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Sample records for zagros basin iran

  1. The Oligocene carbonate platform of the Zagros Basin, SW Iran: An assessment of highly-complex geological heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Tahereh; Ruban, Dmitry A.

    2017-05-01

    North Africa and the Middle East possess rich geological heritage, but the latter is yet to be fully identified and described. The Oligocene carbonate platform of the Zagros Basin in southwest Iran, which corresponds to the lower part of the Asmari Formation, has significant potential for geoconservation and geotourism. The types of the geological heritage, their value, and the possible geosites have been assessed. The studied deposits are interesting because of lithology (carbonate rocks), fossils (larger foraminifera, other microfossils, diverse marine invertebrates, fish microremains, and trace fossils), biostratigraphical developments, facies (homoclinal carbonate ramp) and signature of global events (glacioeustatic fluctuations), and outstanding hydrocarbon resources. The five main geological heritage types are sedimentary, palaeontological, stratigraphical, palaeogeographical, and economical, from which the palaeontological, palaeogeographical, and economical types are of global rank. The Khollar and Kavar sections in the Fars Province of Iran are recommended as geosites suitable for research, education, and tourism. The high complexity of the geological heritage linked to the Oligocene carbonate platform of the Zagros Basin implies the phenomenon of geodiversity should be understood with regard to the relationships between types and their values.

  2. Tectono-sedimentary evolution of the Permian-Triassic extension event in the Zagros basin (Iran): results from analogue modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani-kivi, M.; Zulauf, G.

    2015-12-01

    Since the 1970s, the largest oil and gas reservoirs have been discovered in the Permian-Early Triassic formationsin Saudi Arabia. Thus, this time period is important for the discovery of new oil reserves in Iran. The Arabian passivecontinental margin has undergone lithospheric extension during the Permian-Triassic, which led to the formation of theNeo-Tethys. The aim of this paper is to describe the development of the continental rift basin in the Zagros region basedon the tectono-sedimentological evolution. We have studied well-log data to specify the distribution of synrift depositsin the Zagros and have related this information to the modelling. Environmental changes indicated by various sedimentarysequences, from a siliciclastic basin to a carbonate platform setting, are described. The Cambrian Hormuz salt, whichoverlies the metamorphosed Precambrian basement, becomes effective as a basal detachment layer influencing the styleof overburden deformation during the Permian-Triassic extension event. We have investigated the formation of variousstructures linked to the presence or absence of the Hormuz layer by analogue modelling and relating these structures to theLate Palaeozoic sedimentation. Based on results of the analogue modelling, we argue that the basal detachment layer (Hormuzseries) has contributed to the various structural styles of the extensional basin development in the Fars domain and theLorestan domain.

  3. Zagros Mountains, Iran, SRTM Shaded Relief Anaglyph

    2004-06-17

    The Zagros Mountains in Iran offer a visually stunning topographic display of geologic structure in layered sedimentary rocks in this anaglyph from NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

  4. Elemental geochemistry and strontium-isotope stratigraphy of Cenomanian to Santonian neritic carbonates in the Zagros Basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navidtalab, Amin; Rahimpour-Bonab, Hossain; Huck, Stefan; Heimhofer, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    A Neo-Tethyan upper Cenomanian-Santonian neritic carbonate ramp succession (Sarvak and Ilam formations), drilled in the Zagros Basin in southwest Iran, was investigated via detailed sedimentology, microfacies analysis, elemental geochemistry and Sr-isotope stratigraphy (SIS). The succession contains two exposure surfaces, which are known as the CT-ES and mT-ES (Cenomanian-Turonian and middle Turonian, respectively), and associated prominent negative carbon-isotope excursions that represent important regional stratigraphic marker horizons. Precise knowledge about the onset of platform exposure and the duration of the exposure-related hiatus, however, is currently lacking due to a rather low-resolved shallow-water biostratigraphic framework and a bulk carbonate carbon-isotope pattern that clearly differs from global Late Cretaceous reference curves. Therefore, the existing bio-chemostratigraphic framework was complemented by bulk carbonate strontium-isotope stratigraphy (SIS). As bulk carbonate material is in particular prone to diagenetic alteration, a careful selection of least altered samples has been carried out by means of elemental geochemistry and petrography. In contrast to what could be expected, the meteoric alteration of limestones beneath both exposure surfaces is not clearly expressed by increasing iron and manganese and coeval decreasing strontium contents. On the contrary, the impact of meteoric diagenesis is well illustrated via pronounced increases in Rb concentrations and concomitant prominent positive shifts to radiogenic strontium-isotope values, an observation that clearly reflects the decay of continentally derived 87Rb into 87Sr. Rubidium corrected strontium-isotope values place the CT-ES around the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary and point to an exposure duration of less than 0.4 Myr. This rather short-term CT-ES related hiatus is supported by petrographic evidence, which indicates a youth karstification stage of strata beneath the CT

  5. Linkages between orogenic plateau build-up, fold-thrust shortening, and foreland basin evolution in the Zagros (NW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, D. E.; Stockli, D. F.

    2017-12-01

    The Iranian Plateau (IP) is a thickened, low-relief morphotectonic province of diffuse deformation that formed due to Arabia-Eurasia collision and may serve as a younger analogue for the Tibetan Plateau. Despite detailed geophysical characterization of the IP, its deformation history and relationship to the Zagros fold-thrust belt and its foreland basin evolution remains unresolved. Low-temperature thermochronometry and provenance data from a transect across the internal and external Zagros track growth of the IP and delineate multiphase interaction between upper- and lower-plate processes during closure of the Neotethys and Arabia-Eurasia suturing. Inversion of zircon (U-Th)/He and fission-track data from plutonic and metamorphic basement rocks in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) of the IP reveals an initial stage of low-rate exhumation from 36-25 Ma, simultaneous with the onset of tectonic subsidence and marine incursion in the Zagros foreland basin. Overlapping apatite fission-track and (U-Th)/He ages indicate sharp acceleration in SSZ exhumation rates between 20-15 Ma, coincident with rejuvenation of foreland basin subsidence and an influx of Eurasian-derived sediments into the Zagros foreland deposited above an Oligocene unconformity. The mid-Miocene marks a transition in focused exhumation from the SSZ to Arabian lower-plate. Apatite (U-Th)/He ages suggest in-sequence fold-thrust propagation from the High Zagros to simply folded belt from 10 Ma to recent, which is reflected in the foreland by a shift in provenance to dominantly recycled Arabian-derived detritus and clastic facies progradation. Integrated thermochronometric and provenance data document a two-phase outward expansion of the Iranian Plateau and Zagros fold-thrust belt, tightly coupled to distinct phases of basin evolution and provenance shifts in the Zagros foreland. We associate multiple deformation and basin episodes with protracted collisional processes, from subduction of attenuated Arabian

  6. The cretaceous source rocks in the Zagros Foothills of Iran: An example of a large size intracratonic basin

    SciT

    Bordenave, M.L.; Huc, A.Y.

    1993-02-01

    The Zagros orogenic belt of Iran is one of the world most prolific petroleum producing area. However, most of the oil production is originated from a relatively small area, the 60,000 km[sup 2] wide Dezful Embayment which contains approximately 12% of the proven oil global reserves. The distribution of the oil and gas fields results from the area extent of six identified source rock layers, their thermal history and reservoir, cap rock and trap availability. In this paper, the emphasis is three of the layers of Cretaceous sources rocks. The Garau facies was deposited during the Neocomian to Albian intervalmore » over Lurestan, Northeast Khuzestan and extends over the extreme northeast part of Fars, the Kazhdumi source rock which deposited over the Dezful Embayment, and eventually the Senonian Gurpi Formation which has marginal source rock characteristics in limited areas of Khuzestan and Northern Fars. The deposition environment of these source rock layers corresponds to semipermanent depressions, included in an overall shallow water intracratonic basin communicating with the South Tethys Ocean. These depressions became anoxic when climatic oceanographical and geological conditions were adequate, i.e., humid climate, high stand water, influxes of fine grained clastics and the existence of sills separating the depression from the open sea. Distribution maps of these source rock layers resulting from extensive field work and well control are also given. The maturation history of source rocks is reconstructed from a set of isopachs. It was found that the main contributor to the oil reserves is the Kazhdumi source rock which is associated with excellent calcareous reservoirs.« less

  7. Flexural bending of the Zagros foreland basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirouz, Mortaza; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Gualandi, Adriano; Hassanzadeh, Jamshid; Sternai, Pietro

    2017-09-01

    We constrain and model the geometry of the Zagros foreland to assess the equivalent elastic thickness of the northern edge of the Arabian plate and the loads that have originated due to the Arabia-Eurasia collision. The Oligo-Miocene Asmari formation, and its equivalents in Iraq and Syria, is used to estimate the post-collisional subsidence as they separate passive margin sediments from the younger foreland deposits. The depth to these formations is obtained by synthesizing a large database of well logs, seismic profiles and structural sections from the Mesopotamian basin and the Persian Gulf. The foreland depth varies along strike of the Zagros wedge between 1 and 6 km. The foreland is deepest beneath the Dezful embayment, in southwest Iran, and becomes shallower towards both ends. We investigate how the geometry of the foreland relates to the range topography loading based on simple flexural models. Deflection of the Arabian plate is modelled using point load distribution and convolution technique. The results show that the foreland depth is well predicted with a flexural model which assumes loading by the basin sedimentary fill, and thickened crust of the Zagros. The model also predicts a Moho depth consistent with Free-Air anomalies over the foreland and Zagros wedge. The equivalent elastic thickness of the flexed Arabian lithosphere is estimated to be ca. 50 km. We conclude that other sources of loading of the lithosphere, either related to the density variations (e.g. due to a possible lithospheric root) or dynamic origin (e.g. due to sublithospheric mantle flow or lithospheric buckling) have a negligible influence on the foreland geometry, Moho depth and topography of the Zagros. We calculate the shortening across the Zagros assuming conservation of crustal mass during deformation, trapping of all the sediments eroded from the range in the foreland, and an initial crustal thickness of 38 km. This calculation implies a minimum of 126 ± 18 km of crustal

  8. Modeling of wind gap formation and development of sedimentary basins during fold growth: application to the Zagros Fold Belt, Iran.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collignon, Marine; Yamato, Philippe; Castelltort, Sébastien; Kaus, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Mountain building and landscape evolution are controlled by the interactions between river dynamics and tectonic forces. Such interactions have been largely studied but a quantitative evaluation of tectonic/geomorphic feedbacks remains required for understanding sediments routing within orogens and fold-and-thrust belts. Here, we employ numerical simulations to assess the conditions of uplift and river incision necessary to deflect an antecedent drainage network during the growth of one or several folds. We propose that a partitioning of the river network into internal (endorheic) and longitudinal drainage arises as a result of lithological differences within the deforming crustal sedimentary cover. We show with examples from the Zagros Fold Belt (ZFB) that drainage patterns can be linked to the incision ratio R between successive lithological layers, corresponding to the ratio between their relative erodibilities or incision coefficients. Transverse drainage networks develop for uplift rates smaller than 0.8 mm.yr-1 and -10 < R < 10. Intermediate drainage network are obtained for uplift rates up to 2 mm.yr-1 and incision ratios of 20. Parallel drainage networks and formation of sedimentary basins occur for large values of incision ratio (R >20) and uplift rates between 1 and 2 mm.yr-1. These results have implications for predicting the distribution of sediment depocenters in fold-and-thrust belts, which can be of direct economic interest for hydrocarbon exploration.

  9. The Middle Jurassic basinal deposits of the Surmeh Formation in the Central Zagros Mountains, southwest Iran: Facies, sequence stratigraphy, and controls

    Lasemi, Y.; Jalilian, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    The lower part of the Lower to Upper Jurassic Surmeh Formation consists of a succession of shallow marine carbonates (Toarcian-Aalenian) overlain by a deep marine basinal succession (Aalenian-Bajocian) that grades upward to Middle to Upper Jurassic platform carbonates. The termination of shallow marine carbonate deposition of the lower part of the Surmeh Formation and the establishment of deep marine sedimentation indicate a change in the style of sedimentation in the Neotethys passive margin of southwest Iran during the Middle Jurassic. To evaluate the reasons for this change and to assess the basin configuration during the Middle Jurassic, this study focuses on facies analysis and sequence stratigraphy of the basinal deposits (pelagic and calciturbidite facies) of the Surmeh Formation, referred here as 'lower shaley unit' in the Central Zagros region. The upper Aalenian-Bajocian 'lower shaley unit' overlies, with an abrupt contact, the Toarcian-lower Aalenian platform carbonates. It consists of pelagic (calcareous shale and limestone) and calciturbidite facies grading to upper Bajocian-Bathonian platform carbonates. Calciturbidite deposits in the 'lower shaley unit' consist of various graded grainstone to lime mudstone facies containing mixed deep marine fauna and platform-derived material. These facies include quartz-bearing lithoclast/intraclast grainstone to lime mudstone, bioclast/ooid/peloid intraclast grainstone, ooid grainstone to packstone, and lime wackestone to mudstone. The calciturbidite layers are erosive-based and commonly exhibit graded bedding, incomplete Bouma turbidite sequence, flute casts, and load casts. They consist chiefly of platform-derived materials including ooids, intraclasts/lithoclasts, peloids, echinoderms, brachiopods, bivalves, and open-ocean biota, such as planktonic bivalves, crinoids, coccoliths, foraminifers, and sponge spicules. The 'lower shaley unit' constitutes the late transgressive and the main part of the highstand

  10. Zagros Mountains, Iran, SRTM Shaded Relief Anaglyph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Zagros Mountains in Iran offer a visually stunning topographic display of geologic structure in layered sedimentary rocks. This scene is nearly 100 kilometers (62 miles) wide but is only a small part of similar terrain that covers much of southern Iran. This area is actively undergoing crustal shortening, as global tectonics moves Arabia toward Asia. Consequently, layers of sedimentary rock are folding much like a carpet will fold if pushed. The convex upward folds create structures called anticlines, which are prominently seen here. The convex downward folds (between the anticlines) create structures called synclines, which are mostly buried and hidden by sediments eroding off the anticlines. Layers having differing erosional resistance create distinctive patterns, often sawtooth triangular facets, that encircle the anticlines. Local relief between the higher mountain ridges and their intervening valleys is about 1,200 meters (about 4,000 feet).

    Salt extrusions and salt 'glaciers' are another set of geologic features readily evident in the topography. Salt deposits, likely created by the evaporation of an ancient inland sea, were buried by the sediments that now make up the layers of the anticlines and synclines. But salt is less dense than most other rocks, so it tends to migrate upward through Earth's crust in vertical columns called 'diapirs'. The compressive folding process has probably facilitated the formation of these diapirs, and the diapirs, in turn, are probably enhancing some anticlines by 'inflating' them with salt. Where the diapirs reach the surface, the salt extrudes, much like lava from a volcano, and the salt flows. Two prominent salt flows are evident in the same valley, leaking from neighboring anticlines, just north of the scene center.

    This anaglyph was created by deriving a shaded relief image from the SRTM data, draping it back over the SRTM elevation model, and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye

  11. Zagros Mountains, Iran, SRTM Shaded Relief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Zagros Mountains in Iran offer a visually stunning topographic display of geologic structure in layered sedimentary rocks. This scene is nearly 100 kilometers (62 miles) wide but is only a small part of similar terrain that covers much of southern Iran. This area is actively undergoing crustal shortening, as global tectonics moves Arabia toward Asia. Consequently, layers of sedimentary rock are folding much like a carpet will fold if pushed. The convex upward folds create structures called anticlines, which are prominently seen here. The convex downward folds (between the anticlines) create structures called synclines, which are mostly buried and hidden by sediments eroding off the anticlines. Layers having differing erosional resistance create distinctive patterns, often sawtooth triangular facets, that encircle the anticlines. Local relief between the higher mountain ridges and their intervening valleys is about 1200 meters (about 4000 feet).

    Salt extrusions and salt 'glaciers' are another set of geologic features readily evident in the topography. Salt deposits, likely created by the evaporation of an ancient inland sea, were buried by the sediments that now make up the layers of the anticlines and synclines. But salt is less dense than most other rocks, so it tends to migrate upward through Earth's crust in vertical columns called 'diapirs'. The compressive folding process has probably facilitated the formation of these diapirs, and the diapirs, in turn, are probably enhancing some anticlines by 'inflating' them with salt. Where the diapirs reach the surface, the salt extrudes, much like lava from a volcano, and the salt flows. Two prominent salt flows are evident in the same valley, leaking from neighboring anticlines, just north of the scene center.

    This shaded relief image was created directly from an SRTM elevation model by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction. Northern slopes appear bright and southern slopes appear

  12. Tectonics versus eustatic control on supersequences of the Zagros Mountains of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydari, Ezat

    2008-04-01

    epeirogenic movements. Although tectonic events did not produce supersequences of the Zagros Mountains, they influenced regional lithofacies patterns through the formation of intrashelf depressions such as the Hormoz Salt Basin during the Precambrian and the Dezful Embayment and the Lorestan Basin during the Mesozoic. Tectonic events also affected sedimentation during the Tertiary collision of Arabia and the Central Iran microplate through uplift, erosion, and the formation of the Zagros Foreland Basin. The results of this investigation necessitate a re-evaluation of the role and the significance of pre-Tertiary tectonic events commonly used to interpret the geological evolution of the Zagros Mountains.

  13. Potential field signatures along the Zagros collision zone in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Maysam; Fournier, Dominique; Devriese, Sarah G. R.; Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    2018-01-01

    The Zagros orogenic belt, known as an active fold-thrust belt, was formed in southwestern Iran due to the convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian plates. In this study, potential field data are inverted in 3D to image the variations of magnetic susceptibility and density contrast along the collision zone, resulting in better tectonic understanding of the studied region. Geophysical data measured by airborne magnetic and ground-based gravity systems are used to construct an integrated model that facilitates the interpretations of various tectonic zones across a 450-km line. This line intersects the main structural units from the SW portion of the Zagros belt. The constructed model reveals a contrast that indicates the transition between the two continental plates coinciding with the western boundaries of the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) at the Main Zagros Thrust (MZT) fault. The subduction of the Arabian continental crust below the Iranian one is evident because of its lower susceptibility property and alternating sequence of high and low density regions. Higher susceptibility, magnetic remanence and density are the mainstays of the Urumieh-Dokhtar Magmatic Assemblage (UDMA) zone at the NE of the studied route, whereas lower values of these properties correspond to (1) the thin massive Tertiary-Neogene and Quaternary sediments of the central domain (CD) zone, and (2) the thick sedimentary and salt intrusion cover over the Zagros Fold-and-Thrust belt (ZFTB). Higher density of regions in the Arabian crust below the ZFTB implies that fault activities have caused significant vertical displacement of the basement. Finally, a simplified geological model is presented based upon the inversions of the geophysical data, in which the main geological units are divided along the studied route.

  14. Link between Neogene and modern sedimentary environments in the Zagros foreland basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirouz, Mortaza; Simpson, Guy; Bahroudi, Abbas

    2010-05-01

    The Zagros mountain belt, with a length of 1800 km, is located in the south of Iran and was produced by collision between the Arabian plate and the Iran micro plate some time in the early Tertiary. After collision, the Zagros carbonate-dominated sedimentary basin has been replaced by a largely clastic system. The Neogene Zagros foreland basin comprises four main depositional environments which reflect the progressive southward migration of the deformation front with time. The oldest unit - the Gachsaran formation - is clastic in the northern part of the basin, but is dominated by evaporates in southern part, being deposited in a supratidal Sabkha-type environment. Overlying the Gachsaran is the Mishan formation, which is characterized by the Guri limestone member at the base, overlain by marine green marls. The thickness of the Guri member increases dramatically towards the southeast. The next youngest unit is the Aghajari Formation which consists of well sorted lenticular sandstone bodies in a red silty-mudstone. This formation is interpreted as representing the floodplain of dominantly meandering rivers. Finally, the Bakhtiari formation consists of mainly coarse-grained gravel sheets which are interpreted to represent braided river deposits. Each of these Neogene depositional environments has a modern day equivalent. For example, the braided rivers presently active in the Zagros mountains are modern analogues of the Bakhtiari. In the downstream direction, these braided rivers become meandering systems, which are equivalents of the Aghajari. Eventually, the meandering rivers meet the Persian gulf which is the site of the ‘modern day' Mishan shallow marine marls. Finally, the modern carbonate system on the southern margin of Persian Gulf represents the Guri member paleo-environment, behind which Sabkha-type deposits similar to the Gachsaran are presently being deposited. One important implication of this link between the Neogene foreland basin deposits and the

  15. Lateral and depth variations of coda Q in the Zagros region of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irandoust, Mohsen Ahmadzadeh; Sobouti, Farhad; Rahimi, Habib

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed more than 2800 local earthquakes recorded by the Iranian National Seismic Network (INSN) and the Iranian Seismological Center (IRSC) to estimate coda wave quality factor, Q c , in the Zagros fold and thrust belt and the Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic zone in Iran. We used the single backscattering model to investigate lateral and depth variations of Q c in the study region. In the interior of Zagros, no strong lateral variation in attenuation parameters is observed. In SE Zagros (the Bandar-Abbas region) where transition to the Makran subduction setting begins, the medium shows lower attenuation. The average frequency relations for the SSZ, the Bandar-Abbas region, and the Zagros are Q c = (124 ± 11) f 0.82 ± 0.04, Q c = (109 ± 2) f 0.99 ± 0.01, and Q c = (85 ± 5) f 1.06 ± 0.03, respectively. To investigate the depth variation of Q c , 18 time windows between 5 and 90 s and at two epicentral distance ranges of R < 100 km and 100 < R < 200 km were considered. It was observed that with increasing coda lapse time, Q 0 ( Q c at 1 Hz) and n (frequency dependence factor) show increasing and decreasing trends, respectively. Beneath the SSZ and at depths of about 50 to 80 km, there is a correlation between the reported low velocity medium and the observed sharp change in the trend of Q 0 and n curves. In comparison with results obtained in other regions of the Iranian plateau, the Zagros along with the Alborz Mountains in the north show highest attenuation of coda wave and strongest frequency dependence, an observation that reflects the intense seismicity and active faulting in these mountain ranges. We also observe a stronger depth dependence of attenuation in the Zagros and SSZ compared to central Iran, indicating a thicker lithosphere in the Zagros region than in central Iran.

  16. Spatial evolution of Zagros collision zone in Kurdistan - NW Iran, constraints for Arabia-Eurasia oblique convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S.; Yassaghi, A.

    2015-09-01

    Stratigraphy, detailed structural mapping and crustal scale cross section of the NW Zagros collision zone evolved during convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian plates were conducted to constrain the spatial evolution of the belt oblique convergence since Late Cretaceous. Zagros orogeny in NW Iran consists of the Sanandaj-Sirjan, Gaveh Rud and ophiolite zones as internal, and Bisotoun, Radiolarite and High Zagros zones as external parts. The Main Zagros Thrust is known as major structures of the Zagros suture zone. Two stages of deformation are recognized in the external parts of Zagros. In the early stage, presence of dextrally deformed domains beside the reversely deformed domains in the Radiolarite zone as well as dextral-reverse faults in both Bisotoun and Radiolarite zones demonstrates partitioning of the dextral transpression. In the late stage, southeastward propagation of the Zagros orogeny towards its foreland resulted in synchronous development of orogen-parallel strike-slip and pure thrust faults. It is proposed that the first stage related to the late Cretaceous oblique obduction, and the second stage is resulted from Cenozoic collision. Cenozoic orogen-parallel strike-slip component of Zagros oblique faulting is not confined to the Zagros suture zone (Main Recent) but also occurred in the more external part (Marekhil-Ravansar fault system). Thus, it is proposed that oblique convergence of Arabia-Eurasia plates occurred in Zagros collision zone since the Late Cretaceous.

  17. Early Jurassic extensional inheritance in the Lurestan region of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt, Iran.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, Stefano; Parente, Mariano; Vitale, Stefano; Puzone, Francesco; Erba, Elisabetta; Bottini, Cinzia; Morsalnejad, Davoud; Mazzoli, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    It has long been recognized that the tectonic architecture of the Zagros mountain belt was strongly controlled by inherited structures previously formed within the Arabian plate. These preexisting features span in age from the pre-Cambrian to the Mesozoic, showing different trends and deformation styles. Yet, these structures are currently not fully understood. This uncertainty is partly related with the paucity of exposures, which rarely allows a direct observation of these important deformation features. The Lurestan Province of Iran provides a remarkable exception, since it is one of the few places of the Zagros mountain belt where exposures of Triassic and Jurassic rocks are widespread. In this area we carried out structural observations on Mesozoic extensional structures developed at the southern margin of the Neo-Tethyan basin. Syn-sedimentary extensional faults are hosted within the Triassic-Cretaceous succession, being particularly abundant in the Jurassic portion of the stratigraphy. Early to Middle Jurassic syn-sedimentary faults are observed in different paleogeographic domains of the area, and their occurrence is coherent with the subsequent transition from shallow-water to deep-sea basin environments, observed in a wide portion of the area. Most of the thrusts exposed in the area may indeed be interpreted as reactivated Jurassic extensional faults, or as reverse faults whose nucleation was controlled by the location of preexisting normal faults, as a result of positive inversion during crustal shortening and mountain building.

  18. Late Miocene Coral faunas of Iran (Zagros, Aghar, Firuz abad, Fars) palaeoecology and palaeobiogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehbozorgi, M.; Yazdi, M.; Torabi, H.

    2009-04-01

    Late Miocene Corals assemblage from Zagros Iran are investigated with respect to their palaeoecology and palaeobiogeography implications. This Corals are compared with fauna from Mediterranean Tethys and the Indopacific. Small foraminifers are used for biogeography and to support paleoecology interpretation. The studied section situated in the Zagros Mishan F.m is last depositions sea. A distinct horizon characterized by Porites- Antiguastrea assemblage associated Milliolid and Rotalia is interpreted a shallow bioclastic shoal. Patch reef with a porites and faviidae assemblage are a common feature of Oligocene and Miocene coral occurrence and indicate water depth of less than 20m. The diversity of corals in this area are low and all corals are hematypic. Miocene Corals from Mishan F.m Comprise 7 genera and occur in the single horizon or patch reef. This Corals and patch reefs are compared with corals and patch reefs in Qom F.m Central Iran. This corals report from this section: Antiguastrea sp., Monastrea sp., Favites sp., Porites sp., Dichocoenia sp., Asterohelia sp., Leptoria sp. Keywords: Miocene- Iran- Mishan-Zagros- Formation- Tethys seaway- Corals- Palaeoecology- palaeobiogeography.

  19. Underplating along the northern portion of the Zagros suture zone, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motaghi, K.; Shabanian, E.; Kalvandi, F.

    2017-07-01

    A 2-D absolute shear wave velocity model has been resolved beneath a seismic profile across the northeastern margin of the Arabian Plate-Central Iran by simultaneously inverting data from P receiver functions and fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocity. The data were gathered by a linear seismic array crossing the Zagros fold and thrust belt, Urmia-Dokhtar magmatic arc and Central Iran block assemblage as three major structural components of the Arabia-Eurasia collision. Our model shows a low-velocity tongue protruding from upper to lower crust which, north of the Zagros suture, indicates the signature of an intracontinent low-strength shear zone between the underthrusting and overriding continents. The velocity model confirms the presence of a significant crustal root as well as a thick high-velocity lithosphere in footwall of the suture, continuing northwards beneath the overriding continent for at least 200 km. These features are interpreted as underthrusting of Arabia beneath Central Iran. Time to depth migration of P receiver functions reveals an intracrustal flat interface at ∼17 km depth south of the suture; we interpret it as a significant decoupling within the upper crust. All these crustal scale structural features coherently explain different styles and kinematics of deformation in northern Zagros (Lorestan zone) with respect to its southern part (Fars zone).

  20. Lithospheric Structure of the Zagros and Alborz Mountain Belts (Iran) from Seismic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.; Hatzfeld, D.; Kaviani, A.; Tatar, M.

    2008-12-01

    We present a synthesis of the results of two dense temporary passive seismic experiments installed for a few months across Central Zagros for the first one, and from North-western Zagros to Alborz for the second one. On both transects, the receiver function analysis shows that the crust has an average thickness of ~ 43 km beneath the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt and the Iranian plateau. The crust is thicker in the back side of the Main Zagros Reverse Fault (MZRF), with a larger maximum Moho depth in Central Zagros (69 ± 2 km) than in North-western Zagros (56 ± 2 km). To reconcile Bouguer anomaly data and Moho depth profile of Central Zagros, we proposed that the thickening is related to overthrusting of the Arabian margin by Central Iran on the MZRF considered as a major thrust fault rooted at Moho depth. The better-quality receiver functions of NW Zagros display clear conversions on a low-velocity channel which cross-cuts the whole crust from the surface trace of the MZRF to the Moho on 250-km length. Waveform modeling shows that the crustal LVZ is ~ 10-km thick with a S-wave velocity 8-30 % smaller than the average crustal velocity. We interpret the low-velocity channel as the trace of the thrust fault and the suture between the Arabian and the Iranian lithospheres. We favour the hypothesis of the LVZ being due to sediments of the Arabian margin dragged to depth during the subduction of the Neotethyan Ocean. At upper mantle depth, we find shield-like shear-wave velocities in the Arabian upper-mantle, and lower velocities in the Iranian shallow mantle (50-150 km) which are likely due to higher temperature. The lack of a high-velocity anomaly in the mantle northeast of the MZRF suture suggests that the Neotethian oceanic lithosphere is now detached from the Arabian margin. The crust of the Alborz mountain range is not thickened in relation with its high elevations, but its upper mantle has low P-wave velocities.

  1. Spatial evolution of Zagros collision zone in Kurdistan, NW Iran: constraints on Arabia-Eurasia oblique convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Shahriar; Yassaghi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Stratigraphy, detailed structural mapping and a crustal-scale cross section across the NW Zagros collision zone provide constraints on the spatial evolution of oblique convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian plates since the Late Cretaceous. The Zagros collision zone in NW Iran consists of the internal Sanandaj-Sirjan, Gaveh Rud and Ophiolite zones and the external Bisotoun, Radiolarite and High Zagros zones. The Main Zagros Thrust is the major structure of the Zagros suture zone. Two stages of oblique deformation are recognized in the external part of the NW Zagros in Iran. In the early stage, coexisting dextral strike-slip and reverse dominated domains in the Radiolarite zone developed in response to deformation partitioning due to oblique convergence. Dextral-reverse faults in the Bisotoun zone are also compatible with oblique convergence. In the late stage, deformation partitioning occurred during southeastward propagation of the Zagros orogeny towards its foreland resulting in synchronous development of orogen-parallel strike-slip and thrust faults. It is proposed that the first stage was related to Late Cretaceous oblique obduction, while the second stage resulted from Cenozoic collision. The Cenozoic orogen-parallel strike-slip component of Zagros oblique convergence is not confined to the Zagros suture zone (Main Recent Fault) but also occurred in the external part (Marekhil-Ravansar fault system). Thus, it is proposed that oblique convergence of Arabian and Eurasian plates in Zagros collision zone initiated with oblique obduction in the Late Cretaceous followed by oblique collision in the late Tertiary, consistent with global plate reconstructions.

  2. Morphotectonic aspects of active folding in Zagros Mountains (Fin, SE of Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roustaei, M.; Abbasi, M.

    2008-05-01

    Active deformation in Iran, structural province of Zagros is a result of the convergence between the Arabian & Eurasian plates. The Zagros Mountains in southern Iran are one of the seismically active region & is introduced as fold-thrust belt trending NW-SE within the Arabian plate. Fin lies in Hormozgan province; the south of Iran. The vastness is surrounded by central Iran in the north, High Zagros in the North West and west, Folded Zagros in the east, Makran in the south east and Persian Gulf in the south. The study area is determined by complex structures, alternation of folding, salt diapers and faulting. The surface geology mainly comprises Neogene; Marls, Conglomerate, Sandstones (Mishan, Aghajari, Bakhtiyari formations), old fans and alluvium as syncline that Shur River cuts its north limb and passes from the middle of core .The older formations( Ghachsaran, Rzak and Guri member) folded into prominent anticlines. The fold axes mostly follow the parallel trends .Folds trending are NW-SE (Tashkend anticline), NE-SW (Khur anticline), E-W (Guniz & Handun anticline) and the trend of axes Baz fold in the main part is E-W. Hormoz salt also outcrops in the cores of many whaleback anticlines. Thus, anticlines may be cored with evaporates, even though no salt is currently exposed at the surface. Reason of selecting this area as an example referred to active seismcity. Release of energy is gradually in every events, this seismic character cusses that there was not earthquake with high magnitude in the area but it can not be a role. Answer to the question concerning relationship between folding of the crust layer and faulting at depth is more difficult. There is 2 terms to describe this relationship; "detachment folds" and" forced folds". In this paper, we try to analysis of different satellite imagery; Aster, spot and digital elevation model with high resolution (10 m) in order to detect geomorphic indicators which can help us to find a relationship between faulting

  3. Imaging Subsurface Structure of Central Zagros Zone/Iran Using Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidravesh, Shaghayegh; Pakzad, Mehrdad, ,, Dr.; Hatami, Mohammad Reza, ,, Dr.

    2017-04-01

    The Central Zagros zone, of west Iran & east Iraq, is surrounded by many active faults (including Main Zagros Reversed Fault, Main Recent Fault, High Zagros Fault, Zagros Fold, & Thrust Belt). Recent studies show that cross-correlation of a long-term ambient seismic noise data recorded in station-pair, includes important information regarding empirical Green's functions (EGFs) between stations. Hence, ambient seismic noise carries valuable information of the wave propagation path (which can be extracted). The 2D model of surface waves (Rayleigh & Love) velocities for the studied area is obtained by seismic ambient noise tomography (ANT) method. Throughout this research, we use continuous records of all three vertical, radial, and tangential components (obtained by rotation) recorded by IRSC (Iranian Seismological Center) and IIEES (International Institute of Earthquake Engineering) networks for this area of interest. The IRSC & IIEES networks are equipped by SS-1 kinematics and Guralp CMG-3T sensors respectively. Data of 20 stations were used for 12 months from 2014/Nov. to 2015/Nov. The performed data processing is similar to the one, put into words in detail by Bensen et al. (2007) including the processed daily base data. Mean, trend, and instrument response were removed and the data were decimated to 5 sps (sample per second) to reduce the amount of storage space and computational time required. We then applied merge to handle data gaps. One-bit time-domain normalization was also applied to suppress the influence of instrument irregularities and earthquake signals followed by spectral (frequency-domain) normalization between 0.05-0.2 Hz (period 5-20 sec). After cross-correlation (processing step), we perform rms stacking (new approach of stacking) to stack many cross-correlation functions based on the highest energy in a time interval which we accordingly anticipate to receive Rayleigh & Love waves fundamental modes. To evaluate quality of the stacking process

  4. Post-collisional deposits in the Zagros foreland basin: Implications for diachronous underthrusting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirouz, Mortaza

    2017-11-01

    Detailed sedimentology of the Neogene foreland basin deposits is investigated and classified into 11 lithofacies associations with respect to their paleo-sedimentary environments. The foreland deposits reveal a single coarsening-upward mega-sequence with continuous passage from back-bulge to forebulge, foredeep, and wedge-top sedimentary environments. The Gachsaran deposits form the base of the foreland strata and consist mainly of three different lithofacies associations including fluvial, marine, and sabkha deposits in the eastern Zagros in Fars, and are typically dominated with evaporites toward the west in the Dezful and Kirkuk embayments. The Mishan Formation has three different shallow-marine lithofacies associations in a vertical succession representing foredeep deposits in the eastern Zagros, which tapers toward the Dezful embayment and disappears in Iraq. The Agha Jari distal wedge-top deposits also contain three different lithofacies associations including delta deposits mostly in the Fars, tidal flat deposits in Dezful and Mesopotamia basin, and continental fluvial deposits across the entire Zagros. The uppermost synorogenic Bakhtiari Formation represents proximal wedge-top deposits and consists mainly of two main lithofacies associations including shallow marine and fluvial deposits, within which the fluvial succession is divided into three sub-lithofacies associations with respect to distance from the mountain front and hydraulic power of the river networks. Synthetizing sedimentary facies association with age constraints of the old foreland deposits near the Zagros suture in the High Zagros area suggests that a considerable part of the Arabian plate has been removed at the northern edge by underthrusting and erosion. Moreover, preservation of the young distal foreland deposits near the suture in the western Zagros implies that the magnitude and rate of removal of the proximal foreland deposits have been inconstant along-strike the belt and decreases

  5. Canopy Density Mapping on Ultracam-D Aerial Imagery in Zagros Woodlands, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanifard, Y.; Khodaee, Z.

    2013-09-01

    Canopy density maps express different characteristics of forest stands, especially in woodlands. Obtaining such maps by field measurements is so expensive and time-consuming. It seems necessary to find suitable techniques to produce these maps to be used in sustainable management of woodland ecosystems. In this research, a robust procedure was suggested to obtain these maps by very high spatial resolution aerial imagery. It was aimed to produce canopy density maps by UltraCam-D aerial imagery, newly taken in Zagros woodlands by Iran National Geographic Organization (NGO), in this study. A 30 ha plot of Persian oak (Quercus persica) coppice trees was selected in Zagros woodlands, Iran. The very high spatial resolution aerial imagery of the plot purchased from NGO, was classified by kNN technique and the tree crowns were extracted precisely. The canopy density was determined in each cell of different meshes with different sizes overlaid on the study area map. The accuracy of the final maps was investigated by the ground truth obtained by complete field measurements. The results showed that the proposed method of obtaining canopy density maps was efficient enough in the study area. The final canopy density map obtained by a mesh with 30 Ar (3000 m2) cell size had 80% overall accuracy and 0.61 KHAT coefficient of agreement which shows a great agreement with the observed samples. This method can also be tested in other case studies to reveal its capability in canopy density map production in woodlands.

  6. Crustal thickness variations in the Zagros continental collision zone (Iran) from joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, M.; Nasrabadi, A.

    2013-10-01

    Variations in crustal thickness in the Zagros determined by joint inversion of P wave receiver functions (RFs) and Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity dispersion. The time domain iterative deconvolution procedure was employed to compute RFs from teleseismic recordings at seven broadband stations of INSN network. Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion curves were estimated employing two-station method. Fundamental mode Rayleigh wave group velocities for each station is taken from a regional scale surface wave tomographic imaging. The main variations in crustal thickness that we observe are between stations located in the Zagros fold and thrust belt with those located in the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (SSZ) and Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic assemblage (UDMA). Our results indicate that the average crustal thickness beneath the Zagros Mountain Range varies from ˜46 km in Western and Central Zagros beneath SHGR and GHIR up to ˜50 km beneath BNDS located in easternmost of the Zagros. Toward NE, we observe an increase in Moho depth where it reaches ˜58 km beneath SNGE located in the SSZ. Average crustal thickness also varies beneath the UDMA from ˜50 km in western parts below ASAO to ˜58 in central parts below NASN. The observed variation along the SSZ and UDMA may be associated to ongoing slab steepening or break off in the NW Zagros, comparing under thrusting of the Arabian plate beneath Central Zagros. The results show that in Central Iran, the crustal thickness decrease again to ˜47 km below KRBR. There is not a significant crustal thickness difference along the Zagros fold and thrust belt. We found the same crystalline crust of ˜34 km thick beneath the different parts of the Zagros fold and thrust belt. The similarity of crustal structure suggests that the crust of the Zagros fold and thrust belt was uniform before subsidence and deposition of the sediments. Our results confirm that the shortening of the western and eastern parts of the Zagros basement is small and

  7. Neogene shortening and exhumation of the Zagros fold-thrust belt and foreland basin in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshnaw, Renas I.; Horton, Brian K.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Barber, Douglas E.; Tamar-Agha, Mazin Y.; Kendall, Jerome J.

    2017-01-01

    The Zagros fold-thrust belt in the Kurdistan region of Iraq encroached southward toward a rapidly subsiding Neogene foreland basin and was later partitioned by out-of-sequence shortening focused along the Mountain Front Flexure (MFF), as defined by new low-temperature thermochronologic, stratigraphic, and provenance results. Apatite (U-Th)/He ages document rapid deformation advance from the Main Zagros Fault to southern frontal structures (Kirkuk, Shakal, and Qamar thrusts) at 10-8 Ma, followed by potential basement-involved out-of-sequence development of the MFF (Qaradagh anticline) by 5 Ma. Distinct shifts in detrital zircon U-Pb provenance signatures for Neogene foreland basin fill provide evidence for drainage reorganization during fold-thrust belt advance. U-Pb age spectra and petrologic data from the Injana (Upper Fars) Formation indicate derivation from a variety of Eurasian, Pan-African, ophiolitic and Mesozoic-Cenozoic volcanic terranes, whereas the Mukdadiya (Lower Bakhtiari) and Bai-Hasan (Upper Bakhtiari) Formations show nearly exclusive derivation from the Paleogene Walash-Naopurdan volcanic complex near the Iraq-Iran border. Such a sharp cutoff in Eurasian, Pan-African, and ophiolitic sources is likely associated with drainage reorganization and tectonic development of the geomorphic barrier formed by the MFF. As a result of Zagros crustal shortening, thickening and loading, the Neogene foreland basin developed and accommodated an abrupt influx of fluvial clastic sediment that contains growth stratal evidence of synkinematic accumulation. The apparent out-of-sequence pattern of upper crustal shortening in the hinterland to foreland zone of Iraqi Kurdistan suggests that structural inheritance and the effects of synorogenic erosion and accumulation are important factors influencing the irregular and episodic nature of orogenic growth in the Zagros.

  8. Growth of the Zagros Fold-Thrust Belt and Foreland Basin, Northern Iraq, Kurdistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshnaw, Renas; Horton, Brian; Stockli, Daniel; Barber, Douglas; Ghalib, Hafidh; Dara, Rebwar

    2016-04-01

    The Zagros orogenic belt in the Middle Eastern segment of the Alpine-Himalayan system is among the youngest seismically active continental collision zones on Earth. However, due to diachronous and incremental collision, the precise ages and kinematics of shortening and deposition remain poorly understood. The Kurdistan region of the Zagros fold-thrust belt and foreland basin contains well-preserved Neogene wedge-top and foredeep deposits that include clastic nonmarine fill of the Upper Fars, Lower Bakhtiari, and Upper Bakhtiari Formations. These deposits record significant information about orogenic growth, fold-thrust dynamics, and advance of the deformation front. Thermochronologic and geochronologic data from thrust sheets and stratigraphic archives combined with local earthquake data provide a unique opportunity to address the linkages between surface and subsurface geologic relationships. This research seeks to constrain the timing and geometry of exhumation and deformation by addressing two key questions: (1) Did the northwestern Zagros fold-thrust belt evolve from initial thin-skinned shortening to later thick-skinned deformation or vice-versa? (2) Did the fold-thrust belt advance steadily under critical/supercritical wedge conditions involving in-sequence thrusting or propagate intermittently under subcritical conditions with out-of-sequence deformation? From north to south, apatite (U-Th)/He ages from the Main Zagros Thrust, the Mountain Front Flexure (MFF), and additional frontal thrusts suggest rapid exhumation by ~10 Ma, ~5 Ma, and ~8 Ma respectively. Field observations and seismic sections indicate progressive tilting and development of growth strata within the Lower Bakhtiari Formation adjacent to the frontal thrusts and within the Upper Bakhtiari Formation near the MFF. In the Kurdistan region of Iraq, a regional balanced cross section constrained by new thermochronometric results, proprietary seismic reflection profiles, and earthquake hypocenters

  9. Active Tectonics of the Iran Plateau and South Caspian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priestely, K.; Jackson, J.; Maggi, A.; Talebian, M.; Walker, R.

    2002-12-01

    We use observations of surface faulting, well-constrained earthquake focal mechanisms and centroid depths, and velocity structure to investigate the present-day deformation and kinematics of the region. Current deformation is primarily concentrated in three seismically active belts: the Zagros Mountains of southwest Iran,the Talesh-Alborz-Kopeh Dag Mountains of northern Iran, and the Apsheron-Balkhan Sill in the central Caspian Sea. These belts are separated by seismically inactive regions that act as semi-rigid blocks. The extent to which the active shortening is divided between the three belts is still uncertain. Earthquake locations in the region, particularly their focal depths which are determined from teleseismic arrival times, are poor, and reported subcrustal earthquakes have been cited as evidence for present-day subduction beneath the Zagros. A detailed analysis of earthquake focal depths in the Zagros and elsewhere in the region confirms that no substantial subcrustal earthquakes occur in this part of the Middle East except beneath the Makran subduction zone in the south and the Apsheron-Balkhan Sill in the north. The present-day N-S deformation across the Zagros is partitioned with right-lateral, strike-slip motion on the NW-SE striking Main Recent Fault, and NE-SW shortening across the Zagros. Shortening in the Zagros is accommodated by folding in the sediments (0-10 km depth), moderate earthquakes on high-angle reverse faults striking parallel to the surface folds (~10-20 km depth), and aseismic thickening of the lower crust (~20-45 km depth). The south Caspian basin is essentially free of earthquakes and acts as a rigid block which strongly influences the nature of the deformation in the surrounding active belts. No significant subcrustal earthquakes occur in the Talesh, Alborz, or Kopeh Dag Mountains which bound the northeast, south and west sides of the south Caspian basin, but substantial subcrustal seismicity occurs beneath the Apsheron

  10. Earthquake hazard assessment in the Zagros Orogenic Belt of Iran using a fuzzy rule-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahi Ghasre Aboonasr, Sedigheh; Zamani, Ahmad; Razavipour, Fatemeh; Boostani, Reza

    2017-08-01

    Producing accurate seismic hazard map and predicting hazardous areas is necessary for risk mitigation strategies. In this paper, a fuzzy logic inference system is utilized to estimate the earthquake potential and seismic zoning of Zagros Orogenic Belt. In addition to the interpretability, fuzzy predictors can capture both nonlinearity and chaotic behavior of data, where the number of data is limited. In this paper, earthquake pattern in the Zagros has been assessed for the intervals of 10 and 50 years using fuzzy rule-based model. The Molchan statistical procedure has been used to show that our forecasting model is reliable. The earthquake hazard maps for this area reveal some remarkable features that cannot be observed on the conventional maps. Regarding our achievements, some areas in the southern (Bandar Abbas), southwestern (Bandar Kangan) and western (Kermanshah) parts of Iran display high earthquake severity even though they are geographically far apart.

  11. Effects of Heterogeniety on Spatial Pattern Analysis of Wild Pistachio Trees in Zagros Woodlands, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanifard, Y.; Rezayan, F.

    2014-10-01

    Vegetation heterogeneity biases second-order summary statistics, e.g., Ripley's K-function, applied for spatial pattern analysis in ecology. Second-order investigation based on Ripley's K-function and related statistics (i.e., L- and pair correlation function g) is widely used in ecology to develop hypothesis on underlying processes by characterizing spatial patterns of vegetation. The aim of this study was to demonstrate effects of underlying heterogeneity of wild pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf.) trees on the second-order summary statistics of point pattern analysis in a part of Zagros woodlands, Iran. The spatial distribution of 431 wild pistachio trees was accurately mapped in a 40 ha stand in the Wild Pistachio & Almond Research Site, Fars province, Iran. Three commonly used second-order summary statistics (i.e., K-, L-, and g-functions) were applied to analyse their spatial pattern. The two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test showed that the observed pattern significantly followed an inhomogeneous Poisson process null model in the study region. The results also showed that heterogeneous pattern of wild pistachio trees biased the homogeneous form of K-, L-, and g-functions, demonstrating a stronger aggregation of the trees at the scales of 0-50 m than actually existed and an aggregation at scales of 150-200 m, while regularly distributed. Consequently, we showed that heterogeneity of point patterns may bias the results of homogeneous second-order summary statistics and we also suggested applying inhomogeneous summary statistics with related null models for spatial pattern analysis of heterogeneous vegetations.

  12. A combined magnetometry and gravity study across Zagros orogeny in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Maysam; Oskooi, Behrooz

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the structural geology and the tectonic conditions of the Zagros orogeny along the route of Qom to Kermanshah cities were investigated using the combined geophysical methods of the airborne magnetometry and the ground-based gravity data. Airborne magnetometry data of Iran with a line space of survey, 7.5 km, were used to model the magnetic susceptibility property along the route. At first, the airborne magnetic data were stably 500-m downward continued to the ground surface in order to enhance minor changes of the Earth's magnetic field over the studied region. Afterward, 3D inverse modeling of the magnetic data was implemented to the downward continued data, and subsequently the section of magnetic susceptibility variation along the desired route was extracted and imaged at depth. The acquired model could appropriately predict the observed magnetic data, showing low misfit values between the observation and the predicted data. The analytic signal filter was applied to the reduced-to-pole (RTP) magnetic data leading to the determination of the active and probable hidden faults in the structural zones of the Zagros, such as Sanandaj-Sirjan, Central Domain (CD) and Urumieh-Dokhtar based upon the generated peaks along the profile of analytic signal filter. In addition, the density variations of the subsurface geological layers were determined by 3D inverting of the ground-based gravity data over the whole study area, and extracting this property along the route. The joint models of magnetic susceptibility and density variation could appropriately localize the traces of faults along with the geologically and tectonically structural boundaries in the region. The locations of faults correspond well to the variation of geophysical parameters on the inverted sections. Probable direction, slope and extension at depth of these faults were also determined on the sections, indicating a high tectonized zone of the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) parallel to the zone of

  13. Microbiostratigraphy of the Upper Paleocene to Middle Eocene Jahrum Formation in the Folded Zagros Zone, SW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadighalati, S.; Ahmadi, V.

    2017-12-01

    The Jahrum Formation (Upper Paleocene to Middle Eocene) is composed of carbonate and dolomitic carbonate rocks in the Zagros Basin. The Zagros is located at the boundary between the Arabian and Eurasian lithosphere plates and represent the orogenic response to a collision between Eurasia and advancing Arabia during the Cenozoic. The study area is located in the northern part of Kuh-E-Tudej, 175 km southeast of Shiraz in the Folded Zagros Zone. The Jahrum Formation at Kuh-E-Tudej, with a thickness of 190 m, consists of medium to massive bedded limestone. The following foraminiferal index species are identified in the studied section: Fallotella alavensis, Kathina sp., Miscellanea sp., Lockhartia sp., Orbitolites shirazeinsis, Nummulites sp., Opertorbitolites sp., Dictyoconus cf. egyptiensis, Orbitolites cf. complanatus, Dictyoconus sp., Coskinolina sp., Somalina stefaninii, Discocyclina sp., Praerhapydionina sp., Coskinolina cf. liburnica, Nummulites cf. globulus, Nummulites cf. aturicus, and Alveolina sp. The age of the studied sediments ranges from Upper Paleocene to Middle Eocene. The microbiostratigraphic studies revealed four biozones based on the foraminifers identified in the studied section.

  14. The Zagros hinterland fold-and-thrust belt in-sequence thrusting, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Ghanbarian, Mohammad Ali

    2014-05-01

    The collision of the Iranian microcontinent with the Afro-Arabian continent resulted in the deformation of the Zagros orogenic belt. The foreland of this belt in the Persian Gulf and Arabian platform has been investigated for its petroleum and gas resource potentials, but the Zagros hinterland is poorly investigated and our knowledge about its deformation is much less than other parts of this orogen. Therefore, this work presents a new geological map, stratigraphic column and two detailed geological cross sections. This study indicates the presence of a hinterland fold-and-thrust belt on northeastern side of the Zagros orogenic core that consists of in-sequence thrusting and basement involvement in this important part of the Zagros hinterland. The in-sequence thrusting resulted in first- and second-order duplex systems, Mode I fault-bend folding, fault-propagation folding and asymmetric detachment folding which indicate close relationships between folding and thrusting. Study of fault-bend folds shows that layer-parallel simple shear has the same role in the southeastern and northwestern parts of the study area (αe = 23.4 ± 9.1°). A major lateral ramp in the basement beneath the Talaee plain with about one kilometer of vertical offset formed parallel to the SW movement direction and perpendicular to the major folding and thrusting.

  15. The 2013 Mw 6.2 Khaki-Shonbe (Iran) Earthquake: Seismic Shortening of the Zagros Sedimentary Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J. R.; Bergman, E.; Copley, A.; Ghods, A.; Nissen, E.; Oveisi, B.; Walters, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 Mw 6.2 Khaki-Shonbe earthquake occurred in the Simply Folded Belt of the Zagros Mountains, Iran. This is the largest earthquake in the Zagros since the November 1990 Mw 6.4 Furg (Hormozgan) thrust faulting event, and therefore the largest in the period for which dense InSAR ground displacements are available. It is also the biggest seismic event to have occurred in the Simply Folded Belt since the March 1977 Mw 6.7 Khurgu earthquake. This earthquake therefore potentially provides valuable insights into a range of controversies: (1) the preponderance of earthquake faulting in the crystalline basement versus the sedimentary cover and the potential importance of lithology in controlling and limiting seismic rupture; (2) the nature of surface folding and whether or not there is a one-to-one relationship between buried reverse faults and surface anticlines; and (3) the presence or absence of large pulses of aseismic slip triggered by mainshock rupture. We combine seismological solutions and aftershock relocations with satellite interferometric ground displacements and observations from the field to determine the geometry of faulting and its relationship with the structure, stratigraphy and tectonics of the Central Zagros. The earthquake rupture involved reverse slip on two along-strike southwest dipping fault segments, the rupture initiating at the northern and bottom end of the larger north-west segment. These faults verge away from the foreland and towards the high range interior, contrary to the fault geometries depicted in many structural cross-sections of the Zagros. The slip measured on the reverse segments occurred over two mutually exclusive depth ranges, 10-5 km and 4-2 km, resulting in long (16 km), narrow (7 km) rupture segments. Conversely, aftershocks are found to cluster in the depth range 8-16 km, beneath the main rupture segment. This indicates only significant reverse slip and coseismic shortening in the sedimentary cover, with the slip

  16. Folding pattern in the Fars province, Zagros folded belt: case study on the Karbasi and Khaftar anticlines, interior Fars, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Z.; Arian, M.; Solgi, A.

    2015-08-01

    The anticlines in Fars region, which are located in Zagros fold-thrust belt, are valuable because they possess several hydrocarbons and this area is easily recognized by the NW-SE trending parallel anticlines that verge to the SW. According to the geological classification, the study area is located in Interior Fars region. Due to increasing complication of structural geometry in Fars region and necessity to explore activities for deeper horizons especially the Paleozoic ones, the analysis of fold style elements, which is known as one of the main parts in structural studies, seems necessary. The Karbasi and Khaftar anticlines are case study anticlines in the interior Fars sub-basin (Fassa area). These anticlines have an asymmetric structure and some faults with large strike separation are observed in these structures. Due to increasing complication of structural geometry in Fars region and necessity to explore activities for deeper horizons especially the Paleozoic ones, the analysis of fold style elements, which is known as one of the main parts in structural studies, seems necessary. Description of fold geometry is important because it allows comparisons within and between folds and also allows us to recognize patterns in the occurrence and distribution of fold systems. The main aim of this paper is to determine fold style elements and folding pattern in the study area. This paper presents a part of the results of a regional study of Fars province in the Zagros Simply folded belt, based on satellite images, geological maps, and well data. In the Interior Fars area, it seems that folding pattern is controlled by structural elements such as the Nezamabad basement fault and Dashtak formation. In fact, as a middle detachment unit, Dashtak formation plays an important role regarding folding geometry and fold in style in the study area.

  17. Detrital zircon U-Pb and (U-Th)/He double-dating of Upper Cretaceous-Cenozoic Zagros foreland basin strata in the Kurdistan Region of northern Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, D. E.; Stockli, D. F.; Koshnaw, R. I.; Horton, B. K.; Tamar-Agha, M. Y.; Kendall, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The NW Zagros orogen is the result of the multistage collisional history associated with Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian continents and final closure of Neotethys. Siliciclastic strata preserved within a ~400 km segment of the NW Zagros fold-thrust belt and foreland basin in the Iraqi Kurdistan Region (IKR) provide a widespread record of exhumation and sedimentation. As a means of assessing NW Zagros foreland basin evolution and chronostratigraphy, we present coupled detrital zircon (DZ) U-Pb and (U-Th)/He geo-thermochronometric data of Upper Cretaceous to Pliocene siliciclastic strata from the Duhok, Erbil, and Suleimaniyah provinces of IKR. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb age analyses reveal that the foreland basin fill in IKR in general was dominantly derived from Pan-African/Arabian-Nubian, Peri-Gondwandan, Eurasian, and Cretaceous volcanic arc terrenes. However, the provenance of these strata varies systematically along strike and through time, with an overall increase in complexity upsection. DZ age distribution of Paleocene-Eocene strata is dominated by a ~95 Ma grain age population, likely sourced from the Late Cretaceous Hassanbag-Bitlis volcanic arc complex along the northern margin of Arabia. In contrast, DZ U-Pb age distributions of Neogene strata show a major contribution derived from various Eurasian (e.g., Iranian, Tauride, Pontide; ~45, 150, 300 Ma) and Pan-African (~550, 950 Ma) sources. The introduction of Eurasian DZ ages at the Paleogene-Neogene transition likely records the onset of Arabian-Eurasian collision. Along strike to the southeast, the DZ U-Pb spectra of Neogene strata show a decreased percentage of Pan-African, Peri-Gondwandan, Tauride, and Ordovician ages, coupled with a dramatic increase in 40-50 Ma DZ ages that correspond to Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic rocks in Iran. Combined with paleocurrent data, this suggests that Neogene sediments were transported longitudinally southeastward through an unbroken foreland basin

  18. 40Ar 39Ar Ages and tectonic setting of ophiolite from the Neyriz area, southeast Zagros Range, Iran

    Lanphere, M.A.; Pamic, J.

    1983-01-01

    An ophiolite, considered to be an allochthonous fragment of Tethyan oceanic crust and mantle, crops out near Neyriz in the Zagros Range, Iran. 40Ar 39Ar ages ranging from 76.8 ?? 23.8 Ma to 105 ?? 23.3 Ma were measured on hornblende from five samples of plagiogranite and diabase from the ophiolite. The most precise ages are 85.9 ?? 3.8 Ma for a diabase and 83.6 ?? 8.4 Ma for a plagiogranite. The weighted mean age of hornblende from the five samples is 87.5 ?? 7.2 Ma which indicates that the igneous part of the Neyriz ophiolite formed during the early part of the Late Cretaceous. Pargasite from amphibolite below peridotite of the Neyriz ophiolite has a 40Ar 39Ar age of 94.9 ?? 7.6 Ma. The pargasite age agrees within analytical uncertainty with the ages measured on diabase and plagiogranite. Comparable ages have been measured on igneous rocks from the Samail ophiolite of Oman and on amphibolite below peridotite of the Samail ophiolite. ?? 1983.

  19. Petroleum generation and migration in the Mesopotamian Basin and Zagros fold belt of Iraq: Results from a basin-modeling study

    Pitman, Janet K.; Steinshouer, D.; Lewan, M.D.

    2004-01-01

    A regional 3-D total petroleum-system model was developed to evaluate petroleum generation and migration histories in the Mesopotamian Basin and Zagros fold belt in Iraq. The modeling was undertaken in conjunction with Middle East petroleum assessment studies conducted by the USGS. Regional structure maps, isopach and facies maps, and thermal maturity data were used as input to the model. The oil-generation potential of Jurassic source-rocks, the principal known source of the petroleum in Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary reservoirs in these regions, was modeled using hydrous pyrolysis (Type II-S) kerogen kinetics. Results showed that oil generation in source rocks commenced in the Late Cretaceous in intrashelf basins, peak expulsion took place in the late Miocene and Pliocene when these depocenters had expanded along the Zagros foredeep trend, and generation ended in the Holocene when deposition in the foredeep ceased. The model indicates that, at present, the majority of Jurassic source rocks in Iraq have reached or exceeded peak oil generation and most rocks have completed oil generation and expulsion. Flow-path simulations demonstrate that virtually all oil and gas fields in the Mesopotamian Basin and Zagros fold belt overlie mature Jurassic source rocks (vertical migration dominated) and are situated on, or close to, modeled migration pathways. Fields closest to modeled pathways associated with source rocks in local intrashelf basins were charged earliest from Late Cretaceous through the middle Miocene, and other fields filled later when compression-related traps were being formed. Model results confirm petroleum migration along major, northwest-trending folds and faults, and oil migration loss at the surface.

  20. Sustainability of wild pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf.) in Zagros forests, Iran

    Morteza Pourreza; John D. Shaw; Hoshang Zangeneh

    2008-01-01

    Wild pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf.) is the most economically important tree species in many rural areas in the west of Iran. The species produces resin used for a wide variety of traditional uses. Because the resin can be harvested non-destructively, the trees are maintained until mortality occurs from natural causes. The result is that natural...

  1. Orogen-Wide InSAR Time Series for Detecting Deformation Sources: The Zagros and Makran of Southern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, R. B.; Barnhart, W. D.

    2011-12-01

    We present interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time series maps that span the eastern Zagros (Fars Arc) collisional belt and western Makran accretionary prism of Southern Iran. Given the upcoming availability of large volumes of SAR data from new platforms, such as Sentinel 1 and potentially DESDynI, we explore computationally efficient approaches for extracting deformation time series when the signal of interest is small compared to the level of noise in individual interferograms. We use 12 descending and 2 ascending multi-frame (2-4 frames) Envisat tracks and 2 ascending ALOS tracks spanning 2003-2010 and 2006-2010. We implement a linear inversion, similar to the Small Baseline Subset (SBaS) technique, to derive surface displacements at individual acquisition dates from trees of interferograms with perpendicular baselines less than 350m for Envisat and 1500m for ALOS pairs. This spatially extensive dataset allows us to investigate several attributes of interferometry that vary spatially and temporally over large distances, including changes in phase coherence relative to elevation and relief as well as land use. Through synthetic tests and observed data, we explore various sources of potential error in calculation of time series, including variable coherence of pixels between interferograms in a single track, ambiguities in phase unwrapping, and orbital ramp estimation over scenes with variable correlated noise structure. We present examples of detected signals with both temporally variable characteristics and small magnitudes, including surface/subsurface salt deformation, aseismic deformation across Minab-Zendan-Palami strike-slip zone, and subsidence due to hydrocarbon extraction.

  2. 2-D Density and Directional Analysis of Fault Systems in the Zagros Region (Iran) on a Regional Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Seyed Naser; Baizidi, Chavare

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, 2-D spatial variation of the frequency and length density and frequency-length relation of large-scale faults in the Zagros region (Iran), as a typical fold-and-thrust belt, were examined. Moreover, the directional analysis of these faults as well as the scale dependence of the orientations was studied. For this purpose, a number of about 8000 faults with L ≥ 1.0 km were extracted from the geological maps covering the region, and then, the data sets were analyzed. The overall pattern of the frequency/length distribution of the total faults of the region acceptably fits with a power-law relation with exponent 1.40, with an obvious change in the gradient in L = 12.0 km. In addition, maps showing the spatial variation of fault densities over the region indicate that the maximum values of the frequency and length density of the faults are attributed to the northeastern part of the region and parallel to the suture zone, respectively, and the fault density increases towards the central parts of the belt. Moreover, the directional analysis of the fault trends gives a dominant preferred orientation trend of 300°-330° and the assessment of the scale dependence of the fault directions demonstrates that larger faults show higher degrees of preferred orientations. As a result, it is concluded that the evolutionary path of the faulting process in this region can be explained by increasing the number of faults rather than the growth in the fault lengths and also it seems that the regional-scale faults in this region are generated by a nearly steady-state tectonic stress regime.

  3. Study of Upper Miocene Oysters(Plecypoda) From the Mishan Formation in south west of Firuzabad, Fars, Iran(Zagros mountain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehbozorgi, Mehdi; Sabouhi, Mostafa; Nabavi, Hamid

    2010-05-01

    The out crapes of Mishan Formation located in Aghar area(Firuzabad city) south west of Fars and 70km south west of Firuzabad. this Formation mostly consist of limestone, marly limestone and marlstone with 800m thickness. 6key beds distinctive from limestone beds are recognized in this area. this key beds are useful for local and regional correlation in Zagros mountains. the key beds from base to top are: Red algae, Bryozoa, Gastropoda and Plecypoda, Crabs and Oysters. Mishan Formation in this area is between Gachsaran F.M(Under Formation), Conformable and Aghajari F.M(Upper Formation), Conformable. With due attention to rang and distribution of the Macrofossils, 5 local assmblage biozone were recognized, that is confirming time limit from Early- Upper Miocene. this research cheked and controled a biostrom Plecypoda(Oysters) level by thickness 3- 4m. this biostrom located around 550m the base of section. Ofcurse more of this Plecypoda be assinged to order pterriodia and Genus Oyster. Along with Oysters, Pecten and Venus can be see. This biostrom made up a bioclastic shoal shallow deep in the margin of sea Miocene. This Oysters report from Mishan Formation of Firuzabad, Fars, Zagros, Iran: Ostrea virleti var. crassicostat, Ostrea virleti Desh var. persica, Ostrea digitatai Echiwald var. rohlfsi, Ostrea lamellose. Ostrea cf. biowwondeli. Master of science in Geology (Paleontology), University of Isfahan, Iran.

  4. Reactivation versus reworking of the active continental margin during the Zagros collision: Mahallat-Muteh-Laybid complexes, Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aflaki, Mahtab; Shabanian, Esmaeil; Davoodi, Zeinab; Mohajjel, Mohammad

    2017-06-01

    Reactivation of long-lived basement faults has significant influences on further deformation of collision zones. Three major inherited pre-collisional NW-, N- and NE-trending basement discontinuities have played important roles on the structural and tectono-sedimentary evolution of the Iranian micro-continent in the northeastern part of the Gondwana super-continent. Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (SSZ), known as the metamorphic belt of the Zagros orogeny, marks the SW margin of the Central Iran. SSZ is formed as a result of the Arabia-Eurasia collision and its general trend of deformation coincides with the NW structural trend of the collision. The NE-trending Mahallat, Muteh and Laybid complexes in the middle part of the NW-trending SSZ are the exception and have a trend almost normal to the NW-trending Zagros. A combined methodology of remote sensing, geometric and kinematics analyses complemented by field work was used to reconstruct the history of deformation in the Zagros hinterland since the earlier stages of collision to the present-day. Our results reveal the key role of the preexisting discontinuities of the Iranian basement in both the kinematics and structural pattern of the middle part of the SSZ. These basement faults have acted as main boundary conditions changing the collisional fabric perpendicular to its overall trend. Progressive deformation and the related changes during collision have caused drastic changes in the kinematics of the boundary faults. The establishment of dextral transtension in the SSZ has had secondary influences on the pattern of deformation by local clockwise rotation and localized dextral shear in the southern parts of the area of interest. This study highlights the significance of long-lived pre-existing structures in the deformation of collision zones. Such basement faults are capable to change both the pattern and kinematics of deformation of the adjacent areas involved in a continental collision.

  5. Hydrothermal dolomitization of the Bekhme formation (Upper Cretaceous), Zagros Basin, Kurdistan Region of Iraq: Record of oil migration and degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansurbeg, Howri; Morad, Daniel; Othman, Rushdy; Morad, Sadoon; Ceriani, Andrea; Al-Aasm, Ihsan; Kolo, Kamal; Spirov, Pavel; Proust, Jean Noel; Preat, Alain; Koyi, Hemin

    2016-07-01

    The common presence of oil seepages in dolostones is widespread in Cretaceous carbonate successions of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. This integrated field, petrographic, chemical, stable C, O and Sr isotopes, and fluid inclusion study aims to link dolomitization to the origin and geochemical evolution of fluids and oil migration in the Upper Cretaceous Bekhme carbonates. Flux of hot basinal (hydrothermal) brines, which is suggested to have occurred during the Zagros Orogeny, resulted in dolomitization and cementation of vugs and fractures by coarse-crystalline saddle dolomite, equant calcite and anhydrite. The saddle dolomite and host dolostones have similar stable isotopic composition and formed prior to oil migration from hot (81-115 °C) basinal NaCl-MgCl2-H2O brines with salinities of 18-22 wt.% NaCl eq. The equant calcite cement, which surrounds and hence postdates saddle dolomite, has precipitated during oil migration from cooler (60-110 °C) NaCl-CaCl2-H2O brines (14-18 wt.% NaCl eq). The yellowish fluorescence color of oil inclusions in the equant calcite indicates that the oil had API gravity of 15-25° composition, which is lighter than present-day oil in the reservoirs (API of 10-17°). This difference in oil composition is attributed to oil degradation by the flux of meteoric water, which is evidenced by the low δ13C values (- 8.5‰ to - 3.9‰ VPDB) as well as by nil salinity and low temperature in fluid inclusions of late columnar calcite cement. This study demonstrates that linking fluid flux history and related diagenesis to the tectonic evolution of the basin provides important clues to the timing of oil migration, degradation and reservoir evolution.

  6. The occurrence and origin of celestite in the Abolfares region, Iran: Implications for Sr-mineralization in Zagros fold belt (ZFB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourkaseb, Houshang; Zarasvandi, Alireza; Rezaei, Mohsen; Mahdavi, Reyhaneh; Ghanavati, Fatemeh

    2017-10-01

    The major celestite deposits in Zagros Fold belt are associated with coastal marine carbonate and evaporate sediments of Oligo-Miocene Asmari and Lower Miocene Ghachsaran Formations. In the Abolfares region, celestite mineralization is extended in the western limb of Bangestan anticline in the carbonates of Early Miocene (middle part of Asmari Formation), underlying by dolomitic carbonates of Burdigalian. From bottom to top three main types of mineralization can be distinguished in the study area: (1) layer texture resulting from replacement of algal limestone by celestite minerals with some parts showing idiomorphic crystals (geodes) along the walls of the cavities, (2) celestite occurrence as irregular massive shape interconnected small crystals and nodules, and (3) celestite mineralization associated with steeply dipping veins and open space fracture fillings, resulting from late-stage epigenetic processes. Highlightly, the ore-hosting carbonate rocks were deposited in an intertidal - supratidal protected setting with hypersaline conditions, in accordance with other celestite deposits of the Zagros Fold belt. The abundance of diagenetic crystallization rhythmites, carbonate and anhydrite inclusions as confirmed by Laser Raman spectroscopy analysis, high Sr/Ba values (average; 8726.1) and strong negative correlations between SO3 vs CaO (R2 = 0.98), SrO vs CaO (R2 = 0.96) with positive correlations between Ba vs SrO (R2 = 0.54) and SO3 vs SrO (R2 = 0.98) highlight the role of high Sr late-diagenetic brines in replacement of carbonates with celestite minerals. It seems that the inception of compressional folding during or soon after the deposition of the Asmari Formation in the carbonate platform at the margin of NW-trending basin in the foreland of the Zagros orogenic belt lead to the upward refluxing of penetrated high-Sr diagenetic brines and celestite mineralization.

  7. Crustal structure and evolution of the NW Zagros Mountains (Iran): Insights from numerical modeling of the interplay between surface and tectonic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saura, Eduard; Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel; Casciello, Emilio; Vergés, Jaume

    2014-05-01

    Protracted Arabia-Eurasia convergence resulted in the closure of the >2000 km wide Neo-Tethys Ocean from early Late Cretaceous to Recent. This process was controlled by the structure of the NE margin of the Arabian plate, the NE-dipping oceanic subduction beneath Eurasia, the obduction of oceanic lithosphere and the collision of small continental and volcanic arc domains of the SW margin of Eurasia. The evolution of the Zagros Amiran and Mesopotamian foreland basins is studied in this work along a ~700 km long transect in NW Zagros constrained by field, seismic and published data. We use the well-defined geometries and ages of the Amiran and Mesopotamian foreland basins to estimate the elastic thickness of the lithosphere and model the evolution of the deformation to quantitatively link the topographic, tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the system. Modelling results show two major stages of emplacement. The obduction (pre-collision) stage involves the thin thrust sheets of the Kermanshah complex together with the Bisotun basement. The collision stage corresponds to the emplacement of the basement duplex and associated crustal thickening, coeval to the out of sequence emplacement of Gaveh Rud and Imbricated Zone in the hinterland. The geodynamic model is consistent with the history of the foreland basins, with the regional isostasy model, and with a simple scenario for the surface process efficiency. The emplacement of Bisotun basement during obduction tectonically loaded and flexed the Arabian plate triggering deposition in the Amiran foreland basin. The basement units emplaced during the last 10 My, flexed the Arabian plate below the Mesopotamian basin. During this stage, material eroded from the Simply Folded belt and the Imbricated zone was not enough to fill the Mesopotamian basin, which, according to our numerical model results, required a maximum additional sediment supply of 80 m/Myr. This additional supply had to be provided by an axial drainage system

  8. Role of the Kazerun fault system in active deformation of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt (Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Authemayou, Christine; Bellier, Olivier; Chardon, Dominique; Malekzade, Zaman; Abassi, Mohammad

    2005-04-01

    Field structural and SPOT image analyses document the kinematic framework enhancing transfer of strike-slip partitioned motion from along the backstop to the interior of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in a context of plate convergence slight obliquity. Transfer occurs by slip on the north-trending right-lateral Kazerun Fault System (KFS) that connects to the Main Recent Fault, a major northwest-trending dextral fault partitioning oblique convergence at the rear of the belt. The KFS formed by three fault zones ended by bent orogen-parallel thrusts allows slip from along the Main Recent Fault to become distributed by transfer to longitudinal thrusts and folds. To cite this article: C. Authemayou et al., C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  9. Petrography, geochemistry, and U-Pb geochronology of pegmatites and aplites associated with the Alvand intrusive complex in the Hamedan region, Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, Zagros orogen (Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepahi, Ali Asghar; Salami, Sedigheh; Lentz, David; McFarlane, Christopher; Maanijou, Mohammad

    2018-04-01

    The Alvand intrusive complex in the Hamedan area in Iran is in the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone of the Zagros orogen. It consists of a wide range of plutonic rocks, mainly gabbro, diorite, granodiorite, granite, and leucogranites that were intruded by aplitic and pegmatitic dykes. At least three successive magmatic episodes generated an older gabbro-diorite-tonalite assemblage, followed by a voluminous granodiorite-granite association, which was then followed by minor leucocratic granitoids. Aplitic and pegmatitic dykes and bodies have truncated both plutonic rocks of the Alvand intrusive complex and its metamorphic aureole. Chemically they belong to peraluminous LCT (Li-, Cs-, and Ta-bearing) family of pegmatites. Mineralogically, they resemble Muscovite (MS) and Muscovite Rare Element (MSREL) classes of pegmatites. High amounts of some elements, such as Sn (up to 10,000 ppm), Rb (up to 936 ppm), Ba (up to 706 ppm), and LREE (up to 404 ppm) indicate the highly fractionated nature of some of these aplites and pegmatites. U-Pb dating of monazite, zircon, and allanite by LA-ICPMS indicate the following ages: monazite-bearing aplites of Heydareh-e-Poshteshahr and Barfejin areas, southwest of Hamedan, give an age range of 162-172 Ma; zircon in Heydareh-e-Poshteshar gives an average age of 165 Ma and for allanite-bearing pegmatites of Artiman area, north of Tuyserkan, an age of 154.1 ± 3.7 Ma was determined. These overlap with previously reported ages (ca. 167-153 Ma) for the plutonic rocks of the Alvand complex. Therefore, these data reveal that the Jurassic was a period of magmatism in the Hamedan region and adjacent areas in the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, which was situated at the southern edge of the central Iranian micro-plate (southern Eurasian plate) at this time. Our results also suggest that advective heating in a continental arc setting has caused melting of fertile supracrustal lithologies, such as meta-pelites. These partial melts were then emplaced at much higher

  10. Deformation and kinematic evolution of the subsurface structures: Zagros foreland fold-and-thrust belt, northern Dezful Embayment, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Pash, Raana Razavi; Motamedi, Hossein; Yazdani, Mohammad

    2018-06-01

    The Dezful Embayment is located in the foreland part of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt. Structural style of folding and thrusting vary in the Dezful Embayment. In this study, balanced cross sections and subsurface data including 2D seismic profiles and wells data decoded structural style of the subsurface structures in the northern Dezful Embayment. Presence of the multiple décollement horizons is the main controlling factor of the structural style in this area. The subsurface anticlines have been formed between two main décollement horizons, which include the Miocene Gachsaran Formation as upper decollement and Permian Dashtak evaporites and Lower Cretaceous Garau shales as the middle décollement horizons. Geometry of the subsurface anticlines differs much vertically and horizontally. Growth strata indicate folding is started in Middle Miocene time in this region. Anticlines formed as open, wide and disharmonic structures. Active processes in the evolution of anticlines are limb rotation and hinge migration, which was resulted in increase of inhomogeneous shortening rate. More shortening rate indicates more structural relief in anticlines. These anticlines are formed as a detachment folds in initiation and then during their evolution converted to fault propagation fold and fault-bend fold. Final geometric shape of these anticlines depends on the geometry of thrusts propagation that formed in the forelimb.

  11. Effect of fire severity on physical and biochemical soil properties in Zagros oak (Quercus brantii Lindl.) forests in Iran

    M. Heydari; A. Rostamy; F. Najafi; D. C. Dey

    2017-01-01

    Fire affects the physical and chemical properties and soil biological activity of natural ecosystems. This study was conducted in the Miyan Tang region, Ilam Province in western Iran. The study site was 110 hectares, where we sampled soils in areas that were classified by fire severity: low (LS), high (HS) and medium severity (MS), and unburned (UB), which served as...

  12. Variations in the kinematics of deformation along the Zagros inclined transpression zone, Iran: Implications for defining a curved inclined transpression zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Partabian, Abdolreza; Faghih, Ali

    2013-03-01

    The combination of inclined collision and plate boundary shape can control the nature of deformation and the sense of shear along a transpression zone. The present study investigated the effects of a boundary zone with curvilinear shape along a transpression zone on the kinematics of deformation. The kinematics of the Zagros transpression zone varies with the orientation of the zone boundary. Detailed structural and microstructural studies showed sinistral sense of shear on the southeastern part of the Zagros inclined transpression zone (Fars Arc), but dextral sense of shear on the northwestern part of the zone. It is inferred that the both senses of shear were developed coevally under a bulk general shear, regional-scale deformation along a curved inclined transpression miming the shape of the Fras Arc of the Zagros and the reentrant of the Bandar Abbas Syntaxis. The Zagros transpression zone formed by inclined continental collision between the Afro-Arabian continent and Iranian microcontinent.

  13. Biostratigraphy, paleoenvironment and foraminiferal associations of the Rupelian-Chattian sediments in Zagros Basin, SW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Tahereh

    2016-11-01

    In this research larger benthic foraminiferal distribution and their paleoenvironmental characteristics are used to introduce biostratigraphic zonation, paleoenvironmental reconstruction and paleoecological interpretation of the Oligocene Asmari Formation in Fars Province. Two stratigraphic successions were examined for these purposes. The first (Khollar Section) is Rupelian in age and the second (Siakh Section) is of Chattian age. Recognized assemblage zones are: 1-Nummulites vascus-Nummulites fichteli and 2- Archaias asmaricus/hensoni-Miogypsinoides complanatus. Four microfacies types are identified according to the occurrence of the main biogenic components. They were arranged along the inner part of a carbonate platform. A shallowing upward trend in microfacies arrangement from Rupelian to Chattian times is considered according to the occurrence of larger benthic foraminifera. Two foraminiferal associations are recognized in the investigated sections. The identified foraminiferal associations represent a salinity value of 40-50 psu and a depth range of lower than 40 m, warm tropical and subtropical waters with temperature of 18-25 °C at Rupelian time. More restricted conditions through Chattian Stage has resulted in a shallower depth and higher salinity of more than 50 psu, with water temperature being higher than 20 °C in the oligotrophic to mesotrophic conditions. Restricted conditions in marine circulation is suggested to have controlled these associations.

  14. Shear wave prediction using committee fuzzy model constrained by lithofacies, Zagros basin, SW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiroodi, Sadjad Kazem; Ghafoori, Mohammad; Ansari, Hamid Reza; Lashkaripour, Golamreza; Ghanadian, Mostafa

    2017-02-01

    The main purpose of this study is to introduce the geological controlling factors in improving an intelligence-based model to estimate shear wave velocity from seismic attributes. The proposed method includes three main steps in the framework of geological events in a complex sedimentary succession located in the Persian Gulf. First, the best attributes were selected from extracted seismic data. Second, these attributes were transformed into shear wave velocity using fuzzy inference systems (FIS) such as Sugeno's fuzzy inference (SFIS), adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference (ANFIS) and optimized fuzzy inference (OFIS). Finally, a committee fuzzy machine (CFM) based on bat-inspired algorithm (BA) optimization was applied to combine previous predictions into an enhanced solution. In order to show the geological effect on improving the prediction, the main classes of predominate lithofacies in the reservoir of interest including shale, sand, and carbonate were selected and then the proposed algorithm was performed with and without lithofacies constraint. The results showed a good agreement between real and predicted shear wave velocity in the lithofacies-based model compared to the model without lithofacies especially in sand and carbonate.

  15. Spatiotemporal patterns of stable isotopes and hydrochemistry in springs and river flow of the upper Karkheh River Basin, Iran.

    PubMed

    Osati, Khaled; Koeniger, Paul; Salajegheh, Ali; Mahdavi, Mohammad; Chapi, Kamran; Malekian, Arash

    2014-06-01

    Karst springs of the Zagros Mountains contribute a significant amount to agricultural and human water demands of western and south-western Iran. For an adequate management of available water resources in semi-arid and arid regions, sufficient hydrological monitoring is needed, and hydro-chemical and isotope hydrological data provide important additional information. About 350 water samples were collected from precipitation, river water, and karst springs of the upper part of the Karkheh River Basin (20,895 km(2)) located between 33°35(') and 34°55(') North and 46°22(') and 49°10(') East with elevations ranging from 928 to 3563 m above sea level. Sampling was conducted in monthly time resolution from August 2011 to July 2012. All samples were analysed for hydro-chemical parameters (pH, electrical conductivity, and major ions) and stable isotopes (deuterium, oxygen-18). Isotope values of precipitation indicate a local meteoric water line (Zagros MWL δ(2)H=6.8 δ(18)O+10.1; R(2)=0.99) situated between the Mediterranean MWL and Global MWL. Spring and river water isotope values vary between-7.1 and-4.1 ‰, and-38 and-25 ‰ for δ(18)O and δ(2)H, respectively, responding to winter snowmelt and evaporation. This work implements stable isotopes and hydro-chemical information of springs and river water to understand hydrological and hydro-geological interrelations in karstic semi-arid areas and helps to improve the current water resources management practices of western Iran.

  16. Role of Neogene Exhumation and Sedimentation on Critical-Wedge Kinematics in the Zagros Orogenic Belt, Northeastern Iraq, Kurdistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshnaw, R. I.; Horton, B. K.; Stockli, D. F.; Barber, D. E.; Tamar-Agha, M. Y.; Kendall, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Zagros orogenic belt and foreland basin formed during the Cenozoic Arabia-Eurasia collision, but the precise histories of shortening and sediment accumulation remain ambiguous, especially at the NW extent of the fold-thrust belt in Iraqi Kurdistan. This region is characterized by well-preserved successions of Cenozoic clastic foreland-basin fill and deformed Paleozoic-Mesozoic hinterland bedrock. The study area provides an excellent opportunity to investigate the linkage between orogenic wedge behavior and surface processes of erosion and deposition. The aim of this research is to test whether the Zagros orogenic wedge advanced steadily under critical to supercritical wedge conditions involving in-sequence thrusting with minimal erosion or propagated intermittently under subcritical condition involving out-of-sequence deformation with intense erosion. These endmember modes of mountain building can be assessed by integrating geo/thermochronologic and basin analyses techniques, including apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology, detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology, stratigraphic synthesis, and seismic interpretations. Preliminary apatite (U-Th)/He data indicate activation of the Main Zagros Fault (MZF) at ~10 Ma with frontal thrusts initiating at ~8 Ma. However, thermochronometric results from the intervening Mountain Front Flexure (MFF), located between the MZF and the frontal thrusts, suggest rapid exhumation at ~6 Ma. These results suggest that the MFF, represented by the thrust-cored Qaradagh anticline, represents a major episode of out-of-sequence deformation. Detrital zircon U-Pb analyses from the Neogene foreland-basin deposits show continuous sediment derivation from sources to the NNE in Iraq and western Iran, suggesting that out-of-sequence thrusting did not significantly alter sedimentary provenance. Rather, intense hinterland erosion and recycling of older foreland-basin fill dominated sediment delivery to the basin. The irregular distribution of

  17. Timing of atmospheric precipitation in the Zagros Mountains inferred from a multi-proxy record from Lake Mirabad, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Lora R.; Ito, Emi; Schwalb, Antje; Wright, Herbert E.

    2006-11-01

    A sediment core 7.2 m long from Lake Mirabad, Iran, was examined for loss-on-ignition, mineralogy, oxygen-isotopic composition of authigenic calcite, and trace-element composition of ostracodes to complement earlier pollen and ostracode-assemblage studies. Pollen, ostracode-inferred lake level, and high Sr/Ca ratios indicate that the early Holocene (10000 to 6500 cal yr BP) was drier than the late Holocene. Low δ18O values during this interval are interpreted as resulting from winter-dominated precipitation, characteristic of a Mediterranean climate. Increasing δ18O values after 6500 cal yr BP signal a gradual increase in spring rains, which are present today. A severe 600-yr drought occurred at ca. 5500 cal yr BP, shortly after the transition from pistachio-almond to oak forest. During the late Holocene, two milder droughts occurred at about 1500 and 500 cal yr BP. Within the resolution of the record, no drought is evident during the collapse of the Akkadian empire (4200-3900 cal yr BP). Rather, a decrease in δ18O values to early-Holocene levels may indicate the return to a Mediterranean precipitation regime.

  18. 3D Reconstruction of geological structures based on remote sensing data: example from Anaran anticline, Lurestan province, Zagros folds and thrust belt, Iran.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snidero, M.; Amilibia, A.; Gratacos, O.; Muñoz, J. A.

    2009-04-01

    This work presents a methodological workflow for the 3D reconstruction of geological surfaces at regional scale, based on remote sensing data and geological maps. This workflow has been tested on the reconstruction of the Anaran anticline, located in the Zagros Fold and Thrust belt mountain front. The used remote sensing data-set is a combination of Aster and Spot images as well as a high resolution digital elevation model. A consistent spatial positioning of the complete data-set in a 3D environment is necessary to obtain satisfactory results during the reconstruction. The Aster images have been processed by the Optimum Index Factor (OIF) technique, in order to facilitate the geological mapping. By pansharpening of the resulting Aster image with the SPOT panchromatic one we obtain the final high-resolution image used during the 3D mapping. Structural data (dip data) has been acquired through the analysis of the 3D mapped geological traces. Structural analysis of the resulting data-set allows us to divide the structure in different cylindrical domains. Related plunge lines orientation has been used to project data along the structure, covering areas with little or no information. Once a satisfactory dataset has been acquired, we reconstruct a selected horizon following the dip-domain concept. By manual editing, the obtained surfaces have been adjusted to the mapped geological limits as well as to the modeled faults. With the implementation of the Discrete Smooth Interpolation (DSI) algorithm, the final surfaces have been reconstructed along the anticline. Up to date the results demonstrate that the proposed methodology is a powerful tool for 3D reconstruction of geological surfaces when working with remote sensing data, in very inaccessible areas (eg. Iran, China, Africa). It is especially useful in semiarid regions where the structure strongly controls the topography. The reconstructed surfaces clearly show the geometry in the different sectors of the structure

  19. Multi-phase inversion tectonics related to the Hendijan-Nowrooz-Khafji Fault activity, Zagros Mountains, SW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazem Shiroodi, Sadjad; Ghafoori, Mohammad; Faghih, Ali; Ghanadian, Mostafa; Lashkaripour, Gholamreza; Hafezi Moghadas, Naser

    2015-11-01

    Distinctive characteristics of inverted structures make them important criteria for the identification of certain structural styles of folded belts. The interpretation of 3D seismic reflection and well data sheds new light on the structural evolution and age of inverted structures associated to the Hendijan-Nowrooz-Khafji Fault within the Persian Gulf Basin and northeastern margin of Afro-Arabian plate. Analysis of thickness variations of growth strata using "T-Z plot" (thickness versus throw plot) method revealed the kinematics of the fault. Obtained results show that the fault has experienced a multi-phase evolutionary history over six different extension and compression deformation events (i.e. positive and negative inversion) between 252.2 and 11.62 Ma. This cyclic activity of the growth fault was resulted from alteration of sedimentary processes during continuous fault slip. The structural development of the study area both during positive and negative inversion geometry styles was ultimately controlled by the relative motion between the Afro-Arabian and Central-Iranian plates.

  20. Revealing the significance and polyphase tectonothermal evolution of a major metamorphic unit in an orogen: the central Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, Zagros Mts., Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakerardakani, Farzaneh; Neubauer, Franz; Genser, Johann; Liu, Xiaoming; Dong, Yunpeng; Monfaredi, Behzad; Benroider, Manfred; Finger, Fritz; Waitzinger, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Dorud-Azna region in the central Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic belt plays a key role in promoting the tectonic evolution of Zagros orogen, within the frame of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone. From footwall to hangingwall, structural data combined with the U-Pb zircon and extensive 40Ar-39Ar mineral dating survey demonstrate three metamorphosed tectonic units, which include: (1) The Triassic June complex is metamorphosed within greenschist facies conditions, overlain by (2) the amphibolite-grade metamorphic Galeh-Doz orthogneiss, which is intruded by mafic dykes, and (3) the Amphibolite-Metagabbro unit. To the east, these units were intruded by the Jurassic Darijune gabbro. We present U-Pb detrital zircon ages of a garnet-micaschist from the Amphibolite-Metagabbro unit, which yield six distinctive age groups, including a previously unrecognized Late Grenvillian age population at ~0.93 to 0.99 Ga. We speculate that this unique Late Grenvillian group coupled with biogeographic evidence suggests either relationship with the South China craton or to the "Gondwana superfan". The laser ablation ICP-MS U-Pb zircon ages of 608 ± 18 Ma and 588 ± 41 Ma of the granitic Galeh-Doz orthogneiss reveals a Panafrican basement same as known from the Yazd block of Central Iran. Geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopes of alkaline and subalkaline mafic dykes within the Galeh-Doz orthogneiss show OIB-type to MORB-type and indicate involvement of both depleted and enriched sources for its genesis. The new 40Ar-39Ar amphibole age of ca. 322.2 ± 3.9 Ma from the alkaline mafic dyke implies Carboniferous cooling age after intrusion. The metagabbros (including the Dare-Hedavand metagabbro with a 206Pb/238U age of 314.6 ± 3.7 Ma) and amphibolites with E-MORB geochemical signature of the Amphibolite-Metagabbro unit represent an Upper Paleozoic rift. The geochemical composition of the Triassic greenschist facies metamorphosed June complex, implying formation in a same, but younger tectonic

  1. Structural, micro-structural and kinematic analyses of channel flow in the Karmostaj salt diapir in the Zagros foreland folded belt, Fars province, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Sarshar, Maryam Asadi; Adineh, Sadegh

    2018-02-01

    One of the main characteristic of the Zagros foreland fold-and-thrust belt and the Zagros foreland folded belt are wide distributions of surface extrusion from the Hormuz salt diapirs. This study examines the structure and kinematic of channel flow in the Karmostaj salt diapir in the southwestern part of the Zagros foreland folded belt. This diapir has reached the surface as a result of the channel flow mechanism and has extruded in the southern limb of the Kuh-Gach anticline which is an asymmetric décollement fold with convergence to the south. Structural and microstructural studies and quantitative finite strain (Rs) and kinematic vorticity number (Wk) analyses were carried out within this salt diapir and its namakier. This was in order to investigate the structural evolution in the salt diapiric system, the characteristics and mechanism of the salt flow and the distribution of flow regimes within the salt diapir and interaction of regional tectonics and salt diaprism. The extruded salt has developed a flow foliation sub-parallel to the remnant bedding recorded by different colors, a variety of internal folds including symmetrical and asymmetrical folds and interference fold patterns, shear zones, and boudins. These structures were used to analyze mechanisms and history of diapiric flow and extrusion. The microstructures, reveal various deformation mechanisms in various parts of salt diapir. The measurements of finite strain show that Rs values in the margin of salt diapir are higher than within its namakier which is consistent with the results of structural studies. Mean kinematic vorticity number (Wm) measured in steady state deformation of diapir and namakier is Wm = 0.45-0.48 ± 0.13. The estimated mean finite deformation (Wm) values indicate that 67.8% pure shear and 32.2% simple shear deformation were involved; the implications of which are discussed. The vorticity of flow indicates that in the early stage of growth, Poiseuille flow was the dominate

  2. Evolution of the stress fields in the Zagros Foreland Folded Belt using focal mechanisms and kinematic analyses: the case of the Fars salient, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Zafarmand, Bahareh; Oveisi, Behnam

    2018-03-01

    The NW-SE trending Zagros orogenic belt was initiated during the convergence of the Afro-Arabian continent and the Iranian microcontinent in the Late Cretaceous. Ongoing convergence is confirmed by intense seismicity related to compressional stresses collision-related in the Zagros orogenic belt by reactivation of an early extensional faulting to latter compressional segmented strike-slip and dip-slip faulting. These activities are strongly related either to the deep-seated basement fault activities (deep-seated earthquakes) underlies the sedimentary cover or gently dipping shallow-seated décollement horizon of the rheological weak rocks of the infra-Cambrian Hormuz salt. The compressional stress regimes in the different units play an important role in controlling the stress conditions between the different units within the sedimentary cover and basement. A significant set of nearly N-S trending right-lateral strike-slip faults exists throughout the study area in the Fars area in the Zagros Foreland Folded Belt. Fault-slip and focal mechanism data were analyzed using the stress inversion method to reconstruct the paleo and recent stress conditions. The results suggest that the current direction of maximum principal stress averages N19°E, with N38°E that for the past from Cretaceous to Tertiary (although a few sites on the Kar-e-Bass fault yield a different direction). The results are consistent with the collision of the Afro-Arabian continent and the Iranian microcontinent. The difference between the current and paleo-stress directions indicates an anticlockwise rotation in the maximum principle stress direction over time. This difference resulted from changes in the continental convergence path, but was also influenced by the local structural evolution, including the lateral propagation of folds and the presence of several local décollement horizons that facilitated decoupling of the deformation between the basement and the sedimentary cover. The obliquity of

  3. Geomorphologic Analysis of Drainage Basins in Damavand Volcano Cone, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zareinejad, M.

    2011-12-01

    Damavand volcanic cone is located in the center of the Alborz chain, in the southern Caspian Sea in Iran. Damavand is a dormant volcano in Iran. It is not only the country's highest peak but also the highest mountain on the Middle East; its elevation is 5619 m. The main purpose of this paper is recognition and appraisement of drainage basins in Damavand cone from geomorphic point of view. Water causes erosion in nature in different forms and creates diverse forms on the earth surface depending on the manner of its appearance in nature. Although water is itself a former factor, it flows under morphological effect of earth surface. The difference of earth surface topography and as a result water movement on it, cause the formation of sub-basins. Identification of region drainage basins is considered as one of the requirements for Damavand cone morphometric. Thereupon, five drainage basins were identified in this research by relying on main criteria including topographic contours with 10 m intervals, drainage system, DEM map, slope map, aspect map and satellite images. (Fig 1) Area, perimeter, height classification for classifying morphological landforms in different levels, hypsometric calculations, drainage density, etc. were then calculated by using ArcGIS software. (Table 1) Damavand cone, with a height more than 5,000 meters from the sea surface, has very hard pass slopes and our purpose in this paper is to identify the effect of drainage basins conditions in the region on erosion and the formation of morphological landforms by using SPOT, ASTER, satellite images as well as papering of data in GIS environment.

  4. Uplift of Zagros Mountains slows plate convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-05-01

    Research has indicated that mountain ranges can slow down the convergence between two tectonic plates on timescales as short as a few million years, as the growing mountains provide enough tectonic force to impact plate motions. Focusing on the convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian plates at the Zagros mountain range, which runs across Iran and Iraq, Austermann and Iaffaldano reconstructed the relative motion of the plates using published paleomagnetic data covering the past 13 million years, as well as current geodetic measurements. They show that the convergence of the two plates has decreased by about 30% over the past 5 million years. Looking at the geological record to infer past topography and using a computer model of the mantle-lithosphere system, the authors examined whether the recent uplift across the Zagros Mountains could have caused the observed slowdown. They also considered several other geological events that might have influenced the convergence rate, but the authors were able to rule those out as dominant controls. The authors conclude that the uplift across the Zagros Mountains in the past 5 million years did indeed play a key role in slowing down the convergence between the Eurasian and Arabian plates. (Tectonics, doi:10.1002/tect.20027, 2013)

  5. Sinkholes, collapse structures and large landslides in an active salt dome submerged by a reservoir: The unique case of the Ambal ridge in the Karun River, Zagros Mountains, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Francisco; Lizaga, Iván

    2016-02-01

    Ambal ridge, covering 4 km2, is a salt pillow of Gachsaran Formation with significant salt exposures in direct contact with the Karun River, Zagros Mountains. The highly cavernous salt dome is currently being flooded by the Gotvand Reservoir, second largest in Iran. Geomorphic evidence, including the sharp deflection of the Karun River and defeated streams indicate that Ambal is an active halokinetic structure, probably driven by erosional unloading. Around 30% of the salt dome is affected by large landslides up to ca. 50 × 106 m3 in volume. Slope oversteepening related to fluvial erosion and halokinetic rise seems to be the main controlling factor. A total of 693 sinkholes have been inventoried (170 sinkholes/km2), for which a scaling relationship has been produced. The depressions occur preferentially along a belt with a high degree of clustering. This spatial distribution is controlled by the proximity to the river, slope gradient and halite content in the bedrock. A large compound depression whose bottom lies below the normal maximum level of the reservoir will likely be flooded by water table rise forming a lake. The impoundment of the reservoir has induced peculiar collapse structures 220-280 m across, expressed by systems of arcuate fissures and scarps. Rapid subsurface salt dissolution is expected to generate and reactivate a large number of sinkholes and may reactivate landslides with a significant vertical component due to lack of basal support.

  6. Controls on size and occurrence of the largest sub-aerial landslide on Earth: Seymareh (Saidmarreh) landslide, Zagros fold-thrust belt, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, N. J.; Evans, S. G.

    2009-12-01

    Gigantic (> 1 Gm3) landslides are high-magnitude, low-frequency extremes of mass movements. They are important factors in topographic evolution and hazard in mountain regions due to their magnitude. However, few examples exist for study because of their infrequency. Consequently, controls on the location and size gigantic landslides remain poorly understood. Re-examination of the Seymareh (Saidmarreh) rock avalanche, Zagros fold-thrust belt, shows it to be the largest sub-aerial landslide on Earth (initial failure volume 38 Gm3), thus representing the upper magnitude limit for terrestrial landslides. Detailed examination of the source area (including orbital remote sensing, geotechnical investigation and structural mapping) provides new insights into controls on the size and mobility of gigantic landslides. The gigantic Early Holocene rockslide initiated on the northeast limb of Kabir Kuh, the largest anticline in the Zagros fold-thrust belt, and involved the simultaneous failure of a rock mass measuring 15 km along strike. The rockslide transformed into a rock avalanche that ran-out 19.0 km, filling two adjacent valleys and overtopping an intervening low mountain ridge. The failure involved 220 m of competent jointed limestone (Asmari Formation) underlain by 580 m of weaker mudrock-dominated units. Geologic structure, geomechanical strength and topography of the source slope strongly controlled failure initiation. Extreme landslide dimensions resulted in part from extensive uniform pre-failure stability, produced by structural and topographic features related to the large scale of the Kabir Kuh anticline. High continuity bedding planes determined the large lateral extent along strike. Bedding normal joints, the breached nature of the anticline and fluvial undercutting at the slope toe accommodated expansive lateral, headscarp and toe release, respectively, necessary for extensive failure. Geomechanically weak units at depth aided the penetration of the failure

  7. Non-cylindrical fold growth in the Zagros fold and thrust belt (Kurdistan, NE-Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Nikolaus; Bretis, Bernhard; Grasemann, Bernhard; Lockhart, Duncan

    2010-05-01

    The Zagros mountains extends over 1800 km from Kurdistan in N-Iraq to the Strait of Hormuz in Iran and is one of the world most promising regions for the future hydrocarbon exploration. The Zagros Mountains started to form as a result of the collision between the Eurasian and Arabian Plates, whose convergence began in the Late Cretaceous as part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic system. Geodetic and seismological data document that both plates are still converging and that the fold and thrust belt of the Zagros is actively growing. Extensive hydrocarbon exploration mainly focuses on the antiforms of this fold and thrust belt and therefore the growth history of the folds is of great importance. This work investigates by means of structural field work and quantitative geomorphological techniques the progressive fold growth of the Permam, Bana Bawi- and Safeen- Anticlines located in the NE of the city of Erbil in the Kurdistan region of Northern Iraq. This part of the Zagros fold and thrust belt belongs to the so-called Simply Folded Belt, which is dominated by gentle to open folding. Faults or fault related folds have only minor importance. The mechanical anisotropy of the formations consisting of a succession of relatively competent (massive dolomite and limestone) and incompetent (claystone and siltstone) sediments essentially controls the deformation pattern with open to gentle parallel folding of the competent layers and flexural flow folding of the incompetent layers. The characteristic wavelength of the fold trains is around 10 km. Due to faster erosion of the softer rock layers in the folded sequence, the more competent lithologies form sharp ridges with steeply sloping sides along the eroded flanks of the anticlines. Using an ASTER digital elevation model in combination with geological field data we quantified 250 drainage basins along the different limbs of the subcylindrical Permam, Bana Bawi- and Safeen- Anticlines. Geomorphological indices of the drainage

  8. Regionalization of precipitation characteristics in Iran's Lake Urmia basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazel, Nasim; Berndtsson, Ronny; Uvo, Cintia Bertacchi; Madani, Kaveh; Kløve, Bjørn

    2018-04-01

    Lake Urmia in northwest Iran, once one of the largest hypersaline lakes in the world, has shrunk by almost 90% in area and 80% in volume during the last four decades. To improve the understanding of regional differences in water availability throughout the region and to refine the existing information on precipitation variability, this study investigated the spatial pattern of precipitation for the Lake Urmia basin. Daily rainfall time series from 122 precipitation stations with different record lengths were used to extract 15 statistical descriptors comprising 25th percentile, 75th percentile, and coefficient of variation for annual and seasonal total precipitation. Principal component analysis in association with cluster analysis identified three main homogeneous precipitation groups in the lake basin. The first sub-region (group 1) includes stations located in the center and southeast; the second sub-region (group 2) covers mostly northern and northeastern part of the basin, and the third sub-region (group 3) covers the western and southern edges of the basin. Results of principal component (PC) and clustering analyses showed that seasonal precipitation variation is the most important feature controlling the spatial pattern of precipitation in the lake basin. The 25th and 75th percentiles of winter and autumn are the most important variables controlling the spatial pattern of the first rotated principal component explaining about 32% of the total variance. Summer and spring precipitation variations are the most important variables in the second and third rotated principal components, respectively. Seasonal variation in precipitation amount and seasonality are explained by topography and influenced by the lake and westerly winds that are related to the strength of the North Atlantic Oscillation. Despite using incomplete time series with different lengths, the identified sub-regions are physically meaningful.

  9. Refinement of stratigraphy according to the first finds of planktonic species of Orbulina and Praeorbulina from the Guri Limestone of the Mishan Formation in northwest of Bandar Abbas, South Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshian, J.; Moallemi, S. A.; Derakhshani, M.

    2016-05-01

    The Zagros Basin is one of the most universal oil and gas basins that is located in the west to south of Iran and in north of the Arabian Plate. The Guri Member at the bottom of the Mishan Formation, in some areas such as Bandar Abbas hinterland, contains a significant amount of gas. The Bandar Abbas hinterland is located in the southeast of Zagros. The Guri Limestone is the youngest hydrocarbon reservoirs of the Zagros Sedimentary Basin. In this study, a total of 178 samples from the Guri Limestone in the Handun section are investigated for foraminiferal biostratigraphy. The study of foraminifers led to a recognition of 43 genera and 57 species of benthic and planktonic foraminifera. For the first time, planktonic foraminiferal species including Praeorbulina glomerosa, Praeorbulina transitoria, Orbulina suturalis, and Orbulina universa are reported, and based on the identified benthic and planktonic foraminifera taxa, the age of the Guri Member at Handun section is estimated as late Burdigalian to Langhian.

  10. Ophiolites of Iran: Keys to understanding the tectonic evolution of SW Asia: (II) Mesozoic ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Hadi Shafaii; Stern, Robert J.

    2015-03-01

    Iran is a mosaic of continental terranes of Cadomian (520-600 Ma) age, stitched together along sutures decorated by Paleozoic and Mesozoic ophiolites. Here we present the current understanding of the Mesozoic (and rare Cenozoic) ophiolites of Iran for the international geoscientific audience. We summarize field, chemical and geochronological data from the literature and our own unpublished data. Mesozoic ophiolites of Iran are mostly Cretaceous in age and are related to the Neotethys and associated backarc basins on the S flank of Eurasia. These ophiolites can be subdivided into five belts: 1. Late Cretaceous Zagros outer belt ophiolites (ZOB) along the Main Zagros Thrust including Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene Maku-Khoy-Salmas ophiolites in NW Iran as well as Kermanshah-Kurdistan, Neyriz and Esfandagheh (Haji Abad) ophiolites, also Late Cretaceous-Eocene ophiolites along the Iraq-Iran border; 2. Late Cretaceous Zagros inner belt ophiolites (ZIB) including Nain, Dehshir, Shahr-e-Babak and Balvard-Baft ophiolites along the southern periphery of the Central Iranian block and bending north into it; 3. Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene Sabzevar-Torbat-e-Heydarieh ophiolites of NE Iran; 4. Early to Late Cretaceous Birjand-Nehbandan-Tchehel-Kureh ophiolites in eastern Iran between the Lut and Afghan blocks; and 5. Late Jurassic-Cretaceous Makran ophiolites of SE Iran including Kahnuj ophiolites. Most Mesozoic ophiolites of Iran show supra-subduction zone (SSZ) geochemical signatures, indicating that SW Asia was a site of plate convergence during Late Mesozoic time, but also include a significant proportion showing ocean-island basalt affinities, perhaps indicating the involvement of subcontinental lithospheric mantle.

  11. Revision of the age of the Qom Formation in the Central Iran Basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Youhua; Qi, Yuping; Zhang, Binggao; Yang, Hengren; He, Chengquan; Wang, Shihu; Zhou, Wen; Zhu, Qiang; Li, Zheng

    2007-03-01

    The Qom Formation in the Central Iran Basin contains not only relatively abundant calcareous nannofossils and a small number of dinoflagellate cysts, but also a number of stratigraphically significant benthonic foraminifers and ostracods. Calcareous nannofossils reported for the first time from this formation include Coccolithus pelagicus, Cyclicargolithus abisectus, C. floridanus, Dictyococcites bisectus, D. scrippsae, Helicosphaera euphratis, Ericsonia fenestratus, Pontosphaera sp., Reticulofenestra dictyoda, R. minuta and Sphenolithus moriformis. Dinoflagellates include Homotryblium plectilum, Hystrichokolpoma rigaudiae, Operculodinium centrocarpum, Palaeocystodinium golzowense, Spiniferites pseudofurcatus and Thalassiphora pelagica. Benthonic foraminifers include Assilina aff. spira, Discocyclina sp., Neodiscocyclina cf. barkeri, Nummulites aff. variolarius, Operculina sp. and Orbitolites sp. Among the ostracods recovered are Alocopocythere dhansariensis, Asymmetricythere samalutensis, Bairdia montiformis, Cytherella jonesiana, Cytheretta virgulata, Cytheridea cf. bundensis, C. cf. scruposa, C. sp., Eopaijenborchella sp., Hermanites cf. grafica, Krithe oryza, K. cf. pernoides, Loxoconcha sp., Paracypris sp., Propontocypris zongbuensis, P. sp. and Xestoleberis sp. This assemblage indicates that the Qom Formation is Eocene in age instead of Middle-Late Oligocene to Early Miocene as previously determined.

  12. Middle to late Cenozoic basin evolution in the western Alborz Mountains: Implications for the onset of collisional deformation in northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, Bernard; Horton, Brian K.; Axen, Gary J.; Hassanzadeh, Jamshid; McIntosh, William C.

    2007-12-01

    Oligocene-Miocene strata preserved in synclinal outcrop belts of the western Alborz Mountains record the onset of Arabia-Eurasia collision-related deformation in northern Iran. Two stratigraphic intervals, informally named the Gand Ab and Narijan units, represent a former basin system that existed in the Alborz. The Gand Ab unit is composed of marine lagoonal mudstones, fluvial and alluvial-fan clastic rocks, fossiliferous Rupelian to Burdigalian marine carbonates, and basalt flows yielding 40Ar/39Ar ages of 32.7 ± 0.3 and 32.9 ± 0.2 Ma. The Gand Ab unit is correlated with the Oligocene-lower Miocene Qom Formation of central Iran and is considered a product of thermal subsidence following Eocene extension. The Narijan unit unconformably overlies the Gand Ab unit and is composed of fluvial-lacustrine and alluvial fan sediments exhibiting contractional growth strata. We correlate the Narijan unit with the middle to upper Miocene Upper Red Formation of central Iran on the basis of lithofacies similarities, stratigraphic position, and an 8.74 ± 0.15 Ma microdiorite dike (40Ar/39Ar) that intruded the basal strata. Deformation timing is constrained by crosscutting relationships and independent thermochronological data. The Parachan thrust system along the eastern edge of the ancestral Taleghan-Alamut basin is cut by dikes dated at 8.74 ± 0.15 Ma to 6.68 ± 0.07 Ma (40Ar/39Ar). Subhorizontal gravels that unconformably overlie tightly folded and faulted Narijan strata are capped by 2.86 ± 0.83 Ma (40Ar/39Ar) andesitic lava flows. These relationships suggest that Alborz deformation had migrated southward into the Taleghan-Alamut basin by late Miocene time and shifted to its present location along the active range front by late Pliocene time. Data presented here demonstrate that shortening in the western Alborz Mountains had started by late middle Miocene time. This estimate is consistent with recent thermochronological results that place the onset of rapid exhumation

  13. Looking at the roots of the highest mountains: the lithospheric structure of the Himalaya-Tibet and the Zagros orogens. Results from a geophysical-petrological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunini, L.; Jimenez-Munt, I.; Fernandez, M.; Villasenor, A.; Afonso, J. C.; Verges, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Himalaya-Tibet and Zagros orogens are the two most prominent mountain belts built by continental collision. They are part of a huge belt of Cenozoic age which runs from the Pyrenees to Burma. In its central sector, the collision with the southern margin of the Eurasian plate has resulted not only in the building of mountain ranges over the north-eastern edges of the Arabian and Indian plates but also in widespread deformation 1000-3000 km from the suture zones. Zagros and Himalaya-Tibet orogens share many geodynamic processes but at different rates, amount of convergence and stage of development. The study of their present-day structures provides new insights into their quasi coeval collisional event pointing out differences and similarities in the mountain building processes. We present 2D crust and upper mantle cross-sections down to 400 km depth, along four SW-NE trending profiles. Two profiles cross the Zagros Mountains, running from the Mesopotamian Foreland Basin up to the Alborz and Central Iran. Two other profiles run through the Himalaya-Tibetan orogen: the western transect crosses the western Himalaya, Tarim Basin, Tian Shan Mountains and Junggar Basin; the eastern transect runs from the Indian shield to the Beishan Basin, crossing the eastern Himalaya, Tibetan Plateau, Qaidam Basin and Qilian Mountains. We apply the LitMod-2D code which integrates potential fields (gravity and geoid), isostasy (elevation) and thermal (heat flow and temperature distribution) equations, and mantle petrology. The resulting crust and upper mantle structure is constrained by available data on elevation, Bouguer anomaly, geoid height, surface heat flow and seismic data including P- and S-wave tomography models. Our results show distinct deformation patterns between the crust and the lithospheric mantle beneath the Zagros and Himalaya-Tibetan orogens, indicating a strong strain partitioning in both areas. At crustal level, we found a thickening beneath the Zagros and the

  14. Evolution of arched roofs in salt caves: Role of gravity-induced stress and relative air humidity and temperature changes (Zagros Mts., Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruthans, Jiri; Filippi, Michal; Zare, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    In salt caves in the halite karst in SE Iran the disintegration of rock salt into individual grains can be observed. Highly disintegrated blocks and individual grains form a major volume of debris in many caves on islands in the Persian Gulf. Larger cave rooms have often perfectly arched roof. The perfect geometry of rooms and interlocking of salt grains indicate that evolution of room cross-sections in these caves is controlled by feedback between gravity-induced stress and rock salt disintegration in similar way as in evolution of sandstone landforms (Bruthans et al. 2014). Those portions of rock salt, which are under compressional stress, disintegrate much slower than portions under tensile stress. Important question is the kind of weathering mechanism responsible for intergranular disintegration of rock salt. The relationship between disintegration, its rate and cave climate was studied. Clearly the fastest disintegration rate was found in caves with strong air circulation (i.e, short caves with large cross-sections, open on both ends). Temperature and air humidity changes are considerable in these caves. On the other hand the disintegration is very slow in the inner parts of long caves with slow air circulation or caves with one entrance. The best example of such caves is the inner part of 3N Cave on Namakdan salt diapir with nearly no air circulation and stable temperature and humidity, where disintegration of rock salt into grains is missing. Strong effect of cave climate on disintegration rate can be explained by deliquescence properties of halite. Halite is absorbing air moisture forming NaCl solution if relative humidity (RH) exceeds 75 % (at 20-30 oC). In the Persian Gulf region the RH of the air is passing the 75 % threshold in case of 91% days (Qeshm Island, years 2002-2005), while in mountainous areas in mainland this threshold is less commonly reached. In most of nights (91 %) in Persian Gulf the air with RH >75 % is entering the salt caves and air

  15. Geometry and Dynamics of the Mesopotamian Foreland Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirouz, M.; Avouac, J. P.; Gualandi, A.; Hassanzadeh, J.; Sternai, P.

    2016-12-01

    We have constrained the geometry of the Zagros foreland basin along the entire northern edge of the Arabian plate using subsurface data from Iran, Iraq and Syria. We use the Oligo-Miocene marine Asmari Formation and its equivalents in the region to reconstruct high resolution foreland basin geometry. This extensive carbonate platform limestone unit separates pre-collisional passive margin marine sediments from the Cenozoic foreland deposits dominated by continental sources; and therefore it can be used as a measure of post-collisional deflection. The 3D reconstructed Asmari Formation shows along-strike thickness variations of the foreland basin deposits from 1 to 6 km. The deepest part of the foreland basin coincides with the Dezful embayment in Iran, and its depth decreases on both sides. In principle the basin geometry should reflect the loading resulted from overthrusting in the Zagros fold-thrust belt, the sediment fill and dynamic stresses due to lithospheric and upper mantle deformation. To estimate these various sources of loads we analyze the basin geometry in combination with gravity, free air anomaly, and Moho depths determined from seismological observations. Our analysis suggests in particular that redistribution of surface load by surface processes is a primary controlling factor of the basin geometry. The wavelength of a foreland basin may bear little information on the elastic flexural rigidity of the lithosphere.

  16. Stress states in the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt from passive margin to collisional tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navabpour, Payman; Barrier, Eric

    2012-12-01

    The present-day Zagros fold-and-thrust belt of SW-Iran corresponds to the former Arabian passive continental margin of the southern Neo-Tethyan basin since the Permian-Triassic rifting, undergoing later collisional deformation in mid-late Cenozoic times. In this paper an overview of brittle tectonics and palaeostress reconstructions of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt is presented, based on direct stress tensor inversion of fault slip data. The results indicate that, during the Neo-Tethyan oceanic opening, an extensional tectonic regime affectedthe sedimentary cover in Triassic-Jurassic times with an approximately N-S trend of the σ3 axis, oblique to the margin, which was followed by some local changes to a NE-SW trend during Jurassic-Cretaceous times. The stress state significantly changed to thrust setting, with a NE-SW trend of the σ1 axis, and a compressional tectonic regime prevailed during the continental collision and folding of the sedimentary cover in Oligocene-Miocene times. This compression was then followed by a strike-slip stress state with an approximately N-S trend of the σ1 axis, oblique to the belt, during inversion of the inherited extensional basement structures in Pliocene-Recent times. The brittle tectonic reconstructions, therefore, highlighted major changes of the stress state in conjunction with transitions between thin- and thick-skinned structures during different extensional and compressional stages of continental deformation within the oblique divergent and convergent settings, respectively.

  17. Mitochondrial Genetic Differentiation of Spirlin (Actinopterigii: Cyprinidae) in the South Caspian Sea basin of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Seifali, Mahvash; Arshad, Aziz; Moghaddam, Faezeh Yazdani; Esmaeili, Hamid Reza; Kiabi, Bahram H.; Daud, Siti Khalijah; Aliabadian, Mansour

    2012-01-01

    Background Knowledge about Alburnoides remains lacking relative to many other species, resulting in a lack of a systematic position and taxonomic diagnosis. Basic biological information for Alburnoides has been constructed, and it is necessary to understand further and obtain more information about this species. Its phylogenetic relationships are still debated and no molecular data have been used to study this taxon in Iran. A holistic approach for genetic methods was adopted to analyze possible spirlin population differences at selected centers in the south Caspian Sea basin of Iran. Methods The phylogenetic relationships were determined based on 774 base pairs of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of 32 specimens of spirlin from nine locations in the south Caspian Sea drainage basin of Iran. The nucleotide sequences were subjected to phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods. Results The mitochondrial gene tree largely supports the existence of three major clades. The western populations (clade I) may be considered as Alburnoides eichwaldii, whereas the Talar river populations (clade II) are represented as Alburnoides sp.1 and the eastern populations (clade III) may be distinct taxa of Alburnoides sp.2. Conclusion This molecular evidence supports the hypothesis that A. bipunctatus does not exist in the south Caspian Sea basin of Iran, and that the western and eastern populations are distinct taxa. PMID:22654487

  18. Squalius namak, a new chub from Lake Namak basin in Iran (Teleostei: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Khaefi, Roozbehan; Esmaeili, Hamid Reza; Sayyadzadeh, Golnaz; Geiger, Matthias F; Freyhof, Jörg

    2016-09-19

    Squalius namak, new species, from the endorheic Lake Namak and Kavir basins in Iran, is distinguished from the species of the genus Squalius in the Persian Gulf and the southern Caspian Sea basins by having a wide and thick symphysial knob on the lower jaw, a convex posterior anal-fin margin, a bold, dark-grey or brown, roundish or crescent-shaped blotch at the posterior tip of each flank scale and orange caudal-, anal- and pelvic-fin rays in life. Squalius namak is also characterized by four fixed, diagnostic nucleotide substitutions in the mtDNA COI barcode region.

  19. Palynology of the Kashafrud Formation, Koppeh Dagh basin, Northeastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, H.; Sajjadi, F.; Dehbozorgi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Diverse and moderately well-preserved palynofloras occur in Middle Jurassic sediments of the Kashafrud Formation at the Senjedak section, southeast of Mashhad, northeastern Iran. Trilete and monolete spores and pollen dominate the assemblages, whereas dinoflagellate cysts, foraminiferal test linings, and fungal spores are minor components. Forty-seven species of spores (30 genera) and 15 species of pollen (eight genera) are identified. Representatives of Dictyophyllidites and Klukisporites are particularly abundant. Based on the stratigraphic distribution of miospores, three distinctive stratigraphically successive palynofloras informally termed in ascending order, Assemblages A, B, and C are identified within the Kashafrud Formation. These are compared with palynozones known from Iran and elsewhere. Based on the presence of certain miospore species, the Kashafrud palynofloras are collectively dated as Middle Jurassic (Bajocian-Bathonian), thus corroborating the faunal (ammonoid) evidence. The appearance of a key miospore species, Contignisporites burgeri, within the succession has been used to attribute a late Bajocian age and early Bathonian age to the lower and upper parts of the studied interval, respectively. Inferred natural relationships of the miospores imply derivation from a diverse parental flora of Pterophyta and gymnosperms, such as Coniferophyta, Cycadophyta, and Ginkgophyta, growing under warm, humid conditions during the Bajocian-Bathonian. The associated marine fauna (ammonites), marine palynomorphs (proximate dinoflagellate cysts, and acritarchs such as Micrhystridium), and foraminiferal test linings, along with terrestrial palynomorphs (spores and pollen) collectively indicate an open marine, nearshore depositional setting for the Kashafrud Formation at the section studied.

  20. Tertiary stress field evolution in Sistan (Eastern Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Jentzer; Marc, Fournier; Philippe, Agard; Jafar, Omrani

    2016-04-01

    The Sistan orogenic belt in eastern Iran, near the boundary with Afghanistan, results from the closure of a branch of the Neo-Thethys: the Sistan Ocean. It was divided by Tirrul et al. (1983) in five main units: the Lut (1) and Afghan (2) continental blocks where basement is exposed; the Neh (3) and Ratuk (4) complexes which display ophiolitic rocks weakly and highly (HP-BT) metamorphosed, respectively, and the Sefidabeh basin lying over these complexes and interpreted as a fore-arc basin. Sistan is bordered by the Makran and Zagros (formed by the closure of the Neo-Tethys) to the south and by the Kopet Dagh (formed by the closure of Paleo-Tethys) to the North. The aim of this study is to fill the gap between preliminary studies about the overall structure of the Sistan Suture Zone and recent investigations of active tectonics in the region (e.g., Walker et al., 2004 and 2006 a and b). Questions herein addressed are: (1) how are stresses transfered throughout Iran from the Zagros to the Sistan belts? (2) Did the Zagros, Makran and Sistan belts evolve independently through time, or were they mechanically coupled? In order to answer these questions, we have determined paleostress evolution in the Sistan, using a direct inversion method for 42 microtectonic sites in almost all lithologies of the Neh complex and the Sefidabeh basin. We find three successive directions of compression: (1) 87°N for the oldest deformation stage dated of the Late Miocene, (2) 59°N for the intermediate stage probably dated of the Early Pliocene, and (3) 26°N for the youngest stage dated of the Plio-Quaternary. A counterclockwise rotation of about 60° of the main stress (σ1) in less than 10 Ma is therefore documented in Sistan. These same three stages of deformation were also documented by several microtectonic studies in Iran, especially in Makran and Zagros. The direction of the youngest compression is very homogeneous indicating that the mountain belts and continental blocks of Iran

  1. Impact of climate change on runoff in Lake Urmia basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanikhani, Hadi; Kisi, Ozgur; Amirataee, Babak

    2018-04-01

    Investigation of the impact of climate change on water resources is very necessary in dry and arid regions. In the first part of this paper, the climate model Long Ashton Research Station Weather Generator (LARS-WG) was used for downscaling climate data including rainfall, solar radiation, and minimum and maximum temperatures. Two different case studies including Aji-Chay and Mahabad-Chay River basins as sub-basins of Lake Urmia in the northwest part of Iran were considered. The results indicated that the LARS-WG successfully downscaled the climatic variables. By application of different emission scenarios (i.e., A1B, A2, and B1), an increasing trend in rainfall and a decreasing trend in temperature were predicted for both the basins over future time periods. In the second part of this paper, gene expression programming (GEP) was applied for simulating runoff of the basins in the future time periods including 2020, 2055, and 2090. The input combination including rainfall, solar radiation, and minimum and maximum temperatures in current and prior time was selected as the best input combination with highest predictive power for runoff prediction. The results showed that the peak discharge will decrease by 50 and 55.9% in 2090 comparing with the baseline period for the Aji-Chay and Mahabad-Chay basins, respectively. The results indicated that the sustainable adaptation strategies are necessary for these basins for protection of water resources in future.

  2. 3-D lithospheric structure and regional/residual Bouguer anomalies in the Arabia-Eurasia collision (Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Munt, I.; Fernãndez, M.; Saura, E.; Vergés, J.; Garcia-Castellanos, D.

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this work is to propose a first-order estimate of the crustal and lithospheric mantle geometry of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone and to separate the measured Bouguer anomaly into its regional and local components. The crustal and lithospheric mantle structure is calculated from the geoid height and elevation data combined with thermal analysis. Our results show that Moho depth varies from ˜42 km at the Mesopotamian-Persian Gulf foreland basin to ˜60 km below the High Zagros. The lithosphere is thicker beneath the foreland basin (˜200 km) and thinner underneath the High Zagros and Central Iran (˜140 km). Most of this lithospheric mantle thinning is accommodated under the Zagros mountain belt coinciding with the suture between two different mantle domains on the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone. The regional gravity field is obtained by calculating the gravimetric response of the 3-D crustal and lithospheric mantle structure obtained by combining elevation and geoid data. The calculated regional Bouguer anomaly differs noticeably from those obtained by filtering or just isostatic methods. The residual gravity anomaly, obtained by subtraction of the regional components to the measured field, is analyzed in terms of the dominating upper crustal structures. Deep basins and areas with salt deposits are characterized by negative values (˜-20 mGal), whereas the positive values are related to igneous and ophiolite complexes and shallow basement depths (˜20 mGal).

  3. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Amu Darya Basin and Afghan-Tajik Basin Provinces, Afghanistan, Iran, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, 2011

    Klett, T.R.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Wandrey, Craig J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Cook, Troy A.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2012-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated volumes of undiscovered, technically recoverable, conventional petroleum resources for the Amu Darya Basin and Afghan–Tajik Basin Provinces of Afghanistan, Iran, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. The mean volumes were estimated at 962 million barrels of crude oil, 52 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 582 million barrels of natural gas liquids for the Amu Darya Basin Province and at 946 million barrels of crude oil, 7 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 85 million barrels of natural gas liquids for the Afghan–Tajik Basin Province.

  4. Structural modeling of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt (Iraq) combining field work and remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, D.; Grasemann, B.; Faber, R.; Lockhart, D.

    2009-04-01

    The Zagros fold-and-thrust belt is known for its spectacular fold trains, which have formed in detached Phanerozoic sedimentary cover rocks above a shortened crystalline Precambrian basement. Orogeny evolved through the Late Cretaceous to Miocene collision between the Arabian and Eurasian plate, during which the Neotethys oceanic basin was closed. Still active deformation shortening in the order of 2-2.5 cm/yr is partitioned in S-SW directed folding and thrusting of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt and NW-SE to N-S trending dextral strike slip faults. The sub-cylindrical doubly-plunging fold trains with wavelengths of 5 - 10 km host more than half of the world's hydrocarbon reserves in mostly anticlinal traps. In this work we investigate the three dimensional structure of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. The mapped region is situated NE from the city of Erbil and comprises mainly Cretaceous to Cenozoic folded sediments consisting of mainly limestones, dolomites, sandstones, siltstones, claystones and conglomerates. Although the overall security situation in Kurdistan is much better than in the rest of Iraq, structural field mapping was restricted to sections along the main roads perpendicular to the strike of the fold trains, mainly because of the contamination of the area with landmines and unexploded ordnance, a problem that dates back to the end of World War Two. Landmines were also used by the central government in the 1960s and 1970s in order to subdue Kurdish groups. During the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq War, the north was mined again. In order to extend the structural measurements statistically over the investigated area resulting in a three-dimensional model of the fold trains, we used the Fault Trace module of the WinGeol software (www.terramath.com). This package allows the interactive mapping and visualization of the spatial orientations (i.e. dip and strike) of geological finite planar structures (e.g. faults, lithological

  5. Petroleum geology and resources of the Amu-Darya basin, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Afghanistan, and Iran

    Ulmishek, Gregory F.

    2004-01-01

    The Amu-Darya basin is a highly productive petroleum province in Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan (former Soviet Union), extending southwestward into Iran and southeastward into Afghanistan. The basin underlies deserts and semideserts north of the high ridges of the Kopet-Dag and Bande-Turkestan Mountains. On the northwest, the basin boundary crosses the crest of the Karakum regional structural high, and on the north the basin is bounded by the shallow basement of the Kyzylkum high. On the east, the Amu-Darya basin is separated by the buried southeast spur of the Gissar Range from the Afghan-Tajik basin, which is deformed into a series of north-south-trending synclinoria and anticlinoria. The separation of the two basins occurred during the Neogene Alpine orogeny; earlier, they were parts of a single sedimentary province. The basement of the Amu-Darya basin is a Hercynian accreted terrane composed of deformed and commonly metamorphosed Paleozoic rocks. These rocks are overlain by rift grabens filled with Upper Permian-Triassic rocks that are strongly compacted and diagenetically altered. This taphrogenic sequence, also considered to be a part of the economic basement, is overlain by thick Lower to Middle Jurassic, largely continental, coal-bearing rocks. The overlying Callovian-Oxfordian rocks are primarily carbonates. A deep-water basin surrounded by shallow shelves with reefs along their margins was formed during this time and reached its maximum topographic expression in the late Oxfordian. In Kimmeridgian-Tithonian time, the basin was filled with thick evaporites of the Gaurdak Formation. The Cretaceous-Paleogene sequence is composed chiefly of marine clastic rocks with carbonate intervals prominent in the Valanginian, Barremian, Maastrichtian, and Paleocene stratigraphic units. In Neogene time, the Alpine orogeny on the basin periphery resulted in deposition of continental clastics, initiation of new and rejuvenation of old faults, and formation of most structural

  6. Preliminary results on quaternary studies from Bajestan Basin (Kavir-e Namak), Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid Padashi, Seyed; Büdel, Christian; Ullmann, Tobias; Tintrup, Angela; Baumhauer, Roland

    2017-04-01

    The increasing population and demand for developing infrastructures on the one hand, and the recent issues on water and air quality on the other hand, in addition to droughts and the shrinking of many wetlands and lakes, have encouraged Iran recently to invest more in palaeoenvironmental research - specifically on quaternary basins. Preliminary results of our study through field work, satellite imagery processing, SRTM data analysis and drilling, have created new insights on the Iranian playas and the history of the lakes. A combined geological and geomorphological approach for studying young lakes and playas of Iran has led to the identification of at least five major types of lakes and playas in different parts of Iran; for example the Bajestan basin which ranks the second biggest playa of Iran, is placed in the edge of the central Iranian microplate and Lut structural block. The Bajestan Playa (Kavir-e Namak) is surrounded by cretaceous limestones in the south and Paleozoic formations in the north. The basin comprises several kinds of quaternary deposits including sand dunes and Aeolian deposits, fluvial sediments, alluvial fans and lake sediments. The aeolian activity in the basin is primarily shaping landforms in the southwest and the north of the area. The major fluvial activity is considered to be driven from east and south of the playa. The integration of field observations and data derived from the analysis of SRTM digital elevation model (90m) and Landsat satellite imagery shows that the major part of the playa has flat slope. In addition, the morphometric assessment and the hydrological modelling showed that the major current alluvial channels have SW/NE trend with the highest density and intensity of activity in south west of the basin. The major alluvial deposits in the north and south of the playa represent a dissimilar geomorphology. While the northern part of the basin, from the rock unit outcrops to the edge of playa, is occupied by a narrow

  7. Assessment of undiscovered continuous gas resources in the Amu Darya Basin Province of Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Iran, and Afghanistan, 2017

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Le, Phuong A.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Woodall, Cheryl A.

    2017-08-17

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered, technically recoverable continuous resources of 35.1 trillion cubic feet of gas in the Amu Darya Basin Province of Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Iran, and Afghanistan.

  8. Dating the Barremian-Aptian shallow platform deposits at the eastern part of the Kopet Dagh sedimentary basin, NE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenarani, Atefeh; Hosseini, Seyedabolfazl; Vahidi Nia, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    The Kopet Dagh sedimentary basin covers the northeastern part of Iran, most parts of Turkmenistan and north of Afghanistan which contains several giant gas fields. The extension of this basin in the Iranian part is around 55km2(Afshar Harb, 1994). The Kopet Dagh basin is marked by having very thick sedimentary rocks and lack of volcanic activity. During the Lower Cretaceous, the Tirgan Formation was deposited in a shallow platform setting and lithologically includes in thick-bedded orbitolinid limestones. This study focuses on the biostratigraphy and age determination of these shallow-water deposits using benthic foraminifera and calcareous green algae. In the studied outcrop, the Tirgan Formation has a thickness of 180 m and includes in limestone beds with some marly intervals. It is overlain by the Sarcheshmeh Formation and rests on the Shurijeh Formation. Both contacts are believed to be transitional and lack of discontinuity. A total of 56 thin-sections were used in this study. This study led to determine 28 genera and 14 species of benthic foraminifera along with 13 genera and 5 species of calcareous green algae. Based on the obtained biostratigraphy data, a late Barremian-early Aptian age is suggested for these deposits. We also defined the precise boundary between the Barremian and Aptian which is reported for the first time from this area. Keywords: Barremian-Aptian, Shallow platform, Kopet Dagh, Iran. Reference: Afshar Harb, A., 1994. Geology of Iran: Geology of the Kopet Dagh. Geological survey of Iran, Report No. 11, 275 pp.

  9. Iran.

    PubMed

    1987-05-01

    Iran's population stood at 49.8 million in 1986, 1 1/2-2 million of which were Afghan refugees. The annual population growth rate was 4%. The infant mortality rate was 10/1000 and life expectancy was 54 years. 40% of the labor force is engaged in agriculture, 33% are employed in industry and commerce, and 27% work in services. Iran is an Islamic republic dominated by the Islamic Republican Party. By the 1970s, Iran has achieved significant industrialization and economic modernization. However, economic activity was disrupted by the 1979 revolution and more recently by the war with Iraq and the sharp decline in oil prices. All major business and industrial growth indicators are significantly below prerevolutionary levels and unemployment is over 30%. Political infighting has hampered the formulation of coherent economic policies, and purges in the civil service in the postrevolutionary phase eliminated many qualified personnel. The petroleum, mining, utilities, and transportation sectors have been nationalized, but there is dissension within the Khomeni's regime as to how to proceed with land reform. Iran's gross national product was US$75 billion in 1986, with a per capita income of $1667. Inflation is about 25-40%.

  10. Partitioned transpression in the Triassic Aghdarband basin: evidence for a Cimmerian deformation in NE IRAN:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Zanchetta, Stefano; Balini, Marco; Ghassemi, Mohammad Reza

    2014-05-01

    The Lower-Middle Triassic Aghdarband Basin, NE Iran, consists of a strongly deformed arc-related marine succession deposited along the southern margin of Eurasia (Turan domain) in a highly mobile tectonic context. The marine deposits are unconformably covered by Upper Triassic continental beds, marking the Cimmerian collision of Iran with Eurasia. The Aghdarband Basin is a key-area for the study of the Cimmerian events, as the Triassic units were severely folded and thrust short time after the collision and were unconformably covered by the gently deformed Middle Jurassic succession which seals the Cimmerian structures. The Triassic deposits form a north-verging thrust stack interacting with an important left-lateral strike-slip shear zone exposed in the northernmost part of the basin. Transpressional structures as strike-slip faults and vertical folds are here associated with high angle reverse faults forming intricate positive flower structures. Systematic asymmetry of major and parasitic folds, as well as their geometrical features indicate that they generated in a left-lateral transpressional regime roughly coeval to thrust imbrication to the south, as a consequence of a marked strain partitioning. Aim of this presentation is to describe in detail the deformational structures of the Aghdarband region, based on structural mapping and detailed original mesoscopic field analyses, resuming from the excellent work performed in the '70s by Ruttner (1991). Our work is focused on the pre mid-Jurassic structures which can be related to the final stages of the Cimmerian deformation resulting from the oblique collision of the Iranian microplate with the southern margin of Eurasia, the so-called Turan domain. We will finally discuss the kinematic significance of the Late Triassic oblique convergence zone of Aghdarband in the frame of strain partitioning in transpressional deformation. Structural weakness favouring strain partitioning can be related to inversion of syn

  11. A new species of the genus Acinopus Dejean, 1821 from west of Iran (Coleoptera; Carabidae; Harpalini) with a key to species of Iran.

    PubMed

    Azadbakhsh, Saeed; Wrase, David W

    2016-08-08

    A new species of the genus Acinopus Dejean, 1821, namely Acinopus (Acinopus) zagrosensis sp. n., is described on the basis of specimens collected from west Iran (type locality: Iran, Fars province, Zagros Mts., Sepidan env., 2060 m). The new species is compared with closely related species. A key for the identification of species of genus Acinopus in Iran is provided.

  12. Water footprint concept for a sustainable water resources management in Urmia Lake basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, Anahita; Jarihani, Ben; Rezaie, Hossein; Aligholiniya, Tohid; Rasouli, Negar

    2015-04-01

    The fast shrinkage of Urmia Lake in West Azerbaijan, Iran is one of the most important environmental change hotspots. The dramatic water level reduction (up to 6 meters) has influential environmental, socio-economic and health impacts on Urmia plain and its habitants. The decline is generally blamed on a combination of drought, increased water diversion for irrigated agriculture within the lake's watershed and land use mismanagement. The Urmia Lake sub basins are the agricultural cores of the region and the agricultural activities are the major water consuming sections of the basin. Land use changes and mismanagement in the land use decisions and policies is one of the most important factors in lake shrinkage in recent decades. Fresh water is the main source of water for agricultural usages in the basin. So defining a more low water consuming land use pattern will put less pressure on limited water resources. The above mentioned fact in this study has been assessed through water footprint concept. The water footprint concept (as a quantitative measure showing the appropriation of natural resources) is a comprehensive indicator that can have a crucial role in efficient land use management. In order to evaluate the water use patterns, the water footprint of wheat (as a traditional crop) and apple (recently most popular) have been compared and the results have been discussed in the aspect of the impacts on Lake Urmia demands and its dramatic drying process. Results showed that, higher blue water consumption in such a regions that have severe blue water scarcity, is a major issue and the water consuming pattern must be modified to meet the lake demands. Lower blue water consumption through regionalizing crops for each area is an efficient solution to meet lake demands and consume lower amounts of blue water. So the proper land use practices can be an appropriate method to rescue the lake in a long time period.

  13. Comments on “Arc magmatism and subduction history beneath the Zagros Mountains, Iran: A new report of adakites and geodynamic consequences” by J. Omrani, P. Agard, H. Whitechurch, M. Bennoit, G. Prouteau, L. Jolivet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftabi, Alijan; Atapour, Habibeh

    2009-12-01

    Based on the imprecise geochemical data for 62 samples from Qom, Anar and Baft regions in central Iranian magmatic arc Omrani et al. (Omrani, J., Agard, P., Witechurch, H., Benoit, M., Prouteau, G., Jolivet, L., 2008. Arc magmatism and subduction history beneath the Zagsros Mountains, Iran: A new report of adakites and geodynamic consequences. Lithos 106, 380-398.), suggested that all studied magmatic rocks display the geochemical affinity of subduction-related calc-alkalic rock suites. Here, we demonstrate that the incorrect altered and variable geochemical data (e.g., Al 2O 3, Sr, Y, Ni, Cr, SiO 2, Na 2O, La/Yb and Th/Ce), show that most of the samples actually display calc-alkaline, shoshonitic and calc-alkalic-adakitic affinities. Furthermore, as a result of alteration, rock samples of similar age (e.g., Qom) indicate both adakitic and non-adakitic compositional signatures, which is misleading. On the basis of more than 400 previously published geochemical analyses, we suggest that, after eliminating the false geochemical signatures, the calc-alkaline and adakitic affinities of the central Iranian magmatic arc are due to flat subduction and might be related to a second phase of Miocene- Pliocene porphyry copper mineralization, which is a considerable exploration target and thus merits further investigation.

  14. Revised version of the Cenozoic Collision along the Zagros Orogen, Insights from Cr-spinel and Sandstone Modal Analyses.

    PubMed

    Gholami Zadeh, Parisa; Adabi, Mohammad Hossein; Hisada, Ken-Ichiro; Hosseini-Barzi, Mahboubeh; Sadeghi, Abbas; Ghassemi, Mohammad Reza

    2017-09-07

    Geoscientists have always considered the Neyriz region, located along the Zagros Suture Zone, an important area of interest because of the outcrops of Neotethys ophiolitic rocks. We carried out a modal analysis of the Cenozoic sandstones and geochemistry of the detrital Cr-spinels at Neyriz region in order to determine their provenance and tectonic evolution in the proximal part of Zagros Basin. Our data shows a clear change in provenance from the Late Cretaceous onwards. As from the Late Cretaceous to Eocene, lithic grains are mostly chert and serpentinite; and higher Cr# values of the detrital Cr-spinel compositions indicate that they originate from the fore-arc peridotites and deposited in an accretionary prism setting during this period. From the Late Oligocene to the Miocene periods, volcaniclastic and carbonate lithic grains show an increasing trend, and in the Miocene, metasedimentary lithic grains appear in the sediments. Ophiolite obduction caused a narrow trough sub-basin to be formed parallel to the general trend of the Zagros Orogeny between the Arabian and Iranian plates in Oligocene. From the Miocene onwards, the axial metamorphic complex belt was uplifted in the upper plate. Therefore, the collision along the Zagros Suture Zone must have occurred in the Late Oligocene.

  15. Component Analysis of Errors on PERSIANN Precipitation Estimates over Urmia Lake Basin, IRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghajarnia, N.; Daneshkar Arasteh, P.; Liaghat, A. M.; Araghinejad, S.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, PERSIANN daily dataset is evaluated from 2000 to 2011 in 69 pixels over Urmia Lake basin in northwest of Iran. Different analytical approaches and indexes are used to examine PERSIANN precision in detection and estimation of rainfall rate. The residuals are decomposed into Hit, Miss and FA estimation biases while continues decomposition of systematic and random error components are also analyzed seasonally and categorically. New interpretation of estimation accuracy named "reliability on PERSIANN estimations" is introduced while the changing manners of existing categorical/statistical measures and error components are also seasonally analyzed over different rainfall rate categories. This study yields new insights into the nature of PERSIANN errors over Urmia lake basin as a semi-arid region in the middle-east, including the followings: - The analyzed contingency table indexes indicate better detection precision during spring and fall. - A relatively constant level of error is generally observed among different categories. The range of precipitation estimates at different rainfall rate categories is nearly invariant as a sign for the existence of systematic error. - Low level of reliability is observed on PERSIANN estimations at different categories which are mostly associated with high level of FA error. However, it is observed that as the rate of precipitation increase, the ability and precision of PERSIANN in rainfall detection also increases. - The systematic and random error decomposition in this area shows that PERSIANN has more difficulty in modeling the system and pattern of rainfall rather than to have bias due to rainfall uncertainties. The level of systematic error also considerably increases in heavier rainfalls. It is also important to note that PERSIANN error characteristics at each season varies due to the condition and rainfall patterns of that season which shows the necessity of seasonally different approach for the calibration of

  16. Aphanius arakensis, a new species of tooth-carp (Actinopterygii, Cyprinodontidae) from the endorheic Namak Lake basin in Iran.

    PubMed

    Teimori, Azad; Esmaeili, Hamid Reza; Gholami, Zeinab; Zarei, Neda; Reichenbacher, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    A new species of tooth-carp, Aphanius arakensissp. n., is described from the Namak Lake basin in Iran. The new species is distinguished by the congeners distributed in Iran by the following combination of characters: 10-12 anal fin rays, 28-32 lateral line scales, 10-13 caudal peduncle scales, 8-10 gill rakers, 12-19, commonly 15-16, clearly defined flank bars in males, a more prominent pigmentation along the flank added by relatively big blotches in the middle and posterior flank segments in females, a short but high antirostrum of the otolith that has a wide excisura, and a ventral rim with some small, drop-like processes, and 19 molecular apomorphies (17 transitions, two transversions) in the cytochrome b gene. It was suggested based on the phylogenetic analysis that the new species is sister to Aphanius sophiae from the Kor River and that Aphanius farsicus from the Maharlu Lake basin is sister to Aphanius arakensis plus Aphanius sophiae. A noticeable feature of the Aphanius diversity in Iran is the conservatism of the external morphology as well as morphometric and meristic characters, while distinctive differences are present in genetic characters, otolith morphology, and male color pattern. Transformation of the latter was probably driven by sexual selection.

  17. Aphanius arakensis, a new species of tooth-carp (Actinopterygii, Cyprinodontidae) from the endorheic Namak Lake basin in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Teimori, Azad; Esmaeili, Hamid Reza; Gholami, Zeinab; Zarei, Neda; Reichenbacher, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new species of tooth-carp, Aphanius arakensis sp. n., is described from the Namak Lake basin in Iran. The new species is distinguished by the congeners distributed in Iran by the following combination of characters: 10–12 anal fin rays, 28–32 lateral line scales, 10–13 caudal peduncle scales, 8–10 gill rakers, 12–19, commonly 15–16, clearly defined flank bars in males, a more prominent pigmentation along the flank added by relatively big blotches in the middle and posterior flank segments in females, a short but high antirostrum of the otolith that has a wide excisura, and a ventral rim with some small, drop-like processes, and 19 molecular apomorphies (17 transitions, two transversions) in the cytochrome b gene. It was suggested based on the phylogenetic analysis that the new species is sister to Aphanius sophiae from the Kor River and that Aphanius farsicus from the Maharlu Lake basin is sister to Aphanius arakensis plus Aphanius sophiae. A noticeable feature of the Aphanius diversity in Iran is the conservatism of the external morphology as well as morphometric and meristic characters, while distinctive differences are present in genetic characters, otolith morphology, and male color pattern. Transformation of the latter was probably driven by sexual selection. PMID:22936871

  18. GT-12 - EARTH SKY - IRAN, TRUCIAL COAST

    1966-11-13

    S66-63486 (13 Nov. 1966) --- Iran, Trucial Coast, Oman, Zagros Mountains, and Qishm Island (large island at lower right), as seen from the Gemini-12 spacecraft during its 25th revolution of Earth. Gulf of Oman is large body of water at left and the Persian Gulf is body of water at right. View is looking east. Photo credit: NASA

  19. GT-12 - EARTH SKY - IRAN, TRUCIAL COAST

    1966-11-13

    S66-63485 (13 Nov. 1966) --- Iran, Trucial Coast, Oman, Zagros Mountains, and Qishm Island (large island at lower left), as seen from the Gemini-12 spacecraft during its 25th revolution of Earth. Gulf of Oman is at lower left edge and the Persian Gulf is large body of water in upper half of photo. Photo credit: NASA

  20. Chronometric investigations of the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition in the Zagros Mountains using AMS radiocarbon dating and Bayesian age modelling.

    PubMed

    Becerra-Valdivia, Lorena; Douka, Katerina; Comeskey, Daniel; Bazgir, Behrouz; Conard, Nicholas J; Marean, Curtis W; Ollé, Andreu; Otte, Marcel; Tumung, Laxmi; Zeidi, Mohsen; Higham, Thomas F G

    2017-08-01

    The Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition is often linked with a bio-cultural shift involving the dispersal of modern humans outside of Africa, the concomitant replacement of Neanderthals across Eurasia, and the emergence of new technological traditions. The Zagros Mountains region assumes importance in discussions concerning this period as its geographic location is central to all pertinent hominin migration areas, pointing to both east and west. As such, establishing a reliable chronology in the Zagros Mountains is crucial to our understanding of these biological and cultural developments. Political circumstance, coupled with the poor preservation of organic material, has meant that a clear chronological definition of the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition for the Zagros Mountains region has not yet been achieved. To improve this situation, we have obtained new archaeological samples for AMS radiocarbon dating from three sites: Kobeh Cave, Kaldar Cave, and Ghār-e Boof (Iran). In addition, we have statistically modelled previously published radiocarbon determinations for Yafteh Cave (Iran) and Shanidar Cave (Iraqi Kurdistan), to improve their chronological resolution and enable us to compare the results with the new dataset. Bayesian modelling results suggest that the onset of the Upper Paleolithic in the Zagros Mountains dates to 45,000-40,250 cal BP (68.2% probability). Further chronometric data are required to improve the precision of this age range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Distributed deformation in the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt: insights from geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaid, Ahmed; Allen, Mark

    2017-04-01

    The Zagros fold-and-thrust belt is part of the active Arabia-Eurasia collision zone, and is an excellent region to study the interactions of tectonics and landscape. In this work we present results of a geomorphic analysis covering the entire range, coupled with more detailed analysis of the Kirkuk Embayment, Iraq. This particular region is a low elevation, low relief region of the Zagros, important for the enormous oil and gas reserves held in late Cenozoic anticlinal traps. Constraints from published earthquake focal mechanisms and hydrocarbon industry sub-surface data are combined with original fieldwork observations in northern Iraq, to produce a new regional cross-section and structural interpretation for the Kirkuk Embayment. We find that overall late Cenozoic shortening across the Embayment is on the order of 5%, representing only a few km. This deformation takes place on a series of anticlines, which are interpreted as overlying steep, planar, basement thrusts. These thrusts are further interpreted as reactivated normal faults, on the basis of (rare) published seismic data. The regional earthquake record confirms the basement involvement, although detachments within the sedimentary succession are also important, especially within the Middle Miocene Fat'ha Formation. Overall, the Zagros is sometimes represented as having a few major thrusts each persistent for 100s of km along the strike of the range. However, these faults are very rarely associated with major structural relief and/or surface fault ruptures during earthquakes. We have analysed the hypsometry of the range and find only gradational changes in the hypsometric integral of drainage basins across strike. This contrasts with regions such as the eastern Tibetan Plateau, where published analysis has revealed abrupt changes, correlating with the surface traces of active thrusts. Our interpretation is that the hypsometry of the Zagros reflects distributed deformation on numerous smaller faults, rather

  2. Spatial hydrological drought characteristics in Karkheh River basin, southwest Iran using copulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodangeh, Esmaeel; Shahedi, Kaka; Shiau, Jenq-Tzong; MirAkbari, Maryam

    2017-08-01

    Investigation on drought characteristics such as severity, duration, and frequency is crucial for water resources planning and management in a river basin. While the methodology for multivariate drought frequency analysis is well established by applying the copulas, the estimation on the associated parameters by various parameter estimation methods and the effects on the obtained results have not yet been investigated. This research aims at conducting a comparative analysis between the maximum likelihood parametric and non-parametric method of the Kendall τ estimation method for copulas parameter estimation. The methods were employed to study joint severity-duration probability and recurrence intervals in Karkheh River basin (southwest Iran) which is facing severe water-deficit problems. Daily streamflow data at three hydrological gauging stations (Tang Sazbon, Huleilan and Polchehr) near the Karkheh dam were used to draw flow duration curves (FDC) of these three stations. The Q_{75} index extracted from the FDC were set as threshold level to abstract drought characteristics such as drought duration and severity on the basis of the run theory. Drought duration and severity were separately modeled using the univariate probabilistic distributions and gamma-GEV, LN2-exponential, and LN2-gamma were selected as the best paired drought severity-duration inputs for copulas according to the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), Kolmogorov-Smirnov and chi-square tests. Archimedean Clayton, Frank, and extreme value Gumbel copulas were employed to construct joint cumulative distribution functions (JCDF) of droughts for each station. Frank copula at Tang Sazbon and Gumbel at Huleilan and Polchehr stations were identified as the best copulas based on the performance evaluation criteria including AIC, BIC, log-likelihood and root mean square error (RMSE) values. Based on the RMSE values, nonparametric Kendall-τ is preferred to the parametric maximum likelihood estimation method

  3. Developing Multi-model Ensemble for Precipitation and Temperature Seasonal Forecasts: Implications for Karkheh River Basin in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, Husain; Massah Bavani, Ali Reza; Wanders, Niko; Wood, Eric; Irannejad, Parviz; Robertson, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Water resource managers can utilize reliable seasonal forecasts for allocating water between different users within a water year. In the west of Iran where a decline of renewable water resources has been observed, basin-wide water management has been the subject of many inter-provincial conflicts in recent years. The problem is exacerbated when the environmental water requirements is not provided leaving the Hoor-al-Azim marshland in the downstream dry. It has been argued that information on total seasonal rainfall can support the Iranian Ministry of Energy within the water year. This study explores the skill of the North America Multi Model Ensemble for Karkheh River Basin in the of west Iran. NMME seasonal precipitation and temperature forecasts from eight models are evaluated against PERSIANN-CDR and Climate Research Unit (CRU) datasets. Analysis suggests that anomaly correlation for both precipitation and temperature is greater than 0.4 for all individual models. Lead time-dependent seasonal forecasts are improved when a multi-model ensemble is developed for the river basin using stepwise linear regression model. MME R-squared exceeds 0.6 for temperature for almost all initializations suggesting high skill of NMME in Karkheh river basin. The skill of MME for rainfall forecasts is high for 1-month lead time for October, February, March and October initializations. However, for months when the amount of rainfall accounts for a significant proportion of total annual rainfall, the skill of NMME is limited a month in advance. It is proposed that operational regional water companies incorporate NMME seasonal forecasts into water resource planning and management, especially during growing seasons that are essential for agricultural risk management.

  4. Insights on the lithospheric structure of the Zagros mountain belt from seismological data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.; Kaviani, A.; Vergne, J.; Hatzfeld, D.; Mokhtari, M.

    2003-04-01

    As part of a French-Iranian collaboration, we installed a temporary seismological network across the Zagros for 4.5 months in 2000-2001 to investigate the lithospheric structure of the mountain belt. The network included 65 stations located along a 600-km long line (average spacing of ˜10 km) from the coast of the Persian Gulf to the stable block of Central Iran. A migrated depth cross-section computed from radial receiver functions displays clear P-to-S conversions at the Moho beneath most of the profile. The average Moho depth is 45 to 50 km beneath the folded belt. It deepens rather abruptly beneath the suture zone of the MZT (Main Zagros Thrust) and the Sanandaj-Sirjan (SS) metamorphic zone. The maximum crustal thickness of ˜65 km is reached 50 km NE of the surface trace of the MZT. The region of over-thickened crust is shifted to the NE with respect to the areas of highest elevations and the strongest negative Bouguer anomaly. To the NE, the crust of the block of Central Iran is 40-km thick on average. Two patches of Ps converted energy can be seen below the Moho in the northern half of the transect that cannot be attributed to multiple reflections. Teleseismic P residual travel time curves display lateral variations as large as 1.5 s with both long (faster arrivals in the SW than in the NE) and short-scale variations (in the MZT region). They were inverted for variations of P wave velocity with the ACH technique. The crustal layer exhibits rather strong lateral variations of Vp with lower velocities under the MZT and the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic assemblage, and faster velocities under the SS zone. In the mantle, a clear difference appears between the faster P wave velocities of the Arabian craton and the relatively lower velocities of the mantle of Central Iran.

  5. A fossil unicorn crestfish (Teleostei, Lampridiformes, Lophotidae) from the Eocene of Iran.

    PubMed

    Davesne, Donald

    2017-01-01

    Lophotidae, or crestfishes, is a family of rare deep-sea teleosts characterised by an enlarged horn-like crest on the forehead. They are poorly represented in the fossil record, by only three described taxa. One specimen attributed to Lophotidae has been described from the pelagic fauna of the middle-late Eocene Zagros Basin, Iran. Originally considered as a specimen of the fossil lophotid † Protolophotus , it is proposed hereby as a new genus and species † Babelichthys olneyi , gen. et sp. nov., differs from the other fossil lophotids by its relatively long and strongly projecting crest, suggesting a close relationship with the modern unicorn crestfish, Eumecichthys . This new taxon increases the diversity of the deep-sea teleost fauna to which it belongs, improving our understanding of the taxonomic composition of the early Cenozoic mesopelagic ecosystems.

  6. A fossil unicorn crestfish (Teleostei, Lampridiformes, Lophotidae) from the Eocene of Iran

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Lophotidae, or crestfishes, is a family of rare deep-sea teleosts characterised by an enlarged horn-like crest on the forehead. They are poorly represented in the fossil record, by only three described taxa. One specimen attributed to Lophotidae has been described from the pelagic fauna of the middle-late Eocene Zagros Basin, Iran. Originally considered as a specimen of the fossil lophotid †Protolophotus, it is proposed hereby as a new genus and species †Babelichthys olneyi, gen. et sp. nov., differs from the other fossil lophotids by its relatively long and strongly projecting crest, suggesting a close relationship with the modern unicorn crestfish, Eumecichthys. This new taxon increases the diversity of the deep-sea teleost fauna to which it belongs, improving our understanding of the taxonomic composition of the early Cenozoic mesopelagic ecosystems. PMID:28674642

  7. Early Neogene foreland of the Zagros, implications for the initial closure of the Neo-Tethys and kinematics of crustal shortening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirouz, Mortaza; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Hassanzadeh, Jamshid; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Bahroudi, Abbas

    2017-11-01

    We study the transition from passive margin to foreland basin sedimentation now exposed in the High Zagros belt to provide chronological constraints on the initial stage of Arabia-Eurasia collision and closure of the Neo-Tethys. We performed magnetostratigraphy and strontium isotope stratigraphy along two sections near the Zagros suture which expose the oldest preserved foreland deposits: the Shalamzar section in the west and the Dehmoord section in the east. The top of the passive margin Asmari formation has an age of 28-29 Ma in the High Zagros and is overlain by foreland deposits with a major basal unconformity representing 7 Myr of hiatus. The base of the foreland deposits has an age of 21.5 Ma at Dehmoord and ca. 26 Ma at Shalamzar. The sedimentation rate increased from 30 m/Myr in the passive margin to 247 m/Myr in the foreland. Combined with available age constraints across the Zagros, our results show that the unconformity is diachronous and records the southwestward migration of the flexural bulge within the Arabian plate at an average rate of 24 ± 2 mm/yr over the last 27 Ma. The time evolution of sediment accumulation in the Zagros foreland follows the prediction from a flexural model, as the foreland is thrust beneath the orogenic wedge and loaded by the wedge and basin fill. We detect the onset of forebulge formation within the Asmari Formation around 25 Ma. We conclude that closure of the Neo-Tethys formed the Zagros collisional wedge at 27 ± 2 Ma. Hence, the Arabia-Eurasia collision was probably not the main driver of global cooling which started near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (ca. 33.7 Ma). We estimate 650 km of forebulge migration since the onset of the collision which consists of 350 km of shortening across the orogen, and 300 km of widening of the wedge and increasing flexural rigidity of Arabia. We conclude the average rate of shortening across the Zagros to be ca. 13 mm/yr over the last 27 Myr; a value comparable to the modern rate

  8. Non-parametric trend analysis of the aridity index for three large arid and semi-arid basins in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahani, Hossien; Kherad, Mehrzad; Kousari, Mohammad Reza; van Roosmalen, Lieke; Aryanfar, Ramin; Hosseini, Seyyed Mashaallah

    2013-05-01

    Currently, an important scientific challenge that researchers are facing is to gain a better understanding of climate change at the regional scale, which can be especially challenging in an area with low and highly variable precipitation amounts such as Iran. Trend analysis of the medium-term change using ground station observations of meteorological variables can enhance our knowledge of the dominant processes in an area and contribute to the analysis of future climate projections. Generally, studies focus on the long-term variability of temperature and precipitation and to a lesser extent on other important parameters such as moisture indices. In this study the recent 50-year trends (1955-2005) of precipitation (P), potential evapotranspiration (PET), and aridity index (AI) in monthly time scale were studied over 14 synoptic stations in three large Iran basins using the Mann-Kendall non-parametric test. Additionally, an analysis of the monthly, seasonal and annual trend of each parameter was performed. Results showed no significant trends in the monthly time series. However, PET showed significant, mostly decreasing trends, for the seasonal values, which resulted in a significant negative trend in annual PET at five stations. Significant negative trends in seasonal P values were only found at a number of stations in spring and summer and no station showed significant negative trends in annual P. Due to the varied positive and negative trends in annual P and to a lesser extent PET, almost as many stations with negative as positive trends in annual AI were found, indicating that both drying and wetting trends occurred in Iran. Overall, the northern part of the study area showed an increasing trend in annual AI which meant that the region became wetter, while the south showed decreasing trends in AI.

  9. Tectonically controlled sedimentation: impact on sediment supply and basin evolution of the Kashafrud Formation (Middle Jurassic, Kopeh-Dagh Basin, northeast Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardar Abadi, Mehrdad; Da Silva, Anne-Christine; Amini, Abdolhossein; Aliabadi, Ali Akbar; Boulvain, Frédéric; Sardar Abadi, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-11-01

    The Kashafrud Formation was deposited in the extensional Kopeh-Dagh Basin during the Late Bajocian to Bathonian (Middle Jurassic) and is potentially the most important siliciclastic unit from NE Iran for petroleum geology. This extensional setting allowed the accumulation of about 1,700 m of siliciclastic sediments during a limited period of time (Upper Bajocian-Bathonian). Here, we present a detailed facies analysis combined with magnetic susceptibility (MS) results focusing on the exceptional record of the Pol-e-Gazi section in the southeastern part of the basin. MS is classically interpreted as related to the amount of detrital input. The amount of these detrital inputs and then the MS being classically influenced by sea-level changes, climate changes and tectonic activity. Facies analysis reveals that the studied rocks were deposited in shallow marine, slope to pro-delta settings. A major transgressive-regressive cycle is recorded in this formation, including fluvial-dominated delta to turbiditic pro-delta settings (transgressive phase), followed by siliciclastic to mixed siliciclastic and carbonate shoreface rocks (regressive phase). During the transgressive phase, hyperpycnal currents were feeding the basin. These hyperpycnal currents are interpreted as related to important tectonic variations, in relation to significant uplift of the hinterland during opening of the basin. This tectonic activity was responsible for stronger erosion, providing a higher amount of siliciclastic input into the basin, leading to a high MS signal. During the regressive phase, the tectonic activity strongly decreased. Furthermore, the depositional setting changed to a wave- to tide-dominated, mixed carbonate-siliciclastic setting. Because of the absence of strong tectonic variations, bulk MS was controlled by other factors such as sea-level and climatic changes. Fluctuations in carbonate production, possibly related to sea-level variations, influenced the MS of the siliciclastic

  10. A new species of the genus Capoeta Valenciennes, 1842 from the Caspian Sea basin in Iran (Teleostei, Cyprinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jouladeh-Roudbar, Arash; Eagderi, Soheil; Ghanavi, Hamid Reza; Doadrio, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A new species of algae-scraping cyprinid of the genus Capoeta Valenciennes, 1842 is described from the Kheyroud River, located in the southern part of the Caspian Sea basin in Iran. The species differs from other members of this genus by a combination of the following characters: one pair of barbels; predorsal length equal to postdorsal length; maxillary barbel slightly smaller than eye’s horizontal diameter and reach to posterior margin of orbit; intranasal length slightly shorter than snout length; lateral line with 46–54 scales; 7–9 scales between dorsal-fin origin and lateral line, and 6–7 scales between anal-fin origin and lateral line. PMID:28769726

  11. Along-strike structural variation and thermokinematic development of the Cenozoic Bitlis-Zagros fold-thrust belt, Turkey and Iraqi Kurdistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Douglas E.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Koshnaw, Renas I.; Tamar-Agha, Mazin Y.; Yilmaz, Ismail O.

    2016-04-01

    The Bitlis-Zagros orogen in northern Iraq is a principal element of the Arabia-Eurasia continent collision and is characterized by the lateral intersection of two structural domains: the NW-SE trending Zagros proper system of Iran and the E-W trending Bitlis fold-thrust belt of Turkey and Syria. While these components in northern Iraq share a similar stratigraphic framework, they exhibit along-strike variations in the width and style of tectonic zones, fold morphology and trends, and structural inheritance. However, the distinctions of the Bitlis and Zagros segments remains poorly understood in terms of timing and deformation kinematics as well as first-order controls on fold-thrust development. Structural and stratigraphic study and seismic data combined with low-T thermochronometry provide the basis for reconstructions of the Bitlis-Zagros fold-thrust belt in southeastern Turkey and northern Iraq to elucidate the kinematic and temporal relationship of these two systems. Balanced cross-sections were constructed and incrementally restored to quantify the deformational evolution and use as input for thermokinematic models (FETKIN) to generate thermochronometric ages along the topographic surface of each cross-section line. The forward modeled thermochronometric ages from were then compared to new and previously published apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He and fission-track ages from southeastern Turkey and northern Iraq to test the validity of the timing, rate, and fault-motion geometry associated with each reconstruction. The results of these balanced theromokinematic restorations integrated with constraints from syn-tectonic sedimentation suggest that the Zagros belt between Erbil and Suleimaniyah was affected by an initial phase of Late Cretaceous exhumation related to the Proto-Zagros collision. During the main Zagros phase, deformation advanced rapidly and in-sequence from the Main Zagros Fault to the thin-skinned frontal thrusts (Kirkuk, Shakal, Qamar) from middle

  12. Numerical modelling of the role of salt in continental collision: An application to the southeast Zagros fold-and-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazian, Reza Khabbaz; Buiter, Susanne J. H.

    2014-09-01

    The Zagros fold-and-thrust belt formed in the collision of Arabia with Central Iran. Its sedimentary sequence is characterised by the presence of several weak layers that may control the style of folding and thrusting. We use 2-D thermo-mechanical models to investigate the role of salt in the southeast Zagros fold-and-thrust belt. We constrain the crustal and lithospheric thickness, sedimentary stratification, convergence velocity, and thermal structure of the models from available geological and geophysical data. We find that the thick basal layer of Hormuz salt in models on the scale of the upper-mantle decouples the overlying sediments from the basement and localises deformation in the sediments by trench-verging shear bands. In the collision stage of the models, basement dips with + 1° towards the trench. Including the basal Hormuz salt improves the fit of predicted topography to observed topography. We use the kinematic results and thermal structure of this large-scale model as the initial conditions of a series of upper-crustal-scale models. These models aim to investigate the effects of basal and intervening weak layers, salt strength, basal dip, and lateral salt distribution on deformation style of the simply folded Zagros. Our results show that in addition to the Hormuz salt at the base of the sedimentary cover, at least one intervening weak layer is required to initiate fold-dominated deformation in the southeast Zagros. We find that an upper-crustal-scale model, with a basal and three internal weak layers with viscosities between 5 × 1018 and 1019 Pa s, and a basement that dips + 1° towards the trench, best reproduces present-day topography and the regular folding of the sedimentary layers of the simply folded Zagros.

  13. The Lower Triassic Sorkh Shale Formation of the Tabas Block, east central Iran: Succesion of a failed-rift basin at the Paleotethys margin

    Lasemi, Y.; Ghomashi, M.; Amin-Rasouli, H.; Kheradmand, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Lower Triassic Sorkh Shale Formation is a dominantly red colored marginal marine succession deposited in the north-south trending Tabas Basin of east central Iran. It is correlated with the unconformity-bounded lower limestone member of the Elika Formation of the Alborz Mountains of northern Iran. The Sorkh Shale is bounded by the pre-Triassic and post-Lower Triassic interregional unconformities and consists mainly of carbonates, sandstones, and evaporites with shale being a minor constituent. Detailed facies analysis of the Sorkh Shale Formation resulted in recognition of several genetically linked peritidal facies that are grouped into restricted subtidal, carbonate tidal flat, siliciclastic tidal flat, coastal plain and continental evaporite facies associations. These were deposited in a low energy, storm-dominated inner-ramp setting with a very gentle slope that fringed the Tabas Block of east central Iran and passed northward (present-day coordinates) into deeper water facies of the Paleotethys passive margin of northern Cimmerian Continent. Numerous carbonate storm beds containing well-rounded intraclasts, ooids and bioclasts of mixed fauna are present in the Sorkh Shale Formation of the northern Tabas Basin. The constituents of the storm beds are absent in the fair weather peritidal facies of the Sorkh Shale Formation, but are present throughout the lower limestone member of the Elika Formation. The Tabas Block, a part of the Cimmerian continent in east central Iran, is a rift basin that developed during Early Ordovician-Silurian Paleotethys rifting. Facies and sequence stratigraphic analyses of the Sorkh Shale Formation has revealed additional evidence supporting the Tabas Block as a failed rift basin related to the Paleotethys passive margin. Absence of constituents of the storm beds in the fair weather peritidal facies of the Sorkh Shale Formation, presence of the constituents of the storm beds in the fair weather facies of the Elika Formation (the

  14. Variation in crustal structure in Iran and the surrounding region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rham, D.; Tatar, M.; Ashtiany, M.; Mokhtari, M.; Priestley, K.; Paul, A.

    2007-12-01

    We present a model for the topography of the Moho discontinuity for Iran and its surrounding regions. This is produced using data from field deployments within Iran by the University of Cambridge (UK) and the Universite Joseph-Fourier (FRA) in conjunction with International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (Iran), in addition to data from IRIS and Geofone. We determine tomographic group velocity maps for periods between 10 and 60 s from multiple filter analysis of ~5500 seismograms. Because of the dense path coverage, these images have substantially higher lateral resolution for this region than is currently available from global and regional group velocity studies. Joint inversion of receiver functions and Rayleigh wave dispersion give accurate crustal velocity structures at 96 sites within Iran These provide a constraint for the less sharp crustal velocity profile produced by inverting the Rayleigh wave dispersion curve across all of Iran. We observe variations in the crustal thickness across the region, consistent with the surface topography. The thickest crust (55-60 km) is found beneath the central Zagros mountains, with the crust in the remainder of Iran having a thicknesses of 40-50 km. No significant increase in Moho depth is seen beneath the Alborz or Kopet Dagh mountains. The structure of the South Caspian Basin is presented with a different structure to that found in previous studies, with a crustal thickness of 50 km in the west, and beneath the Caucasus and Talesh mountains, in the middle part of the basin, over the course of the ~100km, this decreases to 40km, and continues to 35 km beneath the Turkmen Platform. Comparisons are also made between the joint inversion results, and accurate hypocentre depths for regional earthquakes. This shows most events occur in the upper crystalline crust (~10-20km depth), with few in the lowest velocity layer. Almost no events are located in the lower crust, and only in the Makran and Aspheron

  15. Phylogenetic status of brown trout Salmo trutta populations in five rivers from the southern Caspian Sea and two inland lake basins, Iran: a morphogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Hashemzadeh Segherloo, I; Farahmand, H; Abdoli, A; Bernatchez, L; Primmer, C R; Swatdipong, A; Karami, M; Khalili, B

    2012-10-01

    Interrelationships, origin and phylogenetic affinities of brown trout Salmo trutta populations from the southern Caspian Sea basin, Orumieh and Namak Lake basins in Iran were analysed from complete mtDNA control region sequences, 12 microsatellite loci and morphological characters. Among 129 specimens from six populations, seven haplotypes were observed. Based on mtDNA haplotype data, the Orumieh and southern Caspian populations did not differ significantly, but the Namak basin-Karaj population presented a unique haplotype closely related to the haplotypes of the other populations (0·1% Kimura two-parameter, K2P divergence). All Iranian haplotypes clustered as a distinct group within the Danube phylogenetic grouping, with an average K2P distance of 0·41% relative to other Danubian haplotypes. The Karaj haplotype in the Namak basin was related to a haplotype (Da26) formerly identified in the Tigris basin in Turkey, to a Salmo trutta oxianus haplotype from the Aral Sea basin, and to haplotype Da1a with two mutational steps, as well as to other Iranian haplotypes with one to two mutational steps, which may indicate a centre of origin in the Caspian basin. In contrast to results of the mtDNA analysis, more pronounced differentiation was observed among the populations studied in the morphological and microsatellite DNA data, except for the two populations from the Orumieh basin, which were similar, possibly due to anthropogenic causes. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  16. Crustal and lithospheric structure of the Alborz Mountains, Iran, and surrounding areas from integrated geophysical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motavalli-Anbaran, Seyed-Hani; Zeyen, Hermann; Brunet, Marie-FrançOise; Ardestani, Vahid Ebrahimzadeh

    2011-10-01

    Using gravity, geoid, topography and surface heat flow data, we have modeled the density and temperature distribution in the lithosphere along three profiles crossing Iran in SW-NE direction from the Arabian foreland in the SW to the South Caspian Basin and the Turan Platform to the NE. We find thin lithosphere (100-120 km) underneath central Iran, whereas thick lithosphere (up to 240 km) is found underneath Arabia, the South Caspian Basin and the Turan Platform. Crustal thickening is found under the Zagros and Alborz mountains (up to 60 km) and under the Kopet-Dagh Mountains (48 km), whereas the thin crust under the southern Caspian Sea is either an oceanic crust or a highly thinned continental one. Below the South Caspian Sea, the shape of the crust-mantle interface and the base of the lithosphere indicate a subduction of the South Caspian block toward the N-NW. Further east, under the Kopet-Dagh, no evidence for active subduction is visible. This can be explained by a rheologically very strong South Caspian block, surrounded by weaker continental lithosphere.

  17. Regional analysis and derivation of copula-based drought Severity-Area-Frequency curve in Lake Urmia basin, Iran.

    PubMed

    Amirataee, Babak; Montaseri, Majid; Rezaie, Hossein

    2018-01-15

    Droughts are extreme events characterized by temporal duration and spatial large-scale effects. In general, regional droughts are affected by general circulation of the atmosphere (at large-scale) and regional natural factors, including the topography, natural lakes, the position relative to the center and the path of the ocean currents (at small-scale), and they don't cover the exact same effects in a wide area. Therefore, drought Severity-Area-Frequency (S-A-F) curve investigation is an essential task to develop decision making rule for regional drought management. This study developed the copula-based joint probability distribution of drought severity and percent of area under drought across the Lake Urmia basin, Iran. To do this end, one-month Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) values during the 1971-2013 were applied across 24 rainfall stations in the study area. Then, seven copula functions of various families, including Clayton, Gumbel, Frank, Joe, Galambos, Plackett and Normal copulas, were used to model the joint probability distribution of drought severity and drought area. Using AIC, BIC and RMSE criteria, the Frank copula was selected as the most appropriate copula in order to develop the joint probability distribution of severity-percent of area under drought across the study area. Based on the Frank copula, the drought S-A-F curve for the study area was derived. The results indicated that severe/extreme drought and non-drought (wet) behaviors have affected the majority of study areas (Lake Urmia basin). However, the area covered by the specific semi-drought effects is limited and has been subject to significant variations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Foraminiferal biostratigraphy of Upper Cretaceous (Campanian - Maastrichtian) sequences in the Peri-Tethys basin; Moghan area, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidvar, Mahboobeh; Safari, Amrollah; Vaziri-Moghaddam, Hossain; Ghalavand, Hormoz

    2018-04-01

    The Upper Cretaceous sediments in the Moghan area, NW Iran, contain diverse planktonic and benthic foraminifera, with a total of 33 genera and 53 species (17 genera and 38 species of planktonic foraminifera and 16 genera and 15 species from benthic foraminifera), which led to the identification of six biozones spanning the middle Campanian to late Maastrichtian. A detailed paleontological study and biostratigraphic zonation of these sequences has been carried out in four surface sections. This study shows that there are two different facies in the Moghan area, based on the faunal content. A deep open marine condition exists in the Molok, Selenchai and Nasirkandi sections. In these sections, Upper Cretaceous sequences have diverse planktonic foraminiferal species including the Globotruncana ventricosa (middle to late Campanian), Globotruncanella havanensis (late Campanian), Globotruncana aegyptiaca (latest Campanian), Gansserina gansseri (latest Campanian to early Maastrichtian), Contusotruncana contusa- Racemiguembelina fructicosa (early to late Maastrichtian) and Abathomphalus mayaroensis (late Maastrichtian) zones. This deep open marine setting grades laterally into shallower marine condition dominated by large benthic foraminifera such as Orbitoides media, Orbitoides gruenbachensis, Orbitoides cf. apiculata, Lepidorbitoides minor, Pseudosiderolites sp., Siderolites praecalcitrapoides, Siderolites aff. calcitrapoides and Siderolites calcitrapoides. This facies is mainly recorded in the Hovay section. A detailed biostratigraphic zonation scheme is presented for the studied sections and correlated with the results of other studies in the Tethyan realm. This is the first biozonation scheme for Upper Cretaceous sequences of the Moghan area that can be used as a basis for ongoing studies in this area and other parts of Tethys basin.

  19. Late Eocene Inversion and Exhumation of the Sivas Basin (Central Anatolia) Based On Low-Temperature Thermochronometry: Implications for Diachronous Initiation of Arabia-Eurasia Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darin, M. H.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Thomson, S. N.; Schleiffarth, W. K.

    2017-12-01

    The timing of initial Arabia-Eurasia collision along the Bitlis-Zagros suture is controversial, with widely varying estimates from middle Eocene to late Miocene ( 45-10 Ma). The Cenozoic Sivas Basin (central Anatolia) preserves a detailed record of the initial stages of Arabia collision directly north of the suture in the Eurasian foreland. New apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He thermochronology data from Late Cretaceous to Paleogene units indicate rapid basin inversion and initiation of the north-vergent Southern Sivas Fold and Thrust Belt (SSFTB) during the late Eocene to early Oligocene ( 40-30 Ma), consistent with the age of a basin-wide unconformity and switch from marine to nonmarine sedimentation. We interpret late Eocene exhumation and the predominantly north-vergent kinematics of the SSFTB to reflect northward propagation of contraction into the Sivas retro-foreland basin due to initial collision of the Arabian passive margin with the Anatolide-Tauride block along the southern Eurasian margin during the late middle Eocene. We test this hypothesis by comparing our new results with regional-scale compilations of both published thermochronology and geochronology data from the entire Arabia-Eurasia collision zone. Low-temperature thermochronology data from eastern Anatolia, the Caucasus, Zagros, and Alborz demonstrate that rapid cooling and intraplate deformation occurred across much of the Eurasian foreland during the middle Eocene to early Oligocene ( 45-30 Ma). Our regional compilation of published geochronology data from central and eastern Anatolia reveals a distinct magmatic lull during the latest Eocene, Oligocene, and earliest Miocene (ca. 38-20 Ma), slightly earlier than a diachronous magmatic lull initiating at 25-5 Ma from northwest to southeast in Iran (Chiu et al., 2013). These results support a tectonic model for diachronous collision in which initial collision of the Arabia promontory occurred in central-eastern Anatolia during the middle

  20. Capoeta damascina (Valenciennes, 1842), a new host of Contracaecum sp. and Capillaria sp. (Nematoda) from the Kor River Basin, southwestern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Zeinab; Rahimi, Mohammad Taghi; Kia, Eshrat Beigom; Esmaeili, Hamid Reza; Mobedi, Iraj

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the parasitic infection status of cyprinid fish, Capoeta damascina in Gomban spring-stream, Kor River Basin, Fars Province, southwestern Iran. Methods A total of 12 cyprinid fish (7 females and 5 males) were collected from Gomban spring-stream, Kor River Basin, Fars Province, southwestern Iran. The collected fish were dissected carefully and their internal organs such as liver, gonad, muscle, abdominal lobes, whole viscera and digestive tract were surveyed parasitologically. Results One female cyprinid fish out of 12 fish was infected with three nematodes. Two nematodes (larvae) were identified as Contracaecum sp. which were attached firmly to the outer part of intestine and another adult helminth was recognized as Capillaria sp. which was recovered from digestive content. Conclusions This study is the first record indicating that cyprinid fish acts as a new host for recovered nematodes. Further helminthological investigations are highly recommended in different parts of Iran in order to expand our knowledge about helmintic parasites of cyprinid fish and their role in transmission of diseases to human and animal. PMID:25183068

  1. Shallow crustal radial anisotropy beneath the Tehran basin of Iran from seismic ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzad, Taghi; Shomali, Z. Hossein

    2014-06-01

    We studied the shear wave velocity structure and radial anisotropy beneath the Tehran basin by analyzing the Rayleigh wave and Love wave empirical Green's functions obtained from cross-correlation of seismic ambient noise. Approximately 199 inter-station Rayleigh and Love wave empirical Green's functions with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios extracted from 30 stations with various sensor types were used for phase velocity dispersion analysis of periods ranging from 1 to 7 s using an image transformation analysis technique. Dispersion curves extracted from the phase velocity maps were inverted based on non-linear damped least squares inversion method to obtain a quasi-3D model of crustal shear wave velocities. The data used in this study provide an unprecedented opportunity to resolve the spatial distribution of radial anisotropy within the uppermost crust beneath the Tehran basin. The quasi-3D shear wave velocity model obtained in this analysis delineates several distinct low- and high-velocity zones that are generally separated by geological boundaries. High-shear-velocity zones are located primarily around the mountain ranges and extend to depths of 2.0 km, while the low-shear-velocity zone is located near regions with sedimentary layers. In the shallow subsurface, our results indicate strong radial anisotropy with negative magnitude (VSV > VSH) primarily associated with thick sedimentary deposits, reflecting vertical alignment of cracks. With increasing depth, the magnitude of the radial anisotropy shifts from predominantly negative (less than -10%) to predominantly positive (greater than 5%). Our results show a distinct change in radial anisotropy between the uppermost sedimentary layer and the bedrock.

  2. The changes in the frequency of daily precipitation in Urmia Lake basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi Bavil, Sepideh; Zeinalzadeh, Kamran; Hessari, Behzad

    2017-06-01

    Urmia Lake, as one of the most valuable saline ecosystems in the world, has faced a sharp drop in the water level in recent years. The trend studies of climatic parameters can be effective in identifying the responsible factors and managing this crisis. This research investigated the frequency trend of daily precipitation in the ranges of less than 5 mm, 5-10 mm, 10-15 mm, 15-20 mm, and more than 20 mm in the Urmia Lake basin. The trend was assessed using Mann-Kendall, Spearman Rho and linear regression tests on 60 stations during a period of 30 years (1981 to 2011). The results showed that in all the three tests, the frequency of daily precipitation of less than 5 mm had a significant increase at 1% level. The 5-10 mm range displayed no significant trend, while the 10-15 mm range showed a significantly decreasing trend. The frequency in the 15-20 mm and above 20 mm ranges showed an insignificant falling trend. The analysis also indicated jumps in 1996 and 1999 (almost coinciding with the sharp drop in the lake's water level). In other words, the frequency trends of daily precipitation with small amounts (as a result, high evapotranspiration loss) were increasing and with large amounts were decreasing. This can be a contributor to reduced run-off and, hence, decreased water entering the lake. The results emphasize the need for changes in the management and consumption of water resources in the basin, in order to adapt to the climatic change.

  3. From thrusting to transpressional tectonics in the Aghdarband Basin (NE Iran): evidence for Cimmerian oblique convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Balini, Marco; Ghassemi, Mohammad Reza; Zanchetta, Stefano

    2010-05-01

    The Aghdarband Basin, consisting of a strongly deformed arc-related Triassic marine succession, is a key-area for the study of the Cimmerian events, as it is unconformably covered by mid-Jurassic gently folded sediments entirely sealing the Cimmerian compressive structures. The basin developed during part of the Triassic in a highly mobile tectonic context suggested by abrupt facies variations and local unconformities. In addition, syn-sedimentary tectonic activity is testified by the occurrence of carbonate olistholiths in the deepest parts of the basin. The marine succession, spanning from Olenekian to lowermost Carnian, shows at the base continental conglomerates andsandstones, as well as basaltic lava flows, possibly of Early Triassic age. They are followed by the shallow water Sefid Kuh Limestone, in which an intraformational unconformity has been now identified. This unit is locally covered by deep-water limestones of the Nazarkardeh Fm. which interfinger with slope facies of the Sefid Kuh Limestone. The volcaniclastic sandstone layers of the Sina Fm follow up-section with a deep unconformity, marked in several places by deep erosion and tilting of the underlying units. The Sina Fm. is in turn unconformably covered by the coal bearing shales of the Miankhui Fm., with a Norian-Rhaetian age testified by plant megafossils, marking the end of marine sedimentation and of volcanic-arc activity. The Triassic units are overthrusted to the south by Upper Palaeozoic siliciclastic successions showing in some cases a LG metamorphic imprint. They largely include the Qara Geithan Fm. consisting of granitic rocks, acidic to basic volcanics, and locally also large blocks of Permian bioclastic limestones derived from the erosion of the Palaeotethys accretionary wedge, exposed south of Aghdarband. The whole succession of the Aghdarband Basin, including the unconformable Miankhui Fm., is deeply involved in a north-verging thrust stack which interacts in the northern part of the

  4. Lithofacies and sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Upper Jurassic siliciclastics in the eastern Kopet-Dagh Basin, NE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zand-Moghadam, Hamed; Moussavi-Harami, Reza; Mahboubi, Asadollah; Aghaei, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian) Mozduran Formation is the most important gas reservoirs of the northeast Iran. Siliciclastic facies of this formation in eastern most parts of the basin have not been studied yet. Therefore, four stratigraphic sections of Mozduran Formation have been selected in the Kole-Malekabad, Kale-Karab, Deraz-Ab and Karizak to interpret depositional history and analyze depositional sequences. Based on texture and sedimentary structures, 14 slilciclastic lithofacies were identified and classified into four categories, including conglomerate (Gms, Gp, Gt), sandstone (Sh, Sp, St, Sr, Sl, Sm, Se), mud rock (Fl) and intermediate sandstone-mud rock (Sr (Fl), Sr/Fl, Fl (Sr)). Identified lithofacies formed four architectural elements CH, SB, LA and FF. Lithofacies characteristics and architectural elements with mostly bimodal pattern of paleocurrents show that the majority of Mozduran lithofacies deposited in the coastal environment (tidal influence). Sequence stratigraphic analysis shows that the Kole-Malekabad section consists of two depositional sequences while other sections are characterized by three depositional sequences. The lower and upper sequence boundaries of the Mozduran Formation in all stratigraphic sections are SB1 that are distinguished by paleosol and sometime conglomerate horizons. Most of depositional sequences in studied sections are composed only of TST and HST. The TST deposits consist mostly of quartzarenite and litharenite petrofacies that have been deposited in the tidal zone. HST packages are mostly including mud rocks with interdeds of sandstone lithofacies that are deposited in supratidal setting. The LST facies is recognized only in the DS3 (equivalent to the second depositional sequences of the Kole-Malekabad), which consist of conglomerate facies. Instead, the Kole-Malekabad section is often composed of supratidal gypsiferrous shales, indicating sea level fall in the study area.

  5. Detection and attribution of climate change at regional scale: case study of Karkheh river basin in the west of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohrabi, Narges; Goodarzi, Elahe; Massah Bavani, Alireza; Najafi, Husain

    2017-11-01

    This research aims at providing a statistical framework for detection and attribution of climate variability and change at regional scale when at least 30 years of observation data are available. While extensive research has been done on detecting significant observed trends in hydroclimate variables and attribution to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions in large continents, less attention has been paid for regional scale analysis. The latter is mainly important for adaptation to climate change in different sectors including but not limited to energy, agriculture, and water resources planning and management, and it is still an open discussion in many countries including the West Asian ones. In the absence of regional climate models, an informative framework is suggested providing useful insights for policymakers. It benefits from general flexibility, not being computationally expensive, and applying several trend tests to analyze temporal variations in temperature and precipitation (gradual and step changes). The framework is implemented for a very important river basin in the west of Iran. In general, some increasing and decreasing trends of the interannual precipitation and temperature have been detected. For precipitation annual time series, a reducing step was seen around 1996 compared with the gradual change in most of the stations, which have not experience a dramatical change. The range of natural forcing is found to be ±76 % for precipitation and ±1.4 °C for temperature considering a two-dimensional diagram of precipitation and temperature anomalies from 1000-year control run of global climate model (GCM). Findings out of applying the proposed framework may provide useful insights into how to approach structural and non-structural climate change adaptation strategies from central governments.

  6. Spatial analysis of groundwater electrical conductivity using ordinary kriging and artificial intelligence methods (Case study: Maharlu-Bakhtegan and Tashk salt lakes basin, Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghader, Fatemeh; Aljoumani, Basem; Tröger, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    The main resources of fresh water are the groundwater. In Iran, the quality and quantity of groundwater is affected significantly by rapid population growth and unsustainable water management in the agricultural and industrial sectors. in Maharlu-Bakhtegan and Tashk salt lakes basin, the overexploitation of groundwater for irrigation purpose caused the salt water intrusion from the lakes to the area's aquifers, moreover, the basin is located in south of Iran with semiarid climate, faces a significant decline in rainfall. All these reasons cause the degradation of ground water quality. For this study, geographical coordinates of 406 observation wells will be defined as inputs and groundwater electrical conductivities (EC) will be set as output. Ordinary kriging (OK) and artificial neural networks (ANN) will be investigated for modeling groundwater salinity. Eighty percent of data will be randomly selected to train and develop mentioned models and twenty percent of data will be used for testing and validating. Finally, the outputs of models will be compared with the corresponding measured values in observation wells.

  7. Geochemistry and geodynamics of the Mawat mafic complex in the Zagros Suture zone, northeast Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Hossein; Hadi, Ayten; Asahara, Yoshihiro; Mohammad, Youssef Osman

    2013-12-01

    The Iraqi Zagros Orogenic Belt includes two separate ophiolite belts, which extend along a northwest-southeast trend near the Iranian border. The outer belt shows ophiolite sequences and originated in the oceanic ridge or supra-subduction zone. The inner belt includes the Mawat complex, which is parallel to the outer belt and is separated by the Biston Avoraman block. The Mawat complex with zoning structures includes sedimentary rocks with mafic interbedded lava and tuff, and thick mafic and ultramafic rocks. This complex does not show a typical ophiolite sequences such as those in Penjween and Bulfat. The Mawat complex shows evidence of dynamic deformation during the Late Cretaceous. Geochemical data suggest that basic rocks have high MgO and are significantly depleted in LREE relative to HREE. In addition they show positive ɛ Nd values (+5 to+8) and low 87Sr/86Sr ratios. The occurrence of some OIB type rocks, high Mg basaltic rocks and some intermediate compositions between these two indicate the evolution of the Mawat complex from primary and depleted source mantle. The absence of a typical ophiolite sequence and the presence of good compatibility of the source magma with magma extracted from the mantle plume suggests that a mantle plume from the D″ layer is more consistent as the source of this complex than the oceanic ridge or supra-subduction zone settings. Based on our proposed model the Mawat basin represents an extensional basin formed during the Late Paleozoic to younger along the Arabian passive margin oriented parallel to the Neo-Tethys oceanic ridge or spreading center. The Mawat extensional basin formed without creation of new oceanic basement. During the extension, huge volumes of mafic lava were intruded into this basin. This basin was squeezed between the Arabian Plate and Biston Avoraman block during the Late Cretaceous.

  8. Spinel and plagioclase peridotites of the Nain ophiolite (Central Iran): Evidence for the incipient stage of oceanic basin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirnia, Tahmineh; Saccani, Emilio; Arai, Shoji

    2018-06-01

    The Nain ophiolites crop out along the western border of the central East Iran Microcontinent (CEIM) and consist of an ophiolitic mélange in which pargasite-bearing spinel and plagioclase mantle lherzolites are largely represented. Whole-rock and mineral chemistry data suggest that these rocks record the complex history of the asthenospheric and lithospheric mantle evolution. The spinel lherzolites have experienced low-degree ( 5%) partial melting and contain clinopyroxenes with positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 1.10-1.48) suggesting that the partial melting occurred under oxidized conditions (fayalite-magnetite-quartz -0.8 to +1.3). The pargasite and coexisting clinopyroxene in these rocks are depleted in light rare earth elements (LREE) (mean chondrite-normalized CeN/SmN = 0.045). The depleted chemistry of this amphibole reflects metasomatism during interaction with H2O-rich subalkaline mafic melts, most likely concurrently with or after the partial melting of the spinel lherzolites. The plagioclase lherzolites were subsequently formed by the subsolidus recrystallization of spinel lherzolites under plagioclase facies conditions as a result of mantle uprising, as evidenced by: (1) the development of plagioclase rims around the spinels; (2) plagioclase + orthopyroxene exsolution textures within some clinopyroxene grains; (3) an increase in plagioclase modal content coupled with an increase in modal olivine and a decrease in modal pyroxene and pargasite; (4) coincident decreases in Al, Mg, and Ni, and increases in Cr, Ti, and Fe in spinel, as well as decreases in Al and Ca, and increases in Cr and Ti in pyroxene and pargasite; and (5) the identical whole rock compositions of the spinel and plagioclase lherzolites, which rules out a magmatic origin for the plagioclase in these units. The Nain lherzolites have similar whole-rock and mineral geochemical compositions to subcontinental peridotites that are typically representative of Iberia-type rifted continental margins

  9. Structure and evolution of the northern Oman margin: gravity and seismic constraints over the Zagros-Makran-Oman collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravaut, P.; Bayer, R.; Hassani, R.; Rousset, D.; Yahya'ey, A. Al

    1997-09-01

    The obduction process in Oman during Late Cretaceous time, and continental-to-oceanic subduction along the Zagros-Makran region during the Tertiary are consequences of the Arabian-Eurasian collision, resulting in construction of complex structures composed of the Oman ophiolite belt, the Zagros continental mountain belt and the Makran subduction zone with its associated accretionary wedge. In this paper, we jointly interpret Bouguer anomaly and available petroleum seismic profiles in terms of crustal structures. We show that the gravity anomaly in northern Oman is characterized by a high-amplitude negative-positive couple. The negative anomaly is coincident with Late Cretaceous (Fiqa) and Tertiary (Pabdeh) foreland basins and with the Zagros-Oman mountain belts, whereas the positive anomaly is correlated to the ophiolite massifs. The Bouguer anomaly map indicates the presence of a post-Late Cretaceous sedimentary basin, the Sohar basin, centred north of the Batinah plain. We interpret the negative/positive couple in terms of loading of the elastic Arabian lithosphere. We estimate the different Cretaceous-to-Recent loads, including topography, ophiolite nappes, sedimentary fill and the accretionary prism of the Makran trench. A new method, using Mindlin's elastic plate theory, is proposed to model the 2D deflection of the heterogeneous elastic Arabian plate, taking into account boundary conditions at the ends of the subducted plate. We show that remnant ophiolites are isolated from Tethyan oceanic lithosphere in the Gulf of Oman by a continental basement ridge, a NW prolongation of the Saih-Hatat window. Loading the northward-limited ophiolite blocks explains the deflection of the Fiqa foredeep basin. West of the Musandam Peninsula, the Tertiary Pabdeh foredeep is probably related to the emplacement of a 8-km-thick tectonic prism located on the Musandam Peninsula and in the Strait of Hormuz. Final 2D density models along profiles through the Oman mountain belt and

  10. Provenance of the Walash-Naopurdan back-arc-arc clastic sequences in the Iraqi Zagros Suture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sarmad A.; Sleabi, Rajaa S.; Talabani, Mohammad J. A.; Jones, Brian G.

    2017-01-01

    Marine clastic rocks occurring in the Walash and Naopurdan Groups in the Hasanbag and Qalander areas, Kurdistan region, Iraqi Zagros Suture Zone, are lithic arenites with high proportions of volcanic rock fragments. Geochemical classification of the Eocene Walash and Oligocene Naopurdan clastic rocks indicates that they were mainly derived from associated sub-alkaline basalt and andesitic basalt in back-arc and island arc tectonic settings. Major and trace element geochemical data reveal that the Naopurdan samples are chemically less mature than the Walash samples and both were subjected to moderate weathering. The seaway in the southern Neotethys Ocean was shallow during both Eocene and Oligocene permitting mixing of sediment from the volcanic arcs with sediment derived from the Arabian continental margin. The Walash and Naopurdan clastic rocks enhance an earlier tectonic model of the Zagros Suture Zone with their deposition occurring during the Eocene Walash calc-alkaline back-arc magmatism and Early Oligocene Naopurdan island arc magmatism in the final stages of intra-oceanic subduction before the Miocene closure and obduction of the Neotethys basin.

  11. Effects of dust on forest tree health in Zagros oak forests.

    PubMed

    Moradi, A; Taheri Abkenar, K; Afshar Mohammadian, M; Shabanian, N

    2017-10-10

    Dust is one of the most devastating factors for the environment threatening all animal and plant species. In many regions, the ecological and economic impact of microdust on scarce species is critical. In the western region of Iran, the Zagros forests have been exposed to dust storms for many years. In this study, the effect of dust on oak trees, the most important trees of Zagros forests, is investigated. For this purpose, 3-year-old seedlings of three species of oak trees under natural conditions were exposed to dust during spring and summer months. Seedlings were divided into two groups; one group was assigned as dust treatment and the other as control that the control group washed regularly to remove dust. Anatomical characteristics of leaves and dust deposits on leaves during the study period were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The rate of photosynthesis and gas exchange in control and treated plants was examined by IRGA, LCI. SEM images showed that stomata structure, trichome density, and epicuticular waxes of leaves are different in all three species. This difference in micromorphology of species influences the effects of dust deposited on the leaves. A comparison of leaf species images in control and dust treatment showed that in dust treatment the percentage of stomata blocked by dust in three species (per unit area) of Quercus infectoria, Q. libni, and Q. brantii were 61/6, 48/4, and 38/1%, respectively. The results of leaf gas exchange investigation indicated that stomatal occlusion by dust had a negative impact on the examined parameters of three oak species (P ≤ 0.01). Thus, gas exchange and photosynthetic rates of the treated species were significantly reduced. The results of both parts of the study showed the vulnerability of the three species to dust as Q. infectoria > Q. libni > Q. brantii. Therefore, based on these findings, dust can disrupt the physiological activities of the studied species and the continuation of the

  12. Analysing streamflow variability and water allocation for sustainable management of water resources in the semi-arid Karkheh river basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masih, Ilyas; Ahmad, Mobin-ud-Din; Uhlenbrook, Stefan; Turral, Hugh; Karimi, Poolad

    This study provides a comprehensive spatio-temporal assessment of the surface water resources of the semi-arid Karkheh basin, Iran, and consequently enables decision makers to work towards a sustainable water development in that region. The analysis is based on the examination of statistical parameters, flow duration characteristics, base flow separation and trend analysis for which data of seven key gauging stations were used for the period of 1961-2001. Additionally, basin level water accounting was carried out for the water year 1993-94. The study shows that observed daily, monthly and annual streamflows are highly variable in space and time within the basin. The streamflows have not been changed significantly at annual scale, but few months have shown significant trends, most notably a decline during May and June and an increase during December and March. The major causes were related to changes in climate, land use and reservoir operations. The study concludes that the water allocations to different sectors were lower than the totally available resources during the study period. However, looking at the high variability of streamflows, changes in climate and land use and ongoing water resources development planning, it will be extremely difficult to meet the demands of all sectors in the future, particularly during dry years.

  13. Investigating the causality of changes in the landscape pattern of Lake Urmia basin, Iran using remote sensing and time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Mehrian, Majid Ramezani; Hernandez, Raul Ponce; Yavari, Ahmad Reza; Faryadi, Shahrzad; Salehi, Esmaeil

    2016-08-01

    Lake Urmia is the second largest hypersaline lake in the world in terms of surface area. In recent decades, the drop in water level of the lake has been one of the most important environmental issues in Iran. At present, the entire basin is threatened due to abrupt decline of the lake's water level and the consequent increase in salinity. Despite the numerous studies, there is still an ambiguity about the main cause of this environmental crisis. This paper is an attempt to detect the changes in the landscape structure of the main elements of the whole basin using remote sensing techniques and analyze the results against climate data with time series analysis for the purpose of achieving a more clarified illustration of processes and trends. Trend analysis of the different affecting factors indicates that the main cause of the drastic dry out of the lake is the huge expansion of irrigated agriculture in the basin between 1999 and 2014. The climatological parameters including precipitation and temperature cannot be the main reasons for reduced water level in the lake. The results show how the increase in irrigated agricultural area without considering the water resources limits can lead to a regional disaster. The approach used in this study can be a useful tool to monitor and assess the causality of environmental disaster.

  14. Fold-and-thrust belt curvature in the Fars region, eastern Zagros, achieved by variable thrust slip vectors and fault block rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edey, Alex; Allen, Mark B.

    2017-04-01

    Many fold-and-thrust belts are curved in plan view, but the origins of this curvature are debated. Understanding which mechanism(s) is appropriate is important to constrain the behaviour of the lithosphere during compressional deformation. Here we analyse the active deformation of the Fars Arc region in the eastern part of the Zagros, Iran, including slip vectors of 92 earthquakes, published GPS and palaeomagnetism data, and the distributions of young and/or active folds. The fold-and-thrust belt in the Fars Arc shows pronounced curvature, convex southwards. Folds trends vary from NW-SE in the west to ENE-WSW in the east. The GPS-derived velocity field shows NNE to SSW convergence, towards the foreland on the Arabian Plate, without dispersion. Earthquake slip vectors are highly variable, spanning a range of azimuths from SW to SSE in an Arabian Plate reference frame. The full variation of azimuths occurs within small (10s of km) sub-regions, but this variation is superimposed on a radial pattern, whereby slip vectors tend to be parallel to the regional topographic gradient. Given the lack of variation in the GPS vectors, we conclude that the Fars Arc is not curved as a result of gravitational spreading over the adjacent foreland, but as a result of deformation being restricted at tectonic boundaries at the eastern and western margins of the Arc. Fault blocks and folds within the Fars Arc, each 20-40 km long, rotate about vertical axes to achieve the overall curvature, predominantly clockwise in the west and counter-clockwise in the east. Active folds of different orientations may intersect and produce dome-and-basin interference patterns, without the need for a series of separate deformation phases of different stress orientations. The Fars Arc clearly contrasts with the Himalayas, where both GPS and earthquake slip vectors display radial patterns towards the foreland, and gravitational spreading is a viable mechanism for producing fold-and-thrust belt curvature.

  15. Discussion on ``Dextral transpression in Late Cretaceous continental collision, Sanandaj Sirjan Zone, western Iran'' [Journal of Structural Geology, 22(8) (2000) 1125 1139

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numan, Nazar M. S.

    2001-12-01

    The NW-SE trending Alpine Zagros Thrust Belt passes from southwest Iran into northeastern Iraq. Mohajjel and Fergusson contend in their work in Iran on the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (with a consistent Zagros trend) that collision of the Afro-Arabian continent and the Iranian microcontinent took place in the Late Cretaceous. It seems that tectonostratigraphic evidence from the neighbouring Iraqi territories, namely the Zagros Thrust Belt in the northern part, the Foreland Belt and the Quasiplatform of the north and the Platform in the western and southern deserts (Fig. 1), chronicles the subductional history in this part of the world to a fair degree of accuracy. It rather provides for an Eocene age of the continental collision between Arabia and the Iranian microcontinent.

  16. Balancing cross-sections combining field work and remote sensing data using LithoTect software in the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt, N Iraq.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Daniel; Grasemann, Bernhard; Lockhart, Duncan

    2010-05-01

    The Zagros fold-and-thrust belt has formed in detached Phanerozoic sedimentary cover rocks above a shortened crystalline Precambrian basement and evolved through the Late Cretaceous to Miocene collision between the Arabian and Eurasian plate, during which the Neotethys oceanic basin was closed. Deformation is partitioned in SW directed folding and thrusting of the sediments and NW-SE to N-S trending dextral strike slip faults. The sub-cylindrical doubly-plunging fold trains with wavelengths of 5 - 10 km host more than half of the world's hydrocarbon reserves in mostly anticlinal traps. Generally the Zagros is divided into three NW-SE striking tectonic units: the Zagros Imbricate Zone, the Zagros Simply Folded Belt and the Zagros Foredeep. This work presents a balanced cross-section through the Simply Folded Belt, NE of the city of Erbil (Kurdistan, Iraq). The regional stratigraphy comprises mainly Cretaceous to Cenozoic folded sediments consisting of massive, carbonate rocks (limestones, dolomites), reacting as competent layers during folding compared to the incompetent behavior of interlayered siltstones, claystones and marls. Although the overall security situation in Kurdistan is much better than in the rest of Iraq, structural field mapping was restricted to asphalt streets, mainly because of the contamination of the area with landmines and unexploded ordnance. In order to extend the structural measurements statistically over the investigated area, we used a newly developed software tool (www.terramath.com) for interactive structural mapping of spatial orientations (i.e. dip direction and dip angles) of the sedimentary beddings from digital elevation models. Structural field data and computed measurements where integrated and projected in NE-SW striking balanced cross-sections perpendicular to the regional trend of the fold axes. We used the software LithoTect (www.geologicsystems.com) for the restoration of the cross-sections. Depending on the interpretation

  17. Integration of hydrologic and water allocation models in basin-scale water resources management considering crop pattern and climate change: Karkheh River Basin in Iran

    The paradigm of integrated water resources management requires coupled analysis of hydrology and water resources in a river basin. Population growth and uncertainties due to climate change make historic data not a reliable source of information for future planning of water resources, hence necessit...

  18. Crustal and lithospheric structure of the Alborz Mountains (Iran) and surrounding areas from integrated geophysical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motavallianbaran, S.; Zeyen, H. J.; Brunet, M.; Ardestani, V. E.

    2010-12-01

    The tectonic evolution of Alborz Mountains (northern Iran) and the South Caspian Basin as well as its transition into the Scythian and Turan platforms are yet an unsolved and debated problem. Using gravity, geoid, topography and surface heat flow data, we have modeled the density and temperature distribution in the lithosphere along three profiles crossing Iran in SW-NE direction from the Arabian foreland in the SW to the South Caspian Basin and the Turan Platform to the NE. We found thin lithosphere (100-120 km) underneath Central Iran, whereas thick lithosphere (up to 260 km), is found underneath Arabia, the South Caspian Basin and the Turan Platform. Crustal thickening is found under the Zagros and Alborz Mountains (up to 58 km) and under the Kopet-Dagh Mountains (48 km), whereas the thin crust under the southern Caspian Sea is interpreted as oceanic crust. Modeling result of Profile I is shown below with the crust in gray scale (darker gray: higher density) and the lithospheric mantle with color-coded temperatures. Since some previous studies argued for the absence of a root under the Alborz, we tested different models to see whether it is possible to explain the data without a root beneath the Alborz and finally we found that it is impossible to fit the calculated data to the measured ones with a geologically reasonable model. Below the South Caspian Sea, the form of the crust-mantle interface and the base of the lithosphere indicate a subduction of the South Caspian block towards the N-NW. Further east, under the Kopet-Dagh, no evidence for active subduction is visible. Based on the temperature distribution, we calculated the vertically integrated rock rigidity along the profiles. It shows that a rheologically very strong South Caspian block is surrounded by weaker continental lithosphere which may explain the rigid-block subduction of the South Caspian block on the one hand and internal deformation of the lithosphere under the Kopet-Dagh on the other hand.

  19. Paleo- and Neo-Tethyan ophiolites of Iran: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazi, M.; Hassanipak, A.; Babaie, H.

    2003-04-01

    The Bitlis-Zagros and Alborz stuture zones of Iran mark two collisional plate boundaries in the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. The ophiolites of these zones together with the ophiolites of Makran accretionary prism and Central Iran form discontinuous linear belts of Tethyan oceanic fragments, which form a bridge between the Mediterranean and Himalayan ophiolites. Based on age alone these ophiolites have been divided into less abundant Paleozoic and much more abundant Mesozoic ophiolites. The Paleozoic ophiolites are located along the Alborz orogenic belt [i.e., Rasht and Mashhad ophiolites (297 Ma and 268 Ma)] and near Anarak in Central Iran. which are the remnants of the Paleo-Tethys ocean crust emplaced as result of closure of the Paleo-Tethys between the Turan and the Central Iranian Microplates (CIM). The Mesezoic ophiolites of Iran are more abundant and include the Zagros ophiolites (i.e., Neyriz and the Kermanshah ophiolites which appear to be coeval with the Oman ophiolite obducted onto the Arabian plate (˜96-92 Ma). The Khoy ophiolite in NW Iran which has formation age of Middle to Late Jurrasic (˜159-155 Ma), and emplacement age Albian ages (˜ 109-104 Ma) has a different tectonics than other Zagros ophiolites. Unfragmented ophiolites of the Makran accretionary prism which are located to the south of the Sanandaj-Sirjan microcontinental block, including complexes such as Band-e-Zeyarat/Dar Anar, Ganj and Remeshk/Mokhtarabad (˜140-98 Ma) are similar in age to the Masirah ophiolite (i.e., ˜150-120 Ma). The ophiolites of the Central Iran include those inside of the Sanandaj-Sirjan microcontinental block, such as Shahr-e-Babak (120 Ma), Naien (100 Ma), Baft, Sabzevar in north central Iran (98-70 Ma) and Tchehel Kureh on the eastern boundary of CIM.Geochemically, these ophiolites are quite diverse and show a significant variations in rock composition, representing a wide range of tectonic environment of formation. In terms of radiogenic isotopic data

  20. Pre-folding fracture development in the Lurestan region of the Zagros Fold and Thrust Belt: constraints from early fracture sets in the Shabazan and Asmari Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradetti, Amerigo; Tavani, Stefano; D'Assisi Tramparulo, Francesco; Prinzi, Ernesto Paolo; Vitale, Stefano; Parente, Mariano; Morsalnejad, Davoud; Mazzoli, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    In the Zagros Fold and Thrust Belt (FTB), the timing of fracture development with respect to folding is debated. Multiple fracture systems occur in the area. These include "typical" fracture systems that are oriented parallel and orthogonal to the NW-SE strike of the belt, as well as sets oriented N-S and E-W. The interpretation of the N-S and E-W sets is controversial. Despite the general consensus about the first-order relationship between these fractures and inherited N-S striking basement faults, their timing and kinematic significance is not yet fully understood. The ambiguous crosscutting/abutting relationships with the NE-SW and NW-SE sets, together with the difficulty of framing them into the classical scenario of fracturing in foreland basin systems, has led to the development of different hypotheses about the timing of N-S and E-W sets. For the generation of these structures, both pre- and syn-thrusting interpretations have been proposed. In this work, we report on the occurrence of bed-perpendicular fracture sets in the upper part of the Shabazan (Eocene) and in the Asmari (Oligo-Miocene) Formations of the Zagros FTB. These fractures have the peculiarity of being filled with karst material. Such filled fractures are preserved in beds showing variable angles of dip, ranging from horizontal to vertical. Their homogeneous distribution in variably dipping beds around folds undoubtedly point to an origin of these fracture sets predating the tilting of the strata in which they are contained. Therefore, fracture development and related infilling occurred at an early stage, in still flat lying strata, following the deposition of the top Shabazan and Asmari Formations. Such a deposition took place within the general framework of ongoing shortening in the Zagros. This process, occurring since the Late Cretaceous, progressively led to folding of the syn-orogenic Shabazan and Asmari Formations subsequently to the development of the studied filled fractures.

  1. Preliminary results of chronostratigraphic field work, OSL-dating and morphogenetic reconstruction of an alluvial apron at Alborz southern foothill, Damghan basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büdel, Christian; Fuchs, Markus; Majid Padashi, Seyed; Baumhauer, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Here we present preliminary results of a chronostratigraphic study of an alluvial fan in the Damghan Basin, northern Iran. The basin sediments date back to the Mio- and Pliocene and therefore represent the starting point of alluvial fan aggradation. Today, the still active alluvial fans prograde from the Albors Mountain ranges and sit on the older sediment bodies. In this study, our focus is on the late Pleistocene to Holocene alluvial fan sedimentation history. The upper stratigraphy of the alluvial fans and intercalated lake deposits is characterized by six individual layers of gravels and fines, representing six different stratigraphic units. These units are described and classified by detailed geomorphological and stratigraphic mapping. To establish an alluvial fan chronology, six profiles were sampled for OSL dating. As expected, due to the high-energy transport system of alluvial fan aggradation in semi-desert environments, OSL dating of these sediments is challenging due to the problem of insufficient bleaching. Consequently, most of the samples are interpreted as maximum ages. However, the measurements show a consistent internal age structure and the overall OSL-based chronology is in agreement with the age model derived from our geomorphological analysis. As a first interpretation, based on surveyed geomorphological features and chronological analysis, we could identify seven morphodynamic phases, leading to a genetic model of alluvial fan aggradation. The oldest Pleistocene age estimate is derived from a former lake terrace. The following ages represent ongoing lake sediment deposition and the development of a proximal and mid-fan gravel cover. After the youngest lake deposits were accumulated within the Holocene, the lake starts to retreat and small alluvial fans are filling up the former lake bottom. This last sedimentation phase can be divided in at least two sub-phases, probably coupled to a lateral shifting of the active depositional lobe and to the

  2. Crustal Structure of the Iran Region from In-Country and Ground-Truth Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    thickness in the region (e.g., Mokhtari et al., 2004), and these data will be utilized in our Pn tomography both as constraints and for validation of...Vergne, and M. Mokhtari (2006). Seismological evidence for crustal-scale thrusting in the Zagros mountain belt (Iran), Geophys. J Int. 166: 227-237...for understanding the deformation history of the Arabian-Eurasian collision. Geophvs. J. Int. 172: 1179-1187. Mokhtari , M., A. M. Farahbod, C. Lindholm

  3. Determining the most suitable areas for artificial groundwater recharge via an integrated PROMETHEE II-AHP method in GIS environment (case study: Garabaygan Basin, Iran).

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Hossein; Boloorani, Ali Darvishi; Sabokbar, Hassan Ali Faraji; Jafari, Hamid Reza; Hamzeh, Mohamad; Rafii, Yusef

    2013-01-01

    Flood spreading is a suitable strategy for controlling and benefiting from floods. Selecting suitable areas for flood spreading and directing the floodwater into permeable formations are amongst the most effective strategies in flood spreading projects. Having combined geographic information systems (GIS) and multi-criteria decision analysis approaches, the present study sought to locate the most suitable areas for flood spreading operation in the Garabaygan Basin of Iran. To this end, the data layers relating to the eight effective factors were prepared in GIS environment. This stage was followed by elimination of the exclusionary areas for flood spreading while determining the potentially suitable ones. Having closely examined the potentially suitable areas using the Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluations (PROMETHEE) II and analytic hierarchy process (AHP) methods, the land suitability map for flood spreading was produced. The PROMETHEE II and AHP were used for ranking all the alternatives and weighting the criteria involved, respectively. The results of the study showed that most suitable areas for the artificial groundwater recharge are located in Quaternary Q(g) and Q(gsc) geologic units and in geomorphological units of pediment and Alluvial fans with slopes not exceeding 3%. Furthermore, significant correspondence between the produced map and the control areas, where the flood spreading projects were successfully performed, provided further evidence for the acceptable efficiency of the integrated PROMETHEE II-AHP method in locating suitable flood spreading areas.

  4. Analyzing long-term spatial variability of blue and green water footprints in a semi-arid mountainous basin with MIROC-ESM model (case study: Kashafrood River Basin, Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghakhani Afshar, A.; Hassanzadeh, Y.; Pourreza-Bilondi, M.; Ahmadi, A.

    2017-11-01

    The river basin hydrology cycles and the available water resources (including blue and green water) are greatly influenced by the climate change and rainfall patterns in regions with arid and semi-arid climates. In this study, the impacts of climate change on the parameters of virtual water is evaluated in the Kashafrood River (KR), as a large-scale basin which is located in the northeast of Iran, by means of SWAT model (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) along with SUFI-2 (Sequential Uncertainty Fitting Program version 2). In addition, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses are taken into account at five runoff stations for calibrating and validating the model. Based on the changes in blue water (BW), green water flow (GWF), and green water storage (GWS), the water availability was analyzed using MIROC-ESM model in series of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) and was compared with two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) of new emission scenarios (RCP2.6 and RCP8.5). These emission scenarios were downscaled based on the observed data under three future periods: near future (2014-2042), intermediate future (2043-2071), and far future (2072-2100) in relation to a historical period (1992-2013). Calibration and validation at multi-site (five stations) showed a proper performance of the SWAT model in modeling hydrological processes. Results of investigating climate change impacts on the blue and green water components (BW and GW) showed that in the historical period, the basin was not in an appropriate climate condition for accessing the water resources. Also, in future times, considerable spatial variations in different hydrological components were observed. On the other hand, under both RCPs and in all three future periods in relative to historical period, the BW contents will increase about 46-74%, while GWF will decrease about 2-15%. Regarding the historical period, it was revealed that the condition of the basin will be improved. In

  5. Structural Analysis and Evolution of the Kashan (Qom-Zefreh) Fault, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safaei, H.; Taheri, A.; Vaziri-Moghaddam, H.

    The main objectives of this research were to identify the geometry and structure of the Qom-Zefreh fault and to determine the extent of its effects on stratigraphy and facies changes. The identification of movement mechanism of major faults in basement, extent and time of their activities are important effects for evaluation of paleogeography of the Iran plateau. In the Orumieh-Dokhtar volcanic band, there are nearly parallel faults to the Zagros Zone. These faults were formed during closure of the Neothetys and collision of the Arabic plate with crust of Iran. The Qom-Zefreh fault is one of these faults, which is known as having four different trend faults. The result indicates that, this fault is not divided in four segments with different trends but the major trend is of Central section, which is the Kashan segment with AZ140 trend and other segments are just related faults. Thus the name of the Kashan fault is recommended for this fault. The mechanism of the Kashan fault is dextral transpression and other related faults in the region are in good correlation with fractures in a dextral transpression system. The stratigraphic studies conducted on the present formations show the effect of fault movements in Upper Cretaceous sedimentary basin. Lack of noticeable changes in Lower Cretaceous sediments and before that indicates that, the fault system activity has been started from the Upper Cretaceous. Thus, based upon these results, the effect of the Neothetys sea closure in this region could be considered at least from the Upper Cretaceous.

  6. Thin-skinned tectonics in the Central Basin of the Iranian Plateau in the Semnan area, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzari, Soheila; Konon, Andrzej; Koprianiuk, Marek; Julapour, Ali A.

    2013-01-01

    During continent-continent convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian plates, and after the late Eocene inversion of a back-arc rift, the Iranian Plateau underwent broad subsidence resulting in the formation of the Central Basin (Morley et al., 2009). New 2D seismic data acquired by National Iranian Oil Company (NIOC) in the NW-SW-trending arm of the Central Basin suggest that during the main stage of shortening (middle-late? Miocene to Pliocene), strain concentrations resulted in the development of the thin-skinned Kuh-e-Gachab, Kuh-e-Gugerd, Garmsar and Sorkh-e-Kuh structures. These structures are built of Oligocene-Miocene/Pliocene(?) rocks belonging to the Lower Red, Qom and Upper Red formations. Seismic data suggest that one of these structures comprises the south-verging Kuh-e-Gachab anticline, which is bounded by the N-dipping Kuh-e-Gachab thrust and cored by a complex array of thrust sheets forming a triangle zone. During the deformation process, two salt evaporate levels played a significant role as detachment horizons. The main detachment horizon was rooted within the Lower Red Formation, whereas the second detachment horizon was located along evaporites belonging to the Upper Red Formation. Variations in the thin-skinned style of deformation between the larger triangle zone in the western part of the Kuh-e-Gachab structure contrasts with less shortening in the smaller triangle zone to the east. This suggests that the change resulted from the increase of thickness of the mobile detachment horizon to the east. Contraction deformations are still active south of the Alborz Mountains, which is confirmed by GPS data and present-day seismicity.

  7. 3D joint inversion modeling of the lithospheric density structure based on gravity, geoid and topography data — Application to the Alborz Mountains (Iran) and South Caspian Basin region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motavalli-Anbaran, Seyed-Hani; Zeyen, Hermann; Ebrahimzadeh Ardestani, Vahid

    2013-02-01

    We present a 3D algorithm to obtain the density structure of the lithosphere from joint inversion of free air gravity, geoid and topography data based on a Bayesian approach with Gaussian probability density functions. The algorithm delivers the crustal and lithospheric thicknesses and the average crustal density. Stabilization of the inversion process may be obtained through parameter damping and smoothing as well as use of a priori information like crustal thicknesses from seismic profiles. The algorithm is applied to synthetic models in order to demonstrate its usefulness. A real data application is presented for the area of northern Iran (with the Alborz Mountains as main target) and the South Caspian Basin. The resulting model shows an important crustal root (up to 55 km) under the Alborz Mountains and a thin crust (ca. 30 km) under the southernmost South Caspian Basin thickening northward to the Apsheron-Balkan Sill to 45 km. Central and NW Iran is underlain by a thin lithosphere (ca. 90-100 km). The lithosphere thickens under the South Caspian Basin until the Apsheron-Balkan Sill where it reaches more than 240 km. Under the stable Turan platform, we find a lithospheric thickness of 160-180 km.

  8. Preliminary investigation of Zagros thrust-fold-belt deformation using SAR interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilforoushan, Faramarz; Talbot, Christopher J.; Fielding, Eric J.

    2005-01-01

    Most of the Zagros deformation resulting from the convergence of Arabia and Eurasia takes place in the Southeast Zagros. To apply the SAR interferometry geodetic technique, a few ERS 1 & 2 satellite images were used to map this continuing deformation proven by GPS. Interferograms over 7 years show surprisingly high coherence. The unwrapped phases display a high correlation with topography reflecting atmospheric noise in addition to the desired tectonic signal. We estimate two simple linear trends and remove them from interferograms. The preliminary results show local uplift rates with a likely minimum of 1-2 mm/yr. These early crude results will be tested by more data in project No. 3174.

  9. Structural style and hydrocarbon trap of Karbasi anticline, in the Interior Fars region, Zagros, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Z.; Arian, M.; Solgi, A.

    2014-07-01

    Karbasi anticline between west-northwest parts of Jahrom town is located in northwest 40 km distance of Aghar gas anticline in interior Fars region. This anticline has asymmetric structure and some faults with large strike separation observed in its structure. The operation of Nezamabad sinistral strike slip fault in west part of this anticline caused fault plunge change in this region. Because of complication increasing of structures geometry in Fars region and necessity to exploration activities for deeper horizons especially the Paleozoic ones, the analysis of fold style elements, which is known as one of the main parts in structural studies seems necessary. In this paper because of some reasons such as Karbasi anticline structural complication, importance of drilling and hydrocarbon explorations in Fars region, it is proceed to analysis and evaluation of fold style elements and geometry with emphasis on Nezamabad fault operation in Interior Fars region. According to fold style elements analysis results, it became clear that in east part of anticline the type of fold horizontal moderately inclined and in west part it is upright moderately plunging, so west evaluation of anticline is affected by more deformation. In this research the relationship present faults especially the Nezamabad sinistral strike slip one with folding and its affection on Dehram horizon and Bangestan group were modeled. Based on received results may be the Nezamabad fault is located between G-G' and E-E' structural sections and this fault in this area operated same as fault zone. In different parts of Karbasi anticline, Dashtak formation as a middle detachment unit plays an important role in connection to folding geometry, may be which is affected by Nezamabad main fault.

  10. Lake Urmia (Iran): can future socio-ecologically motivated river basin management restore lake water levels in an arid region with extensive agricultural development?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazel, Nasim; Berndtsson, Ronny; Bertacchi Uvo, Cintia; Klove, Bjorn; Madani, Kaveh

    2015-04-01

    Lake Urmia, one of the world's largest hyper saline lakes located in northwest of Iran, is a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and Ramsar site, protected as a national park and, supports invaluable and unique biodiversity and related ecosystem services for the region's 6.5 million inhabitants. Due to increased development of the region's water resources for agriculture and industry and to a certain extent climate change, the lake has started to shrink dramatically since 1995 and now is holding less than 30 percent of its volume. Rapid development in agricultural sector and land-use changes has resulted in immense construction of dams and water diversions in almost all lake feeding rivers, intensifying lake shrinking, increasing salinity and degrading its ecosystem. Recently, lake's cultural and environmental importance and social pressure has raised concerns and brought government attention to the lake restoration plans. Along with poor management, low yield agriculture as the most water consuming activity in the region with, rapid, insufficient development is one of the most influential drivers in the lake desiccation. Part of the lake restoration plans in agricultural sector is to restrict the agricultural areas in the main feeding river basins flowing mostly in the southern part of the lake and decreasing the agricultural water use in this area. This study assess the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed plans and its influence on the lake level rise and its impacts on economy in the region using a system dynamics model developed for the Lake consist of hydrological and agro-economical sub-systems. The effect of decrease in agricultural area in the region on GDP and region economy was evaluated and compared with released water contribution in lake level rise for a five year simulation period.

  11. Cenozoic intracontinental deformation of the Kopeh Dagh Belt, Northeastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Yang; Wan, Bo; Chen, Ling; Talebian, Morteza

    2016-04-01

    arc magmatism. During the Jurassic to Eocene rifting, this belt acted as the southern boundary of the Amu Darya Basin with normal faulting, which is also widespread in the South Caspian Sea and the Black Sea. Moreover, such an extended area became a relatively weak zone within the Eurasian Plate, and could be easily reworked. Because of the collision in the Zagros Belt, the intracontinental compression commenced as early as Late Eocene to Early Oligocene, which is interpreted as tectonic inversion along this weak zone. The western zone of the Kopeh Dagh Belt was also affected by southerly indentation/extrusion of the South Caspian block since middle Miocene, possibly resulting in the different deformation patterns between the western and eastern zones.

  12. A molecular approach to the genus Alburnoides using COI sequences data set and the description of a new species, A. damghani, from the Damghan River system (the Dasht-e Kavir Basin, Iran) (Actinopterygii, Cyprinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Roudbar, Arash Jouladeh; Eagderi, Soheil; Esmaeili, Hamid Reza; Coad, Brian W.; Bogutskaya, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The molecular status of nine species of the genus Alburnoides from different river drainages in Iran and additionally by seven species from Europe was assessed. mtDNA COI gene sequences from freshly collected specimens and available NCBI data revealed four major phylogenetic lineages. Based on the results, a distinct taxon from the Cheshmeh Ali (Ali Spring), a Damghan River tributary in the endorheic Dasht-e Kavir basin, northern Iran, which is the closest sister to Alburnoides namaki (Namak Lake basin) + Alburnoides coadi (Nam River in the endorheic Dasht-e Kavir basin) is considered as a new species, Alburnoides damghani sp. n. It is distinguished from other Alburnoides species in Iran by a combination of character states including: a weakly-developed, variably-scaled, ventral keel from completely scaleless to completely scaled, a short snout with the tip of the mouth cleft on a level with the lower margin of the pupil or slightly lower, a small eye (eye horizontal diameter slightly to markedly less than interorbital width), commonly 8½ branched dorsal-fin rays, commonly 11−12½ branched anal-fin rays, 40−46(47) total lateral-line scales, 2.5–4.2 or 2.5–4.1 pharyngeal teeth, gill rakers short and widely spaced, 6−8 in total, 39−41 (commonly 40), total vertebrae, (19)20(21) abdominal vertebrae, 19−21 (most commonly 20) caudal vertebrae, abdominal vertebral region most commonly equal to or longer than caudal region, and most common vertebral formulae 20+20 and 21+19. PMID:27110204

  13. A molecular approach to the genus Alburnoides using COI sequences data set and the description of a new species, A. damghani, from the Damghan River system (the Dasht-e Kavir Basin, Iran) (Actinopterygii, Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Roudbar, Arash Jouladeh; Eagderi, Soheil; Esmaeili, Hamid Reza; Coad, Brian W; Bogutskaya, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The molecular status of nine species of the genus Alburnoides from different river drainages in Iran and additionally by seven species from Europe was assessed. mtDNA COI gene sequences from freshly collected specimens and available NCBI data revealed four major phylogenetic lineages. Based on the results, a distinct taxon from the Cheshmeh Ali (Ali Spring), a Damghan River tributary in the endorheic Dasht-e Kavir basin, northern Iran, which is the closest sister to Alburnoides namaki (Namak Lake basin) + Alburnoides coadi (Nam River in the endorheic Dasht-e Kavir basin) is considered as a new species, Alburnoides damghani sp. n. It is distinguished from other Alburnoides species in Iran by a combination of character states including: a weakly-developed, variably-scaled, ventral keel from completely scaleless to completely scaled, a short snout with the tip of the mouth cleft on a level with the lower margin of the pupil or slightly lower, a small eye (eye horizontal diameter slightly to markedly less than interorbital width), commonly 8½ branched dorsal-fin rays, commonly 11-12½ branched anal-fin rays, 40-46(47) total lateral-line scales, 2.5-4.2 or 2.5-4.1 pharyngeal teeth, gill rakers short and widely spaced, 6-8 in total, 39-41 (commonly 40), total vertebrae, (19)20(21) abdominal vertebrae, 19-21 (most commonly 20) caudal vertebrae, abdominal vertebral region most commonly equal to or longer than caudal region, and most common vertebral formulae 20+20 and 21+19.

  14. Analysis of the stress field and strain rate in Zagros-Makran transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani Rostam, Ghasem; Pakzad, Mehrdad; Mirzaei, Noorbakhsh; Sakhaei, Seyed Reza

    2018-01-01

    Transition boundary between Zagros continental collision and Makran oceanic-continental subduction can be specified by two wide limits: (a) Oman Line is the seismicity boundary with a sizeable reduction in seismicity rate from Zagros in the west to Makran in the east; and (b) the Zendan-Minab-Palami (ZMP) fault system is believed to be a prominent tectonic boundary. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the stress field in the Zagros-Makran transition zone by the iterative joint inversion method developed by Vavrycuk (Geophysical Journal International 199:69-77, 2014). The results suggest a rather uniform pattern of the stress field around these two boundaries. We compare the results with the strain rates obtained from the Global Positioning System (GPS) network stations. In most cases, the velocity vectors show a relatively good agreement with the stress field except for the Bandar Abbas (BABS) station which displays a relatively large deviation between the stress field and the strain vector. This deviation probably reflects a specific location of the BABS station being in the transition zone between Zagros continental collision and Makran subduction zones.

  15. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-07

    resolutions. November 21, 2011: Treasury Department names Iranian financial sector as a jurisdiction of primary money laundering concern. December...imposes sanctions on several key sectors of Iran’s economic infrastructure. For a broader analysis of policy on Iran, see CRS Report RL32048, Iran...1 Energy Sector Sanctions: The Iran

  16. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-18

    Manufacturing Group (Iran, missile prog.) Aerospace Industries Organization (AIO) (Iran) September 2007 Korea Mining and Development Corp. ( N . Korea... Vitaly Sokolenko (general manager of Ferland) April 29, 2014 (for connections to deceptive oil dealings for Iran) Saeed Al Aqili (co-owner of Al

  17. Downscaling of daily precipitation using a hybrid model of Artificial Neural Network, Wavelet, and Quantile Mapping in Gharehsoo River Basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taie Semiromi, M.; Koch, M.

    2017-12-01

    Although linear/regression statistical downscaling methods are very straightforward and widely used, and they can be applied to a single predictor-predictand pair or spatial fields of predictors-predictands, the greatest constraint is the requirement of a normal distribution of the predictor and the predictand values, which means that it cannot be used to predict the distribution of daily rainfall because it is typically non-normal. To tacked with such a limitation, the current study aims to introduce a new developed hybrid technique taking advantages from Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Wavelet and Quantile Mapping (QM) for downscaling of daily precipitation for 10 rain-gauge stations located in Gharehsoo River Basin, Iran. With the purpose of daily precipitation downscaling, the study makes use of Second Generation Canadian Earth System Model (CanESM2) developed by Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis (CCCma). Climate projections are available for three representative concentration pathways (RCPs) namely RCP 2.6, RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 for up to 2100. In this regard, 26 National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis large-scale variables which have potential physical relationships with precipitation, were selected as candidate predictors. Afterwards, predictor screening was conducted using correlation, partial correlation and explained variance between predictors and predictand (precipitation). Depending on each rain-gauge station between two and three predictors were selected which their decomposed details (D) and approximation (A) obtained from discrete wavelet analysis were fed as inputs to the neural networks. After downscaling of daily precipitation, bias correction was conducted using quantile mapping. Out of the complete time series available, i.e. 1978-2005, two third of which namely 1978-1996 was used for calibration of QM and the reminder, i.e. 1997-2005 was considered for the validation. Result showed that the proposed

  18. SWAT-MODSIM-PSO optimization of multi-crop planning in the Karkheh River Basin, Iran, under the impacts of climate change.

    PubMed

    Fereidoon, Majid; Koch, Manfred

    2018-07-15

    Agriculture is one of the environmental/economic sectors that may adversely be affected by climate change, especially, in already nowadays water-scarce regions, like the Middle East. One way to cope with future changes in absolute as well as seasonal (irrigation) water amounts can be the adaptation of the agricultural crop pattern in a region, i.e. by planting crops which still provide high yields and so economic benefits to farmers under such varying climate conditions. To do this properly, the whole cascade starting from climate change, effects on hydrology and surface water availability, subsequent effects on crop yield, agricultural areas available, and, finally, economic value of a multi-crop cultivation pattern must be known. To that avail, a complex coupled simulation-optimization tool SWAT-LINGO-MODSIM-PSO (SLMP) has been developed here and used to find the future optimum cultivation area of crops for the maximization of the economic benefits in five irrigation-fed agricultural plains in the south of the Karkheh River Basin (KRB) southwest Iran. Starting with the SWAT distributed hydrological model, the KR-streamflow as well as the inflow into the Karkheh-reservoir, as the major storage of irrigation water, is calibrated and validated, based on 1985-2004 observed discharge data. In the subsequent step, the SWAT-predicted streamflow is fed into the MODSIM river basin Decision Support System to simulate and optimize the water allocation between different water users (agricultural, environmental, municipal and industrial) under standard operating policy (SOP) rules. The final step is the maximization of the economic benefit in the five agricultural plains through constrained PSO (particle swarm optimization) by adjusting the cultivation areas (decision variables) of different crops (wheat, barley, maize and "others"), taking into account their specific prizes and optimal crop yields under water deficiency, with the latter computed in the LINGO

  19. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-04

    Proliferation Act) authorizes sanctions on foreign persons (individuals or corporations , not countries or governments ) that are determined by the...the German government to order it closed.43 Foreign Companies Exiting the Iran Market Neither the U.S. ban on trade and investment with Iran, nor...and should try to isolate Iran from the international financial system. The energy sector provides about 80% of government revenues. Iran’s large

  20. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-07

    funds the sale to Iran of Indian wheat, pharmaceuticals, rice, sugar , soybeans, auto parts, and other products. Still, there is a large trade...the Persian Gulf coast Sinopec up to $6 billion if new refinery is built Oct. 2009 South Pars Gas Field—Phases 6-8, Gas Sweetening Plant...petrochemical products from Iran. - Niksima Food and Beverage JLT for receiving payments on behalf of Jam Petrochemical Iran Sanctions Congressional

  1. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-18

    That local account funds the sale to Iran of Indian wheat, pharmaceuticals, rice, sugar , soybeans, auto parts, and other products. Still, there is a...Gas Field—Phases 6-8, Gas Sweetening Plant CRS conversation with Embassy of S. Korea in Washington, D.C, July 2010 Contract signed but then...Company for purchasing petrochemical products from Iran. - Niksima Food and Beverage JLT for receiving payments on behalf of Jam Petrochemical Iran

  2. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-12

    imports).9 • Petroleos de Venezuela (reportedly reached a September 2009 deal to supply Iran with gasoline). The cessation of supplies to Iran by the...Pars gas field (September 2009) Petroleos de Venezuela S.A.; 10% stake in venture $760 million Abadan refinery upgrade and expansion; building

  3. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-21

    Iran); Korea Mining and Development Corp. ( N . Korea). October 21, 2007 Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC); Ministry of Defense and Armed...designated under other E.O.); Vitaly Sokolenko (general manager of Ferland) April 29, 2014 (for connections to deceptive oil dealings for Iran) Saeed Al

  4. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-19

    September 2007 Korea Mining and Development Corp. ( N . Korea) September 2007 Iran Sanctions Congressional Research Service 70 October 21, 2007...designated under other E.O.) - Vitaly Sokolenko (general manager of Ferland) April 29, 2014, (for connections to deceptive oil dealings for Iran

  5. Sedimentologic and paleoclimatic reconstructions of carbonate factory evolution in the Alborz Basin (northern Iran) indicate a global response to Early Carboniferous (Tournaisian) glaciations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardar Abadi, Mehrdad; Kulagina, Elena I.; Voeten, Dennis F. A. E.; Boulvain, Frédéric; Da Silva, Anne-Christine

    2017-03-01

    The Lower Carboniferous Mobarak Formation records the development of a storm-sensitive pervasive carbonate factory on the southern Paleo-Tethyan passive margin following the opening of the Paleo-Tethys Ocean into the Alborz Basin along the northern margin of Gondwana. Its depositional facies encompass inner ramp peritidal environments, peloidal to crinoidal shoals, storm to fair-weather influenced mid-ramps, proximal to distal shell beds and low energy outer ramps. Sedimentological analyses and foraminiferal biostratigraphy reveal four events affecting carbonate platform evolution in the Alborz Basin during the Lower Carboniferous: (1) A transgression following global temperature rise in the Early Tournaisian (middle Hastarian) caused the formation of thick-bedded argillaceous limestones. This interval correlates with Early Tournaisian nodular to argillaceous limestones in the Moravia Basin (Lisen Formation, Czech Republic), the Dinant Basin (Pont d'Arcole Formation, Belgium), and at the Rhenish Slate Mountains (Lower Alum shale, Germany). (2) Late Hastarian-early Ivorian glaciations previously identified in Southern Gondwana but had not yet recognized in Northern Gondwana were recorded through a sequence boundary. (3) During the Late Tournaisian-Early Visean?, a differential block faulting regime along the basin's margin caused uplift of the westernmost parts of the Alborz Basin and resulted in subsidence in the eastern part of the central basin. This tectonically controlled shift in depositional regime caused vast sub-aerial exposure and brecciation preserved in the top of the Mobarak Formation in the western portion of the Central Alborz Basin. (4) Tectonic activity coinciding with a progressive, multiphase sea level drop caused indirectly by the Viséan and Serpukhovian glaciations phases ultimately led to the stagnation of the carbonate factory. Paleothermometry proxies, the presence of foraminiferal taxa with a northern Paleo-Tethyan affinity and evidence for

  6. The continuation of the Kazerun fault system across the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safaei, Homayon

    2009-08-01

    The Kazerun (or Kazerun-Qatar) fault system is a north-trending dextral strike-slip fault zone in the Zagros mountain belt of Iran. It probably originated as a structure in the Panafrican basement. This fault system played an important role in the sedimentation and deformation of the Phanerozoic cover sequence and is still seismically active. No previous studies have reported the continuation of this important and ancient fault system northward across the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone. The Isfahan fault system is a north-trending dextral strike-slip fault across the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone that passes west of Isfahan city and is here recognized for the first time. This important fault system is about 220 km long and is seismically active in the basement as well as the sedimentary cover sequence. This fault system terminates to the south near the Main Zagros Thrust and to the north at the southern boundary of the Urumieh-Dokhtar zone. The Isfahan fault system is the boundary between the northern and southern parts of Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, which have fundamentally different stratigraphy, petrology, geomorphology, and geodynamic histories. Similarities in the orientations, kinematics, and geologic histories of the Isfahan and Kazerun faults and the way they affect the magnetic basement suggest that they are related. In fact, the Isfahan fault is a continuation of the Kazerun fault across the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone that has been offset by about 50 km of dextral strike-slip displacement along the Main Zagros Thrust.

  7. Source Parameters for Moderate Earthquakes in the Zagros Mountains with Implications for the Depth Extent of Seismicity

    SciT

    Adams, A; Brazier, R; Nyblade, A

    2009-02-23

    Six earthquakes within the Zagros Mountains with magnitudes between 4.9 and 5.7 have been studied to determine their source parameters. These events were selected for study because they were reported in open catalogs to have lower crustal or upper mantle source depths and because they occurred within an area of the Zagros Mountains where crustal velocity structure has been constrained by previous studies. Moment tensor inversion of regional broadband waveforms have been combined with forward modeling of depth phases on short period teleseismic waveforms to constrain source depths and moment tensors. Our results show that all six events nucleated withinmore » the upper crust (<11 km depth) and have thrust mechanisms. This finding supports other studies that call into question the existence of lower crustal or mantle events beneath the Zagros Mountains.« less

  8. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-14

    Industries Organization (AIO) (Iran); Korea Mining and Development Corp. ( N . Korea). October 21, 2007 Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC...Tankers (Singapore); Siqiriya Maritime (Philippines); Ferland Company Limited (previously designated under other E.O.); Vitaly Sokolenko (general

  9. Orogenic plateau growth: Expansion of the Turkish-Iranian Plateau across the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M. B.; Saville, C.; Blanc, E. J.-P.; Talebian, M.; Nissen, E.

    2013-03-01

    This paper shows how the Turkish-Iranian Plateau grows laterally by incrementally incorporating adjacent parts of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt. The limit of significant, seismogenic, thrusting in the Zagros (Mw > 5) occurs close to the regional 1250 m elevation contour. The seismicity cutoff is not a significant bedrock geology boundary. Elevations increase northward, toward regional plateau elevations of 2 km, implying that another process produced the extra elevation. Between the seismogenic limit of thrusting and the suture, this process is a plausibly ductile thickening of the basement, suggesting depth-dependent strain during compression. Similar depth-dependant crustal strain may explain why the Tibetan plateau has regional elevations 1500 m greater than the elevation limit of seismogenic thrusting at its margins. We estimate 68 km shortening across the Zagros Simply Folded Belt in the Fars region, and 120 km total shortening of the Arabian plate. The Dezful Embayment is a low strain zone in the western Zagros. Deformation is more intense to its northeast, in the Bakhtyari Culmination. The orogenic taper (across strike topographic gradient) across the Dezful Embayment is 0.0004, and across the Bakhtyari Culmination, 0.022. Lateral plateau growth is more pronounced farther east (Fars), where a more uniform structure has a taper of 0.010 up to elevations of 1750 m. A >100 km wide region of the Zagros further northeast has a taper of 0.002 and is effectively part of the Turkish-Iranian Plateau. Internal drainage enhances plateau development but is not a pre-requisite. Aspects of the seismicity, structure, and geomorphology of the Zagros do not support critical taper models for fold-and-thrust belts.

  10. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-02

    status. BP has told CRS in e-mail conversation in late 2009 that it is not selling gasoline to Iran. Petroleos de Venezuela reportedly reached a...might ignore a U.S. law, and possibly even a U.N. resolutions along these lines. Iran and Venezuela ( Petroleos de Venezuela S.A.) signed a gasoline...September 2009) Petroleos de Venezuela S.A.; 10% stake in venture $760 million Abadan refinery upgrade and expansion; building a new refinery

  11. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-24

    outcast international status. Petroleos de Venezuela might be affected because of its September 2009 deal to supply Iran with gasoline, as would state...gasoline suppliers who might ignore a U.S. law, and possibly even a U.N. resolutions along these lines. Iran and Venezuela ( Petroleos de Venezuela...LNG annually by 2012 South Pars gas field (September 2009) Petroleos de Venezuela S.A.; 10% stake in venture $760 million Abadan refinery upgrade

  12. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-31

    sale to Iran of Indian wheat, pharmaceuticals, rice, sugar , soybeans, auto parts, and other products. Still, there is a large trade imbalance...Value Output/Goal Oct. 2009 South Pars Gas Field—Phases 6-8, Gas Sweetening Plant CRS conversation with Embassy of S. Korea in Washington, D.C, July...Company for purchasing petrochemical products from Iran. - Niksima Food and Beverage JLT for receiving payments on behalf of Jam Petrochemical Entities

  13. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources of the Arabian Peninsula and Zagros Fold Belt, 2012

    Pitman, Janet K.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 86 billion barrels of oil and 336 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas resources in the Arabian Peninsula and Zagros Fold Belt. The USGS assessed the potential for undiscovered conventional oil and gas accumulations within the Arabian Peninsula and Zagros Fold Belt as part of the USGS World Petroleum Resources Project. Twenty-three assessment units within seven petroleum systems were quantitatively assessed in this study, which represents a reassessment of this area last published in 2000.

  14. Geotechnical Risk Classification for Underground Mines / Klasyfikacja Poziomu Zagrożenia Geotechnicznego W Kopalniach Podziemnych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ritesh Kumar; Rinne, Mikael

    2015-03-01

    Underground mining activities are prone to major hazards largely owing to geotechnical reasons. Mining combined with the confined working space and uncertain geotechnical data leads to hazards having the potential of catastrophic consequences. These incidents have the potential of causing multiple fatalities and large financial damages. Use of formal risk assessment in the past has demonstrated an important role in the prediction and prevention of accidents in risk prone industries such as petroleum, nuclear and aviation. This paper proposes a classification system for underground mining operations based on their geotechnical risk levels. The classification is done based on the type of mining method employed and the rock mass in which it is carried out. Mining methods have been classified in groups which offer similar geotechnical risk. The rock mass classification has been proposed based on bulk rock mass properties which are collected as part of the routine mine planning. This classification has been subdivided for various stages of mine planning to suit the extent of available data. Alpha-numeric coding has been proposed to identify a mining operation based on the competency of rock and risk of geotechnical failures. This alpha numeric coding has been further extended to identify mining activity under `Geotechnical Hazard Potential (GHP)'. GHP has been proposed to be used as a preliminary tool of risk assessment and risk ranking for a mining activity. The aim of such classification is to be used as a guideline for the justification of a formal geotechnical risk assessment. Górnictwo podziemne pociąga za sobą różnorakie zagrożenia spowodowane przez uwarunkowania geotechniczne. Urabianie złoża w połączeniu z pracą w zamkniętej przestrzeni oraz z niepewnymi danymi geotechnicznymi powodować może zagrożenia, które w konsekwencji prowadzić mogą do wypadków, a te potencjalnie powodować mogą skutki śmiertelne dla osób oraz

  15. Fracture patterns in the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt, Kurdistan Region of Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Daniel; Decker, Kurt; Grasemann, Bernhard; Peresson, Herwig

    2012-11-01

    Fracture data have been collected in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, which is a poorly accessible and unexplored area of the Zagros. Pre to early folding NE-SW striking extensional fractures and NW-SE striking contractive elements represent the older set affecting the exposed multilayer of the area. These latter structures are early syn-folding and followed by folding-related mesostructural assemblages, which include elements striking parallel to the axial trend of major folds (longitudinal fractures). Bedding perpendicular joints and veins, and extensional faults belonging to this second fracture set are located in the outer arc of exposed anticlines, whilst longitudinal reverse faults locate in the inner arcs. Consistently, these elements are associated with syn-folding tangential longitudinal strain. The younger two sets are related to E-W extension and NNE-SSW to N-S shortening, frequently displaying reactivation of the older sets. The last shortening event, which is described along the entire Zagros Belt, probably relates with the onset of N-S compression induced by the northward movement of the Arabian plate relative to the Eurasian Plate. In comparison between the inferred palaeostrain directions and the kinematics of recent GPS measurements, we conclude that the N-S compression and the partitioning into NW-SE trending folds and NW to N trending strike-slip faults likely remained unchanged throughout the Neogene tectonic history of the investigated area.

  16. Mechanical versus kinematical shortening reconstructions of the Zagros High Folded Zone (Kurdistan region of Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Reif, Daniel; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2012-06-01

    This paper compares kinematical and mechanical techniques for the palinspastic reconstruction of folded cross sections in collision orogens. The studied area and the reconstructed NE-SW trending, 55.5 km long cross section is located in the High Folded Zone of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. The present-day geometry of the cross section has been constructed from field as well as remote sensing data. In a first step, the structures and the stratigraphy are simplified and summarized in eight units trying to identify the main geometric and mechanical parameters. In a second step, the shortening is kinematically estimated using the dip domain method to 11%-15%. Then the same cross section is used in a numerical finite element model to perform dynamical unfolding simulations taking various rheological parameters into account. The main factor allowing for an efficient dynamic unfolding is the presence of interfacial slip conditions between the mechanically strong units. Other factors, such as Newtonian versus power law viscous rheology or the presence of a basement, affect the numerical simulations much less strongly. If interfacial slip is accounted for, fold amplitudes are reduced efficiently during the dynamical unfolding simulations, while welded layer interfaces lead to unrealistic shortening estimates. It is suggested that interfacial slip and decoupling of the deformation along detachment horizons is an important mechanical parameter that controlled the folding processes in the Zagros High Folded Zone.

  17. Mechanical versus kinematical shortening reconstructions of the Zagros High Folded Zone (Kurdistan Region of Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, M.; Reif, D.; Grasemann, B.

    2012-04-01

    Our study compares kinematical and mechanical techniques for the palinspastic reconstruction of folded cross-sections in collision orogens. The studied area and the reconstructed NE-SW-trending, 55.5 km long cross-section is located in the High Folded Zone of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The present-day geometry of the cross-section has been constructed from field, as well as remote sensing data. In a first step, the structures and the stratigraphy are simplified and summarized in eight units trying to identify the main geometric and mechanical parameters. In a second step, the shortening is kinematically estimated using the dip-domain method to 11%-15%. Then the same cross-section is used in a numerical finite-element model to perform dynamical unfolding simulations taking various rheological parameters into account. The main factor allowing for an efficient dynamic unfolding is the presence of interfacial slip conditions between the mechanically strong units. Other factors, such as Newtonian vs. power-law viscous rheology or the presence of a basement affect the numerical simulations much less strongly. If interfacial slip is accounted for, fold amplitudes are reduced efficiently during the dynamical unfolding simulations, while welded layer interfaces lead to unrealistic shortening estimates. It is suggested that interfacial slip and decoupling of the deformation along detachment horizons is an important mechanical parameter that controlled the folding processes in the Zagros High Folded Zone.

  18. Study and comparison of the maximum stress directions and main fault orientations in some active zones in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forouhid, Khatereh; Faraji, Atefeh; Ghorashi, Manouchehr

    2010-05-01

    Study and comparison of the maximum stress directions and main fault orientations in some active zones in Iran Khatereh Forouhid, Manouchehr Ghorashi, Atefeh Faraji Institute of Geophysics, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran kforouhid@yahoo.com Farajiatefeh@yahoo.com The Iranian plateau is the widest active zone in Alpine-Himalayan collision system that is located between two stable platforms, the Arabia in southwest and Eurasia in northeast. The convergence of these two platforms towards each other is the main reason for seismicity and different styles of deformation observed in Iran. In this study, the Iranian plateau is divided into 7 regions based on their seismotectonic characteristics. These regions are; Zagros, Makran, East Iran, Alborz, Kopeh Dagh, Central Iran and Azarbayejan (northwest of Iran). In each region, focal mechanism solutions of early and modern instrumental earthquakes (the only source of information suitable to use for stress distribution study in Iran) with magnitudes more than 5.0 and their relations to active faults are considered. By studying each maximum stress direction based on a group of earthquake focal mechanisms and considering main fault orientations, each region is studied individually. According to these data, some of these regions are divided into smaller parts. These sub-divided parts have some characters that make them different from their neighbors in the same region. In this regard, Zagros is studied in detail based on seismotectonic characteristics and divided into three parts, with N-S maximum stress direction (compressional) in one part and two different kind of NE-SW direction in two other. We use this information to investigate the style and distribution of active faulting in the Zagros and the relationships of this activity with shortening of the Arabia-Eurasia collision. It is worth to mention that as the fault slip will almost occur in the direction of maximum resolved shear stress on the fault plane, probably strain

  19. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-09

    that it is not selling gasoline to Iran); • ZhenHua Oil of China (China’s firms reportedly supply one-third of Iran’s gasoline imports);14 • Petroleos ...Austria) $3.2 billion 20 million tonnes of LNG annually by 2012 South Pars gas field (September 2009) Petroleos de Venezuela S.A.; 10% stake in

  20. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-16

    Iran); Korea Mining and Development Corp. ( N . Korea). October 21, 2007 Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC); Ministry of Defense and Armed...Maritime (Philippines); Ferland Company Limited (previously designated under other E.O.); Vitaly Sokolenko (general manager of Ferland) April 29

  1. End-Pleistocene to Holocene paleoenvironmental record from piston corer samples and the challenge of stratigraphic correlation of playa sediment data with a connected alluvial apron from Damghan Basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büdel, Christian; Hoelzmann, Philipp; Wennrich, Volker; Majid Padashi, Sajed; Baumhauer, Roland

    2015-04-01

    The study yields a first characterization and correlation of the end-Pleistocene to Holocene sediment archive of playa and playa lake deposits in the Damghan Basin, northern Iran. The Basin sediments are deposited since Mio- and Pliocene, which is valid for the connected alluvial fans, too. These are covering the area between the playa and mountains and while prograding from the mountain ranges they deliver gravels and fine-sediments to the basins sink. The processes on the studied alluvial apron are described and dated already and can be explained in seven morphodynamic phases, which are linked to a general lake level high-stand in north-east Iran at about 8000-9000 years ago. If and how these phases are passed on from the alluvial record down to the playa sediment record is aim of this study. Today the salt pans margins are highly affected by salt tectonic drifting and access was suboptimal. Only here drilling could be performed through about 280 centimeters of salt-crust unfrequently intercalated with loamy layers. For yielding undisturbed playa sediment records sampling was performed with inliner-tubes deployed in a piston corer (Kullenberg type). Thus at two different drilling sites in summation seven cores could be taken, down to a maximum depth of 129 cm and 1000 cm. Back in Germany the cores had been opened and initially described, photographed and optically scanned with a core logger. Regarding future studies, the aim was a best possible comprehensive documentation of the cores. Therefore basically grainsize measurements (laser diffraction), multi element analyses (XRF, ICP-OES, titrimetry) and mineralogical measurements (XRD) had been deployed on samples taken from every single previously identified layer. Continuous elemental data was secured by use of a XRF-scanning core logger. The sedimentological description together with laboratory element analyses shows saline conditions in the first three meters coincide with general coarser grain sizes. The next

  2. Calculation of Confidence Intervals for the Maximum Magnitude of Earthquakes in Different Seismotectonic Zones of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamat, Mona; Zare, Mehdi; Holschneider, Matthias; Zöller, Gert

    2017-03-01

    The problem of estimating the maximum possible earthquake magnitude m_max has attracted growing attention in recent years. Due to sparse data, the role of uncertainties becomes crucial. In this work, we determine the uncertainties related to the maximum magnitude in terms of confidence intervals. Using an earthquake catalog of Iran, m_max is estimated for different predefined levels of confidence in six seismotectonic zones. Assuming the doubly truncated Gutenberg-Richter distribution as a statistical model for earthquake magnitudes, confidence intervals for the maximum possible magnitude of earthquakes are calculated in each zone. While the lower limit of the confidence interval is the magnitude of the maximum observed event,the upper limit is calculated from the catalog and the statistical model. For this aim, we use the original catalog which no declustering methods applied on as well as a declustered version of the catalog. Based on the study by Holschneider et al. (Bull Seismol Soc Am 101(4):1649-1659, 2011), the confidence interval for m_max is frequently unbounded, especially if high levels of confidence are required. In this case, no information is gained from the data. Therefore, we elaborate for which settings finite confidence levels are obtained. In this work, Iran is divided into six seismotectonic zones, namely Alborz, Azerbaijan, Zagros, Makran, Kopet Dagh, Central Iran. Although calculations of the confidence interval in Central Iran and Zagros seismotectonic zones are relatively acceptable for meaningful levels of confidence, results in Kopet Dagh, Alborz, Azerbaijan and Makran are not that much promising. The results indicate that estimating m_max from an earthquake catalog for reasonable levels of confidence alone is almost impossible.

  3. MT data inversion and sensitivity analysis to image electrical structure of Zagros collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layegh Haghighi, T.; Montahaei, M.; Oskooi, B.

    2018-01-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) data from 46 stations on a 470-km-long profile across the Zagros fold-thrust belt (ZFTB) that marks the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone were inverted to derive 2-D electrical resistivity structure between Busher on the coast of Persian Gulf and Posht-e-Badam, 160 km north east of Yazd. The model includes prominent anomalies in the upper and lower crust, beneath the brittle-ductile transition depth and mostly related to the fluid distribution and sedimentary layers beneath the profile. The conductivities and dimensions of the fault zone conductors (FZCs) and high conductivity zones (HCZs) as the major conductive anomalies in a fault zone conceptual model vary significantly below the different faults accommodated in this region. The enhanced conductivity below the site Z30 correlates well with the main Zagros thrust (MZT), located at the western boundary of Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (SSZ) and known as the transition between the two continents. The depth extent of the huge conductor beneath the south west of the profile, attributed to the thick sedimentary columns of the Arabian crust, cannot be resolved due to the smearing effect of the smoothness constraint employed in the regularized inversion procedure and the sensitivity of MT data to the conductance of the subsurface. We performed different tests to determine the range of 2-D models consistent with the data. Our approach was based on synthetic studies, comprising of hypothesis testing and the use of a priori information throughout the inversion procedure as well as forward modeling. We conclude that the minimum depth extent of the conductive layer beneath the southwest of the profile can be determined as approximately deeper than 15 km and also the screening effect of the conductive overburden is highly intense in this model and prevents the deep structures from being resolved properly.

  4. Geology, ore facies and sulfur isotopes geochemistry of the Nudeh Besshi-type volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit, southwest Sabzevar basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghfouri, Sajjad; Rastad, Ebrahim; Mousivand, Fardin; Lin, Ye; Zaw, Khin

    2016-08-01

    The southwest Sabzevar basin is placed in the southwestern part of a crustal domain known as the Sabzevar zone, at the north of Central Iranian microcontinent. This basin hosts abundant mineral deposits; particularly of the Mn exhalative and Cu-Zn volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) types. The evolution of this basin is governed by the Neo-tethys oceanic crust subduction beneath the Central Iranian microcontinent and by the resulting continental arc (Sanandaj-Sirjan) and back-arc (Sabzevar-Naien). This evolution followed two major sequences: (I) Lower Late Cretaceous Volcano-Sedimentary Sequence (LLCVSS), which is indicated by fine-grained siliciclastic sediments, gray basic coarse-grained different pyroclastic rocks and bimodal volcanism. During this stage, tuff-hosted stratiform, exhalative Mn deposits (Nudeh, Benesbourd, Ferizy and Goft), oxide Cu deposits (Garab and Ferizy) and Cu-Zn VMS (Nudeh, Chun and Lala) deposits formed. (II) Upper Late Cretaceous Sedimentary Dominated Sequence (ULCSS), including pelagic limestone, marly tuff, silty limestone and marl with minor andesitic tuff rocks. The economically most important Mn (Zakeri and Cheshmeh-sefid) deposits of Sabzevar zone occur within the marly tuff of this sequence. The Nudeh Cu-Zn volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposit is situated in the LLCVSS. The host-rock of deposits consists of alkali olivine basalt flow and tuffaceous silty sandstone. Mineralization occurs as stratiform blanket-like and tabular orebodies. Based on ore body structure, mineralogy, and ore fabric, we recognize three different ore facies in the Nudeh deposit: (1) a stringer zone, consisting of a discordant mineralization of sulfides forming a stockwork of sulfide-bearing quartz veins cutting the footwall volcano-sedimentary rocks; (2) a massive ore, consisting of massive replacement pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and Friedrichite with magnetite; (3) bedded ore, with laminated to disseminated pyrite, and chalcopyrite

  5. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-02

    currency and can use it to buy rials—or services denominated in rials—cheaply. • These difficulties—shipping, currency devaluation , and others—have...increasingly trading through barter arrangements rather than hard currency exchange. The pullout from Iran by major international firms has slowed Iran’s...countries to the concept of sanctioning Iran’s Central Bank was based on humanitarian grounds. One of the Central Bank’s roles is to keep Iran’s currency

  6. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-28

    services denominated in rials—cheaply. • These difficulties—shipping, currency devaluation , and others—have driven up the costs to the Iranian trading...increasingly trading through barter arrangements rather than hard currency exchange. The pullout from Iran by major international firms have slowed...One of the Central Bank’s roles is to keep Iran’s currency , the rial, stable. It does so by using hard currency to buy rials to raise the currency

  7. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-16

    currency devaluation , and others—have driven up the costs to the Iranian trading community by an estimated 40%52 - 60%. The EU estimates its overall...through barter arrangements rather than hard currency exchange. Many major international firms have left the Iran market, many Iranian firms are reported...Central Bank’s roles is to keep Iran’s currency , the rial, stable. It does so by using hard currency to buy rials to raise the currency value, or to

  8. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-26

    can use it to buy rials—or services denominated in rials—cheaply. • These difficulties—shipping, currency devaluation , and others—have driven up the...increasingly trading through barter arrangements rather than hard currency exchange. The pullout from Iran by major international firms has slowed Iran’s...countries to the concept of sanctioning Iran’s Central Bank was based on humanitarian grounds. One of the Central Bank’s roles is to keep Iran’s currency

  9. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-15

    clarifying that it is the responsibility of the Treasury Department to implement those ISA sanctions that involve the financial sector , including bans on...international investment in Iran’s energy sector ; the provision of trade credits to Iran; or all financial dealings with Iranian banks. Table 1...various U.N. resolutions. November 21, 2011: Treasury Department names Iranian financial sector as a jurisdiction of primary money laundering

  10. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-09

    suppliers who might ignore a U.S. law, and possibly even a U.N. resolutions along these lines. Iran and Venezuela ( Petroleos de Venezuela S.A...although they reportedly have reduced supplies because of Iran’s increasingly outcast international status. Petroleos de Venezuela might be affected...gas field (September 2009) Petroleos de Venezuela S.A.; 10% stake in venture $760 million Abadan refinery upgrade and expansion; building a new

  11. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-13

    government revenues, and try to isolate Iran, particularly its Revolutionary Guard Corps, from the international financial system. U.S. efforts to curb...Hizbollah, Hamas, and Palestine Islamic Jihad. Iran’s petroleum sector generates about 20% of Iran’s GDP, and 80% of its government revenue. Iran’s oil...probably could not practically, compel any foreign government to take action against one of its firms. The pre-2010 version of ISA requires the

  12. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-09

    the Iran-Syria-North Korea Non- Proliferation Act) authorizes sanctions on foreign persons (individuals or corporations , not countries or governments ...view—increasingly shared by major allies—is that sanctions should target Iran’s energy sector that provides about 80% of government revenues. U.S...its government revenue. Iran’s oil sector is as old as the petroleum industry itself, and Iran’s onshore oil fields and oil industry infrastructure are

  13. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-04

    North Korea Non- Proliferation Act) authorizes sanctions on foreign persons (individuals or corporations , not countries or governments ) that are...intended to reduce the revenue available to Iran’s government and to generate domestic pressure within Iran to adopt policies more acceptable to the...a key Iranian economic vulnerability because Iran’s government revenues are approximately 80% dependent on oil revenues and in need of substantial

  14. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-10

    Korea-Syria Non- Proliferation Act (INKSNA) authorizes sanctions on foreign persons (individuals or corporations , not countries or governments ) that...financial system and had asked the German government to order it closed.42 On May 23, 2011, the EU named EIH and about 100 other entities as Iran...The energy sector provides nearly 70% of Iran’s government revenues. Iran’s alarm stems from the potential loss of oil sales as a result of: • A

  15. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-11

    as sales to Iran of Indian products, including wheat, pharmaceuticals, rice, sugar , soybeans, auto parts, and other products. Still, there is a large... Sweetening Plant CRS conversation with Embassy of S. Korea in Washington, D.C, July 2010 Contract signed but then abrogated by S. Korean firm G and...and Beverage JLT for receiving payments on behalf of Jam Petrochemical Entities Designated as Human Rights Abusers or Limiting Free Expression Under

  16. Analysis of spatial autocorrelation patterns of heavy and super-heavy rainfall in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousta, Iman; Doostkamian, Mehdi; Haghighi, Esmaeil; Ghafarian Malamiri, Hamid Reza; Yarahmadi, Parvane

    2017-09-01

    Rainfall is a highly variable climatic element, and rainfall-related changes occur in spatial and temporal dimensions within a regional climate. The purpose of this study is to investigate the spatial autocorrelation changes of Iran's heavy and super-heavy rainfall over the past 40 years. For this purpose, the daily rainfall data of 664 meteorological stations between 1971 and 2011 are used. To analyze the changes in rainfall within a decade, geostatistical techniques like spatial autocorrelation analysis of hot spots, based on the Getis-Ord G i statistic, are employed. Furthermore, programming features in MATLAB, Surfer, and GIS are used. The results indicate that the Caspian coast, the northwest and west of the western foothills of the Zagros Mountains of Iran, the inner regions of Iran, and southern parts of Southeast and Northeast Iran, have the highest likelihood of heavy and super-heavy rainfall. The spatial pattern of heavy rainfall shows that, despite its oscillation in different periods, the maximum positive spatial autocorrelation pattern of heavy rainfall includes areas of the west, northwest and west coast of the Caspian Sea. On the other hand, a negative spatial autocorrelation pattern of heavy rainfall is observed in central Iran and parts of the east, particularly in Zabul. Finally, it is found that patterns of super-heavy rainfall are similar to those of heavy rainfall.

  17. A hidden Late Cretaceous arc and subsequent magmatic events in the Caucasus-Iran-Anatolia (CIA) orogenic belt: Detrital zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, C. Y.; Lin, Y. C.; Chu, M. F.; Chung, S. L.; Bi˙ngöl, A. F.

    2017-12-01

    The Caucasus-Iran-Anatolia (CIA) orogenic belt formed by "Turkic-type orogeny" consists mainly of subduction-accretion complexes following the collision between Eurasia and Arabia and the closure of Neotethy. This study reports U-Pb and Hf isotopic data of detrital zircon separates from five Eocene to mid-Miocene sandstone samples from Divrigi and Duranlar in the west to the Mus basin in the east, all locating in the northern part of the Bitlis-Zagros suture zone. The U-Pb age data suggest four main magmatic episodes: (1) 100-70 Ma, (2) 60-40 Ma, (3) 30 Ma, and (4) 15 Ma. The Late Cretaceous zircons recovered mainly from the Mus basin are marked by a significant Hf isotopic variation over time, with ɛHf(T) values dropping from +15 to -10. Zircons from the second and third episodes show spatial variations in isotopic compositions, with positive ɛHf(T) values (+10 to +5) in the Mus basin and heterogeneous ɛHf(T) values (+10 to -10) in the west. The fourth and youngest episode of zircons, mainly from Duranlar area, shows uniform ɛHf(T) values around +5. We attribute the Late Cretaceous episode of zircons to the broadly coeval Elazig arc magmatism that, according to our counterpart study, occurred as a short-lived, intra-oceanic arc system by subduction initiation after the formation of Neotethyan ophiolites in the region. Moreover, we argue that this Late Cretaceous arc system may have existed more widely within the southern branch of Neothethys than that suggested by present-day outcrops. The dramatic change in Hf isotopic composition from 100 to 70 Ma, also observed in the rock record by our counterpart study, may be interpreted as a result of subduction to accretion processes. The remaining three episodes of zircons are related to younger stages of magmatism within or around the suture zone that remains poorly studied. Our results indicate that detrital zircon is a useful tool to uncover "hidden" magmatic records in the CIA and other "Turkic-type" orogenic

  18. Assessment of undiscovered conventionally recoverable petroleum resources of the Arabian-Iranian Basin

    Masters, Charles D.; Klemme, H. Douglas; Coury, Anny B.

    1982-01-01

    The estimates of undiscovered conventionally recoverable petroleum resources in the Arabian-Iranian basin at probability levels of 95 percent, 5 percent, and statistical mean are for oil (in billions of barrels): 72, 337, and 174; and for gas (in trillions of cubic feet): 299, 1792, and 849. The occurrence of petroleum can be accounted for in five definitive geological settings or plays. The assessment of undiscovered resource potential assumes that the new discoveries will expand the occurrence of petroleum in these basic plays; no additional plays with significant petroleum potential were recognized. The five plays listed by geologic age are: (I) Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary, (II) Lower and Middle Cretaceous sandstone, (III) Lower and Middle Cretaceous limestone, (IV) Jurassic, and (V) Permian. The Permian play, located in the south-central Arabian Gulf region and extending northeast-southwest from southern Iran to the Ar Rub' al Khali in Saudi Arabia, accounts for over four-fifths of the mean estimate of undiscovered gas. The remainder of the gas is divided about equally among the other four plays. The Jurassic play, located on the south side of the Arabian Gulf, accounts for slightly less than one-third of the estimated undiscovered oil, which is split equally between Saudi Arabia and Iraq. The Lower and Middle Cretaceous limestone play is located in the southern Gulf region and accounts for about one-fifth of the undiscovered oil, most of which is located in Saudi Arabia and the remainder in the United Arab Emirates. The Lower and Middle Cretaceous sandstone play is centralized in Kuwait at the head of the Arabian Gulf with significant potential extending to the northwest in Iraq; the play accounts for about one-third of the undiscovered oil, the great majority of which is estimated to be in Iraq with the remainder divided between Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. The upper Cretaceous-Tertiary play is located in the Zagros fold belt of Iran and Iraq and accounts for

  19. Shadegan, Iran

    2016-11-15

    The town of Shadegan, Iran is northeast of where the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers enter the Persian Gulf. It sits near a wetland and upon land that was once part of an inland river delta. The long, linear orchards follow the topography created by the delta. The image was acquired September 3, 2012, covers an area of 40.6 by 55.3 km, and is located at 30.6 degrees north, 48.6 degrees east. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21170

  20. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-03

    increasingly shared by major allies—is that sanctions should target Iran’s energy sector that provides about 80% of government revenues. U.S. efforts...Hamas, and Palestine Islamic Jihad. Iran’s petroleum sector generates about 20% of Iran’s GDP, and 80% of its government revenue. Iran’s oil sector is...practically, compel any foreign government to take action against one of its firms. Amendments added by P.L. 111-195, the Comprehensive Iran Sanctions

  1. Palaeogeographical peculiarities of the Pabdeh Formation (Paleogene) in Iran: New evidence of global diversity-determined geological heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Tahereh; Nielsen, Jan K.; Ponedelnik, Alena A.; Ruban, Dmitry A.

    2017-11-01

    Unique palaeogeographical peculiarities of sedimentary formations are important for geological heritage conservation and use for the purposes of tourism. The heritage value of the Pabdeh Formation (Paleocene-Oligocene) of the Zagros Fold-Thrust Belt in Iran has been investigated. The uniqueness of its palaeogeographical peculiarities has been assessed on the basis of the literature, field studies of three representative sections in the Fars Province (Kavar, Zanjiran, and Shahneshin sections), and comparison with the similar features known in Iran and globally. The Pabdeh Formation reflects the process of mixed siliciclastic-carbonate ramp progradation and the onset of a typical carbonate platform. The other unique features include representation of mesopelagic palaeohabitat, specific trace fossil assemblages, prehistoric bituminous artefacts (production of which was linked to the Pabdeh deposits), etc. It is established that the palaeogeographical type of geological heritage of the Pabdeh Formation is represented by all known subtypes, namely facies, palaeoecosystem, ichnological, taphonomical, event, and geoarchaeological subtypes. Their rank varies between regional and global. The very fact of co-occurrence of these subtypes determines the global importance of the entire palaeogeographical type in the case of this formation. The establishment of geopark in the Zagros Fold-Thrust Belt will facilitate adequate use of the Pabdeh Formation for the purpose of geotourism development. The aesthetic properties (rocks of different colour and striped patterns of outcrops) increase the attractiveness of this geological body to visitors.

  2. Multiplatform observations of dust vertical distribution during transport over northwest Iran in the summertime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi Vishkaee, Farhad; Flamant, Cyrille; Cuesta, Juan; Flamant, Pierre; Khalesifard, Hamid R.

    2011-03-01

    Dynamical processes leading to dust emission over Iran and surrounding countries in the summer as well as the subsequent transport of dust toward northwest Iran are analyzed on the basis of two case studies using a suite of ground-based and spaceborne remote sensing platforms together with modeling tools. Ground-based lidar measurements acquired in Zanjan provide new insight into the vertical distribution of dust linked to transport over northwest Iran and highlight the importance of low-level transport of dust from both Iraq and Iran for air quality issues in Tehran. During the 3-5 August 2007 case, dust emission regions are located in Syria/Iraq and close to Qom, Iran, in a large intermittent salt lake in the western part of the Dasht-e Kavir desert. The visibility in Tehran associated with this event decreases significantly (reaching 7 km) on 5 August 2007 only. During the 11-13 September 2008 case, the dust transported to northwest Iran originates from Syria/Iraq only. The visibility in Tehran during this case is low throughout the period, sometimes less than 5 km due to the transport of dust at low levels. In both cases, emissions in Syria and Iraq occur in response to strong Shamal winds. However, transport of dust toward Iran takes place at different levels: above 700 hPa in August and below 700 hPa in September. This is found to be related to the presence of strong northeasterly winds over the Zagros Mountains as well as in its lee (south of the range) in the August case only. In August also, dust emissions in the Qom region results from strong winds blowing over the Dasht-e Kavir desert.

  3. Late Jurassic low latitude of Central Iran: paleogeographic and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, Massimo; Muttoni, Giovanni; Cifelli, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    The individual blocks forming present-day Central Iran are now comprised between the Zagros Neo-Tethys suture to the south and the Alborz Palaeo-Tethys suture to the north. At the end of the Palaeozoic, the Iranian blocks rifted away from the northern margin of Gondwana as consequence of the opening of the Neo-Tethys, and collided with Eurasia during the Late Triassic, giving place to the Eo-Cimmerian orogeny. From then on, the Iranian block(s) should have maintained European affinity. Modern generations of apparent polar wander paths (APWPs) show the occurrence in North American and African coordinates of a major and rapid shift in pole position (=plate shift) during the Middle-Late Jurassic. This so-called monster polar shift is predicted also for Eurasia from the North Atlantic plate circuit, but Jurassic data from this continent are scanty and problematic. Here, we present paleomagnetic data from the Kimmeridgian-Tithonian (Upper Jurassic) Garedu Formation of Iran. Paleomagnetic component directions of primary (pre-folding) age indicate a paleolatitude of deposition of 10°N ± 5° that is in excellent agreement with the latitude drop predicted for Iran from APWPs incorporating the Jurassic monster polar shift. We show that paleolatitudes calculated from these APWPs, used in conjunction with simple zonal climate belts, better explain the overall stratigraphic evolution of Iran during the Mesozoic.

  4. An improved evaluation of the seismic/geodetic deformation-rate ratio for the Zagros Fold-and-Thrust collisional belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palano, Mimmo; Imprescia, Paola; Agnon, Amotz; Gresta, Stefano

    2018-04-01

    We present an improved picture of the ongoing crustal deformation field for the Zagros Fold-and-Thrust Belt continental collision zone by using an extensive combination of both novel and published GPS observations. The main results define the significant amount of oblique Arabia-Eurasia convergence currently being absorbed within the Zagros: right-lateral shear along the NW trending Main Recent fault in NW Zagros and accommodated between fold-and-thrust structures and NS right-lateral strike-slip faults on Southern Zagros. In addition, taking into account the 1909-2016 instrumental seismic catalogue, we provide a statistical evaluation of the seismic/geodetic deformation-rate ratio for the area. On Northern Zagros and on the Turkish-Iranian Plateau, a moderate to large fraction (˜49 and >60 per cent, respectively) of the crustal deformation occurs seismically. On the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, the seismic/geodetic deformation-rate ratio suggests that a small to moderate fraction (<40 per cent) of crustal deformation occurs seismically; locally, the occurrence of large historic earthquakes (M ≥ 6) coupled with the high geodetic deformation, could indicate overdue M ≥ 6 earthquakes. On Southern Zagros, aseismic strain dominates crustal deformation (the ratio ranges in the 15-33 per cent interval). Such aseismic deformation is probably related to the presence of the weak evaporitic Hormuz Formation which allows the occurrence of large aseismic motion on both subhorizontal faults and surfaces of décollement. These results, framed into the seismotectonic framework of the investigated region, confirm that the fold-and-thrust-dominated deformation is driven by buoyancy forces; by contrast, the shear-dominated deformation is primary driven by plate stresses.

  5. Iran’s Economy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-12

    Agriculture Iran’s agriculture sector is substantial. Iran is a major source of caviar and pistachio nuts, which constitute significant non-oil exports for Iran...prepared meat and fish, and edible nuts and foods ( pistachios ). There is evidence that Iran is able to obtain embargoed U.S. goods through the re

  6. The rate of rise, fall and gravity spreading at Siahou diapir (Southern Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftabi, P.; Roustaie, M.

    2009-04-01

    InSAR imaging can be used for extracting three dimensional information of the diapirs surface by using the phase part of the radar signal. We used InSAR to examine the cumulative surface deformation between 920706 to 060518, in a 10×10 km region surrounding the salt diapir at Kuh-e-Namak Siahou. The interferograms span periods was between 35-70 and 1248 days. Images acquired in 12 increments provided by ESA. This technique used here involves computation and subsequent combinations of interferometric phase gradient maps were used for mapping the salt flow deformation in the Zagros. Kuh-e-Namak Siahou is one of the salt extrusions currently active in the Zagros range in Iran. Salt rises from a mother salt horizon about 4 km deep and extruded as a dome with glacier on the surface. The geometry and inferred flow pattern of the salt changed between the increments, emphasizing that the extrusion rate and gravity spreading is not steady. Elevations in the salt mountain range from 1000 to 1640 meters and the displacements exceed to 20cm per year . Our InSAR study(Fig1) suggest that the dimensions and velocity of the salt movements are changing between 2 to 20mm per year(-0.7 to0.59 mm per day).The rate of surface dissolution changed between 2 to 4 cm a-1, and its rate of rise out of its orifice at 0 to 200 mm per year. The InSAR study suggest that the vigorous salt extrusion in Siahou is probably active.The deep source probably rise at a similar rates in the past but it fall in the time of InSAR study. The rate of fall was 260 mm per year(for 14 years). The InSAR images suggest that salt extrusion in Siahou flow laterally at rate 20-25 mm per year and the namakiers felt at -2 mm per month. The InSAR results indicated concentric and radial flow in the diapir from a central point at summit and spreading glaciers in sideways.Phase differences measured in our interferograms generally in the range of 0-260 mm/yr(-260 mm) within the studied period, with exceptional high rates

  7. Cyclostratigraphy across a Mississippian carbonate ramp in the Esfahan-Sirjan Basin, Iran: implications for the amplitudes and frequencies of sea-level fluctuations along the southern margin of the Paleotethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayet-Goll, Aram; Esfahani, Fariba Shirezadeh; Daraei, Mehdi; Monaco, Paolo; Sharafi, Mahmoud; Mohammadi, Amir Akbari

    2018-03-01

    The Tournaisian-Visean carbonate successions of the Esfahan-Sirjan Basin (ESB) from Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, Iran, have been used to generate a sequence stratigraphic model that enhances facies characterization and improves paleoenvironmental interpretation of shallow marine successions deposited along the southern margin of the Paleotethys. Detailed facies analysis allowed to differentiate seven facies, which, in order of decreasing abundance, are: (1) shaly and marly, F1; (2) peloidal mudstones/wackestones, F2; (3) peloidal/bioclastic packstones, F3; (4) intraclastic/bioclastic packstones/grainstones, F4; (5) oolitic/bioclastic packstone/grainstone, F5; (6) sandy intraclastic/bioclastic grainstones, F6; (7) sandy oolitic/bioclastic grainstones, F7. The different facies can be grouped into three facies associations that correspond to different environments of a carbonate platform with ramp geometry (homoclinal), from outer ramp (F1 and F2), mid-ramp (F3, F4 and F6) to inner ramp areas (F5 and F7). Meter-scale cycles are the basic building blocks of shallow marine carbonate successions of the Tournaisian-Viséan ramp of the ESB. Small-scale cycles are stacked into medium-scale cycles that in turn are building blocks of large-scale cycles. According to the recognized facies and the stacking pattern of high-frequency cycles across the ramp, five large-scale cycles in the southeastern outcrops (Tournaisian-Viséan) and three large-scale cycles in the northwest outcrops (Viséan) related to eustatic sea-level changes can be recognized. The overall retrogradational nature of the carbonate ramp, illustrated by both vertical facies relationships and the stacking patterns of high-frequency cycles within the third-order cycles, implies that the deposition of the Tournaisian-Viséan successions mainly took place under a long-term transgressive sea-level trend. The stratigraphic architectural style of the sequences, characterized by the lack of lowstand deposits and exposure

  8. Seamount subduction at seismogenic depths: structural and metamorphic evidence from the Zagros suture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, G.; Agard, P.; Angiboust, S.; Fournier, M.; Omrani, J.

    2017-12-01

    Large-scale seafloor topographic features, such as seamounts, are for the most part subducted with the downgoing oceanic plate. They are expected to critically impact the seismogenic and mechanic behavior of subduction zones, but their exact role is strongly debated (i.e., as to whether they represent barriers to propagation or asperities promoting nucleation). Rare natural examples of metamorphosed seamounts, which got sliced off the slab along the plate interface and escaped recycling into the mantle, are therefore precious witnesses to document processes operating at depths of 0-30 km. We herein report the existence of a large-scale oceanic topographic structure sandwiched in the Zagros suture zone (Siah Kuh - SK - unit), most probably a former seamount, along with other blueschist units (Angiboust et al., EPSL 2016). The main criteria for identifying this seamount are its: (1) shape: the SK unit is a 1.5-2 km thick, rounded-shaped body with a 15-20 km diameter, (2) lithologies: it is made mainly of a regular succession of massive basaltic flows, commonly as pillow basalts, minor ophiolite-type gabbros and serpentinite, together with subordinate more differenciated volcanic and plutonic rocks. (3) sedimentary cover: basalts are overlain by shallowly deposited reef limestone and deepening-up sediments with the occurrence of cherts and pelagic limestones (which points to possible subsidence). Basalts have been analyzed for trace elements and have usually a N-MORB to OIB signature, which might be explained by its potential origin as a mid-oceanic ridge seamount. HP-LT minerals (lawsonite, aragonite, blue amphiboles) found across the whole structure, particularly in zones of localized compressive deformation, indicate that this seamount was shallowly subducted at 20 km. This deformation, interpreted to be syn-subduction, is assisted by a décollement rooting in serpentinite and/or oceanic metasediments and is associated with rare cataclase in magmatic rocks. We

  9. The Post-Eocene Evolution of the Doruneh Fault Region (Central Iran): The Intraplate Response to the Reorganization of the Arabia-Eurasia Collision Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadayon, Meisam; Rossetti, Federico; Zattin, Massimiliano; Nozaem, Reza; Calzolari, Gabriele; Madanipour, Saeed; Salvini, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    The Cenozoic deformation history of Central Iran has been dominantly accommodated by the activation of major intracontinental strike-slip fault zones, developed in the hinterland domain of the Arabia-Eurasia convergent margin. Few quantitative temporal and kinematic constraints are available from these strike-slip deformation zones, hampering a full assessment of the style and timing of intraplate deformation in Iran and the understanding of the possible linkage to the tectonic reorganization of the Zagros collisional zone. This study focuses on the region to the north of the active trace of the sinistral Doruneh Fault. By combing structural and low-temperature apatite fission track (AFT) and (U-Th)/He (AHe) thermochronology investigations, we provide new kinematic and temporal constraints to the deformation history of Central Iran. Our results document a post-Eocene polyphase tectonic evolution dominated by dextral strike-slip tectonics, whose activity is constrained since the early Miocene in response to an early, NW-SE oriented paleo-σ1 direction. A major phase of enhanced cooling/exhumation is constrained at the Miocene/Pliocene boundary, caused by a switch of the maximum paleo-σ1 direction to N-S. When integrated into the regional scenario, these data are framed into a new tectonic reconstruction for the Miocene-Quaternary time lapse, where strike-slip deformation in the intracontinental domain of Central Iran is interpreted as guided by the reorganization of the Zagros collisional zone in the transition from an immature to a mature stage of continental collision.

  10. Study on Frequency content in seismic hazard analysis in West Azarbayjan and East Azarbayjan provinces (Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzadafshar, K.; Abbaszadeh Shahri, A.; Isfandiari, K.

    2012-12-01

    ABSTRACT: Iran plate is prone to earthquake, occurrence of destructive earthquakes approximately every 5 years certify it. Due to existence of happened great earthquakes and large number of potential seismic sources (active faults) which some of them are responsible for great earthquakes the North-West of Iran which is located in junction of Alborz and Zagros seismotectonic provinces (Mirzaii et al, 1998) is an interesting area for seismologists. Considering to population and existence of large cities like Tabriz, Ardabil and Orumiyeh which play crucial role in industry and economy of Iran, authors decided to focus on study of seismic hazard assessment in these two provinces to achieve ground acceleration in different frequency content and indicate critical frequencies in the studied area. It is important to note that however lots of studies have been done in North -West of Iran, but building code modifications also need frequency content analysis to asses seismic hazard more precisely which has been done in the present study. Furthermore, in previous studies have been applied free download softwares which were provided before 2000 but the most important advantage of this study is applying professional industrial software which has been written in 2009 and provided by authors. This applied software can cover previous software weak points very well such as gridding potential sources, attention to the seismogenic zone and applying attenuation relationships directly. Obtained hazard maps illustrate that maximum accelerations will be experienced in North West to South East direction which increased by frequency reduction from 100 Hz to 10 Hz then decreased by frequency reduce (to 0.25 Hz). Maximum acceleration will be occurred in the basement in 10 HZ frequency content. Keywords: hazard map, Frequency content, seismogenic zone, Iran

  11. Iran Country Analysis Brief

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    Iran holds the world's fourth-largest proved crude oil reserves and the world's second-largest natural gas reserves. Despite the country's abundant reserves, Iran's crude oil production has substantially declined, and natural gas production growth has been slower than expected over the past few years. International sanctions have profoundly affected Iran's energy sector and have prompted a number of cancellations or delays of upstream oil and gas projects.

  12. Active accommodation of plate convergence in Southern Iran: Earthquake locations, triggered aseismic slip, and regional strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, William D.; Lohman, Rowena B.; Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-01

    We present a catalog of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) constraints on deformation that occurred during earthquake sequences in southern Iran between 1992 and 2011, and explore the implications on the accommodation of large-scale continental convergence between Saudi Arabia and Eurasia within the Zagros Mountains. The Zagros Mountains, a salt-laden fold-and-thrust belt involving ~10 km of sedimentary rocks overlying Precambrian basement rocks, have formed as a result of ongoing continental collision since 10-20 Ma that is currently occurring at a rate of ~3 cm/yr. We first demonstrate that there is a biased misfit in earthquake locations in global catalogs that likely results from neglect of 3-D velocity structure. Previous work involving two M ~ 6 earthquakes with well-recorded aftershocks has shown that the deformation observed with InSAR may represent triggered slip on faults much shallower than the primary earthquake, which likely occurred within the basement rocks (>10 km depth). We explore the hypothesis that most of the deformation observed with InSAR spanning earthquake sequences is also due to shallow, triggered slip above a deeper earthquake, effectively doubling the moment release for each event. We quantify the effects that this extra moment release would have on the discrepancy between seismically and geodetically constrained moment rates in the region, finding that even with the extra triggered fault slip, significant aseismic deformation during the interseismic period is necessary to fully explain the convergence between Eurasia and Saudi Arabia.

  13. Quantification of fold growth of frontal antiforms in the Zagros fold and thrust belt (Kurdistan, NE Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretis, Bernhard; Bartl, Nikolaus; Graseman, Bernhard; Lockhart, Duncan

    2010-05-01

    The Zagros fold and thrust belt is a seismically active orogen, where actual kinematic models based on GPS networks suggest a north-south shortening between Arabian and Eurasian in the order of 1.5-2.5 cm/yr. Most of this deformation is partitioned in south-southwest oriented folding and thrusting with northwest-southeast to north-south trending dextral strike slip faults. The Zagros fold and thrust belt is of great economic interest because it has been estimated that this area contains about 15% of the global recoverable hydrocarbons. Whereas the SE parts of the Zagros have been investigated by detailed geological studies, the NW extent being part of the Republic of Iraq have experienced considerably less attention. In this study we combine field work and remote sensing techniques in order to investigate the interaction of erosion and fold growth in the area NE of Erbil (Kurdistan, Iraq). In particular we focus on the interaction of the transient development of drainage patterns along growing antiforms, which directly reflects the kinematics of progressive fold growth. Detailed geomorphological studies of the Bana Bawi-, Permam- and Safeen fold trains show that these anticlines have not developed from subcylindrical embryonic folds but they have merged from different fold segments that joined laterally during fold amplification. This fold segments with length between 5 and 25 km have been detected by mapping ancient and modern river courses that initially cut the nose of growing folds and eventually got defeated leaving behind a wind gap. Fold segments, propagating in different directions force rivers to join resulting in steep gorges, which dissect the merging fold noses. Along rapidly lateral growing folds (e.g. at the SE end of the Bana Bawi Anticline) we observed "curved wind gaps", a new type of abandoned river course, where form of the wind gap mimics a formed nose of a growing antiform. The inherited curved segments of uplifted curved river courses strongly

  14. Factors affecting Iran`s future. Final report

    SciT

    Sinai, J.

    1993-05-28

    This study examines the factors affecting Iran`s future by focusing on the demographic, economic, and military trends in Iran and their impact on the country`s national security objectives in the next decade. The paper also assesses the implications of an economic embargo on Iran and potential Iranian threats to regional and United States national interests.

  15. The calc-alkaline and adakitic volcanism of the Sabzevar structural zone (NE Iran): Implications for the Eocene magmatic flare-up in Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Hadi Shafaii; Rossetti, Federico; Lucci, Federico; Chiaradia, Massimo; Gerdes, Axel; Martinez, Margarita Lopez; Ghorbani, Ghasem; Nasrabady, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    A major magmatic flare-up is documented along the Bitlis-Zagros suture zone in Eocene-Oligocene times. The Cenozoic magmatism of intraplate Central Iran is an integrant part of this tectono-magmatic scenario. The Cenozoic magmatism of the Sabzevar structural zone consists of mostly intermediate to felsic intrusions and volcanic products. These igneous rocks have calc-alkaline and adakitic geochemical signatures, with nearly coincident zircon U-Pb and mica Ar-Ar ages of ca. 45 Ma. Adakitic rocks have quite low HREE and high Sr/Y ratio, but share most of their geochemical features with the calc-alkaline rocks. The Sabzevar volcanic rocks have similar initial Sr, Nd and Pb isotope ratios, showing their cogenetic nature. Nd model ages cluster tightly around 0.2-0.3 Ga. The geochemistry of the Sabzevar volcanic rocks, along with their isotopic signatures, might strangle that an upper mantle source, metasomatized by slab-derived melts was involved in generating the Sabzevar calc-alkaline rocks. A bulk rock trace element modeling suggests that amphibole-plagioclase-titanite-dominated replenishment-fractional crystallization (RFC) is further responsible for the formation of the middle Eocene Sabzevar adakitic rocks. Extensional tectonics accompanied by lithospheric delamination, possibly assisted by slab break-off and melting at depth was responsible for the Eocene formation of the Sabzevar magmatic rocks and, more in general, for the magmatic "flare-up" in Iran.

  16. Structural Analysis of Active North Bozgush Fault Zone (NW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, R.; Isik, V.; Caglayan, A.

    2013-12-01

    NW Iran is one of the seismically active regions between Zagros Thrust Belt at the south and Caucasus at the north. Not only large magnitude historical earthquakes (Ms>7), but also 1987 Bozgush, 1997 Ardebil (Mw 6.1) and 2012 Ahar-Varzagan (Mw 6.4) earthquakes reveal that the region is seismically active. The North Bozgush Fault Zone (NBFZ) in this region has tens of kilometers in length and hundreds of meters in width. The zone has produced some large and destructive earthquakes (1593 M:6.1 and 1883 M:6.2). The NBFZ affects the Cenozoic units and along this zone Eocene units thrusted over Miocene and/or Plio-Quaternary sedimentary units. Together with morphologic features (stream offsets and alluvial fan movements) affecting the young unites reveal that the zone is active. The zone is mainly characterized by strike-slip faults with reverse component and reverse faults. Reverse faults striking N55°-85°E and dip of 40°-50° to the SW while strike-slip faults show right lateral slip with N60°-85°W and N60°-80°E directions. Our structural data analysis in NBFZ indicates that the axis direction of σ2 principal stress is vertical and the stress ratio (R) is 0.12. These results suggest that the tectonic regime along the North Bozgush Fault Zone is transpressive. Obtained other principal stresses (σ1, σ3) results are compatible with stress directions and GPS velocity suggested for NW Iran.

  17. 31 CFR 561.329 - Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Iran. 561.329 Section 561.329 Money... Iran. The term Iran means the Government of Iran and the territory of Iran and any other territory or... Iran claims sovereignty, sovereign rights, or jurisdiction, provided that the Government of Iran...

  18. 31 CFR 561.329 - Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Iran. 561.329 Section 561.329 Money... Iran. The term Iran means the Government of Iran and the territory of Iran and any other territory or... Iran claims sovereignty, sovereign rights, or jurisdiction, provided that the Government of Iran...

  19. Landscape maturity, fold growth sequence and structural style in the Kirkuk Embayment of the Zagros, northern Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaid, Ahmed K.; Allen, Mark B.

    2017-10-01

    The Kirkuk Embayment is located in the southwest of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt of Iraq. Like fold-and-thrust belts worldwide, the Zagros is conventionally understood to have grown sequentially towards the foreland. Here we use landscape maturity analysis to understand anticline growth in the embayment. Digital Elevation Model (DEM)-based geomorphic indices Hypsometric Integral (HI), Surface Roughness (SR) and their combination Surface Index (SI) have been applied to quantify landscape maturity. The results inform new ideas for the sequence of anticline growth. Maturity indices are highest for the QaraChauq Anticline in the center of the Embayment, then Makhool/Himreen to the south and lastly, the Kirkuk Anticline to the north. The pattern suggests the growth sequence is not classical 'piggy back' thrusting. This result fits the exhumation record, which is loosely constrained by the stratigraphic exposure level. Favored hypotheses for fold growth order are either i) the folds have grown at different times and out of sequence (QaraChauq first, then Makhool/Himreen, and Kirkuk last), or, ii) the growth occurred with different rates of exhumation but at broadly the same time. There are few constraints from available data on syn-tectonic sedimentation patterns. Fold growth across much of the Embayment might have begun within a limited timeframe in the late Miocene-Pliocene, during the deposition of the Mukdadiyah Formation. Another hypothesis is that folds grew in sequence towards the foreland with different rates of exhumation, but we consider this less likely. We also construct a new cross-section for the Embayment, which indicates limited Cenozoic strain: 5% shortening. Analysis of topography and drainage patterns shows two previously-undescribed anticlines with hydrocarbon trap potential, between the Makhool and QaraChauq anticlines.

  20. Iran’s Economy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-22

    is substantial. Iran is a major source of caviar and pistachio nuts, which constitute significant non-oil exports for Iran. Iran’s climate and terrain...and Gas Developments and Trade,” Global Insight Daily Analysis, March 4, 2008. prepared meat and fish, and edible nuts and foods ( pistachios ). There

  1. Climatology of atmospheric circulation patterns of Arabian dust in western Iran.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mohammad Saeed; Sarraf, B S; Zarrin, A; Rasouli, A A

    2017-08-28

    Being in vicinity of vast deserts, the west and southwest of Iran are characterized by high levels of dust events, which have adverse consequences on human health, ecosystems, and environment. Using ground based dataset of dust events in western Iran and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data, the atmospheric circulation patterns of dust events in the Arabian region and west of Iran are identified. The atmospheric circulation patterns which lead to dust events in the Arabian region and western Iran were classified into two main categories: the Shamal dust events that occurs in warm period of year and the frontal dust events as cold period pattern. In frontal dust events, the western trough or blocking pattern at mid-level leads to frontogenesis, instability, and air uplift at lower levels of troposphere in the southwest of Asia. Non-frontal is other pattern of dust event in the cold period and dust generation are due to the regional circulation systems at the lower level of troposphere. In Shamal wind pattern, the Saudi Arabian anticyclone, Turkmenistan anticyclone, and Zagros thermal low play the key roles in formation of this pattern. Summer and transitional patterns are two sub-categories of summer Shamal wind pattern. In summer trough pattern, the mid-tropospheric trough leads to intensify the surface thermal systems in the Middle East and causes instability and rising of wind speed in the region. In synthetic pattern of Shamal wind and summer trough, dust is created by the impact of a trough in mid-levels of troposphere as well as existing the mentioned regional systems which are contributed in formation of summer Shamal wind pattern.

  2. Investigation of dust storms entering Western Iran using remotely sensed data and synoptic analysis.

    PubMed

    Boloorani, Ali D; Nabavi, Seyed O; Bahrami, Hosain A; Mirzapour, Fardin; Kavosi, Musa; Abasi, Esmail; Azizi, Rasoul

    2014-01-01

    One of the natural phenomena which have had considerable impacts on various regions of the world, including Iran, is "dust storm". In recent years, this phenomenon has taken on new dimensions in Iran and has changed from a local problem to a national issue. This study is an attempt to investigate the formation of the dust storms crossing the Western Iran. To find the sources of the dust storms entering Iran, first we examine three determined dust paths in the region and their temporal activities, using MODIS satellite images. Then, four regions were identified as dust sources through soil, land cover and wind data. Finally, atmospheric analyses are implemented to find synoptic patterns inducing dust storms. Source 1 has covered the region between the eastern banks of Euphrates and western banks of Tigris. Source 2 is in desert area of western and south-western Iraq. Finally source 3 is bounded in eastern and south-eastern deserts of Saudi Arabia called Rub-Al-Khali desert, or Empty Quarter. Moreover, south-eastern part of Iraq (source 4) was also determined as a secondary source which thickens the dust masses originating from the above mentioned sources. The study of synoptic circulations suggests that the dust storms originating from source 1 are formed due to the intense pressure gradient between the low-pressure system of Zagros and a high-pressure cell formed on Mediterranean Sea. The dust events in sources 2 and 3 are outcomes of the atmospheric circulations dominant in the cold period of the year in mid-latitudes.

  3. Soil erosion in Iran: Issues and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidreza Sadeghi, Seyed; Cerdà, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    Journal of Geosciences, 7(5), 1941-1950. Khaledi Darvishan, A., Sadeghi, S. H., Homaee, M., Arabkhedri, M. 2013. Measuring sheet erosion using synthetic color-contrast aggregates. Hydrological Processes. Mahmoodabadi, M. Cerdà, A. 2013. WEPP calibration for improved predictions on interril erosion in semi-arid to arid enviorments. Geoderma, 204-205,75-83. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geoderma.2013.04.013, Mehdizade, B., Asadi, H., Shabanpour, M., Ghadiri, H. 2013. Impact of erosion and tillage on the productivity and quality of selected semiarid soils of Iran. International Agrophysics, 27(3), 291-297. Moghadam, B. K., Jabarifar, M., Bagheri, M., Shahbazi, E. 2015. Effects of land use change on soil splash erosion in the semi-arid region of Iran. Geoderma, 241, 210-220. Nosrati, K., Ahmadi, F. 2013. Monitoring of soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks in different land use under surface water erosion in a semi-arid drainage basin of Iran. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management, 17(2), 225-230. Nourzadeh, M., Bahrami, H. A., Goossens, D., Fryrear, D. W. 2013. Determining soil erosion and threshold friction velocity at different soil moisture conditions using a portable wind tunnel. Zeitschrift für Geomorphologie, 57(1), 97-109. Sadeghi, S. H. R., Seghaleh, M. B., Rangavar, A. S. 2013. Plot sizes dependency of runoff and sediment yield estimates from a small watershed. Catena, 102, 55-61. Sadeghi, S. H. R., Seghaleh, M. B., Rangavar, A. S. 2013. Plot sizes dependency of runoff and sediment yield estimates from a small watershed. Catena, 102, 55-61. Sadeghi, S. H., Najafi, S., Riyahi Bakhtiari, A., Abdi, P. 2014. Ascribing soil erosion types for sediment yield using composite fingerprinting technique. Hydrological Sciences Journal, 59(9), 1753-1762. Taghizadeh-Mehrjardi, R., Minasny, B., Sarmadian, F., Malone, B. P. 2014. Digital mapping of soil salinity in Ardakan region, central Iran. Geoderma, 213, 15-28.

  4. A remote sensing study of active folding and faulting in southern Kerman province, S.E. Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Richard Thomas

    2006-04-01

    Geomorphological observations reveal a major oblique fold-and-thrust belt in Kerman province, S.E. Iran. The active faults appear to link the Sabzevaran right-lateral strike-slip fault in southeast Iran to other strike-slip faults within the interior of the country and may provide the means of distributing right-lateral shear between the Zagros and Makran mountains over a wider region of central Iran. The Rafsanjan fault is manifest at the Earth's surface as right-lateral strike-slip fault scarps and folding in alluvial sediments. Height changes across the anticlines, and widespread incision of rivers, are likely to result from hanging-wall uplift above thrust faults at depth. Scarps in recent alluvium along the northern margins of the folds suggest that the thrusts reach the surface and are active at the present-day. The observations from Rafsanjan are used to identify similar late Quaternary faulting elsewhere in Kerman province near the towns of Mahan and Rayen. No instrumentally recorded destructive earthquakes have occurred in the study region and only one historical earthquake (Lalehzar, 1923) is recorded. In addition GPS studies show that present-day rates of deformation are low. However, fault structures in southern Kerman province do appear to be active in the late Quaternary and may be capable of producing destructive earthquakes in the future. This study shows how widely available remote sensing data can be used to provide information on the distribution of active faulting across large areas of deformation.

  5. Stress state and movement potential of the Kar-e-Bas fault zone, Fars, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Zafarmand, Bahareh

    2017-08-01

    The Kar-e-Bas or Mengharak basement-inverted fault is comprised of six segments in the Zagros foreland folded belt of Iran. In the Fars region, this fault zone associated with the Kazerun, Sabz-Pushan and Sarvestan faults serves as a lateral transfer zone that accommodates the change in shortening direction from the western central to the eastern Zagros. This study evaluates the recent tectonic stress regime of the Kar-e-Bas fault zone based on inversion of earthquake focal mechanism data, and quantifies the fault movement potential of this zone based on the relationship between fault geometric characteristics and recent tectonic stress regimes. The trend and plunge of σ 1 and σ 3 are S25°W/04°-N31°E/05° and S65°E/04°-N60°W/10°, respectively, with a stress ratio of Φ = 0.83. These results are consistent with the collision direction of the Afro-Arabian continent and the Iranian microcontinent. The near horizontal plunge of maximum and minimum principle stresses and the value of stress ratio Φ indicate that the state of stress is nearly strike-slip dominated with little relative difference between the value of two principal stresses, σ 1 and σ 2. The obliquity of the maximum compressional stress into the fault trend reveals a typical stress partitioning of thrust and strike-slip motion in the Kar-e-Bas fault zone. Analysis of the movement potential of this fault zone shows that its northern segment has a higher potential of fault activity (0.99). The negligible difference between the fault-plane dips of the segments indicates that their strike is a controlling factor in the changes in movement potential.

  6. Petroleum industry in Iran

    SciT

    Farideh, A.

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the oil industry in Iran from the early discovery of oil nearly two hundred years ago in Mazandaran (north part) to the development of a giant modern industry in the twentieth century. Chapter I presents a brief historical setting to introduce the reader to the importance of oil in Iran. It focuses on the economic implications of the early oil concessions in the period 1901 to 1951. Chapter II discusses the nationalization of the Iranian oil industry and creation of NIOC in 1951 and the international political and economic implication of these activities. Chapter III explains themore » activities of NIOC in Iran. Exploration and drilling, production, exports, refineries, natural gas, petrochemicals and internal distributions are studied. Chapter IV discusses the role of the development planning of Iran. A brief presentation of the First Development Plan through the Fifth Development Plan is given. Sources and uses of funds by plan organization during these Five Plans is studied. The Iran and Iraq War is also studied briefly, but the uncertainty of its resolution prevents any close analysis of its impact on the Iranian oil industry. One conclusion, however, is certain; oil has been a vital resource in Iran's past and it will remain the lifetime of its economic development in the future.« less

  7. 31 CFR 560.303 - Iran; Iranian.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Iran; Iranian. 560.303 Section 560.303... Definitions § 560.303 Iran; Iranian. The term Iran means the territory of Iran and any other territory or... Iran claims sovereignty, sovereign rights, or jurisdiction, provided that the Government of Iran...

  8. 31 CFR 560.303 - Iran; Iranian.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Iran; Iranian. 560.303 Section 560.303... Definitions § 560.303 Iran; Iranian. The term Iran means the territory of Iran and any other territory or... Iran claims sovereignty, sovereign rights, or jurisdiction, provided that the Government of Iran...

  9. Active tectonics of the Qom region, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, J.; Fattahi, M.; Jackson, J. A.; Talebian, M.; Nazari, H.; Bahroudi, A.

    2009-12-01

    Between 50-57°E shortening across the Arabian-Eurasian collision zone is accommodated primarily in the Zagros and Alborz mountains of Iran, which bound the relatively aseismic Central Iranian block. Both the lack of seismicity and the minor variation in GPS velocities across Central Iran suggest this region plays a negligible role in accommodating Arabia-Eurasia shortening at the present day. We examine recent deformation in the Qom region, which lies 100 km south of Tehran within the Central Iran block. This region is notable for a number of large earthquakes over the last 30 years: 1980.12.18 (Mw 6.0), 1980.12.22 (Mw 5.7), and 2007.06.18 (Mw 5.4). Body-waveform modeling of these events indicates N-S shortening on a S-dipping thrust fault which projects to the surface along the Qom thrust. Evidence for longer-term uplift is indicated by the increased topography south of the fault, and the exposure of folded Miocene (U. Red Fmtn) and Late Oligocene (Qom Fmtn) deposits. River incision has resulted in numerous river terraces, and in one location an alluvial fan has been offset across the fault. Four samples were collected from the surface of this fan and their ages determined using OSL dating. The results indicate fan abandonment at ~30 kybp. A DEM of the fan was produced using kinematic GPS surveying data, from which 1.0±0.3 m vertical offset was measured. A minimum uplift rate of 0.02 mm/yr and a minimum shortening rate of 0.01 mm/yr are obtained. If the age of the lower (and youngest) terrace is 10 ky, as is typically seen in other locations throughout Iran, the likely range of uplift rates are 0.02-0.2 mm/yr and shortening rates 0.01-0.2 mm/yr. North of Qom city, U. Red Fmtn deposits have been folded into an asymmetric N-verging anticline known as the Alborz anticline. Seismic, well and surface data all indicate this structure has formed as a fault-bend fold above a decollement at 3 km depth which ramps to the surface along the northern limit of the fold. A

  10. Mapping Glauconite Unites with Using Remote Sensing Techniques in North East of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadirouhani, R.; Samiee, S.

    2014-10-01

    Glauconite is a greenish ferric-iron silicate mineral with micaceous structure, characteristically formed in shallow marine environments. Glauconite has been used as a pigmentation agent for oil paint, contaminants remover in environmental studies and a source of potassium in plant fertilizers, and other industries. Koppeh-dagh basin is extended in Iran, Afghanistan and Turkmenistan countries and Glauconite units exist in this basin. In this research for enhancing and mapping glauconitic units in Koppeh-dagh structural zone in north east of Iran, remote sensing techniques such as Spectral Angle Mapper classification (SAM), band ratio and band composition methods on SPOT, ASTER and Landsat data in 3 steps were applied.

  11. Computer-based self-organized tectonic zoning: a tentative pattern recognition for Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, Ahmad; Hashemi, Naser

    2004-08-01

    Conventional methods of tectonic zoning are frequently characterized by two deficiencies. The first one is the large uncertainty involved in tectonic zoning based on non-quantitative and subjective analysis. Failure to interpret accurately a large amount of data "by eye" is the second. In order to alleviate each of these deficiencies, the multivariate statistical method of cluster analysis has been utilized to seek and separate zones with similar tectonic pattern and construct automated self-organized multivariate tectonic zoning maps. This analytical method of tectonic regionalization is particularly useful for showing trends in tectonic evolution of a region that could not be discovered by any other means. To illustrate, this method has been applied for producing a general-purpose numerical tectonic zoning map of Iran. While there are some similarities between the self-organized multivariate numerical maps and the conventional maps, the cluster solution maps reveal some remarkable features that cannot be observed on the current tectonic maps. The following specific examples need to be noted: (1) The much disputed extent and rigidity of the Lut Rigid Block, described as the microplate of east Iran, is clearly revealed on the self-organized numerical maps. (2) The cluster solution maps reveal a striking similarity between this microplate and the northern Central Iran—including the Great Kavir region. (3) Contrary to the conventional map, the cluster solution maps make a clear distinction between the East Iranian Ranges and the Makran Mountains. (4) Moreover, an interesting similarity between the Azarbaijan region in the northwest and the Makran Mountains in the southeast and between the Kopet Dagh Ranges in the northeast and the Zagros Folded Belt in the southwest of Iran are revealed in the clustering process. This new approach to tectonic zoning is a starting point and is expected to be improved and refined by collection of new data. The method is also a useful

  12. Strong Genetic Differentiation of Submerged Plant Populations across Mountain Ranges: Evidence from Potamogeton pectinatus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Shabnam; Afsharzadeh, Saeed; Saeidi, Hojjatollah; Triest, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Biogeographic barriers for freshwater biota can be effective at various spatial scales. At the largest spatial scale, freshwater organisms can become genetically isolated by their high mountain ranges, vast deserts, and inability to cross oceans. Isolation by distance of aquatic plants is expected to be stronger across than alongside mountain ridges whereas the heterogeneity of habitats among populations and temporary droughts may influence connectivity and hamper dispersal. Suitable aquatic plant habitats became reduced, even for the widespread submerged Potamogeton pectinatus L. (also named Stuckenia pectinata) giving structure to various aquatic habitats. We compared the level of genetic diversity in a heterogeneous series of aquatic habitats across Iran and tested their differentiation over distances and across mountain ranges (Alborz and Zagros) and desert zones (Kavir), with values obtained from temperate region populations. The diversity of aquatic ecosystems across and along large geographic barriers provided a unique ecological situation within Iran. P. pectinatus were considered from thirty-six sites across Iran at direct flight distances ranging from 20 to 1,200 km. Nine microsatellite loci revealed a very high number of alleles over all sites. A PCoA, NJT clustering and STRUCTURE analysis revealed a separate grouping of individuals of southeastern Iranian sites and was confirmed by their different nuclear ITS and cpDNA haplotypes thereby indicating an evolutionary significant unit (ESU). At the level of populations, a positive correlation between allelic differentiation Dest with geographic distance was found. Individual-based STRUCTURE analysis over 36 sites showed 7 genetic clusters. FST and RST values for ten populations reached 0.343 and 0.521, respectively thereby indicating that allele length differences are more important and contain evolutionary information. Overall, higher levels of diversity and a stronger differentiation was revealed among

  13. Strong Genetic Differentiation of Submerged Plant Populations across Mountain Ranges: Evidence from Potamogeton pectinatus in Iran.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Shabnam; Afsharzadeh, Saeed; Saeidi, Hojjatollah; Triest, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Biogeographic barriers for freshwater biota can be effective at various spatial scales. At the largest spatial scale, freshwater organisms can become genetically isolated by their high mountain ranges, vast deserts, and inability to cross oceans. Isolation by distance of aquatic plants is expected to be stronger across than alongside mountain ridges whereas the heterogeneity of habitats among populations and temporary droughts may influence connectivity and hamper dispersal. Suitable aquatic plant habitats became reduced, even for the widespread submerged Potamogeton pectinatus L. (also named Stuckenia pectinata) giving structure to various aquatic habitats. We compared the level of genetic diversity in a heterogeneous series of aquatic habitats across Iran and tested their differentiation over distances and across mountain ranges (Alborz and Zagros) and desert zones (Kavir), with values obtained from temperate region populations. The diversity of aquatic ecosystems across and along large geographic barriers provided a unique ecological situation within Iran. P. pectinatus were considered from thirty-six sites across Iran at direct flight distances ranging from 20 to 1,200 km. Nine microsatellite loci revealed a very high number of alleles over all sites. A PCoA, NJT clustering and STRUCTURE analysis revealed a separate grouping of individuals of southeastern Iranian sites and was confirmed by their different nuclear ITS and cpDNA haplotypes thereby indicating an evolutionary significant unit (ESU). At the level of populations, a positive correlation between allelic differentiation Dest with geographic distance was found. Individual-based STRUCTURE analysis over 36 sites showed 7 genetic clusters. FST and RST values for ten populations reached 0.343 and 0.521, respectively thereby indicating that allele length differences are more important and contain evolutionary information. Overall, higher levels of diversity and a stronger differentiation was revealed among

  14. [History of acupuncture in Iran].

    PubMed

    Bai, Xinghua

    2015-10-01

    Iran is the neighbor of western China, and is a key transport junction on ancient Silk Road. The medical communication between China and Iran dates back to the 10th century, however, according to current evidences, it is indicated that acupuncture has not been introduced to Iran until the early 1970s. Unfortunately over the last 40 years, the acupuncture in Iran has not presented great development. The history of acupuncture development in Iran implies that geographical advantage and personnel exchanges are not essential to the international exchange of acupuncture, while language and cultural background may hinder the spread of acupuncture in foreign countries.

  15. Spatiotemporal analysis of brucellosis incidence in Iran from 2011 to 2014 using GIS.

    PubMed

    Pakzad, Reza; Pakzad, Iraj; Safiri, Saeid; Shirzadi, Mohammad Reza; Mohammadpour, Marzieh; Behroozi, Abbas; Sullman, Mark J M; Janati, Ali

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the distribution and trends associated with brucellosis incidence rates in Iran from 2011 to 2014. The reported incidence rates of brucellosis for the years 2011-2014 were collected and entered into GIS 10.1. The Cochran-Armitage test for linear trends, choropleth maps, hot-spot analysis, and high-low clustering analysis were used to investigate patterns of the disease over the study period and by season, and to identify high-risk areas and any clustering of the disease. The significance level was set at p<0.05. A total of 68493 cases of brucellosis were reported during the study period, giving an average brucellosis incidence rate for this period of 38.67/100000. In 2011, the highest rate of brucellosis was observed in Koohrang County of Chaharmahal-Bakhtiari Province, with 317/100 000. In the subsequent years, 2012-2014, Charuymaq County of East-Azerbaijan Province had incidence rates of 384, 534, and 583/100000, respectively. However, the incidence rate of the disease did not follow a linear trend (p<0.001). The maximum and minimum incidence rates of the disease occurred in mid-summer and mid-winter, respectively. The results of the hot-spot analysis showed that the distribution of the disease was highest in the mountainous areas of Iran, particularly along the Zagros mountain range and in most cities near the Zagros Mountains (p<0.01). In addition, the cluster analysis showed a clustering pattern in these high incidence areas (p<0.01). There were significant differences in the geographic distribution of brucellosis, with the incidence rates being highest in most of the cities in the west and north-west of the country. The incidence of this disease also increased during the summer. It is important to take these patterns into account when allocating resources to combat this disease and to ensure that health programs and other interventions focus on the areas of greatest need. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights

  16. New insights into the active deformation of accretionary prisms: examples from the Western Makran, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, Camilla; Copley, Alex; Oveisi, Benham

    2016-04-01

    The Makran subduction zone, along the southern coasts of Iran and Pakistan, hosts one of the largest exposed accretionary wedges in the world. The western Makran has been characterised by a lack of shallow and thrust seismicity in both the instrumental and historical periods. The Mw 6.1 2013 Minab earthquake thus provides a rare opportunity to study the deformation of the accretionary wedge in the transition region between continent-continent collision, in the Zagros, and oceanic subduction, in the Makran. We study the source parameters and slip distribution of this earthquake using seismology, geodesy and field observations. We observe left-lateral strike-slip motion on a fault striking ENE-WSW; approximately perpendicular to the faults of the Minab-Zendan-Palami fault zone, the main structure previously thought to accommodate the right-lateral shear between the Zagros and the Makran. The fault that ruptured in 2013 is one of a series of approximately E-W striking left-lateral faults visible in the geology and geomorphology. These accommodate a velocity field equivalent to right-lateral shear on N-S striking planes by clockwise rotations about vertical axes. The longitudinal range of shear in the western Makran is likely to be controlled by the distance over which the underthrusting Arabian lithosphere deepens in the transition from continent-continent collision to oceanic subduction. The lack of observed megathrust seismicity in the western Makran has led to assertions that the convergence in this region may be aseismic, in contrast to the eastern Makran, which experienced an Mw8.1 earthquake in 1945. The right-lateral Sistan Suture Zone, which runs ~N-S along the Iran-Afghanistan border to the north of the Makran, appears to separate these regimes. However, right-lateral faulting is not observed south of ~27°N, within the wedge. The Minab earthquake and the 2013 Balochistan earthquake show that the Makran accretionary wedge is dominated by strike-slip faulting

  17. New Criteria to Assess Seismic and Rock Burst Hazard in Coal Mines / Nowe Kryteria Dla Oceny Zagrożenia Sejsmicznego I Tąpaniami W Kopalniach Węgla Kamiennego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutke, Grzegorz; Dubiński, Józef; Lurka, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents new criteria of seismic and rock burst hazard assessment in Polish hard coal mines where longwall mining system is common practice. The presented criteria are based on the results of continuous recording of seismic events and analysis of selected seismological parameters: spatial location of seismic event in relation to mining workings, seismic energy, seismic energy release per unit coal face advance, b-value of Gutenberg-Richter law, seismic energy index EI, seismic moment M0, weighted value of peak particle velocity PPVW. These parameters are determined in a moving daily time windows or time windows with fixed number of seismic tremors. Time changes of these parameters are then compared with mean value estimated in the analyzed area. This is the basis to indicate the zones of high seismic and rock burst hazard in specific moment in time during mining process. Additionally, the zones of high seismic and rock burst hazard are determined by utilization of passive seismic tomography method. All the calculated seismic parameters in moving time windows are used to quantify seismic and rock burst hazard by four level scales. In practice, assessment of seismic and rock burst hazard is used to make daily decision about using rock burst prevention activities and correction of further exploitation of monitored coal panel. Zagrożenie sejsmiczne i związane z nim genetycznie zagrożenie tąpnięciem w dalszym ciągu należą do najgroźniejszych zagrożeń naturalnych występujących w polskich kopalniach węgla kamiennego. W ostatnich latach w kopalniach Górnośląskiego Zagłębia Węglowego (GZW) rocznie rejestrowano 1000÷1500 wstrząsów o energii sejsmicznej Es ≥ 1·105J (magnituda lokalna ML ≥ 1.7), a najsilniejsze z nich osiągały energię Es = 4 ·109J (ML = 4.1). W latach 1991-2010 odnotowano w GZW 101 tąpnięć, z których około 66% miało miejsce w wyrobiskach chodnikowych, powodując ich uszkodzenia lub całkowite zniszczenie, a w

  18. Influence of pre-existing basement faults on the structural evolution of the Zagros Simply Folded belt: 3D numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruh, Jonas B.; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    The Simply Folded Belt of the Zagros orogen is characterized by elongated fold trains symptomatically defining the geomorphology along this mountain range. The Zagros orogen results from the collision of the Arabian and the Eurasian plates. The Simply Folded Belt is located southwest of the Zagros suture zone. An up to 2 km thick salt horizon below the sedimentary sequence enables mechanical and structural detachment from the underlying Arabian basement. Nevertheless, deformation within the basement influences the structural evolution of the Simply Folded Belt. It has been shown that thrusts in form of reactivated normal faults can trigger out-of-sequence deformation within the sedimentary stratigraphy. Furthermore, deeply rooted strike-slip faults, such as the Kazerun faults between the Fars zone in the southeast and the Dezful embayment and the Izeh zone, are largely dispersing into the overlying stratigraphy, strongly influencing the tectonic evolution and mechanical behaviour. The aim of this study is to reveal the influence of basement thrusts and strike-slip faults on the structural evolution of the Simply Folded Belt depending on the occurrence of intercrustal weak horizons (Hormuz salt) and the rheology and thermal structure of the basement. Therefore, we present high-resolution 3D thermo-mechnical models with pre-existing, inversively reactivated normal faults or strike-slip faults within the basement. Numerical models are based on finite difference, marker-in-cell technique with (power-law) visco-plastic rheology accounting for brittle deformation. Preliminary results show that deep tectonic structures present in the basement may have crucial effects on the morphology and evolution of a fold-and-thrust belt above a major detachment horizon.

  19. 31 CFR 560.303 - Iran; Iranian.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Iran; Iranian. 560.303 Section 560.303... Iran; Iranian. The term Iran means the territory of Iran, and any other territory or marine area, including the exclusive economic zone and continental shelf, over which the Government of Iran claims...

  20. 31 CFR 560.303 - Iran; Iranian.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Iran; Iranian. 560.303 Section 560... § 560.303 Iran; Iranian. The term Iran means the territory of Iran, and any other territory or marine area, including the exclusive economic zone and continental shelf, over which the Government of Iran...

  1. 31 CFR 560.303 - Iran; Iranian.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Iran; Iranian. 560.303 Section 560.303... Iran; Iranian. The term Iran means the territory of Iran, and any other territory or marine area, including the exclusive economic zone and continental shelf, over which the Government of Iran claims...

  2. Iran: Country Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFerren, Margaret

    A survey of the status of language usage in Iran begins with an overview of the usage pattern of Persian, the official language spoken by just over half the population, and the competing languages of six ethnic and linguistic minorities: Azerbaijani, Kurdish, Arabic, Gilaki, Luri-Bakhtiari, and Mazandarani. The development of language policy…

  3. U-Pb dating and emplacement history of granitoid plutons in the northern Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Shahryar; Corfu, Fernando; Masoudi, Fariborz; Mehrabi, Behzad; Mohajjel, Mohammad

    2011-05-01

    The Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ), which runs parallel to the Zagros fold and thrust belt of Iran, underwent a multistage evolution starting with Neotethys initiation, its subsequent subduction below the Iranian continental crust, and eventual closure during convergence of Arabia towards central Iran. Plutonic complexes are well developed in the northern part of the SSZ and we have dated a number of them by ID-TIMS U-Pb on zircon. The new data record the following events: a Mid Jurassic period that formed the Boroujerd Plutonic Complex (169 Ma), the Astaneh Pluton (168 Ma) and the Alvand Pluton (165 Ma); Late Jurassic emplacement of the Gorveh Pluton (157-149 Ma); Mid Cretaceous (109 Ma) formation of a I-type phase in the Hasan Salary Pluton near Saqqez, followed by Early Paleocene (60 Ma) intrusion of A-type granite in the same pluton; and the youngest intrusive event recorded so far in the SSZ with the intrusion of granite in the Gosheh-Tavandasht Complex near Boroujerd at 34.9 Ma. These different events reflect specific stages of subduction-related magmatism prior to the eventual Miocene collision between the two continental blocks.

  4. Structural analysis of the Hasan-Robat marbles as traces of folded basement in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadimi, Alireza

    2015-11-01

    Cherty marbles of Hasan-Robat area, northwest of Isfahan, in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone of Iran preserves evidences of multiple deformational events. The Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone is the inner crystalline zone of the Zagros Orogen, which has been highly deformed and exhumed during continental collision between the Arabian Plate and Central Iran. The Hasan-Robat area is an example of the exposed Precambrian-Paleozoic basement rocks that stretched along two NW-SE-trending faults and located in the inner part of the HasanRobat positive flower strcuture. The Hasan-Robat marbles record a complex shortening and shearing history. This lead to the development of disharmonic ptygmatic folds with vertical to sub-vertical axes and some interference patterns of folding that may have been created from deformations during the Pan-African Orogeny and later phases. Based on this research, tectonic evolution of the Hasan-Robat area is interpreted as the product of three major geotectonic events that have been started after Precambrian to Quaternary: (1) old deformation phases (2) contractional movements and (3) strike-slip movements. Different sets and distributions of joints, faults and folds are confirmed with effect of several deformational stages of the area and formation of the flower structure.

  5. Time distribution of heavy rainfall events in south west of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassabi, Zahra; kamali, G. Ali; Meshkatee, Amir-Hussain; Hajam, Sohrab; Javaheri, Nasrolah

    2016-07-01

    Accurate knowledge of rainfall time distribution is a fundamental issue in many Meteorological-Hydrological studies such as using the information of the surface runoff in the design of the hydraulic structures, flood control and risk management, and river engineering studies. Since the main largest dams of Iran are in the south-west of the country (i.e. South Zagros), this research investigates the temporal rainfall distribution based on an analytical numerical method to increase the accuracy of hydrological studies in Iran. The United States Soil Conservation Service (SCS) estimated the temporal rainfall distribution in various forms. Hydrology studies usually utilize the same distribution functions in other areas of the world including Iran due to the lack of sufficient observation data. However, we first used Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model to achieve the simulated rainfall results of the selected storms on south west of Iran in this research. Then, a three-parametric Logistic function was fitted to the rainfall data in order to compute the temporal rainfall distribution. The domain of the WRF model is 30.5N-34N and 47.5E-52.5E with a resolution of 0.08 degree in latitude and longitude. We selected 35 heavy storms based on the observed rainfall data set to simulate with the WRF Model. Storm events were scrutinized independently from each other and the best analytical three-parametric logistic function was fitted for each grid point. The results show that the value of the coefficient a of the logistic function, which indicates rainfall intensity, varies from the minimum of 0.14 to the maximum of 0.7. Furthermore, the values of the coefficient B of the logistic function, which indicates rain delay of grid points from start time of rainfall, vary from 1.6 in south-west and east to more than 8 in north and central parts of the studied area. In addition, values of rainfall intensities are lower in south west of IRAN than those of observed or proposed by the

  6. The Oligo-/Miocene Qom Formation (Iran): evidence for an early Burdigalian restriction of the Tethyan Seaway and closure of its Iranian gateways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, M.; Piller, W. E.; Harzhauser, M.; Mandic, O.; Berning, B.; Rögl, F.; Kroh, A.; Aubry, M.-P.; Wielandt-Schuster, U.; Hamedani, A.

    2009-04-01

    In the central Iranian Esfahan-Sirjan and Qom basins sedimentation of the Oligo-/Miocene Qom Formation took place on extensive mixed carbonate-siliciclastic ramps. During this time, both basins were positioned at the Eurasian margin of the Tethyan Seaway, which connected the western and eastern regions of the Tethys Ocean at least until the late Burdigalian. During the so-called Terminal Tethyan Event the Tethyan Seaway was then closed due to the collision of the African/Arabian and Iranian/Eurasian plates. Facies analysis of the sedimentary record of both basins indicates paleoenvironments ranging from terrestrial to open marine settings, including mangrove, restricted inner shelf lagoon, seagrass meadow, reefal, and deeper offshore environments. Recognition of eight depositional sequences and elaboration of an integrated biostratigraphic framework (calcareous nannoplankton, planktic and larger benthic foraminifers, gastropods, and pectinids) allow us to construct a basin-spanning stratigraphy. The assignment of the recognized sea-level lowstands to the Ru 3 to Bur 3 lowstands of the global sea-level curve enables a comparison with time-equivalent sections from the Zagros Basin, which was part of the African/Arabian Plate on the opposing southern margin of the Tethyan Seaway. The so calibrated sections display restrictions of the Tethyan Seaway and interruption of the south Iranian gateways between the Qom Basin and the Proto-Indopacific in relation to ongoing plate collision during the early Burdigalian.

  7. Iran’s Security Dilemma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    reasoning." Despite its ’For an example of a capabilities-driven analysis see Michael Eisenstadt, " Deja Vu All Over Again? An Assessment of Iran’s Military...Sancton, "No Longer Fenced In," Time, 23 May 1994, pp. 36-38. ’Michael Eisenstadt, " Deja Vu All Over Again? An Assessment of Iran’s Military Buildup...Eisenstadt, " Deja Vu All Over Again? An Assessment Of Iran’s Military Buildup," Iran’s Strategic Intentions and Capabilities, ed., Patrick Clawson

  8. Women, Change, and Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-22

    guardian needed to approve public legal and business transactions. Effectively , the Islamic Revolution removed women from many spheres of life and...society. History is a record of efforts to expand and to diminish the rights afforded women. However, to assess whether women participated effectively in...restricting women’s rights in Iran. It is arguable that women fail to influence the government effectively because they are unable to affect decisions

  9. Remote sensing and GIS approach for water-well site selection, southwest Iran

    Rangzan, K.; Charchi, A.; Abshirini, E.; Dinger, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Pabdeh-Lali Anticline of northern Khuzestan province is located in southwestern Iran and occupies 790 km2. This structure is situated in the Zagros folded belt. As a result of well-developed karst systems in the anticlinal axis, the water supply potential is high and is drained by many peripheral springs. However, there is a scarcity of water for agriculture and population centers on the anticlinal flanks, which imposes a severe problem in terms of area development. This study combines remotely sensed (RS) data and a geographical information system (GIS) into a RSGIS technique to delineate new areas for groundwater development and specific sites for drilling productive water wells. Toward these goals, RS data were used to develop GIS layers for lithology, structural geology, topographic slope, elevation, and drainage density. Field measurements were made to create spring-location and groundwater-quality GIS layers. Subsequently, expert choice and relational methods were used in a GIS environment to conjunctively analyze all layers to delineate preferable regions and 43 individual sites in which to drill water wells. Results indicate that the most preferred areas are, in preferential order, within recent alluvial deposits, the Bakhtiyari Conglomerates, and the Aghajari Sandstone. The Asmari Limestone and other units have much lower potential for groundwater supplies. Potential usefulness of the RSGIS method was indicated when six out of nine producing wells recently drilled by the Khozestan Water and Power Authority (which had no knowledge of this study) were located in areas preferentially selected by this technique.

  10. Iran's Million-Student Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labi, Aisha

    2008-01-01

    The Islamic Azad University was founded by Hashemi Rafsanjani, a cleric who was in the past the first speaker of the Majlis, or Parliament, of Iran's postrevolutionary government. He served as president of Iran from 1989 to 1997 and ran for re-election in 2005, when he was defeated by Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. In the two decades after Azad was founded,…

  11. Natural Gas Exports from Iran

    EIA Publications

    2012-01-01

    This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Iran’s natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

  12. BASINS Publications

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Although BASINS has been in use for the past 10 years, there has been limited modeling guidance on its applications for complex environmental problems, such as modeling impacts of hydro modification on water quantity and quality.

  13. Cigarette smoking in iran.

    PubMed

    Meysamie, A; Ghaletaki, R; Zhand, N; Abbasi, M

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the largest preventable cause of death worldwide. No systematic review is available on the situation of the smoking in Iran, so we decided to provide an overview of the studies in the field of smoking in Iranian populations. Published Persian-language papers of all types until 2009 indexed in the IranMedex (http://www.iranmedex.com) and Magiran (http://www.magiran.com). Reports of World Health Organization were also searched and optionally employed. The studies concerning passive smoking or presenting the statistically insignificant side effects were excluded. Databases were searched using various combinations of the following terms: cigarette, smoking, smoking cessation, prevalence, history, side effects, and lung cancer by independent reviewers. All the 83 articles concerning the prevalence or side effects of the smoking habit in any Iranian population were selected. The prevalence rate of daily cigarette smoking and the 95% confidence interval as well as smoking health risk associated odds ratio (OR) were retrieved from the articles or calculated. The reported prevalence rates of the included studies, the summary of smoking-related side effects and the ORs (95%CI) of smoking associated risks and the available data on smoking cessation in Iran have been shown in the article. Because of lack of certain data, special studies on local pattern of tobacco use in different districts, about the relationship between tobacco use and other diseases, especially non communicable diseases, and besides extension of smoking cessation strategies, studies on efficacy of these methods seems to be essential in this field.

  14. Cigarette Smoking in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Meysamie, A; Ghaletaki, R; Zhand, N; Abbasi, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cigarette smoking is the largest preventable cause of death worldwide. No systematic review is available on the situation of the smoking in Iran, so we decided to provide an overview of the studies in the field of smoking in Iranian populations. Methods: Published Persian-language papers of all types until 2009 indexed in the IranMedex (http://www.iranmedex.com) and Magiran (http://www.magiran.com). Reports of World Health Organization were also searched and optionally employed. The studies concerning passive smoking or presenting the statistically insignificant side effects were excluded. Databases were searched using various combinations of the following terms: cigarette, smoking, smoking cessation, prevalence, history, side effects, and lung cancer by independent reviewers. All the 83 articles concerning the prevalence or side effects of the smoking habit in any Iranian population were selected. The prevalence rate of daily cigarette smoking and the 95% confidence interval as well as smoking health risk associated odds ratio (OR) were retrieved from the articles or calculated. Results: The reported prevalence rates of the included studies, the summary of smoking-related side effects and the ORs (95%CI) of smoking associated risks and the available data on smoking cessation in Iran have been shown in the article. Conclusion: Because of lack of certain data, special studies on local pattern of tobacco use in different districts, about the relationship between tobacco use and other diseases, especially non communicable diseases, and besides extension of smoking cessation strategies, studies on efficacy of these methods seems to be essential in this field. PMID:23113130

  15. The Kharapeh orogenic gold deposit: Geological, structural, and geochemical controls on epizonal ore formation in West Azerbaijan Province, Northwestern Iran

    Niroomand, Shojaeddin; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Moore, Farib; Mohajjel, Mohammad; Marsh, Erin E.

    2011-01-01

    The Kharapeh gold deposit is located along the northwestern margin of the Sanandaj–Sirjan Zone (SSZ) in the West Azerbaijan province, Iran. It is an epizonal orogenic gold deposit formed within the deformed zone between central Iran and the Arabian plate during the Cretaceous–Tertiary Zagros orogeny. The deposit area is underlain by Cretaceous schist and marble, as well as altered andesite and dacite dikes. Structural analysis indicates that the rocks underwent tight to isoclinal recumbent folding and were subsequently co-axially refolded to upright open folds during a second deformation. Late- to post-tectonic Cenozoic granites and granodiorites occur northeast of the deposit area. Mineralization mainly is recognized within NW-trending extensional structures as veins and breccia zones. Normal faults, intermediate dikes, and quartz veins, oriented subparallel to the axial surface of the Kharapeh antiform, indicate synchronous extension perpendicular to the fold axis during the second folding event. The gold-bearing quartz veins are >1 km in length and average about 6 m in width; breccia zones are 10–50 m in length and ≤1 m in width. Hydrothermal alteration mainly consists of silicification, sulfidation, chloritization, sericitization, and carbonatization. Paragenetic relationships indicate three distinct stages—replacement and silicification, brecciation and fracture filling, and cataclastic brecciation—with the latter two being gold-rich. Fluid inclusion data suggest mineral deposition at temperatures of at least 220–255°C and depths of at least 1.4–1.8 km, from a H2O–CO2±CH4 fluid of relatively high salinity (12–14 wt.% NaCl equiv.), which may reflect metamorphism of passive margin carbonate sequences. Ore fluid δ18O values between about 7‰ and 9‰ suggest no significant meteoric water input, despite gold deposition in a relatively shallow epizonal environment. Similarities to other deposits in the SSZ suggest that the deposit formed as

  16. Iran: Regional Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    Iranian plan to specify the underlying development strategy , the overall development objectives, 7 and some sectoral growth targets. Iran’s Fourth Plan...current prices was estimated at 4.42 billion dollars; at the end of the decade it had more than tripled to reach a level of about 14.9 billion dollars...Military Service- 2 years. Total armed forces- 112,500. Army: 100,000. 2 amoured divisions, each of 2 armd bdes and 1 mech bde. 3 infantry divisions

  17. Differential mortality in Iran.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Ardeshir; Taylor, Richard; Naghavi, Mohsen; Lopez, Alan D

    2007-07-28

    Among the available data provided by health information systems, data on mortality are commonly used not only as health indicators but also as socioeconomic development indices. Recognizing that in Iran accurate data on causes of death were not available, the Deputy of Health in the Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MOH&ME) established a new comprehensive system for death registration which started in one province (Bushehr) as a pilot in 1997, and was subsequently expanded to include all other provinces, except Tehran province. These data can be used to investigate the nature and extent of differences in mortality in Iran. The objective of this paper is to estimate provincial differences in the level of mortality using this death registration system. Data from the death registration system for 2004 for each province were evaluated for data completeness, and life tables were created for provinces after correction for under-enumeration of death registration. For those provinces where it was not possible to adjust the data on adult deaths by using the Brass Growth Balance method, adult mortality was predicted based on adult literacy using information from provinces with reliable data. Child mortality (risk of a newborn dying before age 5, or 5q0) in 2004 varied between 47 per 1000 live births for both sexes in Sistan and Baluchistan province, and 25 per 1000 live births in Tehran and Gilan provinces. For adults, provincial differences in mortality were much greater for males than females. Adult mortality (risk of dying between ages 15 and 60, or 45q15) for females varied between 0.133 in Kerman province and 0.117 in Tehran province; for males the range was from 0.218 in Kerman to 0.149 in Tehran province. Life expectancy for females was highest in Tehran province (73.8 years) and lowest in Sistan and Baluchistan (70.9 years). For males, life expectancy ranged from 65.7 years in Sistan and Baluchistan province to 70.9 years in Tehran. Substantial differences in

  18. Lut Desert, Iran

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Iran is a large country with several desert regions. In the Dasht-E-Lut (Lut Desert) (30.5N, 58.5E) an area known as Namak-Zar, about 100 miles east of the city of Kerman, is at the center of this photograph. Some of the world's most prominent Yardangs (very long, parallel ridges and depressions) have been wind eroded in these desert dry lake bed sediments. At the left of the photo is a large field of sand dunes at right angles to the wind.

  19. Echinococcus granulosus genotypes in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sharafi, Seyedeh Maryam; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Moazeni, Mohammad; Yousefi, Morteza; Saneie, Behnam; Hosseini-Safa, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Hydatidosis, caused by Echinococcus granulosus is one of the most important zoonotic diseases, throughout most parts of the world. Hydatidosis is endemic in Iran and responsible for approximately 1% of admission to surgical wards. There are extensive genetic variations within E. granulosus and 10 different genotypes (G1–G10) within this parasite have been reported. Identification of strains is important for improvement of control and prevention of the disease. No new review article presented the situation of Echinococcus granulosus genotypes in Iran in the recent years; therefore in this paper we reviewed the different studies regarding Echinococcus granulosus genotypes in Iran. PMID:24834298

  20. Application of a time probabilistic approach to seismic landslide hazard estimates in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, A. M.; Del Gaudio, V.; Capolongo, D.; Khamehchiyan, M.; Mahdavifar, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    Iran is a country located in a tectonic active belt and is prone to earthquake and related phenomena. In the recent years, several earthquakes caused many fatalities and damages to facilities, e.g. the Manjil (1990), Avaj (2002), Bam (2003) and Firuzabad-e-Kojur (2004) earthquakes. These earthquakes generated many landslides. For instance, catastrophic landslides triggered by the Manjil Earthquake (Ms = 7.7) in 1990 buried the village of Fatalak, killed more than 130 peoples and cut many important road and other lifelines, resulting in major economic disruption. In general, earthquakes in Iran have been concentrated in two major zones with different seismicity characteristics: one is the region of Alborz and Central Iran and the other is the Zagros Orogenic Belt. Understanding where seismically induced landslides are most likely to occur is crucial in reducing property damage and loss of life in future earthquakes. For this purpose a time probabilistic approach for earthquake-induced landslide hazard at regional scale, proposed by Del Gaudio et al. (2003), has been applied to the whole Iranian territory to provide the basis of hazard estimates. This method consists in evaluating the recurrence of seismically induced slope failure conditions inferred from the Newmark's model. First, by adopting Arias Intensity to quantify seismic shaking and using different Arias attenuation relations for Alborz - Central Iran and Zagros regions, well-established methods of seismic hazard assessment, based on the Cornell (1968) method, were employed to obtain the occurrence probabilities for different levels of seismic shaking in a time interval of interest (50 year). Then, following Jibson (1998), empirical formulae specifically developed for Alborz - Central Iran and Zagros, were used to represent, according to the Newmark's model, the relation linking Newmark's displacement Dn to Arias intensity Ia and to slope critical acceleration ac. These formulae were employed to evaluate

  1. Historical explanation of genetic variation in the Mediterranean horseshoe bat Rhinolophus euryale (Chiroptera: Rhinolophidae) inferred from mitochondrial cytochrome-b and D-loop genes in Iran.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Nargess; Akmali, Vahid; Sharifi, Mozafar

    2018-04-26

    Molecular phylogeography and species distribution modelling (SDM) suggest that late Quaternary glacial cycles have portrayed a significant role in structuring current population genetic structure and diversity. Based on phylogenetic relationships using Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood of 535 bp mtDNA (D-loop) and 745 bp mtDNA (Cytb) in 62 individuals of the Mediterranean Horseshoe Bat, Rhinolophus euryale, from 13 different localities in Iran we identified two subspecific populations with differing population genetic structure distributed in southern Zagros Mts. and northern Elburz Mts. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) obtained from D-loop sequences indicates that 21.18% of sequence variation is distributed among populations and 10.84% within them. Moreover, a degree of genetic subdivision, mainly attributable to the existence of significant variance among the two regions is shown (θCT = 0.68, p = .005). The positive and significant correlation between geographic and genetic distances (R 2  = 0.28, r = 0.529, p = .000) is obtained following controlling for environmental distance. Spatial distribution of haplotypes indicates that marginal population of the species in southern part of the species range have occupied this section as a glacial refugia. However, this genetic variation, in conjunction with results of the SDM shows a massive postglacial range expansion for R. euryale towards higher latitudes in Iran.

  2. Landsat View: Tehran, Iran

    2017-12-08

    Between 1985 and 2009, the population of Tehran, Iran, grew from six million to just over seven million. The city's growth was spurred largely by migration from other parts of the country. In addition to being the hub of government and associated public sector jobs, Tehran houses more than half of Iran's industry. Landsat 5 acquired these false-color images of Tehran on August 2, 1985, and July 19, 2009. The city is a web of dark purple lines, vegetation is green and bare ground is pink and tan. The images were created using both infrared and visible light (band combination 7, 4, and 2) to distinguish urban areas from the surrounding desert. ---- NASA and the U.S. Department of the Interior through the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) jointly manage Landsat, and the USGS preserves a 40-year archive of Landsat images that is freely available over the Internet. The next Landsat satellite, now known as the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) and later to be called Landsat 8, is scheduled for launch in 2013. In honor of Landsat’s 40th anniversary in July 2012, the USGS released the LandsatLook viewer – a quick, simple way to go forward and backward in time, pulling images of anywhere in the world out of the Landsat archive. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  3. Managing Proliferation Issues with Iran

    SciT

    Nelson, C. Richard; Saltiel, David H.

    2002-02-15

    Any government in Tehran will be inclined to seek weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and missile delivery options given the realities of its strategic environment. These weapons might help Iran to deter potential external threats, to achieve equality with other major regional powers armed with WMD, and to attain self-reliance in national security, given the isolating experience of arms embargoes. A more pluralist leadership in the future, however, may examine broader choices and trade-offs, and perhaps be less likely to cross key thresholds in WMD acquisition. In any event, Iran's WMD behavior is likely to be determined by both externalmore » factors, mainly the availability of crucial components, and internal factors, including calculations of costs, risks, and benefits. Among the benefits, psychological factors, such as prestige, will play an important role. Other important factors that might well shape Iran's WMD behavior include developments in Iraq, relations with the United States and other Gulf states, Israeli-Palestinian relations and the future price of oil. This paper offers recommendations on how the United States can best hope to influence Iranian decisions regarding the acquisition of WMD and missile delivery systems if the United States decides to pursue more direct engagement with Tehran. An engagement-nonproliferation strategy should involve at least three types of parallel efforts: public, private and indirect. Public efforts should seek to create a more positive, less-threatening image of the United States among opinion leaders in Iran. Private efforts should seek to determine the purposes, nature and extent of Iran's efforts to develop WMD and missiles and to suggest better alternatives for Iran's security and prestige needs. Indirect efforts should involve key third countries and organizations in an attempt both to address Iran's security concerns and to deny Iran access to critical WMD and missile technology and components. Russian policy, in

  4. Right-lateral shear across Iran and kinematic change in the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Mark B.; Kheirkhah, Monireh; Emami, Mohammad H.; Jones, Stuart J.

    2011-02-01

    be accommodated in new ways and new areas, leading to the present pattern of faulting from eastern Iran to western Turkey, and involving the westward transport (`escape') of Anatolia and the concentration of thrusting in the Zagros and Alborz mountains.

  5. 31 CFR 560.427 - Exportation, reexportation, sale or supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of Iran. 560.427 Section 560.427 Money and Finance..., reexportation, sale or supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of Iran. (a) The prohibition on the exportation, reexportation, sale or supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of Iran...

  6. 31 CFR 560.427 - Exportation, reexportation, sale or supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of Iran. 560.427 Section 560.427 Money and Finance..., reexportation, sale or supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of Iran. (a) The prohibition on the exportation, reexportation, sale or supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of Iran...

  7. Understanding the emergence of modern humans and the disappearance of Neanderthals: Insights from Kaldar Cave (Khorramabad Valley, Western Iran).

    PubMed

    Bazgir, Behrouz; Ollé, Andreu; Tumung, Laxmi; Becerra-Valdivia, Lorena; Douka, Katerina; Higham, Thomas; van der Made, Jan; Picin, Andrea; Saladié, Palmira; López-García, Juan Manuel; Blain, Hugues-Alexandre; Allué, Ethel; Fernández-García, Mónica; Rey-Rodríguez, Iván; Arceredillo, Diego; Bahrololoumi, Faranak; Azimi, Moloudsadat; Otte, Marcel; Carbonell, Eudald

    2017-03-02

    Kaldar Cave is a key archaeological site that provides evidence of the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition in Iran. Excavations at the site in 2014-2015 led to the discovery of cultural remains generally associated with anatomically modern humans (AMHs) and evidence of a probable Neanderthal-made industry in the basal layers. Attempts have been made to establish a chronology for the site. These include four thermoluminescence (TL) dates for Layer 4, ranging from 23,100 ± 3300 to 29,400 ± 2300 BP, and three AMS radiocarbon dates from charcoal samples belonging to the lower part of the same layer, yielding ages of 38,650-36,750 cal BP, 44,200-42,350 cal BP, and 54,400-46,050 cal BP (all at the 95.4% confidence level). Kaldar Cave is the first well-stratified Late Palaeolithic locality to be excavated in the Zagros which is one of the earliest sites with cultural materials attributed to early AMHs in western Asia. It also offers an opportunity to study the technological differences between the Mousterian and the first Upper Palaeolithic lithic technologies as well as the human behaviour in the region. In this study, we present a detailed description of the newly excavated stratigraphy, quantified results from the lithic assemblages, preliminary faunal remains analyses, geochronologic data, taphonomic aspects, and an interpretation of the regional paleoenvironment.

  8. Iran’s Foreign and Defense Policies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-06

    terrorism to intimidate or retaliate against Israel or other regional opponents of Iran. Iran’s armed support to Shiite-dominated allied governments ...3 Khamene’i: “U.S. Would Overthrow Iranian Government If It Could—Media.” Reuters, February 8, 2014. 4 Erik Slavin. “Iran Emphasizes Nuclear...foreign policy, Iran provides arms, training, and military advisers in support of allied governments as well as armed factions. Iran supports groups

  9. 15 CFR 746.7 - Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Iran. 746.7 Section 746.7 Commerce and... § 746.7 Iran. The Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) administers a comprehensive trade and investment embargo against Iran. This embargo includes prohibitions on exports and...

  10. 15 CFR 746.7 - Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Iran. 746.7 Section 746.7 Commerce and... § 746.7 Iran. The Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) administers a comprehensive trade and investment embargo against Iran. This embargo includes prohibitions on exports and...

  11. 15 CFR 746.7 - Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... certain reexport transactions involving Iran, including transactions dealing with items subject to the EAR... addition, BIS maintains licensing requirements on exports and reexports to Iran under the EAR as described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section or elsewhere in the EAR (See, e.g., § 742.8—Anti-terrorism: Iran...

  12. Health observatories in iran.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, A; Damari, B; Larijani, B; Vosoogh Moghadda, A; Alikhani, S; Shadpour, K; Khosravi, A

    2013-01-01

    The Islamic Republic of Iran, in her 20 year vision by the year 2025, is a developed country with the first economic, scientific and technological status in the region, with revolutionary and Islamic identity, inspiring Islamic world, as well as effective and constructive interaction in international relations. Enjoying health, welfare, food security, social security, equal opportunities, fair income distribution, strong family structure; to be away from poverty, corruption, and discrimination; and benefiting desirable living environment are also considered out of characteristics of Iranian society in that year. Strategic leadership towards perceived vision in each setting requires restrictive, complete and timely information. According to constitution of National Institute for Health Researches, law of the Fifth Development Plan of the country and characteristics of health policy making, necessity of designing a Health Observatory System (HOS) was felt. Some Principles for designing such system were formulated by taking following steps: reviewing experience in other countries, having local history of the HOS in mind, superior documents, analysis of current production and management of health information, taking the possibilities to run a HOS into account. Based on these principles, the protocol of HOS was outlined in 3 different stages of opinion poll of informed experts responsible for production on management of information, by using questionnaires and Focus Group Discussions. The protocol includes executive regulations, the list of health indicators, vocabulary and a calendar for periodic studies of the community health situation.

  13. Iran: World Oil Report 1991

    SciT

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that at the end of its war with Iraq, Iran embarked on an urgent program to restore its productive capacity. This effort has been hindered by lack of hard currency and, hence, technology, parts, equipment, etc. Iran has been trying to improve relations with the U.S, over the past two years. Recently, the embargo on importing Iranian crude into the U.S. was lifted. Over the past year and a half, Iran accumulated enough money to resume imports of U.S. and other foreign drilling equipment. However, drilling has remained at a low level. Also, efforts to boost outputmore » have been slowed by war damage both on and offshore---particularly the latter---and serious BHP declines in major onshore fields that can only be corrected by ultra- high cost gas injection projects. Currently, large injection projects are only operating in three major fields: Gachsaran, Ahwaz and Marun.« less

  14. San Mateo Creek Basin

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The San Mateo Creek Basin comprises approximately 321 square miles within the Rio San Jose drainage basin in McKinley and Cibola counties, New Mexico. This basin is located within the Grants Mining District (GMD).

  15. 31 CFR 535.433 - Central Bank of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Central Bank of Iran. 535.433 Section... § 535.433 Central Bank of Iran. The Central Bank of Iran (Bank Markazi Iran) is an agency, instrumentality and controlled entity of the Government of Iran for all purposes under this part. (Secs. 201-207...

  16. 31 CFR 560.516 - Transfers of funds involving Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transfers of funds involving Iran. 560... involving Iran. (a) United States depository institutions are authorized to process transfers of funds to or from Iran, or for the direct or indirect benefit of persons in Iran or the Government of Iran, if the...

  17. 31 CFR 535.433 - Central Bank of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Central Bank of Iran. 535.433 Section... § 535.433 Central Bank of Iran. The Central Bank of Iran (Bank Markazi Iran) is an agency, instrumentality and controlled entity of the Government of Iran for all purposes under this part. (Secs. 201-207...

  18. 31 CFR 535.433 - Central Bank of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Central Bank of Iran. 535.433 Section... § 535.433 Central Bank of Iran. The Central Bank of Iran (Bank Markazi Iran) is an agency, instrumentality and controlled entity of the Government of Iran for all purposes under this part. (Secs. 201-207...

  19. 31 CFR 560.516 - Transfers of funds involving Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transfers of funds involving Iran. 560... involving Iran. (a) United States depository institutions are authorized to process transfers of funds to or from Iran, or for the direct or indirect benefit of persons in Iran or the Government of Iran, if the...

  20. 31 CFR 535.433 - Central Bank of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Central Bank of Iran. 535.433 Section... § 535.433 Central Bank of Iran. The Central Bank of Iran (Bank Markazi Iran) is an agency, instrumentality and controlled entity of the Government of Iran for all purposes under this part. (Secs. 201-207...

  1. 31 CFR 535.433 - Central Bank of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Central Bank of Iran. 535.433 Section... § 535.433 Central Bank of Iran. The Central Bank of Iran (Bank Markazi Iran) is an agency, instrumentality and controlled entity of the Government of Iran for all purposes under this part. (Secs. 201-207...

  2. The Iran Sanctions Act (ISA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-23

    France and its partners, Gazprom of Russia and Petronas of Malaysia to develop phases 2 and 3 of the 25-phase South Pars gas field. The EU pledged...EU firms in Iran would not be penalized. Total and Petronas subsequently negotiated to develop a liquified natural gas (LNG) export capability at

  3. Bam, Iran, Radar Interferometry -- Earthquake

    2004-06-25

    A magnitude 6.5 earthquake devastated the small city of Bam in southeast Iran on December 26, 2003. The two images from ESA Envisat show similar measures of the radar interferometric correlation in grayscale on the left and in false colors on the right.

  4. Irans Foreign and Defense Policies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-21

    regional politicians and leaders. Of most concern to U.S. policymakers is that Iran provides direct material support to armed groups , some of which use...such as those of Syria and Iraq, has aggravated challenges from Sunni insurgent groups by fueling Sunni popular resentment. Iran’s national...Regimes and Groups ................................................ 4 Other Political Action

  5. Iran: Illusion, Reality, and Interests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    country. Yet, it was the British who became the focus of Persian and Iranian nationalist ire in the late 19th and 20th century because it was London...120 100. Kenneth M. Pollack, The Persian Puzzle: The Conflict between Iran and America (New York: Random House, 2004): 117. 101. Homa Katouzian

  6. Oil, power, and principle: Iran`s oil nationalizaation and its aftermath

    SciT

    Elm, M.

    1992-12-31

    This book provides a concise and well documented analysis of events leading to Iran`s oil nationalization and its aftermath. It also helps to understand Iran`s 1979 revolution and its current situation. The book, at 413 pages, is divided into twenty-two chapters, beginning with a review of the historical background of Iran`s oil industry from the late 19th century throught the mid-1900s. The book interlaces energy, economic, and political factors of not only Iran, but other important players such as the United States and Great Britian. Also included is a well-documented analysis of the Anglo-American coup to overthrow the Mossadeq government,more » which helps the reader understand why there is so much anti-U.S. sentiment in Iran.« less

  7. Mechanical restoration of large-scale folded multilayers using the finite element method: Application to the Zagros Simply Folded Belt, N-Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Reif, Daniel; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    There are a large number of numerical finite element studies concerned with modeling the evolution of folded geological layers through time. This body of research includes many aspects of folding and many different approaches, such as two- and three-dimensional studies, single-layer folding, detachment folding, development of chevron folds, Newtonian, power-law viscous and more complex rheologies, influence of anisotropy, pure-shear, simple-shear and other boundary conditions and so forth. In recent years, studies of multilayer folding emerged, thanks to more advanced mesh generator software and increased computational power. Common to all of these studies is the fact that they consider a forward directed time evolution, as in nature. Very few studies use the finite element method for reverse-time simulations. In such studies, folded geological layers are taken as initial conditions for the numerical simulation. The folding process is reversed by changing the signs of the boundary conditions that supposedly drove the folding process. In such studies, the geometry of the geological layers before the folding process is searched and the amount of shortening necessary for the final folded geometry can be calculated. In contrast to a kinematic or geometric fold restoration procedure, the described approach takes the mechanical behavior of the geological layers into account, such as rheology and the relative strength of the individual layers. This approach is therefore called mechanical restoration of folds. In this study, the concept of mechanical restoration is applied to a two-dimensional 50km long NE-SW-cross-section through the Zagros Simply Folded Belt in Iraqi Kurdistan, NE from the city of Erbil. The Simply Folded Belt is dominated by gentle to open folding and faults are either absent or record only minor offset. Therefore, this region is ideal for testing the concept of mechanical restoration. The profile used is constructed from structural field measurements

  8. Status of Iran's nuclear program and negotiations

    SciT

    Albright, David

    2014-05-09

    Iran's nuclear program poses immense challenges to international security. Its gas centrifuge program has grown dramatically in the last several years, bringing Iran close to a point where it could produce highly enriched uranium in secret or declared gas centrifuge plants before its breakout would be discovered and stopped. To reduce the risk posed by Iran's nuclear program, the P5+1 have negotiated with Iran short term limits on the most dangerous aspects of its nuclear programs and is negotiating long-term arrangements that can provide assurance that Iran will not build nuclear weapons. These long-term arrangements need to include a farmore » more limited and transparent Iranian nuclear program. In advance of arriving at a long-term arrangement, the IAEA will need to resolve its concerns about the alleged past and possibly on-going military dimensions of Iran's nuclear program.« less

  9. Israel and Iran: A Dangerous Rivalry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    and Knesset view the Islamic Republic as “a bitter ideological enemy that is deter- mined to bring about the physical annihilation of Israel”; only...entirely different set of values. . . . Iran sends children into mine fields. Iran denies the Holocaust. Iran openly calls for Israel’s destruction...compromise on sovereignty by having U.S. troops deployed here.” Quoted in Barbara Opall -Rome, “U.S. to Deploy Radar, Troops In Israel,” Defense News

  10. Counterinsurgency Warfare Approach to Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    p. x. 3 Ibid. 4 Yossi Melman and Meir Javedanfar, The Nuclear Sphinx of Tehran, Caroll & Graf Publishers, 2007, p. 53. 5 Global Security...22 Ibid. 23 Yossi Melman and Meir Javedanfar, The Nuclear Sphinx of Tehran, Caroll & Graf Publishers, 2007, p. 55. 24 Shirin Ebadi, Iran...US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, October 2005) Yossi Melman and Meir Javedanfar, The Nuclear Sphinx of Tehran, Caroll & Graf Publishers, 2007

  11. Iran rebuilds family planning services.

    PubMed

    Butta, P

    1993-07-01

    After the revolution, the Islamic Republic of Iran instituted pronatalist policies which included lowering the minimum marriage age for girls to 9 years, abolishing some laws securing women's rights, and limiting availability of family planning (FP) services. By 1983, Iran's population growth rate was 3.9% which was among the highest worldwide. Before the revolution, Iran had 37 million people. About 2 million more people were added each year, resulting in a population size of 60 million by 1992. By the mid-1980s, economic development stood idle, there were not enough houses, children attended schools on 3 shifts, and malnutrition was spreading. In 1989, the government formed a population council and reestablished FP services. It also increased the minimum age of marriage for girls to 13 years, slightly improved women status, and eliminated fertility incentives for couples with at least 4 children. It also significantly increased funding for FP (from 560 million to 13 billion rials between 1990 and 1992). Government spending for FP will likely increase 2% annually until 2011. The government initiated a promotion of FP mass media campaign, emphasizing a 2-child family. Some posters showed a family with 2 girls. The mass media campaign promoted specific contraceptive methods (even tubal occlusion and vasectomy), a practice other Middle Eastern countries not do. 80% of sterilization acceptors claimed to learn about sterilization from the radio or newspapers. The Ministry of Health has invited the Association for Voluntary Surgical Contraception (AVSC) to help with its campaign to update sterilization techniques, including the non scalpel vasectomy technique. AVSC hopes to become even more involved in helping Iran update its national FP program.

  12. Assessment of brittleness and empirical correlations between physical and mechanical parameters of the Asmari limestone in Khersan 2 dam site, in southwest of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkaripour, Gholam Reza; Rastegarnia, Ahmad; Ghafoori, Mohammad

    2018-02-01

    The determination of brittleness and geomechanical parameters, especially uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and Young's modulus (ES) of rocks are needed for the design of different rock engineering applications. Evaluation of these parameters are time-consuming processes, tedious, expensive and require well-prepared rock cores. Therefore, compressional wave velocity (Vp) and index parameters such as point load index and porosity are often used to predict the properties of rocks. In this paper, brittleness and other properties, physical and mechanical in type, of 56 Asmari limestones in dry and saturated conditions were analyzed. The rock samples were collected from Khersan 2 dam site. This dam with the height of 240 m is being constructed and located in the Zagros Mountain, in the southwest of Iran. The bedrock and abutments of the dam site consist of Asemari and Gachsaran Formations. In this paper, a practical relation for predicting brittleness and some relations between mechanical and index parameters of the Asmari limestone were established. The presented equation for predicting brittleness based on UCS, Brazilian tensile strength and Vp had high accuracy. Moreover, results showed that the brittleness estimation based on B3 concept (the ratio of multiply compressive strength in tensile strength divided 2) had more accuracy as compared to the B2 (the ratio of compressive strength minus tensile strength to compressive strength plus tensile strength) and B1 (the ratio of compressive strength to tensile strength) concepts.

  13. Physical and chemical properties of soils under some wild Pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf) canopies in a semi-arid ecosystem, southwestern Iran.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owliaie, Hamidreza

    2010-05-01

    Pistacia atlantica Desf. is one of the most important wild species in Zagros forests which is of high economical and environmental value. Sustainability of these forests primarily depends on soil quality and water availability. Study the relationships between trees and soil is one of the basic factors in management and planning of forests. Hence, this study was undertaken with the objective of assessing the effect of tree species on soil physical and chemical properties in a semi-arid region (Kohgilouye Province) in the southwestern part of Iran. The experimental design was a factorial 4×2 (4 depths and 2 distances) in a randomized complete block design with six replications. Soil samples (0-20, 20-40, 40-60 and 60-80 cm depth) were taken from beneath the tree crowns and adjacent open areas. Soil samples were analyzed for physical and chemical properties. The results showed that wild pistachio canopy increased mostly organic carbon, hydraulic conductivity, total N, SP, available K+, P (olsen), EC, EDTA extractable Fe2+ and Mn2+, while bulk density, CCE and DTPA extractable Cu2+ were decreased. Pistachio canopy had no significant effect on soil texture, Zn2+ and pH.

  14. Strain analysis in the Sanandaj-Sirjan HP-LT Metamorphic Belt, SW Iran: Insights from small-scale faults and associated drag folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Keshavarz, Saeede; Faghih, Ali

    2015-05-01

    This study is aimed at quantifying the kinematics of deformation using a population of drag fold structures associated with small-scale faults in deformed quartzites from Seh-Ghalatoun area within the HP-LT Sanandaj-Sirjan Metamorphic Belt, SW Iran. A total 30 small-scale faults in the quartzite layers were examined to determine the deformation characteristics. Obtained data revealed α0 (initial fault angle) and ω (angle between flow apophyses) are equal to 83° and 32°, respectively. These data yield mean kinematic vorticity number (Wm) equal to 0.79 and mean finite strain (Rs) of 2.32. These results confirm the relative contribution of ∼43% pure shear and ∼57% simple shear components, respectively. The strain partitioning inferred from this quantitative analysis is consistent with a sub-simple or general shear deformation pattern associated with a transpressional flow regime in the study area as a part of the Zagros Orogen. This type of deformation resulted from oblique convergence between the Afro-Arabian and Central-Iranian plates.

  15. Precipitation response by Qom Playa, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, A. R.; Enzel, Y.; Mushkin, A.; Abbott, E.; Amit, R.; Crouvi, O.

    2006-12-01

    Playas, or dry lakes, are common landforms in the arid and semi-arid parts of the world. They integrate hydrologic and sedimentologic responses to climate at all temporal scales (individual storm to millennial) and, equally important, at regional to basin scales. Playas are also a source or sink for dust, depending on the water-sediment interaction. Therefore, playas are potentially useful in mapping and understanding global and regional climate changes, and geologic studies on individual playas have been useful in paleoclimate studies. The main difficulties in constructing and/or using such records lie in the lack of measured hydrological data, simply because most are located in remote areas such as the Sahara, and central and west Asia. High- resolution multispectral satellite remote sensing has been conducted for most of the Earth since 1973 and the archives are publicly available. These images offer a means of examining current and historical regional variations in precipitation, independent of point measurements, and thus may be especially valuable where there are few weather-monitoring programs. However, spectral images are not simple to use and may be impractical because of cost and availability of expertise. We provide here an example how the immense remote-sensing database provides a >40-yr history of surface-wetting events in playas that complements NCEP reanalysis weather data and recent TRMM rainfall data, which are modeled from cloud-top temperatures. Our analysis takes advantage of the temporal length of the archive to detect changes in hydrological conditions in Qom playa, south of Tehran (Iran), based on the spectral changes that attend wetting and drying of salts and clay and changes in the depth of standing water. High-resolution Landsat and Terra images with ~16-day repeats show variations in hydrology as patterns of playa wetting and drying that we tested against precipitation data. We found 259 Landsat cloud-free archived images of Qom Playa

  16. Ductile deformation history in Laibid metamorphic rocks, Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aflaki, Mahtab; Mohajjel, Mohammad

    2010-05-01

    Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, in northeast of Zagros suture zone, is the metamorphic belt of the Zagros orogen which is metamorphosed during Late Mesozoic, as the active margin of the Neotethys subduction system. Since Late Cretaceous, oblique collision between Afro-Arabian continent and Central Iran micro continent resulted in dextral transpression and Poly-phase deformations of this zone. Laibid area, northwest of Esfahan province, is situated in complexly deformed sub zone of the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone in which structurally exposed Permian metamorphosed rocks are separated from the younger Triassic-Jurassic metamorphic rocks by faulted boundaries. Cretaceous unites do not exist in the study area, but in southern most parts un-metamorphosed Early Cretaceous rocks rest on Jurassic metamorphic units over an angular unconformity. Field observations reveal the existence of 3 folding patterns, folded dikes, semi-ductile to ductile shear zones and also sin-tectonic granite intrusion. Hassan-Robat Alkali-porphyritic-granite is exposed in the eastern part of the area with the possible ages between post-Early Cretaceous to pre-Eocene. In this research, the focus is on ductile structures and their deformation history in the Laibid area. Structural analysis of the folds reveals three deformation stages of a progressive deformation in this area. These folding patterns observed in all pre-Cretaceous metamorphosed unites, but not in Cretaceous rocks. The first stage includes tight to isoclinal folds, S0 || S1, with the aspect ratio changes respectively from tall and short. Although their axial plane and fold axis orientations change due to other two folding stages, but they mostly have moderately dipping to the NE axial plane and moderately plunging fold axis to NW or SE. In the eastern part of the area the trend of F1 foliation changes around the Hassan-Robat granite. The second folding stage includes open to close asymmetric folds which have broad aspect ratio. This folding stage

  17. Desert and desertification in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, M.

    2009-04-01

    One of the greatest environmental concerns in Iran as in other arid and semiarid countries is the transformation of once productive, or marginally productive, land to deteriorated land and soil unable to support plants and animals. Because the land becomes barren and dry, the process is described as desertification, which occurs as a sequence of events. The area of deserts in Iran is about 340,000 Km2 (less than one fifth of its total area), of which 100,000 Km2 is being used for some cultivation, 120,000 Km2 is subjected to moving sands about 40 % of which is active sand dunes. Most of features and processes usual in world famous deserts are also observed in Iran: low precipitation, high evaporation, poor or lack of vegetation, saline and alkaline soils, low population and small and sparse oases. The deserts of Iran are generally classified in the subtropical, warm, arid and semiarid group, but the effect and presence of some geographical and geoclimatical factors such as height, vicinity to Indian Ocean and so on do some changes in climatic conditions and geographical features causing some local and regional differences in them. Geographically, two groups of deserts have been known in Iran: (1) Coastal deserts which, like a ribbon with variable width, stretch from extreme southeast to extreme southwest, at the north parts of Oman Sea and Persian Gulf. One important feature of these deserts is relatively high humidity which differentiates them from other deserts. This causes an increase in vegetation coverage and hence a decrease in eolian erosion and also a dominance of chemical weathering to that of physical. (2) internal deserts, which rest in central, eastern and southeastern plateau of the country and in independent and semi dependent depressions. This situation, which is due to the surrounding high mountains, blocks humidity entry and causes the aridity of these deserts. Wind as a dominant process in the area causes deflated features such as Reg (desert

  18. Reflections on Foreign Language Education in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farhady, Hossein; Hezaveh, Fattaneh Sajadi; Hedayati, Hora

    2010-01-01

    This article reflects upon foreign-language education in Iran. Contrary to its political and historical reputation in the world, Iran has not been well presented regarding its educational system in general and its foreign-language education in particular. Of course, a critical assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the Iranian education…

  19. The state of the environment in Iran.

    PubMed

    Zekavat, S M

    1997-06-01

    This article describes environmental conditions in Iran including air pollution, pesticide pollution, soil depletion and erosion, water pollution, natural resource loss, lack of appropriate waste management, lead poisoning, and desertification. Environmental policy and implementation is described under the Shah and the Islamic Republic. Iran is beset with interrelated problems of environmental degradation, unemployment, poverty, and population growth. Sustainability is being undermined at the cost of future generations. In 1995, Iran had a population of 67 million and a growth rate of 3.6%. Population is expected to exceed 100 million by the year 2000. The country is having difficulty in maintaining its current infrastructure, housing, food, and educational facilities. Competition for admission in higher education discourages women. Women with lower levels of education results in continued supremacy of men over women, more polygamy, and a lower quality of life for women. Iran was food self-sufficient in 1970, and exported its surplus. Today, Iran may be permanently dependent on food imports. Iran has abundant oil reserves, natural gas, copper, lead, and marketable items. Exchanging natural resources for food and technology has time and resource limits. Iran needs monetary assistance from wealthy nations. Population growth leads to increased demand for infrastructure and resources. Iran has signed many international environmental agreements and has enacted detailed environmental policies and regulations, but actual enforcement is lacking.

  20. 15 CFR 746.7 - Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... authorization is considered authorization for purposes of the EAR as well. Transactions that are not subject to... certain reexport transactions involving Iran, including transactions dealing with items subject to the EAR... addition, BIS maintains licensing requirements on exports and reexports to Iran under the EAR as described...

  1. 15 CFR 746.7 - Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... authorization for purposes of the EAR as well. Transactions that are not subject to OFAC regulatory authority... certain reexport transactions involving Iran, including transactions dealing with items subject to the EAR... addition, BIS maintains licensing requirements on exports and reexports to Iran under the EAR as described...

  2. Iran’s Balancing Act in Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    of Pishin, near the Pakistan border (“Iran: Dual Attacks in Sistan- Balochistan ,” 2009). The Iranian government accuses the United States, the United...Contract=cms_Contents_I_News&r=362180 “Iran: Dual Attacks in Sistan- Balochistan ,” Stratfor, October 18, 2009. As of January 5, 2011: http

  3. Modernization and Consanguineous Marriage in Iran.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givens, Benjamin P.; Hirschman, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Used data on 4,667 women from the Iran Fertility Survey to examine trends and social correlates of consanguineous marriage. Found modest increase in proportion of marriages between cousins in Iran from 1940s to 1970s. Results suggest that modernization may be eroding social bases on consanguinity, whereas increased availability of cousins may lead…

  4. A-type granitoid in Hasansalaran complex, northwestern Iran: Evidence for extensional tectonic regime in northern Gondwana in the Late Paleozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Hossein; Kazemi, Tahmineh; Asahara, Yoshihiro

    2017-07-01

    The Hasansalaran plutonic complex is one of the main intrusive bodies with a wide range of granite, monzonite, diorite and syenite that crop out in northwest Iran. This body includes Paleozoic granitoids that are surrounded and cut by Cretaceous granitoids. Zircon U-Pb age dating shows that the crystallization of this body occurred at 360 Ma ago in the Early Carboniferous. Whole rock compositions of the investigated intrusive body, show high contents of Ga (11.1-76.3 ppm), Zr (73.5-1280 ppm), Zn (43.7-358 ppm), Y(17.9-177 ppm), enrichment of rare earth elements (REEs) together with high Ga/Al ratios and a strong Eu negative anomaly, fairly consistent with typical A-type signature. The low εNd(t = 360 Ma) value (< + 3) and high variation of 87Sr/86Sr(initial) ratios are evidence of the role of the continental component for the evolution of A-type granitoids in the Hasansalaran area. Because of the high contents of Ta, Yb, Nb and Y, all samples are plotted in the within-plate tectonic regime without interfering oceanic released fluids in the subduction zone. These high Nb content rocks (37.2-342 ppm without one sample) are classified as A1-type granitoids. Based on the distribution of A1- and A2-type granitoids in the Late Paleozoic in northwest Iran, the existence of some gabbroic rocks with tholeiitic to alkali composition and a long gap for magmatic activities in the area from 550 to 360 Ma (approximately 180 my.a.) between the Zagros and Tabriz faults, we suggest a new thematic model for evolution of northwest Iran in the Late Paleozoic. Based on our model, the upwelling of a mantle plume, probably due to the proto-Tethys oceanic rollback activity beneath northern Gondwana, had a crucial role in the uplifting of the continental crust and resulted in the crystallization of A-type granitoids with some gabbroic rocks in northwest Iran.

  5. 78 FR 46782 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Iran Threat Reduction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ...] RIN 9000-AM44 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Iran Threat Reduction AGENCIES: Department of Defense... expansion of sanctions relating to the energy sector of Iran and sanctions with respect to Iran's Revolutionary Guard Corps, as contained in titles II and III of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights...

  6. 31 CFR 535.301 - Iran; Iranian Entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Iran; Iranian Entity. 535.301 Section... § 535.301 Iran; Iranian Entity. (a) The term Iran and Iranian Entity includes: (1) The state and the Government of Iran as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof or any territory...

  7. 31 CFR 535.301 - Iran; Iranian Entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Iran; Iranian Entity. 535.301 Section... § 535.301 Iran; Iranian Entity. (a) The term Iran and Iranian Entity includes: (1) The state and the Government of Iran as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof or any territory...

  8. 31 CFR 535.301 - Iran; Iranian Entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Iran; Iranian Entity. 535.301 Section... § 535.301 Iran; Iranian Entity. (a) The term Iran and Iranian Entity includes: (1) The state and the Government of Iran as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof or any territory...

  9. 31 CFR 560.304 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Government of Iran. 560.304 Section... § 560.304 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of Iran, as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof; (b) Any entity owned or...

  10. 31 CFR 560.304 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Government of Iran. 560.304 Section... § 560.304 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of Iran, as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof; (b) Any entity owned or...

  11. 31 CFR 561.321 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Government of Iran. 561.321 Section... Definitions § 561.321 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of Iran, as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof; (b) Any entity...

  12. 31 CFR 561.321 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Government of Iran. 561.321 Section... Definitions § 561.321 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of Iran, as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof; (b) Any entity...

  13. 31 CFR 560.304 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Government of Iran. 560.304 Section... Definitions § 560.304 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of Iran, as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof, including the...

  14. 31 CFR 560.304 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Government of Iran. 560.304 Section... Definitions § 560.304 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of Iran, as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof, including the...

  15. 31 CFR 561.321 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Government of Iran. 561.321 Section... Definitions § 561.321 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of Iran, as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof; (b) Any entity...

  16. The effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere in the collision zone between Arabia and Eurasia in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, Ahmad; Samiee, Jafar; Kirby, Jon F.

    2014-11-01

    The effective elastic thickness, Te, has been calculated in the collision zone between Arabia and Eurasia in Iran from the wavelet coherence. The wavelet coherence is calculated from Bouguer anomalies and topography data using the isotropic fan wavelet method, and gives Te values between 14.2 and 62.2 km. The lower value is found in the Central Iranian Blocks and the East Iranian Belt which are bounded by several large strike-slip faults with lithospheric origin. The higher value occurs in the east of the South Caspian Sea Basin. The resulting Te map shows positive and negative correlation with shear wave velocity and surface heat flow, respectively. A comparison between the seismogenic thickness (Ts) and Te in Iran suggests that Te > Ts. Results of the load ratio in Iran indicate that in most of the study area surface loads are much more prevalent than subsurface loads, except in the Central Iranian Blocks and NW of Iran. Intermediate to low Te values in Iran were inherited from multiple rifting and orogenic activities from Late Precambrian (∼650 Ma) to present day which are not only reflected in thin and warm lithosphere but also an increasing seismicity rate.

  17. The intra-oceanic Cretaceous (~ 108 Ma) Kata-Rash arc fragment in the Kurdistan segment of Iraqi Zagros suture zone: Implications for Neotethys evolution and closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sarmad A.; Ismail, Sabah A.; Nutman, Allen P.; Bennett, Vickie C.; Jones, Brian G.; Buckman, Solomon

    2016-09-01

    The Kata-Rash arc fragment is an allochthonous thrust-bound body situated near Penjween, 100 km northeast of Sulymannia city, Kurdistan Region, within the Iraqi portion of the Zagros suture zone. It forms part of the suprasubduction zone 'Upper Allochthon' terranes (designated as the Gimo-Qandil Group), which is dominated by calc-alkaline andesite and basaltic-andesite, rhyodacite to rhyolite, crosscut by granitic, granodioritic, and dioritic dykes. Previously, rocks of the Kata-Rash arc fragment were interpreted as a part of the Eocene Walash volcanic group. However, SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dates on them of 108.1 ± 2.9 Ma (Harbar volcanic rocks) and 107.7 ± 1.9 Ma (Aulan intrusion) indicate an Albian-Cenomanian age, which is interpreted as the time of igneous crystallisation. The Aulan intrusion zircons have initial εHf values of + 8.6 ± 0.2. On a Nb/Yb-Th/Yb diagram, all Kata-Rash samples fall within the compositional field of arc-related rocks, i.e. above the mid-ocean-ridge basalt (MORB)-ocean island basalt (OIB) mantle array. Primitive-mantle-normalised trace-element patterns for the Kata-Rash samples show enrichment in the large ion lithophile elements and depletion in the high-field-strength elements supporting their subduction-related character. Low Ba/La coupled with low La/Yb and Hf/Hf* < 1 for the Aulan sample with initial εHf of + 8.6 ± 0.2 is interpreted as the magma dominated by contributions from fluid fluxing of the mantle wedge and lesser contributions of low temperature melt from subducted slab sediment, in an oceanic setting. This mechanism can explain the sub-DM initial εHf value, without the need to invoke melting of significantly older (continental) crust in an Andean setting. We interpret the Kata-Rash igneous rocks as a fragment of the Late Cretaceous suprasubduction zone system (named here the Kata-Rash arc) that most likely developed within the Neotethys Ocean rather than at a continental margin. Subsequently during the latest Cretaceous

  18. BASINS Technical Notes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has developed several technical notes that provide in depth information on a specific function in BASINS. Technical notes can be used to answer questions users may have, or to provide additional information on the application of features in BASINS.

  19. Los Angeles Basin

    2009-06-29

    The Los Angeles Basin is bordered on the north by the San Gabriel Mountains. Other smaller basins are separated by smaller mountain ranges, like the Verdugo Hills, and the Santa Monica Mountains in this image from NASA Terra spacecraft.

  20. BASINS Tutorials and Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A series of lectures and exercises on how to use BASINS for water quality modeling and watershed assessment. The lectures follow sequentially. Companion exercises are provided for users to practice different BASINS water quality modeling techniques.

  1. Seismic tomographic imaging of P- and S-waves velocity perturbations in the upper mantle beneath Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alinaghi, Alireza; Koulakov, Ivan; Thybo, Hans

    2007-06-01

    The inverse tomography method has been used to study the P- and S-waves velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle underneath Iran. The method, based on the principle of source-receiver reciprocity, allows for tomographic studies of regions with sparse distribution of seismic stations if the region has sufficient seismicity. The arrival times of body waves from earthquakes in the study area as reported in the ISC catalogue (1964-1996) at all available epicentral distances are used for calculation of residual arrival times. Prior to inversion we have relocated hypocentres based on a 1-D spherical earth's model taking into account variable crustal thickness and surface topography. During the inversion seismic sources are further relocated simultaneously with the calculation of velocity perturbations. With a series of synthetic tests we demonstrate the power of the algorithm and the data to reconstruct introduced anomalies using the ray paths of the real data set and taking into account the measurement errors and outliers. The velocity anomalies show that the crust and upper mantle beneath the Iranian Plateau comprises a low velocity domain between the Arabian Plate and the Caspian Block. This is in agreement with global tomographic models, and also tectonic models, in which active Iranian plateau is trapped between the stable Turan plate in the north and the Arabian shield in the south. Our results show clear evidence of the mainly aseismic subduction of the oceanic crust of the Oman Sea underneath the Iranian Plateau. However, along the Zagros suture zone, the subduction pattern is more complex than at Makran where the collision of the two plates is highly seismic.

  2. Understanding the emergence of modern humans and the disappearance of Neanderthals: Insights from Kaldar Cave (Khorramabad Valley, Western Iran)

    PubMed Central

    Bazgir, Behrouz; Ollé, Andreu; Tumung, Laxmi; Becerra-Valdivia, Lorena; Douka, Katerina; Higham, Thomas; van der Made, Jan; Picin, Andrea; Saladié, Palmira; López-García, Juan Manuel; Blain, Hugues-Alexandre; Allué, Ethel; Fernández-García, Mónica; Rey-Rodríguez, Iván; Arceredillo, Diego; Bahrololoumi, Faranak; Azimi, Moloudsadat; Otte, Marcel; Carbonell, Eudald

    2017-01-01

    Kaldar Cave is a key archaeological site that provides evidence of the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition in Iran. Excavations at the site in 2014–2015 led to the discovery of cultural remains generally associated with anatomically modern humans (AMHs) and evidence of a probable Neanderthal-made industry in the basal layers. Attempts have been made to establish a chronology for the site. These include four thermoluminescence (TL) dates for Layer 4, ranging from 23,100 ± 3300 to 29,400 ± 2300 BP, and three AMS radiocarbon dates from charcoal samples belonging to the lower part of the same layer, yielding ages of 38,650–36,750 cal BP, 44,200–42,350 cal BP, and 54,400–46,050 cal BP (all at the 95.4% confidence level). Kaldar Cave is the first well-stratified Late Palaeolithic locality to be excavated in the Zagros which is one of the earliest sites with cultural materials attributed to early AMHs in western Asia. It also offers an opportunity to study the technological differences between the Mousterian and the first Upper Palaeolithic lithic technologies as well as the human behaviour in the region. In this study, we present a detailed description of the newly excavated stratigraphy, quantified results from the lithic assemblages, preliminary faunal remains analyses, geochronologic data, taphonomic aspects, and an interpretation of the regional paleoenvironment. PMID:28252042

  3. Iran-Regional Country Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-16

    AO-A116 226 ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA F/6 5/4 IRAN-REGIONAL C OUNTRY STUDY.IUI UNCLASSIFIED AR8 AE I m I I..h EE f ii111112.0...ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT. TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS US Army War College Carlisle Barracks, PA 17013 11. CONTROLLING...PAGE(WIFhIf Date REmfot)J Bi9 US ARMY WAR COLLEGE INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH BASED ESSAY The views xpressed in this paper are those of the author and do not

  4. 31 CFR 560.205 - Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology, or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., technology, or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons... REGULATIONS Prohibitions § 560.205 Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology, or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons; exceptions. (a) Except as otherwise...

  5. 31 CFR 560.205 - Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons... Prohibitions § 560.205 Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons; exceptions. (a) Except as otherwise authorized...

  6. 31 CFR 560.205 - Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology, or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., technology, or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons... REGULATIONS Prohibitions § 560.205 Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology, or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons; exceptions. (a) Except as otherwise...

  7. 31 CFR 560.205 - Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons... Prohibitions § 560.205 Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons; exceptions. (a) Except as otherwise authorized...

  8. 31 CFR 560.205 - Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons... Prohibitions § 560.205 Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons; exceptions. (a) Except as otherwise authorized...

  9. Water quality trend analysis for the Karoon River in Iran.

    PubMed

    Naddafi, K; Honari, H; Ahmadi, M

    2007-11-01

    The Karoon River basin, with a basin area of 67,000 km(2), is located in the southern part of Iran. Monthly measurements of the discharge and the water quality variables have been monitored at the Gatvand and Khorramshahr stations of the Karoon River on a monthly basis for the period 1967-2005 and 1969-2005 for Gatvand and Khorramshahr stations, respectively. In this paper the time series of monthly values of water quality parameters and the discharge were analyzed using statistical methods and the existence of trends and the evaluation of the best fitted models were performed. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to select the theoretical distribution which best fitted the data. Simple regression was used to examine the concentration-time relationships. The concentration-time relationships showed better correlation in Khorramshahr station than that of Gatvand station. The exponential model expresses better concentration - time relationships in Khorramshahr station, but in Gatvand station the logarithmic model is more fitted. The correlation coefficients are positive for all of the variables in Khorramshahr station also in Gatvand station all of the variables are positive except magnesium (Mg2+), bicarbonates (HCO3-) and temporary hardness which shows a decreasing relationship. The logarithmic and the exponential models describe better the concentration-time relationships for two stations.

  10. Transportation behaviors in Shiraz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Veda; Danaei, Mina; Askarian, Mehrdad; Palenik, Charles John; Abdollahifard, Gholamreza

    2012-01-01

    Motor vehicle accidents can occur as a result of improper driver behavior. There needs to be a comprehensive collection of information concerning driver behavior and its predisposing factors. Study participants (500 males and 500 females ≥18 years old) living in Shiraz, Iran, were selected using a multistage sampling methodology. Data came from questionnaires completed using a face-to-face interview process. Independent variables such as age, gender, marital status, occupation, educational level, socioeconomic status (SES), and history of smoking and stress levels were compared to the dependent variables using a private automobile, public transportation, or motorcycle, wearing a seat belts, wearing safety helmets, and obeying the speed limit. Statistical significance was set at a P value of .05 or less. In general, female, better educated persons, and those with higher SES reported better driving behaviors. Better drivers also did not use tobacco or hookah. Compliance with driving safety factors was disappointing 49.8 percent always wore a seat belt, 22.4 percent always wore a safety helmet (29.4% never wore a helmet), and 49.4 percent always observed the speed limit. There is a need to improve driver safety compliance in Shiraz, Iran. One factor that can be addressed concerns regulation of male drivers, especially among lower SES groups.

  11. Patient's rights charter in Iran.

    PubMed

    Parsapoor, Alireza; Bagheri, Alireza; Larijani, Bagher

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of patient's rights in healthcare, special attention has been given to the concept of patient's rights by the Ministry of Health and Medical Education in Iran. Iranian patient's rights charter has been compiled with a novel and comprehensive approach. This charter aims to elucidate rights of recipients of health services as well as observing ethical standards in medicine. This paper presents the Iranian patient's rights charter. Based on a study done from 2007 to 2009, the charter has been finalized through an extensive consultation involving all stakeholders, patients, physicians, nurses, lawyers, patient associations and health policy makers. The developed charter was adopted by the Ministry of Health in December 2009. Iranian patient's rights charter has been formulated in the framework of 5 chapters and 37 articles including vision and an explanatory note. The five chapters concern right to receiving appropriate services, right to access desired and enough information, right to choose and decide freely about receiving healthcare, right to privacy and confidentiality, and finally right to access an efficient system of dealing with complaints which have been explained in 14, 9, 7, 4 and 3 articles, respectively.  The paper concludes that, adopting the patient's rights charter is a valuable measure to meet patient's rights; however, a serious challenge is how to implement and acculturate observing patient's rights in practice in our healthcare system in Iran.

  12. The Paleotethys suture in Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, S.; Stampfli, G. M.

    2003-04-01

    The Triassic rocks of the Nakhlak area have been used to justify the hypothesis of the rotation of the Central-East Iranian microplate, mainly based on paleomagnetic data. Davoudzadeh and his coworkers (1981) pointed out the existing contrast between the Nakhlakh succession and the time-equivalent lithostratigraphic units exposed in the surrounding regions and compared them with the Triassic rocks of the Aghdarband area on the southern edge of the Turan plate. We recently gathered evidences that this part of central Iran effectively belongs to the Northern Iranian Paleo-Tethys suture zone and related Variscan terrains of the Turan plate. This is the case for the northwestern part of central Iran, where the Anarak-Khur belt (Anarak schists and their thick Cretaceous-Paleocene sedimentary cover) presents all the elements of an orogenic zone such as dismembered ophiolites and silisiclastics, calcareous and volcanic cover which has been deformed and metamorphosed. This belt is separated to the northwest from the Alborz microcontinent by the Great Kavir fault and Cretaceous ophiolite mélanges. To the southeast it is bounded by the Biabanak fault and serpentinites and the Biabanak block, part of the central-east Iranian plate. The later zone is formed by Proterozoic metamorphic basement and marine sedimentary cover, nearly continuous from the Ordovician to the Triassic, at the uppermost part upper Triassic-lower Jurassic bauxites and silisiclastics are observed. Excepted the Ordovician angular unconformities and the boundary between lower Jurassic and younger layers, this sequence displays no significant main unconformities and can be attributed to the Cimmerian super-terrain. Thus, this sequences represents the classical evolution of the southern Paleo-Tethys passive margin, as found in the Alborz microcontinent or the Band-e Bayan zone of Afghanistan and is the witness of large scale duplication of the Paleo-Tethys suture zone through major Alpine strike-slip faults

  13. Structural geology of the Rub' Al-Khali Basin, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    The Rub' Al-Khali basin lies below a Quaternary sand sea, and the structural evolution from the Late Precambrian to Neogene is known only from reflection seismic, gravity, and magnetic data, and wells. Gravity and magnetic data show north-south and northwest-southeast trends, matching mapped Precambrian faults. The deepest structures imaged on reflection seismic data are undrilled Precambrian rifts filled with layered strata at depths up to 13 km. The distribution of Ediacaran-Cambrian Ara/Hormuz mobile salt is restricted to an embayment in the eastern Rub' Al-Khali. The Precambrian rifts show local inversion and were peneplained at base Phanerozoic. A broad crustal-scale fold (Qatar Arch) developed in the Carboniferous and amplified in the Late Triassic, separating subbasins in the west and east Rub' Al-Khali. A phase of kilometer-scale folding occurred in the Late Cretaceous, coeval with thrusting and ophiolite obduction in eastern Oman. These folds trend predominantly north-south, oblique to the northwesterly shortening direction, and occasionally have steep fault zones close to their axial surfaces. The trend and location of these folds closely matches the Precambrian lineaments identified in this study, demonstrating preferential reactivation of basement structures. Compression along the Zagros suture reactivated these folds in the Neogene, this time the result of highly oblique, north-northeast to south-southwest shortening. Cretaceous-Tertiary fold style is interpreted as transpression with minor strain partitioning. Permian, Jurassic, and Eocene evaporite horizons played no role in the structural evolution of the basin, but the Eocene evaporites caused widespread kilometer-scale dissolution collapse structures in the basin center.

  14. Calipso recordings and monitoring dust storms over the open seas in south of the iran plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalesifard, Hamid R.; Bayat, Farizeh

    2018-04-01

    Open seas in the south of the Iran plateau are under the influence of heavy dust storms which are originating either from the Tigris and Euphrates basin, the Arabian Peninsula or Hamoun lake. We have used the recordings of the CALIPSO satellite to investigate the seasonal variations as well as the origins of the dust storms over the region. CALIPSO data set shows dust activities are frequent during May to September in the interested region and the Hamoun lake has considerable impacts on it.

  15. Age, budget and dynamics of an active salt extrusion in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, C. J.; Jarvis, R. J.

    The Hormuz salt of Kuh-e-Namak, Iran began rising through its Phanerozoic cover in Jurassic times and had surfaced by Cretaceous times. In Miocene times, the still-active Zagros folds began to develop and the salt is still extruding to feed a massive topographic dome and two surface flows of salt which have previously been called salt glaciers but are here called namakiers. Two crude but independent estimates for the rate of salt extrusion and loss are shown to balance the salt budget if the current salt dynamics are assumed to be in steady state. First, to replace the extrusive salt likely to be lost in solution in the annual rainfall, the salt must rise at an average velocity of about 11 cm a -1. Second, the foliation pattern shows that the extruding (and partially dissolved) salt column spreads under its own weight. The maximum height of the salt dome is consistent with a viscous fluid with a viscosity of 2.6 × 10 17 poises extruding from its orifice at a rate of almost 17 cm a -1. Both estimates are consistent in indicating that salt can extrude onto the surface 42-85 times faster than the average long term rate at which salt diapirs rise to the surface. The structure, fabrics, textures and deformation mechanisms of the impure halite all change along the path of the extrusive salt from the dome down the length of both namakiers. Such changes tend to occur when the flowing salt encounters changes in its boundary conditions, and the recognition of buried namakiers is discussed in the light of such observations. Episodes of salt flow at a rate of 0.5 m per day have been measured along the margin of the N namakier after significant rain showers. Such brief episodes of rapid flow alternate with long periods when the namakier is dry and stationary. The shape of the colour bands cropping out on the N namakier indicate that the flow over the surface of impure salt with a mylonitic texture obeys a power law with n ≈ 3. Although the reported annual rainfall has the

  16. Evolution of Pull-Apart Basins and Their Scale Independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Atilla; Nur, Amos

    1982-02-01

    Pull-apart basins or rhomb grabens and horsts along major strike-slip fault systems in the world are generally associated with horizontal slip along faults. A simple model suggests that the width of the rhombs is controlled by the initial fault geometry, whereas the length increases with increasing fault displacement. We have tested this model by analyzing the shapes of 70 well-defined rhomb-like pull-apart basins and pressure ridges, ranging from tens of meters to tens of kilometers in length, associated with several major strike-slip faults in the western United States, Israel, Turkey, Iran, Guatemala, Venezuela, and New Zealand. In conflict with the model, we find that the length to width ratio of these basins is a constant value of approximately 3; these basins become wider as they grow longer with increasing fault offset. Two possible mechanisms responsible for the increase in width are suggested: (1) coalescence of neighboring rhomb grabens as each graben increases its length and (2) formation of fault strands parallel to the existing ones when large displacements need to be accommodated. The processes of formation and growth of new fault strands promote interaction among the new faults and between the new and preexisting faults on a larger scale. Increased displacement causes the width of the fault zone to increase resulting in wider pull-apart basins.

  17. Facies Analysis and Depositional environment of the Oligocene-Miocene Qom Formation in the Central Iran (Semnan area)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabouhi, Mostafa; Sheykh, Morteza; Darvish, Zohreh; Naghavi Azad, Maral

    2010-05-01

    The Qom formation was formed in the Oligo-Miocene during the final sea transgression in Central Iran. This Formation in the Central Iran Basin Contains oil and gas. Organic geochemical analysis in previous studies indicated that the hydrocarbons migrated from deeper source rocks, likely of Jurassic age. In the Central Iran Basin, the Qom Formation is 1,200m thick and is abounded by the Oligocene Lower Red Formation and the middle Miocene Upper Red Formation. In previous studies, the Qom Formation was divided into nine members designated from oldest to youngest: a, b, c1 to c4, d, e, and f, of which "e" is 300m thick and constitutes the main reservoir. Our study focused on a Qom Section located in the Arvaneh (Semnan) region of Central Iran that is 498m thick. The lower part of the formation was not deposited, and only the following four members of early Miocene age (Aquitanian-Burdigalian) was identified between the lower and upper Red Formation. The studied section mainly consist of limestone, marl, sandy limestone, sandy marl and argillaceous limestone.According to this study(field and laboratory investigations), 9 carbonate microfacies were recognized which are grouped into four facies associations (microfacies group). These facies associations present platform to basin depositional setting and are nominated as: A (Tidal-flat), B (Lagoon), C (Slope) and D (Open marine). Based on paleoecology and Petrographic analysis, it seems the Qom Formation was deposited in a Carbonate shelf setting. The Qom formation constitutes a regional transgressive-regressive sequence that is bounded by two continental units (Lower and Upper Red Formation).

  18. Anopheles culicifacies in Baluchistan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Zaim, M; Manouchehri, A V; Motabar, M; Emadi, A M; Nazari, M; Pakdad, K; Kayedi, M H; Mowlaii, G

    1995-04-01

    Anopheles culicifacies (probably species A) is the main vector of malaria in Baluchistan, southeastern Iran. Adult mosquitoes were collected during 1990-92 by five methods of sampling: knock-down pyrethrum space-spray indoors, human and animal bait (18.00-05.00 hours), pit shelters and CDC light traps, yielding 62%, 3%, 6%, 4% and 25% of specimens, respectively. Whereas spray-catches comprised c. 70% gravid and semi-gravid females, light trap catches were mostly (c. 60%) unfed females, while females from pit shelters comprised all abdominal stages more equally (13-36%). An.culicifacies populations peaked in April-May and rose again during August-November. Densities of indoor-resting mosquitoes were consistently greater in an unsprayed village than in villages subjected to residual house-spraying with propoxur, malathion or pirimiphos-methyl. Monthly malaria incidence generally followed fluctuations of An.culicifacies density, usually with a peak in May-June.

  19. Social Change and Dissent in Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-01

    on Opioid Agonist Maintenance Treatment (2002) Tehran, Iran, 25-27 June. UNODCCP (2002) Global illicit drug trends (yearly report). New York...Tabrizi, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Georgia State University: Iran: A Solution Rather Than A Problem : The Politics Of Reform Mr. Afshin Molavi...published numerous articles on the topics of Islam and science, post-modernity and Islamic movements, and globalization and human rights. Dr. Kaveh

  20. Iran’s Strategic Intentions and Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    success (diverting attention from domestic problems) and its claim of equality to the great powers. - Iran lacks the resources to engage in an extensive...billion, despite renegotiations on a bilateral basis with Japanese, German and French banks. Following several years when its doors were relatively wide...perceived unpopularity of the present system. During the first decade after the 1979 revolution, Islamic Iran’s leaders took great pride in the hundreds

  1. Social Movements in Post-Revolutionary Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Comparative Perspective,” World Politics 38, no. 3 (1986), 383. 21 Ali Gheissari and Vali Nasr, Democracy in Iran: History and the Quest for Liberty...Arshin Adib-Monghaddam, “The Pluralistic Momentum in Iran and the Future of the Reform Movement,” Third World Quarterly 27, no. 4 (2006), 665. 14...et al., Mullahs, Guards, and Bonyad, 23. 64 Riaz Hassan, “Iran’s Islamic Revolutionaries: Before and After the Revolution,” Third World Quarterly 6

  2. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Keshtkar-Jahromi, Maryam; Sajadi, Mohammad M.; Ansari, Hossein; Mardani, Masoud; Naieni, Kourosh Holakouie

    2014-01-01

    The presence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) in Iran was first identified in studies of livestock sera and ticks in the 1970s, but the first human infection was not diagnosed until 1999. Since that time, the number of cases of CCHF in Iran has markedly increased. Through January 2012, articles in the published literature have reported a total of 870 confirmed cases, with 126 deaths, for a case fatality rate (CFR) of 17.6%. The disease has been seen in 26 of the country’s 31 provinces, with the greatest number of cases in Sistan and Baluchestan, Isfahan, Fars, Tehran, Khorasan, and Khuzestan provinces. The increase in CCHF in Iran has paralleled that in neighboring Turkey, though the number of cases in Turkey has been much larger, with an overall CFR of around 5%. In this article, we review the features of CCHF in Iran, including its history, epidemiology, animal and tick reservoirs, current surveillance and control programs, diagnostic methods, clinical features and experience with ribavirin therapy, and consider possible explanations for the difference in the CFR of CCHF between Iran and Turkey. The emergence of CCHF in Iran calls for countermeasures at many levels to protect the population, but also provides opportunities for studying the epidemiology, diagnosis and management of the disease. PMID:23872313

  3. Re-Os dating of mineralization in Siah Kamar porphyry Mo deposit (NW Iran) and investigating on its temporal relationship with porphyry Cu-Mo deposits in the southern Lesser Caucasus, NW and central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmonds, Vartan; Moazzen, Mohssen; Selby, David

    2017-04-01

    The Neo-Tethyan basin closure in Iran is characterized by the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc (UDMA), formed by north-eastward subduction of the Neo-Tethyan oceanic crust during the Alpine orogeny. This belt also coincides with the porphyry copper metallogenic belt of Iran, which hosts many porphyry Cu-Mo deposits (PCDs) and prospects, such as Sungun (NW Iran) and Sarcheshmeh (central Iran). The Siah Kamar porphyry Mo deposit (PMD) is the first discovered porphyry molybdenum deposit on this belt, which is located 10 km west of Mianeh (NW Iran), with 39.2 Mt proved reserves @ 539 ppm Mo and 66.4 Mt probable reserves @ 266 ppm Mo. The host porphyry stock has quartz-monzonitic composition, which intruded the volcanic and pyroclastic rocks of Eocene age. Re content of molybdenites is about 10.44-41.05 ppm which, considering the several tens of ppm concentration, is comparable with porphyry Mo deposits (e.g., Climax in USA), being clearly distinguished from porphyry Cu-Mo deposits. Re-Os dating of molybdenites from this PMD has given model ages between 28.1±0.15 to 29.06±0.2 Ma, and isochron age of 28.0±2.1 Ma, corresponding to the middle Oligocene (upper part of Rupelian). Comparing the ages determined for Siah Kamar PMD with porphyry Cu-Mo mineralizations in the Lesser Caucasus indicates that it is younger than most of the dated PCDs and prospects there, especially those of upper Eocene, while it is a little older than Paragachay and first-stage Kadjaran PCDs [1]. In a regional scale of NW Iran, it shows a narrow overlap with vein-type Cu-Mo-Au mineralizations in Qarachilar (Qaradagh batholith) and is nearly coeval with Haftcheshmeh PCD, indicating that mineralization in the Siah Kamar PMD corresponds to the second porphyry mineralization epoch in NW Iran, proposed by [2]. Meanwhile, mineralization in Siah Kamar is older than all the porphyry Cu-Mo mineralizations along the central and SE parts of the UDMA, except the Bondar Hanza PCD in Kerman zone, which nearly

  4. Variation of Fundamental Mode Surface Wave Group Velocity Dispersion in Iran and the Surrounding Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rham, D. J.; Preistley, K.; Tatar, M.; Paul, A.

    2006-12-01

    We present group velocity dispersion results from a study of regional fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love waves propagating across Iran and the surrounding region. Data for these measurements comes from field deployments within Iran by the University of Cambridge (GBR) and the Universite Joseph-Fourier (FRA) in conjunction with International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (Iran), in addition to data from IRIS and Geofone. 1D path- averaged dispersion measurements have been made for ~5500 source-receiver paths using multiple filter analysis. We combine these observations in a tomographic inversion to produce group velocity images between 10 and 60 s period. Because of the dense path coverage, these images have substantially higher lateral resolution for this region than is currently available from global and regional group velocity studies. We observe variations in short-period wave group velocity which is consistent with the surface geology. Low group velocities (2.00-2.55 km/s) at short periods (10-20 s), for both Rayleigh and Love waves are observed beneath thick sedimentary deposits; The south Caspian Basin, Black Sea, the eastern Mediterranean, the Persian Gulf, the Makran, the southern Turan shield, and the Indus and Gangetic basins. Somewhat higher group velocity (2.80-3.15 km/s for Rayleigh, and 3.00-3.40 km/s for Love) at these periods occur in sediment poor regions, such as; the Turkish-Iranian plateau, the Arabian shield, and Kazakhstan. At intermediate periods (30-40 s) group velocities over most of the region are low (2.65-3.20 km/s for Rayleigh, and 2.80-3.45 km/s for love) compared to Arabia (3.40-3.70 km/s Rayleigh, 3.50-4.0 km/s Love). At longer periods (50-60 s) Love wave group velocities remain low (3.25-3.70 km/s) over most of Iran, but there are even lower velocities (2.80-3.00 km/s) still associated with the thick sediments of the south Caspian basin, the surrounding shield areas have much higher group velocities (3

  5. Ten years of snakebites in Iran.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Rouhullah; Fathi, Behrooz; Shahi, Morteza Panjeh; Jazayeri, Mehrdad

    2014-11-01

    Many species of venomous snakes are found in Iran. The most medically important species which are responsible for the most snakebite incidents in Iran belong to the Viperidae family, including Vipera lebetina, Echis carinatus, Pseudocerastes persicus, Vipera albicornuta and the Elapidae family, especially Naja naja oxiana. At least one kind of venomous snake is found in each of the 31 provinces, and many provinces have more than one venomous species. As a result, snakebite is a considerable health hazard in Iran, especially in the rural area of south and south-west of Iran. A retrospective, descriptive study of snakebite in Iran during 2002-2011 was carried out in order based on data collected from medical records of bite victims admitted to hospitals and health centers. From 2002 to 2011, 53,787 cases of snake bites were reported by medical centers in Iran. The annual incidence of snake bites in 100,000 of population varied from 4.5 to 9.1 during this decade and the number of recorded deaths were about 67 cases. The highest rate of snakebite was found in provinces of south and southwest of Iran. We suggest that people, especially in the rural areas, need to be trained and educated about venomous snakes, their hazards, prevention of bite and the importance of early hospital referral and treatment of victims. Also adequate antivenins as the main life saving medicine should be made available based on the recorded numbers of victims in each area of the country. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of Preeclampsia and Eclampsia in Iran.

    PubMed

    Kharaghani, Roghieh; Cheraghi, Zahra; Okhovat Esfahani, Batool; Mohammadian, Zahra; Nooreldinc, Reyhaneh Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have been conducted to investigate the prevalence of preeclampsia and eclampsia in Iran. These studies have yielded different results. This meta-analysis was aimed to estimate the prevalence of preeclampsia and eclampsia in Iran. International and national electronic databases were searched up to August 2014 including PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, Science Information Database, MagIran, and IranMedex as well as conference databases. All studies, in which the prevalence or cumulative incidence of preeclampsia in Iran was reported, were included in this meta-analysis. Thirty-six separate studies were assessed involving overall 132,737 participants, of which 4360 had preeclampsia and 49 had eclampsia. Overall prevalence of preeclampsia and eclampsia was 0.05 (95% CI: 0.05, 0.06) and 0.23% (95% CI: 0.12%, 0.33%) respectively. The prevalence of preeclampsia, increased from 0.04 (95% CI: 0.03, 0.05) during 1996 to 2005 to 0.07 (95% CI: 0.04, 0.09) during 2010 to 2013, while the prevalence of eclampsia decreased from 0.30% (95% CI: 0.15%, 0.45%) to 0.01% (95% CI: 0.01%, 0.01%), during the same period. The preeclampsia prevalence had an increasing growth and the eclampsia prevalence had declining growth in recent years. In addition, despite many studies aimed the prevalence of preeclampsia and eclampsia in Iran, there is a significant variation between the results. So, it is difficult to give an exact estimation of the preeclampsia and eclampsia prevalence in Iran.

  7. Iran: Politics, Human Rights, and U.S. Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-17

    Revolution in Iran in 1979, the United States and Iran have been at odds politically and diplomatically, and U.S. policy has been intended to reduce the...the potential for Iran to develop a nuclear weapon increased. Beginning in 2010, the United States orchestrated broad international economic pressure...characterized Iran as an adversary of the United States and stated a commitment to countering Iran’s regional influence – although without taking steps that

  8. Great Basin insect outbreaks

    Barbara Bentz; Diane Alston; Ted Evans

    2008-01-01

    Outbreaks of native and exotic insects are important drivers of ecosystem dynamics in the Great Basin. The following provides an overview of range, forest, ornamental, and agricultural insect outbreaks occurring in the Great Basin and the associated management issues and research needs.

  9. Great Basin aspen ecosystems

    Dale L. Bartos

    2008-01-01

    The health of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the Great Basin is of growing concern. The following provides an overview of aspen decline and die-off in areas within and adjacent to the Great Basin and suggests possible directions for research and management.

  10. Oligocene and Early Miocene coral faunas from Iran: palaeoecology and palaeobiogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, F.; Wielandt, U.

    Oligocene and Early Miocene coral assemblages from three sections of central Iran are investigated with respect to their palaeoecological and palaeobiogeographic implications. These corals are compared with faunas from the Mediterranean Tethys and the Indopacific. Associated larger foraminifers are used for biostratigraphy and to support the palaeoecological interpretation. The studied sections are situated in the foreland basins of the Iranian Plate which is structured into a fore-arc and a back-arc basin separated by a volcanic arc. The coral assemblages from Abadeh indicate a shallowing-upward trend. Infrequently distributed solitary corals at the base of the section indicate a turbid environment. Above, a distinct horizon characterised by a Leptoseris-Stylophora assemblage associated with lepidocyclinids and planktonic foraminifers is interpreted as maximum flooding surface. Small patch reefs with a Porites-Faviidae assemblage are a common feature of Late Oligocene to Early Miocene coral occurrences and indicate water depths of less than 20m. The diversity of the coral faunas shows marked differences. Oligocene corals from the Esfahan-Sirjan fore-arc basin comprise more than 45 species of 32 genera and occur in a wide range of environments. Early Miocene corals from the Qom back-arc basin are less frequent, show a lower diversity (13 genera with 15 species) and occur in single horizons or small patch reefs.

  11. JACK CREEK BASIN, MONTANA.

    Kiilsgaard, Thor H.; Van Noy, Ronald M.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Jack Creek basin area in Montana revealed that phosphate rock underlies the basin. The phosphate rock is in thin beds that dip steeply and are broken and offset by faults. These features plus the rugged topography of the region would make mining difficult; however, this study finds the area to have a probable mineral-resource potential for phosphate. Sedimentary rock formations favorable for oil and gas also underlie the basin. No oil or gas has been produced from the basin or from nearby areas in southwestern Montana, but oil and gas have been produced from the same favorable formations elsewhere in Montana. The possibility of oil and gas being produced from the basin is slight but it cannot be ignored.

  12. Molecular systematics and distribution review of the endemic cyprinid species, Persian chub, Acanthobrama persidis (Coad, 1981) in Southern Iran (Teleostei: Cyprinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Teimori, Azad; Esmaeili, Hamid Reza; Sayyadzadeh, Golnaz; Zarei, Neda; Gholamhosseini, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The Iranian Persian chub is an endemic species of the family Cyprinidae known only from few localities in drainages of Southern Iran. It was originally described in the genus Pseudophoxinus as (Pseudophoxinus persidis) and then Petroleuciscus (as Petroleuciscus persidis). In this study, we examined phylogenetic relationships of the Iranian Persian chub with other relatives in the family Cyprinidae based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene to estimate the phylogenetic (and taxonomic) position of the species. Our molecular phylogenies show that new fish sequences from the drainages in southern Iran are clustered with sequences of the genus Acanthobrama from GenBank while the sequences from two other genera (Pseudophoxinus and Petroleuciscus) are in distinct clade. Therefore, we conclude that the populations of Persian Chub in drainages of southern Iran (i.e., Kol, Kor, Maharlu and Persis) belong to the genus Acanthobrama and species Acanthobrama persidis. The predicted geographic distributions for the species showed a large area of suitable climate for A. persidis across south and west of Iran especially in the Kor River basin. Some other parts in the Persis and Tigris are also might have been suitable habitats for this cyprinid species showing possible dispersal route of Acanthobrama from Tigris to the Persis, Kor and Kol basins. PMID:27844011

  13. Structural analysis and tectonic evolution of the eastern Binalud Mountains, NE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, M. R.; Kouhpeyma, M.

    2012-10-01

    The Binalud Mountains are situated in the south of the Kopeh Dagh as a transitional zone between the Alborz and Central Iran zones. The Palaeotethys suture of the north Iran is located in this area. The Binalud Mountains consists of relatively thick successions of sedimentary, metamorphic and igneous rocks. The earliest deformation, a polyphase synmetamorphic deformation which occurred entirely in ductile conditions, is distinguished in the metamorphic rocks of the eastern part. D1, D2 and D3 deformation phases are related to this deformation. The D4 deformation affected the area after a period of sedimentation and erosion. The thrust faults of the central and southern part of the eastern Binalud were classified as structures related to the D5 tectonic event. From the geodynamic point of view, in Late Palaeozoic times the studied area formed an oceanic trench generated by the subduction of the Palaeotethys oceanic lithosphere beneath the Turan Plate. In the Late Triassic, the Early Cimmerian Event resulted in a collisional type orogeny generating a transpression polyphase deformation and the metamorphism of Permian and older sediments. Following this collision, granite intrusions were emplaced in the area and caused contact metamorphism. The exhumation and erosion of the rocks deformed and metamorphosed during Early Cimmerian Event caused the formation of molassic type sediments in a Rhaetian-Lias back arc basin. The continuation of convergence between the Turan and Iran Plates caused the metamorphism of these sediments and their transformation to phyllite and meta-sandstone. During Late Mesozoic and Early Cenozoic times, the convergence between Central Iran and Turan Plates continued and a NE compression caused folding of the Cretaceous and older rocks in the Kopeh Dagh area. In the Binalud area this deformation caused the generation of several thrust fault systems with S to SW vergence, resulting in a thrusting of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic successions on each other

  14. 15 CFR 742.8 - Anti-terrorism: Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Iran. 742.8 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.8 Anti-terrorism: Iran. (a) License Requirements. (1) A license is required for anti-terrorism purposes to export or reexport to Iran any item for which AT column 1 or AT column 2 is...

  15. 15 CFR 742.8 - Anti-terrorism: Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Iran. 742.8 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.8 Anti-terrorism: Iran. (a) License Requirements. (1) A license is required for anti-terrorism purposes to export or reexport to Iran any item for which AT column 1 or AT column 2 is...

  16. 15 CFR 742.8 - Anti-terrorism: Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Iran. 742.8 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.8 Anti-terrorism: Iran. (a) License Requirements. (1) A license is required for anti-terrorism purposes to export or reexport to Iran any item for which AT column 1 or AT column 2 is...

  17. 15 CFR 742.8 - Anti-terrorism: Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Iran. 742.8 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.8 Anti-terrorism: Iran. (a) License Requirements. (1) A license is required for anti-terrorism purposes to export or reexport to Iran any item for which AT column 1 or AT column 2 is...

  18. 15 CFR 742.8 - Anti-terrorism: Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Iran. 742.8 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.8 Anti-terrorism: Iran. (a) License Requirements. (1) A license is required for anti-terrorism purposes to export or reexport to Iran any item for which AT column 1 or AT column 2 is...

  19. 31 CFR 535.301 - Iran; Iranian Entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Iran; Iranian Entity. 535.301 Section 535.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF... § 535.301 Iran; Iranian Entity. (a) The term Iran and Iranian Entity includes: (1) The state and the...

  20. 31 CFR 535.301 - Iran; Iranian Entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Iran; Iranian Entity. 535.301 Section 535.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF... § 535.301 Iran; Iranian Entity. (a) The term Iran and Iranian Entity includes: (1) The state and the...

  1. 31 CFR 560.403 - Transshipment through Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transshipment through Iran. 560.403... Interpretations § 560.403 Transshipment through Iran. The prohibitions in §§ 560.204, 560.206 and 560.208 apply to... through Iran to third countries. [64 FR 20172, Apr. 26, 1999] ...

  2. 31 CFR 560.403 - Transshipment or transit through Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transshipment or transit through Iran... REGULATIONS Interpretations § 560.403 Transshipment or transit through Iran. The prohibitions in §§ 560.204... transit of goods or technology through Iran to third countries. ...

  3. 48 CFR 25.703-2 - Iran Sanctions Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Iran Sanctions Act. 25.703... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Prohibited Sources 25.703-2 Iran Sanctions Act. (a) Certification. (1) As required by the Iran Sanctions Act (50 U.S.C. 1701 note), unless an exception applies in...

  4. 31 CFR 560.403 - Transshipment or transit through Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transshipment or transit through Iran... REGULATIONS Interpretations § 560.403 Transshipment or transit through Iran. The prohibitions in §§ 560.204... transit of goods or technology through Iran to third countries. ...

  5. 31 CFR 560.403 - Transshipment through Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transshipment through Iran. 560.403... Interpretations § 560.403 Transshipment through Iran. The prohibitions in §§ 560.204, 560.206 and 560.208 apply to... through Iran to third countries. [64 FR 20172, Apr. 26, 1999] ...

  6. 31 CFR 560.403 - Transshipment through Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transshipment through Iran. 560.403... Interpretations § 560.403 Transshipment through Iran. The prohibitions in §§ 560.204, 560.206 and 560.208 apply to... through Iran to third countries. [64 FR 20172, Apr. 26, 1999] ...

  7. Iran’s Economic Conditions: U.S. Policy Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-15

    Iran is a major world provider source of caviar and pistachio nuts, a significant non-oil export for Iran. The country’s climate and... pistachios ). There is evidence that Iran is able to obtain embargoed U.S. goods through the re- export trade, mainly through Dubai.120 In general

  8. 31 CFR 560.304 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Government of Iran. 560.304 Section 560.304 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF... § 560.304 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of...

  9. Status of Transfusion Medicine Education in Iran.

    PubMed

    Javadzadeh Shahshahani, Hayedeh

    2016-06-01

    Optimal use of blood and blood components requires theoretical and practical knowledge in transfusion medicine. While the importance of education in transfusion medicine has long been recognized, a vacancy is widely felt in this regard in Iran. In this study, the current status of transfusion medicine education in Iran is evaluated using a review of studies conducted in this field. To access articles related to transfusion medicine education in Iran, an electronic search was performed in databases, including Magiran, SID, IranMedex, Google Scholar, PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Scopus and the related articles were evaluated. Knowledge of transfusion medicine was not optimal in various medical groups and there was no effective theoretical and practical education and training for transfusion medicine in medical universities. Almost all the studies concluded that transfusion medicine curricula should be implemented for both undergraduate and postgraduate students, because of its great importance in clinical practice. Educational program of transfusion medicine is a basic need of medical education for medical students, interns, residents, nursing, and midwifery students in Iran. Considering our status and capacities and by using educational programs in the world, curricula are suggested for different educational levels. Implementation of these training programs plays a vital role in improving patients' safety and also reduces the high costs of treatment with blood products.

  10. Epidemiology of hepatitis C virus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Taherkhani, Reza; Farshadpour, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    In Iran, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is relatively low according to the population-based epidemiological studies. However, the epidemiology of HCV is changing and the rate of HCV infection is increasing due to the growth in the number of injecting drug users in the society. In addition, a shift has occurred in the distribution pattern of HCV genotypes among HCV-infected patients in Iran. Genotype 1a is the most prevalent genotype in Iran, but in recent years, an increase in the frequency of 3a and a decrease in 1a and 1b have been reported. These variations in the epidemiology of HCV reflect differences in the routes of transmission, status of public health, lifestyles, and risk factors in different groups and geographic regions of Iran. Health policy makers should consider these differences to establish better strategies for control and prevention of HCV infection. Therefore, this review was conducted to present a clear view regarding the current epidemiology of HCV infection in Iran. PMID:26478671

  11. Embargo on Iran hurts supply firms

    SciT

    Lyle, D.

    1995-06-01

    When President Clinton dropped an embargo on Iran, he also collided with oilfield supply companies to the tune of some $662.5 million. The embargo locked Iran away from oil exports to the US and some imports from the US in an attempt to stop Iran from: building a nuclear weapons stockpile; threatening the Persian Gulf with conventional military operations, and supporting terrorism. Most people would agree with the need to stop that activity. But, the supply companies would have preferred something less drastic. The Petroleum Equipment Suppliers Association, and the Tom Wheatley Valve Co. of Houston, said Iran owes suppliersmore » approximately a half-billion dollars in receivables. That money may never be recovered, and it could send some companies into bankruptcy. In addition, the embargo cuts off $325 million in business the US conducts with Iran and about half of that business goes to the oil industry. If you plug that $162.5 million into Department of Labor statistics that say each $1 million sustains 20 jobs, the industry stands to lose 3250 jobs.« less

  12. Epidemiology of hepatitis C virus in Iran.

    PubMed

    Taherkhani, Reza; Farshadpour, Fatemeh

    2015-10-14

    In Iran, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is relatively low according to the population-based epidemiological studies. However, the epidemiology of HCV is changing and the rate of HCV infection is increasing due to the growth in the number of injecting drug users in the society. In addition, a shift has occurred in the distribution pattern of HCV genotypes among HCV-infected patients in Iran. Genotype 1a is the most prevalent genotype in Iran, but in recent years, an increase in the frequency of 3a and a decrease in 1a and 1b have been reported. These variations in the epidemiology of HCV reflect differences in the routes of transmission, status of public health, lifestyles, and risk factors in different groups and geographic regions of Iran. Health policy makers should consider these differences to establish better strategies for control and prevention of HCV infection. Therefore, this review was conducted to present a clear view regarding the current epidemiology of HCV infection in Iran.

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux disease burden in Iran.

    PubMed

    Delavari, Alireza; Moradi, Ghobad; Elahi, Elham; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar

    2015-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is one of the most common disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. The prevalence of this disease ranges from 5% to 20% in Asia, Europe, and North America. The aim of this study was to estimate the burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Iran. Burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Iran was estimated for one year from 21 March 2006 to 20 March 2007. The definition was adjusted with ICD-code of K21. Incident-based disability-adjusted life year (DALY) was used as the unit of analysis to quantify disease burden. A simplified disease model and DisMod II software were used for modeling. The annual incidence for total population of males and females in Iran was estimated 17.72 and 28.06 per 1000, respectively. The average duration of gastroesophageal reflux disease as a chronic condition was estimated around 10 years in both sexes. Total DALYs for an average of 59 symptomatic days per year was estimated 153,554.3 (60,330.8 for males and 93,223.5 for females).   The results of this study showed that reflux imposes high burden and high financial costs on the Iranian population. The burden of this disease in Iran is more similar to that of European countries rather than Asian countries. It is recommended to consider the disease as a public health problem and make decisions and public health plans to reduce the burden and financial costs of the disease in Iran.

  14. Fasciola hepatica eggs in paleofaeces of the Persian onager Equus hemionus onager, a donkey from Chehrabad archaeological site, dating back to the Sassanid Empire (224-651 AD), in ancient Iran.

    PubMed

    Askari, Zeynab; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Bouwman, Abigail S; Boenke, Nicole; Stöllner, Thomas; Aali, Abolfazl; Rezaiian, Mostafa; Mowlavi, Gholamreza

    2018-04-24

    Fascioliasis is a highly pathogenic zoonotic disease caused by the liver trematodes Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica. Within the multidisciplinary initiative against this disease, there is the aim of understanding how this disease reached a worldwide distribution, with important veterinary and medical repercussions, by elucidating the spreading steps followed by the two fasciolids from their paleobiogeograhical origins. Fasciola eggs were detected in paleofaeces of a donkey, probably the present-day endangered Persian onager Equus hemionus onager, found in the Chehrabad salt mine archaeological site, Zanjan province, northwestern Iran. The biological remains dated back to the Sassanid period, 224-651 AD. Egg characteristics allowed for their specific ascription to F. hepatica. The interest of this finding relies on the fact of being the first archaeological finding of Fasciola in Asia and the Near East. Moreover, it allows to reach many conclusions about historical, epidemiological and spreading aspects of the disease. The finding in Chehrabad indicates that, at that time, this fasciolid had already spread through the Zagros mountains eastward from the Fertile Crescent. In that region and in ancient Egypt, livestock domestication played a crucial role in facilitating the disease spread during the postdomestication period. Donkeys appear at present to be usually infected by fasciolids in countries of the Fertile Crescent - Ancient Egypt region or neighbouring that region, with prevalences from low to very high. The high pathogenicity and mortality induced by Fasciola in these equines should be considered as an additional potential factor among the causes of the extinctions of E. h. hemippus in Syria, E. h. hydruntinus in the Anatolia-Balkans area, E. h. onager in the Caucasus and maybe also its decline in Iran. Indeed, Eurasiatic wild asses were present in the region and neighbourhood of the Fertile Crescent when the domestication of the livestock reservoirs of

  15. Marginalized Women in West Iran

    PubMed

    Malmir, Shabnam; Barati, Majid; Khani Jeihooni, Ali; Bashirian, Saeed; Hazavehei, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi

    2018-03-27

    Objective: This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of an educational intervention to prevent cervical cancer among marginalized Iranianwomen based on the Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) as a theoretical framework. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was carried out on 143 women of Kermanshah City in western Iran during 2017. Participants were recruited through cluster and simple random sampling and randomly divided into experimental (n=72) and control groups (n=71). All completed a self-administered questionnaire including PMT constructs and demographic variables. An intervention over six sessions was then applied to the experimental group. Reassessment was conducted three months after the intervention, with data was analyzed with SPSS-16 using chi-square, McNemar, paired T- and independent T-tests. Results: The mean scores for the constructs of PMT, and cervical cancer screening behavior showed no significant differences between the two groups before the intervention (P>0.05). The educational manipulation had significant effects on the experimental groups’ average response for perceived vulnerability, perceived severity, perceived reward, self-efficacy, response efficacy, response cost and protection motivation (all p < 0.001). Also, the prevalence of regular Pap smear testing and referral to health centers were significantly increased after 3 months in the experimental (P=0.048), but notthe control group (P>0.05). Conclusions: The results show that applying an educational intervention based on PMT might help prevent cervical cancer and improve regular Pap smear testing. Creative Commons Attribution License

  16. History of cancer in Iran.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Mohammad Hossein; Bahadori, Moslem; Azizi, Farzaneh

    2013-10-01

    The history of human and animal cancers date back to antiquity. The earliest written document on cancer appeared on Egyptian papyrus. For centuries, the theory of "four humors" was the primary hypothesis that explained the cause for cancer.  Finally, in the 19th century a new era began with the detection of the cellular origin of cancer; in due course, the nature of this lethal disease was better recognized and led to further achievements in cancer treatment. During the 20th century researchers investigated several risk factors for cancer such as tobacco smoking and environmental chemicals, in addition to the carcinogenic role of certain viruses, occupational association of cancer, its relationship with certain hormones and dietary habits, and the genetic basis of cancer. These investigations resulted in more efficient cancer management. After the advent of radiotherapy and chemotherapy as two complementary therapeutic modalities to surgery, the campaign against cancer has improved. However, cancer remains a major health challenge that accounts for substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. The present paper briefly reviews the history of cancer in Iran, particularly during the last decades of the 20th century.

  17. Iran plans huge private sector MTBE plant

    SciT

    Alperowicz, N.

    1992-01-15

    An export-oriented 1-million m.t./year methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) plant is planned as one of Iran`s private sector investment projects. State-owned National Petrochemical Co (NPC; Tehran) and the Dubai-based Iranian businessman Abdul Wahab Galadari have signed a letter of intent allowing Galadari to develop the venture. Colt Engineering (Calgary, AL) is assisting Galadari with costs, planning and technology selection for the estimated $300-million plus venture. An important meeting with NPC is scheduled end of this month, says Galadari, and a financial package should be put together by end of March or April. The facility will most likely be wholly-owned by themore » Galadari family, roughly 50% by members resident in Iran and the remainder by the Dubai-based concern A.W. Galadari Sons. NPC says it may take a token shareholding in the venture.« less

  18. The Iran Nuclear Crisis: An Update

    SciT

    Sagan, Scott

    2007-05-07

    Will Iran develop nuclear weapons capabilities and what effects would such capabilities have on international peace and security? Despite two recent U.N. Security Council resolutions sanctioning Iran for its nuclear activities, the government in Tehran continues to press ahead with efforts to expand its uranium enrichment program to industrial scale. But both the Tehran regime and the Iranian people remain divided on the nuclear question, creating opportunities for a negotiated settlement. It is essential for US security that the Iranian program be contained, for nuclear weapons in Iran would increase risks of regional instability, terrorist use, and further proliferation. Themore » U.S. and its negotiating partners have already missed a number of potential opportunities for a diplomatic breakthrough, but the right mix of incentives designed to address the reasons driving Iran’s nuclear program could still succeed in producing an acceptable outcome.« less

  19. Economics of Gypsum Production in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Abdoulkarim

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the economics of gypsum production in Iran. The trend in production cost, selling price and profit are used to investigate economics of gypsum production. In addition, the multivariate time series method is used to determine factors affecting gypsum price in domestic market. The results indicated that due to increase in production and inflation, profitability of gypsum production has decreased during recent years. It is concluded that tariff and non-tariff barriers on mines machinery are among reasons for increasing production cost in Iranian gypsum mines. Decreasing such barriers could increase profitability of gypsum production in Iran.

  20. Medical Science and Research in Iran.

    PubMed

    Akhondzadeh, Shahin; Ebadifar, Asghar; Baradaran Eftekhari, Monir; Falahat, Katayoun

    2017-11-01

    During the last 3 decades, Iran has experienced a rapid population growth and at the same time the health of Iranian people has improved greatly. This achievement was mainly due to training and availability of health manpower, well organized public health network and medical science and research improvement. In this article, we aimed to report the relevant data about the medical science and research situation in Iran and compare them with other countries. In this study, after reviewing science development and research indicators in medical sciences with participation of key stakeholders, we selected 3 main hybrid indexes consisting of "Research and Development (R&D) expenditures," "Personnel in Science and Technology sector" and "knowledge generation" for evaluation of medical science and research situation. Data was extracted from reliable databases. Over the past decade, Iran has achieved significant success in medical sciences and for the first time in 2015 based on Scopus index, Iran ranked first in the number of published scientific papers and number of citations in the region and among all Islamic countries. Also, 2% of the world's publications belong to Iran. Regarding innovation, the number of Iranian patents submitted to the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) was 3 and 43 in 2008 and 2013, respectively. In these years, the number of personnel in science and technology sectors including post graduate students, researchers and academic members in universities of medical sciences (UMSs) have increased. The female students in medical sciences field account for about twothirds of all students. Also, women comprise about one-third of faculty members. Since 5 years ago, Iran has had growth in science and technology parks. These achievements were attained in spite of the fact that research spending in Iran was still very low (0.5% of gross domestic product [GDP]) due to economic hardships and sanctions. Medical science and research development has

  1. Brief History of pharmacy ethics in Iran.

    PubMed

    Farsam, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacy is an ethical profession. The aim of this study was to investigate the history of pharmacy ethics in Iran. In the ancient Persia, medical and pharmaceutical ethics were related to religious rules, and everybody had to respect it. The ethical rules were similar to some current pharmacy ethics. During Islamic era, the pharmacy ethics were edited according to the Islamic rules. After introduction of European pharmacy into Iran, the pharmacy ethics did not change and was regarded as before. By presentation of bioethics and medical ethics in recent years, new activities are carried out for better manipulation of their rules in health professions including pharmacy.

  2. Brief History of pharmacy ethics in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Farsam, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacy is an ethical profession. The aim of this study was to investigate the history of pharmacy ethics in Iran. In the ancient Persia, medical and pharmaceutical ethics were related to religious rules, and everybody had to respect it. The ethical rules were similar to some current pharmacy ethics. During Islamic era, the pharmacy ethics were edited according to the Islamic rules. After introduction of European pharmacy into Iran, the pharmacy ethics did not change and was regarded as before. By presentation of bioethics and medical ethics in recent years, new activities are carried out for better manipulation of their rules in health professions including pharmacy. PMID:23908727

  3. Construction at Turn Basin

    2017-06-14

    Modifications are underway at the Launch Complex 39 turn basin wharf at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to prepare for the arrival of the agency's massive Space Launch System (SLS) core stage aboard the barge Pegasus. Precast concrete poles are being driven to a depth of about 70 feet into the bedrock below the water around the turn basin; later filled with concrete. The upgrades are necessary to accommodate the increased weight of the core stage along with ground support and transportation equipment aboard the modified barge Pegasus. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing the upgrades to the turn basin wharf.

  4. Turn Basin Construction

    2017-06-14

    Modifications are underway at the Launch Complex 39 turn basin wharf at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to prepare for the arrival of the agency's massive Space Launch System (SLS) core stage aboard the barge Pegasus. A crane will be used to lift up precast concrete poles and position them to be driven to a depth of about 70 feet into the bedrock below the water around the turn basin. The upgrades are necessary to accommodate the 300,000-pound core booster aboard the modified Pegasus barge. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing the upgrades to the turn basin wharf.

  5. Turn Basin Construction

    2017-06-14

    Modifications are underway at the Launch Complex 39 turn basin wharf at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to prepare for the arrival of the agency's massive Space Launch System (SLS) core stage aboard the barge Pegasus. Precast concrete poles are being driven to a depth of about 70 feet into the bedrock below the water around the turn basin. The upgrades are necessary to accommodate the increased weight of the core stage along with ground support and transportation equipment aboard the modified barge Pegasus. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing the upgrades to the turn basin wharf.

  6. Turn Basin Construction

    2017-06-14

    Modifications are underway at the Launch Complex 39 turn basin wharf at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to prepare for the arrival of the agency's massive Space Launch System (SLS) core stage aboard the barge Pegasus. A crane will be used to lift up precast concrete poles and position them to be driven to a depth of about 70 feet into the bedrock below the water around the turn basin. The upgrades are necessary to accommodate the increased weight of the core stage along with ground support and transportation equipment aboard the modified barge Pegasus. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing the upgrades to the turn basin wharf.

  7. Fragrance contact allergy in Iran.

    PubMed

    Firooz, A; Nassiri-Kashani, M; Khatami, A; Gorouhi, F; Babakoohi, S; Montaser-Kouhsari, L; Davari, P; Dowlati, Y

    2010-12-01

    Fragrances are considered as one of the most common causes of allergic contact dermatitis. About 1-4% of the general population suffer from fragrance contact allergy (FCA). To determine the frequency of FCA and its clinical relevance in a sample of Iranian patients with history of contact and/or atopic dermatitis from January 2004 to December 2008. Standardized patch testing with 28-allergen screening series recommended by the German Contact Dermatitis Research Group and European Standard Series was used at six dermatological clinics in Iran. Fragrance allergens comprised of fragrance mix I (FM I), Myroxylon pereirae (MP; balsam of Peru), Lyral, turpentine and FM II. Fragrance contact allergy was detected in 7.2% of the patients. The frequency of positive reactions to FM I, MP and FM II were 3.7% (41/1105), 2.8% (32/1135) and 1.1% (3/267) respectively. 82.4% of the reactions to fragrance allergens were clinically relevant. The most common involved areas were hands (68.4%) and face (35.4%). Fragrance allergy predominantly affected women aged more than 40 years (P=0.008). Positive reaction to more than two allergens was significantly higher in FCA patients compared with other contact dermatitis patients (P<0.0001), and FM I, nickel and MP were the most frequent allergens in these patients. Despite less frequency of FCA in comparison with some European countries, its clinical relevance in Iranian patients seems to be high. It mostly affects the hands and the face predominantly in women aged more than 40 years. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  8. Factors Associated With Suicidal Attempts in Iran: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hakim Shooshtari, Mitra; Malakouti, Seyyed Kazem; Panaghi, Leili; Mohseni, Shohreh; Mansouri, Naghmeh; Rahimi Movaghar, Afarin

    2016-03-01

    Suicide prevention is a health service priority. Some surveys have assessed suicidal behaviors and potential risk factors. The current paper aimed to gather information about etiology of suicide attempts in Iran. Pubmed, ISI web of science, PsychInfo, IranPsych, IranMedex, IranDoc as well as gray literature were searched. By electronic and gray literature search, 128 articles were enrolled in this paper. Pubmed, ISI web of science, PsychInfo, IranPsych, IranMedex, IranDoc were searched for electronic search. After reading the abstracts, 84 studies were excluded and full texts of 44 articles were reviewed critically. Pubmed, ISI web of science, PsychInfo, IranPsych, IranMedex, IranDoc as well as gray literature were searched to find any study about etiologic factors of suicide attempt in Iran. Depressive disorder was the most common diagnosis in suicide attempters that is 45% of the evaluated cases had depression. One study that had used Minnesota multiphasic personality inventory (MMPI) found that Histrionics in females and Schizophrenia and Paranoia in males were significantly influential. Family conflicts with 50.7% and conflict with parents with 44% were two effective psychosocial factors in suicidal attempts. In around one fourth (28.7%) of the cases, conflict with spouse was the main etiologic factor. According to the methodological limitations, outcomes should be generalized cautiously. Further studies will help to plan preventive strategies for suicidal attempts; therefore, continued researches should be conducted to fill the data gaps.

  9. Geochemical prospecting for Cu mineralization in an arid terrain-central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari, Ahmad Reza; Roshani Rodsari, Parisa; Fatehi, Moslem; Shahrestani, Shahed; Pournik, Peyman

    2014-12-01

    Geochemical sampling and data processing were implemented for prospecting Cu mineralization through catchment basin approach in central Iran, Yazd province, over drainage systems in order to determine areas of interest for the detailed exploration program. The target zone, inside an area called Kalout-e-Ashrafa in Yazd province-Iran, was characterized by the collection of 107 stream sediment samples. Catchment basin modeling was conducted based on digital elevation model (DEM) and geological map of the study area. Samples were studied by univariate and multivariate statistical techniques of exploratory data analysis, classical statistical analysis and cluster analysis. The results showed that only Cu had anomalous behavior and it did not exhibit a considerable correlation with other elements. Geochemical maps were prepared for Cu and anomalous zones and separated for potential copper mineralization. It was concluded that due to especial geomorphological and geographical characteristics (smooth topography, negligible annual precipitation and insufficient thickness of silicified Cu-bearing outcrops of the area), low concentrations of Cu would be expected for the delineation of promising zones in similar trains. Using cluster analysis showed that there was a strong correlation between Ag, Sr and S. Calcium and Pb present moderate correlation with Cu. Additionally, there was a strong correlation between Zn and Li, thereby indicating a meaningful correlation with Fe, P, Ti and Mg. Aluminum, Sc and V had a correlation with Be and K. Applying threshold value according to MAD (median absolute deviation) helped us to distinguish anomalous catchments more properly. Finally, there was a significant kind of conformity among anomalous catchment basins and silicified veins and veinlets (as validating index) at the central part of the area.

  10. Turn Basin Construction

    2017-06-14

    Modifications are underway at the Launch Complex 39 turn basin wharf at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to prepare for the arrival of the agency's massive Space Launch System (SLS) core booster aboard the barge Pegasus. Construction workers with Southeast Cherokee Construction Inc. work to shore up the turn basin area. A crane will be used to lift up precast concrete poles and position them to be driven to a depth of about 70 feet into the bedrock below the water around the turn basin. The upgrades are necessary to accommodate the 300,000-pound core booster aboard the modified Pegasus barge. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing the upgrades to the turn basin wharf.

  11. BASINS Framework and Features

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BASINS enables users to efficiently access nationwide environmental databases and local user-specified datasets, apply assessment and planning tools, and run a variety of proven nonpoint loading and water quality models within a single GIS format.

  12. Turn Basin Construction

    2017-06-30

    At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, cement is poured as part of a construction project to upgrade the turn basin wharf. The work includes driving multiple precast concrete piles to a depth of about 70 feet to accommodate arrival of the core stage for the agency's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. When the stage for NASA's SLS departs the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, it will be shipped by the agency's modified barge to the Launch Complex 39 turn basin.

  13. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciT

    PECH, S.H.

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  14. Patient rights in Iran: a review article.

    PubMed

    Joolaee, Soodabeh; Hajibabaee, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    A significant development for conducting research on patient rights has been made in Iran over the past decade. This study is conducted in order to review and analyze the previous studies that have been made, so far, concerning patient rights in Iran. This is a comprehensive review study conducted by searching the Iranian databases, Scientific Information Database, Iranian Research Institute for Information Science and Technology, Iran Medex and Google using the Persian equivalent of keywords for 'awareness', 'attitude', and 'patient rights'. For pertinent Iranian papers published in English, scientific databases PubMed, and Google Scholar were searched using the keyword 'patient rights' and 'Iran'. A total of 41 Persian and five English articles were found for these keywords, only 26 of which fulfilled the objective of our study. The increasing number of papers published indicates that from 1999 onwards, this subject has begun to draw the attention of Iranian researchers in a progressive fashion and Iranian papers in English have also been compiled and published in international sources.

  15. Children's Early Numeracy in Finland and Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aunio, Pirjo; Korhonen, Johan; Bashash, Laaya; Khoshbakht, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates similarities and differences in young children's early numeracy skills related to age, nationality and gender. The participants were five- to seven-year-old children from Finland and Iran. Early numeracy was investigated by using tasks measuring number-related relational skills (e.g. comparison, one-to-one…

  16. Students from the Arab World and Iran.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Althen, Gary L., Ed.

    Information on the background and viewpoints of Middle Eastern students who are studying in the United States is presented in revised papers from a 1978 seminar, "The Middle East: The Arab World and Iran." In the first section of the report, "General Background," James Cowan reviews social and cultural factors, as well as…

  17. Obesity and its socioeconomic determinants in Iran.

    PubMed

    Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Fateh, Mansooreh; Hosseinpoor, Ahmad Reza; Alami, Ali; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the socioeconomic inequality of obesity and its determinants in Iran. Data was from Iran's surveillance system for risk factors of non-communicable diseases which was conducted on 89,400 individuals aged 15-64 years in 2005. Principal component analysis was used to create a new variable for defining socioeconomic status of participants. We assessed inequality by calculating a slop index of inequality and concentration index for obesity. Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition analysis was used to determine the determinants of inequality. The slop index of inequality and concentration index for obesity was -13.1 (95% Confidence Intervals [CI]: -16.3 to -9.8) percentage points and -0.123, respectively. The level of inequality varied widely between different provinces in Iran and was more severe in women and urban population. Obesity persisted in 20.2% (95% CI: 19.4-20.9) of the low-socioeconomic group and 11.0% (95% CI: 10.5-11.6) of the high-socioeconomic group. More than 90% of this gap was due to differences of independent variables (mainly age, gender and marital status) in two socioeconomic status groups. A pro-rich inequality existed in the obesity in Iran. Older age, female gender and rural residency contributed most to the economic inequality of obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Iran rebuilding petroleum industry, output capacity

    SciT

    Tippee, B.

    1991-12-02

    This paper reports on Iran which has turned away from stern isolationism this year in order to rebuild a war-ravaged petroleum industry and stimulate its economy. The reconstruction effort includes participation, under terms still not well defined, by non-Iranian companies in upstream oil and gas operations.

  19. National Strategies of Ophthalmic Education in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Entezari, A; Javadi, MA; Einollahi, B

    2012-01-01

    Background: Academic medicine is in a state of dramatic transformation. For this reason strategic thinking is the most essential part of educational planning. The main purpose of the present study was developing the strategic educational planning of Ophthalmology in Iran from 2007 to 2010 Methods: A qualitative investigation using focus group discussion has been implemented successfully for developing educational planning. Six to twelve representatives of key stakeholders in the ophthalmic education of Iran participated to this study. Results: Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of ophthalmology education in Iran were analyzed. Strategic goals in education, research, and health service providing domains were being developed. Educational goals were defined as training of human resources in accordance with the community needs at the level of general practitioner, specialist, and fellowships in ophthalmology. Research goals of the program were defined as scientific inter-departmental and international communications, in order to promote the level of education, research, and treatment in the country. Also, in the field of health services according to the community needs, providing services by the means of advanced and cost effective methods were defined as strategic objectives. Conclusion: Based on this strategic plan in the last three years ophthalmic education in Iran shall be many changes in educational, research and health care provision for social accountability. PMID:23113125

  20. Medical biotechnology trends and achievements in iran.

    PubMed

    Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Hamedifar, Haleh; Aghajani, Hamideh

    2012-10-01

    A healthcare system has been the most important priority for all governments worldwide. Biotechnology products have affected the promotion of health care over the last thirty years. During the last several decades, Iran has achieved significant success in extending healthcare to the rural areas and in reducing the rates of infant mortality and increasing population growth. Biomedical technology as a converging technology is considered a helpful tool to fulfill the Iranian healthcare missions. The number of biotechnology products has reached 148 in 2012. The total sales have increased to 98 billion USD without considering vaccines and plasma derived proteins in 2012. Iran is one of the leading countries in the Middle East and North Africa in the area of Medical biotechnology. The number of biotechnology medicines launched in Iran is 13 products until 2012. More than 15 products are in pipelines now. Manufacturers are expecting to receive the market release for more than 8 products by the end of 2012. Considering this information, Iran will lead the biotechnology products especially in area of biosimilars in Asia after India in next three years. The present review will discuss leading policy, decision makers' role, human resource developing system and industry development in medical biotechnology.

  1. Medical Biotechnology Trends and Achievements in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Hamedifar, Haleh; Aghajani, Hamideh

    2012-01-01

    A healthcare system has been the most important priority for all governments worldwide. Biotechnology products have affected the promotion of health care over the last thirty years. During the last several decades, Iran has achieved significant success in extending healthcare to the rural areas and in reducing the rates of infant mortality and increasing population growth. Biomedical technology as a converging technology is considered a helpful tool to fulfill the Iranian healthcare missions. The number of biotechnology products has reached 148 in 2012. The total sales have increased to 98 billion USD without considering vaccines and plasma derived proteins in 2012. Iran is one of the leading countries in the Middle East and North Africa in the area of Medical biotechnology. The number of biotechnology medicines launched in Iran is 13 products until 2012. More than 15 products are in pipelines now. Manufacturers are expecting to receive the market release for more than 8 products by the end of 2012. Considering this information, Iran will lead the biotechnology products especially in area of biosimilars in Asia after India in next three years. The present review will discuss leading policy, decision makers’ role, human resource developing system and industry development in medical biotechnology. PMID:23407888

  2. Mechanics of forearc basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassola, Teodoro; Willett, Sean D.; Kopp, Heidrun

    2010-05-01

    In this study, the mechanics of forearc basins will be the object of a numerical investigation to understand the relationships between wedge deformation and forearc basin formation. The aim of this work is to gain an insight into the dynamics of the formation of the forearc basin, in particular the mechanism of formation of accommodation space and the preservation of basin stratigraphy. Our tool is a two-dimensional numerical model that includes the rheological properties of the rock, including effective internal friction angle, effective basal friction angle and thermally-dependent viscosity. We also simulate different sedimentation rates in the basin, to study the influence of underfilled and overfilled basin conditions on wedge deformation. The stratigraphy of the basin will also be studied, because in underfilled conditions the sediments are more likely to undergo tectonic deformation due to inner wedge deformation. We compare the numerical model with basins along the Sunda-Java Trench. This margin shows a variety of structural-settings and basin types including underfilled and overfilled basins and different wedge geometries. We interpret and document these structural styles, using depth migrated seismic sections of the Sunda Trench, obtained in three surveys, GINCO (11/98 - 01/99), MERAMEX (16/09/04 - 7/10/04) and SINDBAD (9/10/06 - 9/11/06) and made available through the IFM-GEOMAR and the Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften and Rohstoffe (BGR). One important aspect of these margins that we observe is the presence of a dynamic backstop, characterized by older accreted material, that, although deformed during and after accretion, later becomes a stable part of the upper plate. We argue that, following critical wedge theory, it entered into the stable field of a wedge either by steepening or weakening of the underlying detachment. As a stable wedge, this older segment of the wedge acts as a mechanical backstop for the frontal deforming wedge. This dynamic

  3. Pasteur Institute of Iran- An Evaluation Model

    PubMed Central

    Dejman, Masoumeh; Habibi, Elham; Baradarn Eftekhari, Monir; Falahat, Katayoun; Malekafzali, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pasteur Institute of Iran was established in 1919 with the aim to produce vaccines and prevent communicable diseases in Iran. Over time, their activities extended into areas of research, education and services. Naturally, such a vast development begs establishment of a comprehensive management and monitoring system. With this outlook, the present study was carried out with the aim to design a performance assessment model for Pasteur Institute of Iran that, in addition to determining evaluation indicators, it could prepare the necessary grounds for providing a unified assessment model for the global network of the Pasteur Institutes. Method: This study was designed and performed in 4 stages: first; design of indicators and determining their scores. Second; editing indicators according to the outcome of discussions and debates held with members of Research Council of Pasteur Institute of Iran. Third; implementation of a pilot model based on the Institute’s activities in 2011. Fourth; providing the pilot model feedback to the stakeholders and finalizing the model according to an opinion survey. Results: Based on the results obtained, the developed indicators for Pasteur Institute of Iran evaluation were designed in 10 axes and 18 sub-axes, which included 101 major and 58 minor indicators. The axes included governance and leadership, resources and facilities, capacity building, knowledge production and collaborations, reference services, economic value of products and services, participation in industrial exhibitions, status of the institute, satisfaction and institute’s role in health promotion. Conclusion: The indicators presented in this article have been prepared based on the balance in the Institute’s four missions, to provide the basis for assessment of the Institute’s activities in consecutive years, and possibility of comparison with other institutes worldwide. PMID:24842146

  4. Association of Sub-continental and Asthenosphere related Volcanism in NW Iran,Implication forMantle thermal perturbation induced by slab break off and collision event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangiri, A.

    2017-12-01

    Cenozoic magmatic rocks occur extensively in the north of the Zagros suture zone and constitute a significant component of the continental crust in this segment of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. They range in age from Eocene to quaternary. Miocene to Plio-Quaternary volcanism with post-collisional related significant is covered vast areas in NW Iran. These volcanic rocks can be divided into three different sub-groups on the basis of their mineralogy, geochemistry and magma sources including: 1. alkaline leucite-bearing mafic rocks, which are characterized with high ratios of K2O/Na2O, high content LILE and low HFS elements like Ti, Nb and Ta. They are display fractionated REE patterns and based on different discrimination diagrams show similarity with subduction related magmas. 2- Olivine basalt to trachy-basaltic samples which shows similarity to within plate basalts with high content of TiO2, Nb, Ta and fractionated REE pattern. However, compared with a global average of OIB, they are display slightly higher LIL elements and lower HFS elements concentrations, features that resemble to the arc magmas and suggest that the source of the magmas may have been contaminated by slab-derived fluids. These rocks have simple mineralogical composition with plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine. 3- Dominant dacitic volcanic rocks with adakitic geochemical characteristics such as highly fractionate REE pattern and high Sr/Y ratio. Generation of adakitic magmas can be related to increased temperatures in the subduction zone due to mantle upwelling and slab tearing. Subsequent asthenospheric upwelling could be caused direct melting of sub-continental mantle to produce the alkaline magmas, with high contents of K2O, MgO and volatile rich phase's potassic magmas that led to crystallization of leucite, phlogopite, apatite and olivine in studied samples. Rupture of the continental lithosphere by strike-slip-related transtensional deformation might have caused decompression

  5. Streamflow characteristics of streams in the Helmand Basin, Afghanistan

    Williams-Sether, Tara

    2008-01-01

    A majority of the Afghan population lacks adequate and safe supplies of water because of contamination, lack of water-resources management regulation, and lack of basic infrastructure, compounded by periods of drought and seasonal flooding. Characteristics of historical streamflows are needed to assist with efforts to quantify the water resources of the Helmand Basin. The Helmand Basin is the largest river basin in Afghanistan. It comprises the southern half of the country, draining waters from the Sia Koh Mountains in Herat Province to the eastern mountains in Gardez Province (currently known as the Paktia Province) and the Parwan Mountains northwest of Kabul, and finally draining into the unique Sistan depression between Iran and Afghanistan (Favre and Kamal, 2004). The Helmand Basin is a desert environment with rivers fed by melting snow from the high mountains and infrequent storms. Great fluctuations in streamflow, from flood to drought, can occur annually. Knowledge of the magnitude and time distribution of streamflow is needed to quantify water resources and for water management and environmental planning. Agencies responsible for the development and management of Afghanistan's surface-water resources can use this knowledge for making safe, economical, and environmentally sound water-resource planning decisions. To provide the Afghan managers with necessary streamflow information, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), computed streamflow statistics for data collected at historical gaging stations within the Helmand Basin. The historical gaging stations used are shown in figure 1 and listed in table 1.

  6. SURVEY OF CROSS-BASIN BOAT TRAFFIC, ATCHAFALAYA BASIN, LOUISIANA

    EPA Science Inventory

    For flood control and for the preservation and enhancement of environmental quality of overflow swamp habitats, introduction of sediment from the Atchafalaya Basin Main Channel into backwater areas of the Atchafalaya Basin Floodway should be minimized. This introduction occurs ma...

  7. Spatial Analysis of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Ehsan; Haghdoost, AliAkbar; Khakifirouz, Sahar; Chinikar, Sadegh

    2013-01-01

    Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a viral zoonotic disease. During 1999–2011, 871 human cases of CCHF were diagnosed in Iran. A history of serologic conversion for CCHF virus was seen in 58.7% of 2,447 sheep samples, 25.0% of 1,091 cattle samples and 24.8% of 987 goat samples from different parts of Iran. Spatial analysis showed that the main foci of this disease in humans during these years were in eastern Iran (P < 0.01) and the second most common foci were in northeastern and central Iran. Two livestock foci were detected in the northeastern northwestern Iran. On the basis of the results of this study, infection likely entered Iran from eastern and western neighboring countries. PMID:24166038

  8. 76 FR 55163 - Actions Taken Pursuant to Executive Order 13382 Related to the Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... Order 13382 Related to the Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping Lines (IRISL) AGENCY: Office of Foreign... MOGHADDAMI FARD, Mohammad, United Arab Emirates; DOB 19 Jul 1956; nationality Iran; Passport N10623175 (Iran....a. TAFAZZOLI, Ahmad); DOB 27 May 1956; POB Bojnord, Iran; nationality Iran; Passport R10748186 (Iran...

  9. Delaware River Basin

    Fischer, Jeffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    Assessing the quality of water in every location of the Nation would not be practical. Therefore, NAWQA investigations are conducted within 59 selected areas called study units (fig. 1). These study units encompass important river and aquifer systems in the United States and represent the diverse geographic, waterresource, land-use, and water-use characteristics of the Nation. The Delaware River Basin is one of 15 study units in which work began in 1996. Water-quality sampling in the study unit will begin in 1999. This fact sheet provides a brief overview of the NAWQA program, describes the Delaware River Basin study unit, identifies the major water-quality issues in the basin, and documents the plan of study that will be followed during the study-unit investigation.

  10. Turn Basin Construction

    2017-06-14

    Modifications are underway at the Launch Complex 39 turn basin wharf at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to prepare for the arrival of the agency's massive Space Launch System (SLS) core stage aboard the barge Pegasus. Tammy Kelly, in the center, site manager, with Southeast Cherokee Construction Inc. talks with construction workers. A crane will be used to lift up precast concrete poles and position them to be driven to a depth of about 70 feet into the bedrock below the water around the turn basin. The upgrades are necessary to accommodate the increased weight of the core stage along with ground support and transportation equipment aboard the modified barge Pegasus. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing the upgrades to the turn basin wharf.

  11. Turn Basin Construction

    2017-06-14

    Modifications are underway at the Launch Complex 39 turn basin wharf at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to prepare for the arrival of the agency's massive Space Launch System (SLS) core stage aboard the barge Pegasus. Equipment is staged and a crane will be used to lift up precast concrete poles and position them to be driven to a depth of about 70 feet into the bedrock below the water around the turn basin. The upgrades are necessary to accommodate the increased weight of the core stage along with ground support and transportation equipment aboard the modified barge Pegasus. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing the upgrades to the turn basin wharf.

  12. Turn Basin Construction

    2017-06-14

    Modifications are underway at the Launch Complex 39 turn basin wharf at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to prepare for the arrival of the agency's massive Space Launch System (SLS) core stage aboard the barge Pegasus. In the foreground is Tammy Kelly, site manager, with Southeast Cherokee Construction Inc. A crane will be used to lift up precast concrete poles and position them to be driven to a depth of about 70 feet into the bedrock below the water around the turn basin. The upgrades are necessary to accommodate the increased weight of the core stage along with ground support and transportation equipment aboard the modified barge Pegasus. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is overseeing the upgrades to the turn basin wharf.

  13. Anthropogenic impacts on hydrology of Karkheh River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, B.; Aghakouchak, A.; Alizadeh, A.; Mousavi Baygi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Karkheh River Basin (KRB) in southwest Iran is a key region for agriculture and energy production. KRB has high human-induced water demand and suffers from low water productivity. The future of the KRB and its growth clearly relies on sustainable water resources and hence, requires a holistic, basin-wide management and monitoring of natural resources (water, soil, vegetation, livestock, etc.). The KRB has dry regions in which water scarcity is a major challenge. In this study, we investigate changes in the hydrology of the basin during the past three decades including human-induced alterations of the system. We evaluate climatic variability, agricultural water use, land cover change and agriculture production. In this reaserch, we have developed a simple indicator for quantifying human influence on the hydrologic cycle. The results show that KRB's hydrology is significantly dominated by human activities. The anthropogenic water demand has increased substantially caused by growth in agriculture industry. In fact, the main reason for water scarcity in the region appears to be due to the increased anthropogenic water demand resulting from substantial socio-economic growth in the past three decades. Our results show that continued growth in the region is not sustainable without considering major changes in water use efficiency, land cover management and water productivity.

  14. Design issues concerning Iran`s Bushehr nuclear power plant VVER-1000 conversion

    SciT

    Carson, C.F.

    On January 8, 1995, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) signed a contract for $800 million with the Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (Minatom) to complete Bushehr nuclear power plant (BNPP) unit 1. The agreement called for a Russian VVER-1000/320 pressurized water reactor (PWR) to be successfully installed into the existing German-built BNPP facilities in 5 yr. System design differences, bomb damage, and environmental exposure are key issues with which Minatom must contend in order to fulfill the contract. The AEOI under the Shah of Iran envisioned Bushehr as the first of many nuclear power plants, with Iranmore » achieving 24 GW(electric) by 1993 and 34 GW(electric) by 2000. Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) began construction of the two-unit plant near the Persian Gulf town of Halileh in 1975. Unit 1 was {approx}80% complete and unit 2 was {approx}50% complete when construction was interrupted by the 1979 Iranian Islamic revolution. Despite repeated AEOI attempts to lure KWU and other companies back to Iran to complete the plant, Western concerns about nuclear proliferation in Iran and repeated bombings of the plant during the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war dissuaded Germany from resuming construction.« less

  15. Iran: Politics, Gulf Security, and U.S. Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-30

    to produce the added benefit of improving U.S.-Iran relations. However, since the deal was finalized, Iran, Iran has tested ballistic missiles and...political and social freedoms and reducing Iran’s international isolation, continues to back state intervention in the economy to benefit workers and lower...is able to generate profits from its business affiliates, which enjoy vast tax and regulatory benefits , and can spend significant amounts of

  16. Turn Basin Construction

    2017-06-30

    Across from the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, cement trucks stand by to support a construction project to upgrade the turn basin wharf. The work includes driving multiple precast concrete piles to a depth of about 70 feet to accommodate arrival of the core stage for the agency's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. When the stage for NASA's SLS departs the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, it will be shipped by the agency's modified barge to the Launch Complex 39 turn basin.

  17. Turn Basin Construction

    2017-06-30

    Across from the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, cement is poured as part of a construction project to upgrade the turn basin wharf. The work includes driving multiple precast concrete piles to a depth of about 70 feet to accommodate arrival of the core stage for the agency's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. When the stage for NASA's SLS departs the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, it will be shipped by the agency's modified barge to the Launch Complex 39 turn basin.

  18. BASINS User Information and Guidance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides links to guidance on how to use BASINS, including the User’s Manual, tutorials and training, technical notes, case studies, and publications that highlight the use of BASINS in various watershed analyses.

  19. BASINS Climate Assessment Tool Tutorials

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The BASINS Climate Assessment Tool (CAT) provides a flexible set of capabilities for exploring the potential effects of climate change on streamflow and water quality using different watershed models in BASINS.

  20. Interaction between active tectonics, erosion and diapirism, a case study from Habble-Rud in Southern Central Alborz (Northern Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaberi, Maryam; Ghassemi, Mohammad R.; Shayan, Siavosh; Yamani, Mojtaba; Zamanzadeh, Seyed Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    The Alborz mountain chain is a region of active deformation within the Arabia-Eurasia continental collision zone. The southern part of central Alborz Mountains, in the north of Iran, represents complex tectonics because it is located at the border of two developing continental sedimentary basins between southern central Alborz and Central Iran. An arid and semi-arid climate, a large extent of Quaternary sediments, rugged topography, salt domes and faults with historical seismicity influence the Habble-Rud River catchment. In the present research, a number of tectonic geomorphologic indices were extracted from satellite imagery and 10 m DEM (digital elevation model) data in order to identify relative tectonic activity within the basin. The indices include: stream length-gradient index (Sl), drainage basin asymmetry (Af), index of mountain front sinuosity (Smf), hypsometric integral (Hi), index of drainage basin shape (Bs), ratio of valley-floor width to valley height (Vf), and fault density (Fd). Due to the presence of heterogeneous indices for all sections of the catchment causing large extension of Habble-Rud (3260 km2), all of the variables such as extremely erodible formations, faults and folds and salt tectonics on the Southern part; were put into a matrix table. As a new approach, the variables were put into the SAW (simple additive model) model as one of MADM (multi-attribute decision-making models) techniques. The study area was divided into four regions according to the values of SAW. These classes include very high (%11), high (48.3%), moderate (34.7%), and low activity (3.4%). The result of the model suggests that the study area is located on a changing tectonic trend in central Alborz from NW-SE to NE-SW. The regions with high relative tectonic activity in HR catchment correspond to the active Garmsar and Sorkhe-Kalout faults and diapirs.

  1. Genetic Epidemiology, Hematological and Clinical Features of Hemoglobinopathies in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    There is large variation in the molecular genetics and clinical features of hemoglobinopathies in Iran. Studying structural variants of hemoglobin demonstrated that the β-chain variants of hemoglobin S and D-Punjab are more prevalent in the Fars (southwestern Iran) and Kermanshah (western Iran) provinces, respectively. Also, α-chain variants of Hb Q-Iran and Hb Setif are prevalent in western Iran. The molecular basis and clinical severity of thalassemias are extremely heterogenous among Iranians due to the presence of multiethnic groups in the country. β-Thalassemia is more prevalent in northern and southern Iran. Among 52 different β-thalassemia mutations that have been identified among Iranian populations, IVSII-1 G:A is the most frequent mutation in most parts of the country. The presence of IVS I-5 G:C mutation with high frequency in southeastern Iran might reflect gene flow from neighboring countries. A wide spectrum of α-thalassemia alleles has been detected among Iranians with −α 3.7 kb as the most prevalent α-thalassemia mutation. The prevention program of thalassemia birth in Iran has reduced the birth rate of homozygous β-thalassemia since the implementation of the program in 1997. In this review genetic epidemiology, clinical and hematological aspects of hemoglobinopathies, and the prevention programs of β-thalassemia in Iran will be discussed. PMID:23853772

  2. Reliability and economy -- Hydro electricity for Iran

    SciT

    Jahromi-Shirazi, M.J.; Zarbakhsh, M.H.

    1998-12-31

    Reliability is the probability that a device or system will perform its function adequately, for the period of time intended, under the operating conditions intended. Reliability and economy are two important factors in operating any system, especially in power generation. Due to the high rate in population growth in Iran, the experts have estimated that the demand for electricity will be about 63,000 MW in the next 25 years, the installed power is now about 26,000 MW. Therefore, the energy policy decision made in Iran is to go to power generation by hydroelectric plants because of reliability, availability of watermore » resources and the economics of hydroelectric power.« less

  3. Medical tourism in Iran: Issues and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Alireza; Delgoshaei, Bahram; Mardani, Raja; Tabibi, Seid Jamaledin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Medical tourism is rapidly becoming a worldwide, multibillion-dollar industry. Iran has a high potential for this industry. The purpose of this study was to examine the medical tourism cluster, using Diamond Analysis tool. Materials and Methods: This study is a descriptive, analytical and qualitative one. Thirty professionals and researchers in this field were interviewed and official documents belonging to the Health ministry as well as tourism organization and finally related literature were examined. The data was analyzed using content analysis method. Results: Positive and negative parts of the medical tourism industry of Iran were determined according to diamond of advantage. Conclusion: The strategic issues were identified and a number of possible solutions for addressing them were recommended. More and effective public-private participations, aggressive marketing, improving infrastructures, and international accreditation of health care facilities and human resources development could improve medical tourism industry in the country. PMID:23555142

  4. Perceptions of nursing practice in Iran.

    PubMed

    Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Alireza; Emami, Azita

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to clarify the characteristics of the nursing profession and the problems that exist within this field. Gaining an understanding of nurses' perceptions regarding their profession can improve knowledge on this subject. The aim of this qualitative study was to describe the perceptions of Iranian Registered Nurses (IRNs) concerning issues related to their profession. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews with 26 IRNs and analyzed with latent content analysis. Two different but interrelated themes emerged: (1) nursing perceived from an institutional and socio-cultural perspective, and (2) nursing that alternates between a routine medical-technical approach and a caring approach. The findings have implications for nursing practice and education in Iran, and can facilitate changes that could effectively improve the status of nursing in Iran.

  5. Medical tourism in Iran: Issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Alireza; Delgoshaei, Bahram; Mardani, Raja; Tabibi, Seid Jamaledin

    2012-01-01

    Medical tourism is rapidly becoming a worldwide, multibillion-dollar industry. Iran has a high potential for this industry. The purpose of this study was to examine the medical tourism cluster, using Diamond Analysis tool. This study is a descriptive, analytical and qualitative one. Thirty professionals and researchers in this field were interviewed and official documents belonging to the Health ministry as well as tourism organization and finally related literature were examined. The data was analyzed using content analysis method. Positive and negative parts of the medical tourism industry of Iran were determined according to diamond of advantage. The strategic issues were identified and a number of possible solutions for addressing them were recommended. More and effective public-private participations, aggressive marketing, improving infrastructures, and international accreditation of health care facilities and human resources development could improve medical tourism industry in the country.

  6. JPRS Report, Near East & South Asia, Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-06

    those who Kordestan in Persian 1730 GMT 13 Aug 91 violate their human rights. In addition to being inhumane, the bestial air and land [Unattributed...by air with Tehran. In addition to flying between Mecca. Although the joint Irano-Saudi economic commis- Tehran and Baku, the aircraft in question will...Republic of Iran. All officials must constantly keep this radio program aired on Thursday. "Those who do not speech in their minds and lay the

  7. Makran Mountain Range, Iran and Pakistan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The long folded mountain ridges and valleys of the coastal Makran Ranges of Iran and Pakistan (26.0N, 63.0E) illustrate the classical Trellis type of drainage pattern, common in this region. The Dasht River and its tributaries is the principal drainage network for this area. To the left, the continental drift of the northward bound Indian sub-continent has caused the east/west parallel ranges to bend in a great northward arc.

  8. The Economics of Energy Independence for Iran

    SciT

    Wood, Thomas W.; Milazzo, Matthew D.; Reichmuth, Barbara A.

    2007-03-01

    Iran has pursued an ambitious nuclear program with the declared goal of long-term energy independence. While this is a worthwhile and generally accepted national planning objective, it is clear that the nuclear program as now structured will not achieve it, and in fact may delay it by diverting capital and other resources from projects that would address pressing current energy sector problems and contribute to ultimate energy independence.

  9. JPRS Report, Near East & South Asia, Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-26

    Studied To Improve Trade With Qatar [KAYHAN INTERNATIONAL 7 Aug] .................... 7 Domestically Assembled Cars Exported to Egypt [London KEYHAN...Persian Gulf nations. Ways Being Studied To Improve Trade With Qatar Tourists Spend $300 Million Yearly in Dubayy 91AS1424A Tehran KAYHAN INTERNATIONAL...Iran- Qatar trade relations, products. They spend about $300 million annually in this emirate. The Iranian official reminded Qatar’s ambassador of the

  10. Suicidal Attempt and Psychiatric Disorders in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Rahgozart, Mehdi; Noorbala, Ahmad Ali; Malekafzali, Hossein; Davidian, Haratoun; Naghavi, Hamidreza; Soori, Hamid; Yazdi, Seyed Abbas Bagheri

    2005-01-01

    This study is part of broader research aimed to determine the lifetime prevalence and pattern of comorbidity on self-reported suicidal attempts in the general population of Iran. Overall, 25,180 subjects were interviewed, face-to-face, at home; the lifetime prevalence was 1.4% (0.9% males and 2% females). The majority of attempters were 26-55…

  11. Coping with Iran: Confrontation, Containment, or Engagement?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    David Ignatius (national security columnist , The Washington Post) IRAN’S NATIONAL SECURITY ENVIRONMENT Mohammad Javad Zarif Iran’s national security...senior editor, Newsweek) David Ignatius (national security columnist , The Washington Post) HOW THE U.S. GOVERNMENT VIEWS IRAN R. Nicholas Burns...Iranian Ambassador to the United Nations Questions Michael Hirsh Senior Editor Newsweek David Ignatius National Security Columnist The Washington

  12. Coping with Iran: Confrontation, Containment, or Engagement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    participating via videoconference from the UN in New York) Questions: Michael Hirsh (senior editor, Newsweek) David Ignatius (national security columnist , The...national security columnist , The Washington Post) HOW THE U.S. GOVERNMENT VIEWS IRAN R. Nicholas Burns The foundations of national security policy are...Michael Hirsh Senior Editor Newsweek David Ignatius National Security Columnist The Washington Post 2:15 P.M. -- Panel 3: What to Do

  13. Iran: The Post-Revolutionary Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    posts should have knowledge of Sharia law (Islamic law), and the country’s ruler should Figure 1: Iran’s Government Structure 7 be a faqih, someone...whose knowledge of Islamic law and justice was superior to that of others.2 Iran’s political system is a complex mix of Islamic theocracy and...relations theorist, attempts to understand the causes of international war. To do this, he considers three levels of analysis, what he calls “images

  14. Socioeconomic inequality in hypertension in Iran.

    PubMed

    Fateh, Mansooreh; Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Asgari, Fereshteh; Alami, Ali; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2014-09-01

    Hypertension covers a large portion of burden of diseases, especially in the developing countries. The unequal distribution of hypertension in the population may affect 'health for all' goal. This study aimed to investigate the socioeconomic inequality of hypertension in Iran and to identify its influencing factors. We used data from Iran's surveillance system for risk factors of noncommunicable diseases which was conducted on 89 400 individuals aged 15-64 years in 2005. To determine the socioeconomic status of participants, a new variable was created using a principal component analysis. We examined hypertension at different levels of this new variable and calculated slop index of inequality (SII) and concentration index (C) for hypertension. We then applied Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition analysis to determine the causes of inequality. The SII and C for hypertension were -32.3 and -0.170, respectively. The concentration indices varied widely between different provinces in Iran and was lower (more unequal) in women than in men. There was significant socioeconomic inequality in hypertension. The results of decomposition indicated that 40.5% of the low-socioeconomic group (n = 18190) and 16.4% of the high-socioeconomic group (n = 16335) had hypertension. Age, education level, sex and residency location were the main associated factors of the difference among groups. According to our results, there was an inequality in hypertension in Iran, so that individuals with low socioeconomic status had a higher prevalence of hypertension. Age was the most contributed factor in this inequality and women in low-socioeconomic group were the most vulnerable people for hypertension.

  15. Considering potential seismic sources in earthquake hazard assessment for Northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahzadeh, Gholamreza; Sazjini, Mohammad; Shahaky, Mohsen; Tajrishi, Fatemeh Zahedi; Khanmohammadi, Leila

    2014-07-01

    Located on the Alpine-Himalayan earthquake belt, Iran is one of the seismically active regions of the world. Northern Iran, south of Caspian Basin, a hazardous subduction zone, is a densely populated and developing area of the country. Historical and instrumental documented seismicity indicates the occurrence of severe earthquakes leading to many deaths and large losses in the region. With growth of seismological and tectonic data, updated seismic hazard assessment is a worthwhile issue in emergency management programs and long-term developing plans in urban and rural areas of this region. In the present study, being armed with up-to-date information required for seismic hazard assessment including geological data and active tectonic setting for thorough investigation of the active and potential seismogenic sources, and historical and instrumental events for compiling the earthquake catalogue, probabilistic seismic hazard assessment is carried out for the region using three recent ground motion prediction equations. The logic tree method is utilized to capture epistemic uncertainty of the seismic hazard assessment in delineation of the seismic sources and selection of attenuation relations. The results are compared to a recent practice in code-prescribed seismic hazard of the region and are discussed in detail to explore their variation in each branch of logic tree approach. Also, seismic hazard maps of peak ground acceleration in rock site for 475- and 2,475-year return periods are provided for the region.

  16. Power resources of older people in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Salehi, Shayesteh; Taleghani, Fariba; Abedi, Heidar Ali; Ishaghi, Sayed Reza; Schuurmans, Marieke J; de Jong, Anneke

    2013-03-01

    Maximising the client's power resources facilitates their ability to cope with chronic illness. Nurses must be well informed about power resources and feelings of empowerment among older people. This article reports on a study exploring power resources in daily life from the perspective of older people in Iran. A qualitative content analysis study was conducted. The participants were selected from older community dwellers in Iran using in-depth, semi-structured interviews to understand their experiences with power resources. Power in older people in Iran is represented by four dimensions: spiritual, intellectual, social and physical. Each power dimension can be divided into intrinsic and extrinsic modes. By maximising older people's power in intellectual, social and especially in spiritual resources, the effect of the loss of physical power, with its deteriorative or depressogenic effect on older people's sense of power and well-being can be compensated for. It is recommended that nurses should plan their interventions to enhance older people's power, especially their spiritual power. Different models of empowering older people should be explored in Iranian nursing care delivery. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Epidemiology of hepatitis E virus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Taherkhani, Reza; Farshadpour, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Iran is known as an endemic country for hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, while there are variations in the epidemiology of HEV infection throughout the country. The available epidemiological studies in different regions of Iran show HEV seroprevalence of 1.1%-14.2% among general population, 4.5% -14.3% among blood donors, 6.1%-22.8% among injecting drug users, 6.3%-28.3% among hemodialysis patients, 1.6%-11.3% among patients infected with other hepatitis viruses, 27.5% among patients with chronic liver disease, 30.8% among kidney transplant recipient patients, and 10%-16.4% among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. These variations reflect differences in the status of public health and hygiene, risk factors, and routes of transmission in different regions and groups. Therefore, it is necessary to review the epidemiology of HEV infection to determine the most prevalent risk factors and routes of transmission, and to evaluate the effectiveness of preventive strategies employed in the public health services of the country. Moreover, the other epidemiological aspects of HEV, including the genotypic pattern, extra hepatic manifestations, and incidence of chronic infection need to be investigated among Iranian population to expand the current knowledge on the epidemiology of HEV and to clarify the real burden of HEV infection. Therefore, this review was performed to provide a general overview regarding the epidemiology of HEV in Iran. PMID:27298557

  18. Risky driving behaviors in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Shams, Mohsen; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2009-03-01

    Iran has one of the highest fatality rates due to road traffic crashes (RTC) in the world. The disability adjusted life years (DALYs) for RTC in Iran is more than 1,300,000 years, which is more than that for any other disease such as cardiovascular or cancer. We evaluated risky driving behaviors in Tehran, the capital of Iran. A retrospective analysis was conducted based on the data obtained from the Tehran Police Safety Driving Department. Offenses and crashes were studied in different municipal districts in Tehran from March 2006 to March 2007. The inclusion criteria were risky driving behaviors fined by the police. Nonbehavioral offences were excluded. There were 3,821,798 offenses in Tehran. Not wearing a seat belt was the most common (59%) example of risky driving behavior, followed by tailgating, not wearing motorcycle helmets, talking on the cell phone while driving, overtaking from the wrong side, speeding, not driving between the lanes, weaving in and out of traffic, left deviation, and changing lanes without signals. The most common causes of RTC in Tehran are speeding, overtaking from the wrong side, and the rapid changing of driving lanes. The study factors effective in preventing risky driving behaviors in Tehran is recommended. The consideration of specific characteristics of the municipal districts is necessary to reduce risky driving behaviors.

  19. Spatial outline of malaria transmission in Iran.

    PubMed

    Barati, Mohammad; Keshavarz-valian, Hossein; Habibi-nokhandan, Majid; Raeisi, Ahmad; Faraji, Leyla; Salahi-moghaddam, Abdoreza

    2012-10-01

    To conduct for modeling spatial distribution of malaria transmission in Iran. Records of all malaria cases from the period 2008-2010 in Iran were retrieved for malaria control department, MOH&ME. Metrological data including annual rainfall, maximum and minimum temperature, relative humidity, altitude, demographic, districts border shapefiles, and NDVI images received from Iranian Climatologic Research Center. Data arranged in ArcGIS. 99.65% of malaria transmission cases were focused in southeast part of Iran. These transmissions had statistically correlation with altitude (650 m), maximum (30 °C), minimum (20 °C) and average temperature (25.3 °C). Statistical correlation and overall relationship between NDVI (118.81), relative humidity (⩾45%) and rainfall in southeast area was defined and explained in this study. According to ecological condition and mentioned cut-off points, predictive map was generated using cokriging method. Copyright © 2012 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Future oil and gas: Can Iran deliver?

    SciT

    Takin, M.

    1996-11-01

    Iran`s oil and gas production and exports constitute the country`s main source of foreign exchange earnings. The future level of these earnings will depend on oil prices, global demand for Iranian exports, the country`s productive capability and domestic consumption. The size of Iranian oil reserves suggests that, in principle, present productive capacity could be maintained and expanded. However, the greatest share of production in coming years still will come from fields that already have produced for several decades. In spite of significant remaining reserves, these fields are not nearly as prolific as they were in their early years. The operationsmore » required for further development are now more complicated and, in particular, more costly. These fields` size also implies that improving production, and instituting secondary and tertiary recovery methods (such as gas injection), will require mega-scale operations. This article discusses future oil and gas export revenues from the Islamic Republic of Iran, emphasizing the country`s future production and commenting on the effects of proposed US sanctions.« less

  1. Regulated compensated donation in Pakistan and Iran.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Adibul Hasan S; Naqvi, Anwar S A; Zafar, Naqi M; Ahmed, Ejaz

    2009-04-01

    Paid living unrelated kidney donor transplantation has flourished in Pakistan and Iran. This review discusses the dynamics and consequences of organ trade in Pakistan and of a regulated paid donor model in Iran on transplant activities in these countries. In 2007, over 2500 renal transplants were performed in Pakistan, where more than 70% were from socioeconomic disadvantaged kidney vendors. More than half of recipients were foreigners who paid US$20,000-30,000. Recipients of vendor kidneys had poor outcome and high infectious complications. Regulated paid donor kidney transplant in Iran number around 1500 per year and constitute 70% of the total transplants. Graft survival rates are similar to those for living related donors. The donors are paid US$1200 and additional monies are negotiated between the recipient-donor pair. This model claims to have abolished waiting lists, although many poor patients wait for deceased donors. In both countries, recipients are relatively rich and vendors are the poor of the society who sell kidneys for quick money or to repay debts. Paid donation, regulated or commercial, leads to coercion and exploitation of the poor and benefits the rich. This situation has forestalled deceased donor program and hence other solid-organ transplants. The way forward is to promote deceased donors by making transplant available to all who need it.

  2. Leukemia in Iran: Epidemiology and Morphology Trends.

    PubMed

    Koohi, Fatemeh; Salehiniya, Hamid; Shamlou, Reza; Eslami, Soheyla; Ghojogh, Ziyaeddin Mahery; Kor, Yones; Rafiemanesh, Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia accounts for 8% of total cancer cases and involves all age groups with different prevalence and incidence rates in Iran and the entire world and causes a significant death toll and heavy expenses for diagnosis and treatment processes. This study was done to evaluate epidemiology and morphology of blood cancer during 2003-2008. This cross- sectional study was carried out based on re- analysis of the Cancer Registry Center report of the Health Deputy in Iran during a 6-year period (2003 - 2008). Statistical analysis for incidence time trends and morphology change percentage was performed with joinpoint regression analysis using the software Joinpoint Regression Program. During the studied years a total of 18,353 hematopoietic and reticuloendothelial system cancers were recorded. Chi square test showed significant difference between sex and morphological types of blood cancer (P-value<0.001). Joinpoint analysis showed a significant increasing trend for the adjusted standard incidence rate (ASIR) for both sexes (P-value<0.05). Annual percent changes (APC) for women and men were 18.7 and 19.9, respectively. The most common morphological blood cancers were ALL, ALM, MM and CLL which accounted for 60% of total hematopoietic system cancers. Joinpoint analyze showed a significant decreasing trend for ALM in both sexes (P-value<0.05). Hematopoietic system cancers in Iran demonstrate an increasing trend for incidence rate and decreasing trend for ALL, ALM and CLL morphology.

  3. Gender and spatial population mobility in Iran.

    PubMed

    Hemmasi, M

    1994-01-01

    1976-1986 data from the National Census of Population and Housing were analyzed to examine the spatial patterns of internal migration of women and men in Iran within its Islamic patriarchal cultural system. The researcher also organized 1986 data into two interprovincial migration matrixes for men and women. Women were spatially as mobile as men (urban, 16.7% for men and 17% for women; rural, 8.4% and 8.9%, respectively). Gender spatial mobility patterns during the 10 years included: migration streams from nine provinces consistently led to Tehran province, most migration flows to Tehran and most other provinces originated from Khuzistan, East Azerbaijan province still continued to lose population (about 500,000), and out-flows generally originated from the provinces affected by the Iran-Iraq war and went to the central and eastern provinces. The strongest determinants of women's migration was men's migration ratio and the road distance between the origin and destination. Reasons for these strong associations were few employed women ( 10%), strong family ties, and traditional cultural values (e.g., women tend not to travel alone). So their migration patterns tended to be associational rather than autonomous. Despite the fact that internal migration patterns of men and women were the same, the causes, processes, and consequences of migration were still very gender-specific in Iran. There are no signs of change in the near future.

  4. Factors Associated With Suicidal Attempts in Iran: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hakim Shooshtari, Mitra; Malakouti, Seyyed Kazem; Panaghi, Leili; Mohseni, Shohreh; Mansouri, Naghmeh; Rahimi Movaghar, Afarin

    2016-01-01

    Context: Suicide prevention is a health service priority. Some surveys have assessed suicidal behaviors and potential risk factors. Objectives: The current paper aimed to gather information about etiology of suicide attempts in Iran. Data Sources: Pubmed, ISI web of science, PsychInfo, IranPsych, IranMedex, IranDoc as well as gray literature were searched. Study Selection: By electronic and gray literature search, 128 articles were enrolled in this paper. Pubmed, ISI web of science, PsychInfo, IranPsych, IranMedex, IranDoc were searched for electronic search. After reading the abstracts, 84 studies were excluded and full texts of 44 articles were reviewed critically. Data Extraction: Pubmed, ISI web of science, PsychInfo, IranPsych, IranMedex, IranDoc as well as gray literature were searched to find any study about etiologic factors of suicide attempt in Iran. Results: Depressive disorder was the most common diagnosis in suicide attempters that is 45% of the evaluated cases had depression. One study that had used Minnesota multiphasic personality inventory (MMPI) found that Histrionics in females and Schizophrenia and Paranoia in males were significantly influential. Family conflicts with 50.7% and conflict with parents with 44% were two effective psychosocial factors in suicidal attempts. In around one fourth (28.7%) of the cases, conflict with spouse was the main etiologic factor. Conclusions: According to the methodological limitations, outcomes should be generalized cautiously. Further studies will help to plan preventive strategies for suicidal attempts; therefore, continued researches should be conducted to fill the data gaps. PMID:27284284

  5. Iran diabetes research roadmap (IDRR) study: a preliminary study on diabetes research in the world and Iran.

    PubMed

    Nasli-Esfahani, Ensieh; Farzadfar, Farshad; Kouhnavard, Marjan; Ghodssi-Ghassemabadi, Robabeh; Khajavi, Alireza; Peimani, Maryam; Razmandeh, Rezvan; Vala, Mahboobeh; Shafiee, Gita; Rambod, Camelia; Sanjari, Mahnaz; Aalaa, Maryam; Ghodsi, Maryam; Razi, Farideh; Bandarian, Fatemeh; Larijani, Bagher

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the most common metabolic disorders worldwide. This study aim was to provide detail analysis of diabetes research output and its trend in Iran as well as in the world and compare them. Data was retrieved from PubMed database using a suitable search strategy and application of proper operator "AND", "OR" and "NOT". All English documents published from 2008 to 2012 were included. Meeting abstract, letter to the editor, guidelines, consensus and reviews were excluded. Obtained documents for Iran and world were categorized in eleven groups including diabetes management, education, paediatrics, nutrition, epidemiology, diabetes complications, stem cells, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), psychiatrics, genetics and prevention and were compared. Total number of DM publications was 59513 for world and 648 for Iran. Trend of DM publications was increasing during the 5 years with a growth rate of 22.5% for world and 23.4% for Iran. Contribution of Iran in the world diabetes output reached 1.08 in 2012. The most and the least number of DM documents were related to complications and preventions, respectively both in Iran and the world. Three leading countries with highest proportion of RCTs (randomized clinical trial) to their total DM publications were Italy, Germany and Iran. The most number of diabetes research was in the field of diabetes complication, management and genetics in the world as well as in Iran. During the 5-year period, despite of the world sanctions against Iran, diabetes research trend was increasing in Iran relatively parallel to the world research and sanction had no significant effect on Iran.

  6. Iran's Implicit Philosophy of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagheri Noaparast, Khosrow

    2018-01-01

    This paper aims to extract Iran's philosophy of education from two sources of the constitution and the course of practice in educational institutions. Regarding the first source, it is argued that parallel to the two main threads of the constitution, Iran's main elements of philosophy of education are expected to be derived from; (1) Islam and (2)…

  7. The United States and Iran: Potential Friends or Contining Enemies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-21

    26 Iranian Political and Social Stance...Iran. This support to Iraqi consisted primarily of military equipment sales and intelligence updates on Iranian troop movements. A major issue of the...aid. In exchange for this facilitation in the sale of spare parts, Iran facilitated the freeing of American hostages held in Lebanon by Iranian backed

  8. 48 CFR 25.703-2 - Iran Sanctions Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... integrity (see the Past Performance Information Retrieval System (including the Federal Awardee Performance.... (ii) Knowingly selling, leasing or providing to Iran goods, services, technology, information, or...) Knowingly selling, leasing, or providing to Iran goods, services, technology, information, or support with a...

  9. 48 CFR 25.703-2 - Iran Sanctions Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... integrity (see the Past Performance Information Retrieval System (including the Federal Awardee Performance.... (ii) Knowingly selling, leasing or providing to Iran goods, services, technology, information, or...) Knowingly selling, leasing, or providing to Iran goods, services, technology, information, or support with a...

  10. Iran's Denial of Education to Baha'is

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the background of the persecution of the Baha'is in Iran, especially the denial of education, and explores what could be done to alleviate this injustice, including enlisting the support of nations, organizations, media and people around the world. Baha'is are the largest religious minority in Iran and have been…

  11. The Idea of English in Iran: An Example from Urmia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeghi, Karim; Richards, Jack C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the place of English in Iran. To do this, we look at the social presence of English in Urmia (the capital of West Azerbaijan province, Iran). The paper draws on instances of the use of English in different contexts in Urmia, including its use in academia, business, state and private education, media, and people's ordinary…

  12. An integrated taxonomic approach to survey Armillaria in Iran

    Saeideh Jafarpour; Khalil-Berdi Fotouhifar; Mohammad Javan-Nikhhah; Mohhamad Reza Asef; Anthony S. Davis; Amy L. Ross-Davis; John W. Hanna; Simona Margaritescu; Jean-Marc Moncalvo; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2016-01-01

    Iran's most valuable forests are located on the coast of the Caspian Sea and cover 1.85 million ha in the northern region of the Alborz mountain range, which is the highest mountain range in the Middle East. Dense forests cover two major provinces, Gilan and Mazandaran; however, less than 10% of Iran is forested. These forests comprise temperate,...

  13. Iran’s Economic Conditions: U.S. Policy Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-15

    is a major world provider source of caviar and pistachio nuts, a significant non-oil export for Iran. The country’s climate and terrain also support...prepared meat and fish, and edible nuts and foods ( pistachios ). There is evidence that Iran is able to obtain embargoed U.S. goods through the re

  14. Organizational Commitment among High School Teachers of India and Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joolideh, Faranak; Yeshodhara, K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the organizational commitment of teachers in India and Iran. It is an attempt to understand how these perceptions vary by demographic variables such as age and subject taught by teachers. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 721 high school teachers in Bangalore (India) and Sanandaj (Iran).…

  15. Canada Basin revealed

    Mosher, David C.; Shimeld, John; Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Chian, D; Lebedeva-Ivanova, Nina; Jackson, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    More than 15,000 line-km of new regional seismic reflection and refraction data in the western Arctic Ocean provide insights into the tectonic and sedimentologic history of Canada Basin, permitting development of new geologic understanding in one of Earth's last frontiers. These new data support a rotational opening model for southern Canada Basin. There is a central basement ridge possibly representing an extinct spreading center with oceanic crustal velocities and blocky basement morphology characteristic of spreading centre crust surrounding this ridge. Basement elevation is lower in the south, mostly due to sediment loading subsidence. The sedimentary succession is thickest in the southern Beaufort Sea region, reaching more than 15 km, and generally thins to the north and west. In the north, grabens and half-grabens are indicative of extension. Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge is a large igneous province in northern Amerasia Basin, presumably emplaced synchronously with basin formation. It overprints most of northern Canada Basin structure. The seafloor and sedimentary succession of Canada Basin is remarkably flat-lying in its central region, with little bathymetric change over most of its extent. Reflections that correlate over 100s of kms comprise most of the succession and on-lap bathymetric and basement highs. They are interpreted as representing deposits from unconfined turbidity current flows. Sediment distribution patterns reflect changing source directions during the basin’s history. Initially, probably late Cretaceous to Paleocene synrift sediments sourced from the Alaska and Mackenzie-Beaufort margins. This unit shows a progressive series of onlap unconformities with a younging trend towards Alpha and Northwind ridges, likely a response to contemporaneous subsidence. Sediment source direction appeared to shift to the Canadian Arctic Archipelago margin for the Eocene and Oligocene, likely due to uplift of Arctic islands during the Eurekan Orogeny. The final

  16. Assessing Climate Change Impacts on Water Allocation in Karkheh River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davtalabsabet, R.; Madani, K.; Massah, A.; Farajzadeh, M.

    2013-12-01

    Rahman Davtalab1, 2, Kaveh Madani2, Alireza Massah3, Manouchehr Farajzadeh1 1Department of Geography, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran 2Department of Civil, Environmental and Construction Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, USA 3Department of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, College of Abureyhan , University of Tehran, Iran Abstract Karkheh river basin, with an area of 50,000 km2 is located, in southwest Iran. This basin supplies water for major agricultural activities and large hydropower production in five Iranian provinces with the total population of four million people. Due to development and population growth, this large trans-boundary basin is incapable of meeting the water demands of the five riparian provinces, causing water allocation conflicts in the region. The situation has been exacerbated by the frequent droughts and is expected to worsen further by climate change. This study evaluates the impacts of climate change on water supply reliability and allocation in this basin. First, outputs of several General Circulation Models (GCMs) under different emission scenarios for different future time horizons are statistically downscaled. Then multiple river flow time series (RFTS) are generated by feeding GCM outputs into a HEC-HMS model, using the Soil Moisture Accounting (SMA). Given a wide range of variations in GCM outputs and the resulting RFTS, the Ward's method is used to identity different RFTS clusters. Clustering helps with increasing the ability of the modeler to test a range of possible future conditions while reducing the redundancies in input data. Karkheh river basin's ability to meet the growing demand under decreasing flows is evaluated for each RFTS cluster representative. Results indicate that Karkheh river flow might decrease by 50% toward the end of the century. This would decrease the reliability of agricultural water deliveries from 78-95% to less than 50%. While currently hydropower dams can only

  17. Iran`s petroleum policy: Current trends and the future outlook

    SciT

    Pezeshki, S.; Fesharaki, F.

    1994-12-01

    The Iranian economy and political situation have undergone radical changes since the 1979 Islamic revolution. The excesses of the early years of the revolution have gradually given way to moderation and a more pragmatic economic policy--based on the principles of the free market. The petroleum policy, as a subset of the economic policies, has been somewhat affected by the political and economic developments in Iran. The petroleum policy has changed from a position of no foreign participation to a position that includes a desire for foreign participation, the text of a model contract, and an attempt to introduce new technologiesmore » in the upstream sector. This report provides an overview of the key issues facing the Iranian oil industry and the economic context in which the oil industry is operating in Iran. It describes the evolution of policies meant to move the oil industry toward the free market; it discusses Iran`s oil trading partners, the outlook for refining and project investments, and current and likely future developments in the natural gas and petrochemical sectors. In short, the report provides an up-to-date assessment of the Iranian petroleum sector and its likely evolution in the future.« less

  18. Deformation Mechanisms of Darreh Sary Metapelites, Sanandaj‒Sirjan Zone, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, O.; Tabatabaei Manesh, S. M.; Nadimi, A. R.

    2018-03-01

    The Darreh Sary metapelitic rocks are located in the northeast of Zagros orogenic belt and Sanandaj-Sirjan structural zone. The lithological composition of these rocks includes slate, phyllite, muscovitebiotite schist, garnet schist, staurolite-garnet schist and staurolite schist. The shale is the protolith of these metamorphic rocks, which was originated from the continental island arc tectonic setting and has been subjected to processes of Zagros orogeny. The deformation mechanisms in these rocks include bulging recrystallization (BLG), subgrain rotation recrystallization (SGR) and grain boundary migration recrystallization (GBM), which are considered as the key to estimate the deformation temperature of the rocks. The estimated ranges of deformation temperature and depth in these rocks show the temperatures of 275-375, 375-500, and >500°C and the depths of 10 to 17 km. The observed structures in these rocks such as faults, fractures and folds, often with the NW-SE direction coordinate with the structural trends of Zagros orogenic belt structures. The S-C mylonite fabrics is observed in these rocks with other microstructures such as mica fish, σ fabric and garnet deformation indicate the dextral shear deformation movements of study area. Based on the obtained results of this research, the stages of tectonic evolution of Darreh Sary area were developed.

  19. 31 CFR 560.551 - Student loan payments from persons in Iran authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Iran authorized. 560.551 Section 560.551 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... payments from persons in Iran authorized. United States depository institutions and private loan companies... payments from persons in Iran or ordinarily resident in Iran. ...

  20. 31 CFR 535.334 - Act of the Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Act of the Government of Iran. 535.334... Definitions § 535.334 Act of the Government of Iran. For purposes of § 535.216, an act of the Government of Iran, includes any acts ordered, authorized, allowed, approved, or ratified by the Government of Iran...

  1. 28 CFR 601.1 - Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Iran/Contra. 601.1 Section 601.1 Judicial Administration OFFICES OF INDEPENDENT COUNSEL, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE JURISDICTION OF THE INDEPENDENT COUNSEL: IRAN/CONTRA § 601.1 Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra. (a) The Independent Counsel. Iran/Contra has jurisdiction to investigate to the...

  2. 28 CFR 601.1 - Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Iran/Contra. 601.1 Section 601.1 Judicial Administration OFFICES OF INDEPENDENT COUNSEL, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE JURISDICTION OF THE INDEPENDENT COUNSEL: IRAN/CONTRA § 601.1 Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra. (a) The Independent Counsel. Iran/Contra has jurisdiction to investigate to the...

  3. 28 CFR 601.1 - Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Iran/Contra. 601.1 Section 601.1 Judicial Administration OFFICES OF INDEPENDENT COUNSEL, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE JURISDICTION OF THE INDEPENDENT COUNSEL: IRAN/CONTRA § 601.1 Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra. (a) The Independent Counsel. Iran/Contra has jurisdiction to investigate to the...

  4. 31 CFR 535.334 - Act of the Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Act of the Government of Iran. 535.334... Definitions § 535.334 Act of the Government of Iran. For purposes of § 535.216, an act of the Government of Iran, includes any acts ordered, authorized, allowed, approved, or ratified by the Government of Iran...

  5. 31 CFR 560.551 - Student loan payments from persons in Iran authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Iran authorized. 560.551 Section 560.551 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... payments from persons in Iran authorized. United States depository institutions and private loan companies... payments from persons in Iran or ordinarily resident in Iran. ...

  6. 31 CFR 535.334 - Act of the Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Act of the Government of Iran. 535.334... Definitions § 535.334 Act of the Government of Iran. For purposes of § 535.216, an act of the Government of Iran, includes any acts ordered, authorized, allowed, approved, or ratified by the Government of Iran...

  7. 28 CFR 601.1 - Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Iran/Contra. 601.1 Section 601.1 Judicial Administration OFFICES OF INDEPENDENT COUNSEL, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE JURISDICTION OF THE INDEPENDENT COUNSEL: IRAN/CONTRA § 601.1 Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra. (a) The Independent Counsel. Iran/Contra has jurisdiction to investigate to the...

  8. 31 CFR 535.334 - Act of the Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Act of the Government of Iran. 535... Definitions § 535.334 Act of the Government of Iran. For purposes of § 535.216, an act of the Government of Iran, includes any acts ordered, authorized, allowed, approved, or ratified by the Government of Iran...

  9. 31 CFR 535.334 - Act of the Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Act of the Government of Iran. 535.334... Definitions § 535.334 Act of the Government of Iran. For purposes of § 535.216, an act of the Government of Iran, includes any acts ordered, authorized, allowed, approved, or ratified by the Government of Iran...

  10. 28 CFR 601.1 - Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Iran/Contra. 601.1 Section 601.1 Judicial Administration OFFICES OF INDEPENDENT COUNSEL, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE JURISDICTION OF THE INDEPENDENT COUNSEL: IRAN/CONTRA § 601.1 Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra. (a) The Independent Counsel. Iran/Contra has jurisdiction to investigate to the...

  11. All About That Basin

    2015-02-25

    This mosaic of Caloris basin is an enhanced-color composite overlain on a monochrome mosaic featured in a previous post. The color mosaic is made up of WAC images obtained when both the spacecraft and the Sun were overhead, conditions best for discerning variations in albedo, or brightness. The monochrome mosaic is made up of WAC and NAC images obtained at off-vertical Sun angles (i.e., high incidence angles) and with visible shadows so as to reveal clearly the topographic form of geologic features. The combination of the two datasets allows the correlation of geologic features with their color properties. In portions of the scene, color differences from image to image are apparent. Ongoing calibration efforts by the MESSENGER team strive to minimize these differences. Caloris basin has been flooded by lavas that appear orange in this mosaic. Post-flooding craters have excavated material from beneath the surface. The larger of these craters have exposed low-reflectance material (blue in this mosaic) from beneath the surface lavas, likely giving a glimpse of the original basin floor material. Analysis of these craters yields an estimate of the thickness of the volcanic layer: 2.5-3.5 km (1.6-2.2 mi.). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19216

  12. Great Basin Paleontological Bibliography

    Blodgett, Robert B.; Zhang, Ning; Hofstra, Albert H.; Morrow, Jared R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction This work was conceived as a derivative product for 'The Metallogeny of the Great Basin' project of the Mineral Resources Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. In the course of preparing a fossil database for the Great Basin that could be accessed from the Internet, it was determined that a comprehensive paleontological bibliography must first be compiled, something that had not previously been done. This bibliography includes published papers and abstracts as well as unpublished theses and dissertations on fossils and stratigraphy in Nevada and adjoining portions of California and Utah. This bibliography is broken into first-order headings by geologic age, secondary headings by taxonomic group, followed by ancillary topics of interest to both paleontologists and stratigraphers; paleoecology, stratigraphy, sedimentary petrology, paleogeography, tectonics, and petroleum potential. References were derived from usage of Georef, consultation with numerous paleontologists and geologists working in the Great Basin, and literature currently on hand with the authors. As this is a Web-accessible bibliography, we hope to periodically update it with new citations or older references that we have missed during this compilation. Hence, the authors would be grateful to receive notice of any new or old papers that the readers think should be added. As a final note, we gratefully acknowledge the helpful reviews provided by A. Elizabeth J. Crafford (Anchorage, Alaska) and William R. Page (USGS, Denver, Colorado).

  13. Integrated Hydrographical Basin Management. Study Case - Crasna River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visescu, Mircea; Beilicci, Erika; Beilicci, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Hydrographical basins are important from hydrological, economic and ecological points of view. They receive and channel the runoff from rainfall and snowmelt which, when adequate managed, can provide fresh water necessary for water supply, irrigation, food industry, animal husbandry, hydrotechnical arrangements and recreation. Hydrographical basin planning and management follows the efficient use of available water resources in order to satisfy environmental, economic and social necessities and constraints. This can be facilitated by a decision support system that links hydrological, meteorological, engineering, water quality, agriculture, environmental, and other information in an integrated framework. In the last few decades different modelling tools for resolving problems regarding water quantity and quality were developed, respectively water resources management. Watershed models have been developed to the understanding of water cycle and pollution dynamics, and used to evaluate the impacts of hydrotechnical arrangements and land use management options on water quantity, quality, mitigation measures and possible global changes. Models have been used for planning monitoring network and to develop plans for intervention in case of hydrological disasters: floods, flash floods, drought and pollution. MIKE HYDRO Basin is a multi-purpose, map-centric decision support tool for integrated hydrographical basin analysis, planning and management. MIKE HYDRO Basin is designed for analyzing water sharing issues at international, national and local hydrographical basin level. MIKE HYDRO Basin uses a simplified mathematical representation of the hydrographical basin including the configuration of river and reservoir systems, catchment hydrology and existing and potential water user schemes with their various demands including a rigorous irrigation scheme module. This paper analyzes the importance and principles of integrated hydrographical basin management and develop a case

  14. Caribbean basin framework, 3: Southern Central America and Colombian basin

    SciT

    Kolarsky, R.A.; Mann, P.

    1991-03-01

    The authors recognize three basin-forming periods in southern Central America (Panama, Costa Rica, southern Nicaragua) that they attempt to correlate with events in the Colombian basin (Bowland, 1984): (1) Early-Late Cretaceous island arc formation and growth of the Central American island arc and Late Cretaceous formation of the Colombian basin oceanic plateau. During latest Cretaceous time, pelagic carbonate sediments blanketed the Central American island arc in Panama and Costa Rica and elevated blocks on the Colombian basin oceanic plateau; (2) middle Eocene-middle Miocene island arc uplift and erosion. During this interval, influx of distal terrigenous turbidites in most areas ofmore » Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks the uplift and erosion of the Central American island arc. In the Colombian basin, turbidites fill in basement relief and accumulate to thicknesses up to 2 km in the deepest part of the basin. In Costa Rica, sedimentation was concentrated in fore-arc (Terraba) and back-arc (El Limon) basins; (3) late Miocene-Recent accelerated uplift and erosion of segments of the Central American arc. Influx of proximal terrigenous turbidites and alluvial fans in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks collision of the Panama arc with the South American continent (late Miocene early Pliocene) and collision of the Cocos Ridge with the Costa Rican arc (late Pleistocene). The Cocos Ridge collision inverted the Terraba and El Limon basins. The Panama arc collision produced northeast-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults and fault-related basins throughout Panama as Panama moved northwest over the Colombian basin.« less

  15. Primary health care and immunisation in Iran.

    PubMed

    Nasseri, K; Sadrizadeh, B; Malek-Afzali, H; Mohammad, K; Chamsa, M; Cheraghchi-Bashi, M T; Haghgoo, M; Azmoodeh, M

    1991-05-01

    The Primary Health Care (PHC) network of Iran consists of a rural and an urban branch. While the rural branch presently covers a sizeable portion of the rural population, the urban PHC project is in its early stages of implementation. The Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI) in Iran, which started as an independent and vertical project in early 1983, is being gradually integrated into the PHC network as the latter expands. Results of the second PHC programme review of Iran shows that immunisation coverage of children has improved appreciably since the first PHC review, especially for BCG which stands at 56.3%. Complete immunisation at first birthday in the rural areas with the PHC services is 44.1%, whereas for urban areas other than Teheran it is 28.1%. While the high coverage in the rural areas is attributed to the 'active' approach and vigilance of the providers of immunisation (i.e. the community health workers and the vaccinators of the mobile teams), the higher coverage in the capital city of Teheran is attributed to the involvement of private paediatricians and the generally higher social, economic, and educational status as well as higher interest of mothers. It is noticed that the results of cluster sampling for determination of immunisation coverage in large metropolitan areas of the developing world must be interpreted with much care. The reason is that in these areas extreme fluctuations in the crude birth rate are common and therefore results tend to over-represent the attributes of the segment of population with lower birth rate. It is also argued that complete immunisation might not be the best indicator for assessing the progress of the immunisation efforts. These and other findings are discussed in detail. are discussed in detail.

  16. Profiteering on the Iran-Iraq war

    SciT

    Brzoska, M.

    1987-06-01

    The military gear delivered from the US in the Iran-contra affair represents only a minor portion of arms sales to the combatants in the Iraq-Iran war. That war has now lasted more than six years and has deeply influenced the international arms market. Occurring during a period when other demand for arms has been relatively low, the war has nourished new suppliers and has revived both the legal and illegal private arms market. The erratic behavior of the USSR and the US, until recently by far the most important arms suppliers to the Third World, has pushed Iran and Iraqmore » toward more commercially oriented sources, including many in the Third World. Both countries have had ample supplies of weapons during the war, and these weapons have served their purpose. Mainly because of its duration, the war already ranks third among post-World War II wars - after the Vietnam war and the Biafra war - in battlefield victims, with 300,000-500,000 casualties. The economic cost has risen to nearly $500 billion in weapons, destruction, and lost income. While it is hard to see anything but losers on the battlefield, the arms traffickers are profiting. Total Iranian arms imports since August 1980 have been higher than $10 billion, while Iraq has imported more than $30 billion worth. It is difficult to know whether making arms more difficult to obtain would have stopped the war, but judging from other recent wars, such as those between India and Pakistan, between Uganda and Tanzania, and in the Middle East, it seems likely that hostilities could have been stopped long ago. 12 references.« less

  17. Clausewitz and the Iran-Iraq War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-06

    consider if called upon to fight in the Middle East. 4 I UNCLASSIFIED SECU~iqY CLASSIICATION OF THIS PA@I EI (MO DOe& Ifn’t,) $wC i iiLiTA Y STUDIES POG...publet" ei vaul it b" bern clear" by the apoprlate ultary esews of gemit .mq4fT. Copy avallable to DTC does not pomt fuy legble re pduelku I : C...Iran had recovered ana raisea its proauction levels by 192. 16 But overproduction by UPEC , alternative sources, ana western mistrust ot total reliance

  18. Plague in Iran: its history and current status.

    PubMed

    Hashemi Shahraki, Abdolrazagh; Carniel, Elizabeth; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Plague remains a public health concern worldwide, particularly in old foci. Multiple epidemics of this disease have been recorded throughout the history of Iran. Despite the long-standing history of human plague in Iran, it remains difficult to obtain an accurate overview of the history and current status of plague in Iran. In this review, available data and reports on cases and outbreaks of human plague in the past and present in Iran and in neighboring countries were collected, and information was compiled regarding when, where, and how many cases occurred. This paper considers the history of plague in Persia (the predecessor of today's Iran) and has a brief review of plague in countries in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region, including a range of countries in the Middle East and North Africa. Since Iran has experienced outbreaks of plague for several centuries, neighboring countries have reported the disease in recent years, the disease can be silent for decades, and the circulation of Yersinia pestis has been reported among rodents and dogs in western Iran, more attention should be paid to disease monitoring in areas with previously reported human cases and in high-risk regions with previous epizootic and enzootic activity.

  19. Plague in Iran: its history and current status

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Plague remains a public health concern worldwide, particularly in old foci. Multiple epidemics of this disease have been recorded throughout the history of Iran. Despite the long-standing history of human plague in Iran, it remains difficult to obtain an accurate overview of the history and current status of plague in Iran. METHODS: In this review, available data and reports on cases and outbreaks of human plague in the past and present in Iran and in neighboring countries were collected, and information was compiled regarding when, where, and how many cases occurred. RESULTS: This paper considers the history of plague in Persia (the predecessor of today’s Iran) and has a brief review of plague in countries in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region, including a range of countries in the Middle East and North Africa. CONCLUSIONS: Since Iran has experienced outbreaks of plague for several centuries, neighboring countries have reported the disease in recent years, the disease can be silent for decades, and the circulation of Yersinia pestis has been reported among rodents and dogs in western Iran, more attention should be paid to disease monitoring in areas with previously reported human cases and in high-risk regions with previous epizootic and enzootic activity. PMID:27457063

  20. Income elasticity of health expenditures in Iran.

    PubMed

    Zare, Hossein; Trujillo, Antonio J; Leidman, Eva; Buttorff, Christine

    2013-09-01

    Because of its policy implications, the income elasticity of health care expenditures is a subject of much debate. Governments may have an interest in subsidizing the care of those with low income. Using more than two decades of data from the Iran Household Expenditure and Income Survey, this article investigates the relationship between income and health care expenditure in urban and rural areas in Iran, a resource rich, upper-middle-income country. We implemented spline and quantile regression techniques to obtain a more robust description of the relationship of interest. This study finds non-uniform effects of income on health expenditures. Although the results show that health care is a necessity for all income brackets, spline regression estimates indicate that the income elasticity is lowest for the poorest Iranians in urban and rural areas. This suggests that they will show low flexibility in medical expenses as income fluctuates. Further, a quantile regression model assessing the effect of income at different level of medical expenditure suggests that households with lower medical expenses are less elastic.

  1. Aflatoxins in Iran: Nature, Hazards and Carcinogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Khoshpey, B; Farhud, DD; Zaini, F

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have shown that mycotoxin contamination of agricultural products is a challenge for individual’s health especially in developing countries. Improper production and storage of foods, prepare conditions for aflatoxin production in crops, especially rice, wheat, pistachio, walnut, almond, etc which are the main sources of foods for people. Feeding livestock by contaminated bread is another way of human exposure to mycotoxins, especially aflatoxin and because of expensive methods for detecting and analyzing aflatoxin in laboratory; it is not measured in foods. This manuscript is a review of some Iranian and nonIranian reports about aflatoxin, its exposure ways, its adverse effect on human health and nutrition, as well as methods for reducing its exposure. Based on studies on foods, aflatoxin exposure is high in Iran. Since livestock feeding by contaminated bread is one of the potential ways for milk contamination, we should control and reduce aflatoxin contamination by improving production process, storage condition and livestock feeding as soon as possible. Pistachio is one of the most important exporting products of Iran and to maintain Iran’s position in exporting of this product, specific regulations on lowering its contamination with aflatoxin should be considered seriously. Finally, effective controlling of all food and feedstuffs which are vulnerable to aflatoxin contamination is necessary to prevent its effects. PMID:23113099

  2. [Observational medicine in 19th century Iran].

    PubMed

    Ebrahimnejad, H

    1998-01-01

    The ravages wrought by epidemics in Iran as of 1821 acted as a stimulus to medical thought while the awakening of political consciousness mobilized efforts to fight contagious diseases. The combination "epidemics-politics-medicine" made nineteenth-century Persia turn to European science for help. Thus western medicine was introduced into Persia. If this introduction has been perceived by political means and epidemiological justification, the theoretical and epistemological process involved has been almost completely overlooked or misinterpreted. It is generally considered that the imported medicine swept away the local one, but this is not altogether true. It was the internal evolution of traditional medicine which paved the way for anatomoclinical medicine. This evolution comes accross clearly in the works of Shirâzi and Sâveji between 1831 and 1862, years in which epidemics struck frequently and violently. While Europeans in Iran such as Dr. Polak qualified heyzeh (a kind of severe diarrhea) a "sporadic cholera" or "autumn cholera", Shirâzi wrote three treatises to show that heyzeh was not cholera but an ordinary kind of diarrhea caused by generalized malnourishment. Shirâzi was also an innovator in the theoretical and terminological fields, doing away with the notion of vabâ which meant a putrid atmosphere. Vabâ became a physiological anomaly which took on epidemic proportions in an impure atmosphere. The modern definition of vabâ meaning cholera was therefore elaborated thanks to Shirâzi.

  3. History of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Moin, Mostafa; Rezaei, Nima

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric immunology came into sight in the second half of 20th century, when pediatricians and basic immunologists began to give attention to diagnosis and treatment of children with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs). Understanding the genetic and mechanistic basis of PIDs provides unique insight into the functioning of the immune system. By progress in basic and clinical immunology, many infrastructural organizations and academic centers have been established in many countries worldwide to focus on training and research on the immune system and related disorders. Along with progress in basic and clinical immunology in the world, pediatric immunology had a good progress in Iran during the last 33-year period. Now, patients with PIDs can benefit from multidisciplinary comprehensive care, which is provided by clinical immunologists in collaboration with other specialists. Patients with history of recurrent and/or chronic infections suggestive of PIDs are evaluated by standard and research-based testing and receive appropriate treatment. The progress in PIDs can be described in three periods. Development of training program for clinical fellowship in allergy and immunology, multidisciplinary and international collaborative projects, primary immunodeficiency diseases textbooks, meetings on immunodeficiency disorders, improvement in diagnosis and treatment, and construction of Iranian primary immunodeficiency association, Students' research group for immunodeficiencies, Iranian primary immunodeficiency registry, and the immunological societies and centers were the main activities on PIDs during these years. In this article, we review the growth of modern pediatric immunology and PIDs status in Iran. PMID:23056678

  4. Progress of Iran in Medical Research.

    PubMed

    Kolahdoozan, Shadi; Massarrat, Sadegh

    2016-11-01

     The indexed Iranian journals in ISI and PubMed at the end of 2012 with known impact factor (IF) were evaluated with regard to the number of articles published in 2010-2012, the number of citations by authors from inside and outside Iran, their IF as well as their ranking order among all other journals in their specialized categories. There were among 130 English journals, 21 indexed with known IF. The mean IF of these journals increased from 0.4 in 2010 to 0.68 in 2012. The number of citations per article by authors from outside Iran increased from 0.19 to 0.49 during the same time period. The rank of the majority of the indexed journals was in the lowest 20% of their category. Although some improvement has been observed in the quality and the number of citations of Iranian journals indexed in ISI during these two years, the quality of the manuscripts remains low. A reduction in the number of journals, a change of their structure as well as more financial resources for research is necessary for the improvement of the quality and better rank and status of Iranian science among an international audience.

  5. Energy portfolio of Iran: A case study of solar desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besharati, Adib

    Energy plays a very important role in the economic development of a country such as Iran where industrial progress and higher living standards increase demand for energy. Iran is one of the countries in the world that simultaneously produces and consumes large amounts of energy. Because of its geographic latitude and weather conditions, Iran has the potential to develop and use of both fossil and renewable energy sources. In South Iran, there are huge oil and gas resources, and at the same time high potential of solar radiation. However, at the present large-scale utilization, solar energy is prohibitively expensive for Iran. Therefore, this study investigates an economical way to utilize solar energy in a meaningful way for Iran. One of the possible uses of solar energy that is both economical and technically feasible is desalination of water using solar energy. People in South Iran live in different areas with relatively low population density. One of the critical problems in those areas is a lack of clean drinking water. As a result, there is an urgent need to investigate ways to produce clean water from the saltwater. Therefore, the present study conducts a case study of solar desalination in south Iran using solar. Different desalination methods, such as humidification dehumidification by using a solar collector, and reverse osmosis, are discussed. In the case study, a prototype desalination plant was considered and both technical and economic aspects of the plant were investigated in details. The results showed higher productivity of drinking water in reverse osmosis method for south Iran.

  6. Great Basin paleontological database

    Zhang, N.; Blodgett, R.B.; Hofstra, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has constructed a paleontological database for the Great Basin physiographic province that can be served over the World Wide Web for data entry, queries, displays, and retrievals. It is similar to the web-database solution that we constructed for Alaskan paleontological data (www.alaskafossil.org). The first phase of this effort was to compile a paleontological bibliography for Nevada and portions of adjacent states in the Great Basin that has recently been completed. In addition, we are also compiling paleontological reports (Known as E&R reports) of the U.S. Geological Survey, which are another extensive source of l,egacy data for this region. Initial population of the database benefited from a recently published conodont data set and is otherwise focused on Devonian and Mississippian localities because strata of this age host important sedimentary exhalative (sedex) Au, Zn, and barite resources and enormons Carlin-type An deposits. In addition, these strata are the most important petroleum source rocks in the region, and record the transition from extension to contraction associated with the Antler orogeny, the Alamo meteorite impact, and biotic crises associated with global oceanic anoxic events. The finished product will provide an invaluable tool for future geologic mapping, paleontological research, and mineral resource investigations in the Great Basin, making paleontological data acquired over nearly the past 150 yr readily available over the World Wide Web. A description of the structure of the database and the web interface developed for this effort are provided herein. This database is being used ws a model for a National Paleontological Database (which we am currently developing for the U.S. Geological Survey) as well as for other paleontological databases now being developed in other parts of the globe. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  7. Pharmaceutical laws and regulations in Iran: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Zaboli, Pardis; Hashemi-Meshkini, Amir; Varmaghani, Mehdi; Gholami, Hadi; Vazirian, Iman; Zekri, Hedieh-Sadat; Eslamitabar, Shahriar; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    The pharmaceutical legal framework is a very important infrastructure in achieving predefined goals in pharmaceutical sector: Accessibility, quality, and rational use of medicine. This study aims to review the current pharmaceutical sector-related legal provisions in Iran where the Food and Drug Organization (FDO) is in charge of regulating all issues related to the pharmaceutical sector. The main laws and regulations enacted by parliament and cabinet and even internal regulations enacted by the Ministry of Health or Iran FDO are reviewed. Different laws and regulations are categorized according to the main goals of Iran national drug policy. PMID:27512704

  8. Iran and the Big Powers, 1900-1953.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-26

    projects- all in return for a modest royalty and initial fee . The threat from both Britain and Russia forced Iran to develop a foreign policy for its...ignored Russian interests in keeping Iran under political and economic bondage through bank loans and trade with Iran. By posing a direct threat to...34.-".-",."..".. . . - . . .. .., ,--.".... 14 Russia 28,972,124 rubles in long-term debt and 3,223,810 in short-term debts . This was against a mere 2,000,000 ruble

  9. Trend analysis of hydro-climatic variables in the north of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikzad Tehrani, E.; Sahour, H.; Booij, M. J.

    2018-04-01

    Trend analysis of climate variables such as streamflow, precipitation, and temperature provides useful information for understanding the hydrological changes associated with climate change. In this study, a nonparametric Mann-Kendall test was employed to evaluate annual, seasonal, and monthly trends of precipitation and streamflow for the Neka basin in the north of Iran over a 44-year period (1972 to 2015). In addition, the Inverse Distance Weight (IDW) method was used for annual seasonal, monthly, and daily precipitation trends in order to investigate the spatial correlation between precipitation and streamflow trends in the study area. Results showed a downward trend in annual and winter precipitation (Z < -1.96) and an upward trend in annual maximum daily precipitation. Annual and monthly mean flows for most of the months in the Neka basin decreased by 14% significantly, but the annual maximum daily flow increased by 118%. Results for the trend analysis of streamflow and climatic variables showed that there are statistically significant relationships between precipitation and streamflow (p value < 0.05). Correlation coefficients for Kendall, Spearman's rank and linear regression are 0.43, 0.61, and 0.67, respectively. The spatial presentation of the detected precipitation and streamflow trends showed a downward trend for the mean annual precipitation observed in the upstream part of the study area which is consistent with the streamflow trend. Also, there is a good correlation between monthly and seasonal precipitation and streamflow for all sub-basins (Sefidchah, Gelvard, Abelu). In general, from a hydro-climatic point of view, the results showed that the study area is moving towards a situation with more severe drought events.

  10. Upper Illinois River basin

    Friedel, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    During the past 25 years, industry and government made large financial investments that resulted in better water quality across the Nation; however, many water-quality concerns remain. Following a 1986 pilot project, the U.S. Geological Survey began implementation of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program in 1991. This program differs from other national water-quality assessment studies in that the NAWQA integrates monitoring of surface- and ground-water quality with the study of aquatic ecosystems. The goals of the NAWQA Program are to (1) describe current water-quality conditions for a large part of the Nation's freshwater streams and aquifers (water-bearing sediments and rocks), (2) describe how water quality is changing over time, and (3) improve our understanding of the primary natural and human factors affecting water quality.The Upper Illinois River Basin National Water- Quality Assessment (NAWQA) study will increase the scientific understanding of surface- and ground-water quality and the factors that affect water quality in the basin. The study also will provide information needed by water-resource managers to implement effective water-quality management actions and evaluate long-term changes in water quality.

  11. The Red Sea and Gulf of Aden Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosworth, William; Huchon, Philippe; McClay, Ken

    2005-10-01

    was slab-pull beneath the Urumieh-Doktar arc on the north side of the narrowing Neotethys. Drag of Arabia by the northward-moving Indian plate across the partially locked northern Owen fracture zone and the position of the Carlsberg oceanic ridge probably also influenced the geometry of the Aden rift. The trigger for the onset of rifting, though, was the impingement of the Afar plume at ˜31 Ma. The Red Sea propagated away from the plume head, perpendicular to the extensional stresses then operating in Arabia, and arrived at the bend in the African-Levant margin, which itself may have been a stress concentration ripe for rifting. The local geometry of the early Red Sea rift was strongly influenced by pre-existing basement structures, and as a consequence followed a complex path from Afar to Suez. Each segment of the rift was initially an asymmetric half graben, with well-defined accommodation zones between sub-basins. In the Gulf of Aden, the positions of accommodation zones were strongly influenced by older Mesozoic rift basins. Early rift structures can be restored to their original contiguous geometries along both the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden conjugate margins. In both basins, present-day shorelines restore to a separation of 40-60 km along most of their lengths. The initial rift basins were 60-80 km in width. Oceanic spreading initiated on the Sheba Ridge east of the Alula-Fartaq fracture zone at ˜19-18 Ma. After stalling at this fracture zone, the ridge probably propagated west into the central Gulf of Aden by ˜16 Ma. This matches the observed termination of syn-tectonic deposition along the onshore Aden margins at approximately the same time. At ˜14 Ma, a transform boundary cut through Sinai and the Levant continental margin, linking the northern Red Sea with the Bitlis-Zagros convergence zone. This corresponded with collision of Arabia and Eurasia, which resulted in a new plate geometry with different boundary forces. Red Sea extension changed from rift

  12. Case Study: Iran, Islam, the NPT, and the Bomb

    SciT

    Saunders, E .

    2011-04-01

    The goals of this case study are: (1) To examine the correlation between Iran's nuclear program and clerical statements; (2) To evaluate the importance of these statements; (3) To understand the relationship between policy and fatwas (Islamic decrees); (4) To address the issue of a 'nuclear fatwa'; and (5) To examine how, if at all, Sharia (Islamic law) has influenced Iran's actions or inactions with respect to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Iran's adherence to its IAEA Safeguards Agreements and the Additional Protocol. The Islamic Republic of Iran (hereinafter Iran) is one of twomore » theocracies in the world, the second being Vatican City. Iran's government derives its constitutional, moral, and political legitimacy from Islam. As a result of this theocratic culture, rules are set and interpreted with a much different calibrator than that of the Western world. Islam affects all aspects of Iranian life. This is further complicated by the fact that Islam is not a nationalistic faith, in that many people all over the world believe in and adhere to Islamic principles. As a result, a political system that derives much of its fervor from being nationalistic is caught between two worlds, one within the land boundaries of Iran and the other within a faith that transcends boundaries. Thus, any understanding of Islamic law must first be understood within this delicate balance of nationalism and transcendence. Iran has found itself on the international stage concerning its nuclear program. Because Iran is a theocratic state, it is imperative to examine its political moves, speeches, rights, and obligations through the lens of Islam. This study will examine how Islam plays a role in Iran's dealing with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its understanding of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), including parties obligations under Safeguards Agreements and the Additional Protocol, and also provide a

  13. Ecology of Anopheles pulcherrimus in Baluchistan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Zaim, M; Manouchehri, A V; Motabar, M; Mowlaii, G; Kayedi, M H; Pakdad, P; Nazari, M

    1992-09-01

    Studies were conducted on the ecology of Anopheles pulcherrimus over a period of 20 months in the village of Zeineddini, Sistan and Baluchistan Province, southeastern Iran. The species was active throughout the year with 2 peaks of activity, April-May and August-September. Light traps captured the highest number of An. pulcherrimus females (65%) as compared to cattle bait collections (19.3%), pyrethrum space spray catches (14.2%), pit shelter (1%) and human bait collections (0.6%). However, 95% of the females captured in light traps were unfed or freshly fed females as opposed to about only 44% of those collected in pyrethrum space spray catches and pit shelter collections. The species was mainly exophilic as shown by the gravid/fed ratio of 0.4 obtained in outlet window traps.

  14. Endoparasites of Wild Rodents in Southeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nateghpour, Mehdi; Motevalli-Haghi, Afsaneh; Akbarzadeh, Kamran; Akhavan, Amir Ahmad; Mohebali, Mehdi; Mobedi, Iraj; Farivar, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed to collect wild rodents for endoparasites determination in some parts of Sistan and Baluchistan Province, southeastern Iran nearby Pakistan and Afghanistan countries. Methods: A total of 100 wild rodents were captured alive with cage traps. Various samples were collected from blood and feces, also impression smear prepared from different organs. The samples were prepared by formalin-ether or stained with Giemsa, after that were examined under microscope. Results: All the caught rodents (47 Tatera indica, 44 Meriones hurriana, 5 Gerbilus nanus and 4 Meriones libycus) were studied for endoparasites emphasizing to their zoonotic aspects. Endoparasites including Spirurida, Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana feraterna, Trichuris trichiura, Skerjabino taenia, Trichostrongylus spp, Entamoeba muris, Chilomastix mesnili and Leishmania spp were parasitologically identified. Conclusion: Among 9 genera or species of the identified parasites at least 5 of them have zoonotic and public health importance. PMID:26114139

  15. Brief historical perspectives of malaria in Iran.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Mohammad Hossein; Bahadori, Moslem

    2013-02-01

    The history of malaria as a serious human disease dates back to ancient times. For centuries, malaria has been a deadly disease with high morbidity and mortality that profoundly impacted the socioeconomic status of endemic countries. However, its causative agent remained unidentified until the last decades of the nineteenth century. There were no effective synthetic anti-malarial agents until the mid-twentieth century. Currently malaria has been eliminated or pre-eliminated in numerous countries; however, this preventable and curable disease remains a significant global health problem. A major concern is drug resistance. Presented here, is a brief look at the history of malaria in Iran and the rest of the world, particularly during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

  16. Orbital Dirofilariasis in Iran: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mobedi, Iraj

    2009-01-01

    Dirofilariasis is a common parasitic disease in both domestic and wild animals around the world, with canines as the principal reservoir host and mosquitoes as the vector. Human ophthalmic dirofilariasis is an uncommon condition, but there have been reports from many parts of the world, including Africa, Australia, the Americas, Europe, and Asia. Ophthalmic involvement with Dirofilaria may present itself as periorbital, subconjunctival, orbital, or intraocular infections. In this report, we present a case of orbital dirofilariasis with lateral rectus muscle involvement. To our knowledge, this is the first orbital dirofilariasis case reported in Iran. Although debulking of the tumor usually leads to resolution, our patient showed an episode of recurrence after biopsy. Complete recovery was achieved after a spontaneous discharge, without the need for systemic medication. PMID:19967089

  17. Iran: Regional Perspectives and U.S. Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-13

    unwilling to publicly challenge Iran on the issue because of their economic dependence on or relationships with Iran...of Iran’s neighbors, like Iraq, and poses direct military threats to others, like Israel and Lebanon. It also directly challenges U.S. efforts to...reports that a former speaker of the Iranian parliament and then- aide to Iran’s Supreme Leader had referred to Bahrain as Iran’s 14th province sparked a

  18. National Security to Nationalist Myth: Why Iran Wants Nuclear Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    Atomic Energy Organization of Iran ( AEOI ),81 as well as Iran’s nuclear technology suppliers. By publicly embracing the “nuclear insecurity” myth and...81 The literature variously refers to the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran as “ AEOI ,” or “IAEO...I have adopted “ AEOI ,” the form used by the IAEA, except where quoting other sources. See “Implementation of the NPT Safeguards Agreement in the

  19. Unraveling the Persian Knot: Indirect Approaches towards Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    34 Kaveh Basmenji, Tehran Blues , Youth Culture in Iran, [London: SAQI, 2005], 73-74 35 Salehi, Insurgency through Culture and...unemployed Iranians that ringed Iran’s cities. For these rural peasants, Shia-Islam provided the only thing familiar to them in a period of drastic change...against the Shah, key symbols portrayed the Shah as an octopus siphoning off the wealth of Iran. 121 Revolutionaries provoked feelings of Islamic

  20. X-Article: Iran Operational Design, Clausewitz, and American Diplomacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    D. Frank United States Army 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES...addresses the United States current challenge with Iran, as the Islamic regime views itself as the regional rival to America and seeks to disrupt U.S...X-Article: Iran Operational Design, Clausewitz, and American Diplomacy by Colonel Patrick D. Frank United States Army