concept for the Core Stage of the Space Launch System (SLS) was analyzed in a short amount of time to guide test data collection efforts of the qualification of the device. CFD analysis of the SLS diffuser design provided new insights into the functioning of the device and was qualitatively validated against hot wire anemometry of the exterior flow field. Rigorous data analysis of the measurements was performed on static and dynamic pressure data, data from two microphones, accelerometers and hot wire anemometry with automated traverse. Feasibility of the LPD concept and validation of the computational model were

  12. Mechanical design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Design concepts for a 1000 mw thermal stationary power plant employing the UF6 fueled gas core breeder reactor are examined. Three design combinations-gaseous UF6 core with a solid matrix blanket, gaseous UF6 core with a liquid blanket, and gaseous UF6 core with a circulating blanket were considered. Results show the gaseous UF6 core with a circulating blanket was best suited to the power plant concept.

  13. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  14. Core-tube data logger

    SciTech Connect

    Henfling, J.A.; Normann, R.A.; Knudsen, S.; Drumheller, D.

    1997-01-01

    Wireline core drilling, increasingly used for geothermal exploration, employs a core-tube to capture a rock core sample during drilling. Three types of core-tube data loggers (CTDL) have been built and tested to date by Sandia national Laboratories. They are: (1) temperature-only logger, (2) temperature/inclinometer logger and (3) heat-shielded temperature/inclinometer logger. All were tested during core drilling operations using standard wireline diamond core drilling equipment. While these tools are designed for core-tube deployment, the tool lends itself to be adapted to other drilling modes and equipment. Topics covered in this paper include: (1) description on how the CTDLs are implemented, (2) the components of the system, (3) the type of data one can expect from this type of tool, (4) lessons learned, (5) comparison to its counterpart and (6) future work.

  15. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  16. Alginate/nanohydroxyapatite scaffolds with designed core/shell structures fabricated by 3D plotting and in situ mineralization for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongxiang; Lode, Anja; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang; Gelinsky, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Composite scaffolds, especially polymer/hydroxyapatite (HAP) composite scaffolds with predesigned structures, are promising materials for bone tissue engineering. Various methods including direct mixing of HAP powder with polymers or incubating polymer scaffolds in simulated body fluid for preparing polymer/HAP composite scaffolds are either uncontrolled or require long times of incubation. In this work, alginate/nano-HAP composite scaffolds with designed pore parameters and core/shell structures were fabricated using 3D plotting technique and in situ mineralization under mild conditions (at room temperature and without the use of any organic solvents). Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, microcomputer tomography, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were applied to characterize the fabricated scaffolds. Mechanical properties and protein delivery of the scaffolds were evaluated, as well as the cell response to the scaffolds by culturing human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC). The obtained data indicate that this method is suitable to fabricate alginate/nano-HAP composite scaffolds with a layer of nano-HAP, coating the surface of the alginate strands homogeneously and completely. The surface mineralization enhanced the mechanical properties and improved the cell attachment and spreading, as well as supported sustaining protein release, compared to pure alginate scaffolds without nano-HAP shell layer. The results demonstrated that the method provides an interesting option for bone tissue engineering application.

  17. Design of single-polarization coupler based on dual-core photonic band-gap fiber implied in resonant fiber optic gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenlong; Li, Xuyou; Zhang, Chunmei; Ling, Weiwei; Liu, Pan; Xia, Linlin; Yang, Hanrui

    2016-12-01

    A novel (to our knowledge) type of single-polarization (SP) coupler based on a dual-core photonic band-gap fiber (PBF) is proposed. The effects of structure parameters on the performance of this coupler are studied numerically based on the full vector finite element method (FEM). Finally, an optimal design with a length of 0.377 mm at the wavelength of 1.55 μm is achieved, and its implication in PBF-based fiber ring resonator (FRR), the effect of angular misalignment on the SP coupler are analyzed as well. When the SP coupler is incorporated into a PBF-based FRR, it functions as the power splitter and the polarizer simultaneously, and can extinct the secondary eigenstate of polarization (ESOP) propagating in the FRR. The mode field of SP coupler can match with the polarization-maintaining (PM) PBF with ultra-low temperature sensitivity proposed in previous study, and an all PM-PBF based FRR can be established, which is of great significance in suppressing the temperature-related polarization fluctuation and improving the long-term stability for RFOG, and the SP coupler has high angular misalignment tolerance as well.

  18. X-ray Structure and Enzymatic Activity Profile of a Core Papain-like Protease of MERS Coronavirus with utility for structure-based drug design

    PubMed Central

    Clasman, Jozlyn R.; Báez-Santos, Yahira M.; Mettelman, Robert C.; O’Brien, Amornrat; Baker, Susan C.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2017-01-01

    Ubiquitin-like domain 2 (Ubl2) is immediately adjacent to the N-terminus of the papain-like protease (PLpro) domain in coronavirus polyproteins, and it may play a critical role in protease regulation and stability as well as in viral infection. However, our recent cellular studies reveal that removing the Ubl2 domain from MERS PLpro has no effect on its ability to process the viral polyprotein or act as an interferon antagonist, which involves deubiquitinating and deISGylating cellular proteins. Here, we test the hypothesis that the Ubl2 domain is not required for the catalytic function of MERS PLpro in vitro. The X-ray structure of MERS PLpro-∆Ubl2 was determined to 1.9 Å and compared to PLpro containing the N-terminal Ubl2 domain. While the structures were nearly identical, the PLpro-∆Ubl2 enzyme revealed the intact structure of the substrate-binding loop. Moreover, PLpro-∆Ubl2 catalysis against different substrates and a purported inhibitor revealed no differences in catalytic efficiency, substrate specificity, and inhibition. Further, no changes in thermal stability were observed between enzymes. We conclude that the catalytic core of MERS PLpro, i.e. without the Ubl2 domain, is sufficient for catalysis and stability in vitro with utility to evaluate potential inhibitors as a platform for structure-based drug design. PMID:28079137

  19. Core layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Hernlund, J. W.; Morbidelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created a planetary accretion and differentiation model that self-consistently builds and evolves Earth's core. From this model, we show that the core grows stably stratified as the result of rising metal-silicate equilibration temperatures and pressures, which increases the concentrations of light element impurities into each newer core addition. This stable stratification would naturally resist convection and frustrate the onset of a geodynamo, however, late giant impacts could mechanically mix the distinct accreted core layers creating large homogenous regions. Within these regions, a geodynamo may operate. From this model, we interpret the difference between the planetary magnetic fields of Earth and Venus as a difference in giant impact histories. Our planetary accretion model is a numerical N-body integration of the Grand Tack scenario [1]—the most successful terrestrial planet formation model to date [2,3]. Then, we take the accretion histories of Earth-like and Venus-like planets from this model and post-process the growth of each terrestrial planet according to a well-tested planetary differentiation model [4,5]. This model fits Earth's mantle by modifying the oxygen content of the pre-cursor planetesimals and embryos as well as the conditions of metal-silicate equilibration. Other non-volatile major, minor and trace elements included in the model are assumed to be in CI chondrite proportions. The results from this model across many simulated terrestrial planet growth histories are robust. If the kinetic energy delivered by larger impacts is neglected, the core of each planet grows with a strong stable stratification that would significantly impede convection. However, if giant impact mixing is very efficient or if the impact history delivers large impacts late, than the stable stratification can be removed. [1] Walsh et al. Nature 475 (2011) [2] O'Brien et al. Icarus 223 (2014) [3] Jacobson & Morbidelli PTRSA 372 (2014) [4] Rubie et al. EPSL 301

  20. Design analysis of the molten core confinement within the reactor vessel in the case of severe accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with a reactor of the VVER type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvonaryov, Yu. A.; Budaev, M. A.; Volchek, A. M.; Gorbaev, V. A.; Zagryazkin, V. N.; Kiselyov, N. P.; Kobzar', V. L.; Konobeev, A. V.; Tsurikov, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    The present paper reports the results of the preliminary design estimate of the behavior of the core melt in vessels of reactors of the VVER-600 and VVER-1300 types (a standard optimized and informative nuclear power unit based on VVER technology—VVER TOI) in the case of beyond-design-basis severe accidents. The basic processes determining the state of the core melt in the reactor vessel are analyzed. The concept of molten core confinement within the vessel based on the idea of outside cooling is discussed. Basic assumptions and models, as well as the results of calculation of the interaction between molten materials of the core and the wall of the reactor vessel performed by means of the SOCRAT severe accident code, are presented and discussed. On the basis of the data obtained, the requirements on the operation of the safety systems are determined, upon the fulfillment of which there will appear potential prerequisites for implementing the concept of the confinement of the core melt within the reactor in cases of severe accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors.

  1. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  2. Place-based research project design for 10-week REU and two-week "mini-REU" internships using lake sediment cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrbo, A.; Howes, T.; Thompson, R.; Drake, C.; Woods, P.; Schuldt, N.; Borkholder, B.; Marty, J.; Lafrancois, T.; Pellerin, H.

    2012-12-01

    Lake sediment cores provide scalable, interdisciplinary research projects that are well suited for summer internships such as the NSF-REU (Research Experience for Undergraduates). Short paleorecords (100-500 years or about a meter of core) are easy to collect and are tractable in terms of sample numbers (Myrbo et al. 2011). Many students find it compelling to reconstruct the recent past; choosing sites with cultural or historical significance is another way to make research seem more relevant. We present the results and experiences of designing two- and ten-week individual, group, and team research projects. Each of these projects contributes to the findings of a collaborative inquiry by the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa (FDL) and the University of Minnesota (UMN). Research questions are determined and framed by FDL Resource Management, and student projects are supported and advised by both FDL and UMN scientists. The research is focused on the past environmental conditions of on- and off-Reservation wild rice lakes and the surrounding landscapes and people, and includes the study of biological and chemical proxies as well as historical records. Over the past three years, this approach has enabled diverse groups of students to conduct authentic and original basic research that also has applications to management and planning issues for Tribal resource managers, and to develop skills that are portable to other management and academic settings. These compelling "short" time scale projects can serve as a gateway for students to further pursue science including longer term paleorecords, climate change research, other disciplines in ecology, water resources, geography, archeology, and geology, as well as humanities research areas such as history and landscape architecture. An overarching goal is to help students understand current environmental change in the context of long-term changes, pre-industrial human land use, and accelerated Anthropocene impacts

  3. Core-to-core uniformity improvement in multi-core fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindley, Emma; Min, Seong-Sik; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Cvetojevic, Nick; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Lawrence, Jon; Gris-Sanchez, Itandehui; Birks, Tim; Haynes, Roger; Haynes, Dionne

    2014-07-01

    Multi-core fiber Bragg gratings (MCFBGs) will be a valuable tool not only in communications but also various astronomical, sensing and industry applications. In this paper we address some of the technical challenges of fabricating effective multi-core gratings by simulating improvements to the writing method. These methods allow a system designed for inscribing single-core fibers to cope with MCFBG fabrication with only minor, passive changes to the writing process. Using a capillary tube that was polished on one side, the field entering the fiber was flattened which improved the coverage and uniformity of all cores.

  4. Saturation current spikes eliminated in saturable core transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F. C.

    1971-01-01

    Unsaturating composite magnetic core transformer, consisting of two separate parallel cores designed so impending core saturation causes signal generation, terminates high current spike in converter primary circuit. Simplified waveform, demonstrates transformer effectiveness in eliminating current spikes.

  5. An ultra-clean firn core from the Devon Island Ice Cap, Nunavut, Canada, retrieved using a titanium drill specially designed for trace element studies.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Fisher, D; Blake, E; Hall, G; Vaive, J; Krachler, M; Zdanowicz, C; Lam, J; Lawson, G; Shotyk, W

    2006-03-01

    An electromechanical drill with titanium barrels was used to recover a 63.7 m long firn core from Devon Island Ice Cap, Nunavut, Canada, representing 155 years of precipitation. The core was processed and analysed at the Geological Survey of Canada by following strict clean procedures for measurements of Pb and Cd at concentrations at or below the pg g(-1) level. This paper describes the effectiveness of the titanium drill with respect to contamination during ice core retrieval and evaluates sample-processing procedures in laboratories. The results demonstrate that: (1) ice cores retrieved with this titanium drill are of excellent quality with metal contamination one to four orders of magnitude less than those retrieved with conventional drills; (2) the core cleaning and sampling protocols used were effective, contamination-free, and adequate for analysis of the metals (Pb and Cd) at low pg g(-1) levels; and (3) results from 489 firn core samples analysed in this study are comparable with published data from other sites in the Arctic, Greenland and the Antarctic.

  6. High-quality SnO2@SnS2 core-shell heterojunctions: Designed construction, mechanism and photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Yang, Junyou; Qu, Qiuliang; Zhu, Pinwen; Li, Weixin

    2015-01-01

    High-quality SnO2@SnS2 core-shell heterojunctions have been constructed through sulfurization of SnO2 nanoflowers self-sacrificial templates with H2S gas at relatively low temperature in this paper. The unreacted SnO2 core and the in-situ synthesized SnS2 shell are in good crystallinity with a low lattice mismatch interface. The formation mechanism of the core-shell heterostructures have been examined by experiments and theoretic computation from the perspectives of both adsorption and diffusion. When used as photoanode in all-solid-state semiconductor-sensitized solar cells, the SnO2@SnS2 core-shell heterojunctions based hybrid solar cell shows a promising conversion efficiency of 1.45% under 1 sun illumination, which is over 5 times than that of SnS2 quantum dot sensitized SnO2 electrode made by the common chemistry bath deposition method. The enhanced photovoltaic performance is contributed to the unique structure of SnO2@SnS2 core-shell heterojunctions which provide highly covered sensitizers and favored interface for suppressing the charge recombination from SnO2 to electrolyte. This strategy and understanding can be extended to other nanostructure core-shell architecture and fields.

  7. Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, Dennis; Butler, Carey; West, Nicole; Cole, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Institute for Scientific Research, Inc. (ISR) research program consist of: 1.Study core physics by adapting existing codes: MCNP4C - Monte Carlo code; COMBINE/VENTURE - diffusion theory; SCALE4 - Monte Carlo, with many utility codes. 2. Determine feasibility and study major design parameters: fuel selection, temperature and reflector sizing. 3. Study reactor kinetics: develop QCALC1 to model point kinetics; study dynamic behavior of the power release.

  8. Core physics analysis of 100% MOX Core in IRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Franceschini, F.; Petrovic, B.

    2006-07-01

    International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) is an advanced small-to-medium-size (1000 MWt) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), targeting deployment around 2015. Its reference core design is based on the current Westinghouse UO{sub 2} fuel with less than 5% {sup 235}U, and the analysis has been previously completed confirming good performance. The full MOX fuel core is currently under evaluation as one of the alternatives for the second wave of IRIS reactors. A full 3-D neutronic analysis has been performed to examine main core performance parameters, such as critical boron concentration, peaking factors, discharge burnup, etc. The enhanced moderation of the IRIS fuel lattice facilitates MOX core design, and all the obtained results are within the requirements, confirming viability of this option from the reactor physics standpoint. (authors)

  9. Designing of an artificial light energy converter in the form of short-chain dyad when combined with core-shell gold/silver nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Dutta Pal, Gopa; Paul, Somnath; Bardhan, Munmun; De, Asish; Ganguly, Tapan

    2017-06-05

    UV-vis absorption, steady state and time resolved fluorescence and absorption spectroscopic investigations demonstrate that the short chain dyad MNTMA when combined with gold-silver core-shell (Au@Ag) nanocomposite , forms elongated conformers in the excited state whereas for the dyad - Ag (spherical) system the majority of dyads remains in a folded conformation. In the dyad-core-shell nanocomposite system, energy wasting charge recombination rate slows down primarily due to elongated conformation and thus it may be anticipated that this hybrid nanocomposite system may serve as a better light energy conversion device.

  10. CopperCore Service Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogten, Hubert; Martens, Harrie; Nadolski, Rob; Tattersall, Colin; van Rosmalen, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    In an e-learning environment there is a need to integrate various e-learning services like assessment services, collaboration services, learning design services and communication services. In this article we present the design and implementation of a generic integrative service framework, called CopperCore Service Integration (CCSI). We will…

  11. Geomagnetism of earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Instrumentation, analytical methods, and research goals for understanding the behavior and source of geophysical magnetism are reviewed. Magsat, launched in 1979, collected global magnetometer data and identified the main terrestrial magnetic fields. The data has been treated by representing the curl-free field in terms of a scalar potential which is decomposed into a truncated series of spherical harmonics. Solutions to the Laplace equation then extend the field upward or downward from the measurement level through intervening spaces with no source. Further research is necessary on the interaction between harmonics of various spatial scales. Attempts are also being made to analytically model the main field and its secular variation at the core-mantle boundary. Work is also being done on characterizing the core structure, composition, thermodynamics, energetics, and formation, as well as designing a new Magsat or a tethered satellite to be flown on the Shuttle.

  12. Uranium droplet core nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1991-01-01

    Uranium droplet nuclear rocket is conceptually designed to utilize the broad temperature range ofthe liquid phase of metallic uranium in droplet configuration which maximizes the energy transfer area per unit fuel volume. In a baseline system dissociated hydrogen at 100 bar is heated to 6000 K, providing 2000 second of Isp. Fission fragments and intense radian field enhance the dissociation of molecular hydrogen beyond the equilibrium thermodynamic level. Uranium droplets in the core are confined and separated by an axisymmetric vortex flow generated by high velocity tangential injection of hydrogen in the mid-core regions. Droplet uranium flow to the core is controlled and adjusted by a twin flow nozzle injection system.

  13. Comparative evaluation of the effect of different crown ferrule designs on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated mandibular premolars restored with fiber posts, composite cores, and crowns: An ex-vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Nikita; Kumar, Bhupendra; Arunagiri, D.; Iqbal, Mohammad; Pushpa, S.; Hussain, Juhi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In cases of severe hard tissue loss, 2 mm circumferential ferrule is difficult to achieve which leads to incorporation of different ferrule designs. Aim: To compare and evaluate the effect of different crown ferrule designs on the fracture resistance of mandibular premolars restored with fiber posts, composite cores, and crowns. Materials and Methods: Fifty freshly extracted mandibular premolars were endodontically treated and divided into five groups: Group I - 2 mm circumferential ferrule above the cementoenamel junction (CEJ); Group II - 2 mm ferrule on the facial aspect above CEJ; Group III - 2 mm ferrule on the lingual aspect above CEJ; Group IV - 2 mm ferrule on the facial and lingual aspects above CEJ with interproximal concavities, and Group V - no ferrule (control group) and were later restored with fiber posts, composite cores, and crowns. Specimens were mounted on a universal testing machine, and compressive load was applied at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until fracture occurred. Results: The results showed that circumferential ferrule produced the highest mean fracture resistance and the least fracture resistance was found in the control group. Conclusion: Circumferential ferrule increases the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with bonded post, core, and crown. PMID:27217642

  14. Ultralight Metallic Panels with Textile Cores Designed for Blast Mitigation and Load Retention/Topologically Structured Materials: Blast and Multifunctional Implementations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Assembly of machined truss core and braze coated face sheets Ti-6AI-4V face sheet k—- /. A J TiCuNi-60 brazing alloy * /"" coating on face...fabrication of these structures can be extended from steel and aluminum alloys to high performance materials such as metal matrix composites and...sheets (d) Face sheets attachment ( brazing ) Heat Applied pressure is Heat T = 975 C, Applied pressure = 0.01-0 05 MPa, t = 30 min

  15. Design and synthesis of highly luminescent near-infrared-emitting water-soluble CdTe/CdSe/ZnS core/shell/shell quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjin; Chen, Guanjiao; Wang, Jian; Ye, Bang-Ce; Zhong, Xinhua

    2009-10-19

    Applications of water-dispersible near-infrared (NIR)-emitting quantum dots (QDs) have been hampered by their instability and low photoluminescence (PL) efficiencies. In this paper, water-soluble highly luminescent NIR-emitting QDs were developed through constructing CdTe/CdSe/ZnS core/shell/shell nanostructure. The CdTe/CdSe type-II structure yields the QDs with NIR emission. By varying the size of CdTe cores and the thickness of the CdSe shell, the emission wavelength of the obtained nanostructure can span from 540 to 825 nm. In addition, the passivation of the ZnS shell with a substantially wide bandgap confines the excitons within the CdTe/CdSe interface and isolates them from the solution environment and consequently improves the stability of the nanostructure, especially in aqueous media. An effective shell-coating route was developed for the preparation of CdTe/CdSe core/shell nanostructures by selecting capping reagents with a strong coordinating capacity and adopting a low temperature for shell deposition. An additional ZnS shell was deposited around the outer layer of CdTe/CdSe QDs to form the core/shell/shell nanostructure through the decomposition of single molecular precursor zinc diethyldithiocarbamate in the crude CdTe/CdSe reaction solution. The water solubilization of the initially oil-soluble CdTe/CdSe/ZnS QDs was achieved through ligand replacement by 3-mercaptopropionic acid. The as-prepared water-soluble CdTe/CdSe/ZnS QDs possess PL quantum yields as high as 84% in aqueous media, which is one of the best results for the luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals.

  16. A scaling study of the natural circulation flow of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400 for designing a scale-down test facility for design verification

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, B. W.; Ha, K. S.; Park, R. J.; Song, J. H.; Revankar, S. T.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper a scaling study on the steady state natural circulation flow along the flow path of the ex vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400 is described, and the scaling criteria for reproducing the same steady state thermalhydraulic characteristics of the natural circulation flow as a prototype core catcher cooling system in the scale-down test facility are derived in terms of the down-comer pipe diameter and orifice resistance. (authors)

  17. Synthetic Core Promoters for Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic promoters are commonly used tools for circuit design or high level protein production. Promoter engineering efforts in yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris have mostly been focused on altering upstream regulatory sequences such as transcription factor binding sites. In higher eukaryotes synthetic core promoters, directly needed for transcription initiation by RNA Polymerase II, have been successfully designed. Here we report the first synthetic yeast core promoter for P. pastoris, based on natural yeast core promoters. Furthermore we used this synthetic core promoter sequence to engineer the core promoter of the natural AOX1 promoter, thereby creating a set of core promoters providing a range of different expression levels. As opposed to engineering strategies of the significantly longer entire promoter, such short core promoters can directly be added on a PCR primer facilitating library generation and are sufficient to obtain variable expression yields. PMID:24187969

  18. Residential Utility Core Wall System - ResCore

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, G.; Lundell, C.; Wendt, R.

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes activities associated with the RESidential utility CORE wall system (ResCore) developed by students and faculty in the Department of Industrial Design at Auburn University between 1996 and 1998. These activities analyize three operational prototype units installed in Habitat for Humanity Houses. The paper contains two Parts: 1) analysis of the three operational prototype units, 2) exploration of alternative design solutions. ResCore is a manufactured construction component designed to expedite home building by decreasing the need for skilled labor at the work site. The unit concentrates untility elements into a wall unit(s), which is shipped to the construction site and installed in minimum time. The ResCore unit is intended to be built off-site in a manufacturing environment where the impact of vagaries of weather and work-crew coordination and scheduling are minimized. The controlled environment of the factory enhances efficient production of building components through material and labor throughput controls, enabling the production of components at a substantially reduced per-unit cost. The ResCore unit when compared to traditional "stick-built" utility wall components is in may ways analogous to the factory built roof truss compared to on-site "stick-Built" roof framing.

  19. Design of a bifunctional fusion protein for ovarian cancer drug delivery: single-chain anti-CA125 core-streptavidin fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Welson Wen-Shang; Das, Dipankar; McQuarrie, Stephen A; Suresh, Mavanur R

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a universal ovarian cancer cell targeting vehicle that can deliver biotinylated therapeutic drugs. A single-chain antibody variable domain (scFv) that recognizes the CA125 antigen of ovarian cancer cells was fused with a core-streptavidin domain (core-streptavidin-VL-VH and VL-VH-core-streptavidin orientations) using recombinant DNA technology and then expressed in Escherichia coli using the T7 expression system. The bifunctional fusion protein (bfFp) was expressed in a shaker flask culture, extracted from the periplasmic soluble protein, and affinity purified using an IMAC column. The two distinct activities (biotin binding and anti-CA125) of the bfFp were demonstrated using ELISA, Western blot and confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM). The ELISA method utilized human NIH OVCAR-3 cells along with biotinylated bovine serum albumin (B-BSA) or biotinylated liposomes, whereas, the Western blot involved probing with B-BSA. The CLSM study has shown specificity in binding to the OVCAR-3 cell-line. ELISA and Western blot studies have confirmed the bifunctional activity and specificity. In the presence of bfFp, there was enhanced binding of biotinylated antigen and liposome to OVCAR-3 cells. In contrast, the control EMT6 cells, which do not express the CA125 antigen, showed minimal binding of the bfFp. Consequently, bfFp based targeting of biotinylated therapeutic drugs, proteins, liposomes, or nanoparticles could be an alternative, convenient method to deliver effective therapy to ovarian cancer patients. Peritoneal infusion of the bfFp-therapeutic complex could also be effective in locally targeting the most common site of metastatic spread.

  20. An Innovative Three-Dimensional Heterogeneous Coarse-Mesh Transport Method for Advanced and Generation IV Reactor Core Analysis and Design

    SciTech Connect

    Farzad Rahnema

    2009-11-12

    This project has resulted in a highly efficient method that has been shown to provide accurate solutions to a variety of 2D and 3D reactor problems. The goal of this project was to develop (1) an accurate and efficient three-dimensional whole-core neutronics method with the following features: based sollely on transport theory, does not require the use of cross-section homogenization, contains a highly accurate and self-consistent global flux reconstruction procedure, and is applicable to large, heterogeneous reactor models, and to (2) create new numerical benchmark problems for code cross-comparison.

  1. Core Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James

    2011-01-01

    The Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation (RHSEG) software has been repackaged to provide a version of the RHSEG software that is not subject to patent restrictions and that can be released to the general public through NASA GSFC's Open Source release process. Like the Core HSEG Software Package, this Core RHSEG Software Package also includes a visualization program called HSEGViewer along with a utility program HSEGReader. It also includes an additional utility program called HSEGExtract. The unique feature of the Core RHSEG package is that it is a repackaging of the RHSEG technology designed to specifically avoid the inclusion of the certain software technology. Unlike the Core HSEG package, it includes the recursive portions of the technology, but does not include processing window artifact elimination technology.

  2. A study on the effect of various design parameters on the natural circulation flow rate of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, B. W.; Ha, K. S.; Park, R. J.; Song, J. H.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a study on the effect of various design parameters such as the channel gap width, heat flux distribution, down-comer pipe size and two-phase flow slip ratio on the natural circulation flow rate is performed based on a physical model for a natural circulation flow along the flow path of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of an EU-APR1400, and these effects on the natural circulation flow rate are analyzed and compared with the minimum flow rate required for the safe operation of the system. (authors)

  3. Toward new designed proteins derived from bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI): covalent cross-linking of two 'core modules' by oxime-forming ligation.

    PubMed

    Carulla, N; Woodward, C; Barany, G

    2001-01-01

    A 25-residue disulfide-cross-linked peptide, termed 'oxidized core module' (OxCM), that includes essentially all of the secondary structural elements of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) most refractory to hydrogen exchange, was shown previously to favor nativelike beta-sheet structure [Carulla, N., Woodward, C., and Barany, G. (2000) Synthesis and Characterization of a beta-Hairpin Peptide That Represents a 'Core Module' of Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor (BPTI). Biochemistry 39, 7927-7937]. The present work prepares to explore the hypothesis that the energies of nativelike conformations, relative to other possible conformations, could be decreased further by covalent linkage of two OxCMs. Optimized syntheses of six approximately 50-residue OxCM dimers are reported herein, featuring appropriate monomer modifications followed by oxime-forming ligation chemistry to create covalent cross-links at various positions and with differing lengths. Several side reactions were recognized through this work, and modified procedures to lessen or mitigate their occurrence were developed. Particularly noteworthy, guanidine or urea denaturants that were included as peptide-solubilizing components for some reaction mixtures were proven to form adducts with glyoxylyl moieties, thus affecting rates and outcomes. All six synthetic OxCM dimers were characterized by 1D (1)H NMR; three of them showed considerable chemical shift dispersion suggestive of self-association and mutual stabilization between the monomer units.

  4. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  5. DIODE STEERED MANGETIC-CORE MEMORY

    DOEpatents

    Melmed, A.S.; Shevlin, R.T.; Laupheimer, R.

    1962-09-18

    A word-arranged magnetic-core memory is designed for use in a digital computer utilizing the reverse or back current property of the semi-conductor diodes to restore the information in the memory after read-out. In order to ob tain a read-out signal from a magnetic core storage unit, it is necessary to change the states of some of the magnetic cores. In order to retain the information in the memory after read-out it is then necessary to provide a means to return the switched cores to their states before read-out. A rewrite driver passes a pulse back through each row of cores in which some switching has taken place. This pulse combines with the reverse current pulses of diodes for each column in which a core is switched during read-out to cause the particular cores to be switched back into their states prior to read-out. (AEC)

  6. Methodology for embedded transport core calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Boyan D.

    The progress in the Nuclear Engineering field leads to developing new generations of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) with complex rector core designs, such as cores loaded partially with mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, high burn-up loadings, and cores with advanced designs of fuel assemblies and control rods. Such heterogeneous cores introduce challenges for the diffusion theory that has been used for several decades for calculations of the current Pressurized Water Rector (PWR) cores. To address the difficulties the diffusion approximation encounters new core calculation methodologies need to be developed by improving accuracy, while preserving efficiency of the current reactor core calculations. In this thesis, an advanced core calculation methodology is introduced, based on embedded transport calculations. Two different approaches are investigated. The first approach is based on embedded finite element (FEM), simplified P3 approximation (SP3), fuel assembly (FA) homogenization calculation within the framework of the diffusion core calculation with NEM code (Nodal Expansion Method). The second approach involves embedded FA lattice physics eigenvalue calculation based on collision probability method (CPM) again within the framework of the NEM diffusion core calculation. The second approach is superior to the first because most of the uncertainties introduced by the off-line cross-section generation are eliminated.

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, W.B.; Corbin, A. Jr.

    1961-07-18

    An improved core for a gas-cooled power reactor which admits gas coolant at high temperatures while affording strong integral supporting structure and efficient moderation of neutrons is described. The multiplicities of fuel elements constituting the critical amassment of fissionable material are supported and confined by a matrix of metallic structure which is interspersed therebetween. Thermal insulation is interposed between substantially all of the metallic matrix and the fuel elements; the insulation then defines the principal conduit system for conducting the coolant gas in heat-transfer relationship with the fuel elements. The metallic matrix itseif comprises a system of ducts through which an externally-cooled hydrogeneous liquid, such as water, is circulated to serve as the principal neutron moderant for the core and conjointly as the principal coolant for the insulated metallic structure. In this way, use of substantially neutron transparent metals, such as aluminum, becomes possible for the supporting structure, despite the high temperatures of the proximate gas. The Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion program's "R-1" reactor design is a preferred embodiment.

  8. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  9. Long Valley Coring Project, Inyo County, California, 1998, preliminary stratigraphy and images of recovered core

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sackett, Penelope C.; McConnell, Vicki S.; Roach, Angela L.; Priest, Susan S.; Sass, John H.

    1999-01-01

    Phase III of the Long Valley Exploratory Well, the Long Valley Coring Project, obtained continuous core between the depths of 7,180 and 9,831 ft (2,188 to 2,996 meters) during the summer of 1998. This report contains a compendium of information designed to facilitate post-drilling research focussed on the study of the core. Included are a preliminary stratigraphic column compiled primarily from field observations and a general description of well lithology for the Phase III drilling interval. Also included are high-resolution digital photographs of every core box (10 feet per box) as well as scanned images of pieces of recovered core. The user can easily move from the stratigraphic column to corresponding core box photographs for any depth. From there, compressed, "unrolled" images of the individual core pieces (core scans) can be accessed. Those interested in higher-resolution core scans can go to archive CD-ROMs stored at a number of locations specified herein. All core is stored at the USGS Core Research Center in Denver, Colorado where it is available to researchers following the protocol described in this report. Preliminary examination of core provided by this report and the archive CD-ROMs should assist researchers in narrowing their choices when requesting core splits.

  10. Investigating core genetic-and-epigenetic cell cycle networks for stemness and carcinogenic mechanisms, and cancer drug design using big database mining and genome-wide next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Wei; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that cell cycle plays a central role in development and carcinogenesis. Thus, the use of big databases and genome-wide high-throughput data to unravel the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying cell cycle progression in stem cells and cancer cells is a matter of considerable interest. Real genetic-and-epigenetic cell cycle networks (GECNs) of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and HeLa cancer cells were constructed by applying system modeling, system identification, and big database mining to genome-wide next-generation sequencing data. Real GECNs were then reduced to core GECNs of HeLa cells and ESCs by applying principal genome-wide network projection. In this study, we investigated potential carcinogenic and stemness mechanisms for systems cancer drug design by identifying common core and specific GECNs between HeLa cells and ESCs. Integrating drug database information with the specific GECNs of HeLa cells could lead to identification of multiple drugs for cervical cancer treatment with minimal side-effects on the genes in the common core. We found that dysregulation of miR-29C, miR-34A, miR-98, and miR-215; and methylation of ANKRD1, ARID5B, CDCA2, PIF1, STAMBPL1, TROAP, ZNF165, and HIST1H2AJ in HeLa cells could result in cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis through NFκB, TGF-β, and PI3K pathways. We also identified 3 drugs, methotrexate, quercetin, and mimosine, which repressed the activated cell cycle genes, ARID5B, STK17B, and CCL2, in HeLa cells with minimal side-effects.

  11. Velocity-Controlled Magnetic Bearings with Solid Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. Ming; Walton, James

    1996-01-01

    A methodology for designing velocity-controlled magnetic bearings with laminated cores has been extended to those with solid cores. The eddy-current effect of the solid cores is modeled as an opposing magnetomotive force. The bearing control dynamics is formulated in a dimensionless fashion which can be readily reviewed on a root-locus plot for stability. This facilitates the controller design and tuning process for solid core magnetic bearings using no displacement sensors.

  12. Challenges Regarding IP Core Functional Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie D.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    For many years, intellectual property (IP) cores have been incorporated into field programmable gate array (FPGA) and application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design flows. However, the usage of large complex IP cores were limited within products that required a high level of reliability. This is no longer the case. IP core insertion has become mainstream including their use in highly reliable products. Due to limited visibility and control, challenges exist when using IP cores and subsequently compromise product reliability. We discuss challenges and suggest potential solutions to critical application IP insertion.

  13. Droplet Core Nuclear Rocket (DCNR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1991-01-01

    The most basic design feature of the droplet core nuclear reactor is to spray liquid uranium into the core in the form of droplets on the order of five to ten microns in size, to bring the reactor to critical conditions. The liquid uranium fuel ejector is driven by hydrogen, and more hydrogen is injected from the side of the reactor to about one and a half meters from the top. High temperature hydrogen is expanded through a nozzle to produce thrust. The hydrogen pressure in the system can be somewhere between 50 and 500 atmospheres; the higher pressure is more desirable. In the lower core region, hydrogen is tangentially injected to serve two purposes: (1) to provide a swirling flow to protect the wall from impingement of hot uranium droplets: (2) to generate a vortex flow that can be used for fuel separation. The reactor is designed to maximize the energy generation in the upper region of the core. The system can result in and Isp of 2000 per second, and a thrust-to-weight ratio of 1.6 for the shielded reactor. The nuclear engine system can reduce the Mars mission duration to less than 200 days. It can reduce the hydrogen consumption by a factor of 2 to 3, which reduces the hydrogen load by about 130 to 150 metric tons.

  14. Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of resources on this month's theme "Design" for K-8 language arts, art and architecture, music and dance, science, math, social studies, health, and physical education. Includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, audiotapes, magazines, professional resources and classroom activities.…

  15. Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Richard; Cross, Nigel; Durling, David; Nelson, Harold; Owen, Charles; Valtonen, Anna; Boling, Elizabeth; Gibbons, Andrew; Visscher-Voerman, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of design were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Richard Buchanan, Nigel Cross, David Durling, Harold Nelson, Charles Owen, and Anna Valtonen. Scholars…

  16. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  17. 23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A COREBLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A CORE-BLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE BOXES WITH RESIGN IMPREGNATED SAND AND CREATED A CORE THAT THEN REQUIRED BAKING, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  18. Ice Core Dating Software for Interactive Dating of Ice Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatov, A. V.; Mayewski, P. A.; Abdul Jawad, B. S.

    2005-12-01

    Scientists involved in ice core dating are well familiar with the problem of identification and recording the depth of annual signals using stable isotopes, glaciochemistry, ECM (electrical conductivity), DEP (dielectric properties) and particle counter data. Traditionally all parameters used for ice core dating were plotted as a function of depth, printed and after years were marked on the paper, converted to depth vs. age time scale. To expedite this tedious and manual process we developed interactive computer software, Ice core Dating (ICD) program. ICD is written in Java programming language, and uses GPL and GPL site licensed graphic libraries. The same 3.5 Mb in size pre-compiled single jar file, that includes all libraries and application code, was successfully tested on WinOS, Mac OSX, Linux, and Solaris operating systems running Java VM version 1.4. We have followed the modular design philosophy in our source code so potential integration with other software modules, data bases and server side distributed computer environments can be easily implemented. We expect to continue development of new suites of tools for easy integration of ice core data with other available time proxies. ICD is thoroughly documented and comes with a technical reference and cookbook that explains the purpose of the software and its many features, and provides examples to help new users quickly become familiar with the operation and philosophy of the software. ICD is available as a free download from the Climate Change Institute web site ( under the terms of GNU GPL public license.

  19. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    A tool makes a cut perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of a core hole at a predetermined depth to free the core at that depth. The tool does not damage the surrounding material from which the core was cut, and it operates within the core-hole kerf. Coring usually begins with use of a hole saw or a hollow cylindrical abrasive cutting tool to make an annular hole that leaves the core (sometimes called the plug ) in place. In this approach to coring as practiced heretofore, the core is removed forcibly in a manner chosen to shear the core, preferably at or near the greatest depth of the core hole. Unfortunately, such forcible removal often damages both the core and the surrounding material (see Figure 1). In an alternative prior approach, especially applicable to toxic or fragile material, a core is formed and freed by means of milling operations that generate much material waste. In contrast, the present tool eliminates the damage associated with the hole-saw approach and reduces the extent of milling operations (and, hence, reduces the waste) associated with the milling approach. The present tool (see Figure 2) includes an inner sleeve and an outer sleeve and resembles the hollow cylindrical tool used to cut the core hole. The sleeves are thin enough that this tool fits within the kerf of the core hole. The inner sleeve is attached to a shaft that, in turn, can be attached to a drill motor or handle for turning the tool. This tool also includes a cutting wire attached to the distal ends of both sleeves. The cutting wire is long enough that with sufficient relative rotation of the inner and outer sleeves, the wire can cut all the way to the center of the core. The tool is inserted in the kerf until its distal end is seated at the full depth. The inner sleeve is then turned. During turning, frictional drag on the outer core pulls the cutting wire into contact with the core. The cutting force of the wire against the core increases with the tension in the wire and

  20. Institutional management of core facilities during challenging financial times.

    PubMed

    Haley, Rand

    2011-12-01

    The economic downturn is likely to have lasting effects on institutions of higher education, prioritizing proactive institutional leadership and planning. Although by design, core research facilities are more efficient and effective than supporting individual pieces of research equipment, cores can have significant underlying financial requirements and challenges. This paper explores several possible institutional approaches to managing core facilities during challenging financial times.

  1. Multi-Core Processor Memory Contention Benchmark Analysis Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Tyler; McGalliard, James

    2009-01-01

    Multi-core processors dominate current mainframe, server, and high performance computing (HPC) systems. This paper provides synthetic kernel and natural benchmark results from an HPC system at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center that illustrate the performance impacts of multi-core (dual- and quad-core) vs. single core processor systems. Analysis of processor design, application source code, and synthetic and natural test results all indicate that multi-core processors can suffer from significant memory subsystem contention compared to similar single-core processors.

  2. Development and analysis for core power gamma thermometer adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Ren-Tai Chiang; Leong, T.

    1996-12-31

    The gamma thermometer (GT) has gained increasing interest to replace the local power range monitor (LPRM) and the traversing in-core probe (TIP) as the core monitoring device in new boiling water reactor (BWR) designs. The number of GTs is designed between the number of LPRMs, 4, and the number of TIPs, 24, per string, but its optimal number is yet to be determined. The authors have modified the BWR core Simulator PANACEA for analyzing the core power GT adaptation and have compared the axial core-averaged relative power distributions and two thermal limits of the GT 8- and 12-point adaptations against those of the TIP 24-point adaptation.

  3. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  4. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  5. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  6. KSI's Cross Insulated Core Transformer Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Uhmeyer, Uwe

    2009-08-04

    Cross Insulated Core Transformer (CCT) technology improves on Insulated Core Transformer (ICT) implementations. ICT systems are widely used in very high voltage, high power, power supply systems. In an ICT transformer ferrite core sections are insulated from their neighboring ferrite cores. Flux leakage is present at each of these insulated gaps. The flux loss is raised to the power of stages in the ICT design causing output voltage efficiency to taper off with increasing stages. KSI's CCT technology utilizes a patented technique to compensate the flux loss at each stage of an ICT system. Design equations to calculate the flux compensation capacitor value are presented. CCT provides corona free operation of the HV stack. KSI's CCT based High Voltage power supply systems offer high efficiency operation, high frequency switching, low stored energy and smaller size over comparable ICT systems.

  7. Core Physics and Kinetics Calculations for the Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.; Albright, D.

    2007-01-01

    Highly efficient, compact nuclear reactors would provide high specific impulse spacecraft propulsion. This analysis and numerical simulation effort has focused on the technical feasibility issues related to the nuclear design characteristics of a novel reactor design. The Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor (FPCR) is a shockwave-driven gaseous-core nuclear reactor, which uses Magneto Hydrodynamic effects to generate electric power to be used for propulsion. The nuclear design of the system depends on two major calculations: core physics calculations and kinetics calculations. Presently, core physics calculations have concentrated on the use of the MCNP4C code. However, initial results from other codes such as COMBINE/VENTURE and SCALE4a. are also shown. Several significant modifications were made to the ISR-developed QCALC1 kinetics analysis code. These modifications include testing the state of the core materials, an improvement to the calculation of the material properties of the core, the addition of an adiabatic core temperature model and improvement of the first order reactivity correction model. The accuracy of these modifications has been verified, and the accuracy of the point-core kinetics model used by the QCALC1 code has also been validated. Previously calculated kinetics results for the FPCR were described in the ISR report, "QCALC1: A code for FPCR Kinetics Model Feasibility Analysis" dated June 1, 2002.

  8. Lightweight Low Force Rotary Percussive Coring Tool for Planetary Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hironaka, Ross; Stanley, Scott

    2010-01-01

    A prototype low-force rotary-percussive rock coring tool for use in acquiring samples for geological surveys in future planetary missions was developed. The coring tool could eventually enable a lightweight robotic system to operate from a relatively small (less than 200 kg) mobile or fixed platform to acquire and cache Mars or other planetary rock samples for eventual return to Earth for analysis. To gain insight needed to design an integrated coring tool, the coring ability of commercially available coring bits was evaluated for effectiveness of varying key parameters: weight-on-bit, rotation speed, percussive rate and force. Trade studies were performed for different methods of breaking a core at its base and for retaining the core in a sleeve to facilitate sample transfer. This led to a custom coring tool design which incorporated coring, core breakage, core retention, and core extraction functions. The coring tool was tested on several types of rock and demonstrated the overall feasibility of this approach for robotic rock sample acquisition.

  9. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  10. Core Concepts of Kinesiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Jackie L.

    1995-01-01

    Core concepts of kinesiology are the basis of communication about movement that facilitate progression of skill levels. The article defines and exemplifies each of 10 core concepts: range of motion, speed of motion, number of segments, nature of segments, balance, coordination, compactness, extension at release/contact, path of projection, and…

  11. CORE - Performance Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-02

    CORE is an architecture to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization. The CORE Technology Program includes a suite of tools and user-centered staff that can facilitate rapid delivery of a deployable integrated information to users.

  12. Iowa Core Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  13. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  14. Modular core holder

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.; Cole, C.W.; Hamid, S.; Lucas, J.K.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes a modular core holder. It comprises: a sleeve, forming an internal cavity for receiving a core. The sleeve including segments; support means, overlying the sleeve, for supporting the sleeve; and access means, positioned between at least two of the segments of the sleeve, for allowing measurement of conditions within the internal cavity.

  15. More on the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Monnica

    2013-01-01

    From a higher education perspective, new "Common Core" standards could improve student college-readiness levels, reduce institutional remediation rates, and close education gaps in and between states. As a national initiative to create common educational standards for students across multiple states, the Common Core State Standards…

  16. Mercury's core evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  17. NFE Core Bibliographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Inst. for International Studies in Education.

    This collection of core bibliographies, which expands on an initial bibliography published in 1979 of the core resources housed in the Non-Formal Education Information Center at Michigan State University, comprises a basic stock of materials on nonformal education and women in development that have been contributed by development planners,…

  18. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  19. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  20. The CORE study protocol: a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial to test a co-design technique to optimise psychosocial recovery outcomes for people affected by mental illness in the community mental health setting

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Victoria J; Chondros, Patty; Piper, Donella; Callander, Rosemary; Weavell, Wayne; Godbee, Kali; Potiriadis, Maria; Richard, Lauralie; Densely, Konstancja; Herrman, Helen; Furler, John; Pierce, David; Schuster, Tibor; Iedema, Rick; Gunn, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction User engagement in mental health service design is heralded as integral to health systems quality and performance, but does engagement improve health outcomes? This article describes the CORE study protocol, a novel stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial (SWCRCT) to improve psychosocial recovery outcomes for people with severe mental illness. Methods An SWCRCT with a nested process evaluation will be conducted over nearly 4 years in Victoria, Australia. 11 teams from four mental health service providers will be randomly allocated to one of three dates 9 months apart to start the intervention. The intervention, a modified version of Mental Health Experience Co-Design (MH ECO), will be delivered to 30 service users, 30 carers and 10 staff in each cluster. Outcome data will be collected at baseline (6 months) and at completion of each intervention wave. The primary outcome is improvement in recovery score using the 24-item Revised Recovery Assessment Scale for service users. Secondary outcomes are improvements to user and carer mental health and well-being using the shortened 8-item version of the WHOQOL Quality of Life scale (EUROHIS), changes to staff attitudes using the 19-item Staff Attitudes to Recovery Scale and recovery orientation of services using the 36-item Recovery Self Assessment Scale (provider version). Intervention and usual care periods will be compared using a linear mixed effects model for continuous outcomes and a generalised linear mixed effects model for binary outcomes. Participants will be analysed in the group that the cluster was assigned to at each time point. Ethics and dissemination The University of Melbourne, Human Research Ethics Committee (1340299.3) and the Federal and State Departments of Health Committees (Project 20/2014) granted ethics approval. Baseline data results will be reported in 2015 and outcomes data in 2017. Trial registration number Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN

  1. Designing dc Inductors With Airgaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, A. P.

    1986-01-01

    Optimal parameters obtained designing near saturation point. New iterative procedure aids design of dc inductors with airgaps in cores. For given core area and length, technique gives design having specified inductance and peak flux density in core, using minimum required copper weight. Executed rapidly on programmable, hand-held calculator. Applications include lightweight inductors for aircraft electronics.

  2. 34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES CORES THAT ARE NOT MADE ON HEATED OR COLD BOX CORE MACHINES, TO SET BINDING AGENTS MIXED WITH THE SAND CREATING CORES HARD ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND THE FLOW OF MOLTEN IRON INSIDE A MOLD. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. Common Core Units in Business Education: Dollars and Sense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goria, Joan

    This secondary unit of instruction on making change is one of sixteen Common Core Units in Business Education (CCUBE). The units were designed for implementing the sixteen common core competencies identified in the California Business Education Program Guide for Office and Distributive Education. Each competency-based unit is designed to…

  4. Common Core Units in Business Education: Making Instructions Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caragozian, Toni

    This secondary unit of instruction on following instructions is one of sixteen Common Core Units in Business Education (CCUBE). The units were designed for implementing the sixteen common core competencies identified in the California Business Education Program Guide for Office and Distributive Education. Each competency-based unit is designed to…

  5. Common Core Units in Business Education: Handwriting. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contra Costa County Superintendent of Schools, CA.

    This secondary unit of instruction on handwriting is one of sixteen Common Core Units in Business Education (CCUBE). The units were designed for implementing the sixteen common core competencies identified in the California Business Education Program Guide for Office and Distributive Education. Each competency-based unit is designed to facilitate…

  6. Common Core Units in Business Education: Math Computations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Robert

    This secondary unit of instruction on mathematics is one of sixteen Common Core Units in Business Education (CCUBE). The units were designed for implementing the sixteen common core competencies identified in the California Business Education Program Guide for Office and Distributive Education. Each competency-based unit is designed to facilitate…

  7. Common Core Units in Business Education: Sorting, Checking, and Verifying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contra Costa County Superintendent of Schools, CA.

    This secondary unit of instruction on handling sales orders is one of sixteen Common Core Units in Business Education (CCUBE). The units were designed for implementing the sixteen common core competencies identified in the California Business Education Program Guide for Office and Distributive Education. Each competency-based unit is designed to…

  8. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  9. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  10. Core shroud corner joints

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  11. Hydrologic characterization of four cores from the Geysers Coring Project

    SciTech Connect

    Persoff, Peter; Hulen, Jeffrey B.

    1996-01-24

    Results of hydrologic tests conducted on four representative core plugs from Geysers Coring Project drill hole SB-15-D have been related to detailed mineralogic and textural characterization of the plugs to yield new information about permeability, porosity, and capillary-pressure characteristics of the uppermost Geysers steam reservoir and its immediately overlying caprock. The core plugs are all fine- to medium-grained, Franciscan-assemblage (late Mesozoic) metagraywacke with sparse Franciscan metamorphic quartz-calcite veins and late Cenozoic, hydrothermal quartz-calcite-pyrite veins. The matrices of three plugs from the caprock are rich in metamorphic mixed-layer illite/smectite and disseminated hydrothermal pyrite; the reservoir plug instead contains abundant illite and only minor pyrite. The reservoir plug and one caprock plug are sparsely disrupted by latest-stage, unmineralized microfractures which both follow and crosscut veinlets but which could be artifacts. Porosities of the plugs, measured by Boyles-law gas expansion, range between 1.9 and 2.5%. Gas permeability and Klinkenberg slip factor were calculated from gas-pressure-pulse-decay measurements using a specially designed permeameter with small (2 mL) reservoirs. Matrix permeabilities in the range 10-21 m² ( = 1 nanodarcy) were measured for two plugs that included mineral-filled veins but no unfilled microfractures. Greater permeabilities were measured on plugs that contained microfractures; at 500 psi net confining pressure, an effective aperture of 1.6 µm was estimated for one plug. Capillary pressure curves were determined for three cores by measuring saturation as weight gain of plugs equilibrated with atmospheres in which the relative humidity was controlled by saturated brines.

  12. Concept for coring from a low-mass rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G.; Khatib, Oussama; Diaz-Calderon, Antonio; Warren, James; Collins, Curtis; Chang, Zensheu

    2006-01-01

    Future Mars missions, such as the Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission, may benefit from core sample acquisition from a low-mass rover where the rover cannot be assumed to be stationary during a coring operation. Manipulation from Mars rovers is currently done under the assumption that the rover acts as a stationary, stable platform for the arm. An MSR mission scenario with a low-mass rover has been developed and the technology needs have been investigated. Models for alternative types of coring tools and tool-environment interaction have been developed and input along with wheel-soil interaction models into the Stanford Simulation & Active Interfaces (SAI) simulation environment to enable simulation of coring operations from a rover. Coring tests using commercial coring tools indicate that the quality of the core is a critical criterion in the system design. Current results of the models, simulation, and coring tests are provided.

  13. Dual hollow-core anti-resonant fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, N. V.; Bradley, T. D.; Hayes, J. R.; Jasion, G. T.; Chen, Y.; Sandoghchi, S. R.; Horak, P.; Poletti, F.; Petrovich, M. N.; Richardson, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    While hollow core-photonic crystal fibres are now a well-established fibre technology, the majority of work on these speciality fibres has been on designs with a single core for optical guidance. In this paper we present the first dual hollow-core anti-resonant fibres (DHC-ARFs). The fibres have high structural uniformity and low loss (minimum loss of 0.5 dB/m in the low loss guidance window) and demonstrate regimes of both inter-core coupling and zero coupling, dependent on the wavelength of operation, input polarisation, core separation and bend radius. In a DHC-ARF with a core separation of 4.3 μm, we find that with an optimised input polarisation up to 65% of the light guided in the launch core can be coupled into the second core, opening up applications in power delivery, gas sensing and quantum optics.

  14. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  15. Magnetorotational iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    1984-01-01

    During its final evolutionary stages, a massive star, as considered in current astrophysical theory, undergoes rapid collapse, thereby triggering a sequence of a catastrophic event which results in a Type II supernova explosion. A remnant neutron star or a black hole is left after the explosion. Stellar collapse occurs, when thermonuclear fusion has consumed the lighter elements present. At this stage, the core consists of iron. Difficulties arise regarding an appropriate model with respect to the core collapse. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of a Type II supernova core including the effects of rotation and magnetic fields. A simple neutrino model is developed which reproduced the spherically symmetric results of Bowers and Wilson (1982). Several two-dimensional computational models of stellar collapse are studied, taking into account a case in which a 15 solar masses iron core was artificially given rotational and magnetic energy.

  16. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  17. INTEGRAL core programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Schoenfelder, V.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

    1997-01-01

    The International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission is described with emphasis on the INTEGRAL core program. The progress made in the planning activities for the core program is reported on. The INTEGRAL mission has a nominal lifetime of two years with a five year extension option. The observing time will be divided between the core program (between 30 and 35 percent during the first two years) and general observations. The core program consists of three main elements: the deep survey of the Galactic plane in the central radian of the Galaxy; frequent scans of the Galactic plane in the search for transient sources, and pointed observations of several selected sources. The allocation of the observation time is detailed and the sensitivities of the observations are outlined.

  18. Biospecimen Core Resource - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Biospecimen Core Resource centralized laboratory reviews and processes blood and tissue samples and their associated data using optimized standard operating procedures for the entire TCGA Research Network.

  19. Core bounce supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1987-01-01

    The gravitational collapse mechanism for Type II supernovae is considered, concentrating on the direct implosion - core bounce - hydrodynamic explosion picture. We examine the influence of the stiffness of the dense matter equation of state and discuss how the shock wave is formed. Its chances of success are determined by the equation of state, general relativistic effects, neutrino transport, and the size of presupernova iron core. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  20. Nuclear core positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Garkisch, Hans D.; Yant, Howard W.; Patterson, John F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural support system for the core of a nuclear reactor which achieves relatively restricted clearances at operating conditions and yet allows sufficient clearance between fuel assemblies at refueling temperatures. Axially displaced spacer pads having variable between pad spacing and a temperature compensated radial restraint system are utilized to maintain clearances between the fuel elements. The core support plates are constructed of metals specially chosen such that differential thermal expansion produces positive restraint at operating temperatures.

  1. Emergency core cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schenewerk, William E.; Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  2. Tuned Chamber Core Panel Acoustic Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents acoustic testing of tuned chamber core panels, which can be used to supplement the low-frequency performance of conventional acoustic treatment. The tuned chamber core concept incorporates low-frequency noise control directly within the primary structure and is applicable to sandwich constructions with a directional core, including corrugated-, truss-, and fluted-core designs. These types of sandwich structures have long, hollow channels (or chambers) in the core. By adding small holes through one of the facesheets, the hollow chambers can be utilized as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. These resonators can then be used to attenuate low-frequency noise (below 400 Hz) inside a vehicle compartment without increasing the weight or size of the structure. The results of this test program demonstrate that the tuned chamber core concept is effective when used in isolation or combined with acoustic foam treatments. Specifically, an array of acoustic resonators integrated within the core of the panels was shown to improve both the low-frequency absorption and transmission loss of the structure in targeted one-third octave bands.

  3. Scoring Dawg Core Breakoff and Retention Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Backes, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    This novel core break-off and retention mechanism consists of a scoring dawg controlled by a set of two tubes (a drill tube and an inner tube). The drill tube and the inner tube have longitudinal concentric holes. The solution can be implemented in an eccentric tube configuration as well where the tubes have eccentric longitudinal holes. The inner tube presents at the bottom two control surfaces for controlling the orientation of the scoring dawg. The drill tube presents a sunk-in profile on the inside of the wall for housing the scoring dawg. The inner tube rotation relative to the drill tube actively controls the orientation of the scoring dawg and hence its penetration and retrieval from the core. The scoring dawg presents a shaft, two axially spaced arms, and a tooth. The two arms slide on the control surfaces of the inner tube. The tooth, when rotated, can penetrate or be extracted from the core. During drilling, the two tubes move together maintaining the scoring dawg completely outside the core. After the desired drilling depth has been reached the inner tube is rotated relative to the drill tube such that the tooth of the scoring dawg moves toward the central axis. By rotating the drill tube, the scoring dawg can score the core and so reduce its cross sectional area. The scoring dawg can also act as a stress concentrator for breaking the core in torsion or tension. After breaking the core, the scoring dawg can act as a core retention mechanism. For scoring, it requires the core to be attached to the rock. If the core is broken, the dawg can be used as a retention mechanism. The scoring dawg requires a hard-tip insert like tungsten carbide for scoring hard rocks. The relative rotation of the two tubes can be controlled manually or by an additional actuator. In the implemented design solution the bit rotation for scoring was in the same direction as the drilling. The device was tested for limestone cores and basalt cores. The torque required for breaking the

  4. The Earth's Core: How Does It Work? Perspectives in Science. Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC.

    Various research studies designed to enhance knowledge about the earth's core are discussed. Areas addressed include: (1) the discovery of the earth's core; (2) experimental approaches used in studying the earth's core (including shock-wave experiments and experiments at high static pressures), the search for the core's light elements, the…

  5. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2010-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the sector grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  6. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the one-twelfth grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  7. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  8. Efficiency of static core turn-off in a system-on-a-chip with variation

    DOEpatents

    Cher, Chen-Yong; Coteus, Paul W; Gara, Alan; Kursun, Eren; Paulsen, David P; Schuelke, Brian A; Sheets, II, John E; Tian, Shurong

    2013-10-29

    A processor-implemented method for improving efficiency of a static core turn-off in a multi-core processor with variation, the method comprising: conducting via a simulation a turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's design stage, wherein the turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's design stage includes a first output corresponding to a first multi-core processor core to turn off; conducting a turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's testing stage, wherein the turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's testing stage includes a second output corresponding to a second multi-core processor core to turn off; comparing the first output and the second output to determine if the first output is referring to the same core to turn off as the second output; outputting a third output corresponding to the first multi-core processor core if the first output and the second output are both referring to the same core to turn off.

  9. Analysis of parameters for high loss side core in chirally coupled core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nan; Liao, Lei; Li, Jiaming; Peng, Jinggang; Li, Jinyan

    2015-08-01

    The chirally-coupled core fibers exhibit excellent single mode performance without any external mode managements. In this paper, we numerically investigated effects of fiber parameters including side core size, NA, helix pitch and offset distance on high order modes loss. A general range of parameters was given for fiber design. The results indicate that to achieve high loss for side modes, the fiber requires side core diameter ranging at a dozen micrometers with a numerical aperture 0.09 and the helix pitch taking values in millimeter magnitude.

  10. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  11. Earth's core iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geophysicist J. Michael Brown of Texas A & M University noted recently at the Spring AGU Meeting in Baltimore that the structure and phase of metallic iron at pressures of the earth's inner core (approximately 3.3 Mbar) could have great significance in defining geometrical aspects of the core itself. Brown worked at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with R.B. McQueen to redetermine the phase relations of metallic iron in a series of new shock-wave experiments. They found the melting point of iron at conditions equal to those at the boundary of the earth's outer (liquid) and inner (solid) cores to be 6000°±500°C (Geophysical Research Letters, 7, 533-536, 1980).

  12. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  13. A Core Curriculum for Soil Science Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montagne, Cliff

    1987-01-01

    Reported are the results of a survey of 60 professional soil scientists which was designed to rate and rank courses that should be required for a baccalaureate degree in soil science. Lists the rankings and ratings, along with the resulting core courses and a proposed year-by-year sequence. (TW)

  14. Health Care Assistant Core. Instructor Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feilner, Veronica; Robling, Jeannine

    This document contains the core curriculum for a basic high school course for health care assistants. It is designed as a 1-semester course of study, after which students can take a course in an emphasis area, such as veterinary, nursing, pharmacology, or physical therapy, in which they learn skills for specific entry-level jobs. The curriculum…

  15. Student Voice and the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonezawa, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Common Core proponents and detractors debate its merits, but students have voiced their opinion for years. Using a decade's worth of data gathered through design-research on youth voice, this article discusses what high school students have long described as more ideal learning environments for themselves--and how remarkably similar the Common…

  16. The Common Core and Inverse Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edenfield, Kelly W.

    2012-01-01

    The widespread adoption of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010) shows a commitment to changing mathematics teaching and learning in pursuit of increasing student achievement. CCSSM should not be viewed as just another list of content standards for publishers and assessment groups to design their products around. Many…

  17. First Core and Refueling Options for IRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, Bojan; Carelli, Mario D.; Greenspan, Ehud; Milosevic, Miodrag; Vujic, Jasmina; Padovani, Enrico; Ganda, Francesco

    2002-07-01

    The International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) is being developed by an international consortium of industry, laboratory, university and utility establishments, led by Westinghouse. The IRIS design addresses key requirements associated with advanced reactors, including improved safety, enhanced proliferation resistance, competitive electricity production cost, and improved waste management. IRIS is a modular, small/medium size (100 to 335 MWe) PWR with integral vessel configuration. Its design is based on proven LWR technology, so that no new technology development is needed and near term deployment is possible. At the same time, aim was to introduce improvements as compared to present PWRs. These opposing requirements resulted in an evolutionary approach to fuel and core design, balancing new features and the need to avoid extensive testing and demonstration programs. A path forward was devised by selecting the current fuel technology for the first IRIS core, but keeping future upgrades possible through the variable moderation fuel assembly design. This paper describes this approach and discusses core fueling options that enable achieving four-year and eight-year core lifetime. (authors)

  18. Formed Core Sampler Hydraulic Conductivity Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. H.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-09-25

    A full-scale formed core sampler was designed and functionally tested for use in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to compare properties of the formed core samples and core drilled samples taken from adjacent areas in the full-scale sampler. While several physical properties were evaluated, the primary property of interest was hydraulic conductivity. Differences in hydraulic conductivity between the samples from the formed core sampler and those representing the bulk material were noted with respect to the initial handling and storage of the samples. Due to testing conditions, the site port samples were exposed to uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions prior to testing whereas the formed core samples were kept in sealed containers with minimal exposure to an uncontrolled environment prior to testing. Based on the results of the testing, no significant differences in porosity or density were found between the formed core samples and those representing the bulk material in the test stand.

  19. History and Systems of Psychology: A Course to Unite a Core Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joshua L.; McCarley, Nancy; Kraft, John

    2013-01-01

    Core curricula are designed, in part, to help undergraduate students become intellectually well-rounded. To merge core curricula with the components of the scholarship of teaching and learning movement, students engaged in core curricula need capstone courses designed to aid them in retaining information over the long term and synthesizing…

  20. Smart System Using New Piezoelectric Fiber with Metal Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimojo, Yoshiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Shan, Yue Jin; Imoto, Hideo; Nagamine, Masaru

    A new piezoelectric ceramic fiber containing a metal core was produced by the extrusion method. The insertion of a metal core is significant because the fiber's strength can be supported by the metal core which also serves as an internal electrode. A new smart board was designed by mounting these piezoelectric fibers into the surface of a CFRP composite. This smart composite board was able to both detect, and suppress vibrations.

  1. Navagating the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McShane, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a debate over the Common Core State Standards Initiative as it has rocketed to the forefront of education policy discussions around the country. The author contends that there is value in having clear cross state standards that will clarify the new online and blended learning that the growing use of technology has provided…

  2. Ultrasonic Drilling and Coring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1998-01-01

    A novel drilling and coring device, driven by a combination, of sonic and ultrasonic vibration, was developed. The device is applicable to soft and hard objects using low axial load and potentially operational under extreme conditions. The device has numerous potential planetary applications. Significant potential for commercialization in construction, demining, drilling and medical technologies.

  3. Authentic to the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukral, Nicole; Spector, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    When educators think about what makes learning relevant to students, often they narrow their thinking to electives or career technical education. While these provide powerful opportunities for students to make relevant connections to their learning, they can also create authentic experiences in the core curriculum. In the San Juan Unified School…

  4. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Olich, Eugene E.; Dahl, Leslie R.

    1995-01-01

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter.

  5. Theory of core excitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, J. D.; Hjalmarson, H. P.; Sankey, O. F.; Allen, R. E.; Buettner, H.

    1980-01-01

    The observation of core excitons with binding energies much larger than those of the valence excitons in the same material has posed a long-standing theoretical problem. A proposed solution to this problem is presented, and Frenkel excitons and Wannier excitons are shown to coexist naturally in a single material. (GHT)

  6. Some Core Contested Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  7. Core Directions in HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of four papers presented at a symposium on core directions in human resource development (HRD) moderated by Verna Willis at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Reengineering the Organizational HRD Function: Two Case Studies" (Neal Chalofsky) reports an action research study in which…

  8. Core Geometry Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirata, Li Ann

    Core Geometry is a course offered in the Option Y sequence of the high school mathematics program described by the Hawaii State Department of Education's guidelines. The emphasis of this course is on the general awareness and use of the relationships among points, lines, and figures in planes and space. This sample course is based on the…

  9. Life from the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Coleman, Max; Pignatti, Johannes; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    Life on Earth is the result of the chaotic combination of several independent chemical and physical parameters. One of them is the shield from ionizing radiation exerted by the atmosphere and the Earth's magnetic field. We hypothesise that the first few billion years of the Earth's history, dominated by bacteria, were characterized by stronger ionizing radiation. Bacteria can survive under such conditions better than any other organism. During the Archean and early Proterozoic the shield could have been weaker, allowing the development of only a limited number of species, more resistant to the external radiation. The Cambrian explosion of life could have been enhanced by the gradual growth of the solid inner core, which was not existent possibly before 1 Ga. The cooling of the Earth generated the solidification of the iron alloy in the center of the planet. As an hypothesis, before the crystallization of the core, the turbulence in the liquid core could have resulted in a lower or different magnetic field from the one we know today, being absent the relative rotation between inner and external core.

  10. The Earth's Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  11. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  12. University City Core Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia City Planning Commission, PA.

    A redevelopment plan for an urban core area of about 300 acres was warranted by--(1) unsuitable building conditions, (2) undesirable land usage, and (3) faulty traffic circulation. The plan includes expansion of two universities and creation of a regional science center, high school, and medical center. Guidelines for proposed land use and zoning…

  13. The Tom Core Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ahting, Uwe; Thun, Clemens; Hegerl, Reiner; Typke, Dieter; Nargang, Frank E.; Neupert, Walter; Nussberger, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    Translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins across the outer membrane of mitochondria is mediated by the multicomponent transmembrane TOM complex. We have isolated the TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa by removing the receptors Tom70 and Tom20 from the isolated TOM holo complex by treatment with the detergent dodecyl maltoside. It consists of Tom40, Tom22, and the small Tom components, Tom6 and Tom7. This core complex was also purified directly from mitochondria after solubilization with dodecyl maltoside. The TOM core complex has the characteristics of the general insertion pore; it contains high-conductance channels and binds preprotein in a targeting sequence-dependent manner. It forms a double ring structure that, in contrast to the holo complex, lacks the third density seen in the latter particles. Three-dimensional reconstruction by electron tomography exhibits two open pores traversing the complex with a diameter of ∼2.1 nm and a height of ∼7 nm. Tom40 is the key structural element of the TOM core complex. PMID:10579717

  14. Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleosome Core Particle grown on STS-81. The fundamental structural unit of chromatin and is the basis for organization within the genome by compaction of DNA within the nucleus of the cell and by making selected regions of chromosomes available for transcription and replication. Principal Investigator's are Dr. Dan Carter and Dr. Gerard Bunick of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  15. From Context to Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    At Campus Technology 2008, Arizona State University Technology Officer Adrian Sannier mesmerized audiences with his mandate to become more efficient by doing only the "core" tech stuff--and getting someone else to slog through the context. This article presents an excerpt from Sannier's hour-long keynote address at Campus Technology '08. Sannier…

  16. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  17. The core legion object model

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.; Grimshaw, A.

    1996-12-31

    The Legion project at the University of Virginia is an architecture for designing and building system services that provide the illusion of a single virtual machine to users, a virtual machine that provides secure shared object and shared name spaces, application adjustable fault-tolerance, improved response time, and greater throughput. Legion targets wide area assemblies of workstations, supercomputers, and parallel supercomputers, Legion tackles problems not solved by existing workstation based parallel processing tools; the system will enable fault-tolerance, wide area parallel processing, inter-operability, heterogeneity, a single global name space, protection, security, efficient scheduling, and comprehensive resource management. This paper describes the core Legion object model, which specifies the composition and functionality of Legion`s core objects-those objects that cooperate to create, locate, manage, and remove objects in the Legion system. The object model facilitates a flexible extensible implementation, provides a single global name space, grants site autonomy to participating organizations, and scales to millions of sites and trillions of objects.

  18. Evaluating Core Quality for a Mars Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, D. K.; Budney, C.; Shiraishi, L.; Klein, K.

    2012-01-01

    Sample return missions, including the proposed Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission, propose to collect core samples from scientifically valuable sites on Mars. These core samples would undergo extreme forces during the drilling process, and during the reentry process if the EEV (Earth Entry Vehicle) performed a hard landing on Earth. Because of the foreseen damage to the stratigraphy of the cores, it is important to evaluate each core for rock quality. However, because no core sample return mission has yet been conducted to another planetary body, it remains unclear as to how to assess the cores for rock quality. In this report, we describe the development of a metric designed to quantitatively assess the mechanical quality of any rock cores returned from Mars (or other planetary bodies). We report on the process by which we tested the metric on core samples of Mars analogue materials, and the effectiveness of the core assessment metric (CAM) in assessing rock core quality before and after the cores were subjected to shocking (g forces representative of an EEV landing).

  19. 17 CFR 38.1150 - Core Principle 22.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Core Principle 22. 38.1150 Section 38.1150 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION DESIGNATED CONTRACT MARKETS Diversity of Board of Directors § 38.1150 Core Principle 22. The board of trade, if...

  20. 17 CFR 38.1150 - Core Principle 22.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Core Principle 22. 38.1150 Section 38.1150 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION DESIGNATED CONTRACT MARKETS Diversity of Board of Directors § 38.1150 Core Principle 22. The board of trade, if...

  1. Common Core Units in Business Education: The Supply Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Coleen

    This secondary unit of instruction on how to use a supply catalog is one of sixteen Common Core Units in Business Education (CCUBE). The units were designed for implementing the sixteen common core competencies identified in the California Business Education Program Guide for Office and Distributive Education. Each competency-based unit is…

  2. Essential Distinctiveness: Strategic Alternatives in Updating the Business Core Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alstete, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to propose the use of specific strategic management tools for identifying opportunities for gaining competitive advantage in the business core curricula offered at colleges and universities. Design/methodology/approach: A brief review of the literature on business core curriculum innovation and change is examined, and…

  3. The General Education Core at Shoreline Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenwasser, Marie E.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the general education core at Washington State's Shoreline Community College, which includes integrated studies courses and learning communities. Indicates that the college has established general education outcomes that guide the design of a coherent core of study for both academic transfer and vocational students. (MAB)

  4. Laser techniques for spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.; Falcone, R. W.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Willison, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss three techniques which allow the use of tunable lasers for high resolution and picosecond time scale spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels. These are: anti-Stokes absorption spectroscopy, laser induced emission from metastable levels, and laser designation of selected core-excited levels.

  5. Allied Health Core Curriculum: Its Time Has Come

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, M. LaCheeta

    2004-01-01

    There is lack of a clear definition regarding an allied health core curriculum. The Pew Health Professions Commission and the Bureau of Health Professions use the following to define a core curriculum: "A set of interdisciplinary courses, clinical training, and other educational exposures designed to provide allied health students at each level…

  6. Investigation of intravalence, core-valence and core-core electron correlation effects in polonium atomic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinet, Pascal

    2014-09-01

    A detailed investigation of the atomic structure and radiative parameters involving the lowest states within the 6p4, 6p36d, 6p37s, 6p37p and 6p37d configurations of neutral polonium is reported in the present paper. Using different physical models based on the pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock approach, the influence of intravalence, core-valence and core-core electron correlation on the atomic parameters is discussed in detail. This work allowed us to fix the spectroscopic designation of some experimental level energy values and to provide for the first time a set of reliable oscillator strengths corresponding to 31 Po I spectral lines in the wavelength region from 175 to 987 nm.

  7. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  8. Core Outlet Temperature Study

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Hoffman, E.; Majumdar, S.

    2008-07-28

    It is a known fact that the power conversion plant efficiency increases with elevation of the heat addition temperature. The higher efficiency means better utilization of the available resources such that higher output in terms of electricity production can be achieved for the same size and power of the reactor core or, alternatively, a lower power core could be used to produce the same electrical output. Since any nuclear power plant, such as the Advanced Burner Reactor, is ultimately built to produce electricity, a higher electrical output is always desirable. However, the benefits of the higher efficiency and electricity production usually come at a price. Both the benefits and the disadvantages of higher reactor outlet temperatures are analyzed in this work.

  9. Dynamics of core accretion

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M⊕ embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolutionmore » on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling however, as

  10. Dynamics of core accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolution on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling

  11. Long Valley Coring Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, John; Finger, John; McConnel, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    In December 1997, the California Energy Commission (CEC) agreed to provide funding for Phase III continued drilling of the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) near Mammoth Lakes, CA, from its present depth. The CEC contribution of $1 million completes a funding package of $2 million from a variety of sources, which will allow the well to be cored continuously to a depth of between 11,500 and 12,500 feet. The core recovered from Phase III will be crucial to understanding the origin and history of the hydrothermal systems responsible for the filling of fractures in the basement rock. The borehole may penetrate the metamorphic roof of the large magmatic complex that has fed the volcanism responsible for the caldera and subsequent activity.

  12. PRISMATIC CORE COUPLED TRANSIENT BENCHMARK

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ortensi; M.A. Pope; G. Strydom; R.S. Sen; M.D. DeHart; H.D. Gougar; C. Ellis; A. Baxter; V. Seker; T.J. Downar; K. Vierow; K. Ivanov

    2011-06-01

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  13. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  14. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  15. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  16. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  17. Toroidal core winder

    DOEpatents

    Potthoff, Clifford M.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for placing wire windings on a toroidal body, such as a transformer core, having an orifice in its center. The apparatus comprises a wire storage spool, a wire loop holding continuous belt maintained in a C-shaped loop by a belt supporting structure and provision for turning the belt to place and tighten loops of wire on a toroidal body, which is disposed within the gap of the C-shaped belt loop.

  18. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Olich, E.E.; Dahl, L.R.

    1995-01-17

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter. 21 figures.

  19. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, Peter M.; Reger, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  20. Some core contested concepts.

    PubMed

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-02-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and to lead to conclusions about a number of significant issues that differ from some conventional beliefs.

  1. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  2. GEOS-CORE

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone for linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.

  3. Advanced reactor physics methods for heterogeneous reactor cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Steven A.

    To maintain the economic viability of nuclear power the industry has begun to emphasize maximizing the efficiency and output of existing nuclear power plants by using longer fuel cycles, stretch power uprates, shorter outage lengths, mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel and more aggressive operating strategies. In order to accommodate these changes, while still satisfying the peaking factor and power envelope requirements necessary to maintain safe operation, more complexity in commercial core designs have been implemented, such as an increase in the number of sub-batches and an increase in the use of both discrete and integral burnable poisons. A consequence of the increased complexity of core designs, as well as the use of MOX fuel, is an increase in the neutronic heterogeneity of the core. Such heterogeneous cores introduce challenges for the current methods that are used for reactor analysis. New methods must be developed to address these deficiencies while still maintaining the computational efficiency of existing reactor analysis methods. In this thesis, advanced core design methodologies are developed to be able to adequately analyze the highly heterogeneous core designs which are currently in use in commercial power reactors. These methodological improvements are being pursued with the goal of not sacrificing the computational efficiency which core designers require. More specifically, the PSU nodal code NEM is being updated to include an SP3 solution option, an advanced transverse leakage option, and a semi-analytical NEM solution option.

  4. ROPEC - ROtary PErcussive Coring Drill for Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Philip; Spring, Justin; Zacny, Kris

    2014-01-01

    The ROtary Percussive Coring Drill is a light weight, flight-like, five-actuator drilling system prototype designed to acquire core material from rock targets for the purposes of Mars Sample Return. In addition to producing rock cores for sample caching, the ROPEC drill can be integrated with a number of end effectors to perform functions such as rock surface abrasion, dust and debris removal, powder and regolith acquisition, and viewing of potential cores prior to caching. The ROPEC drill and its suite of end effectors have been demonstrated with a five degree of freedom Robotic Arm mounted to a mobility system with a prototype sample cache and bit storage station.

  5. Data management integration for biomedical core facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Szymanski, Jacek; Wilson, David

    2007-03-01

    We present the design, development, and pilot-deployment experiences of MIMI, a web-based, Multi-modality Multi-Resource Information Integration environment for biomedical core facilities. This is an easily customizable, web-based software tool that integrates scientific and administrative support for a biomedical core facility involving a common set of entities: researchers; projects; equipments and devices; support staff; services; samples and materials; experimental workflow; large and complex data. With this software, one can: register users; manage projects; schedule resources; bill services; perform site-wide search; archive, back-up, and share data. With its customizable, expandable, and scalable characteristics, MIMI not only provides a cost-effective solution to the overarching data management problem of biomedical core facilities unavailable in the market place, but also lays a foundation for data federation to facilitate and support discovery-driven research.

  6. Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-09-30

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

  7. High-voltage air-core pulse transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    General types of air core pulse transformers designed for high voltage pulse generation and energy transfer applications are discussed with special emphasis on pulse charging systems which operate up to the multi-megavolt range. The design, operation, dielectric materials, and performance are described. It is concluded that high voltage air core pulse transformers are best suited to applications outside the normal ranges of conventional magnetic core transformers. In general these include charge transfer at high power levels and fast pulse generation with comparatively low energy. When properly designed and constructed, they are capable of delivering high energy transfer efficiency and have demonstrated superior high voltage endurance. The principal disadvantage of high voltage air core transformers is that they are not generally available from commercial sources. Consequently, the potential user must become thoroughly familiar with all aspects of design, fabrication and system application before he can produce a high performance transformer system. (LCL)

  8. 33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE CORE MOLDS WERE HAND FILLED AND OFTEN PNEUMATICALLY COMPRESSED WITH A HAND-HELD RAMMER BEFORE THEY WERE BAKED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  9. Coring Methane Hydrate by using Hybrid Pressure Coring System of D/V Chikyu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Y.; Mizuguchi, Y.; Inagaki, F.; Eguchi, N.; Yamamoto, K.

    2013-12-01

    Pressure coring is a technique to keep in-situ conditions in recovering sub-seafloor sediment samples, which are potentially rich in soluble or hydrated gas. In regular core sampling, gas fractions are easily lost through the changes in the pressure and temperature during core recovery, and it has significant impact on the chemical components of the sample. Rapid degassing may also cause critical damages of original structures. To study original characteristics of gaseous sub-seafloor sediment, a new Hybrid Pressure Coring System (Hybrid PCS) was developed for the D/V Chikyu operation by adapting some of the existing pressure sampling technologies. Hybrid PCS is composed of three main parts: top section for the wireline operation, middle section for the accumulator and pressure controlling system, and the bottom section for the autoclave chamber. The design concept is based on that of Pressure Core Sampler used in Ocean Drilling Program, and of Pressure Temperature Core Sampler (PTCS) and Non-cooled PTCS of Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC). Several modifications were made including that on the ball valve, which operates to close the autoclave after coring. The core samples are 51 mm in diameter and up to 3.5 m in length. The system is combined with the Extented Shoe Coring System on the Chikyu and best suited for coring of semi-consolidated formation up to about 3400 m from the sea level. Sample autoclave is compatible with Pressure Core Analysis and Transfer System (PCATS) of Geotek Ltd for sub-sampling and analysis under in-situ pressure. The analysis in PCATS includes X-ray CT scan and core logging with P-wave velocity and gamma density. Depressurization provides accurate volume of gas and its sub-sampling. Hybrid PCS was first tested during the Chikyu Exp. 906 at a submarine mud-volcano in the Nankai Trough. A 0.9 m of hydrate rich material was recovered from the summit (water depth: 2000 m) and the intact hydrate structure was observed

  10. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  11. NEW SOIL VOC SAMPLERS: EN CORE AND ACCU CORE SAMPLING/STORAGE DEVICES FOR VOC ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr

    2006-06-01

    Soil sampling and storage practices for volatile organic analysis must be designed to minimize loss of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from samples. The En Core{reg_sign} sampler is designed to collect and store soil samples in a manner that minimizes loss of contaminants due to volatilization and/or biodegradation. An ASTM International (ASTM) standard practice, D 6418, Standard Practice for Using the Disposable En Core Sampler for Sampling and Storing Soil for Volatile Organic Analysis, describes use of the En Core sampler to collect and store a soil sample of approximately 5 grams or 25 grams for volatile organic analysis and specifies sample storage in the En Core sampler at 4 {+-} 2 C for up to 48 hours; -7 to -21 C for up to 14 days; or 4 {+-} 2 C for up to 48 hours followed by storage at -7 to -21 C for up to five days. This report discusses activities performed during the past year to promote and continue acceptance of the En Core samplers based on their performance to store soil samples for VOC analysis. The En Core sampler is designed to collect soil samples for VOC analysis at the soil surface. To date, a sampling tool for collecting and storing subsurface soil samples for VOC analysis is not available. Development of a subsurface VOC sampling/storage device was initiated in 1999. This device, which is called the Accu Core{trademark} sampler, is designed so that a soil sample can be collected below the surface using a dual-tube penetrometer and transported to the laboratory for analysis in the same container. Laboratory testing of the current Accu Core design shows that the device holds low-level concentrations of VOCs in soil samples during 48-hour storage at 4 {+-} 2 C and that the device is ready for field evaluation to generate additional performance data. This report discusses a field validation exercise that was attempted in Pennsylvania in 2004 and activities being performed to plan and conduct a field validation study in 2006. A draft ASTM

  12. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, G. W.; Qian, Q. Peng, K. L.; Wen, X.; Zhou, G. X.; Sun, M.; Chen, X. D.; Yang, Z. M.

    2015-02-15

    Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se) semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  13. Continuously Optimized Reliable Energy (CORE) Microgrid: Models & Tools (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-07-01

    This brochure describes Continuously Optimized Reliable Energy (CORE), a trademarked process NREL employs to produce conceptual microgrid designs. This systems-based process enables designs to be optimized for economic value, energy surety, and sustainability. Capabilities NREL offers in support of microgrid design are explained.

  14. Modelling of crack deflection at core junctions in sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, J.; Andreasen, J. H.; Thomsen, O. T.

    2009-08-01

    The paper treats the problem of crack propagation in sandwich panels with interior core junctions. When a face-core interface crack approaches a trimaterial wedge, as it may occur at a sandwich core junction, two options exist for further crack advance; one is for the interface crack to penetrate the wedge along the face-core interface, and the second is deflection along the core junction interface. Crack deflection is highly relevant and a requirement for the functionality of a newly developed peel stopper for sandwich structures. The physical model presented in this paper enables the quantitative prediction of the ratio of the toughnesses of the two wedge interfaces required to control the crack propagation, and the derived results can be applied directly in future designs of sandwich structures. The solution strategy is based on finite element analysis (FEA), and a realistic engineering practice example of a tri-material composition corresponding to face and core materials is presented.

  15. Waved core lamination techniques on large and bulb hydroelectric machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Lehoczky, K.N. )

    1988-12-01

    Stator core lamination of large hydroelectric generators and motors and especially bulb type machines are often exposed to heat expansion forces causing severe damages. The temperature difference between the warm core lamination and the relatively colder stator frame, creates both radial and tangential stresses in these components. The consequence of these stresses depends on the axial prestressing of lamination and the internal design of the core. An overriding of some critical combination of these stresses may result in buckling of lamination, fracture of core tensioning and supporting components or cracks in the stator frame. The present waved lamination technique reduces the tangential and radial spring constant of core and prevents the damages. The research performed through theoretical and experimental methods, indicates a fundamental change in the behavior of core. The waved lamination was successfully used in a large number of machines, providing the reliability and wide application range of the method.

  16. SUPERENERGY-2: a multiassembly, steady-state computer code for LMFBR core thermal-hydraulic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Basehore, K.L.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-08-01

    Core thermal-hydraulic design and performance analyses for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) require repeated detailed multiassembly calculations to determine radial temperature profiles and subchannel outlet temperatures for various core configurations and subassembly structural analyses. At steady-state, detailed core-wide temperature profiles are required for core restraint calculations and subassembly structural analysis. In addition, sodium outlet temperatures are routinely needed for each reactor operating cycle. The SUPERENERGY-2 thermal-hydraulic code was designed specifically to meet these designer needs. It is applicable only to steady-state, forced-convection flow in LMFBR core geometries.

  17. Core Vessel Insert Handling Robot for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Van B; Dayton, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source provides the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams for scientific research and industrial development. Its eighteen neutron beam lines will eventually support up to twenty-four simultaneous experiments. Each beam line consists of various optical components which guide the neutrons to a particular instrument. The optical components nearest the neutron moderators are the core vessel inserts. Located approximately 9 m below the high bay floor, these inserts are bolted to the core vessel chamber and are part of the vacuum boundary. They are in a highly radioactive environment and must periodically be replaced. During initial SNS construction, four of the beam lines received Core Vessel Insert plugs rather than functional inserts. Remote replacement of the first Core Vessel Insert plug was recently completed using several pieces of custom-designed tooling, including a highly complicated Core Vessel Insert Robot. The design of this tool are discussed.

  18. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  19. Sneak in Some Core Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Even if students don't have an aversion to core subjects, they may not see the relationship between the core subjects and their career path. In this article, the author outlines a career path project that can be adapted to work in any career and technical education (CTE) class to highlight the relationship between core subjects and the real world.…

  20. Faculty Supports Communication Core Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopenhaver, Lillian Lodge; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Asks public relations educators what they think about core classes required for students in their field. Finds they generally support the idea that their students should take core mass communications courses, even if such core courses are developed from a traditional journalism/news-editorial standpoint. (MS)

  1. Mercury's inner core size and core-crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, Mathieu; Rivoldini, Attilio

    2015-03-01

    Earth-based radar observation of Mercury's rotation vector combined with gravity observation by the MESSENGER spacecraft yield a measure of Mercury's moment of inertia and the amplitude of the 88-day libration of its silicate shell. These two geodetic constraints provide information on Mercury's interior structure, including the presence of a fluid core, the radius of the core-mantle boundary and the bulk densities of the core and mantle. In this work, we show how they further provide information on the size of the solid inner core and on the crystallization regime of the fluid core. If Mercury's fluid core is a Fe-FeS alloy with a sulfur concentration on the Fe-rich side of the eutectic, the largest inner core compatible with geodetic observations at the 1σ level is 1325 ± 250 km. Our results further suggest that the crystallization scenario that best fits the geodetic observations involves the formation of Fe-snow within the fluid core, and that this scenario is preferred for models with an iron-poor mantle composition. Consequently, Mercury's dynamo most likely operates in concert with snow formation. For an inner core larger than ∼650 km, snow formation extends to the inner core boundary. If a dynamo cannot be maintained by the dynamics of snow formation, or if such dynamo produces a magnetic field incompatible with observation, Mercury's inner core must then be smaller than 650 km.

  2. Evaluation of Analysis Techniques for Fluted-Core Sandwich Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Schultz, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    Buckling-critical launch-vehicle structures require structural concepts that have high bending stiffness and low mass. Fluted-core, also known as truss-core, sandwich construction is one such concept. In an effort to identify an analysis method appropriate for the preliminary design of fluted-core cylinders, the current paper presents and compares results from several analysis techniques applied to a specific composite fluted-core test article. The analysis techniques are evaluated in terms of their ease of use and for their appropriateness at certain stages throughout a design analysis cycle (DAC). Current analysis techniques that provide accurate determination of the global buckling load are not readily applicable early in the DAC, such as during preliminary design, because they are too costly to run. An analytical approach that neglects transverse-shear deformation is easily applied during preliminary design, but the lack of transverse-shear deformation results in global buckling load predictions that are significantly higher than those from more detailed analysis methods. The current state of the art is either too complex to be applied for preliminary design, or is incapable of the accuracy required to determine global buckling loads for fluted-core cylinders. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an analytical method for calculating global buckling loads of fluted-core cylinders that includes transverse-shear deformations, and that can be easily incorporated in preliminary design.

  3. Recent Developments and Adaptations in Diamond Wireline Core Drilling Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. M.; Nielson, D. L.; Howell, B. B.; Pardey, M.

    2001-05-01

    Scientific drilling using diamond wireline technology is presently undergoing a significant expansion and extension of activities that has allowed us to recover geologic samples that have heretofore been technically or financially unattainable. Under the direction and management of DOSECC, a high-capacity hybrid core drilling system was designed and fabricated for the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP) in 1998. This system, the DOSECC Hybrid Coring System (DHCS), has the capacity to recover H-sized core from depths of more than 6 km. In 1999, the DHCS completed the first phase of the HSDP to a depth of 3100 m at a substantially lower cost per foot than any previous scientific borehole to comparable depths and, in the process, established a new depth record for recovery of H-sized wireline core. This system has been offered for use in the Unzen Scientific Drilling Project, the Chicxulub (impact crater) Scientific Drilling Project, and the Geysers Deep Geothermal Reservoir Project. More recently, DOSECC has developed a smaller barge-mounted wireline core drilling system, the GLAD800, that is capable of recovering P-sized sediment core to depths of up to 800 m. The GLAD800 has been successfully deployed on Great Salt Lake and Bear Lake in Utah and is presently being mobilized to Lake Titicaca in South America for an extensive core recovery effort there. The coring capabilities of the GLAD800 system will be available to the global lakes drilling community for acquisition of sediment cores from many of the world's deep lakes for use in calibrating and refining global climate models. Presently under development by DOSECC is a heave-compensation system that will allow us to expand the capabilities of the moderate depth coring system to allow us to collect sediment and bottom core from the shallow marine environment. The design and capabilities of these coring systems will be presented along with a discussion of their potential applications for addressing a range of

  4. CANOPEN Controller IP Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramia, Maurizio; Montagna, Mario; Furano, Gianluca; Winton, Alistair

    2010-08-01

    This paper will describe the activities performed by Thales Alenia Space Italia supported by the European Space Agency in the definition of a CAN bus interface to be used on Exomars. The final goal of this activity is the development of an IP core, to be used in a slave node, able to manage both the CAN bus Data Link and Application Layer totally in hardware. The activity has been focused on the needs of the EXOMARS mission where devices with different computational performances are all managed by the onboard computer through the CAN bus.

  5. PROCESS FOR JACKETING A CORE

    DOEpatents

    Last, G.A.

    1960-07-19

    A process is given for enclosing the uranium core of a nuclear fuel element by placing the core in an aluminum cup and closing the open end of the cup over the core. As the metal of the cup is brought together in a weld over the center of the end of the core, it is extruded inwardly as internal projection into a central recess in the core and outwardly as an external projection. Thus oxide inclusions in the weld of the cup are spread out into the internal and external projections and do not interfere with the integrity of the weld.

  6. Plasma core reactor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, T. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fissioning uranium plasma core reactors and to characterize space and terrestrial applications for such reactors. Uranium hexafluoride fuel is injected into core cavities and confined away from the surface by argon buffer gas injected tangentially from the peripheral walls. Radiant heat transfer calculations were performed for a six-cavity reactor configuration. Axial working fluid channels are located along a fraction of each cavity peripheral wall. Results of calculations for outward-directed radiant energy fluxes corresponding to radiating temperatures of 2000 to 5000 K indicate total operating pressures from 80 to 650 atm, centerline temperatures from 6900 to 30,000 K, and total radiated powers from 25 to 2500 MW, respectively. Applications are described for this type of reactor such as (1) high-thrust, high specific impulse space propulsion, (2) highly efficient systems for generation of electricity, and (3) hydrogen or synthetic fuel production systems using the intense radiant energy fluxes.

  7. Models of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  8. Models of the Earth's Core.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D J

    1981-11-06

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with the following properties. Core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and laboratory data.

  9. Vortex core identification in viscous hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Finn, Lucas I; Boghosian, Bruce M; Kottke, Christopher N

    2005-08-15

    We describe a software package designed for the investigation of topological fluid dynamics with a novel algorithm for locating and tracking vortex cores. The package is equipped with modules for generating desired vortex knots and links and evolving them according to the Navier-Stokes equations, while tracking and visualizing them. The package is parallelized using a message passing interface for a multiprocessor environment and makes use of a computational steering library for dynamic user intervention.

  10. Praying Mantis Bending Core Breakoff and Retention Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Lindermann, Randel A.

    2011-01-01

    Sampling cores requires the controlled breakoff of the core at a known location with respect to the drill end. An additional problem is designing a mechanism that can be implemented at a small scale, yet is robust and versatile enough to be used for a variety of core samples. The new design consists of a set of tubes (a drill tube, an outer tube, and an inner tube) and means of sliding the inner and outer tubes axially relative to each other. Additionally, a sample tube can be housed inside the inner tube for storing the sample. The inner tube fits inside the outer tube, which fits inside the drill tube. The inner and outer tubes can move axially relative to each other. The inner tube presents two lamellae with two opposing grabbing teeth and one pushing tooth. The pushing tooth is offset axially from the grabbing teeth. The teeth can move radially and their motion is controlled by the outer tube. The outer tube presents two lamellae with radial extrusions to control the inner tube lamellae motion. In breaking the core, the mechanism creates two support points (the grabbing teeth and the bit tip) and one push point. The core is broken in bending. The grabbing teeth can also act as a core retention mechanism. The praying mantis that is disclosed herein is an active core breaking/retention mechanism that requires only one additional actuator other than the drilling actuator. It can break cores that are attached to the borehole bottom as

  11. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE INSTRUMENT

    DOEpatents

    Mims, L.S.

    1961-08-22

    A multi-purpose instrument for measuring neutron flux, coolant flow rate, and coolant temperature in a nuclear reactor is described. The device consists essentially of a hollow thimble containing a heat conducting element protruding from the inner wall, the element containing on its innermost end an amount of fissionsble materinl to function as a heat source when subjected to neutron flux irradiation. Thermocouple type temperature sensing means are placed on the heat conducting element adjacent the fissionable material and at a point spaced therefrom, and at a point on the thimble which is in contact with the coolant fluid. The temperature differentials measured between the thermocouples are determinative of the neutron flux, coolant flow, and temperature being measured. The device may be utilized as a probe or may be incorporated in a reactor core. (AE C)

  13. HTTF Core Stress Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

    2012-07-01

    In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

  14. Growth outside the core.

    PubMed

    Zook, Chris; Allen, James

    2003-12-01

    Growth in an adjacent market is tougher than it looks; three-quarters of the time, the effort fails. But companies can change those odds dramatically. Results from a five-year study of corporate growth conducted by Bain & Company reveal that adjacency expansion succeeds only when built around strong core businesses that have the potential to become market leaders. And the best place to look for adjacency opportunities is inside a company's strongest customers. The study also found that the most successful companies were able to consistently, profitably outgrow their rivals by developing a formula for pushing out the boundaries of their core businesses in predictable, repeatable ways. Companies use their repeatability formulas to expand into any number of adjacencies. Some companies make repeated geographic moves, as Vodafone has done in expanding from one geographic market to another over the past 13 years, building revenues from $1 billion in 1990 to $48 billion in 2003. Others apply a superior business model to new segments. Dell, for example, has repeatedly adapted its direct-to-customer model to new customer segments and new product categories. In other cases, companies develop hybrid approaches. Nike executed a series of different types of adjacency moves: it expanded into adjacent customer segments, introduced new products, developed new distribution channels, and then moved into adjacent geographic markets. The successful repeaters in the study had two common characteristics. First, they were extraordinarily disciplined, applying rigorous screens before they made an adjacency move. This discipline paid off in the form of learning curve benefits, increased speed, and lower complexity. And second, in almost all cases, they developed their repeatable formulas by studying their customers and their customers' economics very, very carefully.

  15. Distribution of core oligosaccharide types in lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Amor, K; Heinrichs, D E; Frirdich, E; Ziebell, K; Johnson, R P; Whitfield, C

    2000-03-01

    In the lipopolysaccharides of Escherichia coli there are five distinct core oligosaccharide (core OS) structures, designated K-12 and R1 to R4. The objective of this work was to determine the prevalences of these core OS types within the species. Unique sequences in the waa (core OS biosynthesis) gene operon were used to develop a PCR-based system that facilitated unequivocal determination of the core OS types in isolates of E. coli. This system was applied to the 72 isolates in the E. coli ECOR collection, a compilation of isolates that is considered to be broadly representative of the genetic diversity of the species. Fifty (69. 4%) of the ECOR isolates contained the R1 core OS, 8 (11.1%) were representatives of R2, 8 (11.1%) were R3, 2 (2.8%) were R4, and only 4 (5.6%) were K-12. R1 is the only core OS type found in all four major phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2, and D) in the ECOR collection. Virulent extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates tend to be closely related to group B2 and, to a lesser extent, group D isolates. All of the ECOR representatives from the B2 and D groups had the R1 core OS. In contrast, commensal E. coli isolates are more closely related to group A, which contains isolates representing each of the five core OS structures. R3 was the only core OS type found in 38 verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) isolates from humans and cattle belonging to the common enterohemorrhagic E. coli serogroups O157, O111, and O26. Although isolates from other VTEC serogroups showed more core OS diversity, the R3 type (83.1% of all VTEC isolates) was still predominant. When non-VTEC commensal isolates from cattle were analyzed, it was found that most possessed the R1 core OS type.

  16. Efficient provisioning for multi-core applications with LSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Pra, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Tier-1 sites providing computing power for HEP experiments are usually tightly designed for high throughput performances. This is pursued by reducing the variety of supported use cases and tuning for performances those ones, the most important of which have been that of singlecore jobs. Moreover, the usual workload is saturation: each available core in the farm is in use and there are queued jobs waiting for their turn to run. Enabling multi-core jobs thus requires dedicating a number of hosts where to run, and waiting for them to free the needed number of cores. This drain-time introduces a loss of computing power driven by the number of unusable empty cores. As an increasing demand for multi-core capable resources have emerged, a Task Force have been constituted in WLCG, with the goal to define a simple and efficient multi-core resource provisioning model. This paper details the work done at the INFN Tier-1 to enable multi-core support for the LSF batch system, with the intent of reducing to the minimum the average number of unused cores. The adopted strategy has been that of dedicating to multi-core a dynamic set of nodes, whose dimension is mainly driven by the number of pending multi-core requests and fair-share priority of the submitting user. The node status transition, from single to multi core et vice versa, is driven by a finite state machine which is implemented in a custom multi-core director script, running in the cluster. After describing and motivating both the implementation and the details specific to the LSF batch system, results about performance are reported. Factors having positive and negative impact on the overall efficiency are discussed and solutions to reduce at most the negative ones are proposed.

  17. A Technique to Determine Billet Core Charge Weight for P/M Fuel Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, H.B.

    2001-07-02

    The core length in an extruded tube depends on the weight of powder in the billet core. In the past, the amount of aluminum powder needed to give a specified core length was determined empirically. This report gives a technique for calculating the weight of aluminum powder for the P/M core. An equation has been derived which can be used to determine the amount of aluminum needed for P/M billet core charge weights. Good agreement was obtained when compared to Mark 22 tube extrusion data. From the calculated charge weight, the elastomeric bag can be designed and made to compact the U3O8-Al core.

  18. SPEAR3 Gradient Dipole Core Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Nanyang

    2003-07-29

    Traditional means of core fabrication are to glue the laminations or weld them to form the yoke structure. These means result in good yoke assemblies for shorter (<0.6m) magnets. However, because of weld distortions or mechanical strength limitations, welding and/or gluing techniques are difficult to gain high mechanical precision for longer cores. The SPEAR3 gradient dipoles are up to 1.45m long and require distortions of <0.05mm. Therefore, the SPEAR3 gradient dipole core design incorporated an assembly technique, originally devised for the PEPII insertion quadrupoles and later adapted for the ALS gradient magnets. This technique involved fabricating a rigid frame for the core, precisely stacking and compressing the laminations using hydraulic jacks and granite surfaces and straight edges, and fixing the laminations in the frame by filling the grooves between the laminations and frame using steel loaded epoxy. Although this technique has been used in the past, it has never been fully described and published. This paper is written to provide a detailed description of the procedure and to present measurement data demonstrating the mechanical precision and stiffness of the resulting product.

  19. Fabricating the Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ring, Peter J.; Sayre, Edwin D.; Houts, Mike

    2006-01-20

    The solid core heatpipe nuclear reactor has the potential to be the most dependable concept for the nuclear space power system. The design of the conversion system employed permits multiple failure modes instead of the single failure mode of other concepts. Regardless of the material used for the reactor, either stainless steel, high-temperature alloys, Nb1Zr, Tantalum Alloys or MoRe Alloys, making the solid core by machining holes in a large diameter billet is not satisfactory. This is because the large diameter billet will have large grains that are detrimental to the performance of the reactor due to grain boundary diffusion. The ideal fabrication method for the solid core is by hot isostatic pressure diffusion bonding (HIPing). By this technique, wrought fine-grained tubes of the alloy chosen are assembled into the final shape with solid cusps and seal welded so that there is a vacuum in between all surfaces to be diffusion bonded. This welded structure is then HIPed for diffusion bonding. A solid core made of Type 321 stainless steel has been satisfactorily produced by Advanced Methods and Materials and is undergoing evaluation by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

  20. GPM Core Observatory Launch Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. The launch is currently scheduled for Feb. 27, 2014....

  1. Vibroacoustic Characterization of Corrugated-Core and Honeycomb-Core Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Albert; Schiller, Noah

    2016-01-01

    The vibroacoustic characteristics of two candidate launch vehicle fairing structures, corrugated- core and honeycomb-core sandwich designs, were studied. The study of these structures has been motivated by recent risk reduction efforts focused on mitigating high noise levels within the payload bays of large launch vehicles during launch. The corrugated-core sandwich concept is of particular interest as a dual purpose structure due to its ability to harbor resonant noise control systems without appreciably adding mass or taking up additional volume. Specifically, modal information, wavelength dispersion, and damping were determined from a series of vibrometer measurements and subsequent analysis procedures carried out on two test panels. Numerical and analytical modeling techniques were also used to assess assumed material properties and to further illuminate underlying structural dynamic aspects. Results from the tests and analyses described herein may serve as a reference for additional vibroacoustic studies involving these or similar structures.

  2. Allosteric Inhibition Through Core Disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, James R.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-03-05

    Although inhibitors typically bind pre-formed sites on proteins, it is theoretically possible to inhibit by disrupting the folded structure of a protein or, in the limit, to bind preferentially to the unfolded state. Equilibria defining how such molecules act are well understood, but structural models for such binding are unknown. Two novel inhibitors of {beta}-lactamase were found to destabilize the enzyme at high temperatures, but at lower temperatures showed no preference for destabilized mutant enzymes versus stabilized mutants. X-ray crystal structures showed that both inhibitors bound to a cryptic site in {beta}-lactamase, which the inhibitors themselves created by forcing apart helixes 11 and 12. This opened up a portion of the hydrophobic core of the protein, into which these two inhibitors bind. Although this binding site is 16 {angstrom} from the center of the active site, the conformational changes were transmitted through a sequence of linked motions to a key catalytic residue, Arg244, which in the complex adopts conformations very different from those in catalytically competent enzyme conformations. These structures offer a detailed view of what has heretofore been a theoretical construct, and suggest the possibility for further design against this novel site.

  3. Designed Functional Systems for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries Anode: From Solid to Hollow, and to Core-Shell NiCo2O4 Nanoparticles Encapsulated in Ultrathin Carbon Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Zhang, Huijuan; Fang, Ling; Bai, Yuanjuan; Wang, Yu

    2016-02-01

    Binary metal oxides have been considered as ideal and promising anode materials, which can ameliorate and enhance the electrochemical performances of the single metal oxides, such as electronic conductivity, reversible capacity, and structural stability. In this research, we report a rational method to synthesize some novel sandwich-like NiCo2O4@C nanosheets arrays for the first time. The nanostructures exhibit the unique features of solid, hollow, and even core-shell NiCo2O4 nanoparticles encapsulated inside and a graphitized carbon layers coating outside. Compared to the previous reports, these composites demonstrate more excellent electrochemical performances, including superior rate capability and excellent cycling capacity. Therefore, the final conclusion would be given that these multifarious sandwich-like NiCo2O4@C composites could be highly qualified candidates for lithium-ion battery anodes in some special field, in which good capability and high capacity are urgently required.

  4. Core foundations of abstract geometry.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Moira R; Huang, Yi; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2013-08-27

    Human adults from diverse cultures share intuitions about the points, lines, and figures of Euclidean geometry. Do children develop these intuitions by drawing on phylogenetically ancient and developmentally precocious geometric representations that guide their navigation and their analysis of object shape? In what way might these early-arising representations support later-developing Euclidean intuitions? To approach these questions, we investigated the relations among young children's use of geometry in tasks assessing: navigation; visual form analysis; and the interpretation of symbolic, purely geometric maps. Children's navigation depended on the distance and directional relations of the surface layout and predicted their use of a symbolic map with targets designated by surface distances. In contrast, children's analysis of visual forms depended on the size-invariant shape relations of objects and predicted their use of the same map but with targets designated by corner angles. Even though the two map tasks used identical instructions and map displays, children's performance on these tasks showed no evidence of integrated representations of distance and angle. Instead, young children flexibly recruited geometric representations of either navigable layouts or objects to interpret the same spatial symbols. These findings reveal a link between the early-arising geometric representations that humans share with diverse animals and the flexible geometric intuitions that give rise to human knowledge at its highest reaches. Although young children do not appear to integrate core geometric representations, children's use of the abstract geometry in spatial symbols such as maps may provide the earliest clues to the later construction of Euclidean geometry.

  5. IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT: PWR Core Calculations Using MCRAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PetroviĆ, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT CALCULATIONS * In-Core Fuel Management * Methodological Problems of In-Core Fuel Management * In-Core Fuel Management Analytical Tools * PENN STATE FUEL MANAGEMENT PACKAGE * Penn State Fuel Management Package (PFMP) * Assembly Data Description (ADD) * Linking PSU-LEOPARD and MCRAC: An Example * MULTICYCLE REACTOR ANALYSIS CODE (MCRAC) * Main Features and Options of MCRAC code * Core geometry * Diffusion equations * 1.5-group model * Multicycle neutronic analysis * Multicycle cost analysis * Criticality search * Power-dependent xenon feedback calculations * Control rod and burnable absorber simulation * Search for LP with flat BOC power distribution * Artificial ADD option * Variable dimensioning technique * RBI version of MCRAC code * Programming changes in PC version * Fuel interchange option * MCRAC Input/Output * General input description * Sample input * Sample output * EXPERIENCE WITH MCRAC CODE * CONCLUSIONS * REFERENCES

  6. Relativistic frozen core potential scheme with relaxation of core electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Yuya; Seino, Junji; Hayami, Masao; Nakai, Hiromi

    2016-10-01

    This letter proposes a relaxation scheme for core electrons based on the frozen core potential method at the infinite-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess level, called FCP-CR. The core electrons are self-consistently relaxed using frozen molecular valence potentials after the valence SCF calculation is performed. The efficiency of FCP-CR is confirmed by calculations of gold clusters. Furthermore, FCP-CR reproduces the results of the all-electron method for the energies of coinage metal dimers and the core ionization energies and core level shifts of vinyl acetate and three tungsten complexes at the Hartree-Fock and/or symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction levels.

  7. Instructional Management Plans for the Cooperative Industrial Education Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    These Instructional Management Plans (IMPs) are designed to assist teacher-coordinators of cooperative industrial education (CIE) in the design of application experiences for each task of each core competency area. They are intended to help the CIE teacher-coordinator direct the learning of occupational competencies by helping the student-learners…

  8. Business Planning Core Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Itzkowitz, G.N.

    2014-01-01

    Thoughtful business planning is pivotal to the success of any business/operational venture. When planned in a thoughtful and detailed manner there are very few operational or financial surprises for an institution or facility (service center) to contend with. At Stony Brook Medicine we include SWOT analysis and a detailed Market Analysis as part of the process. This is bolstered by an initiative to ensure institutional policies are met so that facilities remain in compliance throughout their lifecycle. As we operate 14 facilities we have had the opportunity to become creative in our approach to coordinate activities, virtualize services, integrate new software business-to-business partners, and finally coordinate plans for phased consolidation instead of outright termination of services when required. As the Associate Dean for Scientific Operations and Research Facilities, the shared research facilities (cores) of the Medical School are in my direct line of sight. We understand their value to the meeting our overall research mission. We have found that an active process of monitoring to predict trouble as much as possible is the best approach for facilities. Some case analysis of this type of interaction will be presented as well.

  9. Adult educators' core competences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  10. Variable depth core sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates to a sampling means, more particularly to a device to sample hard surfaces at varying depths. Often it is desirable to take samples of a hard surface wherein the samples are of the same diameter but of varying depths. Current practice requires that a full top-to-bottom sample of the material be taken, using a hole saw, and boring a hole from one end of the material to the other. The sample thus taken is removed from the hole saw and the middle of said sample is then subjected to further investigation. This paper describes a variable depth core sampler comprimising a circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapse to form a point and capture a sample, and a second saw member residing inside the first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of the first member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside the the first hole saw member.

  11. Core Competencies for Injury and Violence Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Stephens-Stidham, Shelli; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Bou-Saada, Ingrid; Hunter, Wanda; Lindemer, Kristen; Runyan, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to reduce the burden of injury and violence require a workforce that is knowledgeable and skilled in prevention. However, there has been no systematic process to ensure that professionals possess the necessary competencies. To address this deficiency, we developed a set of core competencies for public health practitioners in injury and violence prevention programs. The core competencies address domains including public health significance, data, the design and implementation of prevention activities, evaluation, program management, communication, stimulating change, and continuing education. Specific learning objectives establish goals for training in each domain. The competencies assist in efforts to reduce the burden of injury and violence and can provide benchmarks against which to assess progress in professional capacity for injury and violence prevention. PMID:19197083

  12. Mox fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOEpatents

    Kantrowitz, Mark L.; Rosenstein, Richard G.

    2001-05-15

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion. characteristics of the assembly.

  13. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOEpatents

    Kantrowitz, Mark L.; Rosenstein, Richard G.

    1998-01-01

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

  14. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOEpatents

    Kantrowitz, Mark L.; Rosenstein, Richard G.

    2001-07-17

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

  15. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOEpatents

    Kantrowitz, M.L.; Rosenstein, R.G.

    1998-10-13

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly. 38 figs.

  16. Feasibility study of full-reactor gas core demonstration test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, J. F.; Lofthouse, J. H.; Shaffer, C. J.; Macbeth, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Separate studies of nuclear criticality, flow patterns, and thermodynamics for the gas core reactor concept have all given positive indications of its feasibility. However, before serious design for a full scale gas core application can be made, feasibility must be shown for operation with full interaction of the nuclear, thermal, and hydraulic effects. A minimum sized, and hence minimum expense, test arrangement is considered for a full gas core configuration. It is shown that the hydrogen coolant scattering effects dominate the nuclear considerations at elevated temperatures. A cavity diameter of somewhat larger than 4 ft (122 cm) will be needed if temperatures high enough to vaporize uranium are to be achieved.

  17. Proposed methods for defueling the TMI-2 reactor core

    SciTech Connect

    Henrie, J O

    1984-05-01

    This report constitutes the general concensus of a Debris Defueling Working Group which was established by the US Department of Energy, through EG and G Idaho Inc., to obtain recommendations from nuclear industry representatives concerning techniques for removing fuel debris from the TMI-2 reactor vessel. The current configuration of the reactor core materials is characterized based on the best information available to the group. The overall core removal philosophy of the group is documented. The type of equipment recommended for core removal is described. The need for development testing to support the design and operation of the equipment is discussed.

  18. Fast Flux Test Facility core restraint system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, S.L.; Trenchard, R.G.

    1990-02-01

    Characterizing Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) core restraint system performance has been ongoing since the first operating cycle. Characterization consists of prerun analysis for each core load, in-reactor and postirradiation measurements of subassembly withdrawal loads and deformations, and using measurement data to fine tune predictive models. Monitoring FFTF operations and performing trend analysis has made it possible to gain insight into core restraint system performance and head off refueling difficulties while maximizing component lifetimes. Additionally, valuable information for improved designs and operating methods has been obtained. Focus is on past operating experience, emphasizing performance improvements and avoidance of potential problems. 4 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. COVERING A CORE BY EXTRUSION

    DOEpatents

    Karnie, A.J.

    1963-07-16

    A method of covering a cylindrical fuel core with a cladding metal ms described. The metal is forced between dies around the core from both ends in two opposing skirts, and as these meet the ends turn outward into an annular recess in the dics. By cutting off the raised portion formed by the recess, oxide impurities are eliminated. (AEC)

  20. Common Core: Victory Is Yours!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Jennifer L. W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to implement the Common Core State Standards in the classroom. She presents examples and activities that will leave teachers feeling "rosy" about tackling the new standards. She breaks down important benchmarks and shows how other teachers are doing the Core--and loving it!

  1. Complicated Politics to the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuinn, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    People dislike the Common Core for several different reasons, and so it is important to disaggregate the sources of opposition and to assess and then to dispel some of the myths that have built up around it. It also is important to understand the unusual political alliances that have emerged in opposition to Common Core implementation and how they…

  2. Core-shell hydrogel microcapsules for improved islets encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Minglin; Chiu, Alan; Sahay, Gaurav; Doloff, Joshua C; Dholakia, Nimit; Thakrar, Raj; Cohen, Joshua; Vegas, Arturo; Chen, Delai; Bratlie, Kaitlin M; Dang, Tram; York, Roger L; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Weir, Gordon C; Anderson, Daniel G

    2013-05-01

    Islets microencapsulation holds great promise to treat type 1 diabetes. Currently used alginate microcapsules often have islets protruding outside capsules, leading to inadequate immuno-protection. A novel design of microcapsules with core-shell structures using a two-fluid co-axial electro-jetting is reported. Improved encapsulation and diabetes correction is achieved in a single step by simply confining the islets in the core region of the capsules.

  3. Reactor design for nuclear electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, D. R.; Ranken, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    The paper analyzes the consequences of heat pipe failures, that resulted in modifications to the basic design of a heat-pipe cooled, fast spectrum nuclear reactor and led to consideration of an entirely different core design. The new design features an integral laminated core configuration consisting of alternating layers of UO2 and molybdenum sheets that span the diameter of the core. Design characteristics are presented and compared for two reactors. A conceptual design for a heat exchanger between the core and the thermionic converter assembly is described. This heat exchanger would provide design and fabrication decoupling of these two assemblies.

  4. Glass-clad semiconductor core optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Stephanie Lynn

    Glass-clad optical fibers comprising a crystalline semiconductor core have garnered considerable recent attention for their potential utility as novel waveguides for applications in nonlinear optics, sensing, power delivery, and biomedicine. As research into these fibers has progressed, it has become evident that excessive losses are limiting performance and so greater understanding of the underlying materials science, coupled with advances in fiber processing, is needed. More specifically, the semiconductor core fibers possess three performance-limiting characteristics that need to be addressed: (a) thermal expansion mismatches between crystalline core and glass cladding that lead to cracks, (b) the precipitation of oxide species in the core upon fiber cooling, which results from partial dissolution of the cladding glass by the core melt, and (c) polycrystallinity; all of which lead to scattering and increased transmission losses. This dissertation systematically studies each of these effects and develops both a fundamental scientific understanding of and practical engineering methods for reducing their impact. With respect to the thermal expansion mismatch and, in part, the dissolution of oxides, for the first time to our knowledge, oxide and non-oxide glass compositions are developed for a series of semiconductor cores based on two main design criteria: (1) matching the thermal expansion coefficient between semiconductor core and glass cladding to minimize cracking and (2) matching the viscosity-temperature dependences, such that the cladding glass draws into fiber at a temperature slightly above the melting point of the semiconductor in order to minimize dissolution and improve the fiber draw process. The x[Na 2O:Al2O3] + (100 - 2x)SiO2 glass compositional family was selected due to the ability to tailor the glass properties to match the aforementioned targets through slight variations in composition and adjusting the ratios of bridging and non-bridging oxygen

  5. The EPOS Integrated Core Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Keith; Michelini, Alberto; Bailo, Daniele

    2013-04-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) is integrating the diverse, but advanced Research Infrastructures in Europe for solid Earth Science, and will build on new e-science opportunities to monitor and understand the dynamic and complex solid-Earth System. This integration requires a significant coordination between, among others, disciplinary (thematic) communities, national RIs policies and initiatives, and geo- and IT-scientists. The RIs that EPOS will coordinate include at least, but not only: regionally-distributed geophysical observing systems (seismological and geodetic networks), local observatories (including geomagnetic, permanent in-situ and volcano observatories), experimental & analogue laboratories in Europe, integrated satellite data and geological information. EPOS is promoting open access to geophysical and geological data as well as modelling/processing tools, enabling a step change in multidisciplinary scientific research for Earth Sciences The EPOS e-infrastructure is developed through strawman (initial design / architecture), woodman (refined design/architecture) and ironman (final design/architecture) phases. Midway in the project we are in the woodman phase based on extensive primary requirements from users and secondary requirements for interoperation with other geoscience systems, other European environmental research infrastructure projects and e-infrastructure projects (e.g. EUDAT). The EPOS e-infrastructure is being developed along 3 parallel tracks: (a) an inventory of assets offered by organisations within the EPOS community. The RIDE (Research Infrastructure Database for EPOS) system from the strawman phase is being extended in the woodman phase to the metadata catalog describing computing and scientific resources, data, services (software), and users which will drive the EPOS e-infrastructure; (b) refining an architecture to meet the requirements. This is an iterative process with the working groups (organised thematically) within

  6. Systematic review of core muscle activity during physical fitness exercises.

    PubMed

    Martuscello, Jason M; Nuzzo, James L; Ashley, Candi D; Campbell, Bill I; Orriola, John J; Mayer, John M

    2013-06-01

    A consensus has not been reached among strength and conditioning specialists regarding what physical fitness exercises are most effective to stimulate activity of the core muscles. Thus, the purpose of this article was to systematically review the literature on the electromyographic (EMG) activity of 3 core muscles (lumbar multifidus, transverse abdominis, quadratus lumborum) during physical fitness exercises in healthy adults. CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, PubMed, SPORTdiscus, and Web of Science databases were searched for relevant articles using a search strategy designed by the investigators. Seventeen studies enrolling 252 participants met the review's inclusion/exclusion criteria. Physical fitness exercises were partitioned into 5 major types: traditional core, core stability, ball/device, free weight, and noncore free weight. Strength of evidence was assessed and summarized for comparisons among exercise types. The major findings of this review with moderate levels of evidence indicate that lumbar multifidus EMG activity is greater during free weight exercises compared with ball/device exercises and is similar during core stability and ball/device exercises. Transverse abdominis EMG activity is similar during core stability and ball/device exercises. No studies were uncovered for quadratus lumborum EMG activity during physical fitness exercises. The available evidence suggests that strength and conditioning specialists should focus on implementing multijoint free weight exercises, rather than core-specific exercises, to adequately train the core muscles in their athletes and clients.

  7. Multi-core advantages for mask data preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeap, Johnny; Nogatch, John

    2009-04-01

    Smaller design pattern feature sizes continue to increase mask data file sizes, which increases mask data processing (MDP) times. To satisfy the need for faster turn-around-time, MDP has progressively migrated from single-computer computation, to multi-threading, and then to distributed processing on multiple computers. The availability of low cost multi-core processors can be used advantageously to reduce Mask Data Preparation runtime. Compared to single core processors, multi-core processor have higher performance, however, total available memory and I/O bandwidth need to be increased proportionally with the additional cores. Memory per core and available I/O bandwidth limit the maximum number of cores that can be effective with distributed processing. When a single job is broken down to 2 or more tasks, the granularity of the tasks influences the efficiency of the processing. Smaller tasks allow for smaller memory footprint, better distribution of tasks and increased scalability, but increase input file access time and reduce output data compaction. By choosing a combination of multi-threading and distributed processing, faster run-time and better scalability can be achieved, as compared to either technique alone. The optimal configuration depends on the number of cores per processor, number of processors and memory per core.

  8. Magnetic and Electrical Characteristics of Permalloy Thin Tape Bobbin Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.; Wieserman, William R.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2005-01-01

    The core loss, that is, the power loss, of a soft ferromagnetic material is a function of the flux density, frequency, temperature, excitation type (voltage or current), excitation waveform (sine, square, etc.) and lamination or tape thickness. In previously published papers we have reported on the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loop results for several polycrystalline, nanocrystalline, and amorphous soft magnetic materials. In this previous research we investigated the effect of flux density, frequency, temperature, and excitation waveform for voltage excitation on the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loop. In this paper, we will report on an experimental study to investigate the effect of tape thicknesses of 1, 1/2, 1/4, and 1/8-mil Permalloy type magnetic materials on the specific core loss. The test cores were fabricated by winding the thin tapes on ceramic bobbin cores. The specific core loss tests were conducted at room temperature and over the frequency range of 10 kHz to 750 kHz using sine wave voltage excitation. The results of this experimental investigation will be presented primarily in graphical form to show the effect of tape thickness, frequency, and magnetic flux density on the specific core loss. Also, the experimental results when applied to power transformer design will be briefly discussed.

  9. Data interchange across cores of multi-core optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Ehab S.

    2015-12-01

    A novel device for data interchange among space-division multiplexed cores inside MCF is demonstrated using numerical simulations. The device allows complete exchange of all WDM data channels between MCF cores in propagation direction whether the channels have the same or different sets of wavelengths. This is crucial in future MCF optical networks where in-fiber data interchange over space-division multiplexed cores can allow for a simple and fast data swapping among cores without a need for space-division demultiplexing to single-mode single-core fibers. The data core-interchange (DCI) device consists of a graded refractive-index rectangular waveguide enclosing the two interchanged cores in addition to the cladding region in between them. Both finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) and eigenmode expansion (EME) simulations are performed to verify the device operation and characterize its performance. The simulations demonstrate that the DCI has a very short-length with polarization independent operation, and high performance over the broadband wavelength range S, C, L, and U bands. Moreover, the device shows a high coupling-factor of -0.13 dB with small cross-talk, back-reflection, and return-loss of -26.3, -46.1, and -48.8 dB, respectively.

  10. Crystallization in Earth's Core after High-Temperature Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, K.; Morard, G.; Hernlund, J. W.; Helffrich, G. R.; Ozawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent core formation models based on the metal-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements suggest that the Earth's core was formed by metal segregation at high pressure and high temperature in a deep magma ocean. It is also thought that the simultaneous solubility of silicon and oxygen in liquid iron are strongly enhanced at high pressure and high temperature, such that at the end of accretion the core was rich in both silicon and oxygen. Here we performed crystallization experiments on the Fe-Si binary and Fe-Si-O ternary systems up to core pressure in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The starting material for the latter was a homogeneous mixture of fine-grain Fe-Si and SiO2 (<1 µm). We prepared cross sections of samples recovered from the DAC using a focused ion beam (FIB) and subsequently performed textural and chemical characterization with field-emission-type electron microprobe (FE-EPMA). Quenched liquid alloy was found at the hottest part coexisting with a solid phase (liquidus phase) at the periphery. These results combined with literature data on the melting phase relations in the Fe-FeO binary system demonstrate that the liquidus field of SiO2 is very wide at the Fe-rich portion of the Fe-Si-O ternary system at the core pressure range. It indicates that the original Fe-Si-O core liquid should have crystallized a large amount SiO2 until it lost either silicon or oxygen. The recent finding of high thermal conductivity of the core suggests that core thermal convection is difficult to sustain without extreme degrees of secular cooling. However, even for modest degrees of joint Si-O incorporation into the early core, the buoyancy released by crystallization of SiO2 is sufficient to overcome thermal stratification and sustain the geodynamo.

  11. Is the sheet-flow design a 'frozen core' (a Bauplan) of the gas exchangers? Comparative functional morphology of the respiratory microvascular systems: illustration of the geometry and rationalization of the fractal properties.

    PubMed

    Maina, J N

    2000-08-01

    The sheet-flow design is ubiquitous in the respiratory microvascular systems of the modern gas exchangers. The blood percolates through a maze of narrow microvascular channels spreading out into a thin film, a "sheet". The design has been convergently conceived through remarkably different evolutionary strategies. Endothelial cells, e.g. connect parallel epithelial cells in the fish gills and reptilian lungs; epithelial cells divide the gill filaments in the crustacean gills, the amphibian lungs, and vascular channels on the lung of pneumonate gastropods; connective tissue elements weave between the blood capillaries of the mammalian lungs; and in birds, the blood capillaries attach directly and in some areas connect by short extensions of the epithelial cells. In the gills, skin, and most lungs, the blood in the capillary meshwork geometrically lies parallel to the respiratory surface. In the avian lung, where the blood capillaries anastomose intensely and interdigitate closely with the air capillaries, the blood occasions a 'volume' rather than a 'sheet.' The sheet-flow design and the intrinsic fractal properties of the respiratory microvascular systems have produced a highly tractable low-pressure low-resistance region that facilitates optimal perfusion. In complex animals, the sheet-flow design is a prescriptive evolutionary construction for efficient gas exchange by diffusion. The design facilitates the internal and external respiratory media to be exposed to each other over an extensive surface area across a thin tissue barrier. This comprehensive design is a classic paradigm of evolutionary convergence motivated by common enterprise to develop corresponding functionally efficient structures. With appropriate corrections for any relevant intertaxa differences, use of similar morphofunctional models in determining the diffusing capacities of various gas exchangers is warranted.

  12. Research on taper zone coupling from single-core fiber to annular-core hollow beam fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Chengguo; Zhang, Tao; Li, Jianqi; Wang, Pengfei; Kang, Chong; Yuan, Libo

    2017-02-01

    We designed and manufactured a novel annular-core hollow beam fiber which could directly yield ring light with a central dark spot inside the beam employing MCVD technique and a custom-made fiber drawing tower. The tapered fiber zone geometric shapes at varied stretching speed between the single-core fiber and the annular-core hollow beam fiber were studied theoretically. According to the beam propagation method, the bi-tapered coupling energy transmission between these two fibers was simulated and analyzed. Moreover, by adopting a fusion splicing and stretching technique at the fiber-linked point, an effective coupling approach had been fulfilled.

  13. Research on taper zone coupling from single-core fiber to annular-core hollow beam fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Chengguo; Zhang, Tao; Li, Jianqi; Wang, Pengfei; Kang, Chong; Yuan, Libo

    2016-11-01

    We designed and manufactured a novel annular-core hollow beam fiber which could directly yield ring light with a central dark spot inside the beam employing MCVD technique and a custom-made fiber drawing tower. The tapered fiber zone geometric shapes at varied stretching speed between the single-core fiber and the annular-core hollow beam fiber were studied theoretically. According to the beam propagation method, the bi-tapered coupling energy transmission between these two fibers was simulated and analyzed. Moreover, by adopting a fusion splicing and stretching technique at the fiber-linked point, an effective coupling approach had been fulfilled.

  14. Silicon Nanophotonics for Many-Core On-Chip Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Moustafa

    Number of cores in many-core architectures are scaling to unprecedented levels requiring ever increasing communication capacity. Traditionally, architects follow the path of higher throughput at the expense of latency. This trend has evolved into being problematic for performance in many-core architectures. Moreover, the trends of power consumption is increasing with system scaling mandating nontraditional solutions. Nanophotonics can address these problems, offering benefits in the three frontiers of many-core processor design: Latency, bandwidth, and power. Nanophotonics leverage circuit-switching flow control allowing low latency; in addition, the power consumption of optical links is significantly lower compared to their electrical counterparts at intermediate and long links. Finally, through wave division multiplexing, we can keep the high bandwidth trends without sacrificing the throughput. This thesis focuses on realizing nanophotonics for communication in many-core architectures at different design levels considering reliability challenges that our fabrication and measurements reveal. First, we study how to design on-chip networks for low latency, low power, and high bandwidth by exploiting the full potential of nanophotonics. The design process considers device level limitations and capabilities on one hand, and system level demands in terms of power and performance on the other hand. The design involves the choice of devices, designing the optical link, the topology, the arbitration technique, and the routing mechanism. Next, we address the problem of reliability in on-chip networks. Reliability not only degrades performance but can block communication. Hence, we propose a reliability-aware design flow and present a reliability management technique based on this flow to address reliability in the system. In the proposed flow reliability is modeled and analyzed for at the device, architecture, and system level. Our reliability management technique is

  15. Computer-aided design and synthesis of CdTe@SiO2 core-shell molecularly imprinted polymers as a fluorescent sensor for the selective determination of sulfamethoxazole in milk and lake water.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wanzhen; Wang, Yingchun; Huang, Weihong; Yu, Luan; Yang, Yanfei; Liu, Hong; Yang, Wenming

    2017-03-01

    In this work, a molecular dynamics simulation method was introduced to compute the preassembled system of molecular imprinted polymers for sulfamethoxazole monomer. The results revealed that the ratio of sulfamethoxazole as template molecule to 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane as functional monomer to tetraethylorthosilicate as cross-linker of 10:10:40 led to the most stable template-functional monomer cluster. Based on the result of computational simulation, CdTe@SiO2 core-shell imprinted polymers, a cadmium telluride quantum dots layer on the surface of aminofunctionalized SiO2 , were synthesized as the fluorescent sensor. Then, a series of measures were used to characterize the structure and morphology to get optimal sensors. The concentration range was 5.0-30.0 μmol/L between molecular imprinted polymers at CdTe at SiO2 , and sulfamethoxazole of the fluorescence intensity. To further verify the reliability and accuracy of the fluorescent sensor, the application was successfully by analyzing sulfamethoxazole in pure milk and lake water. The results showed the recoveries were above 96.89% with a relative standard deviation of 1.25-5.45%, and the fluorescence sensor with selective recognition provides an alternative solution for the determination of sulfamethoxazole.

  16. Common Core Units in Business Education: Data Processing and the (W)5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muscat, Eugene

    This secondary unit of instruction on data processing is one of sixteen Common Core Units in Business Education (CCUBE). The units were designed for implementing the sixteen common core competencies identified in the California Business Education Program Guide for Office and Distributive Education. Each competency-based unit is designed to…

  17. Common Core Units in Business Education: The How and Why of the Adding Machine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamoureaux, Sarann

    This secondary unit of instruction on the adding machine is one of sixteen Common Core Units in Business Education (CCUBE). The units were designed for implementing the sixteen common core competencies identified in the California Business Education Program Guide for Office and Distributive Education. Each competency-based unit is designed to…

  18. Common Core Units in Business Education: How to Apply for a Job.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassman, Mary Jane

    This secondary unit of instruction on applying for a job is one of sixteen Common Core Units in Business Education (CCUBE). The units were designed for implementing the sixteen common core competencies identified in the California Business Education Program Guide for Office and Distributive Education. Each competency-based unit is designed to…

  19. Status of ASME Section III Task Group on Graphite Support Core Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Robert L. Bratton; Tim D. Burchell

    2005-08-01

    This report outlines the roadmap that the ASME Project Team on Graphite Core Supports is pursuing to establish design codes for unirradiated and irradiated graphite core components during its first year of operation. It discusses the deficiencies in the proposed Section III, Division 2, Subsection CE graphite design code and the different approaches the Project Team has taken to address those deficiencies.

  20. Radiation Effects: Core Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicello, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The risks to personnel in space from the naturally occurring radiations are generally considered to be one of the most serious limitations to human space missions, as noted in two recent reports of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. The Core Project of the Radiation Effects Team for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute is the consequences of radiations in space in order to develop countermeasure, both physical and pharmaceutical, to reduce the risks of cancer and other diseases associated with such exposures. During interplanetary missions, personnel in space will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays, including high-energy protons and energetic ions with atomic masses of iron or higher. In addition, solar events will produce radiation fields of high intensity for short but irregular durations. The level of intensity of these radiations is considerably higher than that on Earth's surface, and the biological risks to astronauts is consequently increased, including increased risks of carcinogenesis and other diseases. This group is examining the risk of cancers resulting from low-dose, low-dose rate exposures of model systems to photons, protons, and iron by using ground-based accelerators which are capable of producing beams of protons, iron, and other heavy ions at energies comparable to those encountered in space. They have begun the first series of experiments using a 1-GeV iron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and 250-MeV protons at Loma Linda University Medical Center's proton synchrotron facility. As part of these studies, this group will be investigating the potential for the pharmaceutical, Tamoxifen, to reduce the risk of breast cancer in astronauts exposed to the level of doses and particle types expected in space. Theoretical studies are being carried out in a collaboration between scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center and Johns Hopkins University in parallel with the experimental program have provided

  1. HOW STARLESS ARE STARLESS CORES?

    SciTech Connect

    Schnee, Scott; Friesen, Rachel; Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Enoch, Melissa; Sadavoy, Sarah

    2012-01-20

    In this paper, we present the results of Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy continuum and spectral line observations of the dense core Per-Bolo 45. Although this core has previously been classified as starless, we find evidence for an outflow and conclude that Per-Bolo 45 is actually an embedded, low-luminosity protostar. We discuss the impact of newly discovered, low-luminosity, embedded objects in the Perseus molecular cloud on starless core and protostar lifetimes. We estimate that the starless core lifetime has been overestimated by 4%-18% and the Class 0/I protostellar lifetime has been underestimated by 5%-20%. Given the relatively large systematic uncertainties involved in these calculations, variations on the order of 10% do not significantly change either core lifetimes or the expected protostellar luminosity function. Finally, we suggest that high-resolution (sub)millimeter surveys of known cores lacking near-infrared and mid-infrared emission are necessary to make an accurate census of starless cores.

  2. Dynamics of the core, geodynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Paul H.

    1995-07-01

    "The mechanism for generating the geomagnetic field remains one of the central unsolved problems in geoscience." So states the report on the National Geomagnetic Initiative (NGI) prepared by the U.S. Geodynamics Committee, et al [1993], with advice from the NGI Workshop held in Washington D.C. in March 1992. All analyses of the geomagnetic data point to the core as containing the source of the field and "The basic premise that virtually everyone accepts is that the Earth's magnetism is created by a self-sustaining dynamo driven by fluid motions in Earth's core" (NGI, p.135). Dynamical questions at once arise, such as "What is the energy source driving those motions?" Jacobs [1953] proposed that the solid inner core (SIC) is the result of the freezing of the fluid outer core (FOC). Verhoogen [1961] noticed that the release of latent heat at the inner core boundary (ICB) during freezing would help drive thermal convection in the FOC, and Braginsky [1963] pointed out that the release of the light alloying elements during fractionation at the ICB would provide compositional buoyancy. These two sources suffice to supply the geodynamo with energy throughout geological time, even in the absence of dissolved radioactivity in the core [Braginsky and Roberts, 1994a; Kuang et al, 1994]. Stevenson [1991] argues that potential differences on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) of electrochemical origin may be partially responsible for the geomagnetic field.

  3. Core Exercises: Why You Should Strengthen Your Core Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read on to find out why. Core exercises train the muscles in your pelvis, lower back, hips ... manner that involves maintaining a stable trunk can train and strengthen several of your muscles, including your ...

  4. Rolling-Tooth Core Breakoff and Retention Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Bickler, Donald B.; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Hudson, Nicolas H.

    2011-01-01

    Sampling cores requires the controlled breakoff of the core at a known location with respect to the drill end. An additional problem is designing a mechanism that can be implemented at a small scale that is robust and versatile enough to be used for a variety of core samples. This design consists of a set of tubes (a drill tube and an inner tube) and a rolling element (rolling tooth). An additional tube can be used as a sample tube. The drill tube and the inner tube have longitudinal holes with the axes offset from the axis of each tube. The two eccentricities are equal. The inner tube fits inside the drill tube, and the sample tube fits inside the inner tube. While drilling, the two tubes are positioned relative to each other such that the sample tube is aligned with the drill tube axis and core. The drill tube includes teeth and flutes for cuttings removal. The inner tube includes, at the base, the rolling element implemented as a wheel on a shaft in an eccentric slot. An additional slot in the inner tube and a pin in the drill tube limit the relative motion of the two tubes. While drilling, the drill assembly rotates relative to the core and forces the rolling tooth to stay hidden in the slot along the inner tube wall. When the drilling depth has been reached, the drill bit assembly is rotated in the opposite direction, and the rolling tooth is engaged and penetrates into the core. Depending on the strength of the created core, the rolling tooth can score, lock the inner tube relative to the core, start the eccentric motion of the inner tube, and break the core. The tooth and the relative position of the two tubes can act as a core catcher or core-retention mechanism as well. The design was made to fit the core and hole parameters produced by an existing bit; the parts were fabricated and a series of demonstration tests were performed. This invention is potentially applicable to sample return and in situ missions to planets such as Mars and Venus, to moons such

  5. ac power control in the Core Flow Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    This work represents a status report on a development effort to design an ac power controller for the Core Flow Test Loop. The Core Flow Test Loop will be an engineering test facility which will simulate the thermal environment of a gas-cooled fast-breeder reactor. The problems and limitations of using sinusoidal ac power to simulate the power generated within a nuclear reactor are addressed. The transformer-thyristor configuration chosen for the Core Flow Test Loop power supply is presented. The initial considerations, design, and analysis of a closed-loop controller prototype are detailed. The design is then analyzed for improved performance possibilities and failure modes are investigated at length. A summary of the work completed to date and a proposed outline for continued development completes the report.

  6. Surface-core fiber gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osório, Jonas H.; Oliveira, Ricardo; Mosquera, L.; Franco, Marcos A. R.; Heidarialamdarloo, Jamshid; Bilro, Lúcia; Nogueira, Rogério N.; Cordeiro, Cristiano M. B.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of the induction of long-period and Bragg gratings on surface-core optical fibers. Surface-core fibers described herein were fabricated from commercial silica tubes and germanium-doped silica rods by employing a very simple procedure. Being the core on the fiber surface, it can be sensitive to refractive index variations in the environment in which the fiber is immersed. Thus, results concerning the sensitivity of these gratings to environmental refractive index variations are presented. Besides, simulation data are presented for comparison to the experimental behavior and for projecting future steps in this research.

  7. Core Benchmarks Descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-05-24

    Actual regulations while designing of new fuel cycles for nuclear power installations comprise a calculational justification to be performed by certified computer codes. It guarantees that obtained calculational results will be within the limits of declared uncertainties that are indicated in a certificate issued by Gosatomnadzor of Russian Federation (GAN) and concerning a corresponding computer code. A formal justification of declared uncertainties is the comparison of calculational results obtained by a commercial code with the results of experiments or of calculational tests that are calculated with an uncertainty defined by certified precision codes of MCU type or of other one. The actual level of international cooperation provides an enlarging of the bank of experimental and calculational benchmarks acceptable for a certification of commercial codes that are being used for a design of fuel loadings with MOX fuel. In particular, the work is practically finished on the forming of calculational benchmarks list for a certification of code TVS-M as applied to MOX fuel assembly calculations. The results on these activities are presented.

  8. Gas core reactors for actinide transmutation and breeder applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    This work consists of design power plant studies for four types of reactor systems: uranium plasma core breeder, uranium plasma core actinide transmuter, UF6 breeder and UF6 actinide transmuter. The plasma core systems can be coupled to MHD generators to obtain high efficiency electrical power generation. A 1074 MWt UF6 breeder reactor was designed with a breeding ratio of 1.002 to guard against diversion of fuel. Using molten salt technology and a superheated steam cycle, an efficiency of 39.2% was obtained for the plant and the U233 inventory in the core and heat exchangers was limited to 105 Kg. It was found that the UF6 reactor can produce high fluxes (10 to the 14th power n/sq cm-sec) necessary for efficient burnup of actinide. However, the buildup of fissile isotopes posed severe heat transfer problems. Therefore, the flux in the actinide region must be decreased with time. Consequently, only beginning-of-life conditions were considered for the power plant design. A 577 MWt UF6 actinide transmutation reactor power plant was designed to operate with 39.3% efficiency and 102 Kg of U233 in the core and heat exchanger for beginning-of-life conditions.

  9. Characterizing Facesheet/Core Disbonding in Honeycomb Core Sandwich Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinker, Martin; Ratcliffe, James G.; Adams, Daniel O.; Krueger, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental investigation into facesheet core disbonding in carbon fiber reinforced plastic/Nomex honeycomb sandwich structures using a Single Cantilever Beam test. Specimens with three, six and twelve-ply facesheets were tested. Specimens with different honeycomb cores consisting of four different cell sizes were also tested, in addition to specimens with three different widths. Three different data reduction methods were employed for computing apparent fracture toughness values from the test data, namely an area method, a compliance calibration technique and a modified beam theory method. The compliance calibration and modified beam theory approaches yielded comparable apparent fracture toughness values, which were generally lower than those computed using the area method. Disbonding in the three-ply facesheet specimens took place at the facesheet/core interface and yielded the lowest apparent fracture toughness values. Disbonding in the six and twelve-ply facesheet specimens took place within the core, near to the facesheet/core interface. Specimen width was not found to have a significant effect on apparent fracture toughness. The amount of scatter in the apparent fracture toughness data was found to increase with honeycomb core cell size.

  10. Critical review of the impact of core stability on upper extremity athletic injury and performance

    PubMed Central

    Silfies, Sheri P.; Ebaugh, David; Pontillo, Marisa; Butowicz, Courtney M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Programs designed to prevent or rehabilitate athletic injuries or improve athletic performance frequently focus on core stability. This approach is based upon the theory that poor core stability increases the risk of poor performance and/or injury. Despite the widespread use of core stability training amongst athletes, the question of whether or not sufficient evidence exists to support this practice remains to be answered. OBJECTIVES: 1) Open a dialogue on the definition and components of core stability. 2) Provide an overview of current science linking core stability to musculoskeletal injuries of the upper extremity. 3) Provide an overview of evidence for the association between core stability and athletic performance. DISCUSSION: Core stability is the ability to control the position and movement of the trunk for optimal production, transfer, and control of forces to and from the upper and lower extremities during functional activities. Muscle capacity and neuromuscular control are critical components of core stability. A limited body of evidence provides some support for a link between core stability and upper extremity injuries amongst athletes who participate in baseball, football, or swimming. Likewise, few studies exist to support a relationship between core stability and athletic performance. CONCLUSIONS: A limited body of evidence exists to support the use of core stability training in injury prevention or performance enhancement programs for athletes. Clearly more research is needed to inform decision making when it comes to inclusion or emphasis of core training when designing injury prevention and rehabilitation programs for athletes. PMID:26537806

  11. Safety design of prototype fast breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bhoje, S.B.; Chetal, S.C.; Singh, Om Pal

    2004-07-01

    The basic design and safety design of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is presented. Design aspects covered include safety classification, seismic categorization, design basis conditions, design safety limits, core physics, core monitoring, shutdown system, decay heat removal system, protection against sodium leaks and tube leaks in steam generator, plant layout, radiation protection, event analysis, beyond design basis accidents, integrity of primary containment, reactor containment building and design pressure resulting from core disruptive accident. The measures provided in the design represent a robust case of the safety of the reactor. (authors)

  12. Core Optimization of a Deep-Burn Pebble Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-06-01

    Achieving a high fuel burnup in the Deep-Burn (DB) pebble bed reactor design, while remaining within the limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback, is challenging. The high content of Pu and Minor Actinides in the Deep-Burn fuel significantly impacts the thermal neutron energy spectrum as compared to a ’standard’ UO2 fueled core. This can result in power and temperature peaking in the pebble bed core in locally thermalized regions near the graphite reflectors. Furthermore, the interplay of the Pu resonances of the neutron absorption cross sections at low-lying energies can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator at certain operating conditions. The DB concept focuses on the destruction of spent fuel transuranics in TRISO coated particle fueled gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60-70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA), using a single-pass, multi in-core fuel (re)cycling scheme. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the present low enriched uranium core designs, i.e. the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). A Pu and Minor Actinide fueled PBMR-400 design serves as the starting point for a core optimization study. The fuel temperature, power peak, temperature reactivity coefficients, and burnup capabilities of the modified designs are analyzed with the PEBBED code. A code-to-code coupling with the PASTA code allows for the analysis of the TRISO fuel performance for both normal and Loss Of Forced Cooling conditions. An improved core design is sought, maximizing the fuel discharge burnup, while retaining negative temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range and avoiding high fuel temperatures (fuel failure probabilities).

  13. Assessing Core Competencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marches in 1987. Assessment in the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). It is widely recognized that sophisticated computing technologies are becoming a key element in today's classroom instructional techniques. Regardless, the Professor must be held responsible for creating an instructional environment in which the technology actually supplements learning outcomes of the students. Almost all academic disciplines have found a niche for computer-based instruction in their respective professional domain. In many cases, it is viewed as an essential and integral part of the educational process. Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology

  14. Random close packing in protein cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohern, Corey

    Shortly after the determination of the first protein x-ray crystal structures, researchers analyzed their cores and reported packing fractions ϕ ~ 0 . 75 , a value that is similar to close packing equal-sized spheres. A limitation of these analyses was the use of `extended atom' models, rather than the more physically accurate `explicit hydrogen' model. The validity of using the explicit hydrogen model is proved by its ability to predict the side chain dihedral angle distributions observed in proteins. We employ the explicit hydrogen model to calculate the packing fraction of the cores of over 200 high resolution protein structures. We find that these protein cores have ϕ ~ 0 . 55 , which is comparable to random close-packing of non-spherical particles. This result provides a deeper understanding of the physical basis of protein structure that will enable predictions of the effects of amino acid mutations and design of new functional proteins. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Institute for Biological, Physical, and Engineering Sciences, National Library of Medicine training grant T15LM00705628 (J.C.G.), and National Science Foundation DMR-1307712 (L.R.).

  15. Uncovering the information core in recommender systems

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei; Zeng, An; Liu, Hao; Shang, Ming-Sheng; Zhou, Tao

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid growth of the Internet and overwhelming amount of information that people are confronted with, recommender systems have been developed to effectively support users' decision-making process in online systems. So far, much attention has been paid to designing new recommendation algorithms and improving existent ones. However, few works considered the different contributions from different users to the performance of a recommender system. Such studies can help us improve the recommendation efficiency by excluding irrelevant users. In this paper, we argue that in each online system there exists a group of core users who carry most of the information for recommendation. With them, the recommender systems can already generate satisfactory recommendation. Our core user extraction method enables the recommender systems to achieve 90% of the accuracy of the top-L recommendation by taking only 20% of the users into account. A detailed investigation reveals that these core users are not necessarily the large-degree users. Moreover, they tend to select high quality objects and their selections are well diversified. PMID:25142186

  16. Uncovering the information core in recommender systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Wei; Zeng, An; Liu, Hao; Shang, Ming-Sheng; Zhou, Tao

    2014-08-01

    With the rapid growth of the Internet and overwhelming amount of information that people are confronted with, recommender systems have been developed to effectively support users' decision-making process in online systems. So far, much attention has been paid to designing new recommendation algorithms and improving existent ones. However, few works considered the different contributions from different users to the performance of a recommender system. Such studies can help us improve the recommendation efficiency by excluding irrelevant users. In this paper, we argue that in each online system there exists a group of core users who carry most of the information for recommendation. With them, the recommender systems can already generate satisfactory recommendation. Our core user extraction method enables the recommender systems to achieve 90% of the accuracy of the top-L recommendation by taking only 20% of the users into account. A detailed investigation reveals that these core users are not necessarily the large-degree users. Moreover, they tend to select high quality objects and their selections are well diversified.

  17. Vapor core propulsion reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Nils J.

    1991-01-01

    Many research issues were addressed. For example, it became obvious that uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) is a most preferred fuel over uranium hexafluoride (UF6). UF4 has a very attractive vaporization point (1 atm at 1800 K). Materials compatible with UF4 were looked at, like tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, carbon. It was found that in the molten state, UF4 and uranium attacked most everything, but in the vapor state they are not that bad. Compatible materials were identified for both the liquid and vapor states. A series of analyses were established to determine how the cavity should be designed. A series of experiments were performed to determine the properties of the fluid, including enhancement of the electrical conductivity of the system. CFD's and experimental programs are available that deal with most of the major issues.

  18. The ADNI PET Core: 2015

    PubMed Central

    Jagust, William J.; Landau, Susan M.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chester A.; Price, Julie C.; Foster, Norman L.; Wang, Angela Y.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This paper reviews the work done in the ADNI PET core over the past 5 years, largely concerning techniques, methods, and results related to amyloid imaging in ADNI. METHODS The PET Core has utilized [18F]florbetapir routinely on ADNI participants, with over 1600 scans available for download. Four different laboratories are involved in data analysis, and have examined factors such as longitudinal florbetapir analysis, use of FDG-PET in clinical trials, and relationships between different biomarkers and cognition. RESULTS Converging evidence from the PET Core has indicated that cross-sectional and longitudinal florbetapir analyses require different reference regions. Studies have also examined the relationship between florbetapir data obtained immediately after injection, which reflects perfusion, and FDG-PET results. Finally, standardization has included the translation of florbetapir PET data to a centiloid scale. CONCLUSION The PET Core has demonstrated a variety of methods for standardization of biomarkers such as florbetapir PET in a multicenter setting. PMID:26194311

  19. Convection, nucleosynthesis, and core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazan, Grant; Arnett, David

    1994-01-01

    We use a piecewise parabolic method hydrodynamics code (PROMETHEUS) to study convective burning in two dimensions in an oxygen shell prior to core collapse. Significant mixing beyond convective boundaries determined by mixing-length theory brings fuel (C-12) into the convective regon, causing hot spots of nuclear burning. Plumes dominate the velocity structure. Finite perturbations arise in a region in which O-16 will be explosively burned to Ni-56 when the star explodes; the resulting instabilities and mixing are likely to distribute Ni-56 throughout the supernova envelope. Inhomogeneities in Y(sub e) may be large enough to affect core collapse and will affect explosive nucleosynthesis. The nature of convective burning is dramatically different from that assumed in one-dimensional simulations; quantitative estimates of nucleosynthetic yields, core masses, and the approach to core collapse will be affected.

  20. High-voltage air-core pulse transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G.J.

    1981-08-01

    High voltage air core pulse transformers are best suited to applications outside the normal ranges of conventional magnetic core transformers. In general these include charge transfer at high power levels and fast pulse generation with comparatively low energy. When properly designed and constructed, they are capable of delivering high energy transfer efficiency and have demonstrated superior high voltage endurance. The general types designed for high voltage pulse generation and energy transfer applications are described. Special emphasis is given to pulse charging systems which operate up to the multi-megavolt range. (WHK)