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Sample records for zagros folded belt

  1. Non-cylindrical fold growth in the Zagros fold and thrust belt (Kurdistan, NE-Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Nikolaus; Bretis, Bernhard; Grasemann, Bernhard; Lockhart, Duncan

    2010-05-01

    The Zagros mountains extends over 1800 km from Kurdistan in N-Iraq to the Strait of Hormuz in Iran and is one of the world most promising regions for the future hydrocarbon exploration. The Zagros Mountains started to form as a result of the collision between the Eurasian and Arabian Plates, whose convergence began in the Late Cretaceous as part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic system. Geodetic and seismological data document that both plates are still converging and that the fold and thrust belt of the Zagros is actively growing. Extensive hydrocarbon exploration mainly focuses on the antiforms of this fold and thrust belt and therefore the growth history of the folds is of great importance. This work investigates by means of structural field work and quantitative geomorphological techniques the progressive fold growth of the Permam, Bana Bawi- and Safeen- Anticlines located in the NE of the city of Erbil in the Kurdistan region of Northern Iraq. This part of the Zagros fold and thrust belt belongs to the so-called Simply Folded Belt, which is dominated by gentle to open folding. Faults or fault related folds have only minor importance. The mechanical anisotropy of the formations consisting of a succession of relatively competent (massive dolomite and limestone) and incompetent (claystone and siltstone) sediments essentially controls the deformation pattern with open to gentle parallel folding of the competent layers and flexural flow folding of the incompetent layers. The characteristic wavelength of the fold trains is around 10 km. Due to faster erosion of the softer rock layers in the folded sequence, the more competent lithologies form sharp ridges with steeply sloping sides along the eroded flanks of the anticlines. Using an ASTER digital elevation model in combination with geological field data we quantified 250 drainage basins along the different limbs of the subcylindrical Permam, Bana Bawi- and Safeen- Anticlines. Geomorphological indices of the drainage

  2. The Zagros hinterland fold-and-thrust belt in-sequence thrusting, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Ghanbarian, Mohammad Ali

    2014-05-01

    The collision of the Iranian microcontinent with the Afro-Arabian continent resulted in the deformation of the Zagros orogenic belt. The foreland of this belt in the Persian Gulf and Arabian platform has been investigated for its petroleum and gas resource potentials, but the Zagros hinterland is poorly investigated and our knowledge about its deformation is much less than other parts of this orogen. Therefore, this work presents a new geological map, stratigraphic column and two detailed geological cross sections. This study indicates the presence of a hinterland fold-and-thrust belt on northeastern side of the Zagros orogenic core that consists of in-sequence thrusting and basement involvement in this important part of the Zagros hinterland. The in-sequence thrusting resulted in first- and second-order duplex systems, Mode I fault-bend folding, fault-propagation folding and asymmetric detachment folding which indicate close relationships between folding and thrusting. Study of fault-bend folds shows that layer-parallel simple shear has the same role in the southeastern and northwestern parts of the study area (αe = 23.4 ± 9.1°). A major lateral ramp in the basement beneath the Talaee plain with about one kilometer of vertical offset formed parallel to the SW movement direction and perpendicular to the major folding and thrusting.

  3. Growth of the Zagros Fold-Thrust Belt and Foreland Basin, Northern Iraq, Kurdistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshnaw, Renas; Horton, Brian; Stockli, Daniel; Barber, Douglas; Ghalib, Hafidh; Dara, Rebwar

    2016-04-01

    The Zagros orogenic belt in the Middle Eastern segment of the Alpine-Himalayan system is among the youngest seismically active continental collision zones on Earth. However, due to diachronous and incremental collision, the precise ages and kinematics of shortening and deposition remain poorly understood. The Kurdistan region of the Zagros fold-thrust belt and foreland basin contains well-preserved Neogene wedge-top and foredeep deposits that include clastic nonmarine fill of the Upper Fars, Lower Bakhtiari, and Upper Bakhtiari Formations. These deposits record significant information about orogenic growth, fold-thrust dynamics, and advance of the deformation front. Thermochronologic and geochronologic data from thrust sheets and stratigraphic archives combined with local earthquake data provide a unique opportunity to address the linkages between surface and subsurface geologic relationships. This research seeks to constrain the timing and geometry of exhumation and deformation by addressing two key questions: (1) Did the northwestern Zagros fold-thrust belt evolve from initial thin-skinned shortening to later thick-skinned deformation or vice-versa? (2) Did the fold-thrust belt advance steadily under critical/supercritical wedge conditions involving in-sequence thrusting or propagate intermittently under subcritical conditions with out-of-sequence deformation? From north to south, apatite (U-Th)/He ages from the Main Zagros Thrust, the Mountain Front Flexure (MFF), and additional frontal thrusts suggest rapid exhumation by ~10 Ma, ~5 Ma, and ~8 Ma respectively. Field observations and seismic sections indicate progressive tilting and development of growth strata within the Lower Bakhtiari Formation adjacent to the frontal thrusts and within the Upper Bakhtiari Formation near the MFF. In the Kurdistan region of Iraq, a regional balanced cross section constrained by new thermochronometric results, proprietary seismic reflection profiles, and earthquake hypocenters

  4. Fracture patterns in the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt, Kurdistan Region of Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Daniel; Decker, Kurt; Grasemann, Bernhard; Peresson, Herwig

    2012-11-01

    Fracture data have been collected in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, which is a poorly accessible and unexplored area of the Zagros. Pre to early folding NE-SW striking extensional fractures and NW-SE striking contractive elements represent the older set affecting the exposed multilayer of the area. These latter structures are early syn-folding and followed by folding-related mesostructural assemblages, which include elements striking parallel to the axial trend of major folds (longitudinal fractures). Bedding perpendicular joints and veins, and extensional faults belonging to this second fracture set are located in the outer arc of exposed anticlines, whilst longitudinal reverse faults locate in the inner arcs. Consistently, these elements are associated with syn-folding tangential longitudinal strain. The younger two sets are related to E-W extension and NNE-SSW to N-S shortening, frequently displaying reactivation of the older sets. The last shortening event, which is described along the entire Zagros Belt, probably relates with the onset of N-S compression induced by the northward movement of the Arabian plate relative to the Eurasian Plate. In comparison between the inferred palaeostrain directions and the kinematics of recent GPS measurements, we conclude that the N-S compression and the partitioning into NW-SE trending folds and NW to N trending strike-slip faults likely remained unchanged throughout the Neogene tectonic history of the investigated area.

  5. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources of the Arabian Peninsula and Zagros Fold Belt, 2012

    Pitman, Janet K.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 86 billion barrels of oil and 336 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas resources in the Arabian Peninsula and Zagros Fold Belt. The USGS assessed the potential for undiscovered conventional oil and gas accumulations within the Arabian Peninsula and Zagros Fold Belt as part of the USGS World Petroleum Resources Project. Twenty-three assessment units within seven petroleum systems were quantitatively assessed in this study, which represents a reassessment of this area last published in 2000.

  6. Distributed deformation in the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt: insights from geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaid, Ahmed; Allen, Mark

    2017-04-01

    The Zagros fold-and-thrust belt is part of the active Arabia-Eurasia collision zone, and is an excellent region to study the interactions of tectonics and landscape. In this work we present results of a geomorphic analysis covering the entire range, coupled with more detailed analysis of the Kirkuk Embayment, Iraq. This particular region is a low elevation, low relief region of the Zagros, important for the enormous oil and gas reserves held in late Cenozoic anticlinal traps. Constraints from published earthquake focal mechanisms and hydrocarbon industry sub-surface data are combined with original fieldwork observations in northern Iraq, to produce a new regional cross-section and structural interpretation for the Kirkuk Embayment. We find that overall late Cenozoic shortening across the Embayment is on the order of 5%, representing only a few km. This deformation takes place on a series of anticlines, which are interpreted as overlying steep, planar, basement thrusts. These thrusts are further interpreted as reactivated normal faults, on the basis of (rare) published seismic data. The regional earthquake record confirms the basement involvement, although detachments within the sedimentary succession are also important, especially within the Middle Miocene Fat'ha Formation. Overall, the Zagros is sometimes represented as having a few major thrusts each persistent for 100s of km along the strike of the range. However, these faults are very rarely associated with major structural relief and/or surface fault ruptures during earthquakes. We have analysed the hypsometry of the range and find only gradational changes in the hypsometric integral of drainage basins across strike. This contrasts with regions such as the eastern Tibetan Plateau, where published analysis has revealed abrupt changes, correlating with the surface traces of active thrusts. Our interpretation is that the hypsometry of the Zagros reflects distributed deformation on numerous smaller faults, rather

  7. Folding pattern in the Fars province, Zagros folded belt: case study on the Karbasi and Khaftar anticlines, interior Fars, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Z.; Arian, M.; Solgi, A.

    2015-08-01

    The anticlines in Fars region, which are located in Zagros fold-thrust belt, are valuable because they possess several hydrocarbons and this area is easily recognized by the NW-SE trending parallel anticlines that verge to the SW. According to the geological classification, the study area is located in Interior Fars region. Due to increasing complication of structural geometry in Fars region and necessity to explore activities for deeper horizons especially the Paleozoic ones, the analysis of fold style elements, which is known as one of the main parts in structural studies, seems necessary. The Karbasi and Khaftar anticlines are case study anticlines in the interior Fars sub-basin (Fassa area). These anticlines have an asymmetric structure and some faults with large strike separation are observed in these structures. Due to increasing complication of structural geometry in Fars region and necessity to explore activities for deeper horizons especially the Paleozoic ones, the analysis of fold style elements, which is known as one of the main parts in structural studies, seems necessary. Description of fold geometry is important because it allows comparisons within and between folds and also allows us to recognize patterns in the occurrence and distribution of fold systems. The main aim of this paper is to determine fold style elements and folding pattern in the study area. This paper presents a part of the results of a regional study of Fars province in the Zagros Simply folded belt, based on satellite images, geological maps, and well data. In the Interior Fars area, it seems that folding pattern is controlled by structural elements such as the Nezamabad basement fault and Dashtak formation. In fact, as a middle detachment unit, Dashtak formation plays an important role regarding folding geometry and fold in style in the study area.

  8. Quantification of fold growth of frontal antiforms in the Zagros fold and thrust belt (Kurdistan, NE Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretis, Bernhard; Bartl, Nikolaus; Graseman, Bernhard; Lockhart, Duncan

    2010-05-01

    The Zagros fold and thrust belt is a seismically active orogen, where actual kinematic models based on GPS networks suggest a north-south shortening between Arabian and Eurasian in the order of 1.5-2.5 cm/yr. Most of this deformation is partitioned in south-southwest oriented folding and thrusting with northwest-southeast to north-south trending dextral strike slip faults. The Zagros fold and thrust belt is of great economic interest because it has been estimated that this area contains about 15% of the global recoverable hydrocarbons. Whereas the SE parts of the Zagros have been investigated by detailed geological studies, the NW extent being part of the Republic of Iraq have experienced considerably less attention. In this study we combine field work and remote sensing techniques in order to investigate the interaction of erosion and fold growth in the area NE of Erbil (Kurdistan, Iraq). In particular we focus on the interaction of the transient development of drainage patterns along growing antiforms, which directly reflects the kinematics of progressive fold growth. Detailed geomorphological studies of the Bana Bawi-, Permam- and Safeen fold trains show that these anticlines have not developed from subcylindrical embryonic folds but they have merged from different fold segments that joined laterally during fold amplification. This fold segments with length between 5 and 25 km have been detected by mapping ancient and modern river courses that initially cut the nose of growing folds and eventually got defeated leaving behind a wind gap. Fold segments, propagating in different directions force rivers to join resulting in steep gorges, which dissect the merging fold noses. Along rapidly lateral growing folds (e.g. at the SE end of the Bana Bawi Anticline) we observed "curved wind gaps", a new type of abandoned river course, where form of the wind gap mimics a formed nose of a growing antiform. The inherited curved segments of uplifted curved river courses strongly

  9. Orogenic plateau growth: Expansion of the Turkish-Iranian Plateau across the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M. B.; Saville, C.; Blanc, E. J.-P.; Talebian, M.; Nissen, E.

    2013-03-01

    This paper shows how the Turkish-Iranian Plateau grows laterally by incrementally incorporating adjacent parts of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt. The limit of significant, seismogenic, thrusting in the Zagros (Mw > 5) occurs close to the regional 1250 m elevation contour. The seismicity cutoff is not a significant bedrock geology boundary. Elevations increase northward, toward regional plateau elevations of 2 km, implying that another process produced the extra elevation. Between the seismogenic limit of thrusting and the suture, this process is a plausibly ductile thickening of the basement, suggesting depth-dependent strain during compression. Similar depth-dependant crustal strain may explain why the Tibetan plateau has regional elevations 1500 m greater than the elevation limit of seismogenic thrusting at its margins. We estimate 68 km shortening across the Zagros Simply Folded Belt in the Fars region, and 120 km total shortening of the Arabian plate. The Dezful Embayment is a low strain zone in the western Zagros. Deformation is more intense to its northeast, in the Bakhtyari Culmination. The orogenic taper (across strike topographic gradient) across the Dezful Embayment is 0.0004, and across the Bakhtyari Culmination, 0.022. Lateral plateau growth is more pronounced farther east (Fars), where a more uniform structure has a taper of 0.010 up to elevations of 1750 m. A >100 km wide region of the Zagros further northeast has a taper of 0.002 and is effectively part of the Turkish-Iranian Plateau. Internal drainage enhances plateau development but is not a pre-requisite. Aspects of the seismicity, structure, and geomorphology of the Zagros do not support critical taper models for fold-and-thrust belts.

  10. Modeling of wind gap formation and development of sedimentary basins during fold growth: application to the Zagros Fold Belt, Iran.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collignon, Marine; Yamato, Philippe; Castelltort, Sébastien; Kaus, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Mountain building and landscape evolution are controlled by the interactions between river dynamics and tectonic forces. Such interactions have been largely studied but a quantitative evaluation of tectonic/geomorphic feedbacks remains required for understanding sediments routing within orogens and fold-and-thrust belts. Here, we employ numerical simulations to assess the conditions of uplift and river incision necessary to deflect an antecedent drainage network during the growth of one or several folds. We propose that a partitioning of the river network into internal (endorheic) and longitudinal drainage arises as a result of lithological differences within the deforming crustal sedimentary cover. We show with examples from the Zagros Fold Belt (ZFB) that drainage patterns can be linked to the incision ratio R between successive lithological layers, corresponding to the ratio between their relative erodibilities or incision coefficients. Transverse drainage networks develop for uplift rates smaller than 0.8 mm.yr-1 and -10 < R < 10. Intermediate drainage network are obtained for uplift rates up to 2 mm.yr-1 and incision ratios of 20. Parallel drainage networks and formation of sedimentary basins occur for large values of incision ratio (R >20) and uplift rates between 1 and 2 mm.yr-1. These results have implications for predicting the distribution of sediment depocenters in fold-and-thrust belts, which can be of direct economic interest for hydrocarbon exploration.

  11. Stress states in the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt from passive margin to collisional tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navabpour, Payman; Barrier, Eric

    2012-12-01

    The present-day Zagros fold-and-thrust belt of SW-Iran corresponds to the former Arabian passive continental margin of the southern Neo-Tethyan basin since the Permian-Triassic rifting, undergoing later collisional deformation in mid-late Cenozoic times. In this paper an overview of brittle tectonics and palaeostress reconstructions of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt is presented, based on direct stress tensor inversion of fault slip data. The results indicate that, during the Neo-Tethyan oceanic opening, an extensional tectonic regime affectedthe sedimentary cover in Triassic-Jurassic times with an approximately N-S trend of the σ3 axis, oblique to the margin, which was followed by some local changes to a NE-SW trend during Jurassic-Cretaceous times. The stress state significantly changed to thrust setting, with a NE-SW trend of the σ1 axis, and a compressional tectonic regime prevailed during the continental collision and folding of the sedimentary cover in Oligocene-Miocene times. This compression was then followed by a strike-slip stress state with an approximately N-S trend of the σ1 axis, oblique to the belt, during inversion of the inherited extensional basement structures in Pliocene-Recent times. The brittle tectonic reconstructions, therefore, highlighted major changes of the stress state in conjunction with transitions between thin- and thick-skinned structures during different extensional and compressional stages of continental deformation within the oblique divergent and convergent settings, respectively.

  12. Role of the Kazerun fault system in active deformation of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt (Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Authemayou, Christine; Bellier, Olivier; Chardon, Dominique; Malekzade, Zaman; Abassi, Mohammad

    2005-04-01

    Field structural and SPOT image analyses document the kinematic framework enhancing transfer of strike-slip partitioned motion from along the backstop to the interior of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in a context of plate convergence slight obliquity. Transfer occurs by slip on the north-trending right-lateral Kazerun Fault System (KFS) that connects to the Main Recent Fault, a major northwest-trending dextral fault partitioning oblique convergence at the rear of the belt. The KFS formed by three fault zones ended by bent orogen-parallel thrusts allows slip from along the Main Recent Fault to become distributed by transfer to longitudinal thrusts and folds. To cite this article: C. Authemayou et al., C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  13. Structural modeling of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt (Iraq) combining field work and remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, D.; Grasemann, B.; Faber, R.; Lockhart, D.

    2009-04-01

    The Zagros fold-and-thrust belt is known for its spectacular fold trains, which have formed in detached Phanerozoic sedimentary cover rocks above a shortened crystalline Precambrian basement. Orogeny evolved through the Late Cretaceous to Miocene collision between the Arabian and Eurasian plate, during which the Neotethys oceanic basin was closed. Still active deformation shortening in the order of 2-2.5 cm/yr is partitioned in S-SW directed folding and thrusting of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt and NW-SE to N-S trending dextral strike slip faults. The sub-cylindrical doubly-plunging fold trains with wavelengths of 5 - 10 km host more than half of the world's hydrocarbon reserves in mostly anticlinal traps. In this work we investigate the three dimensional structure of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. The mapped region is situated NE from the city of Erbil and comprises mainly Cretaceous to Cenozoic folded sediments consisting of mainly limestones, dolomites, sandstones, siltstones, claystones and conglomerates. Although the overall security situation in Kurdistan is much better than in the rest of Iraq, structural field mapping was restricted to sections along the main roads perpendicular to the strike of the fold trains, mainly because of the contamination of the area with landmines and unexploded ordnance, a problem that dates back to the end of World War Two. Landmines were also used by the central government in the 1960s and 1970s in order to subdue Kurdish groups. During the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq War, the north was mined again. In order to extend the structural measurements statistically over the investigated area resulting in a three-dimensional model of the fold trains, we used the Fault Trace module of the WinGeol software (www.terramath.com). This package allows the interactive mapping and visualization of the spatial orientations (i.e. dip and strike) of geological finite planar structures (e.g. faults, lithological

  14. Deformation and kinematic evolution of the subsurface structures: Zagros foreland fold-and-thrust belt, northern Dezful Embayment, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Pash, Raana Razavi; Motamedi, Hossein; Yazdani, Mohammad

    2018-06-01

    The Dezful Embayment is located in the foreland part of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt. Structural style of folding and thrusting vary in the Dezful Embayment. In this study, balanced cross sections and subsurface data including 2D seismic profiles and wells data decoded structural style of the subsurface structures in the northern Dezful Embayment. Presence of the multiple décollement horizons is the main controlling factor of the structural style in this area. The subsurface anticlines have been formed between two main décollement horizons, which include the Miocene Gachsaran Formation as upper decollement and Permian Dashtak evaporites and Lower Cretaceous Garau shales as the middle décollement horizons. Geometry of the subsurface anticlines differs much vertically and horizontally. Growth strata indicate folding is started in Middle Miocene time in this region. Anticlines formed as open, wide and disharmonic structures. Active processes in the evolution of anticlines are limb rotation and hinge migration, which was resulted in increase of inhomogeneous shortening rate. More shortening rate indicates more structural relief in anticlines. These anticlines are formed as a detachment folds in initiation and then during their evolution converted to fault propagation fold and fault-bend fold. Final geometric shape of these anticlines depends on the geometry of thrusts propagation that formed in the forelimb.

  15. Pre-folding fracture development in the Lurestan region of the Zagros Fold and Thrust Belt: constraints from early fracture sets in the Shabazan and Asmari Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradetti, Amerigo; Tavani, Stefano; D'Assisi Tramparulo, Francesco; Prinzi, Ernesto Paolo; Vitale, Stefano; Parente, Mariano; Morsalnejad, Davoud; Mazzoli, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    In the Zagros Fold and Thrust Belt (FTB), the timing of fracture development with respect to folding is debated. Multiple fracture systems occur in the area. These include "typical" fracture systems that are oriented parallel and orthogonal to the NW-SE strike of the belt, as well as sets oriented N-S and E-W. The interpretation of the N-S and E-W sets is controversial. Despite the general consensus about the first-order relationship between these fractures and inherited N-S striking basement faults, their timing and kinematic significance is not yet fully understood. The ambiguous crosscutting/abutting relationships with the NE-SW and NW-SE sets, together with the difficulty of framing them into the classical scenario of fracturing in foreland basin systems, has led to the development of different hypotheses about the timing of N-S and E-W sets. For the generation of these structures, both pre- and syn-thrusting interpretations have been proposed. In this work, we report on the occurrence of bed-perpendicular fracture sets in the upper part of the Shabazan (Eocene) and in the Asmari (Oligo-Miocene) Formations of the Zagros FTB. These fractures have the peculiarity of being filled with karst material. Such filled fractures are preserved in beds showing variable angles of dip, ranging from horizontal to vertical. Their homogeneous distribution in variably dipping beds around folds undoubtedly point to an origin of these fracture sets predating the tilting of the strata in which they are contained. Therefore, fracture development and related infilling occurred at an early stage, in still flat lying strata, following the deposition of the top Shabazan and Asmari Formations. Such a deposition took place within the general framework of ongoing shortening in the Zagros. This process, occurring since the Late Cretaceous, progressively led to folding of the syn-orogenic Shabazan and Asmari Formations subsequently to the development of the studied filled fractures.

  16. Preliminary investigation of Zagros thrust-fold-belt deformation using SAR interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilforoushan, Faramarz; Talbot, Christopher J.; Fielding, Eric J.

    2005-01-01

    Most of the Zagros deformation resulting from the convergence of Arabia and Eurasia takes place in the Southeast Zagros. To apply the SAR interferometry geodetic technique, a few ERS 1 & 2 satellite images were used to map this continuing deformation proven by GPS. Interferograms over 7 years show surprisingly high coherence. The unwrapped phases display a high correlation with topography reflecting atmospheric noise in addition to the desired tectonic signal. We estimate two simple linear trends and remove them from interferograms. The preliminary results show local uplift rates with a likely minimum of 1-2 mm/yr. These early crude results will be tested by more data in project No. 3174.

  17. Along-strike structural variation and thermokinematic development of the Cenozoic Bitlis-Zagros fold-thrust belt, Turkey and Iraqi Kurdistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Douglas E.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Koshnaw, Renas I.; Tamar-Agha, Mazin Y.; Yilmaz, Ismail O.

    2016-04-01

    The Bitlis-Zagros orogen in northern Iraq is a principal element of the Arabia-Eurasia continent collision and is characterized by the lateral intersection of two structural domains: the NW-SE trending Zagros proper system of Iran and the E-W trending Bitlis fold-thrust belt of Turkey and Syria. While these components in northern Iraq share a similar stratigraphic framework, they exhibit along-strike variations in the width and style of tectonic zones, fold morphology and trends, and structural inheritance. However, the distinctions of the Bitlis and Zagros segments remains poorly understood in terms of timing and deformation kinematics as well as first-order controls on fold-thrust development. Structural and stratigraphic study and seismic data combined with low-T thermochronometry provide the basis for reconstructions of the Bitlis-Zagros fold-thrust belt in southeastern Turkey and northern Iraq to elucidate the kinematic and temporal relationship of these two systems. Balanced cross-sections were constructed and incrementally restored to quantify the deformational evolution and use as input for thermokinematic models (FETKIN) to generate thermochronometric ages along the topographic surface of each cross-section line. The forward modeled thermochronometric ages from were then compared to new and previously published apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He and fission-track ages from southeastern Turkey and northern Iraq to test the validity of the timing, rate, and fault-motion geometry associated with each reconstruction. The results of these balanced theromokinematic restorations integrated with constraints from syn-tectonic sedimentation suggest that the Zagros belt between Erbil and Suleimaniyah was affected by an initial phase of Late Cretaceous exhumation related to the Proto-Zagros collision. During the main Zagros phase, deformation advanced rapidly and in-sequence from the Main Zagros Fault to the thin-skinned frontal thrusts (Kirkuk, Shakal, Qamar) from middle

  18. Numerical modelling of the role of salt in continental collision: An application to the southeast Zagros fold-and-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazian, Reza Khabbaz; Buiter, Susanne J. H.

    2014-09-01

    The Zagros fold-and-thrust belt formed in the collision of Arabia with Central Iran. Its sedimentary sequence is characterised by the presence of several weak layers that may control the style of folding and thrusting. We use 2-D thermo-mechanical models to investigate the role of salt in the southeast Zagros fold-and-thrust belt. We constrain the crustal and lithospheric thickness, sedimentary stratification, convergence velocity, and thermal structure of the models from available geological and geophysical data. We find that the thick basal layer of Hormuz salt in models on the scale of the upper-mantle decouples the overlying sediments from the basement and localises deformation in the sediments by trench-verging shear bands. In the collision stage of the models, basement dips with + 1° towards the trench. Including the basal Hormuz salt improves the fit of predicted topography to observed topography. We use the kinematic results and thermal structure of this large-scale model as the initial conditions of a series of upper-crustal-scale models. These models aim to investigate the effects of basal and intervening weak layers, salt strength, basal dip, and lateral salt distribution on deformation style of the simply folded Zagros. Our results show that in addition to the Hormuz salt at the base of the sedimentary cover, at least one intervening weak layer is required to initiate fold-dominated deformation in the southeast Zagros. We find that an upper-crustal-scale model, with a basal and three internal weak layers with viscosities between 5 × 1018 and 1019 Pa s, and a basement that dips + 1° towards the trench, best reproduces present-day topography and the regular folding of the sedimentary layers of the simply folded Zagros.

  19. Influence of pre-existing basement faults on the structural evolution of the Zagros Simply Folded belt: 3D numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruh, Jonas B.; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    The Simply Folded Belt of the Zagros orogen is characterized by elongated fold trains symptomatically defining the geomorphology along this mountain range. The Zagros orogen results from the collision of the Arabian and the Eurasian plates. The Simply Folded Belt is located southwest of the Zagros suture zone. An up to 2 km thick salt horizon below the sedimentary sequence enables mechanical and structural detachment from the underlying Arabian basement. Nevertheless, deformation within the basement influences the structural evolution of the Simply Folded Belt. It has been shown that thrusts in form of reactivated normal faults can trigger out-of-sequence deformation within the sedimentary stratigraphy. Furthermore, deeply rooted strike-slip faults, such as the Kazerun faults between the Fars zone in the southeast and the Dezful embayment and the Izeh zone, are largely dispersing into the overlying stratigraphy, strongly influencing the tectonic evolution and mechanical behaviour. The aim of this study is to reveal the influence of basement thrusts and strike-slip faults on the structural evolution of the Simply Folded Belt depending on the occurrence of intercrustal weak horizons (Hormuz salt) and the rheology and thermal structure of the basement. Therefore, we present high-resolution 3D thermo-mechnical models with pre-existing, inversively reactivated normal faults or strike-slip faults within the basement. Numerical models are based on finite difference, marker-in-cell technique with (power-law) visco-plastic rheology accounting for brittle deformation. Preliminary results show that deep tectonic structures present in the basement may have crucial effects on the morphology and evolution of a fold-and-thrust belt above a major detachment horizon.

  20. An improved evaluation of the seismic/geodetic deformation-rate ratio for the Zagros Fold-and-Thrust collisional belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palano, Mimmo; Imprescia, Paola; Agnon, Amotz; Gresta, Stefano

    2018-04-01

    We present an improved picture of the ongoing crustal deformation field for the Zagros Fold-and-Thrust Belt continental collision zone by using an extensive combination of both novel and published GPS observations. The main results define the significant amount of oblique Arabia-Eurasia convergence currently being absorbed within the Zagros: right-lateral shear along the NW trending Main Recent fault in NW Zagros and accommodated between fold-and-thrust structures and NS right-lateral strike-slip faults on Southern Zagros. In addition, taking into account the 1909-2016 instrumental seismic catalogue, we provide a statistical evaluation of the seismic/geodetic deformation-rate ratio for the area. On Northern Zagros and on the Turkish-Iranian Plateau, a moderate to large fraction (˜49 and >60 per cent, respectively) of the crustal deformation occurs seismically. On the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, the seismic/geodetic deformation-rate ratio suggests that a small to moderate fraction (<40 per cent) of crustal deformation occurs seismically; locally, the occurrence of large historic earthquakes (M ≥ 6) coupled with the high geodetic deformation, could indicate overdue M ≥ 6 earthquakes. On Southern Zagros, aseismic strain dominates crustal deformation (the ratio ranges in the 15-33 per cent interval). Such aseismic deformation is probably related to the presence of the weak evaporitic Hormuz Formation which allows the occurrence of large aseismic motion on both subhorizontal faults and surfaces of décollement. These results, framed into the seismotectonic framework of the investigated region, confirm that the fold-and-thrust-dominated deformation is driven by buoyancy forces; by contrast, the shear-dominated deformation is primary driven by plate stresses.

  1. Balancing cross-sections combining field work and remote sensing data using LithoTect software in the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt, N Iraq.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Daniel; Grasemann, Bernhard; Lockhart, Duncan

    2010-05-01

    The Zagros fold-and-thrust belt has formed in detached Phanerozoic sedimentary cover rocks above a shortened crystalline Precambrian basement and evolved through the Late Cretaceous to Miocene collision between the Arabian and Eurasian plate, during which the Neotethys oceanic basin was closed. Deformation is partitioned in SW directed folding and thrusting of the sediments and NW-SE to N-S trending dextral strike slip faults. The sub-cylindrical doubly-plunging fold trains with wavelengths of 5 - 10 km host more than half of the world's hydrocarbon reserves in mostly anticlinal traps. Generally the Zagros is divided into three NW-SE striking tectonic units: the Zagros Imbricate Zone, the Zagros Simply Folded Belt and the Zagros Foredeep. This work presents a balanced cross-section through the Simply Folded Belt, NE of the city of Erbil (Kurdistan, Iraq). The regional stratigraphy comprises mainly Cretaceous to Cenozoic folded sediments consisting of massive, carbonate rocks (limestones, dolomites), reacting as competent layers during folding compared to the incompetent behavior of interlayered siltstones, claystones and marls. Although the overall security situation in Kurdistan is much better than in the rest of Iraq, structural field mapping was restricted to asphalt streets, mainly because of the contamination of the area with landmines and unexploded ordnance. In order to extend the structural measurements statistically over the investigated area, we used a newly developed software tool (www.terramath.com) for interactive structural mapping of spatial orientations (i.e. dip direction and dip angles) of the sedimentary beddings from digital elevation models. Structural field data and computed measurements where integrated and projected in NE-SW striking balanced cross-sections perpendicular to the regional trend of the fold axes. We used the software LithoTect (www.geologicsystems.com) for the restoration of the cross-sections. Depending on the interpretation

  2. Mechanical restoration of large-scale folded multilayers using the finite element method: Application to the Zagros Simply Folded Belt, N-Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Reif, Daniel; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    There are a large number of numerical finite element studies concerned with modeling the evolution of folded geological layers through time. This body of research includes many aspects of folding and many different approaches, such as two- and three-dimensional studies, single-layer folding, detachment folding, development of chevron folds, Newtonian, power-law viscous and more complex rheologies, influence of anisotropy, pure-shear, simple-shear and other boundary conditions and so forth. In recent years, studies of multilayer folding emerged, thanks to more advanced mesh generator software and increased computational power. Common to all of these studies is the fact that they consider a forward directed time evolution, as in nature. Very few studies use the finite element method for reverse-time simulations. In such studies, folded geological layers are taken as initial conditions for the numerical simulation. The folding process is reversed by changing the signs of the boundary conditions that supposedly drove the folding process. In such studies, the geometry of the geological layers before the folding process is searched and the amount of shortening necessary for the final folded geometry can be calculated. In contrast to a kinematic or geometric fold restoration procedure, the described approach takes the mechanical behavior of the geological layers into account, such as rheology and the relative strength of the individual layers. This approach is therefore called mechanical restoration of folds. In this study, the concept of mechanical restoration is applied to a two-dimensional 50km long NE-SW-cross-section through the Zagros Simply Folded Belt in Iraqi Kurdistan, NE from the city of Erbil. The Simply Folded Belt is dominated by gentle to open folding and faults are either absent or record only minor offset. Therefore, this region is ideal for testing the concept of mechanical restoration. The profile used is constructed from structural field measurements

  3. Neogene shortening and exhumation of the Zagros fold-thrust belt and foreland basin in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshnaw, Renas I.; Horton, Brian K.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Barber, Douglas E.; Tamar-Agha, Mazin Y.; Kendall, Jerome J.

    2017-01-01

    The Zagros fold-thrust belt in the Kurdistan region of Iraq encroached southward toward a rapidly subsiding Neogene foreland basin and was later partitioned by out-of-sequence shortening focused along the Mountain Front Flexure (MFF), as defined by new low-temperature thermochronologic, stratigraphic, and provenance results. Apatite (U-Th)/He ages document rapid deformation advance from the Main Zagros Fault to southern frontal structures (Kirkuk, Shakal, and Qamar thrusts) at 10-8 Ma, followed by potential basement-involved out-of-sequence development of the MFF (Qaradagh anticline) by 5 Ma. Distinct shifts in detrital zircon U-Pb provenance signatures for Neogene foreland basin fill provide evidence for drainage reorganization during fold-thrust belt advance. U-Pb age spectra and petrologic data from the Injana (Upper Fars) Formation indicate derivation from a variety of Eurasian, Pan-African, ophiolitic and Mesozoic-Cenozoic volcanic terranes, whereas the Mukdadiya (Lower Bakhtiari) and Bai-Hasan (Upper Bakhtiari) Formations show nearly exclusive derivation from the Paleogene Walash-Naopurdan volcanic complex near the Iraq-Iran border. Such a sharp cutoff in Eurasian, Pan-African, and ophiolitic sources is likely associated with drainage reorganization and tectonic development of the geomorphic barrier formed by the MFF. As a result of Zagros crustal shortening, thickening and loading, the Neogene foreland basin developed and accommodated an abrupt influx of fluvial clastic sediment that contains growth stratal evidence of synkinematic accumulation. The apparent out-of-sequence pattern of upper crustal shortening in the hinterland to foreland zone of Iraqi Kurdistan suggests that structural inheritance and the effects of synorogenic erosion and accumulation are important factors influencing the irregular and episodic nature of orogenic growth in the Zagros.

  4. Early Jurassic extensional inheritance in the Lurestan region of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt, Iran.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, Stefano; Parente, Mariano; Vitale, Stefano; Puzone, Francesco; Erba, Elisabetta; Bottini, Cinzia; Morsalnejad, Davoud; Mazzoli, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    It has long been recognized that the tectonic architecture of the Zagros mountain belt was strongly controlled by inherited structures previously formed within the Arabian plate. These preexisting features span in age from the pre-Cambrian to the Mesozoic, showing different trends and deformation styles. Yet, these structures are currently not fully understood. This uncertainty is partly related with the paucity of exposures, which rarely allows a direct observation of these important deformation features. The Lurestan Province of Iran provides a remarkable exception, since it is one of the few places of the Zagros mountain belt where exposures of Triassic and Jurassic rocks are widespread. In this area we carried out structural observations on Mesozoic extensional structures developed at the southern margin of the Neo-Tethyan basin. Syn-sedimentary extensional faults are hosted within the Triassic-Cretaceous succession, being particularly abundant in the Jurassic portion of the stratigraphy. Early to Middle Jurassic syn-sedimentary faults are observed in different paleogeographic domains of the area, and their occurrence is coherent with the subsequent transition from shallow-water to deep-sea basin environments, observed in a wide portion of the area. Most of the thrusts exposed in the area may indeed be interpreted as reactivated Jurassic extensional faults, or as reverse faults whose nucleation was controlled by the location of preexisting normal faults, as a result of positive inversion during crustal shortening and mountain building.

  5. The occurrence and origin of celestite in the Abolfares region, Iran: Implications for Sr-mineralization in Zagros fold belt (ZFB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourkaseb, Houshang; Zarasvandi, Alireza; Rezaei, Mohsen; Mahdavi, Reyhaneh; Ghanavati, Fatemeh

    2017-10-01

    The major celestite deposits in Zagros Fold belt are associated with coastal marine carbonate and evaporate sediments of Oligo-Miocene Asmari and Lower Miocene Ghachsaran Formations. In the Abolfares region, celestite mineralization is extended in the western limb of Bangestan anticline in the carbonates of Early Miocene (middle part of Asmari Formation), underlying by dolomitic carbonates of Burdigalian. From bottom to top three main types of mineralization can be distinguished in the study area: (1) layer texture resulting from replacement of algal limestone by celestite minerals with some parts showing idiomorphic crystals (geodes) along the walls of the cavities, (2) celestite occurrence as irregular massive shape interconnected small crystals and nodules, and (3) celestite mineralization associated with steeply dipping veins and open space fracture fillings, resulting from late-stage epigenetic processes. Highlightly, the ore-hosting carbonate rocks were deposited in an intertidal - supratidal protected setting with hypersaline conditions, in accordance with other celestite deposits of the Zagros Fold belt. The abundance of diagenetic crystallization rhythmites, carbonate and anhydrite inclusions as confirmed by Laser Raman spectroscopy analysis, high Sr/Ba values (average; 8726.1) and strong negative correlations between SO3 vs CaO (R2 = 0.98), SrO vs CaO (R2 = 0.96) with positive correlations between Ba vs SrO (R2 = 0.54) and SO3 vs SrO (R2 = 0.98) highlight the role of high Sr late-diagenetic brines in replacement of carbonates with celestite minerals. It seems that the inception of compressional folding during or soon after the deposition of the Asmari Formation in the carbonate platform at the margin of NW-trending basin in the foreland of the Zagros orogenic belt lead to the upward refluxing of penetrated high-Sr diagenetic brines and celestite mineralization.

  6. Petroleum generation and migration in the Mesopotamian Basin and Zagros fold belt of Iraq: Results from a basin-modeling study

    Pitman, Janet K.; Steinshouer, D.; Lewan, M.D.

    2004-01-01

    A regional 3-D total petroleum-system model was developed to evaluate petroleum generation and migration histories in the Mesopotamian Basin and Zagros fold belt in Iraq. The modeling was undertaken in conjunction with Middle East petroleum assessment studies conducted by the USGS. Regional structure maps, isopach and facies maps, and thermal maturity data were used as input to the model. The oil-generation potential of Jurassic source-rocks, the principal known source of the petroleum in Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary reservoirs in these regions, was modeled using hydrous pyrolysis (Type II-S) kerogen kinetics. Results showed that oil generation in source rocks commenced in the Late Cretaceous in intrashelf basins, peak expulsion took place in the late Miocene and Pliocene when these depocenters had expanded along the Zagros foredeep trend, and generation ended in the Holocene when deposition in the foredeep ceased. The model indicates that, at present, the majority of Jurassic source rocks in Iraq have reached or exceeded peak oil generation and most rocks have completed oil generation and expulsion. Flow-path simulations demonstrate that virtually all oil and gas fields in the Mesopotamian Basin and Zagros fold belt overlie mature Jurassic source rocks (vertical migration dominated) and are situated on, or close to, modeled migration pathways. Fields closest to modeled pathways associated with source rocks in local intrashelf basins were charged earliest from Late Cretaceous through the middle Miocene, and other fields filled later when compression-related traps were being formed. Model results confirm petroleum migration along major, northwest-trending folds and faults, and oil migration loss at the surface.

  7. Structural, micro-structural and kinematic analyses of channel flow in the Karmostaj salt diapir in the Zagros foreland folded belt, Fars province, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Sarshar, Maryam Asadi; Adineh, Sadegh

    2018-02-01

    One of the main characteristic of the Zagros foreland fold-and-thrust belt and the Zagros foreland folded belt are wide distributions of surface extrusion from the Hormuz salt diapirs. This study examines the structure and kinematic of channel flow in the Karmostaj salt diapir in the southwestern part of the Zagros foreland folded belt. This diapir has reached the surface as a result of the channel flow mechanism and has extruded in the southern limb of the Kuh-Gach anticline which is an asymmetric décollement fold with convergence to the south. Structural and microstructural studies and quantitative finite strain (Rs) and kinematic vorticity number (Wk) analyses were carried out within this salt diapir and its namakier. This was in order to investigate the structural evolution in the salt diapiric system, the characteristics and mechanism of the salt flow and the distribution of flow regimes within the salt diapir and interaction of regional tectonics and salt diaprism. The extruded salt has developed a flow foliation sub-parallel to the remnant bedding recorded by different colors, a variety of internal folds including symmetrical and asymmetrical folds and interference fold patterns, shear zones, and boudins. These structures were used to analyze mechanisms and history of diapiric flow and extrusion. The microstructures, reveal various deformation mechanisms in various parts of salt diapir. The measurements of finite strain show that Rs values in the margin of salt diapir are higher than within its namakier which is consistent with the results of structural studies. Mean kinematic vorticity number (Wm) measured in steady state deformation of diapir and namakier is Wm = 0.45-0.48 ± 0.13. The estimated mean finite deformation (Wm) values indicate that 67.8% pure shear and 32.2% simple shear deformation were involved; the implications of which are discussed. The vorticity of flow indicates that in the early stage of growth, Poiseuille flow was the dominate

  8. Evolution of the stress fields in the Zagros Foreland Folded Belt using focal mechanisms and kinematic analyses: the case of the Fars salient, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Zafarmand, Bahareh; Oveisi, Behnam

    2018-03-01

    The NW-SE trending Zagros orogenic belt was initiated during the convergence of the Afro-Arabian continent and the Iranian microcontinent in the Late Cretaceous. Ongoing convergence is confirmed by intense seismicity related to compressional stresses collision-related in the Zagros orogenic belt by reactivation of an early extensional faulting to latter compressional segmented strike-slip and dip-slip faulting. These activities are strongly related either to the deep-seated basement fault activities (deep-seated earthquakes) underlies the sedimentary cover or gently dipping shallow-seated décollement horizon of the rheological weak rocks of the infra-Cambrian Hormuz salt. The compressional stress regimes in the different units play an important role in controlling the stress conditions between the different units within the sedimentary cover and basement. A significant set of nearly N-S trending right-lateral strike-slip faults exists throughout the study area in the Fars area in the Zagros Foreland Folded Belt. Fault-slip and focal mechanism data were analyzed using the stress inversion method to reconstruct the paleo and recent stress conditions. The results suggest that the current direction of maximum principal stress averages N19°E, with N38°E that for the past from Cretaceous to Tertiary (although a few sites on the Kar-e-Bass fault yield a different direction). The results are consistent with the collision of the Afro-Arabian continent and the Iranian microcontinent. The difference between the current and paleo-stress directions indicates an anticlockwise rotation in the maximum principle stress direction over time. This difference resulted from changes in the continental convergence path, but was also influenced by the local structural evolution, including the lateral propagation of folds and the presence of several local décollement horizons that facilitated decoupling of the deformation between the basement and the sedimentary cover. The obliquity of

  9. Fold-and-thrust belt curvature in the Fars region, eastern Zagros, achieved by variable thrust slip vectors and fault block rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edey, Alex; Allen, Mark B.

    2017-04-01

    Many fold-and-thrust belts are curved in plan view, but the origins of this curvature are debated. Understanding which mechanism(s) is appropriate is important to constrain the behaviour of the lithosphere during compressional deformation. Here we analyse the active deformation of the Fars Arc region in the eastern part of the Zagros, Iran, including slip vectors of 92 earthquakes, published GPS and palaeomagnetism data, and the distributions of young and/or active folds. The fold-and-thrust belt in the Fars Arc shows pronounced curvature, convex southwards. Folds trends vary from NW-SE in the west to ENE-WSW in the east. The GPS-derived velocity field shows NNE to SSW convergence, towards the foreland on the Arabian Plate, without dispersion. Earthquake slip vectors are highly variable, spanning a range of azimuths from SW to SSE in an Arabian Plate reference frame. The full variation of azimuths occurs within small (10s of km) sub-regions, but this variation is superimposed on a radial pattern, whereby slip vectors tend to be parallel to the regional topographic gradient. Given the lack of variation in the GPS vectors, we conclude that the Fars Arc is not curved as a result of gravitational spreading over the adjacent foreland, but as a result of deformation being restricted at tectonic boundaries at the eastern and western margins of the Arc. Fault blocks and folds within the Fars Arc, each 20-40 km long, rotate about vertical axes to achieve the overall curvature, predominantly clockwise in the west and counter-clockwise in the east. Active folds of different orientations may intersect and produce dome-and-basin interference patterns, without the need for a series of separate deformation phases of different stress orientations. The Fars Arc clearly contrasts with the Himalayas, where both GPS and earthquake slip vectors display radial patterns towards the foreland, and gravitational spreading is a viable mechanism for producing fold-and-thrust belt curvature.

  10. Controls on size and occurrence of the largest sub-aerial landslide on Earth: Seymareh (Saidmarreh) landslide, Zagros fold-thrust belt, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, N. J.; Evans, S. G.

    2009-12-01

    Gigantic (> 1 Gm3) landslides are high-magnitude, low-frequency extremes of mass movements. They are important factors in topographic evolution and hazard in mountain regions due to their magnitude. However, few examples exist for study because of their infrequency. Consequently, controls on the location and size gigantic landslides remain poorly understood. Re-examination of the Seymareh (Saidmarreh) rock avalanche, Zagros fold-thrust belt, shows it to be the largest sub-aerial landslide on Earth (initial failure volume 38 Gm3), thus representing the upper magnitude limit for terrestrial landslides. Detailed examination of the source area (including orbital remote sensing, geotechnical investigation and structural mapping) provides new insights into controls on the size and mobility of gigantic landslides. The gigantic Early Holocene rockslide initiated on the northeast limb of Kabir Kuh, the largest anticline in the Zagros fold-thrust belt, and involved the simultaneous failure of a rock mass measuring 15 km along strike. The rockslide transformed into a rock avalanche that ran-out 19.0 km, filling two adjacent valleys and overtopping an intervening low mountain ridge. The failure involved 220 m of competent jointed limestone (Asmari Formation) underlain by 580 m of weaker mudrock-dominated units. Geologic structure, geomechanical strength and topography of the source slope strongly controlled failure initiation. Extreme landslide dimensions resulted in part from extensive uniform pre-failure stability, produced by structural and topographic features related to the large scale of the Kabir Kuh anticline. High continuity bedding planes determined the large lateral extent along strike. Bedding normal joints, the breached nature of the anticline and fluvial undercutting at the slope toe accommodated expansive lateral, headscarp and toe release, respectively, necessary for extensive failure. Geomechanically weak units at depth aided the penetration of the failure

  11. 3D Reconstruction of geological structures based on remote sensing data: example from Anaran anticline, Lurestan province, Zagros folds and thrust belt, Iran.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snidero, M.; Amilibia, A.; Gratacos, O.; Muñoz, J. A.

    2009-04-01

    This work presents a methodological workflow for the 3D reconstruction of geological surfaces at regional scale, based on remote sensing data and geological maps. This workflow has been tested on the reconstruction of the Anaran anticline, located in the Zagros Fold and Thrust belt mountain front. The used remote sensing data-set is a combination of Aster and Spot images as well as a high resolution digital elevation model. A consistent spatial positioning of the complete data-set in a 3D environment is necessary to obtain satisfactory results during the reconstruction. The Aster images have been processed by the Optimum Index Factor (OIF) technique, in order to facilitate the geological mapping. By pansharpening of the resulting Aster image with the SPOT panchromatic one we obtain the final high-resolution image used during the 3D mapping. Structural data (dip data) has been acquired through the analysis of the 3D mapped geological traces. Structural analysis of the resulting data-set allows us to divide the structure in different cylindrical domains. Related plunge lines orientation has been used to project data along the structure, covering areas with little or no information. Once a satisfactory dataset has been acquired, we reconstruct a selected horizon following the dip-domain concept. By manual editing, the obtained surfaces have been adjusted to the mapped geological limits as well as to the modeled faults. With the implementation of the Discrete Smooth Interpolation (DSI) algorithm, the final surfaces have been reconstructed along the anticline. Up to date the results demonstrate that the proposed methodology is a powerful tool for 3D reconstruction of geological surfaces when working with remote sensing data, in very inaccessible areas (eg. Iran, China, Africa). It is especially useful in semiarid regions where the structure strongly controls the topography. The reconstructed surfaces clearly show the geometry in the different sectors of the structure

  12. Lithospheric Structure of the Zagros and Alborz Mountain Belts (Iran) from Seismic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.; Hatzfeld, D.; Kaviani, A.; Tatar, M.

    2008-12-01

    We present a synthesis of the results of two dense temporary passive seismic experiments installed for a few months across Central Zagros for the first one, and from North-western Zagros to Alborz for the second one. On both transects, the receiver function analysis shows that the crust has an average thickness of ~ 43 km beneath the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt and the Iranian plateau. The crust is thicker in the back side of the Main Zagros Reverse Fault (MZRF), with a larger maximum Moho depth in Central Zagros (69 ± 2 km) than in North-western Zagros (56 ± 2 km). To reconcile Bouguer anomaly data and Moho depth profile of Central Zagros, we proposed that the thickening is related to overthrusting of the Arabian margin by Central Iran on the MZRF considered as a major thrust fault rooted at Moho depth. The better-quality receiver functions of NW Zagros display clear conversions on a low-velocity channel which cross-cuts the whole crust from the surface trace of the MZRF to the Moho on 250-km length. Waveform modeling shows that the crustal LVZ is ~ 10-km thick with a S-wave velocity 8-30 % smaller than the average crustal velocity. We interpret the low-velocity channel as the trace of the thrust fault and the suture between the Arabian and the Iranian lithospheres. We favour the hypothesis of the LVZ being due to sediments of the Arabian margin dragged to depth during the subduction of the Neotethyan Ocean. At upper mantle depth, we find shield-like shear-wave velocities in the Arabian upper-mantle, and lower velocities in the Iranian shallow mantle (50-150 km) which are likely due to higher temperature. The lack of a high-velocity anomaly in the mantle northeast of the MZRF suture suggests that the Neotethian oceanic lithosphere is now detached from the Arabian margin. The crust of the Alborz mountain range is not thickened in relation with its high elevations, but its upper mantle has low P-wave velocities.

  13. Mechanical versus kinematical shortening reconstructions of the Zagros High Folded Zone (Kurdistan region of Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Reif, Daniel; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2012-06-01

    This paper compares kinematical and mechanical techniques for the palinspastic reconstruction of folded cross sections in collision orogens. The studied area and the reconstructed NE-SW trending, 55.5 km long cross section is located in the High Folded Zone of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. The present-day geometry of the cross section has been constructed from field as well as remote sensing data. In a first step, the structures and the stratigraphy are simplified and summarized in eight units trying to identify the main geometric and mechanical parameters. In a second step, the shortening is kinematically estimated using the dip domain method to 11%-15%. Then the same cross section is used in a numerical finite element model to perform dynamical unfolding simulations taking various rheological parameters into account. The main factor allowing for an efficient dynamic unfolding is the presence of interfacial slip conditions between the mechanically strong units. Other factors, such as Newtonian versus power law viscous rheology or the presence of a basement, affect the numerical simulations much less strongly. If interfacial slip is accounted for, fold amplitudes are reduced efficiently during the dynamical unfolding simulations, while welded layer interfaces lead to unrealistic shortening estimates. It is suggested that interfacial slip and decoupling of the deformation along detachment horizons is an important mechanical parameter that controlled the folding processes in the Zagros High Folded Zone.

  14. Mechanical versus kinematical shortening reconstructions of the Zagros High Folded Zone (Kurdistan Region of Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, M.; Reif, D.; Grasemann, B.

    2012-04-01

    Our study compares kinematical and mechanical techniques for the palinspastic reconstruction of folded cross-sections in collision orogens. The studied area and the reconstructed NE-SW-trending, 55.5 km long cross-section is located in the High Folded Zone of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The present-day geometry of the cross-section has been constructed from field, as well as remote sensing data. In a first step, the structures and the stratigraphy are simplified and summarized in eight units trying to identify the main geometric and mechanical parameters. In a second step, the shortening is kinematically estimated using the dip-domain method to 11%-15%. Then the same cross-section is used in a numerical finite-element model to perform dynamical unfolding simulations taking various rheological parameters into account. The main factor allowing for an efficient dynamic unfolding is the presence of interfacial slip conditions between the mechanically strong units. Other factors, such as Newtonian vs. power-law viscous rheology or the presence of a basement affect the numerical simulations much less strongly. If interfacial slip is accounted for, fold amplitudes are reduced efficiently during the dynamical unfolding simulations, while welded layer interfaces lead to unrealistic shortening estimates. It is suggested that interfacial slip and decoupling of the deformation along detachment horizons is an important mechanical parameter that controlled the folding processes in the Zagros High Folded Zone.

  15. Morphotectonic aspects of active folding in Zagros Mountains (Fin, SE of Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roustaei, M.; Abbasi, M.

    2008-05-01

    Active deformation in Iran, structural province of Zagros is a result of the convergence between the Arabian & Eurasian plates. The Zagros Mountains in southern Iran are one of the seismically active region & is introduced as fold-thrust belt trending NW-SE within the Arabian plate. Fin lies in Hormozgan province; the south of Iran. The vastness is surrounded by central Iran in the north, High Zagros in the North West and west, Folded Zagros in the east, Makran in the south east and Persian Gulf in the south. The study area is determined by complex structures, alternation of folding, salt diapers and faulting. The surface geology mainly comprises Neogene; Marls, Conglomerate, Sandstones (Mishan, Aghajari, Bakhtiyari formations), old fans and alluvium as syncline that Shur River cuts its north limb and passes from the middle of core .The older formations( Ghachsaran, Rzak and Guri member) folded into prominent anticlines. The fold axes mostly follow the parallel trends .Folds trending are NW-SE (Tashkend anticline), NE-SW (Khur anticline), E-W (Guniz & Handun anticline) and the trend of axes Baz fold in the main part is E-W. Hormoz salt also outcrops in the cores of many whaleback anticlines. Thus, anticlines may be cored with evaporates, even though no salt is currently exposed at the surface. Reason of selecting this area as an example referred to active seismcity. Release of energy is gradually in every events, this seismic character cusses that there was not earthquake with high magnitude in the area but it can not be a role. Answer to the question concerning relationship between folding of the crust layer and faulting at depth is more difficult. There is 2 terms to describe this relationship; "detachment folds" and" forced folds". In this paper, we try to analysis of different satellite imagery; Aster, spot and digital elevation model with high resolution (10 m) in order to detect geomorphic indicators which can help us to find a relationship between faulting

  16. Linkages between orogenic plateau build-up, fold-thrust shortening, and foreland basin evolution in the Zagros (NW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, D. E.; Stockli, D. F.

    2017-12-01

    The Iranian Plateau (IP) is a thickened, low-relief morphotectonic province of diffuse deformation that formed due to Arabia-Eurasia collision and may serve as a younger analogue for the Tibetan Plateau. Despite detailed geophysical characterization of the IP, its deformation history and relationship to the Zagros fold-thrust belt and its foreland basin evolution remains unresolved. Low-temperature thermochronometry and provenance data from a transect across the internal and external Zagros track growth of the IP and delineate multiphase interaction between upper- and lower-plate processes during closure of the Neotethys and Arabia-Eurasia suturing. Inversion of zircon (U-Th)/He and fission-track data from plutonic and metamorphic basement rocks in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) of the IP reveals an initial stage of low-rate exhumation from 36-25 Ma, simultaneous with the onset of tectonic subsidence and marine incursion in the Zagros foreland basin. Overlapping apatite fission-track and (U-Th)/He ages indicate sharp acceleration in SSZ exhumation rates between 20-15 Ma, coincident with rejuvenation of foreland basin subsidence and an influx of Eurasian-derived sediments into the Zagros foreland deposited above an Oligocene unconformity. The mid-Miocene marks a transition in focused exhumation from the SSZ to Arabian lower-plate. Apatite (U-Th)/He ages suggest in-sequence fold-thrust propagation from the High Zagros to simply folded belt from 10 Ma to recent, which is reflected in the foreland by a shift in provenance to dominantly recycled Arabian-derived detritus and clastic facies progradation. Integrated thermochronometric and provenance data document a two-phase outward expansion of the Iranian Plateau and Zagros fold-thrust belt, tightly coupled to distinct phases of basin evolution and provenance shifts in the Zagros foreland. We associate multiple deformation and basin episodes with protracted collisional processes, from subduction of attenuated Arabian

  17. Modelling of lateral fold growth and fold linkage: Applications to fold-and-thrust belt tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    We use a finite element model to investigate the three-dimensional fold growth and interference of two initially isolated fold segments. The most critical parameter, which controls the fold linkage mode, is the phase difference between the laterally growing fold hinge lines: 1) "Linear-linkage" yields a sub-cylindrical fold with a saddle at the location where the two initial folds linked. 2) "Oblique-linkage" produces a curved fold resembling a Type II refold structure. 3) "Oblique-no-linkage" results in two curved folds with fold axes plunging in opposite directions. 4) "Linear-no-linkage" yields a fold train of two separate sub-cylindrical folds with fold axes plunging in opposite directions. The transition from linkage to no-linkage occurs when the fold separation between the initially isolated folds is slightly larger than one half of the low-amplitude fold wavelength. The model results compare well with previously published plasticine analogue models and can be directly applied to the investigation of fold growth history in fold-and-thust belts. An excellent natural example of lateral fold linkage is described from the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The fold growth in this region is not controlled by major thrust faults but the shortening of the Paleozoic to Cenozoic passive margin sediments of the Arabian plate occurred mainly by detachment folding. The sub-cylindrical anticlines with hinge-parallel lengths of more than 50 km have not developed from single sub-cylindrical embryonic folds but they have merged from different fold segments that joined laterally during fold amplification and lateral fold growth. Linkage points are marked by geomorphological saddle points which are structurally the lowermost points of antiforms and points of principal curvatures with opposite sign. Linkage points can significantly influence the migration of mineral-rich fluids and hydrocarbons and are therefore of great economic importance.

  18. Insights on the lithospheric structure of the Zagros mountain belt from seismological data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.; Kaviani, A.; Vergne, J.; Hatzfeld, D.; Mokhtari, M.

    2003-04-01

    As part of a French-Iranian collaboration, we installed a temporary seismological network across the Zagros for 4.5 months in 2000-2001 to investigate the lithospheric structure of the mountain belt. The network included 65 stations located along a 600-km long line (average spacing of ˜10 km) from the coast of the Persian Gulf to the stable block of Central Iran. A migrated depth cross-section computed from radial receiver functions displays clear P-to-S conversions at the Moho beneath most of the profile. The average Moho depth is 45 to 50 km beneath the folded belt. It deepens rather abruptly beneath the suture zone of the MZT (Main Zagros Thrust) and the Sanandaj-Sirjan (SS) metamorphic zone. The maximum crustal thickness of ˜65 km is reached 50 km NE of the surface trace of the MZT. The region of over-thickened crust is shifted to the NE with respect to the areas of highest elevations and the strongest negative Bouguer anomaly. To the NE, the crust of the block of Central Iran is 40-km thick on average. Two patches of Ps converted energy can be seen below the Moho in the northern half of the transect that cannot be attributed to multiple reflections. Teleseismic P residual travel time curves display lateral variations as large as 1.5 s with both long (faster arrivals in the SW than in the NE) and short-scale variations (in the MZT region). They were inverted for variations of P wave velocity with the ACH technique. The crustal layer exhibits rather strong lateral variations of Vp with lower velocities under the MZT and the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic assemblage, and faster velocities under the SS zone. In the mantle, a clear difference appears between the faster P wave velocities of the Arabian craton and the relatively lower velocities of the mantle of Central Iran.

  19. Role of Neogene Exhumation and Sedimentation on Critical-Wedge Kinematics in the Zagros Orogenic Belt, Northeastern Iraq, Kurdistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshnaw, R. I.; Horton, B. K.; Stockli, D. F.; Barber, D. E.; Tamar-Agha, M. Y.; Kendall, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Zagros orogenic belt and foreland basin formed during the Cenozoic Arabia-Eurasia collision, but the precise histories of shortening and sediment accumulation remain ambiguous, especially at the NW extent of the fold-thrust belt in Iraqi Kurdistan. This region is characterized by well-preserved successions of Cenozoic clastic foreland-basin fill and deformed Paleozoic-Mesozoic hinterland bedrock. The study area provides an excellent opportunity to investigate the linkage between orogenic wedge behavior and surface processes of erosion and deposition. The aim of this research is to test whether the Zagros orogenic wedge advanced steadily under critical to supercritical wedge conditions involving in-sequence thrusting with minimal erosion or propagated intermittently under subcritical condition involving out-of-sequence deformation with intense erosion. These endmember modes of mountain building can be assessed by integrating geo/thermochronologic and basin analyses techniques, including apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology, detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology, stratigraphic synthesis, and seismic interpretations. Preliminary apatite (U-Th)/He data indicate activation of the Main Zagros Fault (MZF) at ~10 Ma with frontal thrusts initiating at ~8 Ma. However, thermochronometric results from the intervening Mountain Front Flexure (MFF), located between the MZF and the frontal thrusts, suggest rapid exhumation at ~6 Ma. These results suggest that the MFF, represented by the thrust-cored Qaradagh anticline, represents a major episode of out-of-sequence deformation. Detrital zircon U-Pb analyses from the Neogene foreland-basin deposits show continuous sediment derivation from sources to the NNE in Iraq and western Iran, suggesting that out-of-sequence thrusting did not significantly alter sedimentary provenance. Rather, intense hinterland erosion and recycling of older foreland-basin fill dominated sediment delivery to the basin. The irregular distribution of

  20. Landscape maturity, fold growth sequence and structural style in the Kirkuk Embayment of the Zagros, northern Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaid, Ahmed K.; Allen, Mark B.

    2017-10-01

    The Kirkuk Embayment is located in the southwest of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt of Iraq. Like fold-and-thrust belts worldwide, the Zagros is conventionally understood to have grown sequentially towards the foreland. Here we use landscape maturity analysis to understand anticline growth in the embayment. Digital Elevation Model (DEM)-based geomorphic indices Hypsometric Integral (HI), Surface Roughness (SR) and their combination Surface Index (SI) have been applied to quantify landscape maturity. The results inform new ideas for the sequence of anticline growth. Maturity indices are highest for the QaraChauq Anticline in the center of the Embayment, then Makhool/Himreen to the south and lastly, the Kirkuk Anticline to the north. The pattern suggests the growth sequence is not classical 'piggy back' thrusting. This result fits the exhumation record, which is loosely constrained by the stratigraphic exposure level. Favored hypotheses for fold growth order are either i) the folds have grown at different times and out of sequence (QaraChauq first, then Makhool/Himreen, and Kirkuk last), or, ii) the growth occurred with different rates of exhumation but at broadly the same time. There are few constraints from available data on syn-tectonic sedimentation patterns. Fold growth across much of the Embayment might have begun within a limited timeframe in the late Miocene-Pliocene, during the deposition of the Mukdadiyah Formation. Another hypothesis is that folds grew in sequence towards the foreland with different rates of exhumation, but we consider this less likely. We also construct a new cross-section for the Embayment, which indicates limited Cenozoic strain: 5% shortening. Analysis of topography and drainage patterns shows two previously-undescribed anticlines with hydrocarbon trap potential, between the Makhool and QaraChauq anticlines.

  1. Earthquake hazard assessment in the Zagros Orogenic Belt of Iran using a fuzzy rule-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahi Ghasre Aboonasr, Sedigheh; Zamani, Ahmad; Razavipour, Fatemeh; Boostani, Reza

    2017-08-01

    Producing accurate seismic hazard map and predicting hazardous areas is necessary for risk mitigation strategies. In this paper, a fuzzy logic inference system is utilized to estimate the earthquake potential and seismic zoning of Zagros Orogenic Belt. In addition to the interpretability, fuzzy predictors can capture both nonlinearity and chaotic behavior of data, where the number of data is limited. In this paper, earthquake pattern in the Zagros has been assessed for the intervals of 10 and 50 years using fuzzy rule-based model. The Molchan statistical procedure has been used to show that our forecasting model is reliable. The earthquake hazard maps for this area reveal some remarkable features that cannot be observed on the conventional maps. Regarding our achievements, some areas in the southern (Bandar Abbas), southwestern (Bandar Kangan) and western (Kermanshah) parts of Iran display high earthquake severity even though they are geographically far apart.

  2. Numerical modeling of fold-and-thrust belts: Applications to Kuqa foreland fold belt, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H.; Morgan, J. K.; Zhang, J.; Wang, Z.

    2009-12-01

    We constructed discrete element models to simulate the evolution of fold-and-thrust belts. The impact of rock competence and decollement strength on the geometric pattern and deformation mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts has been investigated. The models reproduced some characteristic features of fold-and-thrust belts, such as faulted detachment folds, pop-ups, far-traveled thrust sheets, passive-roof duplexes, and back thrusts. In general, deformation propagates farther above a weak decollement than above a strong decollement. Our model results confirm that fold-and-thrust belts with strong frictional decollements develop relatively steep and narrow wedges formed by closely spaced imbricate thrust slices, whereas fold belts with weak decollements form wide low-taper wedges composed of faulted detachment folds, pop-ups, and back thrusts. Far-traveled thrust sheets and passive-roof duplexes are observed in the model with a strong lower decollement and a weak upper detachment. Model results also indicate that the thickness of the weak layer is critical. If it is thick enough, it acts as a ductile layer that is able to flow under differential stress, which helps to partition deformation above and below it. The discrete element modeling results were used to interpret the evolution of Kuqa Cenozoic fold-and-thrust belt along northern Tarim basin, China. Seismic and well data show that the widely distributed Paleogene rock salt has a significant impact on the deformation in this area. Structures beneath salt are closely spaced imbricate thrust and passive-roof duplex systems. Deformation above salt propagates much farther than below the salt. Faults above salt are relatively wide spaced. A huge controversy over the Kuqa fold-and-thrust belt is whether it is thin-skinned or thick-skinned. With the insights from DEM results, we suggest that Kuqa structures are mostly thin-skinned with Paleogene salt as decollement, except for the rear part near the backstop, where the

  3. Microbiostratigraphy of the Upper Paleocene to Middle Eocene Jahrum Formation in the Folded Zagros Zone, SW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadighalati, S.; Ahmadi, V.

    2017-12-01

    The Jahrum Formation (Upper Paleocene to Middle Eocene) is composed of carbonate and dolomitic carbonate rocks in the Zagros Basin. The Zagros is located at the boundary between the Arabian and Eurasian lithosphere plates and represent the orogenic response to a collision between Eurasia and advancing Arabia during the Cenozoic. The study area is located in the northern part of Kuh-E-Tudej, 175 km southeast of Shiraz in the Folded Zagros Zone. The Jahrum Formation at Kuh-E-Tudej, with a thickness of 190 m, consists of medium to massive bedded limestone. The following foraminiferal index species are identified in the studied section: Fallotella alavensis, Kathina sp., Miscellanea sp., Lockhartia sp., Orbitolites shirazeinsis, Nummulites sp., Opertorbitolites sp., Dictyoconus cf. egyptiensis, Orbitolites cf. complanatus, Dictyoconus sp., Coskinolina sp., Somalina stefaninii, Discocyclina sp., Praerhapydionina sp., Coskinolina cf. liburnica, Nummulites cf. globulus, Nummulites cf. aturicus, and Alveolina sp. The age of the studied sediments ranges from Upper Paleocene to Middle Eocene. The microbiostratigraphic studies revealed four biozones based on the foraminifers identified in the studied section.

  4. Deformation and kinematics of the central Kirthar Fold Belt, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinsch, Ralph; Hagedorn, Peter; Asmar, Chloé; Nasim, Muhammad; Aamir Rasheed, Muhammad; Kiely, James M.

    2017-04-01

    The Kirthar Fold Belt is part of the lateral mountain belts in Pakistan linking the Himalaya orogeny with the Makran accretionary wedge. This region is deforming very oblique/nearly parallel to the regional plate motion vector. The study area is situated between the prominent Chaman strike-slip fault in the West and the un-deformed foreland (Kirthar Foredeep/Middle Indus Basin) in the East. The Kirthar Fold Belt is subdivided into several crustal blocks/units based on structural orientation and deformation style (e.g. Kallat, Khuzdar, frontal Kirthar). This study uses newly acquired and depth-migrated 2D seismic lines, surface geology observations and Google Earth assessments to construct three balanced cross sections for the frontal part of the fold belt. Further work was done in order to insure the coherency of the built cross-sections by taking a closer look at the regional context inferred from published data, simple analogue modelling, and constructed regional sketch sections. The Khuzdar area and the frontal Kirthar Fold Belt are dominated by folding. Large thrusts with major stratigraphic repetitions are not observed. Furthermore, strike-slip faults in the Khuzdar area are scarce and not observed in the frontal Kirthar Fold Belt. The regional structural elevation rises from the foreland across the Kirthar Fold Belt towards the hinterland (Khuzdar area). These observations indicate that basement-involved deformation is present at depth. The domination of folding indicates a weak decollement below the folds (soft-linked deformation). The fold pattern in the Khuzdar area is complex, whereas the large folds of the central Kirthar Fold Belt trend SSW-NNE to N-S and are best described as large detachment folds that have been slightly uplifted by basement involved transpressive deformation underneath. Towards the foreland, the deformation is apparently more hard-linked and involves fault-propagation folding and a small triangle zone in Cretaceous sediments

  5. Folding kinematics expressed in fracture patterns: An example from the Anti-Atlas fold belt, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismat, Zeshan

    2008-11-01

    The Anti-Atlas fold belt, Morocco, formed during the same Variscan collisional event that produced the Valley-and-Ridge fold-thrust belt of the Appalachian mountains. Both are external belts of the Appalachian-Ouachita-Mauritanides chain and at the map scale have very similar topographic expressions. The Anti-Atlas, however, consists of map-scale folds that are buckle-related, detachment folds, whereas the Valley-and-Ridge folds developed in response to imbricate thrusting. For this reason, the Anti-Atlas is referred to as a fold belt rather than a fold-thrust belt. This paper examines Variscan folding processes in the Anti-Atlas Mountains. Folding in some layers occurred by sliding along a penetrative network of mesoscale fractures, i.e. cataclastic flow, during buckling. Layer-parallel shortening fractures were reactivated in the later stages of folding to accommodate limb rotation. Although 'boutonnieres', i.e. basement uplifts, punctuate the fold belt, the fracture patterns indicate that the uplifts failed to provide any 'bending' component. Folding is also interpreted to occur under low to moderate confining pressures because the fracture network includes conjugate shear fractures with very small (˜20°) dihedral angles.

  6. Modelling the Deformation Front of a Fold-Thrust Belt: the Effect of an Upper Detachment Horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burberry, C. M.; Koyi, H.; Nilfouroushan, F.; Cosgrove, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    Structures found at the deformation fronts of fold-thrust belts are variable in type, geometry and spatial organisation, as can be demonstrated from comparisons between structures in the Zagros Fold-Thrust Belt, Iran and the Sawtooth Range, Montana. A range of influencing factors has been suggested to account for this variation, including the mechanical properties and distribution of any detachment horizons within the cover rock succession. A series of analogue models was designed to test this hypothesis, under conditions scaled to represent the Sawtooth Range, Montana. A brittle sand pack, containing an upper ductile layer with variable geometry, was shortened above a ductile base and the evolution of the deformation front was monitored throughout the deformation using a high-accuracy laser scanner. In none of the experiments did the upper detachment horizon cover the entire model. In experiments where it pinched out perpendicular to the shortening direction, a triangle zone was formed when the deformation front reached the pinch out. This situation is analogous to the Teton Canyon region structures in the Sawtooth Range, Montana, where the Cretaceous Colorado Shale unit pinches out at the deformation front, favouring the development of a triangle zone in this region. When the pinch out was oblique to the shortening direction, a more complex series of structures was formed. However, when shortening stopped before the detachment pinch out was reached, the deformation front structures were foreland-propagating and no triangle zone was observed. This situation is analogous to foreland-propagating thrust structures developed at the deformation front in the Swift Dam region of the Sawtooth Range, Montana and to the development of fault-bend folds at the deformation front of the Zagros Fold-Thrust Belt, Iran. We suggest that the presence of a suitable intermediate detachment horizon within a sediment pile can be invoked as a valid explanation for the development of

  7. Fault-related fold styles and progressions in fold-thrust belts: Insights from sandbox modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dan-Ping; Xu, Yan-Bo; Dong, Zhou-Bin; Qiu, Liang; Zhang, Sen; Wells, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Fault-related folds of variable structural styles and assemblages commonly coexist in orogenic belts with competent-incompetent interlayered sequences. Despite their commonality, the kinematic evolution of these structural styles and assemblages are often loosely constrained because multiple solutions exist in their structural progression during tectonic restoration. We use a sandbox modeling instrument with a particle image velocimetry monitor to test four designed sandbox models with multilayer competent-incompetent materials. Test results reveal that decollement folds initiate along selected incompetent layers with decreasing velocity difference and constant vorticity difference between the hanging wall and footwall of the initial fault tips. The decollement folds are progressively converted to fault-propagation folds and fault-bend folds through development of fault ramps breaking across competent layers and are followed by propagation into fault flats within an upper incompetent layer. Thick-skinned thrust is produced by initiating a decollement fault within the metamorphic basement. Progressive thrusting and uplifting of the thick-skinned thrust trigger initiation of the uppermost incompetent decollement with formation of a decollement fold and subsequent converting to fault-propagation and fault-bend folds, which combine together to form imbricate thrust. Breakouts at the base of the early formed fault ramps along the lowest incompetent layers, which may correspond to basement-cover contacts, domes the upmost decollement and imbricate thrusts to form passive roof duplexes and constitute the thin-skinned thrust belt. Structural styles and assemblages in each of tectonic stages are similar to that in the representative orogenic belts in the South China, Southern Appalachians, and Alpine orogenic belts.

  8. Crustal thickness variations in the Zagros continental collision zone (Iran) from joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, M.; Nasrabadi, A.

    2013-10-01

    Variations in crustal thickness in the Zagros determined by joint inversion of P wave receiver functions (RFs) and Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity dispersion. The time domain iterative deconvolution procedure was employed to compute RFs from teleseismic recordings at seven broadband stations of INSN network. Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion curves were estimated employing two-station method. Fundamental mode Rayleigh wave group velocities for each station is taken from a regional scale surface wave tomographic imaging. The main variations in crustal thickness that we observe are between stations located in the Zagros fold and thrust belt with those located in the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (SSZ) and Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic assemblage (UDMA). Our results indicate that the average crustal thickness beneath the Zagros Mountain Range varies from ˜46 km in Western and Central Zagros beneath SHGR and GHIR up to ˜50 km beneath BNDS located in easternmost of the Zagros. Toward NE, we observe an increase in Moho depth where it reaches ˜58 km beneath SNGE located in the SSZ. Average crustal thickness also varies beneath the UDMA from ˜50 km in western parts below ASAO to ˜58 in central parts below NASN. The observed variation along the SSZ and UDMA may be associated to ongoing slab steepening or break off in the NW Zagros, comparing under thrusting of the Arabian plate beneath Central Zagros. The results show that in Central Iran, the crustal thickness decrease again to ˜47 km below KRBR. There is not a significant crustal thickness difference along the Zagros fold and thrust belt. We found the same crystalline crust of ˜34 km thick beneath the different parts of the Zagros fold and thrust belt. The similarity of crustal structure suggests that the crust of the Zagros fold and thrust belt was uniform before subsidence and deposition of the sediments. Our results confirm that the shortening of the western and eastern parts of the Zagros basement is small and

  9. Kink detachment fold in the southwest Montana fold and thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Michael M.; Woodward, Nicholas B.

    1988-02-01

    The Hossfeldt anticline in the southwest Montana thrust belt is characterized by a kink geometry and probably overlies a thrust detachment at depth. The mesofabric distribution in the limbs documents that the eastern overturned limb has undergone most of the rotation and internal deformation during folding, leaving the gently dipping western limb virtually undeformed. The anticline exhibits unique mesofabrics in its hinge region that require a pinned anticlinal hinge during its evolution. The half-wavelength of the Hossfeldt anticline-Eustis syncline pair coincides with that predicted from buckling theory, if one considers the massive carbonates of the Paleozoic section as a competent beam. Although the geometry and mesofabric distribution of the Hossfeldt anticline satisfy the geometric requirements of either a fault-propagation fold or a detachment kink fold, the buckling wavelength strongly suggests that its origin was as a kink-buckle fold above a flat detachment rather than as a fault-propagation fold above a thrust ramp.

  10. Origin of the Uinta recess, Sevier fold thrust belt, Utah: influence of basin architecture on fold thrust belt geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Timothy; Marshak, Stephen

    1999-11-01

    Structural trends in the Sevier fold-thrust belt define a pronounced concave-to-the-foreland map-view curve, the Uinta recess, in north-central Utah. This recess separates two convex-to-the-foreland curves, the Provo salient on the south and the Wyoming salient on the north. The two limbs of the recess comprise transverse zones (fault zones at a high-angle to the regional trend of the orogen) that border the flanks of the east-west-trending Uinta/Cottonwood arch. Our structural analysis indicates that the transverse zones formed during the Sevier orogeny, and that they differ markedly from each other in structural style. The Charleston transverse zone (CTZ), on the south side of the arch, initiated as a complex sinistral strike-slip fault system that defines the abrupt northern boundary of the Provo salient. The Mount Raymond transverse zone (MRTZ), on the north side of the arch, represents the region in which the southeast-verging southern limb of the gently curving Wyoming salient was tilted northwards during the Laramide phase of uplift of the Uinta/Cottonwood arch. In effect, the MRTZ represents an oblique cross section through a thrust belt. The contrasting architecture of these transverse zones demonstrates how pre-deformation basin geometry influences the geometry of a fold-thrust belt. Analysis of isopach maps indicates that, at the time the Sevier fold-thrust belt formed, the area just north of the present site of the Uinta/Cottonwood arch was a basement high, with a gently dipping north flank, and a steeply dipping south flank. Thus, predeformational sediment thickened abruptly to the south of the high and thickened gradually to the north of the high. As illustrated by sandbox models, the distance that a fold-thrust belt propagates into the foreland depends on the thickness of the sedimentary layer being deformed, so the shape of the salient mimics the longitudinal cross-sectional shape of the sedimentary basin. Where basins taper gradually along strike

  11. Potential field signatures along the Zagros collision zone in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Maysam; Fournier, Dominique; Devriese, Sarah G. R.; Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    2018-01-01

    The Zagros orogenic belt, known as an active fold-thrust belt, was formed in southwestern Iran due to the convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian plates. In this study, potential field data are inverted in 3D to image the variations of magnetic susceptibility and density contrast along the collision zone, resulting in better tectonic understanding of the studied region. Geophysical data measured by airborne magnetic and ground-based gravity systems are used to construct an integrated model that facilitates the interpretations of various tectonic zones across a 450-km line. This line intersects the main structural units from the SW portion of the Zagros belt. The constructed model reveals a contrast that indicates the transition between the two continental plates coinciding with the western boundaries of the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) at the Main Zagros Thrust (MZT) fault. The subduction of the Arabian continental crust below the Iranian one is evident because of its lower susceptibility property and alternating sequence of high and low density regions. Higher susceptibility, magnetic remanence and density are the mainstays of the Urumieh-Dokhtar Magmatic Assemblage (UDMA) zone at the NE of the studied route, whereas lower values of these properties correspond to (1) the thin massive Tertiary-Neogene and Quaternary sediments of the central domain (CD) zone, and (2) the thick sedimentary and salt intrusion cover over the Zagros Fold-and-Thrust belt (ZFTB). Higher density of regions in the Arabian crust below the ZFTB implies that fault activities have caused significant vertical displacement of the basement. Finally, a simplified geological model is presented based upon the inversions of the geophysical data, in which the main geological units are divided along the studied route.

  12. Generation of buckle folds in Naga fold thrust belt, north-east India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, B.; Dietl, C.

    2009-04-01

    Naga fold thrust belt (NFTB), India, formed as a result of northward migration of the Indian plate initiated in Eocene and its subsequent collision with the Burmese plate during Oligocene. The NW-SE oriented compression generated a spectrum of structures; among them, we intend to focus on the folds- varying from gentle to tight asymmetric in geometry. Large recumbent folds are often associated with thrusting. Buckle folds forming under shallow crustal conditions are frequently reported from NFTB. Buckle folding occurs mainly within sandstones with intercalated shale layers which are in the study area typical for the Barail, Surma and Tipam Groups. We have tried to explain the controlling factors behind the variation of the buckle fold shapes and their varying wavelengths throughout the fold thrust belt with the aid of analogue (sand box) modelling. It is undoubted that competence contrast along with the layer parallel compressive stress are the major influencing factors in generation of buckle folds. Schmalholz and Podladchikov (1999) and Jeng et al. (2002) have shown that when low strain rate and low temperature are applicable, not only the viscosity contrast, but also the elasticity contrast govern the geometry of the developing buckle folds. Rocks deforming under high temperature and high pressure deform in pure viscous manner, whereas, rocks undergoing less confining stress and less temperature, are subjected to pure elastic deformation. However, they are the end members, and most of the deformations are a combination of these two end members, i.e. of viscoelastic nature. Our models are made up of sieved sand (0.5 mm grain size) and mica layers (1-5 mm) This interlayering imparts a mechanical anisotropy in the model. Mica is not a pure viscous material, rather it displays more elastic behaviour. The mica layers in the model produce bedding parallel slip during shortening through internal reorganization of the individual mica crystals leading to the thickening

  13. Comparison of fault-related folding algorithms to restore a fold-and-thrust-belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Christian; Tanner, David

    2017-04-01

    Fault-related folding means the contemporaneous evolution of folds as a consequence of fault movement. It is a common deformation process in the upper crust that occurs worldwide in accretionary wedges, fold-and-thrust belts, and intra-plate settings, in either strike-slip, compressional, or extensional regimes. Over the last 30 years different algorithms have been developed to simulate the kinematic evolution of fault-related folds. All these models of fault-related folding include similar simplifications and limitations and use the same kinematic behaviour throughout the model (Brandes & Tanner, 2014). We used a natural example of fault-related folding from the Limón fold-and-thrust belt in eastern Costa Rica to test two different algorithms and to compare the resulting geometries. A thrust fault and its hanging-wall anticline were restored using both the trishear method (Allmendinger, 1998; Zehnder & Allmendinger, 2000) and the fault-parallel flow approach (Ziesch et al. 2014); both methods are widely used in academia and industry. The resulting hanging-wall folds above the thrust fault are restored in substantially different fashions. This is largely a function of the propagation-to-slip ratio of the thrust, which controls the geometry of the related anticline. Understanding the controlling factors for anticline evolution is important for the evaluation of potential hydrocarbon reservoirs and the characterization of fault processes. References: Allmendinger, R.W., 1998. Inverse and forward numerical modeling of trishear fault propagation folds. Tectonics, 17, 640-656. Brandes, C., Tanner, D.C. 2014. Fault-related folding: a review of kinematic models and their application. Earth Science Reviews, 138, 352-370. Zehnder, A.T., Allmendinger, R.W., 2000. Velocity field for the trishear model. Journal of Structural Geology, 22, 1009-1014. Ziesch, J., Tanner, D.C., Krawczyk, C.M. 2014. Strain associated with the fault-parallel flow algorithm during kinematic fault

  14. Modelling the role of basement block rotation and strike-slip faulting on structural pattern in the cover units of fold-and-thrust belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyi, Hemin; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Hessami, Khaled

    2015-04-01

    A series of scaled analogue models are run to study the degree of coupling between basement block kinematics and cover deformation. In these models, rigid basal blocks were rotated about vertical axis in a "bookshelf" fashion, which caused strike-slip faulting along the blocks and, to some degrees, in the overlying cover units of loose sand. Three different combinations of cover basement deformations are modeled; cover shortening prior to basement fault movement; basement fault movement prior to shortening of cover units; and simultaneous cover shortening with basement fault movement. Model results show that the effect of basement strike-slip faults depends on the timing of their reactivation during the orogenic process. Pre- and syn-orogen basement strike-slip faults have a significant impact on the structural pattern of the cover units, whereas post-orogenic basement strike-slip faults have less influence on the thickened hinterland of the overlying fold-and-thrust belt. The interaction of basement faulting and cover shortening results in formation of rhomb features. In models with pre- and syn-orogen basement strike-slip faults, rhomb-shaped cover blocks develop as a result of shortening of the overlying cover during basement strike-slip faulting. These rhombic blocks, which have resemblance to flower structures, differ in kinematics, genesis and structural extent. They are bounded by strike-slip faults on two opposite sides and thrusts on the other two sides. In the models, rhomb-shaped cover blocks develop as a result of shortening of the overlying cover during basement strke-slip faulting. Such rhomb features are recognized in the Alborz and Zagros fold-and-thrust belts where cover units are shortened simultaneously with strike-slip faulting in the basement. Model results are also compared with geodetic results obtained from combination of all available GPS velocities in the Zagros and Alborz FTBs. Geodetic results indicate domains of clockwise and

  15. Critical taper wedge mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts on Venus - Initial results from Magellan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suppe, John; Connors, Chris

    1992-01-01

    Examples of fold-and-thrust belts from a variety of tectonic settings on Venus are introduced. Predictions for the mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts on Venus are examined on the basis of wedge theory, rock mechanics data, and currently known conditions on Venus. The theoretical predictions are then compared with new Magellan data.

  16. Lateral and depth variations of coda Q in the Zagros region of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irandoust, Mohsen Ahmadzadeh; Sobouti, Farhad; Rahimi, Habib

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed more than 2800 local earthquakes recorded by the Iranian National Seismic Network (INSN) and the Iranian Seismological Center (IRSC) to estimate coda wave quality factor, Q c , in the Zagros fold and thrust belt and the Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic zone in Iran. We used the single backscattering model to investigate lateral and depth variations of Q c in the study region. In the interior of Zagros, no strong lateral variation in attenuation parameters is observed. In SE Zagros (the Bandar-Abbas region) where transition to the Makran subduction setting begins, the medium shows lower attenuation. The average frequency relations for the SSZ, the Bandar-Abbas region, and the Zagros are Q c = (124 ± 11) f 0.82 ± 0.04, Q c = (109 ± 2) f 0.99 ± 0.01, and Q c = (85 ± 5) f 1.06 ± 0.03, respectively. To investigate the depth variation of Q c , 18 time windows between 5 and 90 s and at two epicentral distance ranges of R < 100 km and 100 < R < 200 km were considered. It was observed that with increasing coda lapse time, Q 0 ( Q c at 1 Hz) and n (frequency dependence factor) show increasing and decreasing trends, respectively. Beneath the SSZ and at depths of about 50 to 80 km, there is a correlation between the reported low velocity medium and the observed sharp change in the trend of Q 0 and n curves. In comparison with results obtained in other regions of the Iranian plateau, the Zagros along with the Alborz Mountains in the north show highest attenuation of coda wave and strongest frequency dependence, an observation that reflects the intense seismicity and active faulting in these mountain ranges. We also observe a stronger depth dependence of attenuation in the Zagros and SSZ compared to central Iran, indicating a thicker lithosphere in the Zagros region than in central Iran.

  17. Kink-style detachment folding in Bachu fold belt of central Tarim Basin, China: geometry and seismic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Zhang; Jinjiang, Zhang; Shuyu, Yan; Jiang, Liu; Jinhai, Zhang; Zhongpei, Zhang

    2010-05-01

    The phenomenon of Kink banding is well known throughout the engineering and geophysical sciences. Associated with layered structures compressed in a layer-parallel direction, it arises for example in stratified geological systems under tectonic compression. Our work documented it is also possible to develop super large-scale kink-bands in sedimentary sequences. We interpret the Bachu fold uplift belt of the central Tarim basin in western China to be composed of detachment folds flanked by megascopic-scale kink-bands. Those previous principal fold models for the Bachu uplift belt incorporated components of large-scale thrust faulting, such as the imbricate fault-related fold model and the high-angle, reverse-faulted detachment fold model. Based on our observations in the outcrops and on the two-dimension seismic profiles, we interpret that first-order structures in the region are kink-band style detachment folds to accommodate regional shortening, and thrust faulting can be a second-order deformation style occurring on the limb of the detachment folds or at the cores of some folds to accommodate the further strain of these folds. The belt mainly consists of detachment folds overlying a ductile decollement layer. The crests of the detachment folds are bounded by large-scale kink-bands, which are zones of angularly folded strata. These low-signal-tonoise, low-reflectivity zones observed on seismic profiles across the Bachu belt are poorly imaged sections, which resulted from steeply dipping bedding in the kink-bands. The substantial width (beyond 200m) of these low-reflectivity zones, their sub-parallel edges in cross section, and their orientations at a high angle to layering between 50 and 60 degrees, as well as their conjugate geometry, support a kink-band interpretation. The kink-band interpretation model is based on the Maximum Effective Moment Criteria for continuous deformation, rather than Mohr-Column Criteria for brittle fracture. Seismic modeling is done to

  18. Cenozoic structural evolution, thermal history, and erosion of the Ukrainian Carpathians fold-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakapelyukh, Mykhaylo; Bubniak, Ihor; Bubniak, Andriy; Jonckheere, Raymond; Ratschbacher, Lothar

    2018-01-01

    The Carpathians are part of the Alpine-Carpathian-Dinaridic orogen surrounding the Pannonian basin. Their Ukrainian part constitutes an ancient subduction-accretion complex that evolved into a foreland fold-thrust belt with a shortening history that was perpendicular to the orogenic strike. Herein, we constrain the evolution of the Ukrainian part of the Carpathian fold-thrust belt by apatite fission-track dating of sedimentary and volcanic samples and cross-section balancing and restoration. The apatite fission-track ages are uniform in the inner―southwestern part of the fold-thrust belt, implying post-shortening erosion since 12-10 Ma. The ages in the leading and trailing edges record provenance, i.e., sources in the Trans-European suture zone and the Inner Carpathians, respectively, and show that these parts of the fold-thrust were not heated to more than 100 °C. Syn-orogenic strata show sediment recycling: in the interior of the fold-thrust belt―the most thickened and most deeply eroded nappes―the apatite ages were reset, eroded, and redeposited in the syn-orogenic strata closer to the fore- and hinterland; the lag times are only a few million years. Two balanced cross sections, one constructed for this study and based on field and subsurface data, reveal an architecture characterized by nappe stacks separated by high-displacement thrusts; they record 340-390 km shortening. A kinematic forward model highlights the fold-thrust belt evolution from the pre-contractional configuration over the intermediate geometries during folding and thrusting and the post-shortening, erosional-unloading configuration at 12-10 Ma to the present-day geometry. Average shortening rates between 32-20 Ma and 20-12 Ma amounted to 13 and 21 km/Ma, respectively, implying a two-phased deformation of the Ukrainian fold-thrust belt.

  19. Fold and thrust partitioning in a contracting fold belt: Insights from the 1931 Mach earthquake in Baluchistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeliga, Walter; Bilham, Roger; Schelling, Daniel; Kakar, Din Mohamed; Lodi, Sarosh

    2009-10-01

    Surface deformation associated with the 27 August 1931 earthquake near Mach in Baluchistan is quantified from spirit-leveling data and from detailed structural sections of the region interpreted from seismic reflection data constrained by numerous well logs. Mean slip on the west dipping Dezghat/Bannh fault system amounted to 1.2 m on a 42 km × 72 km thrust plane with slip locally attaining 3.2 m up dip of an inferred locking line at ˜9 km depth. Slip also occurred at depths below the interseismic locking line. In contrast, negligible slip occurred in the 4 km near the interseismic locking line. The absence of slip here in the 4 years following the earthquake suggests that elastic energy there must either dissipate slowly in the interseismic cycle, or that a slip deficit remains, pending its release in a large future earthquake. Elastic models of the earthquake cycle in this fold and thrust belt suggest that slip on the frontal thrust fault is reduced by a factor of 2 to 8 compared to that anticipated from convergence of the hinterland, a partitioning process that is presumably responsible for thickening of the fold and thrust belt at the expense of slip on the frontal thrust. Near the latitude of Quetta, GPS measurements indicate that convergence is ˜5 mm/yr. Hence the minimum renewal time between earthquakes with 1.2-m mean displacement should be as little as 240 years. However, when the partitioning of fold belt convergence to frontal thrust slip is taken into account the minimum renewal time may exceed 2000 years.

  20. Lateral ramps in the folded Appalachians and in overthrust belts worldwide; a fundamental element of thrust-belt architecture

    Pohn, Howard A.

    2000-01-01

    Lateral ramps are zones where decollements change stratigraphic level along strike; they differ from frontal ramps, which are zones where decollements change stratigraphic level perpendicular to strike. In the Appalachian Mountains, the surface criteria for recognizing the subsurface presence of lateral ramps include (1) an abrupt change in wavelength or a termination of folds along strike, (2) a conspicuous change in the frequency of mapped faults or disturbed zones (extremely disrupted duplexes) at the surface, (3) long, straight river trends emerging onto the coastal plain or into the Appalachian Plateaus province, (4) major geomorphic discontinuities in the trend of the Blue Ridge province, (5) interruption of Mesozoic basins by cross-strike border faults, and (6) zones of modern and probable ancient seismic activity. Additional features related to lateral ramps include tectonic windows, cross-strike igneous intrusions, areas of giant landslides, and abrupt changes in Paleozoic sedimentation along strike. Proprietary strike-line seismic-reflection profiles cross three of the lateral ramps that were identified by using the surface criteria. The profiles confirm their presence and show their detailed nature in the subsurface. Like frontal ramps, lateral ramps are one of two possible consequences of fold-and-thrust-belt tectonics and are common elements in the Appalachian fold-and-thrust belt. A survey of other thrust belts in the United States and elsewhere strongly suggests that lateral ramps at depth can be identified by their surface effects. Lateral ramps probably are the result of thrust sheet motion caused by continued activation of ancient cratonic fracture systems. Such fractures localized the transform faults along which the continental segments adjusted during episodes of sea-floor spreading.

  1. Formation of fold-and-thrust belts on Venus by thick-skinned deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, M. T.; Parmentier, E. M.

    1995-10-01

    ON Venus, fold-and-thrust belts—which accommodate large-scale horizontal crustal convergence—are often located at the margins of kilometre-high plateaux1-5. Such mountain belts, typically hundreds of kilometres long and tens to hundreds of kilometres wide, surround the Lakshmi Planum plateau in the Ishtar Terra highland (Fig. 1). In explaining the origin of fold-and-thrust belts, it is important to understand the relative importance of thick-skinned deformation of the whole lithosphere and thin-skinned, large-scale overthrusting of near-surface layers. Previous quantitative analyses of mountain belts on Venus have been restricted to thin-skinned models6-8, but this style of deformation does not account for the pronounced topographic highs at the plateau edge. We propose that the long-wavelength topography of these venusian fold-and-thrust belts is more readily explained by horizontal shortening of a laterally heterogeneous lithosphere. In this thick-skinned model, deformation within the mechanically strong outer layer of Venus controls mountain building. Our results suggest that lateral variations in either the thermal or mechanical structure of the interior provide a mechanism for focusing deformation due to convergent, global-scale forces on Venus.

  2. Structural evolution of the J-fold; a multi-scalar approach to modeling kinematic fold evolution in the Cordilleran fold-thrust belt, southwestern Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, James W.

    The Highway 2 structural complex (HW2SC) is part of the North American western Cordilleran fold-and-thrust belt that extends from northern Wyoming into northwestern Canada. More precisely, the HW2SC is located on the southeastern margin of the Helena salient in what is known as the southwest Montana transverse zone. Based on the location of the HW2SC it appears to have formed as footwall deformation associated with displacement along the southwestern Montana transverse zone. The most prominent structural feature in the HW2SC is the Late-Cretaceous "J-fold", a east-west trending, muliti-hinged, northeast plunging anticline with an associated northeast plunging syncline. The purpose of this study is to provide insight into whether the geometries of thrust-related folds correlate to particular mechanical responses taking place within the folded sedimentary sequences. This is accomplished by conducting a multifaceted examination of the J-fold using high-resolution terrestrial laser scanning combined with detailed field measurements of kinematic indicators, and petrographic analysis of microstructures in thin section. Based on the findings of this study four specific conclusions about the kinematic and mechanical evolution of the J-fold can be made: 1) the J-fold kinematically behaves as a fault-bend fold throughout its structural evolution; 2) the J-fold enjoyed two stages of fault-bend folding deformation that produced its present day geometry; 3) the J-fold has been tectonically thinned by >50% in the Permian Phosphoria and Jurassic Ellis-Rierdon formations located in the Overturned forelimb; and finally 4) the J-fold is mechanically accommodating the thinning in the Overturned forelimb by pressure solution and dissolution of chert grains in the Permian Phosphoria formation and by faulting and shearing in the Jurassic Ellis-Rierdon formation.

  3. Strain analysis in the Sanandaj-Sirjan HP-LT Metamorphic Belt, SW Iran: Insights from small-scale faults and associated drag folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Keshavarz, Saeede; Faghih, Ali

    2015-05-01

    This study is aimed at quantifying the kinematics of deformation using a population of drag fold structures associated with small-scale faults in deformed quartzites from Seh-Ghalatoun area within the HP-LT Sanandaj-Sirjan Metamorphic Belt, SW Iran. A total 30 small-scale faults in the quartzite layers were examined to determine the deformation characteristics. Obtained data revealed α0 (initial fault angle) and ω (angle between flow apophyses) are equal to 83° and 32°, respectively. These data yield mean kinematic vorticity number (Wm) equal to 0.79 and mean finite strain (Rs) of 2.32. These results confirm the relative contribution of ∼43% pure shear and ∼57% simple shear components, respectively. The strain partitioning inferred from this quantitative analysis is consistent with a sub-simple or general shear deformation pattern associated with a transpressional flow regime in the study area as a part of the Zagros Orogen. This type of deformation resulted from oblique convergence between the Afro-Arabian and Central-Iranian plates.

  4. Permian paleomagnetism of the Tien Shan fold belt, Central Asia: post-collisional rotations and deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenov, Mikhail L.; S. Burtman, Valentin; Dvorova, Ariadna V.

    1999-11-01

    Permian volcanic and sedimentary rocks were sampled from eight localities in the western and central parts of the Tien Shan fold belt. High-temperature, sometimes intermediate-temperature components isolated from these rocks at seven localities after stepwise thermal demagnetization are shown either to predate folding or be acquired during deformation; the conglomerate test at some localities is positive. The observed inclinations fit rather well with the Eurasian reference data, whereas the declinations are strongly deflected westward; westerly declinations have already been observed from the other parts of the Tien Shan (from the Turan plate in the west to the northern rim of Tarim and the Urumque area in the east). Our analysis shows that a considerable counterclockwise rotation of the Tien Shan fold belt as a rigid body is geologically improbable. We hypothesize that a sinistral shear zone existed over the fold belt thus accounting for systematically westerly declinations. This zone is about 300 km wide and is traced along the Tien Shan fold belt for 2500 km. A large area of Permian alkali magmatism in the West and Central Tien Shan is interpreted as an extensional domain conjugated with the shear zone. This shear zone can be accounted for by translation of the Kara Kum and Tarim blocks along the Eurasian boundary after their oblique collision in the Late Carboniferous. Two phases of rotation are recognized in the Tien Shan. The earlier rotation took place under shear strain during the D3 stage of deformation in the Artinskian-Ufimian. The later rotation is connected with transpression (D4 stage of deformation) and could occur from the Late Permian to Early Jurassic.

  5. Transpressional deformation, strain partitioning and fold superimposition in the southern Chinese Altai, Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengfei; Sun, Min; Rosenbaum, Gideon; Cai, Keda; Chen, Ming; He, Yulin

    2016-06-01

    Transpressional deformation has played an important role in the late Paleozoic evolution of the western Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), and understanding the structural evolution of such transpressional zones is crucial for tectonic reconstructions. Here we focus on the transpressional Irtysh Shear Zone with an aim at understanding amalgamation processes between the Chinese Altai and the West/East Junggar. We mapped macroscopic fold structures in the southern Chinese Altai and analyzed their relationships with the development of the adjacent Irtysh Shear Zone. Structural observations from these macroscopic folds show evidence for four generations of folding and associated fabrics. The earlier fabric (S1), is locally recognized in low strain areas, and is commonly isoclinally folded by F2 folds that have an axial plane orientation parallel to the dominant fabric (S2). S2 is associated with a shallowly plunging stretching lineation (L2), and defines ∼NW-SE tight-close upright macroscopic folds (F3) with the doubly plunging geometry. F3 folds are superimposed by ∼NNW-SSE gentle F4 folds. The F3 and F4 folds are kinematically compatible with sinistral transpressional deformation along the Irtysh Shear Zone and may represent strain partitioning during deformation. The sub-parallelism of F3 fold axis with the Irtysh Shear Zone may have resulted from strain partitioning associated with simple shear deformation along narrow mylonite zones and pure shear-dominant deformation (F3) in fold zones. The strain partitioning may have become less efficient in the later stage of transpressional deformation, so that a fraction of transcurrent components was partitioned into F4 folds.

  6. Complex fold and thrust belt structural styles: Examples from the Greater Juha area of the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, Luke; Hill, Kevin; McLaren, Sandra; Hanani, Amanda

    2017-07-01

    The remote and inhospitable Papuan Fold Belt in Papua New Guinea is one of the youngest yet least well-documented fold and thrust belts on Earth. Within the frontal Greater Juha area we have carried out >100 km of geological traverses and associated analyses that have added significantly to the contemporary geological and geophysical dataset. Our structural analysis provides evidence of major inversion, detachment and triangle zone faults within the uplifted Eastern Muller Ranges. We have used the dataset to develop a quasi-3D model for the Greater Juha area, with associated cross-sections revealing that the exposed Cenozoic Darai Limestone is well-constrained with very low shortening of 12.6-21.4% yet structures are elevated up to 7 km above regional. We suggest the inversion of pre-existing rift architecture is the primary influence on the evolution of the area and that structures link to the surface via triangle zones and detachment faults within the incompetent Mesozoic passive-margin sedimentary sequence underlying competent Darai Limestone. Arc-normal oriented structures, dominantly oblique dextral, up-to-the-southeast, are pervasive across a range of scales and are here interpreted to relate at depth to weakened pre-existing basement cross-structures. It is proposed that Palaeozoic basement fabric controlled the structural framework of the basin during Early Mesozoic rifting forming regional-scale accommodation zones and related local-scale transfer structures that are now expressed as regional-scale arc-normal lineaments and local-scale arc-normal structures, respectively. Transfer structures, including complexly breached relay ramps, utilise northeast-southwest striking weaknesses associated with the basement fabric, as a mechanism for accommodating displacement along major northwest-southeast striking normal faults. These structures have subsequently been inverted to form arc-normal oriented zones of tear faulting that accommodate laterally variable

  7. Detachments in Shale: Controlling Characteristics on Fold-Thrust Belt Style

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansberry, Rowan; King, Ros; Collins, Alan; Morley, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Fold-thrust belts occur across multiple tectonic settings where thin-skinned deformation is accommodated by one or more detachment zones, both basal and within the fold-thrust belt. These fold-thrust belts exhibit considerable variation in structural style and vergence depending on the characteristics (e.g. strength, thickness, and lithology) and number of detachment zones. Shale as a detachment lithology is intrinsically weaker than more competent silts and sands; however, it can be further weakened by high pore pressures, reducing resistance to sliding and; high temperatures, altering the rheology of the detachment. Despite the implications for petroleum exploration and natural hazard assessment the precise nature by which detachments in shale control and are involved in deformation in fold-thrust belts is poorly understood. Present-day active basal detachment zones are usually located in inaccessible submarine regions. Therefore, this project employs field observations and sample analysis of ancient, exhumed analogues to document the nature of shale detachments (e.g. thickness, lithology, dip and dip direction, deformational temperature and thrust propagation rates) at field sites in Thailand, Norway and New Zealand. X-ray diffraction analysis of illite crystallinity and oxygen stable isotopes analysis are used as a proxy for deformational temperature whilst electron-backscatter diffraction analysis is used to constrain microstructural deformational patterns. K-Ar dating of synkinematic clay fault gouges is being applied to date the final stages of activity on individual faults with a view to constraining thrust activation sequences. It is not possible to directly measure palaeo-data for some key detachment parameters, such as pore pressure and coefficients of friction. However, the use of critical taper wedge theory has been used to successfully infer internal and basal coefficients of friction and depth-normalized pore pressure within a wedge and at its base

  8. A viscoelastic strain energy principle expressed in fold thrust belts and other compressional regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Regan L.; Watkinson, A. John

    2005-07-01

    A mathematical folding theory for stratified viscoelastic media in layer parallel compression is presented. The second order fluid, in slow flow, is used to model rock rheological behavior because it is the simplest nonlinear constitutive equation exhibiting viscoelastic effects. Scaling and non-dimensionalization of the model system reveals the presence of Weissenberg number ( Wi), defined as a ratio of time scales τ*/( H*/ V*). V*/ H* is the strain rate (s -1) imposed by an assumed far field velocity V* acting on a layer of thickness H*, while τ* (s) is related to the relaxation of normal stresses. Our most significant finding is a transitional behavior as Wi→½, which is independent of the viscosity contrast. A change of variables shows that lengths associated with this transition are scaled by a parameter α=[(1-2 Wi)/(1+2 Wi)] 1/2, which is inversely proportional to local strain energy. On this basis a scaling law representing a distribution of non-dimensional wavelengths (wavelength/layer thickness) is derived. Geologically this is consistent with a transition from folding to faulting, as observed in fold-thrust belts. Folding, a distributed deformation scaling as Wi-1, is found to be energetically favored at non-dimensional wavelengths ranging from about three to seven. Furthermore, the transition from folding to faulting, a localized deformation scaling as ( αWi) -1, is predicted at a non-dimensional wavelength of about seven. These findings are consistent with measurements of thrust sheets in the Sawtooth Mountains of western Montana, USA and other fold-thrust belts. A review of the literature reveals a similar distribution of non-dimensional wavelengths spanning a wide range of observational scales in compressional deformation. Specific examples include lithospheric scale folding in the central Indian Basin and microscopic scale failure of ice columns between splay microcracks in laboratory studies.

  9. Structural analysis of sheath folds in the Sylacauga Marble Group, Talladega slate belt, southern Appalachians

    Mies, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Remnant blocks of marble from the Moretti-Harrah dimension-stone quarry provide excellent exposure of meter-scale sheath folds. Tubular structures with elliptical cross-sections (4 ???Ryz ??? 5) are the most common expression of the folds. The tubes are elongate subparallel to stretching lineation and are defined by centimeter-scale layers of schist. Eccentrically nested elliptical patterns and opposing asymmetry of folds ('S' and 'Z') are consistent with the sheath-fold interpretation. Sheath folds are locally numerous in the Moretti-Harrah quarry but are not widely distributed in the Sylacauga Marble Group; reconnaissance in neighboring quarries provided no additional observations. The presence of sheath folds in part of the Talladega slate belt indicates a local history of plastic, non-coaxial deformation. Such a history of deformation is substantiated by petrographic study of an extracted hinge from the Moretti-Harrah quarry. The sheath folds are modeled as due to passive amplification of initial structures during simple shear, using both analytic geometry and graphic simulation. As indicated by these models, relatively large shear strains (y ??? 9) and longitudinal initial structures are required. The shear strain presumably relates to NW-directed displacement of overlying crystalline rocks during late Paleozoic orogeny. ?? 1993.

  10. Structural model of the eastern Achara-Trialeti fold and thrust belt using seismic reflection profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alania, Victor; Chabukiani, Alexander; Enukidze, Onise; Razmadze, Alexander; Sosson, Marc; Tsereteli, Nino; Varazanashvili, Otar

    2017-04-01

    Our study focused on the structural geometry at the eastern Achara-Trialeti fold and thrust belt (ATFTB) located at the retro-wedge of the Lesser Caucasus orogen (Alania et al., 2016a). Our interpretation has integrated seismic reflection profiles, several oil-wells, and the surface geology data to reveal structural characteristics of the eastern ATFTB. Fault-related folding theories were used to seismic interpretation (Shaw et al., 2004). Seismic reflection data reveal the presence of basement structural wedge, south-vergent backthrust, north-vergent forethrust and some structural wedges (or duplex). The rocks are involved in the deformation range from Paleozoic basement rocks to Tertiary strata. Building of thick-skinned structures of eastern Achara-Trialeti was formed by basement wedges propagated from south to north along detachment horizons within the cover generating thin-skinned structures. The kinematic evolution of the south-vergent backthrust zone with respect to the northward propagating structural wedge (or duplexes). The main style of deformation within the backthrust belt is a series of fault-propagation folds. Frontal part of eastern ATFTB are represent by triangle zone (Alania et al., 2016b; Sosson et al., 2016). A detailed study was done for Tbilisi area: seismic refection profiles, serial balanced cross-sections, and earthquakes reveal the presence of an active blind thrust fault beneath Tbilisi. 2 & 3-D structural models show that 2002 Mw 4.5 Tbilisi earthquake related to a north-vergent blind thrust. Empirical relations between blind fault rupture area and magnitude suggest that these fault segments could generate earthquakes of Mw 6.5. The growth fault-propagation fold has been observed near Tbilisi in the frontal part of eastern ATFTB. Seismic reflection profile through Ormoiani syncline shows that south-vergent growth fault-propagation fold related to out-of-the-syncline thrust. The outcrop of fault-propagation fold shown the geometry of the

  11. Mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges Cohesive Coulomb theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlen, F. A.; Suppe, J.; Davis, D.

    1984-01-01

    A self-consistent theory for the mechanics of thin-skinned accretionary Coulomb wedges is developed and applied to the active fold-and-thrust belt of western Taiwan. The state of stress everywhere within a critical wedge is determined by solving the static equilibrium equations subject to the appropriate boundary conditions. The influence of wedge cohesion, which gives rise to a concave curvature of the critical topographic surface and affects the orientation of the principal stresses and Coulomb fracture within the wedge, is considered. The shape of the topographic surface and the angles at which thrust faults step up from the basal decollement in the Taiwanese belt is analyzed taking into account the extensive structural and fluid-pressure data available there. It is concluded that the gross geometry and structure of the Taiwan wedge are consistent with normal laboratory frictional and fracture strengths of sedimentary rocks.

  12. Shear zones of the Verkhoyansk fold-and-thrust belt, Northeast Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridovsky, Valery; Polufuntikova, Lena

    2017-04-01

    The Verkhoyansk fold-and-thrust belt is situated on the submerged eastern margin of the North Asian craton, and is largely composed of the Ediacaran - Middle Paleozoic carbonate and the Upper Paleozoic-Mesozoic terrigenous rocks. The Upper Carboniferous - Jurassic sediments constitute the Verkhoyansk terrigenous complex containing economically viable orogenic gold deposits. The structure of the belt is mainly controlled by thrusts and associated diagonal strike slips. Linear concentric folds are common all over the area of the belt. Shear zones with associated similar folds are confined to long narrow areas. Shear zones were formed during the early stages of the Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian collisional and accretionary events prior to the emplacement of large orogenic granitoid plutons. The main ore-controlling structures are shear zones associated with slaty cleavage, shear folds, mullion- and boudinage-structures, and transposition features. The shear zones are listric-type, and represent branches of a detachment structure, which is assumed to be present at the base of the Verkhoyansk fold-and-thrust belt. A vertical zonation of shear zones is correlated with the distance to the detachment. Changes in the dip angle of the shear zones (as indicated mainly by cleavage), structural paragenesis, the degree of microdeformation of the host rocks, and the type of ore-controlling structures can be clearly observed in the direction away from the detachment. Structural zoning is evidenced, among other things, by changing morphologic types of microstructures and by strain-indicators of the degree of rock metamorphism. Four morphologic types of microstructures are identified. The first platy-shear type is characterized by aggregate cleavage and the coefficient of deformation (Cd) of single grains from 1.0 to 2.0. Irregular angular fragments of variously oriented grains can be observed in thin sections. The second shear-cataclastic morphologic type (Cd from 2.0 to 3.0) exhibits

  13. Orogen-transverse tectonic window in the Eastern Himalayan fold belt: A superposed buckling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Santanu; Mandal, Nibir; Acharyya, S. K.; Ghosh, Subhajit; Saha, Puspendu

    2014-09-01

    The Eastern Lesser Himalayan fold-thrust belt is punctuated by a row of orogen-transverse domal tectonic windows. To evaluate their origin, a variety of thrust-stack models have been proposed, assuming that the crustal shortening occurred dominantly by brittle deformations. However, the Rangit Window (RW) in the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya (DSH) shows unequivocal structural imprints of ductile deformations of multiple episodes. Based on new structural maps, coupled with outcrop-scale field observations, we recognize at least four major episodes of folding in the litho-tectonic units of DSH. The last episode has produced regionally orogen-transverse upright folds (F4), the interference of which with the third-generation (F3) orogen-parallel folds has shaped the large-scale structural patterns in DSH. We propose a new genetic model for the RW, invoking the mechanics of superposed buckling in the mechanically stratified litho-tectonic systems. We substantiate this superposed buckling model with results obtained from analogue experiments. The model explains contrasting F3-F4 interferences in the Lesser Himalayan Sequence (LHS). The lower-order (terrain-scale) folds have undergone superposed buckling in Mode 1, producing large-scale domes and basins, whereas the RW occurs as a relatively higher-order dome nested in the first-order Tista Dome. The Gondwana and the Proterozoic rocks within the RW underwent superposed buckling in Modes 3 and 4, leading to Type 2 fold interferences, as evident from their structural patterns.

  14. Episodic growth of fold-thrust belts: Insights from Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Peel, Frank J.; Sanderson, David J.; McNeill, Lisa C.

    2017-09-01

    The sequential development of a fold-thrust belt was investigated using 2D Finite Element Modelling (FEM). The new model results show that a thrust system is typically composed of three distinct regions: the thrust wedge, pre-wedge, and undeformed region. The thrust wedge involves growth that repeats episodically and cyclically. A cycle of wedge building starts as frontal accretion occurs, which is accompanied by a rapid increase in wedge width reducing the taper angle below critical. In response to this, the wedge interior (tracked here by the 50 m displacement position) rapidly propagates forwards into a region of incipient folding. The taper angle progressively increases until it obtains a constant apparent critical value (∼10°). During this period, the wedge experiences significant shortening after a new thrust initiates at the failure front, leading to a decrease in wedge width. Successive widening of the wedge and subsequent shortening and thrusting maintain a reasonably constant taper angle. The fold-thrust belt evolves cyclically, through a combination of rapid advancement of the wedge and subsequent gradual, slow wedge growth. The new model results also highlights that there is clear, although minor, deformation (0-10 m horizontal displacement) in front of the thrust wedge.

  15. The paradox of vertical σ2 in foreland fold and thrust belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    Occurrence of aesthetically appealing thrust systems and associated large scale anticlines, in both active and fossil foreland fold and thrust belts, is commonly interpreted as an evidence for Andersonian compressional framework. Indeed, these structures would testify for a roughly vertical σ3. Such a correlation between thrusts occurrence and stress field orientation, however, frequently fails to explain denser observations at a smaller scale. The syn-orogenic deformation meso-structures hosted in exposed km-scale thrust-related folds, in fact, frequently and paradoxically witness for a syn-thrusting strike-slip stress configuration, with a near-vertical σ2 and a sub-horizontal σ3. This apparent widespread inconsistency between syn-orogenic meso-structures and stress field orientation is here named "the σ2 paradox". A possible explanation for such a paradox is provided by inherited extensional deformation structures commonly developed prior to thrusting, in the flexural foreland basins located ahead of fold and thrust belts. Thrust nucleation and propagation is facilitated and driven by the positive inversion of the extensional inheritances, and their subsequent linkage. This process eventually leads to the development of large reverse fault zones and can occur both in compressive and strike-slip stress configurations.

  16. Dynamics of thin-skinned fold and thrust belts with a tilted detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Naiara; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Epard, Jean-Luc

    2014-05-01

    The formation of the Jura fold and thrust belt is linked to the Alpine orogeny. However, it is still a matter of debate why the Jura was formed tens of kilometres far away from the active deformation front while the Molasse basin that lies in between remained mostly undeformed. Progressive thickening of the Molasse basin due to its infill with sediments, and the existence of a tilted potential detachment level at the Triassic evaporitic units, have been pushed forward as the main causes for the detachment of the Molasse basin and the consequent jump of the deformation front from the Alpine front to the position of the Jura at around 22 Ma or later (e.g Willett and Schlunegger, 2010). In order to better understand the dynamics of a thin-skinned fold and thrust belt with a tilted detachment we have performed systematic forward numerical simulations with the 2D thermo-mechanical finite element code MILAMIN_VEP. The modelled setup consists of a tilted detachment, overlain by a sedimentary cover of constant thickness and a wedge shaped basin infill that makes the initial surface slope of the system to be zero. In this study we have tested the importance of the following factors in the dynamics of such a fold and thrust belt evolution: 1) the applied boundary conditions 2) the angle of a uniformly tilted detachment 3) the end displacement of a curved detachment with a flexural foreland basin profile. The implications of the studied factors are discussed for the case of the Jura-Molasse system. Acknowledgements Funding was provided by the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework program (FP7/2007-2013) ERC Grant agreement #258830. References Willett, S.D. and Schlunegger, F. 2010, The last phase of deposition in the Swiss Molasse Basin: from foredeep to negative-alpha basin. Basin Research 22, 623-639, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2117.2009.00435.x

  17. Do mesoscale faults in a young fold belt indicate regional or local stress?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokado, Akihiro; Yamaji, Atsushi; Sato, Katsushi

    2017-04-01

    The result of paleostress analyses of mesoscale faults is usually thought of as evidence of a regional stress. On the other hand, the recent advancement of the trishear modeling has enabled us to predict the deformation field around fault-propagation folds without the difficulty of assuming paleo mechanical properties of rocks and sediments. We combined the analysis of observed mesoscale faults and the trishear modeling to understand the significance of regional and local stresses for the formation of mesoscale faults. To this end, we conducted the 2D trishear inverse modeling with a curved thrust fault to predict the subsurface structure and strain field of an anticline, which has a more or less horizontal axis and shows a map-scale plane strain perpendicular to the axis, in the active fold belt of Niigata region, central Japan. The anticline is thought to have been formed by fault-propagation folding under WNW-ESE regional compression. Based on the attitudes of strata and the positions of key tephra beds in Lower Pleistocene soft sediments cropping out at the surface, we obtained (1) a fault-propagation fold with the fault tip at a depth of ca. 4 km as the optimal subsurface structure, and (2) the temporal variation of deformation field during the folding. We assumed that mesoscale faults were activated along the direction of maximum shear strain on the faults to test whether the fault-slip data collected at the surface were consistent with the deformation in some stage(s) of folding. The Wallace-Bott hypothesis was used to estimate the consistence of faults with the regional stress. As a result, the folding and the regional stress explained 27 and 33 of 45 observed faults, respectively, with the 11 faults being consistent with the both. Both the folding and regional one were inconsistent with the remaining 17 faults, which could be explained by transfer faulting and/or the gravitational spreading of the growing anticline. The lesson we learnt from this work was

  18. Underplating along the northern portion of the Zagros suture zone, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motaghi, K.; Shabanian, E.; Kalvandi, F.

    2017-07-01

    A 2-D absolute shear wave velocity model has been resolved beneath a seismic profile across the northeastern margin of the Arabian Plate-Central Iran by simultaneously inverting data from P receiver functions and fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocity. The data were gathered by a linear seismic array crossing the Zagros fold and thrust belt, Urmia-Dokhtar magmatic arc and Central Iran block assemblage as three major structural components of the Arabia-Eurasia collision. Our model shows a low-velocity tongue protruding from upper to lower crust which, north of the Zagros suture, indicates the signature of an intracontinent low-strength shear zone between the underthrusting and overriding continents. The velocity model confirms the presence of a significant crustal root as well as a thick high-velocity lithosphere in footwall of the suture, continuing northwards beneath the overriding continent for at least 200 km. These features are interpreted as underthrusting of Arabia beneath Central Iran. Time to depth migration of P receiver functions reveals an intracrustal flat interface at ∼17 km depth south of the suture; we interpret it as a significant decoupling within the upper crust. All these crustal scale structural features coherently explain different styles and kinematics of deformation in northern Zagros (Lorestan zone) with respect to its southern part (Fars zone).

  19. Oak Ridge fault, Ventura fold belt, and the Sisar decollement, Ventura basin, California

    SciT

    Yeats, R.S.; Huftile, G.J.; Grigsby, F.B.

    1988-12-01

    The rootless Ventura Avenue, San Miguelito, and Rincon anticlines (Ventura fold belt) in Pliocene -Pleistocene turbidites are fault-propagation folds related to south-dipping reverse faults rising from a decollement in Miocene shale. To the east, the Sulfur Mountain anticlinorium overlies and is cut by the Sisar, Big Canyon, and Lion south-dipping thrusts that merge downward into the Sisar decollement in lower Miocene shale. Shortening of the Miocene and younger sequence is {approximately} 3 km greater than that of underlying competent Paleogens strata in the Ventura fold belt and {approximately} 7 km greater farther east at Sulfur Mountain. Cross-section balancing requires thatmore » this difference be taken up by the Paleogene sequence at the Oak Ridge fault to the south. Convergence is northeast to north-northeast on the base of earthquake focal mechanisms, borehole breakouts, and piercing-point offest of the South Mountain seaknoll by the Oak Ridge fault. A northeast-trending line connecting the west end of Oak Ridge and the east end of Sisar fault separates an eastern domain where late Quaternary displacement is taken up entirely on the Oak Ridge fault and a western domain where displacement is transferred to the Sisar decollement and its overlying rootless folds. This implies that (1) the Oak Ridge fault near the coast presents as much seismic risk as it does farther east, despite negligible near-surface late Quaternary movement; (2) ground-rupture hazard is high for the Sisar fault set in the upper Ojai Valley; and (3) the decollement itself could produce an earthquake analogous to the 1987 Whittier Narrows event in Low Angeles.« less

  20. 2-D traveltime and waveform inversion for improved seismic imaging: Naga Thrust and Fold Belt, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Priyank; Zelt, Colin A.; Bally, Albert W.; Dasgupta, Rahul

    2008-05-01

    Exploration along the Naga Thrust and Fold Belt in the Assam province of Northeast India encounters geological as well as logistic challenges. Drilling for hydrocarbons, traditionally guided by surface manifestations of the Naga thrust fault, faces additional challenges in the northeast where the thrust fault gradually deepens leaving subtle surface expressions. In such an area, multichannel 2-D seismic data were collected along a line perpendicular to the trend of the thrust belt. The data have a moderate signal-to-noise ratio and suffer from ground roll and other acquisition-related noise. In addition to data quality, the complex geology of the thrust belt limits the ability of conventional seismic processing to yield a reliable velocity model which in turn leads to poor subsurface image. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of traveltime and waveform inversion as supplements to conventional seismic imaging and interpretation processes. Both traveltime and waveform inversion utilize the first arrivals that are typically discarded during conventional seismic processing. As a first step, a smooth velocity model with long wavelength characteristics of the subsurface is estimated through inversion of the first-arrival traveltimes. This velocity model is then used to obtain a Kirchhoff pre-stack depth-migrated image which in turn is used for the interpretation of the fault. Waveform inversion is applied to the central part of the seismic line to a depth of ~1 km where the quality of the migrated image is poor. Waveform inversion is performed in the frequency domain over a series of iterations, proceeding from low to high frequency (11-19 Hz) using the velocity model from traveltime inversion as the starting model. In the end, the pre-stack depth-migrated image and the waveform inversion model are jointly interpreted. This study demonstrates that a combination of traveltime and waveform inversion with Kirchhoff pre-stack depth migration is a promising approach

  1. The Port Isabel Fold Belt: Salt enhanced Neogene Gravitational Spreading in the East Breaks, Western Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebit, Hermann; Clavaud, Marie; Whitehead, Sam; Opdyke, Scott; Luneburg, Catalina

    2017-04-01

    The Port Isabel fold belt is situated at the northwestern corner of the deep water Gulf of Mexico where the regional E-W trending Texas-Louisiana shelf bends into the NNE-SSW trend of the East Mexico Shelf. The fold belt forms an allochthonous wedge that ramps up from West to East with its front occupied by shallow salt complexes (local canopies). It is assumed that the belt predominantly comprises Oligocene siliciclastic sequences which reveal eastward facing folds and thrusts with a NE-SW regional trend. The structural architecture of the fold belt is very well imaged on recently processed 3D seismic volumes. Crystal III is a wide-azimuth survey acquired in 2011 and reprocessed in 2016 leveraging newly developed state-of-the-art technology. 3D deghosting, directional designature and multi-model 3D SRME resulted in broader frequency spectrum. The new image benefits from unique implementation of FWI, combined with classic tomographic updates. Seismically transparent zones indicating over-pressured shales are limited to the core of anticlines or to the footwall of internal thrust. Mobile shales associated with diapirs are absent in the study area. In contrast, salt is mobile and apparently forms the major decollement of the PIFB as indicated by remnant salt preferentially located in triangles along the major thrusts and fault intersections or at the core of anticlines. Shallow salt diapirs seam to root in the fold belt, while lacking evidence for salt feeders being connected to the deep salt underlying the Mesozoic to Paleogene substratum of the fold belt. Towards the WNW the fold belt is transient into a extensional regime, characterized by roll-over structures associated with deep reaching normal faults which form ultra-deep mini basins filled with Neogene deposits. Kinematic restorations confirm the simultaneous evolution of the deep mini basins and the outboard fold belt. This resembles a gravitational spreading system with the extensional tectonics of the deep

  2. Tectonics and kinematics of a foreland folded belt influenced by salt, arctic Canada

    SciT

    Harrison, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    The Ordovician (upper Arenig-Llanvirn) Bay Fiord Formation is one of three widespread evaporite units known to have profoundly influenced the style of contractional tectonics within the Innuitian orogen of Arctic Canada. In the western Arctic Islands, the salt-bearing Bay Fiord Formation has accommodated buckling and mostly subsurface thrusting in the west-trending Parry Islands foldbelt. A characteristic feature of this belt is a stratigraphic succession more than 10 km thick featuring three rigid and widespread sedimentary layers and two intervening ductile layers (lower salt and upper shale). The ductile strata have migrated to anticlinal welts during buckling. Other features of themore » foldbelt include (1) an extreme length of individual upright folds (up to 330 km), (2) extreme foldbelt width (up to 11%), (5) a shallow dipping salt decollement system (0.1{degrees}-0.6{degrees}) that has also been folded in the hinterland and later extended, and (6) a complete absence of halokinetic piercing diapirs. The progression from simple thrust-fold structure on the foldbelt periphery to complex in the interior provides a viable kinematic model for this and other contractional salt provinces. One feature of this model is a single massive triangle zone structure (passive roof duplex) that may envelop the entire 200-km width of the foldbelt and underlie an area exceeding 52,000 km{sup 2}.« less

  3. Deepwater fold and thrust belt classification, tectonics, structure and hydrocarbon prospectivity: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, C. K.; King, R.; Hillis, R.; Tingay, M.; Backe, G.

    2011-01-01

    Deepwater fold and thrust belts (DWFTBs) are classified into near-field stress-driven Type 1 systems confined to the sedimentary section, and Type 2 systems deformed by either far-field stresses alone, or mixed near- and far-field stresses. DWFTBs can occur at all stages of the Wilson cycle up to early stage continent continent collision. Type 1 systems have either weak shale or salt detachments, they occur predominantly on passive margins but can also be found in convergent-related areas such as the Mediterranean and N. Borneo. Examples include the Niger and Nile deltas, the west coast of Africa, and the Gulf of Mexico. Type 2 systems are subdivided on a tectonic setting basis into continent convergence zones and active margin DWFTBs. Continent convergence zones cover DWFTBs developed during continent-arc or continent-continent collision, and those in a deepwater intracontinental setting (e.g. W. Sulawesi, Makassar Straits). Active margins include accretionary prisms and transform margins. The greatest variability in DWFTB structural style occurs between salt and shale detachments, and not between tectonic settings. Changes in fold amplitude and wavelength appear to be more related to thickness of the sedimentary section than to DWFTB type. In comparison with shale, salt detachment DWFTBS display a lower critical wedge taper, more detachment folds, long and episodic duration of deformation and more variation in vergence. Structures unique to salt include canopies and nappes. Accretionary prisms also standout from other DWFTBs due to their relatively long, continuous duration, rapid offshore propagation of the thrust front, and large amount of shortening. In terms of petroleum systems, many similar issues affect all DWFTBs, these include: the oceanward decrease in heat flow, offshore increase in age of mature source rock, and causes of trap failure (e.g. leaky oblique and frontal thrust faults, breach of top seal by fluid pipes). One major difference between Type 1

  4. Regional magnetic anomalies, crustal strength, and the location of the northern Cordilleran fold-and-thrust belt

    Saltus, R.W.; Hudson, T.L.

    2007-01-01

    The northern Cordilleran fold-and-thrust belt in Canada and Alaska is at the boundary between the broad continental margin mobile belt and the stable North American craton. The fold-and-thrust belt is marked by several significant changes in geometry: cratonward extensions in the central Yukon Territory and northeastern Alaska are separated by marginward re-entrants. These geometric features of the Cordilleran mobile belt are controlled by relations between lithospheric strength and compressional tectonic forces developed along the continental margin. Regional magnetic anomalies indicate deep thermal and compositional characteristics that contribute to variations in crustal strength. Our detailed analysis of one such anomaly, the North Slope deep magnetic high, helps to explain the geometry of the fold-and-thrust front in northern Alaska. This large magnetic anomaly is inferred to reflect voluminous mafic magmatism in an old (Devonian?) extensional domain. The presence of massive amounts of malic material in the lower crust implies geochemical depletion of the underlying upper mantle, which serves to strengthen the lithosphere against thermal erosion by upper mantle convection. We infer that deep-source magnetic highs are an important indicator of strong lower crust and upper mantle. This stronger lithosphere forms buttresses that play an important role in the structural development of the northern Cordilleran fold-and-thrust belt. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  5. Geodetic Insights into the Earthquake Cycle in a Fold and Thrust Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingleby, T. F.; Wright, T. J.; Butterworth, V.; Weiss, J. R.; Elliott, J.

    2017-12-01

    Geodetic measurements are often sparse in time (e.g. individual interferograms) and/or space (e.g. GNSS stations), adversely affecting our ability to capture the spatiotemporal detail required to study the earthquake cycle in complex tectonic systems such as subaerial fold and thrust belts. In an effort to overcome these limitations we combine 3 generations of SAR satellite data (ERS 1/2, Envisat & Sentinel-1a/b) to obtain a 25 year, high-resolution surface displacement time series over the frontal portion of an active fold and thrust belt near Quetta, Pakistan where a Mw 7.1 earthquake doublet occurred in 1997. With these data we capture a significant portion of the seismic cycle including the interseismic, coseismic and postseismic phases. Each satellite time series has been referenced to the first ERS-1 SAR epoch by fitting a ground deformation model to the data. This allows us to separate deformation associated with each phase and to examine their relative roles in accommodating strain and creating topography, and to explore the relationship between the earthquake cycle and critical taper wedge mechanics. Modeling of the coseismic deformation suggests a long, thin rupture with rupture length 7 times greater than rupture width. Rupture was confined to a 20-30 degree north-northeast dipping reverse fault or ramp at depth, which may be connecting two weak decollements at approximately 8 km and 13 km depth. Alternatively, intersections between the coseismic fault plane and pre-existing steeper splay faults underlying folds may have played a significant role in inhibiting rupture, as evidenced by intersection points bordering the rupture. These fault intersections effectively partition the fault system down-dip and enable long, thin ruptures. Postseismic deformation is manifest as uplift across short-wavelength folds at the thrust front, with displacement rates decreasing with time since the earthquake. Broader patterns of postseismic uplift are also observed

  6. Episodic Growth of Fold-Thrust Belts: Insights from Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Peel, F.; Sanderson, D. J.; McNeill, L. C.

    2016-12-01

    The sequential development of an imbricate thrust system was investigated using a set of 2D FEM models. This study provides new insights on how the style and location of thrust activity changes through cycles of thrust accretion by making refined measurements of the thrust system parameters through time and tracking these parameters through each cycle. In addition to conventional wedge parameters (i.e. surface slope, wedge width and height), the overall taper angle is used to determine how the critical taper angle is reached; a particular focus is on the region of outboard minor horizontal displacement provides insights into the forward propagation of material within, and in front of, the thrust wedge; tracking the position of the failure front (where the frontal thrust roots into the basal detachment) reveals the sequence and advancement of the imbricate thrusts. The model results show that a thrust system is generally composed of three deformation components: thrust wedge, pre-wedge and wedge front. A thrust belt involves growth that repeats episodically and cyclically. When a wedge reaches critical taper ( 10°), thrust movement within the wedge slows while the taper angle and wedge width gradually increase. In contrast, the displacement front (tracked here by the location of 0 m displacement) rapidly propagates forward along whilst the wedge height is fast growing. During this period, the wedge experiences a significant shortening after a new thrust initiates at the failure front, leading to an obvious decrease in wedge width. As soon as the critical taper is achieved, wedge interior (tracked here by the location of 50 m displacement) accelerates forward reducing the taper angle below critical. This is accompanied by a sudden increase in wedge width, slow advancement of displacement front, and slow uplift of the fold-thrust belt. The rapid movements within and in front of the wedge occur alternately. The model results also show that there is clear, although

  7. Radiometric Dating of Folds: A new approach to determine the timing of deformation at shallow-crustal conditions, with examples from the Mexican Fold-Thrust Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitz Diaz, E.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    We are developing a robust method to obtain absolute ages of folds that were formed at shallow crustal conditions. The method takes advantage of illite neocrystallization in folded, clay-bearing layers and the ability to obtain accurate retention and total gas ages from small size fractions using encapsulated Ar analysis, analogous to prior work on fault gouge dating. We illustrate our approach in folded Cretaceous shale-bentonitic layers that are interbedded with carbonates of the Zimapán and the Tampico-Misantla cretaceous basins in central-eastern Mexico. Basinal carbonates were buried by syntectonic turbidites and inverted during the formation of the Mexican Fold-Thrust in the Late Cretaceous. Results were obtained from four chevron folds that are representative of different stages of deformation, burial/temperature conditions and location within this thin-skinned orogenic wedge: two from the Zimapán Basin (Folds 1 and 2) in the west and two from the Tampico-Misantla Basin (Folds 3 and 4) in the east. Mineralogic compositions and variations in illite-polytypes, crystallite-size (CS) and Ar/Ar ages were obtained from size fractions in limbs and hinges of folded layers. Ar retention ages produce a folding age of ~81 Ma for Fold 1 and ~69 Ma for Fold 2, which are fully consistent with stratigraphic limits from syn-orogenic turbidities and observed overprinting events in the Mexican Fold-Thrust Belt. The total gas age of Fold 3, on the easternmost margin of the Tampico-Misantla Basin is similar to that of Fold 2, indicating that the second event is regional in scale. In addition to presenting a new, reliable method to constrain the timing of local deformation, we interpret folding and associated clay neo-mineralization in terms of the regional burial history, and localization and propagation of deformation within a heterogeneous orogenic wedge involving progressive deformation of two basins separated by a platform block.

  8. Aseismic deformation of a fold-and-thrust belt imaged by SAR interferometry near Shahdad, southeast Iran

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielding, Eric J.; Wright, Tim J.; Muller, Jordan; Parsons, Barry E.; Walker, Richard

    2004-01-01

    At depth, many fold-and-thrust belts are composed of a gently dipping, basal thrust fault and steeply dipping, shallower splay faults that terminate beneath folds at the surface. Movement on these buried faults is difficult to observe, but synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry has imaged slip on at least 600 square kilometers of the Shahdad basal-thrust and splay-fault network in southeast Iran.

  9. Connecting the Yakima fold and thrust belt to active faults in the Puget Lowland, Washington

    Blakely, R.J.; Sherrod, B.L.; Weaver, C.S.; Wells, R.E.; Rohay, A.C.; Barnett, E.A.; Knepprath, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic surveys of the Cascade Range and Yakima fold and thrust belt (YFTB), Washington, provide insights on tectonic connections between forearc and back-arc regions of the Cascadia convergent margin. Magnetic surveys were measured at a nominal altitude of 250 m above terrain and along flight lines spaced 400 m apart. Upper crustal rocks in this region have diverse magnetic properties, ranging from highly magnetic rocks of the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group to weakly magnetic sedimentary rocks of various ages. These distinctive magnetic properties permit mapping of important faults and folds from exposures to covered areas. Magnetic lineaments correspond with mapped Quaternary faults and with scarps identified in lidar (light detection and ranging) topographic data and aerial photography. A two-dimensional model of the northwest striking Umtanum Ridge fault zone, based on magnetic and gravity data and constrained by geologic mapping and three deep wells, suggests that thrust faults extend through the Tertiary section and into underlying pre-Tertiary basement. Excavation of two trenches across a prominent scarp at the base of Umtanum Ridge uncovered evidence for bending moment faulting possibly caused by a blind thrust. Using aeromagnetic, gravity, and paleoseismic evidence, we postulate possible tectonic connections between the YFTB in eastern Washington and active faults of the Puget Lowland. We suggest that faults and folds of Umtanum Ridge extend northwestward through the Cascade Range and merge with the Southern Whidbey Island and Seattle faults near Snoqualmie Pass 35 km east of Seattle. Recent earthquakes (MW ≤ 5.3) suggest that this confluence of faults may be seismically active today.

  10. Distinguishing thrust sequences in gravity-driven fold and thrust belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. I.; Weinberger, R.; Marco, S.

    2018-04-01

    Piggyback or foreland-propagating thrust sequences, where younger thrusts develop in the footwalls of existing thrusts, are generally assumed to be the typical order of thrust development in most orogenic settings. However, overstep or 'break-back' sequences, where later thrusts develop above and in the hangingwalls of earlier thrusts, may potentially form during cessation of movement in gravity-driven mass transport deposits (MTDs). In this study, we provide a detailed outcrop-based analysis of such an overstep thrust sequence developed in an MTD in the southern Dead Sea Basin. Evidence that may be used to discriminate overstep thrusting from piggyback thrust sequences within the gravity-driven fold and thrust belt includes upright folds and forethrusts that are cut by younger overlying thrusts. Backthrusts form ideal markers that are also clearly offset and cut by overlying younger forethrusts. Portions of the basal detachment to the thrust system are folded and locally imbricated in footwall synclines below forethrust ramps, and these geometries also support an overstep sequence. However, new 'short-cut' basal detachments develop below these synclines, indicating that movement continued on the basal detachment rather than it being abandoned as in classic overstep sequences. Further evidence for 'synchronous thrusting', where movement on more than one thrust occurs at the same time, is provided by displacement patterns on sequences of thrust ramp imbricates that systematically increases downslope towards the toe of the MTD. Older thrusts that initiate downslope in the broadly overstep sequence continue to move and therefore accrue greater displacements during synchronous thrusting. Our study provides a template to help distinguish different thrust sequences in both orogenic settings and gravity-driven surficial systems, with displacement patterns potentially being imaged in seismic sections across offshore MTDs.

  11. Variable deep structure of a midcontinent fault and fold zone from seismic reflection: La Salle deformation belt, Illinois basin

    McBride, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Deformation within the United States mid-continent is frequently expressed as quasilinear zones of faulting and folding, such as the La Salle deformation belt, a northwest-trending series of folds cutting through the center of the Illinois basin. Seismic reflection profiles over the southern La Salle deformation belt reveal the three-dimensional structural style of deformation in the lower Paleozoic section and uppermost Precambrian(?) basement. Individual profiles and structural contour maps show for the first time that the folds of the La Salle deformation belt are underlain at depth by reverse faults that disrupt and offset intrabasement structure, offset the top of interpreted Precambrian basement, and accommodate folding of overlying Paleozoic strata. The folds do not represent development of initial dips by strata deposited over a preexisting basement high. Rather, the structures resemble subdued "Laramide-style" forced folds, in that Paleozoic stratal reflectors appear to be flexed over a fault-bounded basement uplift with the basement-cover contact folded concordantly with overlying strata. For about 40 km along strike, the dominant faults reverse their dip direction, alternating between east and west. Less well expressed antithetic or back thrusts appear to be associated with the dominant faults and could together describe a positive flower structure. The overall trend of this part of the La Salle deformation belt is disrupted by along-strike discontinuities that separate distinct fold culminations. Observations of dual vergence and along-strike discontinuities suggest an original deformation regime possibly involving limited transpression associated with distant late Paleozoic Appalachian-Ouachita mountain building. Moderate-magnitude earthquakes located west of the western flank of the La Salle deformation belt have reverse and strike-slip mechanisms at upper trustai depths, which might be reactivating deep basement faults such as observed in this study

  12. Geometry and Kinematics of the Lamu Basin Deep-Water Fold-and-Thrust Belt (East Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchi, Massimiliano R.; Cruciani, Francesco; Porreca, Massimiliano

    2016-04-01

    Even if most thin-skinned fold-and-thrust belt are generated at convergent plate boundaries, in the last decades advances in seismic exploration and acquisition of large datasets have shown that they are also notably widespread along continental passive margins, driven by gravity processes in deep-water areas. In this study a composite set of modern and vintage reprocessed seismic reflection profiles is used to investigate the internal structure and kinematic evolution of the Lamu Basin Deep-Water Fold-and-Trust Belt (DW-FTB). The Lamu Basin is an example of giant-scale, gravity driven compressional belt developed in Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary along a still poorly explored sector of the East-African continental margin, at the Kenya-Somalia border. The compressional domain extends longitudinally for more than 450 km, is up to 180 km wide and shows remarkable structural complexity both along strike and along dip. The external part is dominated by ocean-verging imbricate thrusts, above a gently landward-dipping basal detachment. The internal part is characterised by almost symmetrical detachment folds and double verging structures, sustaining bowl-shaped syn-tectonic basins. Here the basal detachment surface is almost flat. The mean fold wavelength displays a progressive landward increase, from 2.5 km, at the toe of the belt, to about 10 km. This structural variability is thought to be related to the lateral variation of the section under shortening and particularly to the different thickness of the Early Cretaceous shaly unit involved in the deformations, increasing landward from about 400 m to more than 1 km. Through the sequential restoration of regional cross-sections, we evaluated that the northern portion of the thrust belt experienced a shortening of almost 50 km (corresponding to 20%), with a shortening rate (during the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene main event) of about 3.5 mm/yr. Under many respects, the dimensions and internal structure of this thrust belt

  13. Structural Evolution and Fracture Development of Chinshui Anticline in a Fold-and-Thrust Belt, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. W.; Hu, J. C.; Huang, S. T.

    2016-12-01

    Hsinchu-Miaoli area is the major hydrocarbon producing fields in the fold-and-thrust belt of Taiwan. To understand the nature and the geometry of the reservoirs in this area, 82 wells were drilled in the Chinshui Field, which is one of the important gas fields in the Hsinchu-Miaoli area. However, the subsurface structures and fracture distribution of these fields are still unclear, and the reason for long time producing is also unknown. Fractures in the oil-bearing reservoir might be one of the important factors of long time gas producing, but the fracture reservoirs attaining hydrocarbons associated with fault-related folding need to be further clarified. In this study, we first represent a new structural interpretation of Chinshui anticlines and adjacent structures by a geological cross section across from Miaoli offshore to inner western foothills. After conducting 2D restoration with 2DMove, we could test whether our structural interpretation is reasonable and clarify the evolution history of Chinshui anticline and adjacent structures. We further construct a 3D structural model of Chinshui anticline by GOCAD. By using surface restoration, the location with higher fracture density could be inferred and be taken into account for reproduction. According to the restoration, we conclude that Chinshui anticline is mainly formed by the movement of the deep detachment. The old strata between two detachments develop a thrust wedge and deform upper strata to form Chinshui anticline. Furthermore, we obtain strain fields and the extension areas of Talu shale, Tungkeng, Chuhaungkeng, Mushan and Wuchihshan Formation of Chinshui anticline during the deformation. The results reveal that the highest fracture density lies in the hinge of A and C blocks in Mushan Formation as well as the hinge of B block in Wuchihshan Formation. After comparing the curvature and strain fields of these surfaces, we also find out that the strain field is highly relevant to the curvature of Chinshui

  14. Late Permian rivers draining the uplifted Cape Fold Belt: magnetostratigraphy and detrital thermochronology of Karoo Basin sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohver, E.; Schmieder, M.; Arosio, R.; Lanci, L.; Jourdan, F.; Wilson, A.; Ratcliffe, K.; Payenberg, T.; Flint, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Cape Fold Belt and Karoo Basin of southern Africa formed during the Permian orogeny that affected the 13,000 km southern margin of the Gondwanan continent. In this report, we synthesize new and recent magnetostratigraphic and geochronologic data to establish a chronostratigraphic framework for Karoo Basin sedimentation for comparison with the thermal/exhumation history of the Cape Fold Belt. The source-sink model is evaluated using new data from detrital muscovite and zircon from 2 km composite section of fluvial sandstone and mudstones deposited at ca.275 - 260 Ma. Coherent age populations of detrital zircon grains indicate rapid incorporation of contemporary volcanic ashbeds into the sedimentary record. In contrast, cooling age distributions of detrital muscovite are typically ca. 5 - 10 Ma older than the age of deposition; similar lag times are observed from modern sediments in active mountain belts. Trace element geochemical signatures demonstrate a clear shift towards crustal recycling via headland erosion in the Beaufort Group relative to the underlying Ecca Group. These observations pinpoint the age of uplift for the Cape Fold Belt, which began to function as the major sediment source for the foreland Karoo Basin with the deposition of the uppermost Ecca Group and basal Beaufort Group.

  15. Deepwater Fold-and-Thrust Belt Along New Caledonia's Western Margin: Relation to Post-obduction Vertical Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collot, J.; Patriat, M.; Etienne, S.; Rouillard, P.; Soetaert, F.; Juan, C.; Marcaillou, B.; Palazzin, G.; Clerc, C.; Maurizot, P.; Pattier, F.; Tournadour, E.; Sevin, B.; Privat, A.

    2017-10-01

    Classically, deepwater fold-and-thrust belts are classified in two main types, depending if they result from near- or far-field stresses and the understanding of their driving and triggering mechanism is poorly known. We present a geophysical data set off the western margin of New Caledonia (SW Pacific) that reveals deformed structures of a deepwater fold-and-thrust belt that we interpret as a near-field gravity-driven system, which is not located at a rifted passive margin. The main factor triggering deformation is inferred to be oversteepening of the margin slope by postobduction isostatic rebound. Onshore erosion of abnormally dense obducted material, combined with sediment loading in the adjacent basin, has induced vertical motions that have caused oversteepening of the margin. Detailed morphobathymetric, seismic stratigraphic, and structural analysis reveals that the fold-and-thrust belt extends 200 km along the margin, and 50 km into the New Caledonia Trough. Deformation is rooted at depths greater than 5 km beneath the seafloor, affects an area of 3,500 km2, and involves a sediment volume of approximately 13,000 km3. This deformed belt is organized into an imbricate fan system of faults, and one out-of-sequence thrust fault affects the seabed. The thrust faults are deeply rooted in the basin along a low-angle floor thrust and connected to New Caledonia Island along a major detachment. This study not only provides a better knowledge of the New Caledonia margin but also provides new insight into the mechanisms that trigger deepwater fold-and-thrust belts.

  16. Imaging Subsurface Structure of Central Zagros Zone/Iran Using Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidravesh, Shaghayegh; Pakzad, Mehrdad, ,, Dr.; Hatami, Mohammad Reza, ,, Dr.

    2017-04-01

    The Central Zagros zone, of west Iran & east Iraq, is surrounded by many active faults (including Main Zagros Reversed Fault, Main Recent Fault, High Zagros Fault, Zagros Fold, & Thrust Belt). Recent studies show that cross-correlation of a long-term ambient seismic noise data recorded in station-pair, includes important information regarding empirical Green's functions (EGFs) between stations. Hence, ambient seismic noise carries valuable information of the wave propagation path (which can be extracted). The 2D model of surface waves (Rayleigh & Love) velocities for the studied area is obtained by seismic ambient noise tomography (ANT) method. Throughout this research, we use continuous records of all three vertical, radial, and tangential components (obtained by rotation) recorded by IRSC (Iranian Seismological Center) and IIEES (International Institute of Earthquake Engineering) networks for this area of interest. The IRSC & IIEES networks are equipped by SS-1 kinematics and Guralp CMG-3T sensors respectively. Data of 20 stations were used for 12 months from 2014/Nov. to 2015/Nov. The performed data processing is similar to the one, put into words in detail by Bensen et al. (2007) including the processed daily base data. Mean, trend, and instrument response were removed and the data were decimated to 5 sps (sample per second) to reduce the amount of storage space and computational time required. We then applied merge to handle data gaps. One-bit time-domain normalization was also applied to suppress the influence of instrument irregularities and earthquake signals followed by spectral (frequency-domain) normalization between 0.05-0.2 Hz (period 5-20 sec). After cross-correlation (processing step), we perform rms stacking (new approach of stacking) to stack many cross-correlation functions based on the highest energy in a time interval which we accordingly anticipate to receive Rayleigh & Love waves fundamental modes. To evaluate quality of the stacking process

  17. Spatial evolution of Zagros collision zone in Kurdistan - NW Iran, constraints for Arabia-Eurasia oblique convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S.; Yassaghi, A.

    2015-09-01

    Stratigraphy, detailed structural mapping and crustal scale cross section of the NW Zagros collision zone evolved during convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian plates were conducted to constrain the spatial evolution of the belt oblique convergence since Late Cretaceous. Zagros orogeny in NW Iran consists of the Sanandaj-Sirjan, Gaveh Rud and ophiolite zones as internal, and Bisotoun, Radiolarite and High Zagros zones as external parts. The Main Zagros Thrust is known as major structures of the Zagros suture zone. Two stages of deformation are recognized in the external parts of Zagros. In the early stage, presence of dextrally deformed domains beside the reversely deformed domains in the Radiolarite zone as well as dextral-reverse faults in both Bisotoun and Radiolarite zones demonstrates partitioning of the dextral transpression. In the late stage, southeastward propagation of the Zagros orogeny towards its foreland resulted in synchronous development of orogen-parallel strike-slip and pure thrust faults. It is proposed that the first stage related to the late Cretaceous oblique obduction, and the second stage is resulted from Cenozoic collision. Cenozoic orogen-parallel strike-slip component of Zagros oblique faulting is not confined to the Zagros suture zone (Main Recent) but also occurred in the more external part (Marekhil-Ravansar fault system). Thus, it is proposed that oblique convergence of Arabia-Eurasia plates occurred in Zagros collision zone since the Late Cretaceous.

  18. Contemporary deformation in the Yakima fold and thrust belt estimated with GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Robert; King, Robert W.; Wells, Ray E.; Lancaster, Matthew; Miller, M. Meghan

    2016-10-01

    Geodetic, geologic and palaeomagnetic data reveal that Oregon (western USA) rotates clockwise at 0.3 to 1.0° Ma-1 (relative to North America) about an axis near the Idaho-Oregon-Washington border, while northeast Washington is relatively fixed. This rotation has been going on for at least 15 Ma. The Yakima fold and thrust belt (YFTB) forms the boundary between northern Oregon and central Washington where convergence of the clockwise-rotating Oregon block is apparently accommodated. North-south shortening across the YFTB has been thought to occur in a fan-like manner, increasing in rate to the west. We obtained high-accuracy, high-density geodetic GPS measurements in 2012-2014 that are used with earlier GPS measurements from the 1990s to characterize YFTB kinematics. The new results show that the deformation associated with the YFTB starts at the Blue Mountains Anticline in northern Oregon and extends north beyond the Frenchman Hills in Washington, past the epicentre of the 1872 Mw 7.0 Entiat earthquake to 49°N. The north-south strain rate across the region is 2 to 3 × 10-9 yr-1 between the volcanic arc and the eastern edge of the YFTB (241.0°E); east of there it drops to about 10-9 yr-1. At the eastern boundary of the YFTB, faults and earthquake activity are truncated by a north-trending, narrow zone of deformation that runs along the Pasco Basin and Moses Lake regions near 240.9°E. This zone, abutting the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation, accommodates about 0.5 mm yr-1 of east to northeast shortening. A similar zone of N-trending transpression is seen along 239.9°E where there is a change in the strike of the Yakima folds. The modern deformation of the YFTB is about 600 km wide from south to north and internally may be controlled by pre-existing crustal structure.

  19. Contemporary deformation in the Yakima fold and thrust belt estimated with GPS

    McCaffrey, Robert; King, Robert W.; Wells, Ray; Lancaster, Matthew; Miller, M. Meghan

    2016-01-01

    Geodetic, geologic and palaeomagnetic data reveal that Oregon (western USA) rotates clockwise at 0.3 to 1.0° Ma−1 (relative to North America) about an axis near the Idaho–Oregon–Washington border, while northeast Washington is relatively fixed. This rotation has been going on for at least 15 Ma. The Yakima fold and thrust belt (YFTB) forms the boundary between northern Oregon and central Washington where convergence of the clockwise-rotating Oregon block is apparently accommodated. North–south shortening across the YFTB has been thought to occur in a fan-like manner, increasing in rate to the west. We obtained high-accuracy, high-density geodetic GPS measurements in 2012–2014 that are used with earlier GPS measurements from the 1990s to characterize YFTB kinematics. The new results show that the deformation associated with the YFTB starts at the Blue Mountains Anticline in northern Oregon and extends north beyond the Frenchman Hills in Washington, past the epicentre of the 1872 Mw 7.0 Entiat earthquake to 49°N. The north–south strain rate across the region is 2 to 3 × 10−9 yr−1 between the volcanic arc and the eastern edge of the YFTB (241.0°E); east of there it drops to about 10−9 yr−1. At the eastern boundary of the YFTB, faults and earthquake activity are truncated by a north-trending, narrow zone of deformation that runs along the Pasco Basin and Moses Lake regions near 240.9°E. This zone, abutting the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation, accommodates about 0.5 mm yr−1 of east to northeast shortening. A similar zone of N-trending transpression is seen along 239.9°E where there is a change in the strike of the Yakima folds. The modern deformation of the YFTB is about 600 km wide from south to north and internally may be controlled by pre-existing crustal structure.

  20. Yakataga fold-and-thrust belt: Structural geometry and tectonic implications of a small continental collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Wesley K.

    Collision of the Yakutat terrane with southern Alaska created a collisional fold-and-thrust belt along the Pacific-North America plate boundary. This southerner fold-and-thrust belt formed within continental sedimentary rocks but with the seaward vergence and tectonic position typical of an accretionary wedge. Northward exposure of progressively older rocks reflects that the fold-and-thrust belt forms a southward-tapered orogenic wedge that increases northward in structural relief and depth of erosion. Narrow, sharp anticlines separate wider, flat-bottomed synclines. Relatively steep thrust faults commonly cut the forelimbs of anticlines. Fold shortening and fault displacement both generally increase northward, whereas fault dip generally decreases northward. The coal-bearing lower part of the sedimentary section serves as a detachment for both folds and thrust faults. The folded and faulted sedimentary section defines a regional south dip of about 8°. The structural relief combined with the low magnitude of shortening of the sedimentary section suggest that the underlying basement is structurally thickened. I propose a new interpretation in which this thickening was accommodated by a passive-roof duplex with basement horses that are separated from the overlying folded and thrust-faulted sedimentary cover by a roof thrust with a backthrust sense of motion. Basement horses are ˜7 km thick, based on the thickness between the inferred roof thrust and the top of the basement in offshore seismic reflection data. This thickness is consistent with the depth of the zone of seismicity onshore. The inferred zone of detachment and imbrication of basement corresponds with the area of surface exposure of the fold-and-thrust belt within the Yakutat terrane and with the Wrangell subduction zone and arc farther landward. By contrast, to the west, the crust of the Yakutat terrane has been carried down a subduction zone that extends far landward with a gentle dip, corresponding

  1. Formation of fold and thrust belts on Venus due to horizontal shortening of a laterally heterogeneous lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, M. T.; Parmentier, E. M.; Neumann, G. A.

    1994-03-01

    An outstanding question relevant to understanding the tectonics of Venus is the mechanism of formation of fold and thrust belts, such as the mountain belts that surround Lakshmi Planum in western Ishtar Terra. These structures are typically long (hundreds of km) and narrow (many tens of km), and are often located at the margins of relatively high (km-scale) topographic rises. Previous studies have attempted to explain fold and thrust belts in various areas of Venus in the context of viscous and brittle wedge theory. However, while wedge theory can explain the change in elevation from the rise to the adjacent lowland, it fails to account for a fundamental aspect of the deformation, i.e., the topographic high at the edge of the rise. In this study we quantitatively explore the hypothesis that fold and thrust belt morphology on Venus can alternatively be explained by horizontal shortening of a lithosphere that is laterally heterogeneous, due either to a change in thickness of the lithosphere or the crust. Lateral heterogeneities in lithosphere structure may arise in response to thermal thinning or extensive faulting, while variations in crustal thickness may arise due to either spatially variable melting of mantle material or by horizontal shortening of the crust. In a variable thickness lithosphere or crust that is horizontally shortened, deformation will tend to localize in the vicinity of thickness heterogeneity, resulting in a higher component of dynamic topography there as compared to elsewhere in the shortening lithosphere. This mechanism may thus provide a simple explanation for the topographic high at the edge of the rise.

  2. Formation of fold and thrust belts on Venus due to horizontal shortening of a laterally heterogeneous lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, M. T.; Parmentier, E. M.; Neumann, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    An outstanding question relevant to understanding the tectonics of Venus is the mechanism of formation of fold and thrust belts, such as the mountain belts that surround Lakshmi Planum in western Ishtar Terra. These structures are typically long (hundreds of km) and narrow (many tens of km), and are often located at the margins of relatively high (km-scale) topographic rises. Previous studies have attempted to explain fold and thrust belts in various areas of Venus in the context of viscous and brittle wedge theory. However, while wedge theory can explain the change in elevation from the rise to the adjacent lowland, it fails to account for a fundamental aspect of the deformation, i.e., the topographic high at the edge of the rise. In this study we quantitatively explore the hypothesis that fold and thrust belt morphology on Venus can alternatively be explained by horizontal shortening of a lithosphere that is laterally heterogeneous, due either to a change in thickness of the lithosphere or the crust. Lateral heterogeneities in lithosphere structure may arise in response to thermal thinning or extensive faulting, while variations in crustal thickness may arise due to either spatially variable melting of mantle material or by horizontal shortening of the crust. In a variable thickness lithosphere or crust that is horizontally shortened, deformation will tend to localize in the vicinity of thickness heterogeneity, resulting in a higher component of dynamic topography there as compared to elsewhere in the shortening lithosphere. This mechanism may thus provide a simple explanation for the topographic high at the edge of the rise.

  3. The 2013 Mw 6.2 Khaki-Shonbe (Iran) Earthquake: Seismic Shortening of the Zagros Sedimentary Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J. R.; Bergman, E.; Copley, A.; Ghods, A.; Nissen, E.; Oveisi, B.; Walters, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 Mw 6.2 Khaki-Shonbe earthquake occurred in the Simply Folded Belt of the Zagros Mountains, Iran. This is the largest earthquake in the Zagros since the November 1990 Mw 6.4 Furg (Hormozgan) thrust faulting event, and therefore the largest in the period for which dense InSAR ground displacements are available. It is also the biggest seismic event to have occurred in the Simply Folded Belt since the March 1977 Mw 6.7 Khurgu earthquake. This earthquake therefore potentially provides valuable insights into a range of controversies: (1) the preponderance of earthquake faulting in the crystalline basement versus the sedimentary cover and the potential importance of lithology in controlling and limiting seismic rupture; (2) the nature of surface folding and whether or not there is a one-to-one relationship between buried reverse faults and surface anticlines; and (3) the presence or absence of large pulses of aseismic slip triggered by mainshock rupture. We combine seismological solutions and aftershock relocations with satellite interferometric ground displacements and observations from the field to determine the geometry of faulting and its relationship with the structure, stratigraphy and tectonics of the Central Zagros. The earthquake rupture involved reverse slip on two along-strike southwest dipping fault segments, the rupture initiating at the northern and bottom end of the larger north-west segment. These faults verge away from the foreland and towards the high range interior, contrary to the fault geometries depicted in many structural cross-sections of the Zagros. The slip measured on the reverse segments occurred over two mutually exclusive depth ranges, 10-5 km and 4-2 km, resulting in long (16 km), narrow (7 km) rupture segments. Conversely, aftershocks are found to cluster in the depth range 8-16 km, beneath the main rupture segment. This indicates only significant reverse slip and coseismic shortening in the sedimentary cover, with the slip

  4. Characterization of orogenic remagnetizations within various fold geometries in Carboniferous carbonates from thin skinned fold and thrust belts, SW Alberta and NW Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechmeister, M. S.; Elmore, R. D.; Ferre, E. C.; Pannalal, S. J.; Hamilton, E. M.

    2007-12-01

    Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic analysis was conducted on a complex fault propagation fold train in Kananaskis Country, Alberta to compliment an ongoing study of orogenic remagnetiztions in the thin-skinned, fold and thrust belt (NW Montana and SW Alberta). The complex structure is composed of an asymmetrical anticline to the west and chevron syncline to the east, with both folds plunging ~15° to the south. The fold train contains a magnetization with two stable ancient components. The characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) with northerly declinations and steep down inclinations is removed between ~350°C and the maximum unblocking temperature of 540°C. Tilt tests on the preliminary data reveal that the ChRM is early syntilting in the anticline and syntilting in the syncline. These results from this fold train are similar to a previous study in the Sawtooths (NW MT) which reported that fault propagation folds have a syntilting ChRM whereas fault bend folds contain a pretilting ChRM. An intermediate temperature reversed component is unblocked by 340°C and is late syntilting to post-tilting. Preliminary high-field rock magnetic data from folds in Montana and Alberta show that saturation is reached before 0.3T and the majority of the samples have wasp-waisted hysteresis loops. On a log plot of Mrs/Ms versus Hcr/Hc, the data has a power law distribution that is similar to trends reported by other authors. Interestingly though, samples from a fault bend fold have higher Mrs/Ms ratios than those measured in fault propagation folds, suggesting that strain induced by the various folding styles may influence the rock magnetic properties. Additional studies are underway to test these preliminary results and determine if the differences in the hysteresis ratios are significant. Petrographic analysis shows magnetite replacing pyrite in some samples suggesting an authigenic origin for the ChRM. The intensity of the ChRM as well as the strongest rock magnetic signal is

  5. Seismic Expression of Fault Related Folding in Southeastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchamp, W.; McDonald, D.

    2009-12-01

    Weldon Beauchamp, and David McDonald,TransAtlantic Petroleum Corp. 5910 N. Central Expressway, Suite 1755, Dallas, TX 75206 weldon@tapcor.com, 214-395-7125 The Zagros fold belt extends northwest from Iran and Iraq into southeastern Turkey. Large scale fault related folds control the topography of this region and the path of the Tigris river. Large surface anticlines in the Zagros Mountains provide traps for giant oil and gas fields in Iran and Iraq. Similar scale folds extend into southeast Turkey. These southward verging fault related folds are believed to detach in the Paleozoic. Borehole data, surface geological maps, satellite data and digital topographic models were used to create models to constrain structure at depth. Structural modeling of these folds was used to design, acquire and process seismic reflection data in the region. The seismic reflection data confirmed the presence of asymmetrical, south verging complex fault related folding. Faults related to these folds detach in the Lower Ordovician to Cambrian age shales. These folds are believed to form doubly plunging structures that fold Tertiary through Paleozoic age rocks forming multiple levels of possible hydrocarbon entrapment.

  6. Kinematics of the active West Andean fold-and-thrust belt (central Chile): Structure and long-term shortening rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesner, M.; Lacassin, R.; Simoes, M.; Armijo, R.; Rauld, R.; Vargas, G.

    2017-02-01

    West verging thrusts, synthetic with the Nazca-South America subduction interface, have been recently discovered at the western front of the Andes. At 33°30'S, the active San Ramón fault stands as the most frontal of these west verging structures and represents a major earthquake threat for Santiago, capital city of Chile. Here we elaborate a detailed 3-D structural map and a precise cross section of the West Andean fold-and-thrust belt based on field observations, satellite imagery, and previous structural data, together with digital topography. We then reconstruct the evolution of this frontal belt using a trishear kinematic approach. Our reconstruction implies westward propagation of deformation with a total shortening of 9-15 km accumulated over the last 25 Myr. An overall long-term shortening rate of 0.1-0.5 mm/yr is deduced. The maximum value of this shortening rate compares well with the rate that may be inferred from recent trench data across the San Ramón fault and the slip associated with the past two Mw > 7 earthquakes. This suggests that the San Ramón fault is most probably the only presently active fault of the West Andean fold-and-thrust-belt and that most—if not all—the deformation is to be released seismically.

  7. Stratigraphy and Folding in the Cenozoic Cover of a Fold-Thrust Belt in the Nallıhan Region (Ankara, Central Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaaǧaç, Serdal; Koral, Hayrettin

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates stratigraphy and structural features in the Cenozoic sedimentary sequence of the fold-thrust belt of the Nallıhan-Ankara region, located to the north of the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan Suture Zone. Permian-Triassic age marble intercalated with schist-phyllites, the upper Jurassic-lower Cretaceous age limestone and the upper Cretaceous age sandstone-shale alternation compose the basement in the study area. These rocks are unconformably overlain by the Cenozoic age terrestrial sedimentary and volcanic units. The Cenozoic stratigraphy begins with the Paleocene-Eocene age coal-bearing, at times, volcanic intercalated conglomerate-sandstone-mudstone alternation of alluvial-fluvial origins (Aksaklar Formation) and the tuff intercalated with lacustrine limestone, bituminous limestone (Kabalar Formation). These units are conformably overlain by the Eocene age basalt-andesite and pyroclastic rocks (Meyildere volcanics). The Paleocene-Eocene aged units are unconformably overlain by the conglomerate-sandstone-mudstone-marl of a lower-middle Miocene lacustrine environment (Hançili Formation). The terrestrial conglomerate-sandstone alternation (Örencik Formation) is the youngest unit in the Cenozoic stratigraphy, and is assumed to be of Pliocene age based its stratigraphic position on older units. Field study shows existence of both folds and faults in the sedimentary cover. Stereographic projections of bedding measured in the field shows N25W/45NW and N60W/4SE-oriented fold axes in the Paleocene-Eocene age units. There are also N76W/12SE and N88E/8NE-oriented folds. The difference in fold-axis orientations suggests that some folds may have been rotated in blocks bound by faults during the post-Paleocene/Eocene period. Whereas, the lower-middle Miocene units manifest N88W/13SE-oriented fold axes. It is thus proposed that the observed difference in the azimuth of fold axes represent two different folding phases, one with NE-SW and the other with N

  8. First thermochronological constraints on the Cenozoic extension along the Balkan fold-thrust belt (Central Stara Planina Mountains, Bulgaria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kounov, Alexandre; Gerdjikov, Ianko; Vangelov, Dian; Balkanska, Eleonora; Lazarova, Anna; Georgiev, Stoyan; Blunt, Edward; Stockli, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    The Balkan fold-thrust belt, exposed in Bulgaria and north-east Serbia, is part of the north-east vergent segment of the bi-vergent Eastern Mediterranean Alpine orogen. It was formed during two distinct compressional stages; the first one lasted from the Middle Jurassic to the Early Cretaceous and the second from Late Cretaceous to the Paleogene. Although the compressional tectonic evolution of the Balkan fold-thrust belt since the Middle Jurassic and during most of the Mesozoic is relatively well studied, the final exhumation of the rocks of the belt during the Cenozoic has remained poorly understood. Here, we present the first thermochronological constraints, based on fission-track and [U-Th-(Sm)]/He analysis, showing that along the central part of the belt syn- to post-orogenic extension could have started as early as the middle Eocene. Low-temperature thermochronological analysis of samples collected from three areas reveals at least two phases of increased cooling and exhumation during the Cenozoic. The first exhumation phase took place between 44 and 30 Ma and appears to be related to the syn- to post-orogenic collapse coeval with the earliest Cenozoic extensional stage observed across the southern Balkan Peninsula. A period of relative quiescence (between 30 and 25 Ma) is followed by the next cooling stage, between 25 and 20 Ma, which appears to be related to late Oligocene to early Miocene crustal extension across the Balkan Peninsula. Extension accommodated by the late Miocene to Recent age Sub-Balkan Graben System does not appear to have produced exhumation of rocks from beneath 2-4 km depth, as it was not detected by the low-temperature thermochronological methods applied in this study.

  9. Role of tectonic inheritance in the instauration of Tunisian Atlassic fold-and-thrust belt: Case of Bouhedma - Boudouaou structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, Mohamed Abdelhamid; Ghanmi, Mohamed; Aridhi, Sabri; Ben Salem, Mohamed Sadok; Zargouni, Fouad

    2016-07-01

    Tectonic inversion in the Bouhedma-Boudouaou Mountains was investigated through recent field work and seismic lines interpretation calibrated with petroleum well data. Located to the Central-Southern Atlas of Tunisia, this area signed shortened intra-continental fold-and-thrust belts. Two dissymmetric anticlines characterize Bouhedma - Boudouaou major fold. These structures show a strong virgation respectively from E-W to NNE-SSW as a response to the interference between both tectonic inversion and tectonic inheritance. This complex geometry is driven by Mesozoic rifting, which marked an extensional inherited regime. A set of late Triassic-Early Jurassic E-W and NW-SE normal faults dipping respectively to the North and to the East seems to widely affect the overall geodynamic evolution of this domain. They result in major thickness changes across the hanging wall and the footwall blocks in response with the rifting activity. Tectonic inversion is inferred from convergence between African and European plates since late Cretaceous. During Serravalian - Tortonian event, NW-SE trending paroxysm led to: 1) folding of pre-inversion and syn-inversion strata, 2) reactivation of pre-existing normal faults to reverse ones and 3) orogeny of the main structures with NE-SW and E-W trending. The compressional feature still remains active during Quaternary event (Post-Villafranchian) with N-S trending compression. Contraction during inversion generates folding and internal deformation as well as Fault-Propagation-Fold and folding related strike.

  10. Middle Pennsylvanian recurrent uplift of the Ouachita fold belt and basin subsidence in the Arkoma basin, Oklahoma

    SciT

    Elmore, R.D.; Sutherland, P.K.; White, P.B.

    1990-09-01

    Recurrent uplift of the Ouachita fold belt in Oklahoma coincided with the disruption of the Arkoma basin following the deposition of the Boggy Formation (early Desmoinesian time). The Boggy, composed of sandstone-shale sequences that record southerly progradation of coal-bearing, fluvially dominated deltaic complexes into the Arkoma basin, was folded at the time of uplift of the Ouachita fold belt. The uplift ended the progressive subsidence of the Arkoma basin and shifted the depocenter to the northwest. Subsequently, the Thurman Formation (middle Desmoinesian), which had a source in the southeast, was deposited in the smaller resurgent foreland basin over the foldedmore » and eroded surface of the Boggy. Chert-pebble conglomerates in the Thurman were derived from the erosion of newly elevated Ordovician and Devonian cherts in the core of the Ouachita foldbelt. Sandstone-shale packages are found in both formations. The origin of the coal-bearing cycles in the Boggy are enigmatic, but they probably were controlled by a combination of factors such as glacio-eustatic changes in sea level and delta-lobe abandonment. In contrast, cycles in the Thurman probably were strongly influenced by episodic thrust faulting and uplift in the Ouachitas.« less

  11. Evolution of fracture and fault-controlled fluid pathways in carbonates of the Albanides fold-thrust belt

    Graham, Wall B.R.; Girbacea, R.; Mesonjesi, A.; Aydin, A.

    2006-01-01

    The process of fracture and fault formation in carbonates of the Albanides fold-thrust belt has been systematically documented using hierarchical development of structural elements from hand sample, outcrop, and geologic-map scales. The function of fractures and faults in fluid migration was elucidated using calcite cement and bitumen in these structures as a paleoflow indicator. Two prefolding pressure-solution and vein assemblages were identified: an overburden assemblage and a remote tectonic stress assemblage. Sheared layer-parallel pressure-solution surfaces of the overburden assemblage define mechanical layers. Shearing of mechanical layers associated with folding resulted in the formation of a series of folding assemblage fractures at different orientations, depending on the slip direction of individual mechanical layers. Prefolding- and folding-related fracture assemblages together formed fragmentation zones in mechanical layers and are the sites of incipient fault localization. Further deformation along these sites was accommodated by rotation and translation of fragmented rock, which formed breccia and facilitated fault offset across multiple mechanical layers. Strike-slip faults formed by this process are organized in two sets in an apparent conjugate pattern. Calcite cement and bitumen that accumulated along fractures and faults are evidence of localized fluid flow along fault zones. By systematic identification of fractures and faults, their evolution, and their fluid and bitumen contents, along with subsurface core and well-log data, we identify northeast-southwest-trending strike-slip faults and the associated structures as dominant fluid pathways in the Albanides fold-thrust belt. Copyright ?? 2006. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid Intradeformational Emplacement of the Big Hole Canyon Pluton Into the Sevier Fold-Thrust Belt, Southwest Montana.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hespenheide, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    The Big Hole Canyon pluton (BHCp) is a Late Cretaceous pluton emplaced within the Sevier fold-and-thrust belt of the western North American Cordillera. The pluton is exposed over 60km2 and a thickness of ~1400m. Combined anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), structural, and field studies document a clear pattern of magmatic flow radiating from at least three subvertical conduits <100m wide and ~300 to ~800m long. Interpreted flow plunges change rapidly to subhorizontal fabrics across the rest of the pluton, matching the expected pattern for laccolithic emplacement. Ascent conduits within the Big Hole Canyon pluton are coincident with the fold axis of an anticline above a thrust ramp, suggesting that the magma ascended up the fault of the fault-bend-fold. Geobarometry and stratigraphic reconstructions indicate an emplacement depth of approximately ~3km. Preliminary thermal modeling indicates that the BHCp was emplaced in 250,000 years, likely between periods of regional shortening deformation. Rapid magma ascent rates calculated by dike flow modeling and implied by entrained wall-rock xenoliths may indicate sequential magma injection into the pluton; an absence of chill margins between phases within the pluton indicates that sequential injections must have taken place quickly enough that the magmas did not have time to cool below the solidus temperature. The geometry and location of the BHCp suggest that magma used a pre-existing fault as a mechanical discontinuity for both ascent and emplacement. Continued intrusion of magma had a sufficient amount of driving pressure to stretch, shear, and lift the roof of the pluton. Detailed field mapping, structural studies, AMS, and thermobarometry indicate that the Late Cretaceous Big Hole Canyon pluton was emplaced as a laccolith at the top of a pre-existing fault-bend-fold in the frontal portion of the Sevier fold-thrust belt.

  13. Frontal belt curvature and oblique ramp development at an obliquely collided irregular margin: Geometry and kinematics of the NW Taiwan fold-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Olivier; Mouthereau, FréDéRic; Angelier, Jacques; Chu, Hao-Tsu; Lee, Jian-Cheng

    2003-06-01

    Combined structural and tectonic analyses demonstrate that the NW Foothills of the Taiwan collision belt constitute mainly an asymmetric "primary arc" type fold-thrust belt. The arcuate belt developed as a basin-controlled salient in the portion of the foreland basin that was initially thicker, due to the presence of a precollisional depocenter (the Taihsi basin). Additional but limited buttress effects at end points related to interaction with foreland basement highs (Kuanyin and Peikang highs) may have also slightly enhanced curvature. The complex structural pattern results from the interaction between low-angle thrusting related to shallow decollement tectonics and oblique inversion of extensional structures of the margin on the southern edge of the Kuanyin basement high. The tectonic regimes and mechanisms revealed by the pattern of paleostress indicators such as striated outcrop-scale faults are combined with the orientation and geometry of offshore and onshore regional faults in order to accurately define the Quaternary kinematics of the propagating units. The kinematics of this curved range is mainly controlled by distributed transpressional wrenching along the southern edge of the Kuanyin high, leading to the development of a regional-scale oblique ramp, the Kuanyin transfer fault zone, which is conjugate of the NW trending Pakua transfer fault zone north of the Peikang basement high. The divergence between the N120° regional transport direction and the maximum compressive trend that evolved from N120° to N150° (and even to N-S) in the northern part of the arc effectively supports distributed wrench deformation along its northern limb during the Pleistocene. The geometry and kinematics of the western Taiwan Foothills therefore appear to be highly influenced by both the preorogenic structural pattern of the irregularly shaped Chinese passive margin and the obliquity of its Plio-Quaternary collision with the Philippine Sea plate.

  14. Geometry and kinematics of Majiatan Fold-and-thrust Belt, Western Ordos Basin: implication for Tectonic Evolution of North-South Tectonic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D.

    2017-12-01

    The Helan-Chuandian North-South Tectonic Belt crossed the central Chinese mainland. It is a boundary of geological, geophysical, and geographic system of Chinese continent tectonics from shallow to deep, and a key zone for tectonic and geomorphologic inversion during Mesozoic to Cenozoic. It is superimposed by the southeastward and northeastward propagation of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau in late Cenozoic. It is thus the critical division for West and East China since Mesozoic. The Majiatan fold-and-thrust belt (MFTB), locating at the central part of HCNSTB and the western margin of Ordos Basin, is formed by the tectonic evolution of the Helan-Liupanshan Mountains. Based on the newly-acquired high-resolution seismic profiles, deep boreholes, and surface geology, the paper discusses the geometry, kinematics, and geodynamic evolution of MFTB. With the Upper Carboniferous coal measures and the pre-Sinian ductile zone as the detachments, MFTB is a multi-level detached thrust system. The thrusting was mainly during latest Jurassic to Late Cretaceous, breaking-forward in the foreland, and resulting in a shortening rate of 25-29%. By structural restoration, this area underwent extension in Middle Proterozoic to Paleozoic, which can be divided into three phases of rifting such as Middle to Late Proterozoic, Cambiran to Ordovician, and Caboniferous to early Permian. It underwent compression since Late Triassic, including such periods as Latest Triassic, Late Jurassic to early Cretaceous, Late Cretaceous to early Paleogene, and Pliocene to Quaternary, with the largest shortening around Late Jurassic to early Cretaceous period (i.e. the mid-Yanshanian movement by the local name). However, trans-extension since Eocene around the Ordos Basin got rise to the formation the Yingchuan, Hetao, and Weihe grabens. It is concluded that MFTB is the leading edge of the intra-continental Helan orogenic belt, and formed by multi-phase breaking-forward thrusting during Late Jurassic to Cretaceous

  15. Effect of Cohesion Uncertainty of Granular Materials on the Kinematics of Scaled Models of Fold-and-Thrust Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilfouroushan, F.; Pysklywec, R.; Cruden, S.

    2009-05-01

    Cohesionless or very low cohesion granular materials are widely used in analogue/physical models to simulate brittle rocks in the upper crust. Selection of materials with appropriate cohesion values in such models is important for the simulation of the dynamics of brittle rock deformation in nature. Uncertainties in the magnitude of cohesion (due to measurement errors, extrapolations at low normal stresses, or model setup) in laboratory experiments can possibly result in misinterpretation of the styles and mechanisms of deformation in natural fold-and thrust belts. We ran a series of 2-D numerical models to investigate systematically the effect of cohesion uncertainties on the evolution of models of fold-and-thrust belts. The analyses employ SOPALE, a geodynamic code based on the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element method. Similar to analogue models, the material properties of sand and transparent silicone (PDMS) are used to simulate brittle and viscous behaviors of upper crustal rocks. The suite of scaled brittle and brittle-viscous numerical experiments have the same initial geometry but the cohesion value of the brittle layers is increased systematically from 0 to 100 Pa. The stress and strain distribution in different sets of models with different cohesion values are compared and analyzed. The kinematics and geometry of thrust wedges including the location and number of foreland- and hinterland- verging thrust faults, pop-up structures, tapers and topography are also explored and their sensitivity to cohesion value is discussed.

  16. Kinematic evolution of a regional-scale gravity-driven deepwater fold-and-thrust belt: The Lamu Basin case-history (East Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, F.; Barchi, M. R.; Koyi, H. A.; Porreca, M.

    2017-08-01

    The deepwater fold-and-thrust belts (DWFTBs) are geological structures recently explored thanks to advances in offshore seismic imaging by oil industry. In this study we present a kinematic analysis based on three balanced cross-sections of depth-converted, 2-D seismic profiles along the offshore Lamu Basin (East African passive margin). This margin is characterized by a regional-scale DWFTB (> 450 km long), which is the product of gravity-driven contraction on the shelf that exhibits complex structural styles and differing amount of shortening along strike. Net shortening is up to 48 km in the northern wider part of the fold-and-thrust belt (≈ 180 km), diminishing to < 15 km toward the south, where the belt is markedly narrower (≈ 50 km). The three balanced profiles show a shortening percentage around 20% (comparable with the maximum values documented in other gravity-driven DWFTBs), with a significant variability along dip: higher values are achieved in the outer (i.e. down-dip) portion of the system, dominated by basinward-verging, imbricate thrust sheets. Fold wavelength increases landward, where doubly-verging structures and symmetric detachment folds accommodate a lower amount of shortening. Similar to other cases, a linear and systematic relationship between sedimentary thickness and fold wavelength is observed. Reconstruction of the rate of shortening through time within a fold-and-thrust belt shows that after an early phase of slow activation (Late Cretaceous), > 95% of net shortening was produced in < 10 Myr (during Paleocene). During this acme phase, which followed a period of high sedimentation rate, thrusts were largely synchronous and the shortening rate reached a maximum value of 5 mm/yr. The kinematic evolution reconstructed in this study suggests that the structural evolution of gravity-driven fold-and-thrust belts differs from the accretionary wedges and the collisional fold-and-thrust belts, where thrusts propagate in-sequence and shortening

  17. Quaternary Deformation Constrained by River Terraces across the Longmen Shan Fold-and-Thrust Belt, Eastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Jiang, D., Sr.; Ding, R.; Li, W.; Gomez, F. G.

    2017-12-01

    The Longmen Shan is known for both the steep topography and the absence of Cenozoic foreland deposition. The 2008 Wenchuan Mw 7.9 earthquake, which ruptured the thrust faults along the range front, inspires vigorous debates about topography origin and seismic hazard. Two end-member models, crustal shortening and lower crustal flow, have been proposed. However, both of them need further verification. The Minjiang river and the Qingyijiang river run through the middle and the southern Longmen Shan respectively, which make it possible to study the strain distribution by relict river terraces. Longitudinal profiles of river terraces were restored by detailed field survey, high-precision measurement, sediment dating and chemical analyses. Deformed fluvial terraces shows that most thrust faults are active in the late Quaternary, and crust shortening dominates the fold-and-thrust belt, but the strain distributions are quite different between the south and north segments. In the north, thrust slips are mainly accommodated along the range front, the crustal shortening rate is 1.4 to 2.0 mm/yr, and only 25% of crust shortening are absorbed by the foreland. In the south, thrust slips are distributed among the thrust belt, the crustal shortening rate is 2.9 to 4.6mm/yr, and up to 83% of crustal shortening are absorbed by the foreland. Compared with other margins of the Tibetan Plateau, the Longmen Shan has much narrower thrust belt and nappe. The Himalayas, the Karakoram and the Qilian Shan thrust nappes are about 3 to 5 times wider than the Longmen Shan. However, all of these belts have comparable elevations above their foreland, respectively. Comparable altitude difference distributed across a narrow belt makes a greater topographic relief in the Longmen Shan, where narrow thrust nappe exerts less tectonic loading on the footwall which doesn't favor the formation of foreland basin. Our research results favor the model of crustal shortening, and reveal that all basement

  18. Application of High Resolution Topography and Remote Sensing: Imagery to the Kinematics of Fold-and-Thrust Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Charles

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes one year of funding for NASA contract NAGW-3691, Application of High Resolution Topography and Remote Sensing: Imagery to the Kinematics of Fold-and-Thrust Belts. I never received year three from NASA. The funds were to support on going tectonic and topographic studies along the front of the central Transverse Ranges and expand the topographic studies to the north. Below are results from the first two years of actual funds that I received from NASA (see attached Federal Cash Transaction Reports). The main focus of this contract was to define and understand the major tectonic processes affecting the formation and evolution of the topography in convergent tectonic settings. The results will be used to test ongoing space-based geodetic measurements and will be compared with present-day seismicity in the central Transverse Ranges and adjacent basins. Two major factors that controls topography in active regions are (1) tectonic uplift due to fault-normal compression and (2) subsequent erosion. The central Transverse and Temblor Ranges are excellent regions for these focused topographic studies. The tectonic processes leading to the mountain building are relatively straightforward and thus are easy to model. Available evidence suggests that the topography in this region is relatively young, - 3.5 Ma or less. In addition,, erosional processes may be relatively easier to model compared to larger and more ancient mountain belts. For example, in larger mountain belts, topographic relief may cause significant orographic effects and high elevation may result in part of the topography located above snowline. Both factors complicate interpretation of erosional processes that may be controlled by elevation. Mountain ranges that are significantly older may have experienced a much wider variety of erosional or climatic conditions over their lifetime. While erosion rates have certainly not been consistent in the Transverse or Temblor ranges over its 3.5 Ma

  19. Fault-controlled pluton emplacement in the Sevier fold-and-thrust belt of southwest Montana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalakay, Thomas J.; John, Barbara E.; Lageson, David R.

    2001-06-01

    Problems associated with syncompressional pluton emplacement center on the need to make room for magma in environments where crustal shortening, not extension, occurs on a regional scale. New structural data from the Pioneer and Boulder batholiths of southwest Montana, USA, suggest emplacement at the top of frontal thrust ramps as composite tabular bodies at crustal depths between 1 and 10 km. Frontal thrust facilitated pluton emplacement was accommodated by: (1) a magma feeder zone created along the ramp interface; (2) providing 'releasing steps' at ramp tops that serve as initial points of emplacement and subsequent pluton growth; and (3) localizing antithetic back-thrusts that assist in pluton ascent. A model of magma emplacement is proposed that involves these elements. This model for syntectonic ramp-top emplacement of plutons helps explain how space is made for plutons within fold-and-thrust belts.

  20. Structure, paleogeographic inheritance, and deformation history of the southern Atlas foreland fold and thrust belt of Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SaïD, Aymen; Baby, Patrice; Chardon, Dominique; Ouali, Jamel

    2011-12-01

    Structural analysis of the southern Tunisian Atlas was carried out using field observation, seismic interpretation, and cross section balancing. It shows a mix of thick-skinned and thin-skinned tectonics with lateral variations in regional structural geometry and amounts of shortening controlled by NW-SE oblique ramps and tear faults. It confirms the role of the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic rifting inheritance in the structuring of the active foreland fold and thrust belt of the southern Tunisian Atlas, in particular in the development of NW-SE oblique structures such as the Gafsa fault. The Late Triassic-Early Jurassic structural pattern is characterized by a family of first-order NW-SE trending normal faults dipping to the east and by second-order E-W trending normal faults limiting a complex system of grabens and horsts. These faults have been inverted during two contractional tectonic events. The first event occurred between the middle Turonian and the late Maastrichtian and can be correlated with the onset of the convergence between Africa and Eurasia. The second event corresponding to the principal shortening tectonic event in the southern Atlas started in the Serravalian-Tortonian and is still active. During the Neogene, the southern Atlas foreland fold and thrust belt propagated on the evaporitic décollement level infilling the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic rift. The major Eocene "Atlas event," described in hinterland domains and in eastern Tunisia, did not deform significantly the southern Tunisian Atlas, which corresponded in this period to a backbulge broad depozone.

  1. Contemporary seismicity in and around the Yakima Fold and Thrust Belt in eastern Washington

    Gomberg, J.; Sherrod, B.; Trautman, M.; Burns, E.; Snyder, Diane

    2012-01-01

    We examined characteristics of routinely cataloged seismicity from 1970 to the present in and around the Yakima fold‐and‐thrust belt (YFTB) in eastern Washington to determine if the characteristics of contemporary seismicity provide clues about regional‐scale active tectonics or about more localized, near‐surface processes. We employed new structural and hydrologic models of the Columbia River basalts (CRB) and found that one‐third to one‐half of the cataloged earthquakes occur within the CRB and that these CRB earthquakes exhibit significantly more clustered, and swarmlike, behavior than those outside. These results and inferences from published studies led us to hypothesize that clustered seismicity is likely associated with hydrologic changes in the CRB, which hosts the regional aquifer system. While some general features of the regional groundwater system support this hypothesis, seismicity patterns and mapped long‐term changes in groundwater levels and present‐day irrigation neither support nor refute it. Regional tectonic processes and crustal‐scale structures likely influence the distribution of earthquakes both outside and within the CRB as well. We based this inference on qualitatively assessed alignments between the dominant northwest trends in the geologic structure and the seismicity generally and between specific faults and characteristics of the 2009 Wooded Island swarm and aseismic slip, which is the only cluster studied in detail and the most vigorous since regional monitoring began.

  2. Deformation evolution of Eastern Sichuan-Xuefeng fold-thrust belt in South China: Insights from analogue modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wengang; Zhou, Jianxun; Yuan, Kang

    2018-04-01

    The Eastern Sichuan-Xuefeng fold-thrust belt (CXFTB) located in South China has received wide attention due to its distinctive deformation styles and close relationships with natural gas preservation, but its deformation evolution still remains controversial. In order to study further this issue, we designed three sets of analogue models. Based on the results of the models, we suggest that: 1) the deformation in the CXFTB may simultaneously initiate along two zones nearby the Dayong and Qiyueshan faults at ∼190 Ma, and then progressively propagate into the interiors of the Western Hunan-Hubei and Eastern Sichuan domains at ∼140-150 Ma, and finally reach the front of the Huayingshan fault at ∼120 Ma; 2) the difference in décollement depth is the main factor determining the patterns of folds in different domains of the CXFTB; and 3) the Eastern Sichuan domain may have a basement significantly different from those of the Western Sichuan and Western Hunan-Hubei domains.

  3. MT data inversion and sensitivity analysis to image electrical structure of Zagros collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layegh Haghighi, T.; Montahaei, M.; Oskooi, B.

    2018-01-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) data from 46 stations on a 470-km-long profile across the Zagros fold-thrust belt (ZFTB) that marks the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone were inverted to derive 2-D electrical resistivity structure between Busher on the coast of Persian Gulf and Posht-e-Badam, 160 km north east of Yazd. The model includes prominent anomalies in the upper and lower crust, beneath the brittle-ductile transition depth and mostly related to the fluid distribution and sedimentary layers beneath the profile. The conductivities and dimensions of the fault zone conductors (FZCs) and high conductivity zones (HCZs) as the major conductive anomalies in a fault zone conceptual model vary significantly below the different faults accommodated in this region. The enhanced conductivity below the site Z30 correlates well with the main Zagros thrust (MZT), located at the western boundary of Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (SSZ) and known as the transition between the two continents. The depth extent of the huge conductor beneath the south west of the profile, attributed to the thick sedimentary columns of the Arabian crust, cannot be resolved due to the smearing effect of the smoothness constraint employed in the regularized inversion procedure and the sensitivity of MT data to the conductance of the subsurface. We performed different tests to determine the range of 2-D models consistent with the data. Our approach was based on synthetic studies, comprising of hypothesis testing and the use of a priori information throughout the inversion procedure as well as forward modeling. We conclude that the minimum depth extent of the conductive layer beneath the southwest of the profile can be determined as approximately deeper than 15 km and also the screening effect of the conductive overburden is highly intense in this model and prevents the deep structures from being resolved properly.

  4. A Method for Estimating 2D Horizontal Shortening at Wrinkle Ridges from Remote Sensing Data: Results from the Yakima Fold Belt (Columbia Plateau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mege, D.

    1999-03-01

    Field data and length/displacement scaling laws applied to the Yakima fold belt on the Columbia Plateau are used to demonstrate a method for estimating surface shortening of wrinkle ridge areas. Application to martian wrinkle ridges is given in another abstract.

  5. Mid-Late Miocene deformation of the northern Kuqa fold-and-thrust belt (southern Chinese Tian Shan): An apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jian; Tian, Yuntao; Qiu, Nansheng

    2017-01-01

    The Kuqa fold-and-thrust belt developed in response to Cenozoic southward shortening between the Chinese Tian Shan and the Tarim Basin. This study aims to constrain the timing of the Late Cenozoic deformation by determining the onset time of enhanced rock cooling using apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronometry. Eight sedimentary samples were collected from Triassic to Cretaceous strata exposed along a 17 km N-S transect, cross-cutting the northern Kuqa fold-and-thrust belt. Single-grain AHe ages from these samples mostly cluster around 8-16 Ma and are younger than their depositional ages. Older AHe ages show a positive relationship with [eU], a proxy for radiation damage. Modelling of the observed age-eU relationships suggest a phase of enhanced cooling and erosion initiated at Mid-Late Miocene time (10-20 Ma) in the northern Kuqa fold-and-thrust belt. This result is consistent with a coeval abrupt increase of sedimentation rate in the foreland Kuqa depression, south of the study area, indicating a Mid-Late Miocene phase of shortening in the northern Kuqa fold-and-thrust belt.

  6. The kinematic evolution of the Serra Central Salient, Eastern Brazil: A Neoproterozoic progressive arc in northern Espinhaço fold-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersan, Samuel Moreira; Danderfer, André; Lagoeiro, Leonardo; Costa, Alice Fernanda de Oliveira

    2017-12-01

    Convex-to-the-foreland map-view curves are common features in fold-thrust belts around cratonic areas. These features are easily identifiable in belts composed of supracrustal rocks but have been rarely described in rocks from relatively deeper crustal levels where plastic deformation mechanisms stand out. Several local salients have been described in Neoproterozoic marginal fold-thrust belts around the São Francisco craton. In the northern part of the Espinhaço fold-thrust belt, which borders the eastern portion of the São Francisco craton, both Archean-Paleoproterozoic basement rocks and Proterozoic cover rocks are involved in the so-called Serra Central salient. A combination of conventional structural analysis and microstructural and paleostress studies were conducted to characterize the kinematic and the overall architecture and processes involved in the generation of this salient. The results allowed us to determine that the deformation along the Serra Central salient occur under low-grade metamorphic conditions and was related to a gently oblique convergence with westward mass transport that developed in a confined flow, controlled by two transverse bounding shear zones. We propose that the Serra Central salient nucleates as a basin-controlled primary arc that evolves to a progressive arc with secondary vertical axis rotation. This secondary rotation, well-illustrated by the presence of two almost orthogonal families of folds, was dominantly controlled by buttress effect exert by a basement high located in the foreland of the Serra Central salient.

  7. Development of an arcuate fold-thrust belt as a result of basement configuration: an example from the Rocky Mountain Front Range, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burberry, C. M.; Cannon, D. L.; Engelder, T.; Cosgrove, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Sawtooth Range forms part of the Montana Disturbed Belt in the Front Ranges of the Rocky Mountains, along strike from the Alberta Syncline in the Canadian Rockies. The belt developed in the footwall to the Lewis Thrust during the Sevier orogeny and is similar in deformation style to the Canadian Foothills, with a series of stacked thrust sheets carrying Palaeozoic carbonates. The Sawtooth Range can be divided into an inner and outer deformed belt, separated by exposed fold structures in the overlying clastic sequence. Structures in the deformed belts plunge into the culmination of the NE-trending Scapegoat-Bannatyne trend, part of the Great Falls Tectonic Zone (GFTZ). Other mapped faults, including the Pendroy fault zone to the north, parallel this trend. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for the development of primary arcs in fold-thrust belts, including linkage of two thrust belts with different strikes, differential transport of segments of the belt, the geometry of the indentor, local plate heterogeneity and pre-existing basement configuration. Arcuate belts may also develop as a result of later bending of an initially straight orogen. In the Swift Dam area, part of the outer belt of the Sawtooth Range, the strike of the belt changes from 165 to 150. This apparent change in strike is accommodated by a sinistral lateral ramp in the Swift Dam Thrust. In addition, this outer belt becomes broader to the north in the Swift Dam region. However, the outer belt becomes extremely narrow in the Teton Canyon region to the south, and the deformation front is characterised by an intercutaneous wedge structure, rather than the trailing-edge imbricate fan seen to the north. A similar imbricate fan structure is seen to the south, in the Sun River Canyon region, corresponding well to the classic model of a deformation belt governed by a dominant thrust sheet, after Boyer & Elliot. The Sawtooth Range can be described as an active-roof duplex in the footwall to the

  8. Earthquakes, gravity, and the origin of the Bali Basin: An example of a Nascent Continental Fold-and-Thrust Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Robert; Nabelek, John

    1987-01-01

    We infer from the bathymetry and gravity field and from the source mechanisms and depths of the eight largest earthquakes in the Bali region that the Bali Basin is a downwarp in the crust of the Sunda Shelf produced and maintained by thrusting along the Flores back arc thrust zone. Earthquake source mechanisms and focal depths are inferred from the inversion of long-period P and SH waves for all events and short-period P waves for two of the events. Centroidal depths that give the best fit to the seismograms range from 10 to 18 km, but uncertainties in depth allow a range from 7 to 24 km. The P wave nodal planes that dip south at 13° to 35° (±7°) strike roughly parallel to the volcanic arc and are consistent with thrusting of crust of the Bali Basin beneath it. The positions of the earthquakes with respect to crustal features inferred from seismic and gravity data suggest that the earthquakes occur in the basement along the western end of the Flores thrust zone. The slip direction for the back arc thrust zone inferred from the orientation of the earthquake slip vectors indicates that the thrusting in the Bali Basin is probably part of the overall plate convergence, as it roughly coincides with the convergence direction between the Sunda arc and the Indian Ocean plate. Summation of seismic moments of earthquakes between 1960 and 1985 suggests a minimum rate of convergence across the thrust zone of 4 ± 2 mm/a. The presence of back arc thrusting suggests that some coupling between the Indian Ocean plate and the Sunda arc occurs but mechanisms such as continental collision or a shallow subduction of the Indian Ocean plate probably can be ruled out. The present tectonic setting and structure of the Bali Basin is comparable to the early forelands of the Andes or western North America in that a fold-and-thrust belt is forming on the continental side of an arc-trench system at which oceanic lithosphere is being subducted. The Bali Basin is flanked by the Tertiary Java

  9. Effect of decollement rheology and deformation rate on the structural development of fold thrust belts in sand box models and their implications for the Naga fold thrust belt (NE India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, B.; Dietl, C.

    2009-04-01

    Previous studies on decollement kinematics have shed light on the differing structures of fold thrust belt forming above lithologically different decollements, such as shales, carbonates and evaporites. Factors, affecting the decollement kinematics most are (1) rock rheology and (2) deformation rate. This study is intended to explain the deformation style of the Naga fold thrust belt (NFTB, NE India) with the aid of sand box modelling performed at a basal temperature of 50C and deformed at varying strain rates from 3*10-6 s-1 to 4*10-3 s-1. The models are made up (from bottom to top) of a 0.25 cm thick layer of temperature-sensitive PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), overlain by 1.75 cm of alternating black and yellow sand. The basal PDMS layer simulates a shale decollement. Decollements in the NFTB are generally developed in the Barail Shale of Oligocene age at 50C (the depth of the Barail Shale is about 2 km and the prevailing geothermal gradient is 25C/km). The sand layers simulate the brittlely behaving sandstones which prevail in the NFTB. All of the models were subjected to 35% compression, as the NFTB experienced similar shortening. The varying deformation velocities were chosen to model differing decollement rheologies. PDMS simulates shale decollement, which is mobile when overpressured and undergoes compression. The rheology of PDMS changes considerably with the applied temperature and strain rate. PDMS, although generally regarded as Newtonian, does behave non-Newtonian at strain rates of 10-3 s-1. The relation between decollement pore fluid overpressure with that of model strain rate, the material rheology, scaled body forces, density of the decollement in nature can be expressed as: λ = 1- [ V ηmodel / f Hmodel ρnatureg Hnature σ*] where λ = coeifficient of pore fluid overpressure in the decollement, V = the deformation velocity with which the models are deforming, ηmodel= viscosity of the decollement material, f = the co efficient of overpressure, and

  10. Nature and time of emplacement of a pegmatoidal granite within the Delhi Fold Belt near Bayalan, Rajasthan, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, N.; Sen, J.; Pal, T.; Ghosh, T.

    2009-04-01

    The study area is situated about 70 km south east of Ajmer, in Rajasthan, India around the village Bayala (26o 02' 19 N''; 74o 21' 01'') within the Ajmer district of Central Rajasthan. The area is along the eastern flank of the central portion of the Precambrian South Delhi Fold Belt (SDFB) and it stratigraphically belongs to the Bhim Group of rocks. Basement rocks of Archaean age, commonly known as the Banded gneissic Complex (BGC), is exposed to the east, where the rocks of the Bhim Group rests unconformably over BGC. To the west gneissic basement rocks of mid-Proterozoic times underlie the Bhim Group and have been referred to as the Beawar gneiss (BG). The Bhim Group of rocks comprises of metamorphosed marls and calc-silicate gneisses with minor amounts of quartzites and pelitic schists, indicative of its shallow marine origin. Within the Bhim Group, a pegmatoidal granite has intruded the calc silicate gneisses of the area. The pegmatoidal granite body is elliptical in outline with the long dimension(20 km) trending N-S and covers an area of 300 sq. km. approximately. This granite have so far been mapped as basement rocks (BG) surrounding the Beawar town (26o 06' 05'' N; 74o 19' 03'' E), 50 km south east of Ajmer. Rafts of calc-silicate gneisses, belonging to the Bhim Group, are seen to be entrapped within granite. Fragments of BG and its equivalents have also been found as caught up blocks within this pegmatoidal granite body near Andheri Devari, a small hamlet east of Beawar. The objective of the study was to map this pegmatoidal body, and decipher the mechanism and time of emplacement of this granite. A detailed structural mapping of the area in a 1:20000 scale spread over a 30 sq. km area in the vicinity of Bayala was carried out to analyse the geometry and the time of emplacement of the pegmatitic granite. The ridges of calc silicates and marbles adjoining the area were studied for the structural analyses of the Delhi fold belt rocks of the area. The calc

  11. Paleoseismology of a newly discovered scarp in the Yakima fold-and-thrust belt, Kittitas County, Washington

    Barnett, Elizabeth A.; Sherrod, Brian L.; Norris, Robert; Gibbons, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    The Boylston Mountains anticlinal ridge is one of several that are cored by rocks of the Columbia River Basalt Group and, with the interceding synclinal valleys, constitute the Yakima fold-and-thrust belt of central Washington. Lidar data acquired from the U.S. Army's Yakima Training Center reveal a prominent, northwest-side-up, 65°- to 70°-trending, 3- to 4-meter-high scarp that cuts across the western end of the Boylston Mountains, perpendicular to the mapped anticline. The scarp continues to the northeast from the ridge on the southern side of Park Creek and across the low ridges for a total length of about 3 kilometers. A small stream deeply incises its flood plain where it projects across Johnson Canyon. The scarp is inferred to be late Quaternary in age based on its presence on the modern landscape and the incised flood-plain sediments in Johnson Canyon. Two trenches were excavated across this scarp. The most informative of the two, the Horned Lizard trench, exposed shallow, 15.5-Ma Grande Ronde Basalt, which is split by a deep, wide crack that is coincident with the base of the scarp and filled with wedges of silty gravels that are interpreted to represent at least two generations of fault colluvium that offset a buried soil.

  12. Tectonomorphic evolution of the Eastern Cordillera fold-thrust belt, Colombia: New insights based on apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbal, B.; Stockli, D. F.; Mora, A.; Horton, B. K.; Blanco, V.; Sanchez, N.

    2010-12-01

    The Eastern Cordillera (EC) of Colombia marks the eastern boundary of Cenozoic fold-thrust deformation in the northern Andes. It is a classic example of an inversion belt formed in the retro-arc region, in this case superimposed on a Triassic/Jurassic to Cretaceous intracontinental rift system of northern South America. Ongoing thrust reactivation (inversion) in this contractional orogen provides an excellent opportunity to study the patterns of deformation and influence of preexisting anisotropies (Mora et al., 2006). The objective of this detailed (U-Th)/He study is to unravel the tectonic and thermal evolution of the EC from the Magdalena Valley basin in the west to the Llanos foreland basin in the east and reconstruct the temporal and spatial progression of deformation in the EC fold-thrust belt. Furthermore, the Subandean or foothills zone of Colombia is key for understanding the petroleum systems in the complex frontal zone of the inverted fold-thrust belt. We present detailed apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometric data from surface samples along a ~220 km WNW-ESE transect across the EC from the frontal fold-thrust belt at the edge of the Llanos basin to the western edge of the EC, the Magdalena basin. Surface and borehole zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He data, integrated with structural data, show that the EC fold-thrust belt propagated foreland-ward from the axial zone to the modern edges of the fold-thrust belt from at least the early Oligocene to the early Miocene. Detailed apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He data from surface samples and borehole samples in the foothills-Llanos transition zone and the Middle Magdalena Valley basin, between the large-displacement Guaicaramo and Pajarito-Chámeza thrusts in the east and the La Salina fault system in the west show a temporally complex evolution. The frontal fold-thrust belt was characterized by continued progressive foreland-ward migration of deformation and an apparent phase of major out-of-sequence motion

  13. Seismic images of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt, Arctic Alaska, from an integrated seismic reflection/refraction experiment

    Levander, A.; Fuis, G.S.; Wissinger, E.S.; Lutter, W.J.; Oldow, J.S.; Moore, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    We describe results of an integrated seismic reflection/refraction experiment across the Brooks Range and flanking geologic provinces in Arctic Alaska. The seismic acquisition was unusual in that reflection and refraction data were collected simultaneously with a 700 channel seismograph system deployed numerous times along a 315 km profile. Shot records show continuous Moho reflections from 0-180 km offset, as well as numerous upper- and mid-crustal wide-angle events. Single and low-fold near-vertical incidence common midpoint (CMP) reflection images show complex upper- and middle-crustal structure across the range from the unmetamorphosed Endicott Mountains allochthon (EMA) in the north, to the metamorphic belts in the south. Lower-crustal and Moho reflections are visible across the entire reflection profile. Travel-time inversion of PmP arrivals shows that the Moho, at 33 km depth beneath the North Slope foothills, deepens abruptly beneath the EMA to a maximum of 46 km, and then shallows southward to 35 km at the southern edge of the range. Two zones of upper- and middle-crustal reflections underlie the northern Brooks Range above ~ 12-15 km depth. The upper zone, interpreted as the base of the EMA, lies at a maximum depth of 6 km and extends over 50 km from the range front to the north central Brooks Range where the base of the EMA outcrops above the metasedimentary rocks exposed in the Doonerak window. We interpret the base of the lower zone, at ~ 12 km depth, to be from carbonate rocks above the master detachment upon which the Brooks Range formed. The seismic data suggest that the master detachment is connected to the faults in the EMA by several ramps. In the highly metamorphosed terranes south of the Doonerak window, the CMP section shows numerous south-dipping events which we interpret as a crustal scale duplex involving the Doonerak window rocks. The basal detachment reflections can be traced approximately 100 km, and dip southward from about 10-12 km

  14. Earthquakes, geodesy, and the structure of mountain belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Mark; Walters, Richard; Nissen, Ed

    2015-04-01

    Most terrestrial mountain belts are the topographic expression of thrust faulting and folding, which are how the continents deform in compression. Fold-and-thrust belts are therefore a global phenomenon, in existence since at least the onset of plate tectonics. They are typically described as wedge-shaped zones of deformation, overlying a basal low-angle thrust fault (≤10o dip). Here we use earthquake focal mechanisms and geodetic data from active continental fold-and-thrust belts worldwide, to test these concepts. We find that widespread, seismogenic, low-angle thrusting at the base of a wedge occurs only in the Himalayas, New Guinea, Talesh and far-eastern Zagros, which are plausibly underthrust by strong plates. In other ranges there is no focal mechanism evidence for a basal low-angle thrust, and well-constrained hypocentre depths are typically <20 km. Available geodetic data show that active deformation is focussed on a single, low-angle thrust in the Himalayas and New Guinea, but distributed in other ranges for which there are sufficient observations. We suggest that the more common style of deformation approximates to pure shear, with a brittle lid overlying the rest of the plate, where ductile or plastic deformation predominates. Interpretations of both active and ancient mountain belts will need re-evaluation in the light of these results.

  15. Rotation of the Pacific Northwest and Deformation Across the Yakima Fold and Thrust Belt Estimated with GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, R.; King, R. W.; Lancaster, M.; Miller, M. M.; Wells, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Geodetic, geologic and paleomagnetic data reveal that Oregon and parts of California, Nevada and Idaho rotate clockwise at 0.3 to 1.0 deg/Ma (relative to North America) about an axis near the Idaho-Oregon-Washington border, while northeast Washington is relatively fixed to North America. This rotation has been going on for at least 15 Ma. The spatial termination of the rotation requires shortening between Oregon and Washington. The Yakima fold and thrust belt (YFTB) lies along the boundary between northern Oregon and central Washington where convergence of the clockwise-rotating Oregon block is apparently accommodated. Shortening across the YFTB is thought to occur in a fan-like manner, increasing to the west. We obtained high-accuracy, high-density geodetic GPS measurements in 2012 and 2013 that are used with earlier measurements to characterize YFTB kinematics. Deformation associated with the YFTB starts in the south at the Blue Mountains Anticline in northern Oregon and extends northward to Frenchman Hills in Washington. To the east, the faulting and earthquake activity of the YFTB are truncated by a NNW-trending, narrow zone of deformation that runs along the Pasco Basin and Moses Lake region. It accommodates about 0.5 to 1.0 mm/yr of east to northeast shortening along the eastern boundary of the Department of Energy Hanford Site. The deforming zone aligns with recent seismicity in the Ice Harbor dike swarm, a relatively young ~ 8.5 Ma vent complex. West of the Cascade arc, shortening is accommodated by a series of east-trending faults, starting at the Doty fault in central coastal Washington and extending through Seattle up to the Canadian border. South of the Doty fault, other faults may take up some motion but may be too slow to resolve with GPS.

  16. Association of deformation and fluid events in the central Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt, Northern Alaska

    Moore, Thomas E.; Potter, Christopher J.; O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Shelton, Kevin L.; Underwood, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    Ocentral Brooks Range consists of two superposed north-directed contractional orogens, one formed between 140-120 Ma and the other at ~60-45 Ma. The older orogen was an arc-continent collisional zone characterized by far-traveled allochthons and relatively low structural relief. The younger orogen is a retroarc thrust belt with relatively low amounts of shortening and high structural relief. Folding and thrusting of the younger episode is superimposed on the thin-skinned deformational wedge of the earlier orogen and also produced a frontal triangle zone in a thick sequence of mid-Cretaceous foreland basin sediments to the north. Stable isotope compositions of calcite and quartz veins indicate two fluid events including: (1) an earlier, higher-temperature (~250-300° C) event that produced veins in deformed Devonian clastic rocks, and (2) a younger, lower-temperature (~150° C) event that deposited veins in deformed Mississippian through Albian strata. The fluids in the first event had variable d18O values, but nearly constant d13C values buffered by limestone lithologies. The vein-forming fluids in the second event had similarly variable d18O values, but with distinctly lower d13C values as a result of oxidation of organic matter and/or methane. Zircon fission track ages demonstrate cooling to temperatures below 200° C between 140-120 Ma for the Devonian rocks, whereas zircon and apatite fission track ages show that Mississippian to Albian rocks were never heated above 200° C and cooled below 110-90° C at ~60-45 Ma. These data are interpreted as indicating that the older, high-temperature fluid event was active during thrusting at 120-140 Ma, and the younger fluid event during deformation at ~60-45 Ma. The data and results presented in this poster will be published in early 2004 in Moore and others (in press).

  17. The Cenozoic fold-and-thrust belt of Eastern Sardinia: Evidences from the integration of field data with numerically balanced geological cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arragoni, S.; Maggi, M.; Cianfarra, P.; Salvini, F.

    2016-06-01

    Newly collected structural data in Eastern Sardinia (Italy) integrated with numerical techniques led to the reconstruction of a 2-D admissible and balanced model revealing the presence of a widespread Cenozoic fold-and-thrust belt. The model was achieved with the FORC software, obtaining a 3-D (2-D + time) numerical reconstruction of the continuous evolution of the structure through time. The Mesozoic carbonate units of Eastern Sardinia and their basement present a fold-and-thrust tectonic setting, with a westward direction of tectonic transport (referred to the present-day coordinates). The tectonic style of the upper levels is thin skinned, with flat sectors prevailing over ramps and younger-on-older thrusts. Three regional tectonic units are present, bounded by two regional thrusts. Strike-slip faults overprint the fold-and-thrust belt and developed during the Sardinia-Corsica Block rotation along the strike of the preexisting fault ramps, not affecting the numerical section balancing. This fold-and-thrust belt represents the southward prosecution of the Alpine Corsica collisional chain and the missing link between the Alpine Chain and the Calabria-Peloritani Block. Relative ages relate its evolution to the meso-Alpine event (Eocene-Oligocene times), prior to the opening of the Tyrrhenian Sea (Tortonian). Results fill a gap of information about the geodynamic evolution of the European margin in Central Mediterranean, between Corsica and the Calabria-Peloritani Block, and imply the presence of remnants of this double-verging belt, missing in the Southern Tyrrhenian basin, within the Southern Apennine chain. The used methodology proved effective for constraining balanced cross sections also for areas lacking exposures of the large-scale structures, as the case of Eastern Sardinia.

  18. The Ross Orogen and Lachlan Fold Belt in Marie Byrd Land, Northern Victoria Land and New Zealand: implication for the tectonic setting of the Lachlan Fold Belt in Antarctica

    Bradshaw, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Correlation of the Cambrian Delamerian Orogen of Australia and Ross Orogen of the Transantarctic Mountains widely accepted but the extension of the adjacent Lachlan Orogen into Antarctica is controversial. Outside the main Ross-Delamerian belt, evidence of this orogeny is preserved at Mt Murphy in Marie Byrd Land and the in Takaka Terrane of New Zealand. In all pre-break- configurations of the SW Pacific, these two areas are far removed from the Ross-Delamerian belt. Evidence from conglomerates in the Takaka Terrane, however, shows that in Late Cambrian times it was adjacent to the Ross Orogen. This indicates major tectonic displacements within Gondwana after the Cambrian and before break-up. The Lachlan Orogen formed in an extensional belt in a supra-subduction zone setting and the Cambrian rocks of Marie Byrd Land and New Zealand are interpreted as parts of a rifted continental ribbon on the outboard side of the Lachlan belt.

  19. Mesozoic intracontinental underthrust in the SE margin of the North China Block: Insights from the Xu-Huai thrust-and-fold belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Liangshu; Yin, Hongwei; Faure, Michel; Chen, Yan

    2017-06-01

    The Xu-Huai thrust-and-fold belt, located in the southeastern margin of the North China Block, consists mainly of thrust and folded pre-Mesozoic strata. Its geodynamic evolution and tectonic setting are topics of long debate. This paper provides new evidence from geological mapping, structural analysis, and making balance cross-sections, with restoration of cross-sections. Results suggest that this belt was subjected to two-phase deformation, including an early-phase regional-scale NW-ward thrust and fold, and a late-phase extension followed by the emplacement of dioritic, monzodioritic porphyrites dated at 131-135 Ma and locally strike-slip shearing. According to the mapping, field observations and drill-hole data, three structural units were distinguished, namely, (1) the pre-Neoproterozoic crystalline basement in the eastern segment, (2) the nappe unit or the thrust-and-fold zone in the central segment, which is composed of Neoproterozoic to Ordovician carbonate rocks and Carboniferous-Permian coal-bearing rocks, about 2600 m thick, and (3) the western frontal zone. A major decollement fault has also been identified in the base of the nappe unit, on which dozen-meter to km-scale thrust-and-fold bodies were commonly developed. All pre-Mesozoic depositional sequences were involved into a widespread thrust and fold event. Six uncompetent-rock layers with biostratigraphic ages (Nanjing University, 1996) have been recognized, and each uncompetent-rock layer occurred mainly in the top of the footwall, playing an important role in the development of the Xu-Huai thrust-and-fold belt. Geometry of the major decollement fault suggests that the nappe unit of this belt was rooted in its eastern side, near the Tan-Lu Fault Zone. Two geological cross-sections were chosen for structural balancing and restoration. From the balanced cross-sections, ramp-flat and imbricated faults as well as fault-related folds were identified. A shortening of 20.6-29.6 km was obtained from

  20. Fold interference pattern in thick-skinned tectonics; a case study from the external Variscan belt of Eastern Anti-Atlas, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidder, L.; Michard, A.; Soulaimani, A.; Fekkak, A.; Eddebbi, A.; Rjimati, E.-C.; Raddi, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Conflicting views are expressed in literature concerning fold interference patterns in thick-skinned tectonic context (e.g. Central Anti-Atlas and Rocky Mountains-Colorado areas). Such patterns are referred to superimposed events with distinct orientation of compression or to the inversion of paleofaults with distinct strike during a single compressional event. The present work presents a case study where both types of control on fold interference are likely to be combined. The studied folds occur in the Tafilalt-Maider area of eastern Anti-Atlas, i.e. in the E-trending foreland fold belt of the Meseta Variscan Orogen in the area where it connects with the SE-trending, intracontinental Ougarta Variscan belt. Detail mapping documents unusual fold geometries such as sigmoidal and croissant- or boomerang-shaped folds associated with a complex major fault pattern. The folded rock material corresponds to a 6-8 km-thick Cambrian-Serpukhovian sedimentary pile that includes alternating competent and incompetent formations. The basement of the Paleozoic succession is made up of rhomboedric tilted blocks that formed during the Cambrian rifting of north-western Gondwana and the Devonian dislocation of the Sahara platform. The latter event is responsible for an array of paleofaults bounding the Maider and South Tafilalt Devonian-Early Carboniferous basins with respect to the adjoining high axes. The Variscan Orogeny began during the Bashkirian-Westphalian with a N-S direction of shortening that converted the NW-trending Ougnat-Ouzina paleogeographic high into a mega dextral shear zone. Folds developed on top of a moving mosaic of basement blocks, being oriented en echelon on the inverted paleofaults or above intensely sheared fault zones. However, a dominantly NE-SW compression responsible for the building of the Ougarta belt also affected the studied area, presumably during the latest Carboniferous-Early Permian. The resulting fold interference pattern and peculiar geometries

  1. Formation and inversion of transtensional basins in the western part of the Lachlan Fold Belt, Australia, with emphasis on the Cobar Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glen, R. A.

    The Palaeozoic history of the western part of the Lachlan Fold Belt in New South Wales was dominated by strike-slip tectonics. In the latest Silurian to late Early Devonian, an area of crust >25,000 km 2 lying west of the Gilmore Suture underwent regional sinistral transtension, leading to the development of intracratonic successor basins, troughs and flanking shelves. The volcaniclastic deep-water Mount Hope Trough and Rast Trough, the siliciclastic Cobar Basin and the volcanic-rich Canbelego-Mineral Hill Belt of the Kopyje Shelf all were initiated around the Siluro-Devonian boundary. They all show clear evidence of having evolved by both active syn-rift processes and passive later post-rift (sag-phase) processes. Active syn-rift faulting is best documented for the Cobar Basin and Mount Hope Trough. In the former case, the synchronous activity on several fault sets suggests that the basin formed by sinistral transtension in response to a direction of maximum extension oriented NE-SW. Structures formed during inversion of the Cobar Basin and Canbelego-Mineral Hill Belt indicate closure under a dextral transpressive strain regime, with a far-field direction of maximum shortening oriented NE-SW. In the Cobar Basin, shortening was partitioned into two structural zones. A high-strain zone in the east was developed into a positive half-flower structure by re-activation of early faults and by formation of short-cut thrusts, some with strike-slip movement, above an inferred steep strike-slip fault. Intense subvertical cleavage, a steep extension lineation and variably plunging folds are also present. A lower-strain zone to the west developed by syn-depositional faults being activated as thrusts soling into a gently dipping detachment. A subvertical cleavage and steep extension lineation are locally present, and variably plunging folds are common. Whereas Siluro-Devonian basin-opening appeared to be synchronous in the western part of the fold belt, the different period of

  2. How the structural architecture of the Eurasian continental margin affects the structure, seismicity, and topography of the south central Taiwan fold-and-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Dennis; Alvarez-Marron, Joaquina; Biete, Cristina; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Camanni, Giovanni; Ho, Chun-Wei

    2017-07-01

    Studies of mountain belts worldwide show that along-strike changes are common in their foreland fold-and-thrust belts. These are typically caused by processes related to fault reactivation and/or fault focusing along changes in sedimentary sequences. The study of active orogens, like Taiwan, can also provide insights into how these processes influence transient features such as seismicity and topography. In this paper, we trace regional-scale features from the Eurasian continental margin in the Taiwan Strait into the south central Taiwan fold-and-thrust belt. We then present newly mapped surface geology, P wave velocity maps and sections, seismicity, and topography data to test the hypothesis of whether or not these regional-scale features of the margin are contributing to along-strike changes in structural style, and the distribution of seismicity and topography in this part of the Taiwan fold-and-thrust belt. These data show that the most important along-strike change takes place at the eastward prolongation of the upper part of the margin necking zone, where there is a causal link between fault reactivation, involvement of basement in the thrusting, concentration of seismicity, and the formation of high topography. On the area correlated with the necking zone, the strike-slip reactivation of east northeast striking extensional faults is causing sigmoidal offset of structures and topography along two main zones. Here basement is not involved in the thrusting; there is weak focusing of seismicity and localized development of topography. We also show that there are important differences in structure, seismicity, and topography between the margin shelf and its necking zone.

  3. Evolution of the Chos Malal and Agrio fold and thrust belts, Andes of Neuquén: Insights from structural analysis and apatite fission track dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Vera, E. A.; Mescua, J.; Folguera, A.; Becker, T. P.; Sagripanti, L.; Fennell, L.; Orts, D.; Ramos, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Chos Malal and Agrio fold and thrust belts are located in the western part of the Neuquén basin, an Andean retroarc basin of central-western Argentina. Both belts show evidence of tectonic inversion at the western part during Late Cretaceous times. The eastern part is dominated by late Miocene deformation which also partially reactivated the western structures. This work focuses on the study of the regional structure and the deformational event that shaped the relief of this part of the Andes. Based on new field work and structural data and previously published works a detailed map of the central part of the Neuquén basin is presented. Three regional structural cross sections were surveyed and balanced using the 2d Move™ software. In order to define a more accurate uplift history, new apatite fission track analyses were carried on selected structures. These data was used for new thermal history modeling of the inner part of the Agrio and Chos Malal fold and thrust belts. The results of the fission track analyses improve the knowledge of how these fold and thrust belts have grown trough time. Two main deformational events are defined in Late Cretaceous to Paleocene and Late Miocene times. Based on this regional structural analysis and the fission track data the precise location of the orogenic front for the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene times is reconstructed and it is proposed a structural evolution of this segment of the Andes. This new exhumation data show how the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene event was a continuous and uninterrupted deformational event.

  4. Deformation of Fold-and-Thrust Belts above a Viscous Detachment: New Insights from Analogue Modelling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Carlos R.; Marques, Fernando O.

    2015-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies on fold-and-thrusts belts (FTB) have shown that, under Coulomb conditions, deformation of brittle thrust wedges above a dry frictional basal contact is characterized by dominant frontward vergent thrusts (forethrusts) with thrust spacing and taper angle being directly influenced by the basal strength (increase in basal strength leading to narrower thrust spacing and higher taper angles); whereas thrust wedges deformed above a weak viscous detachment, such as salt, show a more symmetric thrust style (no prevailing vergence of thrusting) with wider thrust spacing and shallower wedges. However, different deformation patterns can be found on this last group of thrust wedges both in nature and experimentally. Therefore we focused on the strength (friction) of the wedge basal contact, the basal detachment. We used a parallelepiped box with four fixed walls and one mobile that worked as a vertical piston drove by a computer controlled stepping motor. Fine dry sand was used as the analogue of brittle rocks and silicone putty (PDMS) with Newtonian behaviour as analogue of the weak viscous detachment. To investigate the strength of basal contact on thrust wedge deformation, two configurations were used: 1) a horizontal sand pack with a dry frictional basal contact; and 2) a horizontal sand pack above a horizontal PDMS layer, acting as a basal weak viscous contact. Results of the experiments show that: the model with a dry frictional basal detachment support the predictions for the Coulomb wedges, showing a narrow wedge with dominant frontward vergence of thrusting, close spacing between FTs and high taper angle. The model with a weak viscous frictional basal detachment show that: 1) forethrusts (FT) are dominant showing clearly an imbricate asymmetric geometry, with wider spaced thrusts than the dry frictional basal model; 2) after FT initiation, the movement on the thrust can last up to 15% model shortening, leading to great amount of

  5. Investigation of neotectonic deformation in the eastern part of the Caucasus Intermountain Area, Kura Fold-Thrust Belt, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhishvili, L.; Javakhishvili, Z.; Forte, A. M.; Boichenko, G.; Merebashvili, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Kura Fold-Thrust Belt (KFTB), located in the eastern Caucasus, is a young first-order structural system within the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone and absorbs greater than 50% of total convergence between the Greater and Lesser Caucasus at this longitude. The structure, activity, and initiation age of the KFTB is well constrained in Azerbaijan, but less so within Georgia. Based on regional stratigraphic relationships, it is suggested that deformation of the Georgian portion of the KFTB initiated before or during Akchagyl time (3.4-1.6 Ma), but field data verifying this hypothesis is lacking. The Gombori Range represents the western extent of the KFTB, rises to elevations > 1900 m, and currently is a topographic barrier to south-directed rivers flowing from the Greater Caucasus, with the first river crossing the KFTB >100 km to the east. The Gombori Range also contains exposures of deformed Pliocene to Quaternary fluvial sediments that likely record a drainage network reorganization in response to the growth of the KFTB and a shift from through-going south-flowing rivers to the current network. To test this hypothesis, we focus on 1 km exposure of continuous Plio-Quaternary section along the Turdo river, which flows northwards from the Gombori range. The exposures are a >40 m vertical cliff, so we first use photogrammetry to construct a digital outcrop model and analyze it in a virtual reality environment to select strategic locations for detailed paleocurrent analysis in attempt to bracket the timing of KFTB development. Understanding the history and current location of active deformation in this region is essential for seismic hazard assessment for the nearby major cities of Telavi and Tbilisi. From previous active fault studies, the maximum earthquake magnitude in this region is Mw=7.0 and the strongest recorded earthquake was a Mw=5.3 in 1997. Observed seismicity is sparse and it's difficult to delineate active faults by earthquakes hypocenters. To determine

  6. Geochronology and thermochronology of Cretaceous plutons and metamorphic country rocks, Anyui-Chukotka fold belt, North East Arctic Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, E. L.; Katkov, S. M.; Strickland, A.; Toro, J.; Akinin, V. V.; Dumitru, T. A.

    2009-09-01

    U-Pb isotopic dating of seven granitoid plutons and associated intrusions from the Bilibino region (Arctic Chukotka, Russia) was carried out using the SHRIMP-RG. The crystallization ages of these granitoids, which range from approximately 116.9±2.5 to 108.5±2.7 Ma, bracket two regionally significant deformational events. The plutons cut folds, steep foliations and thrust-related structures related to sub-horizontal shortening at lower greenschist facies conditions (D1), believed to be the result of the collision of the Arctic Alaska-Chukotka microplate with Eurasia along the South Anyui Zone (SAZ). Deformation began in the Late Jurassic, based on fossil ages of syn-orogenic clastic strata, and involves strata as young as early Cretaceous (Valanginian) north of Bilibino and as young as Hauterivian-Barremian, in the SAZ. The second phase of deformation (D2) is developed across a broad region around and to the east of the Lupveem batholith of the Alarmaut massif and is interpreted to be coeval with magmatism. D2 formed gently-dipping, high-strain foliations (S2). Growth of biotite, muscovite and actinolite define S2 adjacent to the batholith, while chlorite and white mica define S2 away from the batholith. Sillimanite (± andalusite) at the southeastern edge the Lupveem batholith represent the highest grade metamorphic minerals associated with D2. D2 is interpreted to have developed during regional extension and crustal thinning. Extension directions as measured by stretching lineations, quartz veins, boudinaged quartz veins is NE-SW to NW-SE. Mapped dikes associated with the plutons trend mostly NW-SE and indicate NE-SW directed extension. 40Ar/39Ar ages from S2 micas range from 109.3±1.2 to 103.0±1.8 Ma and are interpreted as post-crystallization cooling ages following a protracted period of magmatism and high heat flow. Regional uplift and erosion of many kilometers of cover produced a subdued erosional surface prior to the eruption of volcanic rocks of the

  7. Post-collisional deposits in the Zagros foreland basin: Implications for diachronous underthrusting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirouz, Mortaza

    2017-11-01

    Detailed sedimentology of the Neogene foreland basin deposits is investigated and classified into 11 lithofacies associations with respect to their paleo-sedimentary environments. The foreland deposits reveal a single coarsening-upward mega-sequence with continuous passage from back-bulge to forebulge, foredeep, and wedge-top sedimentary environments. The Gachsaran deposits form the base of the foreland strata and consist mainly of three different lithofacies associations including fluvial, marine, and sabkha deposits in the eastern Zagros in Fars, and are typically dominated with evaporites toward the west in the Dezful and Kirkuk embayments. The Mishan Formation has three different shallow-marine lithofacies associations in a vertical succession representing foredeep deposits in the eastern Zagros, which tapers toward the Dezful embayment and disappears in Iraq. The Agha Jari distal wedge-top deposits also contain three different lithofacies associations including delta deposits mostly in the Fars, tidal flat deposits in Dezful and Mesopotamia basin, and continental fluvial deposits across the entire Zagros. The uppermost synorogenic Bakhtiari Formation represents proximal wedge-top deposits and consists mainly of two main lithofacies associations including shallow marine and fluvial deposits, within which the fluvial succession is divided into three sub-lithofacies associations with respect to distance from the mountain front and hydraulic power of the river networks. Synthetizing sedimentary facies association with age constraints of the old foreland deposits near the Zagros suture in the High Zagros area suggests that a considerable part of the Arabian plate has been removed at the northern edge by underthrusting and erosion. Moreover, preservation of the young distal foreland deposits near the suture in the western Zagros implies that the magnitude and rate of removal of the proximal foreland deposits have been inconstant along-strike the belt and decreases

  8. Evidence for synchronous thin-skinned and basement deformation in the Cordilleran fold-thrust belt: the Tendoy Mountains, southwestern Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Robin John

    1997-01-01

    The Tendoy Mountains contain the easternmost thin-skinned thrust sheets in the Cordilleran fold-thrust belt of southwestern Montana, and are in the zone of tectonic overlap between the Rocky Mountain foreland and the Cordilleran fold-thrust belt. The three frontal thrust sheets of the Tendoy Mountains are from north to south, the Armstead, McKenzie, and Tendoy sheets. Near the southeastern terminus of the Tendoy thrust sheet is a lateral ramp in which the Tendoy thrust climbs along strike from the Upper Mississippian Lombard Limestone to lower Cretaceous rocks. This ramp coincides with the southeastern side of the Paleozoic Snowcrest trough and projection of the range-flanking basement thrust of the Blacktail-Snowcrest uplift, suggesting either basement or stratigraphic control on location of the lateral ramp. Axes of major folds on the southern part of the Tendoy thrust sheet are parallel to the direction of thrust transport and to the trend of the Snowcrest Range. They are a result of: (1) Pre-thrust folding above basement faults; (2) Passive transportation of the folds from a down-plunge position; (3) Minor reactivation of basement faults; and (4) Emplacement of blind, sub-Tendoy, thin-skinned thrust faults. The Tendoy sheet also contains a major out-of-sequence thrust fault that formed in thick Upper Mississippian shales and created large, overturned, foreland-verging folds in Upper Mississippian to Triassic rocks. The out-of-sequence fault can be identified where stratigraphic section is omitted, and by a stratigraphic separation diagram that shows it cutting down section in the direction of transport. The prominent lateral ramp at the southern terminus of the Tendoy thrust sheet is a result of fault propagation through strata folded over the edge of the Blacktail-Snowcrest uplift.

  9. Along-dip variations of structural style in the Somali Basin deep-water fold and thrust belt (East Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, Francesco; Rinaldo Barchi, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    Continental passive margins are place of extended slope-failure phenomena, which can lead to the formation of gravity-driven deep-water fold and thrust belts (DW-FTBs), in regions where no far-field compressional stress is active. These giant geological features, which are confined to the sedimentary section, consist of extensional-compressional linked systems detached over a common décollement, generally salt or shales. The continental passive margin of northern Kenya and southern Somalia is an excellent and relatively unexplored site for recognizing and understanding the DW-FTBs originated over a regional shale décollement. In this study we have interpreted a 2D seismic data-set of the 1980s, hosted by Marine Geoscience Data System at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University (http://www.marine-geo.org), and recently reprocessed by ENI, in order to investigate the structural style of a DW-FTB developed offshore of northern Kenya and southern Somalia (Somali Basin). This region records the oldest sedimentary section of the Indian Ocean since the breakup of Gondwana began in the Middle-Lower Jurassic separating Madagascar from Africa. From the Upper Cretaceous to at least the Lower Miocene, the margin has been characterized by gravitational collapse leading to the formation of a DW-FTB extending more than 400 km along-strike. The northern portion of the DW-FTB is about 150 km wide, whilst in the southern portion is few tens of km wide. We analysed the northern portion along a regional seismic section. Our study represents the first detailed structural interpretation of this DW-FTB since its discovery in the 1980s. The good quality of the available reprocessed seismic data has allowed us to identify remarkable along-dip variations in the structural style. The basal detachment constantly deepens landward, in agreement with a prevailing gravity-spreading deformation process (as in the case of the Niger Delta). On the seismic data are not visible, as

  10. The Gogebic Iron Range - A Sample of the Northern Margin of the Penokean Fold and Thrust Belt

    Cannon, William F.; LaBerge, Gene L.; Klasner, John S.; Schulz, Klaus J.

    2008-01-01

    The Gogebic iron range is an elongate belt of Paleoproterozoic strata extending from the west shore of Lake Gogebic in the upper peninsula of Michigan for about 125 km westward into northern Wisconsin. It is one of six major informally named iron ranges in the Lake Superior region and produced about 325 million tons of direct-shipping ore between 1887 and 1967. A significant resource of concentrating-grade ore remains in the western and eastern parts of the range. The iron range forms a broad, gently southward-opening arc where the central part of the range exposes rocks that were deposited somewhat north of the eastern and western parts. A fundamental boundary marking both the tectonic setting of deposition and the later deformation within the Penokean orogen lies fortuitously in an east-west direction along the range so that the central part of the range preserves sediments deposited north of that boundary, whereas the eastern and western parts of the range were deposited south of the boundary. Thus, the central part of the range provides a record of sedimentation and very mild deformation in a part of the Penokean orogen farthest from the interior of the orogen to the south. The eastern and western parts of the range, in contrast, exhibit a depositional and deformational style typical of parts closer to the interior of the orogen. A second fortuitous feature of the iron range is that the entire area was tilted from 40° to 90° northward by Mesoproterozoic deformation so that the map view offers an oblique cross section of the Paleoproterozoic sedimentary sequence and structures. Together, these features make the Gogebic iron range a unique area in which to observe (1) the lateral transition from deposition on a stable platform to deposition in a tectonically and volcanically active region, and (2) the transition from essentially undeformed Paleoproterozoic strata to their folded and faulted equivalents.Paleoproterozoic strata in the Gogebic iron range are part

  11. Subsurface structural interpretation by applying trishear algorithm: An example from the Lenghu5 fold-and-thrust belt, Qaidam Basin, Northern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yangwen; Paton, Douglas A.; Wu, Kongyou; Xie, Liujuan

    2017-08-01

    The application of trishear algorithm, in which deformation occurs in a triangle zone in front of a propagating fault tip, is often used to understand fault related folding. In comparison to kink-band methods, a key characteristic of trishear algorithm is that non-uniform deformation within the triangle zone allows the layer thickness and horizon length to change during deformation, which is commonly observed in natural structures. An example from the Lenghu5 fold-and-thrust belt (Qaidam Basin, Northern Tibetan Plateau) is interpreted to help understand how to employ trishear forward modelling to improve the accuracy of seismic interpretation. High resolution fieldwork data, including high-angle dips, 'dragging structures', thinning hanging-wall and thickening footwall, are used to determined best-fit trishear model to explain the deformation happened to the Lenghu5 fold-and-thrust belt. We also consider the factors that increase the complexity of trishear models, including: (a) fault-dip changes and (b) pre-existing faults. We integrate fault dip change and pre-existing faults to predict subsurface structures that are apparently under seismic resolution. The analogue analysis by trishear models indicates that the Lenghu5 fold-and-thrust belt is controlled by an upward-steepening reverse fault above a pre-existing opposite-thrusting fault in deeper subsurface. The validity of the trishear model is confirmed by the high accordance between the model and the high-resolution fieldwork. The validated trishear forward model provides geometric constraints to the faults and horizons in the seismic section, e.g., fault cutoffs and fault tip position, faults' intersecting relationship and horizon/fault cross-cutting relationship. The subsurface prediction using trishear algorithm can significantly increase the accuracy of seismic interpretation, particularly in seismic sections with low signal/noise ratio.

  12. The evolution of a Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic intraplate basin (Duaringa Basin), eastern Australia: evidence for the negative inversion of a pre-existing fold-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaahmadi, Abbas; Sliwa, Renate; Esterle, Joan; Rosenbaum, Gideon

    2017-12-01

    The Duaringa Basin in eastern Australia is a Late Cretaceous?-early Cenozoic sedimentary basin that developed simultaneously with the opening of the Tasman and Coral Seas. The basin occurs on the top of an earlier (Permian-Triassic) fold-thrust belt, but the negative inversion of this fold-thrust belt, and its contribution to the development of the Duaringa Basin, are not well understood. Here, we present geophysical datasets, including recently surveyed 2D seismic reflection lines, aeromagnetic and Bouguer gravity data. These data provide new insights into the structural style in the Duaringa Basin, showing that the NNW-striking, NE-dipping, deep-seated Duaringa Fault is the main boundary fault that controlled sedimentation in the Duaringa Basin. The major activity of the Duaringa Fault is observed in the southern part of the basin, where it has undergone the highest amount of displacement, resulting in the deepest and oldest depocentre. The results reveal that the Duaringa Basin developed in response to the partial negative inversion of the pre-existing Permian-Triassic fold-thrust belt, which has similar orientation to the extensional faults. The Duaringa Fault is the negative inverted part of a single Triassic thrust, known as the Banana Thrust. Furthermore, small syn-depositional normal faults at the base of the basin likely developed due to the reactivation of pre-existing foliations, accommodation faults, and joints associated with Permian-Triassic folds. In contrast to equivalent offshore basins, the Duaringa Basin lacks a complex structural style and thick syn-rift sediments, possibly because of the weakening of extensional stresses away from the developing Tasman Sea.

  13. Limited fluid in carbonate-shale hosted thrust faults of the Rocky Mountain Fold-and-Thrust Belt (Sun River Canyon, Montana)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OBrien, V. J.; Kirschner, D. L.

    2001-12-01

    It is widely accepted that fluids play a fundamental role in the movement of thrust faults in foreland fold-and-thrust belts. We have begun a combined structure-geochemistry study of faults in the Rocky Mountain fold-and-thrust belt in order to provide more insight into the occurrence and role(s) of fluid in the deformation of thrust faults. We focus on faults exposed in the Sun River Canyon of Montana, an area that contains some of the best exposures of the Rocky Mountain fold-and-thrust belt in the U.S. Samples were collected from two well exposed thrusts in the Canyon -- the Diversion and French thrusts. Both faults have thrust Mississippian dolostones over Cretaceous shales. Displacement exceeds several kilometers. Numerous small-displacement, subsidiary faults characterize the deformation in the hanging wall carbonates. The footwall shales accommodated more penetrative deformation, resulting in well developed foliation and small-scale folds. Stable isotope data have been obtained from host rock samples and veins from these faults. The data delimit an arcuate trend in oxygen-carbon isotope space. Approximately 50 host rock carbonate samples from the hanging walls have carbon and oxygen isotope values ranging from +3 to 0 and 28 to 19 per mil, respectively. There is no apparent correlation between isotopic values and distance from thrust fault at either locality. Fifteen samples of fibrous slickensides on small-displacement faults in the hanging walls have similar carbon and lower oxygen isotope values (down to 16 per mil). And 15 veins that either post-date thrusting or are of indeterminate origin have carbon and oxygen isotope values down to -3 and12 per mil, respectively. The isotopic data collected during the initial stages of this project are similar to some results obtained several hundred kilometers north in the Front Ranges of the Canadian Rockies (Kirschner and Kennedy, JGR 2000) and in carbonate fold-thrust belts of the Swiss Helvetic Alps and Italian

  14. Zagros Mountains, Iran, SRTM Shaded Relief Anaglyph

    2004-06-17

    The Zagros Mountains in Iran offer a visually stunning topographic display of geologic structure in layered sedimentary rocks in this anaglyph from NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

  15. Geochemistry and field geology of shoshonitic magmas in the Late Cretaceous foreland fold and thrust belt of southwestern Montana: Results from the North Doherty Mountain Intrusive Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beranek, L. P.; Burton, B. R.; Ihinger, P. D.

    2002-12-01

    The North Doherty Mountain Intrusive Complex (NDMIC) is one of several satellite plutons related to the areally extensive Boulder batholith of southwestern Montana. The Boulder batholith comprises multiple plutons and intrusive phases, and the magmatism has long been thought to be the result of subduction due to its calc-alkaline granodioritic composition. The batholith is situated in the Helena salient, which differs from other parts of the North American Cordilleran foreland because there, magmatism spatially and temporally overlaps with deformation in the foreland fold and thrust belt. The North Doherty Mountain Intrusive Complex (NDMIC) is one of several satellite plutons related to the Boulder batholith and represents an ideal microcosm of the batholith for petrogenetic and structural studies because it exposes both mafic and felsic units and was emplaced in the limb of a major thrust related fold. We present new geologic mapping and detailed trace element geochemical analyses to show that the entire mafic-to-felsic suite of rocks in the NDMIC are cogenetic and shoshonitic in character. Shoshonites are unusual magmas that are distinguished by their high concentrations of K, Rb, Sr, Ba, Zr, and Th contents, and are thought to represent partial melting at great depths within the mantle wedge above a subducting slab. The presence of shoshonitic magma in the Cordilleran foreland fold and thrust belt provides important clues into the nature of the formation of this unusual magma type and can provide insights into our understanding of magmatism in foreland structural settings.

  16. Rock magnetism and magnetic fabric of the Triassic rocks from the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt and its foreland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudzisz, Katarzyna; Szaniawski, Rafał; Michalski, Krzysztof; Chadima, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic fabric and magnetomineralogy of the Early Triassic sedimentary rocks, collected along the length of the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt (WSFTB) and from subhorizontal beds on its foreland, is presented with the aim to compare magnetic mineralogy of these areas, determine the carriers of magnetic fabric and identify tectonic deformation reflected in the magnetic fabric. Magnetic mineralogy varies and only in part depends on the lithology. The magnetic fabric at all sampling sites is controlled by paramagnetic minerals (phyllosilicates and Fe-carbonates). In the fold belt, it reflects the low degree of deformation in a compressional setting with magnetic lineation parallel to fold axis (NW-SE). This is consistent with pure orthogonal compression model of the WSFTB formation, but it also agrees with decoupling model. Inverse fabric, observed in few sites, is carried by Fe-rich carbonates. In the WSFTB foreland, magnetic lineation reflects the Triassic paleocurrent direction (NE-SW). The alternation between normal and inverse magnetic fabric within the stratigraphic profile could be related to sedimentary cycles.

  17. Fault fluid evolution at the outermost edges of the southern Apennines fold-and-thrust belt, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, Fabrizio; Belviso, Claudia; Cavalcante, Francesco; Vita Petrullo, Angela

    2017-04-01

    This work focuses on the structural architecture and mineralization of a high-angle, extensional fault zone that crosscuts the Middle Pleistocene tuffs and pyroclastites of the Vulture Volcano, southern Italy. This fault zone is topped by a few m-thick travertine deposit formed by precipitation, in a typical lacustrine depositional environment, from a fault fluid that included a mixed, biogenic- and mantle-derived CO2. The detailed analysis of its different mineralization can shed new lights into the shallow crustal fluid flow that took place during deformation of the outer edge of the southern Apennines fold-and-thrust belt. In fact, the study fault zone is interpreted as a shallow-seated, tear fault associated with a shallow thrust fault displacing the most inner portion of the Bradano foredeep basin infill, and was thus active during the latest stages of contractional deformation. Far from the fault zone, the fracture network is made up of three high-angle joint sets striking N-S, E-W and NW-SE, respectively. The former two sets can be interpreted as the older structural elements that pre-dated the latter one, which is likely due to the current stress state that affects the whole Italian peninsula. In the vicinity of the fault zone, a fourth joint high-angle set striking NE-SW is also present, which becomes the most dominant fracture set within the study footwall fault damage zone. Detailed X-ray diffraction analysis of the powder obtained from hand specimens representative of the multiple mineralization present within the fault zone, and in the surrounding volcanites, are consistent with circulation of a fault fluid that modified its composition with time during the latest stages of volcanic activity and contractional deformation. Specifically, veins infilled with and slickenside coated by jarosite, Opal A and/or goethite are found in the footwall fault damage zone. Based upon the relative timing of formation of the aforementioned joint sets, deciphered after

  18. Neotectonics and seismicity of a slowly deforming segment of the Adria-Europe convergence zone - the northern Dinarides fold-and-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustaszewski, Kamil; Herak, Marijan; Tomljenović, Bruno; Herak, Davorka; Matej, Srebrenka

    2014-05-01

    With GPS-derived shortening rates of c. 3-5 mm/a, the Adria-Europe convergence zone across the fold-and-thrust belt of the Dinarides (Balkan Peninsula) is a slowly deforming plate boundary by global standards. We have analysed the active tectonics and instrumental seismicity of the northernmost segment of this fold-and-thrust belt at its border to the Pannonian Basin. This area hosts a Maastrichtian collisional suture formed by closure of Mesozoic fragments of the Neotethys, overprinted by Miocene back-arc extension, which led to the exhumation of greenschist- to amphibolite-grade rocks in several core complexes. Geological, geomorphological and reflection seismic data provide evidence for a compressive or transpressive reactivation of extensional faults after about 5 Ma. The study area represents the seismically most active region of the Dinarides apart from the Adriatic Sea coast and the area around Zagreb. The strongest instrumentally recorded earthquake (27 October 1969) affected the city of Banja Luka (northern Bosnia and Herzegovina). Fault plane solutions for the main shock (ML 6.4) and its largest foreshock (ML 6.0) indicate reverse faulting along ESE-WNW-striking nodal planes and generally N-S trending pressure axes. The spatial distribution of epicentres and focal depths, analyses of the macroseismic field and fault-plane solutions for several smaller events suggest on-going shortening in the internal Dinarides. Our results therefore imply that current Adria-Europe convergence is widely distributed across c. 300 km, rendering the entire Dinarides fold-and-thrust belt a slowly deforming plate boundary.

  19. Neotectonic reactivation of the western section of the Malargüe fold and thrust belt (Tromen volcanic plateau, Southern Central Andes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagripanti, Lucía; Rojas Vera, Emilio A.; Gianni, Guido M.; Folguera, Andrés; Harvey, Jonathan E.; Farías, Marcelo; Ramos, Victor A.

    2015-03-01

    This study examines the neotectonic deformation and development of the Tromen massif, a Quaternary retroarc volcanic field located in the western section of the Malargüe fold and thrust belt in the Southern Central Andes. The linkages between neotectonic deformation in the intra-arc zone and the recent retroarc structures of the Tromen volcanic plateau are not clearly understood. These retroarc deformations affect the mid-section of the fold and thrust belt, leaving to the east a 200 km-wide deformed zone that can be considered inactive over the last 12-10 Ma. This out-of-sequence deformation west of the orogenic front area has not been previously addressed in detail. In this study, exhaustive mapping is used to describe and discriminate structures with a neotectonic component from those fossilized by Pleistocene strata. Two balanced cross-sections are constructed showing the distribution of the youngest deformations and their relation to pre-Miocene structures. An important means for evaluating this is the morphometric and morphological analyses that allowed identification of perturbations in the fluvial network associated with active structures. In a broader perspective, neotectonic activity in the fold and thrust belt is discussed and inferred to be caused by local mechanical weakening of the retroarc zone, due to injection of asthenospheric material evidenced by magnetotelluric surveys. Thus, deformation imposed by the oblique convergence between South American and Nazca plates, while to the south being limited to the Liquiñe-Ofqui fault system that runs through the arc zone, in the retroarc area is located at the site of magmatic emplacement, presumably in association with a thermally weakened-upper crust. This control exemplifies the relationship that exists between surficial processes, magmatic emplacement and upper asthenospheric dynamics in the Southern Central Andes.

  20. Structural analysis of hanging wall and footwall blocks within the Río Guanajibo fold-and-thrust belt in Southwest Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laó-Dávila, Daniel A.; Llerandi-Román, Pablo A.

    2017-01-01

    The Río Guanajibo fold-and-thrust belt (RGFT), composed of Cretaceous serpentinite and volcano-sedimentary rocks, represents the deformation front of a contractional event in SW Puerto Rico during the Paleogene. Previous studies inferred structural and stratigraphic relationships from poorly exposed outcrops. New road cuts exposed the Yauco (YF) and El Rayo Formations (ERF) providing insights on the deformation of the hanging wall and footwall. We described the nature and orientation of faults and folds and analyzed the kinematic indicators to characterize the deformation. The YF occurs in the hanging wall and shows a sequence of folded, medium-bedded mudstone and thinly bedded shale and sandstone. Major folds strike NW-SE and are gentle with steeply inclined axial planes and sub-horizontal fold axes. Minor folds are open with moderately inclined axial planes and gently to moderately inclined SE-plunging fold axes. NW-SE striking reverse and thrust faults cut layers and show movement to the SW. Steep left-lateral faults strike NW-SE and NE-SW, and smaller right-lateral strike-slip faults strike NNE-SSW. At the footwall, the ERF consists of bioclastic limestone and polymictic orthoconglomerates and paraconglomerates. Reverse and strike-slip faults cut along lithological contacts. Results suggest that the hanging wall and footwall accommodated strain along preexisting weaknesses, which are dependent on lithology and sedimentary structures. The kinematic analysis suggests that shortening in the NE-SW direction was partitioned between folding and interlayer shortening, accommodated by flexural slip, and reverse and left-lateral faults that resulted from contraction. The RGFT represents the Paleogene back arc deformation of a bivergent thrust system.

  1. Influence of pre-tectonic carbonate facies architecture on deformation patterns of syntectonic turbidites, an example from the central Mexican fold-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vásquez Serrano, Alberto; Tolson, Gustavo; Fitz Diaz, Elisa; Chávez Cabello, Gabriel

    2018-04-01

    The Mexican fold-thrust belt in central México excellently exposes relatively well preserved syntectonic deposits that overlay rocks with lateral lithostratigraphic changes across the belt. We consider the deformational effects of these changes by investigating the geometry, kinematics and strain distribution within syntectonic turbidites, which are deposited on top of Albian-Cenomanian shallow and deep water carbonate layers. Field observations and detailed structural analysis at different stratigraphic and structural levels of the Late Cretaceous syntectonic formation are compared with the deformation as a function of lithological and structural variations in the underlying carbonate units, to better understand the effect of these lithostratigraphic variations on deformation, kinematics, strain distribution and propagation of deformation. From our kinematic analyses, we conclude that the syntectonic strata are pervasively affected by folding in all areas and that deformation partitioning localized shear zones at the boundaries of this unit, particularly along the contact with massive carbonates. At the boundaries with massive platformal carbonates, the turbidites are strongly deformed by isoclinal folding with a pervasive sub-horizontal axial plane cleavage and 70-60% shortening. In contrast, contacts with thinly-bedded carbonate layers (basinal facies), do not show strain localization, and have horizontal shortening of 50-40% that is accommodated by buckle folds with a less pervasive, steeply dipping cleavage. The mechanical properties variations in the underlying pre-tectonic units as a function of changes in lithostratigraphy fundamentally control the deformation in the overlying syntectonic strata, which is an effect that could be expected to occur in any deformed sedimentary sequence with such variations.

  2. Thick-skinned tectonics in a Late Cretaceous-Neogene intracontinental belt (High Atlas Mountains, Morocco): The flat-ramp fault control on basement shortening and cover folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekkak, A.; Ouanaimi, H.; Michard, A.; Soulaimani, A.; Ettachfini, E. M.; Berrada, I.; El Arabi, H.; Lagnaoui, A.; Saddiqi, O.

    2018-04-01

    Most of the structural studies of the intracontinental High Atlas belt of Morocco have dealt with the central part of the belt, whose basement does not crop out. Here we study the Alpine deformation of the North Subatlas Zone, which is the part of the Western High Atlas (WHA) Paleozoic Massif that involves both Paleozoic basement units and remnants of their Mesozoic-Cenozoic cover formations. Our aim is to better constrain the geometry and kinematics of the basement faults during the Alpine shortening. Based on detail mapping, satellite imagery and field observations, we describe an array of sub-equatorial, transverse and oblique faults between the WHA Axial Zone and the Haouz Neogene basin. They define a mosaic of basement blocks pushed upon one another and upon the Haouz basement along the North Atlas Fault (NAF). The Axial Zone makes up the hanging-wall of the Adassil-Medinet Fault (AMF) south of this mosaic. The faults generally presents flat-ramp-flat geometry linked to the activation of multiple décollement levels, either within the basement where its foliation is subhorizontal or within favourable cover formations (Jurassic evaporites, Lower Cretaceous silty red beds, Upper Cretaceous evaporitic marls, Neogene basal argillites). The occurrence of the North Atlas detachment (NAD) allowed folded pop-up units to develop in front of the propagating NAF. Shortening began as early as the Campanian-Maastrichtian along the AMF. The direction of the maximum horizontal stress rotated from NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE from the Maastrichtian-Paleocene to the Neogene. The amount of shortening reaches 20% in the Azegour transect. This compares with the shortening amount published for the central-eastern High Atlas, suggesting that similar structures characterize the Paleozoic basement all along the belt. The WHA thick-skinned tectonics evokes that of the frontal Sevier belt and of the external Western Alps, although with a much minor pre-inversion burial.

  3. Impact of an interbedded viscous décollement on the structural and kinematic coupling in fold-and-thrust belts: Insights from analogue modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borderie, Sandra; Graveleau, Fabien; Witt, César; Vendeville, Bruno C.

    2018-01-01

    Fold-and-thrust belts (FTBs) can be segmented both across and along strike because of various factors including tectonic and stratigraphic inheritance. In this study, we investigated along/across-strike structural interactions in a FTB propagating toward a foreland which displays contrasted lithological sequences. A set of analogue models was performed in a compressional box where a single viscous level of varying width was interbedded within a frictional series. The tectonic interaction between the viscous and the frictional provinces was tested both along and across strike. Results indicate that a frictional province influences the along-strike tectonic evolution of an adjacent viscous province. This influence decreases when the width of the viscous province increases. The frictional provinces control the taper, structural style, obliquity of the structures' trend and kinematics of the shallow deformation front of the viscous province. Results evidence how far a frictional province can impact the deformation of an adjacent viscous province. For frictional-viscous wedges, it appears that the critical taper theory, which is generally applied in 2-D, should be likely considered in terms of 3-D. Moreover, the kinematics of the deep deformation front shows mutual influences between the adjacent viscous and frictional provinces. Experimental results are compared to natural examples in the Kuqa Basin (Southern Tian Shan, China) and the Salt Range (Pakistan), and give an insight to a better understanding of the dynamics of fold-and-thrust belts bearing a viscous décollement, such as salt.

  4. The structural geometry and development of the central Appalachian fold-and thrust belt across the Pennsylvania salient: The effects of syntectonic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Mark

    2017-04-01

    The Pennsylvania salient is a classic arcuate fold-and-thrust belt that was deformed during the Late Paleozoic Alleghenian orogeny. 38 regional cross-sections with an along-strike spacing of 5 to 10 km were constructed, and show that the structural geometry varies significantly from the 030°-striking southwestern segment to 060°-striking northeastern segment. The primary competent lithotectonic unit is the 2 to 3 km thick Cambro-Ordovician carbonate sequence which is detached along a Cambrian clastic unit. The 5 to 7 km thick preserved Upper Paleozoic sequence is less homogeneous, and locally exhibits significant internal deformation. In the southwest part of the salient, the hinterland part of the fold belt is defined by a series of imbricated Cambro-Ordovician carbonate horses with leading-edge fault-propagation style folds that have a structural amplitude of 5 to 7 km. In the central part of the fold belt, the Broadtop synclinorium exhibits little to no imbrication of the Cambro-Ordovician unit, while in the western part of the belt toward the foreland, two additional carbonate horses with leading-edge fault-propagation style folds comprise the Wills Mt. anticlinorium. In the central and eastern parts of the salient, the structural geometry toward the foreland is defined by a duplex with 4 -5 imbricate horses of Cambro-Ordovician carbonates that transitions to an antiformal stack of two to three carbonate thrust sheets comprising the Nittany anticlinorium. Toward the hinterland, the Cambro-Ordovician carbonate sequence is faulted into broadly-spaced fault-related folds, and includes the regionally continuous (>160 km) Jacks Mt. - Berwick anticline that spans both limbs of the salient. Upon retrodeformation of the cross sections, the 060°-striking northeastern segment restoration path curves 25°-30° to the east, while the 030°-striking southwestern segment curves 20°-25° to the south. The major fault underlying the presently curved Jacks Mt. - Berwick

  5. Control of preexisting faults and near-surface diapirs on geometry and kinematics of fold-and-thrust belts (Internal Prebetic, Eastern Betic Cordillera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrera, Antonio; Marín-Lechado, Carlos; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; García-Lobón, José Luis

    2014-07-01

    We have determined, for the first time, the 3D geometry of a sector of the eastern Internal Prebetic comprised between Parcent and Altea diapirs, combining structural, borehole and multichannel seismic reflection data. The tectonic structure of the Jurassic-Cretaceous carbonate series is characterized by regional ENE-WSW fold-and-thrusts that interact with oblique N-S and WNW-ESE folds, detached over Triassic evaporites and clays. The structural style comprises box-shape anticlines, and N-vergent anticlines with vertical to overturned limbs frequently bordered by reverse and strike-slip faults. The anticlines surround a triangular broad synclinal structure, the Tárbena basin, filled by a late Oligocene to Tortonian sedimentary sequence that recorded folding and thrusting history. The location and geometrical characteristics of fold-and-thrusts may be controlled by the positive inversion of pre-existing Mesozoic normal faults, and by the position and shape of near-surface diapirs composed of Triassic rocks. Therefore, we propose an initial near-surface diapir emplacement of Triassic evaporitic rocks driven by late Jurassic to early Cretaceous rifting of the southern Iberian paleomargin. Thrusting and folding started during the latest Oligocene (∼28-23 Ma) roughly orthogonal to the NW-directed shortening. Deformation migrated to the south during Aquitanian (∼23-20 Ma), when tectonic inversion implied the left-lateral transpressive reactivation of N-S striking former normal faults and right-lateral/reverse reactivation of inherited WNW-ESE faults. We show two mechanisms driving the extrusion of the diapirs during contraction: lateral migration of a pre-existing near-surface diapir associated with dextral transpression; and squeezing of a previous near-surface diapir at the front of an anticline. Our study underlines the value of 3D geological modeling to characterize geometry and kinematics of complex fold-and-thrust belts influenced by preexisting faults and

  6. Effect of basement structure and salt tectonics on deformation styles along strike: An example from the Kuqa fold-thrust belt, West China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neng, Yuan; Xie, Huiwen; Yin, Hongwei; Li, Yong; Wang, Wei

    2018-04-01

    The Kuqa fold-thrust belt (KFTB) has a complex thrust-system geometry and comprises basement-involved thrusts, décollement thrusts, triangle zones, strike-slip faults, transpressional faults, and pop-up structures. These structures, combined with the effects of Paleogene salt tectonics and Paleozoic basement uplift form a complex structural zone trending E-W. Interpretation and comprehensive analysis of recent high-quality seismic data, field observations, boreholes, and gravity data covering the KFTB has been performed to understand the characteristics and mechanisms of the deformation styles along strike. Regional sections, fold-thrust system maps of the surface and the sub-salt layer, salt and basement structure distribution maps have been created, and a comprehensive analysis of thrust systems performed. The results indicate that the thrust-fold system in Paleogene salt range can be divided into five segments from east to west: the Kela-3, Keshen, Dabei, Bozi, and Awate segments. In the easternmost and westernmost parts of the Paleogene salt range, strike-slip faulting and basement-involved thrusting are the dominant deformation styles, as basement uplift and the limits of the Cenozoic evaporite deposit are the main controls on deformation. Salt-core detachment fold-thrust systems coincide with areas of salt tectonics, and pop-up, imbricate, and duplex structures are associated with the main thrust faults in the sub-salt layer. Distribution maps of thrust systems, basement structures, and salt tectonics show that Paleozoic basement uplift controlled the Paleozoic foreland basin morphology and the distribution of Cenozoic salt in the KFTB, and thus had a strong influence on the segmented structural deformation and evolution of the fold-thrust belt. Three types of transfer zone are identified, based on the characteristics of the salt layer and basement uplift, and the effects of these zones on the fault systems are evaluated. Basement uplift and the boundary of

  7. Cenozoic intracontinental deformation of the Kopeh Dagh Belt, Northeastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Yang; Wan, Bo; Chen, Ling; Talebian, Morteza

    2016-04-01

    Compressional intracontinental orogens represent large tectonic zones far from plate boundaries. Since intracontinental mountain belts cannot be framed in the conventional plate tectonics theory, several hypotheses have been proposed to account for the formations of these mountain belts. The far-field effect of collision/subduction at plate margins is now well accepted for the origin and evolution of the intracontinental crust thickening, as exemplified by the Miocene tectonics of central Asia. In northern Iran, the Binalud-Alborz mountain belt witnessed the Triassic tectonothermal events (Cimmerian orogeny), which are interpreted as the result of the Paleotethys Ocean closure between the Eurasia and Central Iran blocks. The Kopeh Dagh Belt, located to the north of the Binalud-Alborz Belt, has experienced two significant tectonic phases: (1) Jurassic to Eocene rifting with more than 7 km of sediments; and (2) Late Eocene-Early Oligocene to Quaternary continuous compression. Due to the high seismicity, deformation associated with earthquakes has received more and more attention; however, the deformation pattern and architecture of this range remain poorly understood. Detailed field observations on the Cenozoic deformation indicate that the Kopeh Dagh Belt can be divided into a western zone and an eastern zone, separated by a series of dextral strike-slip faults, i.e. the Bakharden-Quchan Fault System. The eastern zone characterized by km-scale box-fold structures, associated with southwest-dipping reverse faults and top-to-the NE kinematics. In contrast, the western zone shows top-to-the SW kinematics, and the deformation intensifies from NE to SW. In the northern part of this zone, large-scale asymmetrical anticlines exhibit SW-directed vergence with subordinate thrusts and folds, whereas symmetrical anticlines are observed in the southern part. In regard to its tectonic feature, the Kopeh Dagh Belt is a typical Cenozoic intracontinental belt without ophiolites or

  8. Tok-Algoma magmatic complex of the Selenga-Stanovoi Superterrain in the Central Asian fold belt: Age and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, A. B.; Larin, A. M.; Salnikova, E. B.; Velikoslavinskii, S. D.; Sorokin, A. A.; Sorokin, A. P.; Yakovleva, S. Z.; Anisimova, I. V.; Tolmacheva, E. V.

    2012-05-01

    According to the results of U-Pb geochronological investigations, the hornblende subalkali diorite rocks making up the Tok-Algoma Complex in the eastern part of the Selenga-Stanovoi Superterrain of the Central Asian fold belt were formed in the Middle Jurassic rather than in the Middle Archean as was suggested previously. Thus, the age of the regional amphibolite facies metamorphism manifested itself in the Ust'-Gilyui rock sequence of the Stanovoi Complex and that superimposed on granitoids of the Tok-Algoma Complex is Mesozoic rather than Early Precambrian. The geochemical features of the Tok-Algoma granitoids are indicative of the fact that they were formed in the geodynamic setting of the active continental margin or a mature island arc. Hence, it is possible to suggest that the subduction processes along the southern boundary between the Selenga-Stanovoi Superterrain and the Mongolian-Okhotsk ocean basin in the Middle Jurassic resulted in the formation of a magmatic belt of over 500 km in length.

  9. Sedimentation of Jurassic fan-delta wedges in the Xiahuayuan basin reflecting thrust-fault movements of the western Yanshan fold-and-thrust belt, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chengfa; Liu, Shaofeng; Zhuang, Qitian; Steel, Ronald J.

    2018-06-01

    Mesozoic thrusting within the Yanshan fold-and-thrust belt of North China resulted in a series of fault-bounded intramontane basins whose infill and evolution remain poorly understood. In particular, the bounding faults and adjacent sediment accumulations along the western segments of the belt are almost unstudied. A sedimentological and provenance analysis of the Lower Jurassic Xiahuayuan Formation and the Upper Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation have been mapped to show two distinctive clastic wedges: an early Jurassic wedge representing a mass-flow-dominated, Gilbert-type fan delta with a classic tripartite architecture, and an late Jurassic shoal-water fan delta without steeply inclined strata. The basinward migration of the fan-delta wedges, together with the analysis of their conglomerate clast compositions, paleocurrent data and detrital zircon U-Pb age spectra, strongly suggest that the northern-bounding Xuanhuan thrust fault controlled their growth during accumulation of the Jiulongshan Formation. Previous studies have suggested that the fan-delta wedge of the Xiahuayuan Formation was also syntectonic, related to movement on the Xuanhua thrust fault. Two stages of thrusting therefore exerted an influence on the formation and evolution of the Xiahuayuan basin during the early-late Jurassic.

  10. Early paleozoic gabbro-amphibolites in the structure of the Bureya Terrane (eastern part of the Central Asian Fold Belt): First geochronological data and tectonic position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Yu. V.; Sorokin, A. A.; Kudryashov, N. M.

    2012-07-01

    Resulting from U-Pb geochronological study, it has been found that the gabbro-amphibolites composing the Bureya (Turan) Terrane in the eastern part of the Central Asian Fold Belt are Early Paleozoic (Early Ordovician; 455 ± 1.5 Ma) in age rather than Late Proterozoic as was believed earlier. The gabbro-amphibolites and associated metabasalts are close to tholeiites of the intraoceanic island arcs in terms of the geochemical properties. It is suggested that the tectonic block composed of these rocks was initially a seafloor fragment that divided the Bureya and Argun terranes in the Early Paleozoic and was later tectonically incorporated into the modern structure of the Bureya Terrane as a result of Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic events.

  11. Zagros Mountains, Iran, SRTM Shaded Relief Anaglyph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Zagros Mountains in Iran offer a visually stunning topographic display of geologic structure in layered sedimentary rocks. This scene is nearly 100 kilometers (62 miles) wide but is only a small part of similar terrain that covers much of southern Iran. This area is actively undergoing crustal shortening, as global tectonics moves Arabia toward Asia. Consequently, layers of sedimentary rock are folding much like a carpet will fold if pushed. The convex upward folds create structures called anticlines, which are prominently seen here. The convex downward folds (between the anticlines) create structures called synclines, which are mostly buried and hidden by sediments eroding off the anticlines. Layers having differing erosional resistance create distinctive patterns, often sawtooth triangular facets, that encircle the anticlines. Local relief between the higher mountain ridges and their intervening valleys is about 1,200 meters (about 4,000 feet).

    Salt extrusions and salt 'glaciers' are another set of geologic features readily evident in the topography. Salt deposits, likely created by the evaporation of an ancient inland sea, were buried by the sediments that now make up the layers of the anticlines and synclines. But salt is less dense than most other rocks, so it tends to migrate upward through Earth's crust in vertical columns called 'diapirs'. The compressive folding process has probably facilitated the formation of these diapirs, and the diapirs, in turn, are probably enhancing some anticlines by 'inflating' them with salt. Where the diapirs reach the surface, the salt extrudes, much like lava from a volcano, and the salt flows. Two prominent salt flows are evident in the same valley, leaking from neighboring anticlines, just north of the scene center.

    This anaglyph was created by deriving a shaded relief image from the SRTM data, draping it back over the SRTM elevation model, and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye

  12. Zagros Mountains, Iran, SRTM Shaded Relief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Zagros Mountains in Iran offer a visually stunning topographic display of geologic structure in layered sedimentary rocks. This scene is nearly 100 kilometers (62 miles) wide but is only a small part of similar terrain that covers much of southern Iran. This area is actively undergoing crustal shortening, as global tectonics moves Arabia toward Asia. Consequently, layers of sedimentary rock are folding much like a carpet will fold if pushed. The convex upward folds create structures called anticlines, which are prominently seen here. The convex downward folds (between the anticlines) create structures called synclines, which are mostly buried and hidden by sediments eroding off the anticlines. Layers having differing erosional resistance create distinctive patterns, often sawtooth triangular facets, that encircle the anticlines. Local relief between the higher mountain ridges and their intervening valleys is about 1200 meters (about 4000 feet).

    Salt extrusions and salt 'glaciers' are another set of geologic features readily evident in the topography. Salt deposits, likely created by the evaporation of an ancient inland sea, were buried by the sediments that now make up the layers of the anticlines and synclines. But salt is less dense than most other rocks, so it tends to migrate upward through Earth's crust in vertical columns called 'diapirs'. The compressive folding process has probably facilitated the formation of these diapirs, and the diapirs, in turn, are probably enhancing some anticlines by 'inflating' them with salt. Where the diapirs reach the surface, the salt extrudes, much like lava from a volcano, and the salt flows. Two prominent salt flows are evident in the same valley, leaking from neighboring anticlines, just north of the scene center.

    This shaded relief image was created directly from an SRTM elevation model by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction. Northern slopes appear bright and southern slopes appear

  13. Age and evolution of thin-skinned deformation in Zacatecas, Mexico: Sevier orogeny evidence in the Mexican Fold-Thrust Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Peña, César Francisco; Chávez-Cabello, Gabriel

    2017-07-01

    Integrating U-Pb ages from zircons of syn- and postectonic intrusives emplaced in folded pre- and synorogenic marine sedimentary rocks, it is proposed that thin-skinned deformation in the Concepción del Oro salient of the Mexican Fold Thrust Belt in northern Zacatecas, Mexico, was active between 92 and 71.6 Ma. The intrusives Pico de Teyra and El Peñuelo (U-Pb zircon ages: 76.9 and 72.5 Ma) show internal tectonic foliations and horizontal shear zones that cut off aplitic veins, which apparently developed syntectonically to thin-skinned deformation. Other intrusives like Saltillito (71.6 Ma) and Concepción del Oro are clearly postectonic because they are undeformed internally, cut regional structures and are younger than syntectonic plutons. Biostratigraphic ages reported for synorogenic sediments (Concepción del Oro and Parras formations) indicate that regional thin-skinned deformation was active between Early Turonian and Late Campanian, which is in agreement with syn and postectonic intrusive emplacement ages in the area. Nevertheless, the thin-skinned structures are disrupted by a younger NNW-SSE high angle reverse and normal faults that uplifts the San Julián Block in the west and truncate the Concepción del Oro salient, suggesting a post-Paleocene thick-skinned stage of deformation. In this work, we propose that style and age of thin-skinned deformation is similar to the Sevier orogeny in the Rocky Mountains.

  14. The Lamu Basin deepwater fold-and-thrust belt: An example of a margin-scale, gravity-driven thrust belt along the continental passive margin of East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, Francesco; Barchi, Massimiliano R.

    2016-03-01

    In recent decades, advances in seismic processing and acquisition of new data sets have revealed the presence of many deepwater fold-and-thrust belts (DW-FTBs), often developing along continental passive margins. These kinds of tectonic features have been intensively studied, due to their substantial interest. This work presents a regional-scale study of the poorly explored Lamu Basin DW-FTB, a margin-scale, gravity-driven system extending for more than 450 km along the continental passive margin of Kenya and southern Somalia (East Africa). A 2-D seismic data set was analyzed, consisting of both recently acquired high-quality data and old reprocessed seismic profiles, for the first detailed structural and stratigraphic interpretation of this DW-FTB. The system originated over an Early to mid-Cretaceous shale detachment due to a mainly gravity-spreading mechanism. Analysis of synkinematic strata indicates that the DW-FTB was active from the Late Cretaceous to the Early Miocene, but almost all of the deformation occurred before the Late Paleocene. The fold-and-thrust system displays a marked N-S variation in width, the northern portion being more than 150 km wide and the southern portion only a few dozen kilometers wide; this along-strike variation is thought to be related to the complex tectonosedimentary evolution of the continental margin at the Somalia-Kenya boundary, also reflected in the present-day bathymetry. Locally, a series of volcanic edifices stopped the basinward propagation of the DW-FTB. A landward change in the dominant structural style, from asymmetric imbricate thrust sheets to pseudo-symmetric detachment folds, is generally observed, related to the landward thickening of the detached shales.

  15. 2-D Density and Directional Analysis of Fault Systems in the Zagros Region (Iran) on a Regional Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Seyed Naser; Baizidi, Chavare

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, 2-D spatial variation of the frequency and length density and frequency-length relation of large-scale faults in the Zagros region (Iran), as a typical fold-and-thrust belt, were examined. Moreover, the directional analysis of these faults as well as the scale dependence of the orientations was studied. For this purpose, a number of about 8000 faults with L ≥ 1.0 km were extracted from the geological maps covering the region, and then, the data sets were analyzed. The overall pattern of the frequency/length distribution of the total faults of the region acceptably fits with a power-law relation with exponent 1.40, with an obvious change in the gradient in L = 12.0 km. In addition, maps showing the spatial variation of fault densities over the region indicate that the maximum values of the frequency and length density of the faults are attributed to the northeastern part of the region and parallel to the suture zone, respectively, and the fault density increases towards the central parts of the belt. Moreover, the directional analysis of the fault trends gives a dominant preferred orientation trend of 300°-330° and the assessment of the scale dependence of the fault directions demonstrates that larger faults show higher degrees of preferred orientations. As a result, it is concluded that the evolutionary path of the faulting process in this region can be explained by increasing the number of faults rather than the growth in the fault lengths and also it seems that the regional-scale faults in this region are generated by a nearly steady-state tectonic stress regime.

  16. First-order control of syntectonic sedimentation on crustal-scale structure of mountain belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdős, Zoltán.; Huismans, Ritske S.; van der Beek, Peter

    2015-07-01

    The first-order characteristics of collisional mountain belts and the potential feedback with surface processes are predicted by critical taper theory. While the feedback between erosion and mountain belt structure has been fairly extensively studied, less attention has been given to the potential role of synorogenic deposition. For thin-skinned fold-and-thrust belts, recent studies indicate a strong control of syntectonic deposition on structure, as sedimentation tends to stabilize the thin-skinned wedge. However, the factors controlling basement deformation below fold-and-thrust belts, as evident, for example, in the Zagros Mountains or in the Swiss Alps, remain largely unknown. Previous work has suggested that such variations in orogenic structure may be explained by the thermotectonic "age" of the deforming lithosphere and hence its rheology. Here we demonstrate that sediment loading of the foreland basin area provides an additional control and may explain the variable basement involvement in orogenic belts. When examining the role of sedimentation, we identify two end-members: (1) sediment-starved orogenic systems with thick-skinned basement deformation in an axial orogenic core and thin-skinned deformation in the bordering forelands and (2) sediment-loaded orogens with thick packages of synorogenic deposits, derived from the axial basement zone, deposited on the surrounding foreland fold-and-thrust belts, and characterized by basement deformation below the foreland. Using high-resolution thermomechanical models, we demonstrate a strong feedback between deposition and crustal-scale thick-skinned deformation. Our results show that the loading effects of syntectonic sediments lead to long crustal-scale thrust sheets beneath the orogenic foreland and explain the contrasting characteristics of sediment-starved and sediment-loaded orogens, showing for the first time how both thin- and thick-skinned crustal deformations are linked to sediment deposition in these

  17. Andean Basin Evolution Associated with Hybrid Thick- and Thin-Skinned Deformation in the Malargüe Fold-Thrust Belt, Western Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.

    2015-12-01

    Andean deformation and basin evolution in the Malargüe fold-thrust belt of western Argentina (34-36°S) has been dominated by basement faults influenced by pre-existing Mesozoic rift structures of the hydrocarbon-rich Neuquen basin. However, the basement structures diverge from classic inversion structures, and the associated retroarc basin system shows a complex Mesozoic-Cenozoic history of mixed extension and contraction, along with an enigmatic early Cenozoic stratigraphic hiatus. New results from balanced structural cross sections (supported by industry seismic, well data, and surface maps), U-Pb geochronology, and foreland deposystem analyses provide improved resolution to examine the duration and kinematic evolution of Andean mixed-mode deformation. The basement structures form large anticlines with steep forelimbs and up to >5 km of structural relief. Once the propagating tips of the deeper basement faults reached cover strata, they fed slip to shallow thrust systems that were transported in piggyback fashion by newly formed basement structures, producing complex structural relationships. Detrital zircon U-Pb ages for the 5-7 km-thick basin fill succession reveal shifts in sedimentation pathways and accumulation rates consistent with (1) local basement sources during Early-Middle Jurassic back-arc extension, (2) variable cratonic and magmatic arc sources during Late Jurassic-Cretaceous postrift thermal subsidence, and (3) Andean arc and thrust-belt sources during irregular Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic shortening. Although pulses of flexural subsidence can be attributed to periods of fault reactivation (inversion) and geometrically linked thin-skinned thrusting, fully developed foreland basin conditions were only achieved in Late Cretaceous and Neogene time. Separating these two contractional episodes is an Eocene-lower Miocene (roughly 40-20 Ma) depositional hiatus within the Cenozoic succession, potentially signifying forebulge passage or neutral to

  18. Revised version of the Cenozoic Collision along the Zagros Orogen, Insights from Cr-spinel and Sandstone Modal Analyses.

    PubMed

    Gholami Zadeh, Parisa; Adabi, Mohammad Hossein; Hisada, Ken-Ichiro; Hosseini-Barzi, Mahboubeh; Sadeghi, Abbas; Ghassemi, Mohammad Reza

    2017-09-07

    Geoscientists have always considered the Neyriz region, located along the Zagros Suture Zone, an important area of interest because of the outcrops of Neotethys ophiolitic rocks. We carried out a modal analysis of the Cenozoic sandstones and geochemistry of the detrital Cr-spinels at Neyriz region in order to determine their provenance and tectonic evolution in the proximal part of Zagros Basin. Our data shows a clear change in provenance from the Late Cretaceous onwards. As from the Late Cretaceous to Eocene, lithic grains are mostly chert and serpentinite; and higher Cr# values of the detrital Cr-spinel compositions indicate that they originate from the fore-arc peridotites and deposited in an accretionary prism setting during this period. From the Late Oligocene to the Miocene periods, volcaniclastic and carbonate lithic grains show an increasing trend, and in the Miocene, metasedimentary lithic grains appear in the sediments. Ophiolite obduction caused a narrow trough sub-basin to be formed parallel to the general trend of the Zagros Orogeny between the Arabian and Iranian plates in Oligocene. From the Miocene onwards, the axial metamorphic complex belt was uplifted in the upper plate. Therefore, the collision along the Zagros Suture Zone must have occurred in the Late Oligocene.

  19. Detrital zircon U-Pb and (U-Th)/He double-dating of Upper Cretaceous-Cenozoic Zagros foreland basin strata in the Kurdistan Region of northern Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, D. E.; Stockli, D. F.; Koshnaw, R. I.; Horton, B. K.; Tamar-Agha, M. Y.; Kendall, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The NW Zagros orogen is the result of the multistage collisional history associated with Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian continents and final closure of Neotethys. Siliciclastic strata preserved within a ~400 km segment of the NW Zagros fold-thrust belt and foreland basin in the Iraqi Kurdistan Region (IKR) provide a widespread record of exhumation and sedimentation. As a means of assessing NW Zagros foreland basin evolution and chronostratigraphy, we present coupled detrital zircon (DZ) U-Pb and (U-Th)/He geo-thermochronometric data of Upper Cretaceous to Pliocene siliciclastic strata from the Duhok, Erbil, and Suleimaniyah provinces of IKR. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb age analyses reveal that the foreland basin fill in IKR in general was dominantly derived from Pan-African/Arabian-Nubian, Peri-Gondwandan, Eurasian, and Cretaceous volcanic arc terrenes. However, the provenance of these strata varies systematically along strike and through time, with an overall increase in complexity upsection. DZ age distribution of Paleocene-Eocene strata is dominated by a ~95 Ma grain age population, likely sourced from the Late Cretaceous Hassanbag-Bitlis volcanic arc complex along the northern margin of Arabia. In contrast, DZ U-Pb age distributions of Neogene strata show a major contribution derived from various Eurasian (e.g., Iranian, Tauride, Pontide; ~45, 150, 300 Ma) and Pan-African (~550, 950 Ma) sources. The introduction of Eurasian DZ ages at the Paleogene-Neogene transition likely records the onset of Arabian-Eurasian collision. Along strike to the southeast, the DZ U-Pb spectra of Neogene strata show a decreased percentage of Pan-African, Peri-Gondwandan, Tauride, and Ordovician ages, coupled with a dramatic increase in 40-50 Ma DZ ages that correspond to Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic rocks in Iran. Combined with paleocurrent data, this suggests that Neogene sediments were transported longitudinally southeastward through an unbroken foreland basin

  20. Flexural bending of the Zagros foreland basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirouz, Mortaza; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Gualandi, Adriano; Hassanzadeh, Jamshid; Sternai, Pietro

    2017-09-01

    We constrain and model the geometry of the Zagros foreland to assess the equivalent elastic thickness of the northern edge of the Arabian plate and the loads that have originated due to the Arabia-Eurasia collision. The Oligo-Miocene Asmari formation, and its equivalents in Iraq and Syria, is used to estimate the post-collisional subsidence as they separate passive margin sediments from the younger foreland deposits. The depth to these formations is obtained by synthesizing a large database of well logs, seismic profiles and structural sections from the Mesopotamian basin and the Persian Gulf. The foreland depth varies along strike of the Zagros wedge between 1 and 6 km. The foreland is deepest beneath the Dezful embayment, in southwest Iran, and becomes shallower towards both ends. We investigate how the geometry of the foreland relates to the range topography loading based on simple flexural models. Deflection of the Arabian plate is modelled using point load distribution and convolution technique. The results show that the foreland depth is well predicted with a flexural model which assumes loading by the basin sedimentary fill, and thickened crust of the Zagros. The model also predicts a Moho depth consistent with Free-Air anomalies over the foreland and Zagros wedge. The equivalent elastic thickness of the flexed Arabian lithosphere is estimated to be ca. 50 km. We conclude that other sources of loading of the lithosphere, either related to the density variations (e.g. due to a possible lithospheric root) or dynamic origin (e.g. due to sublithospheric mantle flow or lithospheric buckling) have a negligible influence on the foreland geometry, Moho depth and topography of the Zagros. We calculate the shortening across the Zagros assuming conservation of crustal mass during deformation, trapping of all the sediments eroded from the range in the foreland, and an initial crustal thickness of 38 km. This calculation implies a minimum of 126 ± 18 km of crustal

  1. Tectono-sedimentary evolution of salt controlled minibasin in a fold-an-thrust belt setting Example from the Sivas Basin Turkey and physical model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kergaravat, Charlie; Ribes, Charlotte; Darnault, Romain; Callot, Jean-Paul; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to present the influence of regional shortening on the evolution of a minibasin province and the associated foldbelt geometry based on a natural example, the Sivas Basin, then compared to a physical experiment. The Sivas Basin in the Central Anatolian Plateau (Turkey) is a foreland fold-and-thrust belt, displaying in the central part a typical wall and basin province characterized by spectacularly exposed minibasins, separated by continuous steep-flanked walls and diapirs over a large area (45x25 km). The advance of the orogenic wedge is expressed within the second generation of minibasins by a shortening-induced squeezing of diapirs. Network of walls and diapirs evolve form polygonal to linear pattern probably induced by the squeezing of pre-existing evaporite walls and diapirs, separating linear primary minibasins. From base to top of secondary minibasins, halokinetic structures seem to evolve from small-scale objects along diapir flanks, showing hook and wedges halokinetic sequences, to large stratigraphic wedging, megaflap and salt sheets. Minibasins show progressively more linear shape at right angle to the regional shortening and present angular unconformities along salt structures related to the rejuvenation of pre-existing salt diapirs and walls probably encouraged by the shortening tectonic regime. The advance of the fold-and-thrust belts during the minibasins emplacement is mainly expressed during the late stage of minibasins development by a complex polygonal network of small- and intermediate-scale tectonic objects: (1) squeezed evaporite walls and diapirs, sometimes thrusted forming oblique or vertical welds, (2) allochthonous evaporite sheets, (3) thrusts and strike-slip faults recording translation and rotation of minibasins about vertical axis. Some minibasins are also tilted, with up to vertical position, associated with both the salt expulsion during minibasins sinking, recorded by large stratigraphic wedge, and the late

  2. Orogenic front propagation in the basement involved Malargüe fold and thrust belt, Neuquén Basin, (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branellec, Matthieu; Nivière, Bertrand; Callot, Jean-Paul; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2015-04-01

    The Malargüe fold and thrust belt (MFTB) and the San Rafael Block (SRB) are located in the northern termination of the Neuquén basin in Argentina. This basin is a wide inverted intracratonic sag basin with polyphased evolution controlled at large scale by the dynamic of the Pacific subduction. By late Triassic times, narrow rift basins developed and evolved toward a sag basin from middle Jurassic to late Cretaceous. From that time on, compression at the trench resulted in various shortening pulses in the back-arc area. Here we aim to analyze the Andean system at 35°S by comparing the Miocene structuration in the MFTB and the current deformation along the oriental border or the San Rafael Block. The main structuration stage in the MFTB occurred by Miocene times (15 to 10 Ma) producing the principal uplift of the Andean Cordillera. As shown by new structural cross sections, Triassic-early Jurassic rift border faults localized the Miocene compressive tectonics. Deformation is compartmentalized and does not exhibit a classical propagation of homogeneous deformation sequence expected from the critical taper theory. Several intramontane basins in the hangingwall of the main thrusts progressively disconnected from the foreland. In addition, active tectonics has been described in the front of the MFTB attesting for the on-going compression in this area. 100 km farther to the east, The San Rafael Block, is separated from the MFTB by the Rio Grande basin. The SRB is mostly composed of Paleozoic terranes and Triassic rift-related rocks, overlain by late Miocene synorogenic deposits. The SRB is currently uplifted along its oriental border along several active faults. These faults have clear morphologic signatures in Quaternary alluvial terraces and folded Pleistocene lavas. As in the MFTB, the active deformation localization remains localized by structural inheritance. The Andean system is thus evolving as an atypical orogenic wedge partly by frontal accretion at the front

  3. Tectonic insight based on anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and compaction studies in the Sierras Australes thrust and fold belt (southwest Gondwana boundary, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzadún, Guadalupe; Tomezzoli, Renata N.; Cesaretti, Nora N.

    2016-04-01

    The Sierras Australes fold and thrust belt (Buenos Aires Province, Argentina) was in the southwestern Gondwanaland margin during the Paleozoic. The Tunas Formation (Permian) is exposed along the eastern part of it and continues eastward beneath the Claromecó Basin. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and compaction studies are described and compared with previous paleomagnetic studies with the aim of determining direction and magnitude of the main stresses acting during the sedimentation of the Tunas Formation. The anisotropy ellipsoids are triaxial with oblate or prolate shapes, reflecting different stages of layer parallel shortening during the evolution of the basin. Kmax axes trend NW-SE, parallel to the fold axes, while Kmin move from a horizontal (base) to a vertical orientation at the top of the succession, showing a change from a tectonic to almost a sedimentary fabric. The magnitude of anisotropy and compaction degree decreases toward the top of the succession. The AMS results are consistent with the outcrop structural observations and the compaction and paleomagnetic data. Regional pattern indicates a compression from the SW along this part of Gondwana, with a migration of the orogenic front and attenuation toward the NE in the foreland basin during the Upper Paleozoic. This deformation, locally assigned to the San Rafael noncollisional orogenic phase, is the result of the latitudinal movements toward the Equator of Gondwana (southern plates) and Laurentia (northern plates) during the Permian. This movement is the result of a rearrangement of the microplates that collided with Gondwana during the Late Devonian, to configure Pangea during the Triassic.

  4. Uplift of Zagros Mountains slows plate convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-05-01

    Research has indicated that mountain ranges can slow down the convergence between two tectonic plates on timescales as short as a few million years, as the growing mountains provide enough tectonic force to impact plate motions. Focusing on the convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian plates at the Zagros mountain range, which runs across Iran and Iraq, Austermann and Iaffaldano reconstructed the relative motion of the plates using published paleomagnetic data covering the past 13 million years, as well as current geodetic measurements. They show that the convergence of the two plates has decreased by about 30% over the past 5 million years. Looking at the geological record to infer past topography and using a computer model of the mantle-lithosphere system, the authors examined whether the recent uplift across the Zagros Mountains could have caused the observed slowdown. They also considered several other geological events that might have influenced the convergence rate, but the authors were able to rule those out as dominant controls. The authors conclude that the uplift across the Zagros Mountains in the past 5 million years did indeed play a key role in slowing down the convergence between the Eurasian and Arabian plates. (Tectonics, doi:10.1002/tect.20027, 2013)

  5. Thin‐ or thick‐skinned faulting in the Yakima fold and thrust belt (WA)? Constraints from kinematic modeling of the saddle mountains anticline

    Casale, Gabriele; Pratt, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    The Yakima fold and thrust belt (YFTB) deforms the Columbia River Basalt Group flows of Washington State. The YFTB fault geometries and slip rates are crucial parameters for seismic‐hazard assessments of nearby dams and nuclear facilities, yet there are competing models for the subsurface fault geometry involving shallowly rooted versus deeply rooted fault systems. The YFTB is also thought to be analogous to the evenly spaced wrinkle ridges found on other terrestrial planets. Using seismic reflection data, borehole logs, and surface geologic data, we tested two proposed kinematic end‐member thick‐ and thin‐skinned fault models beneath the Saddle Mountains anticline of the YFTB. Observed subsurface geometry can be produced by 600–800 m of heave along a single listric‐reverse fault or ∼3.5  km of slip along two superposed low‐angle thrust faults. Both models require decollement slip between 7 and 9 km depth, resulting in greater fault areas than sometimes assumed in hazard assessments. Both models require initial slip much earlier than previously thought and may provide insight into the subsurface geometry of analogous comparisons to wrinkle ridges observed on other planets.

  6. High-resolution geological mapping at 3D Environments: A case study from the fold-and-thrust belt in northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. C.; Shih, N. C.; Hsieh, Y. C.

    2016-12-01

    Geologic maps have provided fundamental information for many scientific and engineering applications in human societies. Geologic maps directly influence the reliability of research results or the robustness of engineering projects. In the past, geologic maps were mainly produced by field geologists through direct field investigations and 2D topographic maps. However, the quality of traditional geologic maps was significantly compromised by field conditions, particularly, when the map area is covered by heavy forest canopies. Recent developments in airborne LiDAR technology may virtually remove trees or buildings, thus, providing a useful data set for improving geological mapping. Because high-quality topographic information still needs to be interpreted in terms of geology, there are many fundamental questions regarding how to best apply the data set for high-resolution geological mapping. In this study, we aim to test the quality and reliability of high-resolution geologic maps produced by recent technological methods through an example from the fold-and-thrust belt in northern Taiwan. We performed the geological mapping by applying the LiDAR-derived DEM, self-developed program tools and many layers of relevant information at interactive 3D environments. Our mapping results indicate that the proposed methods will considerably improve the quality and consistency of the geologic maps. The study also shows that in order to gain consistent mapping results, future high-resolution geologic maps should be produced at interactive 3D environments on the basis of existing geologic maps.

  7. Soro West: A non-seismically defined, fault cut-off prospect in the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt, Papua New Guinea

    SciT

    Robinson, W.F.; Swift, C.M. Jr.

    Soro West is a fault cut-off prospect located in the frontal portion of the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt. Prospective Toro and Imburu sandstones are interpreted to be in the hanging wall of the Soro Thrust. Truncation against the thrust, both updip and through lateral ramps, provides the trapping mechanism. The Soro West Prospect was defined using geological, geochemical, remote sensing, and geophysical data. The definition and location of the trap is a primary risk and work was focused on this aspect. Surface geological data (lithology, strikes, and dips) topography and synthetic aperture radar imagery were incorporated into the evaluation.more » Statistical curvature analysis techniques helped define the shape of the structure and the locations of the lateral ramps. Strontium isotope analyses of Darai Limestone surface samples refined erosional levels using a locally-derived reference curve. Severe karst precludes the acquisition of coherent surface seismic data, so the primary geophysical tool used was magnetotellurics (MT). A detailed, pre-survey feasibility study defined expected responses from alternative structural models. The MT data demonstrated that the limestone at surface is underlain by thick conductive clastics and not another Darai Limestone sheet. The data also constrained the range of fault cut-off positions significantly. Multiple, three-dimensionally consistent, restorable alternative structural models were created using results from all analyses. These led to a positive assessment of the prospect and an exploratory test is to be drilled in 1996.« less

  8. Crustal structure of central Syria: The intracontinental Palmyride mountain belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saad, Damen; Sawaf, Tarif; Gebran, Ali; Barazangi, Muawia; Best, John A.; Chaimov, Thomas A.

    1992-07-01

    Along a 450-km transect across central Syria seismic reflection data, borehole information, potential field data and surface geologic mapping have been combined to examine the crustal structure of the northern Arabian platform beneath Syria. The transect is surrounded by the major plate boundaries of the Middle East, including the Dead Sea transform fault system along the Levantine margin to the west, the Bitlis suture and East Anatolian fault to the north, and the Zagros collisional belt to the northeast and east. Three main tectonic provinces of the northern Arabian platform in Syria are crossed by this transect from south to north: the Rutbah uplift, the Palmyra fold-thrust belt, and the Aleppo plateau. The Rutbah uplift in southern Syria is a broad, domal basement-cored structure with a thick Phanerozoic (mostly Paleozoic) cover of 6-7 km. Isopachs based on well and seismic reflection data indicate that this region was an early Paleozoic depocenter. The Palmyra fold-thrust belt, the northeastern arm of the Syrian Arc, is a northeast-southwest-trending intracontinental mountain belt that acts as a mobile tectonic zone between the relatively stable Rutbah uplift to the south and the less stable Aleppo plateau to the north. Short-wavelength en-echelon folds characterized by relatively steep, faulted southeast flanks dominate in the southwest, most strongly deformed segment of the belt, while a complex system of deeply rooted faults and broad folds characterize the northeastern region, described in this study. The Aleppo plateau lies immediately north of the Palmyride belt, with a combined Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary section that averages 4-5 km in thickness. Although this region appears relatively undeformed on seismic reflection data when compared to Palmyride deformation, a system of near-vertical, probable strike-slip faults crosscut the region in a dominantly northeasterly direction. Gravity and magnetic modeling constrains the deep crustal structure

  9. Geometry and kinematics of the fold-thrust belt and structural evolution of the major Himalayan fault zones in the Darjeeling -- Sikkim Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kathakali

    The Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya lies in the eastern part of the Himalayan fold-thrust belt (FTB) in a zone of high arc-perpendicular convergence between the Indian and Eurasian plates. In this region two distinct faults form the Main Central thrust (MCT), the structurally higher MCT1 and the lower MCT2; both these faults have translated the Greater Himalayan hanging wall rocks farther towards the foreland than in the western Himalaya. The width of the sub-MCT Lesser Himalayan rocks progressively decreases from the western Himalaya to this part of the eastern Himalaya, and as a result, the width of the FTB is narrower in this region compared to the western Himalaya. Our structural analysis shows that in the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya the sub-MCT Lesser Himalayan duplex is composed of two duplex systems and has a more complex geometry than in the rest of the Himalayan fold-thrust belt. The structurally higher Dating duplex is a hinterland-dipping duplex; the structurally lower Rangit duplex varies in geometry from a hinterland-dipping duplex in the north to an antiformal stack in the middle and a foreland-dipping duplex in the south. The MCT2 is the roof thrust of the Daling duplex and the Ramgarh thrust is the roof thrust of the Rangit duplex. In this region, the Ramgarh thrust has a complex structural history with continued reactivation during footwall imbrication. The foreland-dipping component of the Rangit duplex, along with the large displacement associated with the reactivation of the Ramgarh thrust accounts for the large translation of the MCT sheets in the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya. The growth of the Lesser Himalayan duplex modified the final geometry of the overlying MCT sheets, resulting in a plunge culmination that manifests itself as a broad N-S trending "anticline" in the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya. This is not a "river anticline" as its trace lies west of the Teesta river. A transport parallel balanced cross section across this region has accommodated

  10. Pervasive Palaeogene remagnetization of the central Taurides fold-and-thrust belt (southern Turkey) and implications for rotations in the Isparta Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijers, Maud J. M.; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Dekkers, Mark J.; Altıner, Demir; Kaymakcı, Nuretdin; Langereis, Cor G.

    2011-03-01

    The Turkish Anatolide-Tauride block rifted away from the northern margin of Gondwana in the Triassic, which gave way to the opening of the southern Neo-Tethys. By the late Palaeocene to Eocene, it collided with the southern Eurasian margin, leading to the closure of the northern Neo-Tethys ocean. To determine the position of the Anatolide-Tauride block with respect to the African and Eurasian margin we carried out a palaeomagnetic study in the central Taurides belt, which constitutes the eastern limb of the Isparta Angle. The sampled sections comprise Carboniferous to Palaeocene rocks (mainly limestones). Our data suggest that all sampled rocks are remagnetized during the late Palaeocene to Eocene phase of folding and thrusting event, related to the collision of the Anatolide-Tauride block with Eurasia. To further test the possibility of remagnetization, we use a novel end-member modelling approach on 174 acquired isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) curves. We argue that the preferred three end-member model confirms the proposed remagnetization of the rocks. Comparing our data to the post-Eocene declination pattern in the central Tauride belt, we conclude that our clockwise rotations are in agreement with data from other studies. After combining our results with previously published data from the Isparta Angle (that includes our study area), we have reasons to cast doubt on the spatial and temporal extent of an earlier reported early to middle Miocene remagnetization event. We argue that the earlier reported remagnetized directions from Triassic rocks—in tilt corrected coordinates—from the southwestern Antalya Nappes (western Taurides), are in good agreement with other studies from the area that show a primary origin of their characteristic remanent magnetization. This implies that we document a clockwise rotation for the southwestern Antalya Nappes since the Triassic that is remarkably similar to the post-Eocene (˜40°) rotation of the central Taurides

  11. Detrital zircon age distribution from Devonian and Carboniferous sandstone in the Southern Variscan Fold-and-Thrust belt (Montagne Noire, French Massif Central), and their bearings on the Variscan belt evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei; Faure, Michel; Li, Xian-hua; Chu, Yang; Ji, Wenbin; Xue, Zhenhua

    2016-05-01

    In the Southern French Massif Central, the Late Paleozoic sedimentary sequences of the Montagne Noire area provide clues to decipher the successive tectonic events that occurred during the evolution of the Variscan belt. Previous sedimentological studies already demonstrated that the siliciclastic deposits were supplied from the northern part of the Massif Central. In this study, detrital zircon provenance analysis has been investigated in Early Devonian (Lochkovian) conglomerate and sandstone, and in Carboniferous (Visean to Early Serpukhovian) sandstone from the recumbent folds and the foreland basin of the Variscan Southern Massif Central in Montagne Noire. The zircon grains from all of the samples yielded U-Pb age spectra ranging from Neoarchean to Late Paleozoic with several age population peaks at 2700 Ma, 2000 Ma, 980 Ma, 750 Ma, 620 Ma, 590 Ma, 560 Ma, 480 Ma, 450 Ma, and 350 Ma. The dominant age populations concentrate on the Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic. The dominant concordant detrital zircon age populations in the Lochkovian samples, the 480-445 Ma with a statistical peak around 450 Ma, are interpreted as reflecting the rifting event that separated several continental stripes, such as Armorica, Mid-German Crystalline Rise, and Avalonia from the northern part of Gondwana. However, Ediacaran and Cambrian secondary peaks are also observed. The detrital zircons with ages at 352 - 340 Ma, with a statistical peak around 350 Ma, came from the Early Carboniferous volcanic and plutonic rocks similar to those exposed in the NE part of the French Massif Central. Moreover, some Precambrian grains recorded a more complex itinerary and may have experienced a multi-recycling history: the Archean and Proterozoic grains have been firstly deposited in Cambrian or Ordovician terrigenous rocks, and secondly re-sedimented in Devonian and/or Carboniferous formations. Another possibility is that ancient grains would be inherited grains, scavenged from an underlying but not

  12. Analogue modeling of 3-D structural segmentation in fold-and-thrust belts: interactions between frictional and viscous provinces in foreland basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borderie, Sandra; Graveleau, Fabien; Witt, César; Vendeville, Bruno C.

    2016-04-01

    Accretionary wedges are generally segmented both across and along strike because of diverse factors including tectonic and stratigraphic inheritance. In fold-and-thrust belts, along-strike stratigraphic changes in the foreland sequence are classically observed and cause a curvature of the deformation front. Although the parameters controlling this curvature are well documented, the structural interactions and mutual influences between adjacent provinces are much less analyzed. To investigate this question, we deformed analogue models in a compressional box equipped with digital cameras and a topographic measurement apparatus. Models where shortened above a basal frictional detachment (glass microbeads) and segmentation was tested by having a region in which we added an interbedded viscous level (silicone polymer) within the sedimentary cover (dry sand). By changing the number (2 or 3) and the relative width of the purely frictional and viscous provinces, our goal was to characterize geometrically and kinematically the interactions between the viscous and the purely frictional provinces. We used a commercial geomodeller to generate 3-D geometrical models. The results indicate that regardless of the relative width of the purely frictional vs. viscous provinces, the deformation style in the frictional province is not influenced by the presence of the adjacent viscous province. On the contrary, the structural style and the deformation kinematics in the viscous province is significantly impacted by the presence or absence of an adjacent purely frictional province. At first order, the deformation style in the viscous province depends on its width, and three structural styles can be defined along strike. Far from the frictional area, structures are primarily of salt-massif type, and they do not seem to be influenced by the frictional wedge province. Towards the frictional province, deformation changes gradually to a zone of purely forethrusts (foreland verging), and

  13. Kinematic reconstruction of a thin-skinned, deep-water fold and thrust belt: the case of the Outer Tuscan Nappe (Umbria, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carboni, Filippo; Barchi, Massimiliano; Brozzetti, Francesco; Cruciani, Francesco; Ercoli, Maurizio; Mirabella, Francesco; Porreca, Massimiliano

    2017-04-01

    Fold-and-Thrust Belts occur worldwide in a variety of tectonic settings. Most of them develop in a deepwater environment (Deep Water Fold-and-Thrust Belts, DWFTBs), at both continental passive and active margins, driven by gravity (near-field stresses) and tectonic forces (far-field stresses) respectively. Here we present a multidisciplinary geological study of the Outer Tuscan Nappe (OTN), an imbricate thrust system in the Northern Apennines of Italy, emplaced in Early Miocene times in deep water environment. Despite the wide scientific literature, the geometry and the kinematic evolution of the OTN were never reconstructed in detail. Furthermore, its total amount of shortening and then its shortening rate, were never measured and calculated through proper restoration techniques. The OTN involves a 2000 m thick, Late Cretaceous-Tertiary "Tuscan" succession, consisting of arenaceous turbidites (Macigno Fm.), overlying a thick level of marls and calcarenites (Scaglia Toscana Fm.), which form the major basal décollement of the imbricate system. Along this basal décollement, the OTN overthrusts eastward younger turbidite units (Mt. Rentella and Marnoso-Arenacea successions). In this study we interpreted a set of 2D seismic reflection profiles calibrated with a deep borehole, crossing transversally (WSW-ENE) and longitudinally (NNW-SSE) the OTN. To better constrain the interpretation, selected controls of key outcrops was performed, mainly aimed at reconstructing: i) the actual transport direction during the OTN emplacement; ii) the position of the subsequent, NNW-SSE trending, extensional faults dissecting the tectonic wedge; iii) the role of transversal faults, longitudinally segmenting the thrust system. Combining the aforesaid data, we drew an integrated 20 km long geological cross section showing the internal geometry of the imbricate thrust system, down to the main basal décollement. The integrated section was successively restored in 2D using the software

  14. Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of salt-controlled minibasins in a fold and thrust belt, the Oligo-Miocene central Sivas Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kergaravat, Charlie; Ribes, Charlotte; Callot, Jean-Paul; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2017-09-01

    The Central Sivas Basin (Turkey) provides an outcrop example of a minibasin province developed above a salt canopy within a foreland-fold and thrust belt. Several minibasins are examined to assess the influence of regional Oligo-Miocene shortening during the development of a minibasin province. The results are based on extensive field work, including regional and detailed outcrop mapping of at least 15 minibasin margins and analysis of the structural elements at all scales. This reveals a progressive increase in shortening and a decrease in salt tectonics during evolution of the province. The initiation of minibasins is driven mostly by the salt-induced accommodation forming a polygonal network of salt structures with mainly local halokinetic sequences (i.e. hooks and wedges). The initiation of shortening is marked by an abrupt increase in sedimentation rate within the flexural foreland basin causing burial of the preexisting salt structures. Subsequently, orogenic compression encourages the rejuvenation of linear salt structures oriented at right angle to the regional shortening direction. The influence of orogenic shortening during the last steps of the minibasin province evolution is clearly shown by: (i) the squeezing of salt structures to form welds which are developed both at right angle and oblique to the regional shortening direction, (ii) the emergence of thrust faults, (iii) the tilting and rotation of minibasins about vertical axis associated with the formation of strike-slip fault zones, and (iv) the extrusion of salt sheets. The pre-shortening geometry of the salt structures pattern, polygonal network of walls and diapirs versus linear and sub-parallel walls, influence the resultant structural style of the minibasin province subjected to shortening. Preexisting linear depocenter limited by sub-parallel walls accommodate preferentially the shortening compare to the preexisting sub-circular depocenter limited by polygonal network of salt walls and

  15. Linking Late Cretaceous to Eocene Tectonostratigraphy of the San Jacinto Fold Belt of NW Colombia With Caribbean Plateau Collision and Flat Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, J. Alejandro; Oncken, Onno; Le Breton, Eline; Ibánez-Mejia, Mauricio; Faccenna, Claudio; Veloza, Gabriel; Vélez, Vickye; de Freitas, Mario; Mesa, Andrés.

    2017-11-01

    Collision with and subduction of an oceanic plateau is a rare and transient process that usually leaves an indirect imprint only. Through a tectonostratigraphic analysis of pre-Oligocene sequences in the San Jacinto fold belt of northern Colombia, we show the Late Cretaceous to Eocene tectonic evolution of northwestern South America upon collision and ongoing subduction with the Caribbean Plate. We linked the deposition of four fore-arc basin sequences to specific collision/subduction stages and related their bounding unconformities to major tectonic episodes. The Upper Cretaceous Cansona sequence was deposited in a marine fore-arc setting in which the Caribbean Plate was being subducted beneath northwestern South America, producing contemporaneous magmatism in the present-day Lower Magdalena Valley basin. Coeval strike-slip faulting by the Romeral wrench fault system accommodated right-lateral displacement due to oblique convergence. In latest Cretaceous times, the Caribbean Plateau collided with South America marking a change to more terrestrially influenced marine environments characteristic of the upper Paleocene to lower Eocene San Cayetano sequence, also deposited in a fore-arc setting with an active volcanic arc. A lower to middle Eocene angular unconformity at the top of the San Cayetano sequence, the termination of the activity of the Romeral Fault System, and the cessation of arc magmatism are interpreted to indicate the onset of low-angle subduction of the thick and buoyant Caribbean Plateau beneath South America, which occurred between 56 and 43 Ma. Flat subduction of the plateau has continued to the present and would be the main cause of amagmatic post-Eocene deposition.

  16. Microfractures in bed-parallel veins (beef) as predictors of vertical macrofractures in shale: Vaca Muerta Formation, Agrio Fold-and-Thrust Belt, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukar, Estibalitz; Lopez, Ramiro G.; Laubach, Stephen E.; Gale, Julia F. W.; Manceda, René; Marrett, Randall

    2017-11-01

    Shales of the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Vaca Muerta Formation are the main source rock for petroleum in the Neuquén Basin, Argentina and an important unconventional exploration target. Folded Vaca Muerta Formation is well exposed in the Agrio Fold-and-Thrust belt where an arid climate and rapid erosion reveal relatively unweathered shale strata accessible along creek beds at Arroyo Mulichinco and in 10+ m-tall cliffs at Puesto. Widespread within these organic-rich shales are several cm-thick, prominent bed-parallel veins (BPVs) of fibrous calcite (beef) that are cut by multiple sets of vertical calcite lined or filled fractures having apertures unaffected by near-surface stress release. Similar, and probably contemporaneous fractures are present within horizons of interbedded dolomitic rock. Evidence that vertical fractures in BPVs and dolomitic horizons continue into shale beds suggests that in-depth analysis of vertical fractures within BPVs and dolomitic horizons allows fracture set and orientation identification and size population measurements-primarily aperture distributions-that circumvent some of the limitations of shale outcrops. At Arroyo Mulichinco, four main fracture sets are present separable by orientation and crosscutting relations. An E-W set is oldest, followed by successively younger NE-SW, NW-SE, and N-S sets. At Puesto, the E-W and N-S sets are the most prominent and show opposite cross-cutting relationships (E-W set is youngest) indicating a possible episode of younger E-W fractures. The E-W set shows the highest micro-and macrofracture intensity at both localities. The intensity of N-S micro- and macrofractures is similar at both outcrops away from faults, but macrofracture intensity increases closer to faults. While macrofracture abundance is similar in BPVs and in shale, microfractures having apertures smaller than ∼0.1 mm are mostly absent in shale and dolomitic layers but are abundant cutting BPVs. Thus, microfractures are BPV

  17. Early Neogene foreland of the Zagros, implications for the initial closure of the Neo-Tethys and kinematics of crustal shortening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirouz, Mortaza; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Hassanzadeh, Jamshid; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Bahroudi, Abbas

    2017-11-01

    We study the transition from passive margin to foreland basin sedimentation now exposed in the High Zagros belt to provide chronological constraints on the initial stage of Arabia-Eurasia collision and closure of the Neo-Tethys. We performed magnetostratigraphy and strontium isotope stratigraphy along two sections near the Zagros suture which expose the oldest preserved foreland deposits: the Shalamzar section in the west and the Dehmoord section in the east. The top of the passive margin Asmari formation has an age of 28-29 Ma in the High Zagros and is overlain by foreland deposits with a major basal unconformity representing 7 Myr of hiatus. The base of the foreland deposits has an age of 21.5 Ma at Dehmoord and ca. 26 Ma at Shalamzar. The sedimentation rate increased from 30 m/Myr in the passive margin to 247 m/Myr in the foreland. Combined with available age constraints across the Zagros, our results show that the unconformity is diachronous and records the southwestward migration of the flexural bulge within the Arabian plate at an average rate of 24 ± 2 mm/yr over the last 27 Ma. The time evolution of sediment accumulation in the Zagros foreland follows the prediction from a flexural model, as the foreland is thrust beneath the orogenic wedge and loaded by the wedge and basin fill. We detect the onset of forebulge formation within the Asmari Formation around 25 Ma. We conclude that closure of the Neo-Tethys formed the Zagros collisional wedge at 27 ± 2 Ma. Hence, the Arabia-Eurasia collision was probably not the main driver of global cooling which started near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (ca. 33.7 Ma). We estimate 650 km of forebulge migration since the onset of the collision which consists of 350 km of shortening across the orogen, and 300 km of widening of the wedge and increasing flexural rigidity of Arabia. We conclude the average rate of shortening across the Zagros to be ca. 13 mm/yr over the last 27 Myr; a value comparable to the modern rate

  18. Comments on "The Cenozoic fold-and-thrust belt of Eastern Sardinia: Evidences from the integration of field data with numerically balanced geological cross section" by Arragoni et al., 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berra, F.; Lanfranchi, A.; Jadoul, F.

    2017-02-01

    Arragoni et al. (2016) suggest in their paper published on tectonics that the carbonate succession of Eastern Sardinia represents a Cenozoic fold-and-thrust belt, related to the Alpine orogenesis. According to these authors, this supposed fold-and-thrust belt represents the southward continuation of the Alpine Corsica collisional chain and the missing link between the Alpine Chain and the Calabria-Peloritani domain. Field evidence and the published literature document instead that all the surfaces that Arragoni et al. interpret as thrust are actually stratigraphic contacts. The balanced geological section of Arragoni represents thus a geometric exercise missing the basic data needed to nurse the proposed model, and it does not reflect the geology of Eastern Sardinia. The data provided by Arragoni et al. (2016) do not support the presence of an Alpine thrust-and-fold belt in Eastern Sardinia, and this paper may suggest to the geological community a misleading interpretation of the geodynamic evolution of the Alpine and Mediterranean area.

  19. Fold-and-thrust belt evolution influenced by along and across strike thickness variations: new insights from brittle-ductile centrifuge analogue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santolaria Otin, Pablo; Harris, Lyal; Casas, Antonio; Soto, Ruth

    2014-05-01

    Using a new centrifuge analogue modelling approach, 38 models were performed to study the influence of along and across strike thickness variations of a ductile-brittle layered sequence on the kinematics and deformation style of fold-and-thrust belts. Four different series, changing the brittle-ductile thickness ratio in models with i) constant thickness, ii) across strike varying thickness, iii) along strike varying thickness and iv) along and across-strike varying thickness, were performed. The brittle sedimentary cover was simulated by "Moon Sand™", regular fine-grained quartz sand coated by polymer and synthetic rubber binders, allowing layers to be placed vertically in the centrifuge (impossible with normal sand). The ductile décollement (evaporites) was simulated by silicone putty (Crazy Aaron Enterprise's Thinking Putty™). Models were run step by step in a high-acceleration centrifuge attaining 900 g, what allows to drastically reduce the experimental time. In addition to surface observation and serial cross-sections at the end of the models, CT scans portray the progressive 3- and 4-dimensional evolution of several models. With constant thickness, the increase of the brittle-ductile ratio results in the decrease of the number of structures where shortening is accommodated and the development of structures does not follow a linear sequence. Across-strike thickness variations trigger the location of deformation towards the wedge front, precluding the emplacement of structures in the hinterland. Along-strike thickness changes result in the lateral variation of the number of structure and a differential displacement of the deformation front. The occurrence of oblique structures is enhanced in wedges with across and along strike thickness variations where, in addition, rotational domains are observed. Comparison with the South Pyrenean Central Unit, in the Southern Pyrenees, characterized by a west- and southward thinning of the pretectonic Mesozoic series

  20. 3D Reservoir Modeling of Semutang Gas Field: A lonely Gas field in Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt, with Integrated Well Log, 2D Seismic Reflectivity and Attributes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehin, Z.; Woobaidullah, A. S. M.; Snigdha, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bengal Basin with its prolific gas rich province provides needed energy to Bangladesh. Present energy situation demands more Hydrocarbon explorations. Only 'Semutang' is discovered in the high amplitude structures, where rest of are in the gentle to moderate structures of western part of Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt. But it has some major thrust faults which have strongly breached the reservoir zone. The major objectives of this research are interpretation of gas horizons and faults, then to perform velocity model, structural and property modeling to obtain reservoir properties. It is needed to properly identify the faults and reservoir heterogeneities. 3D modeling is widely used to reveal the subsurface structure in faulted zone where planning and development drilling is major challenge. Thirteen 2D seismic and six well logs have been used to identify six gas bearing horizons and a network of faults and to map the structure at reservoir level. Variance attributes were used to identify faults. Velocity model is performed for domain conversion. Synthetics were prepared from two wells where sonic and density logs are available. Well to seismic tie at reservoir zone shows good match with Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator on seismic section. Vsh, porosity, water saturation and permeability have been calculated and various cross plots among porosity logs have been shown. Structural modeling is used to make zone and layering accordance with minimum sand thickness. Fault model shows the possible fault network, those liable for several dry wells. Facies model have been constrained with Sequential Indicator Simulation method to show the facies distribution along the depth surfaces. Petrophysical models have been prepared with Sequential Gaussian Simulation to estimate petrophysical parameters away from the existing wells to other parts of the field and to observe heterogeneities in reservoir. Average porosity map for each gas zone were constructed. The outcomes of the research

  1. Xenotime-(Y) formation from zircon dissolution-precipitation and HREE fractionation: an example from a metamorphosed phosphatic sandstone, Espinhaço fold belt (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Gerhard; Morteani, Giulio; Rhede, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    We present an example where xenotime-(Y) together with metamorphic zircon replaces detrital zircon in a phosphatic sandstone from the Mesoproterozoic Espinhaço fold belt, Brazil, in a dissolution-precipitation reaction: {{zircon}}1 ( {{relict}} ) + {{P-}}{{bearing fluid}} = {{zircon}}2 ( {{metamorphic}} ) + {{xenotime}}. During the Brasiliano orogeny at 634 ± 19 Ma, the rocks experienced amphibolite facies metamorphism at ≥0.6 GPa/ 550 ± 37 °C (Southern Espinhaço) and ≥0.6 GPa/ 570 ± 35 °C (Northern Espinhaço), constrained by Zr-in-rutile and Ti-in-quartz thermometry and the presence of kyanite + muscovite + quartz. Many of the rocks show unusual rare earth element (REE) patterns with a hump at Gd-Tb-Dy and depletion in light REE. Detrital zircons (with relict ages between 1.5 and 3.3 Ga) show varying degrees of replacement as indicated by the presence of xenotime and associated porosity, from almost pristine to complete alteration. Textural evidence indicates local mobility of Zr and REE at the scale of the thin section. Xenotime-(Y) occurs together with other phosphates, mainly augelite, lazulite, and minerals of the svanbergite-crandallite-goyacite-florencite group. Xenotime-(Y) is very heterogeneous and reaches unusually high contents of up to 14 wt% Gd2O3, 13 wt% Dy2O3, and 3 wt% Tb2O3, corresponding to ≤0.36 REE atoms per formula unit due to the exchange Y = REE. The heavy REE patterns of xenotime-(Y) therefore show variable enrichment in individual elements, which explains the characteristic hump at Gd-Tb-Dy in the REE patterns of the whole rock. Although the rocks reached amphibolite facies conditions, textures indicate that formation of xenotime likely occurred during the early stages of diagenesis—metamorphism. Comparison with REE concentrations in xenotime-(Y) from the literature shows that selective REE incorporation into xenotime-(Y) is controlled by interaction with P-bearing hydrous fluids.

  2. Steady growth or fits and starts: observing the style of and controls on carbonate crystallization in an Alpine fold and thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, M. K.; Akker, V.; Herwegh, M.; Eiler, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    temperatures in flysch units where peak conditions exceeded 200 °C. Barring a late addition of cold, retrograde dolomite, these discrepancies indicate that carbonate recrystallization is also phase-specific, and that dolomite is uniquely resistant to recrystallization during low-grade metamorphism in major fold-and-thrust belts.

  3. Implications of meso- to micro-scale deformation for fault sealing capacity: Insights from the Lenghu5 fold-and-thrust belt, Qaidam Basin, NE Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Liujuan; Pei, Yangwen; Li, Anren; Wu, Kongyou

    2018-06-01

    As faults can be barriers to or conduits for fluid flow, it is critical to understand fault seal processes and their effects on the sealing capacity of a fault zone. Apart from the stratigraphic juxtaposition between the hanging wall and footwall, the development of fault rocks is of great importance in changing the sealing capacity of a fault zone. Therefore, field-based structural analysis has been employed to identify the meso-scale and micro-scale deformation features and to understand their effects on modifying the porosity of fault rocks. In this study, the Lenghu5 fold-and-thrust belt (northern Qaidam Basin, NE Tibetan Plateau), with well-exposed outcrops, was selected as an example for meso-scale outcrop mapping and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) micro-scale structural analysis. The detailed outcrop maps enabled us to link the samples with meso-scale fault architecture. The representative rock samples, collected in both the fault zones and the undeformed hanging walls/footwalls, were studied by SEM micro-structural analysis to identify the deformation features at the micro-scale and evaluate their influences on the fluid flow properties of the fault rocks. Based on the multi-scale structural analyses, the deformation mechanisms accounting for porosity reduction in the fault rocks have been identified, which are clay smearing, phyllosilicate-framework networking and cataclasis. The sealing capacity is highly dependent on the clay content: high concentrations of clay minerals in fault rocks are likely to form continuous clay smears or micro- clay smears between framework silicates, which can significantly decrease the porosity of the fault rocks. However, there is no direct link between the fault rocks and host rocks. Similar stratigraphic juxtapositions can generate fault rocks with very different magnitudes of porosity reduction. The resultant fault rocks can only be predicted only when the fault throw is smaller than the thickness of a faulted bed, in

  4. Imaging of 2-D multichannel land seismic data using an iterative inversion-migration scheme, Naga Thrust and Fold Belt, Assam, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Priyank; Dasgupta, Rahul

    2010-05-01

    seismic data from the Naga Thrust and Fold Belt (NTFB), India, were several exploratory wells in the last decade targeting sub-thrust leads in the footwall have failed. This failure is speculatively due to incorrect depth images which are in turn attributed to incorrect velocity models that are developed using conventional methods. The 2-D seismic data in this study is acquired perpendicular to the trend of the NTFB where the outcropping hanging wall has a topographic culmination. The acquisition style is split-spread with 30 m shot and receiver spacing and a nominal fold of 90. The data are recorded with a sample interval of 2 ms. Overall the data have a moderate signal-to-noise ratio and a broad frequency bandwidth of 8-80 Hz. The seismic line contains the failed exploratory well in the central part. The final results from unified imaging (both the depth image and the corresponding velocity model) suggest presence of a triangle zone, which was previously undiscovered. Conventional imaging had falsely portrayed the triangle zone as structural high which was interpreted as an anticline. As a result, the exploratory well, meant to target the anticline, met with pressure changes which were neither expected nor explained. The unified imaging results not only explain the observations in the well but also reveal new leads in the region. The velocity model from unified imaging was also found to be adequate for frequency-domain full-waveform imaging of the hanging wall. Results from waveform inversion are further corroborated by the geological interpretation of the exploratory well.

  5. Mechanical study of the Chartreuse Fold-and-Thrust Belt: relationships between fluids overpressure and decollement within the Toarcian source-rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelon, Josselin; Sassi, William; Burov, Evgueni

    2016-04-01

    Many source-rocks are shale and constitute potential detachment levels in Fold-and-Thrust Belts (FTB): the toarcian Schistes-Cartons in the French Chartreuse FTB for example. Their mechanical properties can change during their burial and thermal maturation, as for example when large amount of hydrocarbon fluids are generated. A structural reconstruction of the Chartreuse FTB geo-history places the Toarcian Formation as the major decollement horizon. In this work, a mechanical analysis integrating the fluids overpressuring development is proposed to discuss on the validity of the structural interpretation. At first, an analogue of the Chartreuse Toarcian Fm, the albanian Posidonia Schist, is documented as it can provide insights on its initial properties and composition of its kerogen content. Laboratory characterisation documents the vertical evolution of the mineralogical, geochemical and mechanical parameters of this potential decollement layer. These physical parameters (i.e. Total Organic Carbon (TOC), porosity/permeability relationship, friction coefficient) are used to address overpressure buildup in the frontal part of the Chartreuse FTB with TEMISFlow Arctem Basin modelling approach (Faille et al, 2014) and the structural emplacement of the Chartreuse thrust units using the FLAMAR thermo-mechanical model (Burov et al, 2014). The hydro-mechanical modeling results highlight the calendar, distribution and magnitude of the overpressure that developed within the source-rock in the footwall of a simple fault-bend fold structure localized in the frontal part of the Chartreuse FTB. Several key geological conditions are required to create an overpressure able to fracture the shale-rocks and induce a significant change in the rheological behaviour: high TOC, low permeability, favourable structural evolution. These models highlight the importance of modeling the impact of a diffuse natural hydraulic fracturing to explain fluids propagation toward the foreland within

  6. Link between Neogene and modern sedimentary environments in the Zagros foreland basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirouz, Mortaza; Simpson, Guy; Bahroudi, Abbas

    2010-05-01

    The Zagros mountain belt, with a length of 1800 km, is located in the south of Iran and was produced by collision between the Arabian plate and the Iran micro plate some time in the early Tertiary. After collision, the Zagros carbonate-dominated sedimentary basin has been replaced by a largely clastic system. The Neogene Zagros foreland basin comprises four main depositional environments which reflect the progressive southward migration of the deformation front with time. The oldest unit - the Gachsaran formation - is clastic in the northern part of the basin, but is dominated by evaporates in southern part, being deposited in a supratidal Sabkha-type environment. Overlying the Gachsaran is the Mishan formation, which is characterized by the Guri limestone member at the base, overlain by marine green marls. The thickness of the Guri member increases dramatically towards the southeast. The next youngest unit is the Aghajari Formation which consists of well sorted lenticular sandstone bodies in a red silty-mudstone. This formation is interpreted as representing the floodplain of dominantly meandering rivers. Finally, the Bakhtiari formation consists of mainly coarse-grained gravel sheets which are interpreted to represent braided river deposits. Each of these Neogene depositional environments has a modern day equivalent. For example, the braided rivers presently active in the Zagros mountains are modern analogues of the Bakhtiari. In the downstream direction, these braided rivers become meandering systems, which are equivalents of the Aghajari. Eventually, the meandering rivers meet the Persian gulf which is the site of the ‘modern day' Mishan shallow marine marls. Finally, the modern carbonate system on the southern margin of Persian Gulf represents the Guri member paleo-environment, behind which Sabkha-type deposits similar to the Gachsaran are presently being deposited. One important implication of this link between the Neogene foreland basin deposits and the

  7. Tectonic and thermal history of the western Serrania del Interior foreland fold and thrust belt and Guarico Basin, north central Venezuela: Implications of new apatite fission track analysis and seismic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez de Armas, Jaime Gonzalo

    Structural analysis, interpretation of seismic reflection lines, and apatite fission-track analysis in the Western Serrania del Interior fold and thrust belt and in the Guarico basin of north-central Venezuela indicate that the area underwent Mesozoic and Tertiary-to-Recent deformation. Mesozoic deformation, related to the breakup of Pangea, resulted in the formation of the Espino graben in the southernmost portion of the Guarico basin and in the formation of the Proto-Caribbean lithosphere between the diverging North and South American plates. The northern margin of Venezuela became a northward facing passive margin. Minor normal faults formed in the Guarico basin. The most intense deformation took place in the Neogene when the Leeward Antilles volcanic island arc collided obliquely with South America. The inception of the basal foredeep unconformity in the Late Eocene-Early Oligocene marks the formation of a perisutural basin on top of a buried graben system. It is coeval with minor extension and possible reactivation of Cretaceous normal faults in the Guarico basin. It marks the deepening of the foredeep. Cooling ages derived from apatite fission-tracks suggest that the obduction of the fold and thrust belt in the study area occurred in the Late Oligocene through the Middle Miocene. Field data and seismic interpretations suggest also that contractional deformation began during the Neogene, and specifically during the Miocene. The most surprising results of the detrital apatite fission-track study are the ages acquired in the sedimentary rocks of the easternmost part of the study area in the foreland fold and thrust belt. They indicate an Eocene thermal event. This event may be related to the Eocene NW-SE convergence of the North and South American plates that must have caused the Proto-Caribbean lithosphere to be shortened. This event is not related to the collision of the arc with South America, as the arc was far to the west during the Eocene.

  8. Crustal structure and evolution of the NW Zagros Mountains (Iran): Insights from numerical modeling of the interplay between surface and tectonic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saura, Eduard; Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel; Casciello, Emilio; Vergés, Jaume

    2014-05-01

    Protracted Arabia-Eurasia convergence resulted in the closure of the >2000 km wide Neo-Tethys Ocean from early Late Cretaceous to Recent. This process was controlled by the structure of the NE margin of the Arabian plate, the NE-dipping oceanic subduction beneath Eurasia, the obduction of oceanic lithosphere and the collision of small continental and volcanic arc domains of the SW margin of Eurasia. The evolution of the Zagros Amiran and Mesopotamian foreland basins is studied in this work along a ~700 km long transect in NW Zagros constrained by field, seismic and published data. We use the well-defined geometries and ages of the Amiran and Mesopotamian foreland basins to estimate the elastic thickness of the lithosphere and model the evolution of the deformation to quantitatively link the topographic, tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the system. Modelling results show two major stages of emplacement. The obduction (pre-collision) stage involves the thin thrust sheets of the Kermanshah complex together with the Bisotun basement. The collision stage corresponds to the emplacement of the basement duplex and associated crustal thickening, coeval to the out of sequence emplacement of Gaveh Rud and Imbricated Zone in the hinterland. The geodynamic model is consistent with the history of the foreland basins, with the regional isostasy model, and with a simple scenario for the surface process efficiency. The emplacement of Bisotun basement during obduction tectonically loaded and flexed the Arabian plate triggering deposition in the Amiran foreland basin. The basement units emplaced during the last 10 My, flexed the Arabian plate below the Mesopotamian basin. During this stage, material eroded from the Simply Folded belt and the Imbricated zone was not enough to fill the Mesopotamian basin, which, according to our numerical model results, required a maximum additional sediment supply of 80 m/Myr. This additional supply had to be provided by an axial drainage system

  9. Neotectonics and structure of the Himalayan deformation front in the Kashmir Himalaya, India: Implication in defining what controls a blind thrust front in an active fold-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavillot, Y. G.; Meigs, A.; Yule, J. D.; Rittenour, T. M.; Malik, M. O. A.

    2014-12-01

    Active tectonics of a deformation front constrains the kinematic evolution and structural interaction between the fold-thrust belt and most-recently accreted foreland basin. In Kashmir, the Himalayan Frontal thrust (HFT) is blind, characterized by a broad fold, the Suruin-Mastargh anticline (SMA), and displays no emergent faults cutting either limb. A lack of knowledge of the rate of shortening and structural framework of the SMA hampers quantifying the earthquake potential for the deformation front. Our study utilized the geomorphic expression of dated deformed terraces on the Ujh River in Kashmir. Six terraces are recognized, and three yield OSL ages of 53 ka, 33 ka, and 0.4 ka. Vector fold restoration of long terrace profiles indicates a deformation pattern characterized by regional uplift across the anticlinal axis and back-limb, and by fold limb rotation on the forelimb. Differential uplift across the fold trace suggests localized deformation. Dip data and stratigraphic thicknesses suggest that a duplex structure is emplaced at depth along the basal décollement, folding the overlying roof thrust and Siwalik-Muree strata into a detachment-like fold. Localized faulting at the fold axis explains the asymmetrical fold geometry. Folding of the oldest dated terrace, suggest that rock uplift rates across the SMA range between 2.0-1.8 mm/yr. Assuming a 25° dipping ramp for the blind structure on the basis of dip data constraints, the shortening rate across the SMA ranges between 4.4-3.8 mm/yr since ~53 ka. Of that rate, ~1 mm/yr is likely absorbed by minor faulting in the near field of the fold axis. Given that Himalaya-India convergence is ~18.8-11 mm/yr, internal faults north of the deformation front, such as the Riasi thrust absorbs more of the Himalayan shortening than does the HFT in Kashmir. We attribute a non-emergent thrust at the deformation front to reflect deformation controlled by pre-existing basin architecture in Kashmir, in which the thick succession

  10. Geochemistry and geodynamics of the Mawat mafic complex in the Zagros Suture zone, northeast Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Hossein; Hadi, Ayten; Asahara, Yoshihiro; Mohammad, Youssef Osman

    2013-12-01

    The Iraqi Zagros Orogenic Belt includes two separate ophiolite belts, which extend along a northwest-southeast trend near the Iranian border. The outer belt shows ophiolite sequences and originated in the oceanic ridge or supra-subduction zone. The inner belt includes the Mawat complex, which is parallel to the outer belt and is separated by the Biston Avoraman block. The Mawat complex with zoning structures includes sedimentary rocks with mafic interbedded lava and tuff, and thick mafic and ultramafic rocks. This complex does not show a typical ophiolite sequences such as those in Penjween and Bulfat. The Mawat complex shows evidence of dynamic deformation during the Late Cretaceous. Geochemical data suggest that basic rocks have high MgO and are significantly depleted in LREE relative to HREE. In addition they show positive ɛ Nd values (+5 to+8) and low 87Sr/86Sr ratios. The occurrence of some OIB type rocks, high Mg basaltic rocks and some intermediate compositions between these two indicate the evolution of the Mawat complex from primary and depleted source mantle. The absence of a typical ophiolite sequence and the presence of good compatibility of the source magma with magma extracted from the mantle plume suggests that a mantle plume from the D″ layer is more consistent as the source of this complex than the oceanic ridge or supra-subduction zone settings. Based on our proposed model the Mawat basin represents an extensional basin formed during the Late Paleozoic to younger along the Arabian passive margin oriented parallel to the Neo-Tethys oceanic ridge or spreading center. The Mawat extensional basin formed without creation of new oceanic basement. During the extension, huge volumes of mafic lava were intruded into this basin. This basin was squeezed between the Arabian Plate and Biston Avoraman block during the Late Cretaceous.

  11. Fold growth and drainage evolution of the Perman - Bana Bawi Anticline (Northern Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretis, B.; Grasemann, B.; Faber, R.; Lockhart, D.

    2009-04-01

    The Zagros fold- and thrust belt is a seismically active orogen, which is the result of the Cenozoic collision between the Eurasian and the Arabian plates. Kinematic models based on GPS networks suggest a north-south shortening between Arabia and Eurasia in the order of 2-2.5 cm/a. Most of this deformation is partitioned within the Zagros mountains in S-SW directed folding and thrusting as well as in NW-SE to N-S trending dextral strike slip faults. We investigate in this work the growth of the Perman - Bana Bawi anticlines (northeast of Erbil in Kurdistan region) by means of structural field work and tectonic geomorphology based on a geological map and ASTER remote sensing data (digital elevation model and satellite images). The Perman - Bana Bawi anticline forms a slightly S-shaped NW-SE striking fold chain over an exposed distance of more than 80 km. The dominant wavelength of the fold train is about 8 km. The backlimb dips with about 35° to the NE and the forelimb has a mean dip of about 45° towards SW. Hydrologically, there are few rivers with all-year flow conditions and therefore the dominant fluviatile erosion mainly takes place in the months with periodical precipitation, which varies between 700 and 3,000 mm/a (i.e. during the winter months). The presence of wind gaps and the pattern of deflected rivers suggest that the Perman and the Bana Bawi anticline initially developed as individual structures. The lateral growth directions are constrained by fanned drainage, which are especially in the cylindrical parts of the fold strongly overprinted by transverse rivers perpendicular to the fold axis. Although incising the same stratigraphic strata, the erosion pattern on backlimbs clearly differs from the tributary pattern on the forelimbs. The backlimbs are characterized by drainage parallel to the fold crest and asymmetric forked networks. Forelimbs are more strongly dissected by rivers with higher sinuosities with an older generation partly oblique to the

  12. Sediment provenance in contractional orogens: The detrital zircon record from modern rivers in the Andean fold-thrust belt and foreland basin of western Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaldi, Tomas N.; Horton, Brian K.; McKenzie, N. Ryan; Stockli, Daniel F.; Odlum, Margaret L.

    2017-12-01

    This study analyzes detrital zircon U-Pb age populations from Andean rivers to assess whether active synorogenic sedimentation accurately records proportional contributions from varied bedrock source units across different drainage areas. Samples of modern river sand were collected from west-central Argentina (28-33°S), where the Andes are characterized by active uplift and deposition in diverse contractional provinces, including (1) hinterland, (2) wedge-top, (3) proximal foreland, and (4) distal broken foreland basin settings. Potential controls on sediment provenance were evaluated by comparing river U-Pb age distributions with predicted age spectra generated by a sediment mixing model weighted by relative catchment exposure (outcrop) areas for different source units. Several statistical measures (similarity, likeness, and cross-correlation) are employed to compare how well the area-weighted model predicts modern river age populations. (1) Hinterland basin provenance is influenced by local relief generated along thrust-bounded ranges and high zircon fertility of exposed crystalline basement. (2) Wedge-top (piggyback) basin provenance is controlled by variable lithologic durability among thrust-belt bedrock sources and recycled basin sediments. (3) Proximal foreland (foredeep) basin provenance of rivers and fluvial megafans accurately reflect regional bedrock distributions, with limited effects of zircon fertility and lithologic durability in large (>20,000 km2) second-order drainage systems. (4) In distal broken segments of the foreland basin, regional provenance signatures from thrust-belt and hinterland areas are diluted by local contributions from foreland basement-cored uplifts.

  13. Structure and evolution of the northern Oman margin: gravity and seismic constraints over the Zagros-Makran-Oman collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravaut, P.; Bayer, R.; Hassani, R.; Rousset, D.; Yahya'ey, A. Al

    1997-09-01

    The obduction process in Oman during Late Cretaceous time, and continental-to-oceanic subduction along the Zagros-Makran region during the Tertiary are consequences of the Arabian-Eurasian collision, resulting in construction of complex structures composed of the Oman ophiolite belt, the Zagros continental mountain belt and the Makran subduction zone with its associated accretionary wedge. In this paper, we jointly interpret Bouguer anomaly and available petroleum seismic profiles in terms of crustal structures. We show that the gravity anomaly in northern Oman is characterized by a high-amplitude negative-positive couple. The negative anomaly is coincident with Late Cretaceous (Fiqa) and Tertiary (Pabdeh) foreland basins and with the Zagros-Oman mountain belts, whereas the positive anomaly is correlated to the ophiolite massifs. The Bouguer anomaly map indicates the presence of a post-Late Cretaceous sedimentary basin, the Sohar basin, centred north of the Batinah plain. We interpret the negative/positive couple in terms of loading of the elastic Arabian lithosphere. We estimate the different Cretaceous-to-Recent loads, including topography, ophiolite nappes, sedimentary fill and the accretionary prism of the Makran trench. A new method, using Mindlin's elastic plate theory, is proposed to model the 2D deflection of the heterogeneous elastic Arabian plate, taking into account boundary conditions at the ends of the subducted plate. We show that remnant ophiolites are isolated from Tethyan oceanic lithosphere in the Gulf of Oman by a continental basement ridge, a NW prolongation of the Saih-Hatat window. Loading the northward-limited ophiolite blocks explains the deflection of the Fiqa foredeep basin. West of the Musandam Peninsula, the Tertiary Pabdeh foredeep is probably related to the emplacement of a 8-km-thick tectonic prism located on the Musandam Peninsula and in the Strait of Hormuz. Final 2D density models along profiles through the Oman mountain belt and

  14. Interference of lithospheric folding in western Central Asia by simultaneous Indian and Arabian plate indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, J. H. W.; Cloetingh, S. A. P. L.; Burov, E.; Tesauro, M.; Sokoutis, D.; Kaban, M.

    2013-08-01

    Large-scale intraplate deformation of the crust and the lithosphere in Central Asia as a result of the indentation of India has been extensively documented. In contrast, the impact of continental collision between Arabia and Eurasia on lithosphere tectonics in front of the main suture zone, has received much less attention. The resulting Neogene shortening and uplift of the external Zagros, Alborz, Kopeh Dagh and Caucasus Mountain belts in Iran and surrounding areas is characterised by a simultaneous onset of major topography growth at ca. 5 Ma. At the same time, subsidence accelerated in the adjacent Caspian, Turan and Amu Darya basins. We present evidence for interference of lithospheric folding patterns induced by the Arabian and Indian collision with Eurasia. Wavelengths and spatial patterns are inferred from satellite-derived topography and gravity models. The observed interference of the patterns of folding appears to be primarily the result of spatial orientation of the two indenters, differences in their convergence velocities and the thermo-mechanical structure of the lithosphere west and east of the Kugitang-Tunka Line.

  15. A remote sensing study of active folding and faulting in southern Kerman province, S.E. Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Richard Thomas

    2006-04-01

    Geomorphological observations reveal a major oblique fold-and-thrust belt in Kerman province, S.E. Iran. The active faults appear to link the Sabzevaran right-lateral strike-slip fault in southeast Iran to other strike-slip faults within the interior of the country and may provide the means of distributing right-lateral shear between the Zagros and Makran mountains over a wider region of central Iran. The Rafsanjan fault is manifest at the Earth's surface as right-lateral strike-slip fault scarps and folding in alluvial sediments. Height changes across the anticlines, and widespread incision of rivers, are likely to result from hanging-wall uplift above thrust faults at depth. Scarps in recent alluvium along the northern margins of the folds suggest that the thrusts reach the surface and are active at the present-day. The observations from Rafsanjan are used to identify similar late Quaternary faulting elsewhere in Kerman province near the towns of Mahan and Rayen. No instrumentally recorded destructive earthquakes have occurred in the study region and only one historical earthquake (Lalehzar, 1923) is recorded. In addition GPS studies show that present-day rates of deformation are low. However, fault structures in southern Kerman province do appear to be active in the late Quaternary and may be capable of producing destructive earthquakes in the future. This study shows how widely available remote sensing data can be used to provide information on the distribution of active faulting across large areas of deformation.

  16. Deformation bands, early markers of tectonic activity in front of a fold-and-thrust belt: Example from the Tremp-Graus basin, southern Pyrenees, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Romain; Robion, Philippe; Souloumiac, Pauline; David, Christian; Saillet, Elodie

    2018-05-01

    Strain localization in a porous calcarenite facies of the Aren formation in the Tremp basin was studied. This Maastrichtian syn-tectonic formation exposed in front of the Boixols thrust, in the Central South Pyrenean Zone, hosts bedding perpendicular deformation bands. These bands are organized in two major band sets, striking East-West and N-020 respectively. Both populations formed during early deformation stages linked to the growth of the fold and thrust. A magnetic fabric study (Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility, AMS) was carried out to constrain the shortening direction responsible for the deformation bands development during the upper Cretaceous-Paleocene N-S contraction in the region, which allowed us to define populations of Pure Compaction Bands (PCB) and Shear Enhanced Compaction Bands (SECB) regarding their orientations compared to the shortening direction. Both sets are formed by cataclastic deformation, but more intense in the case of SECBs, which are also thinner than PCBs. The initial pore space is both mechanically reduced and chemically filled by several cementation phases. We propose a geomechanical model based on the regional context of layer parallel shortening, thrusting and strike-slip tectonics considering the burial history of the formation, in order to explain the development of both types of bands at remarkably shallow depths.

  17. Stress history and fracture pattern in fault-related folds based on limit analysis: application to the Sub-Andean thrust belt of Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbe, Charlotte; Leroy, Yves; Ben Miloud, Camille

    2017-04-01

    A methodology is proposed to construct the stress history of a complex fault-related fold in which the deformation mechanisms are essentially frictional. To illustrate the approach, fours steps of the deformation of an initially horizontally layered sand/silicone laboratory experiment (Driehaus et al., J. of Struc. Geol., 65, 2014) are analysed with the kinematic approach of limit analysis (LA). The stress, conjugate to the virtual velocity gradient in the sense of mechanicam power, is a proxy for the true statically admmissible stress field which prevailed over the structure. The material properties, friction angles and cohesion, including their time evolution are selected such that the deformation pattern predicted by the LA is consistent with the two main thrusting events, the first forward and the second backward once the layers have sufficiently rotated. The fractures associated to the stress field determined at each step are convected on today configuration to define the complete pattern which should be observed. The end results are presented along virtual vertical wells and could be used within the oil industry at an early phase of exploration to prepare drealing operations.

  18. The Western Carpathians fold and thrust belt and its relationships with the inner zone of the orogen: constraints from sequentially restored, balanced cross-sections integrated with low-temperature thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoli, Stefano; Castelluccio, Ada; Andreucci, Benedetta; Jankowski, Leszek; Ketcham, Richard A.; Szaniawski, Rafal; Zattin, Massimiliano

    2017-04-01

    The Western Carpathians are the northernmost, W-E-trending branch of a more than 1500 km long, curved orogen. Traditionally, the Western Carpathians have been divided into two distinct parts, namely the Inner Carpathians (including basement nappes) and the Outer Carpathians fold and thrust belt. These two major domains are separated by the so-called 'Pieniny Klippen Belt', a narrow zone of intensely deformed and sheared Mesozoic to Palaeogene rocks. In this contribution, a new interpretation for the tectonic evolution of the Western Carpathians is provided based on: (i) the analysis of the stratigraphy of the Mesozoic-Tertiary successions across the different orogenic domains; (ii) the construction of a series of balanced and restored cross-sections, validated by 2D forward modeling; and (iii) the integration of a large thermochronometric dataset (apatite fission tracks and apatite and zircon (U-Th-(Sm))/He ages). The latter work included thermo-kinematic modeling using FetKin, a finite element solver that takes as input a series of balanced cross-sections. The software solves the heat flow equations in 2D together with the predicted thermochronometric ages, which can be compared with the measured data. Moreover, the spatial distribution of burial depths, cooling ages and the rate of exhumation were correlated with heat flow, topographic relief, crustal and lithospheric thickness. This process allowed us to obtain the cooling history along each section and test the response of low-temperature thermochronometers to the changes in the thrust belt geometry produced by fault activity and topography evolution. Our sequentially restored, balanced cross-sections, showing a mix of thin-skinned thrusting and thick-skinned tectonic inversion involving the reactivation of pre-existing basement normal faults, effectively unravel the tectonic evolution of the thrust belt-foreland basin system. Our analysis provides a robust correlation of the stratigraphy from the Outer to the

  19. Tectono-metamorphic evolution of high-P/T and low-P/T metamorphic rocks in the Tia Complex, southern New England Fold Belt, eastern Australia: Insights from K-Ar chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Shiro; Tsujimori, Tatsuki; Watanabe, Teruo; Itaya, Tetsumaru

    2012-10-01

    The Tia Complex in the southern New England Fold Belt is a poly-metamorphosed Late Paleozoic accretionary complex. It consists mainly of high-P/low-T type pumpellyite-actinolite facies (rare blueschist facies) schists, phyllite and serpentinite (T = 300 °C and P = 5 kbar), and low-P/high-T type amphibolite facies schist and gneiss (T = 600 °C and P < 5 kbar) associated with granodioritic plutons (Tia granodiorite). White mica and biotite K-Ar ages distinguish Carboniferous subduction zone metamorphism and Permian granitic intrusions, respectively. The systematic K-Ar age mapping along a N-S traverse of the Tia Complex exhibits a gradual change. The white mica ages become younger from the lowest-grade zone (339 Ma) to the highest-grade zone (259 Ma). In contrast, Si content of muscovite changes drastically only in the highest-grade zone. The regional changes of white mica K-Ar ages and chemical compositions of micas indicate argon depletion from precursor high-P/low-T type phengitic white mica during the thermal overprinting and recrystallization by granitoids intrusions. Our new K-Ar ages and available geological data postulate a model of the eastward rollback of a subduction zone in Early Permian. The eastward shift of a subduction zone system and subsequent magmatic activities of high-Mg andesite and adakite might explain formation of S-type granitoids (Hillgrove suite) and coeval low-P/high-T type metamorphism in the Tia Complex.

  20. Eocene Total Petroleum System -- North and East of the Eocene West Side Fold Belt Assessment Unit of the San Joaquin Basin Province: Chapter 19 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    Gautier, Donald L.; Hosford Scheirer, Allegra

    2009-01-01

    The North and East of Eocene West Side Fold Belt Assessment Unit (AU) of the Eocene Total Petroleum System of the San Joaquin Basin Province comprises all hydrocarbon accumulations within the geographic and stratigraphic limits of this confirmed AU. Oil and associated gas accumulations occur in Paleocene through early middle Miocene marine to nonmarine sandstones found on the comparatively stable northeast shelf of the basin. The assessment unit is located north and east of the thickest accumulation of Neogene sediments and the west side fold belt. The area enclosed by the AU has been affected by only mild deformation since Eocene time. Traps containing known accumulations are mostly low-relief domes, anticlines, and up-dip basin margin traps with faulting and stratigraphic components. Map boundaries of the assessment unit are shown in figures 19.1 and 19.2; this assessment unit replaces the Northeast Shelf of Neogene Basin play 1006, the East Central Basin and Slope North of Bakersfield Arch play 1010, and part of the West Side Fold Belt Sourced by Pre-middle Miocene Rocks play 1005 considered by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in their 1995 National Assessment (Beyer, 1996). Stratigraphically, the AU includes rocks from the uppermost crystalline basement to the topographic surface. In the region of overlap with the Central Basin Monterey Diagenetic Traps Assessment Unit, the North and East of Eocene West Side Fold Belt AU extends from basement rocks to the top of the Temblor Formation (figs. 19.3 and 19.4). In map view, the northern boundary of the assessment unit corresponds to the northernmost extent of Eocene-age Kreyenhagen Formation. The northeast boundary is the eastern limit of possible oil reservoir rocks near the eastern edge of the basin. The southeast boundary corresponds to the pinch-out of Stevens sand of Eckis (1940) to the south, which approximately coincides with the northern flank of the Bakersfield Arch (fig. 19.1). The AU is bounded on the

  1. Deformation behavior of migmatites: insights from microstructural analysis of a garnet-sillimanite-mullite-quartz-feldspar-bearing anatectic migmatite at Rampura-Agucha, Aravalli-Delhi Fold Belt, NW India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Abhishek; Piazolo, Sandra; Saha, Lopamudra; Bhattacharya, Abhijit; Pal, Durgesh Kumar; Sarkar, Saheli

    2018-03-01

    In the present study we investigate the microstructural development in mullite, quartz and garnet in an anatectic migmatite hosted within a Grenvillian-age shear zone in the Aravalli-Delhi Fold Belt. The migmatite exhibits three main deformation structures and fabrics (S1, S2, S3). Elongated garnet porphyroblasts are aligned parallel to the metatexite S2 layers and contain crenulation hinges defined by biotite-sillimanite-mullite-quartz (with S1 axial planar foliation). Microstructural evidence and phase equilibrium relations establish the garnet as a peritectic phase of incongruent melting by breakdown of biotite, sillimanite ± mullite and quartz at peak P-T of 8 kbar, 730 °C along a tight-loop, clockwise P-T path. Monazite dating establishes that the partial melting occurred between 1000 and 870 Ma. The absence of subgrains and systematic crystal lattice distortions in these garnets despite their elongation suggests growth pseudomorphing pre-existing 3-D networks of S1 biotite aggregates rather than high-temperature crystal plastic deformation which is noted in the S1 quartz grains that exhibit strong crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO), undulatory extinction and subgrains. Mode-I fractures in these garnet porphyroblasts induced by high melt pressure during late stage of partial melt crystallization are filled by retrograde biotite-sillimanite. Weak CPO and non-systematic crystal lattice distortions in the coarse quartz grains within the S2 leucosome domains indicate these crystallized during melt solidification without later crystal plastic deformation overprint. In the later stages of deformation (D3), strain was mostly accommodated in the mullite-biotite-sillimanite-rich restite domains forming S3 which warps around garnet and leucosome domains; consequently, fine-grained S3 quartz does not exhibit strong CPOs.

  2. Preliminary Depositional and Provenance Records of Mesozoic Basin Evolution and Cenozoic Shortening in the High Andes, La Ramada Fold-Thrust Belt, Southern-Central Andes (32-33°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackaman-Lofland, C.; Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.; Constenius, K. N.; McKenzie, R.; Alvarado, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Argentinian Andes define key examples of retroarc shortening and basin evolution above a zone of active subduction. The La Ramada fold-thrust belt (RFTB) in the High Andes provides insights into the relative influence and temporal records of diverse convergent margin processes (e.g. flat-slab subduction, convergent wedge dynamics, structural inversion). The RFTB contains Mesozoic extensional basin strata deformed by later Andean shortening. New detrital zircon U-Pb analyses of Mesozoic rift sediments reveal: (1) a dominant Permo-Triassic age signature (220-280 Ma) associated with proximal sources of effective basement (Choiyoi Group) during Triassic synrift deposition; (2) upsection younging of maximum depositional ages from Late Triassic through Early Cretaceous (230 to 100 Ma) with the increasing influence of western Andean arc sources; and (3) a significant Late Cretaceous influx of Paleozoic (~350-550 Ma) and Proterozoic (~650-1300 Ma) populations during the earliest shift from back-arc post-extensional subsidence to upper-plate shortening. The Cenozoic detrital record of the Manantiales foreland basin (between the Frontal Cordillera and Precordillera) records RFTB deformation prior to flat-slab subduction. A Permo-Triassic Choiyoi age signature dominates the Miocene succession, consistent with sources in the proximal Espinacito range. Subordinate Mesozoic (~80-250 Ma) to Proterozoic (~850-1800 Ma) U-Pb populations record exhumation of the Andean magmatic arc and recycling of different structural levels in the RFTB during thrusting/inversion of Mesozoic rift basin strata and subjacent Paleozoic units. Whereas maximum depositional ages of sampled Manantiales units cluster at 18-20 Ma, the Estancia Uspallata basin (~50 km to the south) shows consistent upsection younging of Cenozoic populations attributed to proximal volcanic centers. Ongoing work will apply low-temperature thermochronology to pinpoint basin accumulation histories and thrust timing.

  3. belt law

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-03-01

    A 2003 study estimated that if all States had primary seat belt laws from 1995 to 2002, over 12,000 lives would have been saved. Failure to implement a primary seat belt law creates a real cost to a States budget for Medicaid and other State medic...

  4. Looking at the roots of the highest mountains: the lithospheric structure of the Himalaya-Tibet and the Zagros orogens. Results from a geophysical-petrological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunini, L.; Jimenez-Munt, I.; Fernandez, M.; Villasenor, A.; Afonso, J. C.; Verges, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Himalaya-Tibet and Zagros orogens are the two most prominent mountain belts built by continental collision. They are part of a huge belt of Cenozoic age which runs from the Pyrenees to Burma. In its central sector, the collision with the southern margin of the Eurasian plate has resulted not only in the building of mountain ranges over the north-eastern edges of the Arabian and Indian plates but also in widespread deformation 1000-3000 km from the suture zones. Zagros and Himalaya-Tibet orogens share many geodynamic processes but at different rates, amount of convergence and stage of development. The study of their present-day structures provides new insights into their quasi coeval collisional event pointing out differences and similarities in the mountain building processes. We present 2D crust and upper mantle cross-sections down to 400 km depth, along four SW-NE trending profiles. Two profiles cross the Zagros Mountains, running from the Mesopotamian Foreland Basin up to the Alborz and Central Iran. Two other profiles run through the Himalaya-Tibetan orogen: the western transect crosses the western Himalaya, Tarim Basin, Tian Shan Mountains and Junggar Basin; the eastern transect runs from the Indian shield to the Beishan Basin, crossing the eastern Himalaya, Tibetan Plateau, Qaidam Basin and Qilian Mountains. We apply the LitMod-2D code which integrates potential fields (gravity and geoid), isostasy (elevation) and thermal (heat flow and temperature distribution) equations, and mantle petrology. The resulting crust and upper mantle structure is constrained by available data on elevation, Bouguer anomaly, geoid height, surface heat flow and seismic data including P- and S-wave tomography models. Our results show distinct deformation patterns between the crust and the lithospheric mantle beneath the Zagros and Himalaya-Tibetan orogens, indicating a strong strain partitioning in both areas. At crustal level, we found a thickening beneath the Zagros and the

  5. Reactivation versus reworking of the active continental margin during the Zagros collision: Mahallat-Muteh-Laybid complexes, Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aflaki, Mahtab; Shabanian, Esmaeil; Davoodi, Zeinab; Mohajjel, Mohammad

    2017-06-01

    Reactivation of long-lived basement faults has significant influences on further deformation of collision zones. Three major inherited pre-collisional NW-, N- and NE-trending basement discontinuities have played important roles on the structural and tectono-sedimentary evolution of the Iranian micro-continent in the northeastern part of the Gondwana super-continent. Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (SSZ), known as the metamorphic belt of the Zagros orogeny, marks the SW margin of the Central Iran. SSZ is formed as a result of the Arabia-Eurasia collision and its general trend of deformation coincides with the NW structural trend of the collision. The NE-trending Mahallat, Muteh and Laybid complexes in the middle part of the NW-trending SSZ are the exception and have a trend almost normal to the NW-trending Zagros. A combined methodology of remote sensing, geometric and kinematics analyses complemented by field work was used to reconstruct the history of deformation in the Zagros hinterland since the earlier stages of collision to the present-day. Our results reveal the key role of the preexisting discontinuities of the Iranian basement in both the kinematics and structural pattern of the middle part of the SSZ. These basement faults have acted as main boundary conditions changing the collisional fabric perpendicular to its overall trend. Progressive deformation and the related changes during collision have caused drastic changes in the kinematics of the boundary faults. The establishment of dextral transtension in the SSZ has had secondary influences on the pattern of deformation by local clockwise rotation and localized dextral shear in the southern parts of the area of interest. This study highlights the significance of long-lived pre-existing structures in the deformation of collision zones. Such basement faults are capable to change both the pattern and kinematics of deformation of the adjacent areas involved in a continental collision.

  6. Characterization of Fluid Transfer Properties in a Transpressive Fault System: Chaîne des Matheux Fold-and-Thrust Belt and Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault Zone - Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, R.; Ellouz-Zimmermann, N.; Rosenberg, C.; Hamon, Y.; Battani, A.; Bellahsen, N.; Deschamps, R.; Leroy, S. D.; Momplaisir, R.

    2016-12-01

    The NW - SE trending Chaîne des Matheux (CdM) comprises the onshore frontal thrust sheet of the SW-verging Haitian fold-and-thrust belt (HFTB). The HFTB's active deformation front is covered by sediments of the Cul-de-Sac plain and is bounded on the south by the E - W trending left-lateral Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ). Seismicity down to the junction between the two systems has been recorded during the 12 January 2010 Mw 7.0 Léogâne earthquake. Stratigraphic, structural and kinematic field data on a transect from the CdM to the EPGFZ indicate (N)NE - (S)SW oriented shortening, which is partitioned over 1) (N)NE-dipping oblique thrusts rooted in Cretaceous basement, 2) decollement levels in both latest Cretaceous and Paleogene limestones, and 3) by strike-slip and positive flower structures along the EPGFZ. We investigated the geometry and kinematics of both fault and fracture systems, which was coupled with sampling and analysis of fluid-derived mineralizations to constrain the timing and geological evolution. C & O isotope and whole-rock analyses have been performed to characterize the geochemistry of the source of these fluids. Raman spectroscopy and fluid-inclusion analyses has been applied to selected samples to comprehend the local burial history. Fluid and gas seepages along fault planes are qualitative indicators for transfer properties between different fault segments and their connectivity with deeper crustal or mantle reservoirs. Relative timing of structures in the CdM coupled with cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy reveals three deformation phases, characterized by associated calcite veins that precipitated from oxidizing meteoric fluids. The deeply rooted frontal CdM thrust lacks mineralization, but fluids expelled from along-strike natural springs registered He and Ne isotope ratios suggesting a strong mantle-derived component. CL microscopy results on calcite veins from the EPGFZ's fault core imply fluid circulation in an

  7. Provenance of the Neogene Surma Group from the Chittagong Tripura Fold Belt, southeast Bengal Basin, Bangladesh: Constraints from whole-rock geochemistry and detrital zircon U-Pb ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. Julleh Jalalur; Xiao, Wenjiao; McCann, Tom; Songjian, Ao

    2017-10-01

    Miocene Surma Group from the Chittagong Tripura Fold Belt (CTFB), southeast Bengal Basin has been analyzed to evaluate their provenance, tectonic settings and paleoweathering conditions. The sandstones show moderate to high contents of SiO2 (65-80%; 75% on average), and Al2O3 (9.94% on average), with Fe2O3 (total Fe as Fe2O3) + MgO contents of 5.1%, TiO2 (0.57% on average). Compared to the upper continental crust (UCC), the sandstones are depleted in CaO (1.49%) and enriched in Al2O3, Fe2O3 and Na2O. The Neogene shales of the Surma Group are in fair concurrence when compared to the NASC (North American Shale Composite), UCC (the upper continental crust) with the exception of the low content of CaO but when compared with the PAAS (Post-Archaean Australian Shale), the Neogene shales are a little more depleted in Al2O3 content. Sandstones and shales have Eu/Eu∗ ∼0.61 and ∼0.65, (La/Lu)N ∼9.06 and ∼8.70, La/Sc- ∼3.90 and ∼2.86, Th/Sc ∼1.19 and ∼1.41, La/Co- ∼3.69 and ∼2.42, Th/Co ∼1.08 and ∼1.20 and Cr/Th ∼7.90 and ∼5.88 ratios as well as Chondrite-normalized REE patterns with flat HREE, LREE enrichment, and negative Eu anomalies indicate the derivation from predominantly felsic sources subjected to low to moderate chemical weathering [Chemical index of alteration (CIA) values of sandstones- 31.11-74.46, av. 60.08); shales- 43.96-73.07, av. 61.80]. Integrated geochemical and zircon U-Pb studies reveal that main sediment input might have been from the Himalaya with mixing influence from the east of the Indo-Burman Ranges in an active margin setting at the convergence of the Indian and Burmese plates.

  8. Folding Beauties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Leah Wrenn

    2006-01-01

    This article has its genesis in an MAA mini-course on origami, where a way to get a parabola by folding paper was presented. This article discusses the methods and mathematics of other curves obtained by paper-folding.

  9. Structure sismique du socle paléozoïque du bassin des Doukkala, Môle côtier, Maroc occidental. Indication en faveur de l'existence d'une phase éo-varisqueSeismic structure of the Doukkala basin, Palaeozoic basement, western Morocco: a hint for an Eovariscan fold-and-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echarfaoui, Hassan; Hafid, Mohamed; Salem, Abdallah Aı̈t

    2002-01-01

    Seismic profiles and well data from the Doukkala basin unravel the structure of the Palaeozoic basement and suggest that this coastal zone of western Morocco was affected by a compressive phase during the Frasnian. This resulted in the formation of upright, plurikilometric folds associated with reverse faults (North Doukkala), and of asymmetrical folds associated with mostly west verging ramps (South Doukkala). Folding involved all pre-Upper Frasnian formations and caused partial or total hiatus of Upper Frasnian-Strunian strata. This event can be correlated with the orogenic phase reported from more internal domains of the Morocco Hercynian belt, where it is referred to as the 'Bretonne' or 'Eovariscan' phase. To cite this article: H. Echarfaoui et al., C. R. Geoscience 334 (2002) 13-20

  10. Extreme Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaine, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Our understanding of the mathematics and algorithms behind paper folding, and geometric folding in general, has increased dramatically over the past several years. These developments have found a surprisingly broad range of applications. In the art of origami, it has helped spur the technical origami revolution. In engineering and science, it has helped solve problems in areas such as manufacturing, robotics, graphics, and protein folding. On the recreational side, it has led to new kinds of folding puzzles and magic. I will give an overview of the mathematics and algorithms of folding, with a focus on new mathematics and sculpture.

  11. Interference of lithospheric folding in Central Asia by simultaneous Indian and Arabian plate indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, J. H. W.; Cloetingh, S. A. P. L.; Burov, E.; Sokoutis, D.; Kaban, M.; Tesauro, M.; Burg, J.-P.

    2012-04-01

    Although large-scale folding of the crust and the lithosphere in Central Asia as a result of the indentation of India has been extensively documented, the impact of continental collision between Arabia and Eurasia has been largely overlooked. The resulting Neogene shortening and uplift of the Zagros, Albors, Kopet Dagh and Kaukasus mountain belts in Iran and surrounding areas is characterised by a simultaneous onset of major topography growth at ca. 5 Ma. At the same time, the adjacent Caspian, Turan and Amu Darya basins underwent an acceleration in subsidence. It is common knowledge that waves with different orientations will interfere with each other. Folding, by its nature similar to a standing wave, is not likely to be an exception. We demonstrate that collision of the Eurasian plate with the Arabian and Indian plates generates folding of the Eurasian lithosphere in two different directions and that interaction between both generates characteristic interference patterns that can be recognised from the regional gravity signal. We present evidence for interference of lithospheric folding patterns induced by Arabian and Indian collision with Eurasia. Wavelengths (from 50 to 250 km) and spatial patterns are inferred from satellite-derived topography and gravity models and attest for rheologically stratified lithosphere with relatively strong mantle rheology (thickness of strong mechanical core on the order of 40-50 km) and less competent crust (thickness of the mechanical core on the order of 10-15 km). The observations are compared with inferences from numerical and analogue tectonic experiments for a quantitative assessment of factors such as lithosphere rheology and stratification, lateral variations in lithosphere strength, thermo-mechanical age and distance to the plate boundary on the activity of folding as a mechanism of intra-plate deformation in this area. The observed interference of the patterns of folding appears to be primarily the result of spatial

  12. Duplex thrusting in the South Dabashan arcuate belt, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wangpeng; Liu, Shaofeng; Wang, Yi; Qian, Tao; Gao, Tangjun

    2017-10-01

    Due to later tectonic superpositioning and reworking, the South Dabashan arcuate belt extending NW to SE has experienced several episodes of deformation. The earlier deformational style and formation mechanism of this belt remain controversial. Seismic interpretations and fieldwork show that the curved orogen can be divided into three sub-belts perpendicular to the strike of the orogen, the imbricate thrust fault belt, the detachment fold belt and the frontal belt from NE to SW. The imbricate thrust fault belt is characterized by a series of SW-directed thrust faults and nappes. Two regional detachment layers at different depths have been recognized in the detachment fold and frontal belts, and these detachment layers divide the sub-belts into three structural layers: the lower, middle, and upper structural layers. The middle structural layer is characterized by a passive roof duplex structure, which is composed of a roof thrust at the top of the Sinian units, a floor thrust in the upper Lower Triassic units, and horses in between. Apatite fission track dating results and regional structural analyses indicate that the imbricate thrust fault belt may have formed during the latest Early Cretaceous to earliest Paleogene and that the detachment fold belt may have formed during the latest Late Cretaceous to earliest Neogene. Our findings provide important reference values for researching intra-continental orogenic and deformation mechanisms in foreland fold-thrust belts.

  13. Sedimentation and basin-fill history of the Neogene clastic succession exposed in the southeastern fold belt of the Bengal Basin, Bangladesh: a high-resolution sequence stratigraphic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royhan Gani, M.; Mustafa Alam, M.

    2003-02-01

    The Tertiary basin-fill history of the Bengal Basin suffers from oversimplification. The interpretation of the sedimentary history of the basin should be consistent with the evolution of its three geo-tectonic provinces, namely, western, northeastern and eastern. Each province has its own basin generation and sediment-fill history related mainly to the Indo-Burmese and subordinately to the Indo-Tibetan plate convergence. This paper is mainly concerned with facies and facies sequence analysis of the Neogene clastic succession within the subduction-related active margin setting (oblique convergence) in the southeastern fold belt of the Bengal Basin. Detailed fieldwork was carried out in the Sitapahar anticline of the Rangamati area and the Mirinja anticline of the Lama area. The study shows that the exposed Neogene succession represents an overall basinward progradation from deep marine through shallow marine to continental-fluvial environments. Based on regionally correlatable erosion surfaces the entire succession (3000+ m thick) has been grouped into three composite sequences C, B and A, from oldest to youngest. Composite sequence C begins with deep-water base-of-slope clastics overlain by thick slope mud that passes upward into shallow marine and nearshore clastics. Composite sequence B characteristically depicts tide-dominated open-marine to coastal depositional systems with evidence of cyclic marine regression and transgression. Repetitive occurrence of incised channel, tidal inlet, tidal ridge/shoal, tidal flat and other tidal deposits is separated by shelfal mudstone. Most of the sandbodies contain a full spectrum of tide-generated structures (e.g. herringbone cross-bedding, bundle structure, mud couplet, bipolar cross-lamination with reactivation surfaces, 'tidal' bedding). Storm activities appear to have played a subordinate role in the mid and inner shelf region. Rizocorallium, Rosselia, Planolites and Zoophycos are the dominant ichnofacies within the

  14. Geochronological, geochemical and mineralogical constraints of emplacement depth of TTG suite from the Sinassi Batholith in the Central African Fold Belt (CAFB) of northern Cameroon: Implications for tectonomagmatic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houketchang Bouyo, M.; Penaye, J.; Njel, U. O.; Moussango, A. P. I.; Sep, J. P. N.; Nyama, B. A.; Wassouo, W. J.; Abaté, J. M. E.; Yaya, F.; Mahamat, A.; Ye, Hao; Wu, Fei

    2016-04-01

    The Sinassi Batholith in the Central African Fold Belt (CAFB) of northern Cameroon represents the largest volume of plutonic rocks or granitoids massif of the Western Cameroonian Domain. It is made up dominantly of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) suite and lesser granite which are locally more or less deformed, and composed of varying proportions of quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar, biotite, hornblende, sphene, magnetite, apatite and zircon. Major and trace element compositions of fifteen rock samples of granitoids (Djourdé granodiorite, Sinassi quartz diorite and orthogneisses groups) indicate that investigated rocks from the Sinassi Batholith are characterized by medium- to high-K calc-alkaline affinity and metaluminous I-type signature. In addition, their chondrite- and primitive mantle-normalized trace element patterns are strongly fractionated ((La/Yb)N = 2.96-61.40) and show respectively enrichment in LREE relative to HREE and enrichment in LILE compared to HFSE with moderate to slight negative Nb-Ta, Ti and Eu anomalies consistent with a continental magmatic arc setting related to a subduction zone. Geothermobarometric calculations using hornblende-plagioclase thermometry and aluminum-in-hornblende barometry on eleven rock samples indicate that plutons from Sinassi Batholith were emplaced at average temperatures and pressures ranging between 698 and 720 °C and 4.06-5.82 kbar (Djourdé granitoids), 698-728 °C and 4.04-5.34 kbar (Sinassi granitoids) and 667-670 and 4.23-4.76 kbar (orthogneisses group) respectively. The average emplacement depths estimates for the investigated granitoids is constrained at ca 16-18 km, indicating that at least 16 km of crustal rocks of the Sinassi Batholith must have been eroded or uplifted at approximately exhumation rates of 0.08-0.10 mm/year. Regardless of their Th/U ratios, geochronological results highlight three main events characterizing the Neoproterozoic tectonomagmatic evolution within the Sinassi Batholith

  15. New Insights Into the Genesis and Compositional Evolution of I-type Granitic magmas in the Lachlan Fold Belt (SE Australia) by in situ Hf Isotopic Analysis of Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, T. I.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Hergt, J. M.; Woodhead, J.

    2004-05-01

    Isotope studies have proved of enormous benefit in fingerprinting the source rocks of silicic magmas and tracing open system petrogenetic processes, such as crustal assimilation or magma mixing. Quantification of these processes, especially the role of mantle-derived magmas, is essential to formulating realistic models for the thermal regime and compositional evolution of the continental crust. However, this remains problematic, since whole-rock isotopic data registers the final state of the magmatic system but gives no information on the pathways by which this state was attained. For example, the eNd - initial 87Sr/86Sr isotopic array defined by the classic I- and S-type granites of the Lachlan Fold Belt has been variously interpreted to reflect (1) mixing between two end-member magmas, one depleted mantle-like, the other evolved and continental crust-like, (2) mixing between a juvenile magma and a magma sourced from mafic lower crust, accompanied by sediment assimilation, (3) derivation of the granites from mixed source rocks and (4) derivation from a sequence of protoliths of various ages and sedimentary maturity. The implications of these possibilities for crustal architecture, and whether granitic magmatism was associated with the recycling or growth of new continental crust are drastically different. One way to now resolve such ambiguities is by unravelling the isotopic information encoded in the fine-scale growth zoning of minerals such as zircon, which potentially tracks the processes operative during crystallisation. To this end we report the first laser-ablation ICP-MS study into the Hf isotope stratigraphy of zircons hosted by LFB I-type granites and their mafic enclaves. This is integrated with a prior U-Pb isotope study and trace element concentrations measured on the same zircons. Two suites were investigated, the Cobargo and Why Worry Suites of the Bega Batholith. Although the bulk rock isotopic variation within these suites is restricted, this study

  16. Spatial evolution of Zagros collision zone in Kurdistan, NW Iran: constraints on Arabia-Eurasia oblique convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Shahriar; Yassaghi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Stratigraphy, detailed structural mapping and a crustal-scale cross section across the NW Zagros collision zone provide constraints on the spatial evolution of oblique convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian plates since the Late Cretaceous. The Zagros collision zone in NW Iran consists of the internal Sanandaj-Sirjan, Gaveh Rud and Ophiolite zones and the external Bisotoun, Radiolarite and High Zagros zones. The Main Zagros Thrust is the major structure of the Zagros suture zone. Two stages of oblique deformation are recognized in the external part of the NW Zagros in Iran. In the early stage, coexisting dextral strike-slip and reverse dominated domains in the Radiolarite zone developed in response to deformation partitioning due to oblique convergence. Dextral-reverse faults in the Bisotoun zone are also compatible with oblique convergence. In the late stage, deformation partitioning occurred during southeastward propagation of the Zagros orogeny towards its foreland resulting in synchronous development of orogen-parallel strike-slip and thrust faults. It is proposed that the first stage was related to Late Cretaceous oblique obduction, while the second stage resulted from Cenozoic collision. The Cenozoic orogen-parallel strike-slip component of Zagros oblique convergence is not confined to the Zagros suture zone (Main Recent Fault) but also occurred in the external part (Marekhil-Ravansar fault system). Thus, it is proposed that oblique convergence of Arabian and Eurasian plates in Zagros collision zone initiated with oblique obduction in the Late Cretaceous followed by oblique collision in the late Tertiary, consistent with global plate reconstructions.

  17. Tectonics versus eustatic control on supersequences of the Zagros Mountains of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydari, Ezat

    2008-04-01

    At least 12 km of strata ranging in age from the latest Precambrian to the Recent are exposed in the Zagros Mountains of Iran. This sedimentary cover is characterized by distinct stratal packages separated by major unconformities forming twelve supersequences. They are informally named as: (1) Late Precambrian - Cambrian Hakhamanesh Supersequence, (2) Ordovician Kourosh Supersequence, (3) Silurian Camboojiyeh Supersequence, (4) Devonian Darioush Supersequence, (5) Mississippian - Pennsylvanian Khashayar Supersequence, (6) Permian - Triassic Ashk Supersequence, (7) Jurassic Farhad Supersequence, (8) Early Cretaceous Mehrdad Supersequence, (9) Late Cretaceous Ardavan Supersequence, (10) Paleocene - Oligocene Sassan Supersequence, (11) Oligocene - Miocene Ardeshir Supersequence, and (12) Miocene - Pleistocene Shapour Supersequence. These supersequences and their correlatives in neighboring areas have been used to infer tectonic events. The dominant interpretation has been that local or regional epeirogenic movements were responsible for the formation of these supersequences. Unconformities are considered as indications that epeirogenic movements associated with tectonic events affected the area. The present investigation provides an alternative to the established view of the Phanerozoic supersequences of the Zagros Mountains. A good correlation exists between the lithofacies of supersequences in the Zagros Mountains and the second-order eustatic sea-level changes. Deposition of deep-water, marine shales occurred during periods of eustatic sea-level rise. Platform-wide unconformities coincided with eustatic sea-level lows. In fact, supersequences of the Zagros Mountains are nearly identical to those described from the North American Craton and the Russian Platform suggesting that these stratal packages are global. These observations suggest that supersequences of the Zagros Mountains formed by second order eustatic sea-level changes and not by local or regional

  18. Analysis of the stress field and strain rate in Zagros-Makran transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani Rostam, Ghasem; Pakzad, Mehrdad; Mirzaei, Noorbakhsh; Sakhaei, Seyed Reza

    2018-01-01

    Transition boundary between Zagros continental collision and Makran oceanic-continental subduction can be specified by two wide limits: (a) Oman Line is the seismicity boundary with a sizeable reduction in seismicity rate from Zagros in the west to Makran in the east; and (b) the Zendan-Minab-Palami (ZMP) fault system is believed to be a prominent tectonic boundary. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the stress field in the Zagros-Makran transition zone by the iterative joint inversion method developed by Vavrycuk (Geophysical Journal International 199:69-77, 2014). The results suggest a rather uniform pattern of the stress field around these two boundaries. We compare the results with the strain rates obtained from the Global Positioning System (GPS) network stations. In most cases, the velocity vectors show a relatively good agreement with the stress field except for the Bandar Abbas (BABS) station which displays a relatively large deviation between the stress field and the strain vector. This deviation probably reflects a specific location of the BABS station being in the transition zone between Zagros continental collision and Makran subduction zones.

  19. Laterally bendable belt conveyor

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, William J.

    1985-01-01

    An endless, laterally flexible and bendable belt conveyor particularly adapted for coal mining applications in facilitating the transport of the extracted coal up- or downslope and around corners in a continuous manner is disclosed. The conveying means includes a flat rubber belt reinforced along the middle portion thereof along which the major portion of the belt tension is directed so as to cause rotation of the tubular shaped belt when trammed around lateral turns thus preventing excessive belt bulging distortion between adjacent belt supports which would inhibit belt transport. Pretension induced into the fabric reinforced flat rubber belt by conventional belt take-up means supports the load conveyed when the belt conveyor is making lateral turns. The carrying and return portions of the belt are supported and formed into a tubular shape by a plurality of shapers positioned along its length. Each shaper is supported from above by a monorail and includes clusters of idler rollers which support the belt. Additional cluster rollers in each shaper permit the belt supporting roller clusters to rotate in response to the belt's operating tension imposed upon the cluster rollers by induced lateral belt friction forces. The freely rotating roller clusters thus permit the belt to twist on lateral curves without damage to itself while precluding escape of the conveyed material by effectively enclosing it in the tube-shaped, inner belt transport length.

  20. Orogen-Wide InSAR Time Series for Detecting Deformation Sources: The Zagros and Makran of Southern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, R. B.; Barnhart, W. D.

    2011-12-01

    We present interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time series maps that span the eastern Zagros (Fars Arc) collisional belt and western Makran accretionary prism of Southern Iran. Given the upcoming availability of large volumes of SAR data from new platforms, such as Sentinel 1 and potentially DESDynI, we explore computationally efficient approaches for extracting deformation time series when the signal of interest is small compared to the level of noise in individual interferograms. We use 12 descending and 2 ascending multi-frame (2-4 frames) Envisat tracks and 2 ascending ALOS tracks spanning 2003-2010 and 2006-2010. We implement a linear inversion, similar to the Small Baseline Subset (SBaS) technique, to derive surface displacements at individual acquisition dates from trees of interferograms with perpendicular baselines less than 350m for Envisat and 1500m for ALOS pairs. This spatially extensive dataset allows us to investigate several attributes of interferometry that vary spatially and temporally over large distances, including changes in phase coherence relative to elevation and relief as well as land use. Through synthetic tests and observed data, we explore various sources of potential error in calculation of time series, including variable coherence of pixels between interferograms in a single track, ambiguities in phase unwrapping, and orbital ramp estimation over scenes with variable correlated noise structure. We present examples of detected signals with both temporally variable characteristics and small magnitudes, including surface/subsurface salt deformation, aseismic deformation across Minab-Zendan-Palami strike-slip zone, and subsidence due to hydrocarbon extraction.

  1. The cretaceous source rocks in the Zagros Foothills of Iran: An example of a large size intracratonic basin

    SciT

    Bordenave, M.L.; Huc, A.Y.

    1993-02-01

    The Zagros orogenic belt of Iran is one of the world most prolific petroleum producing area. However, most of the oil production is originated from a relatively small area, the 60,000 km[sup 2] wide Dezful Embayment which contains approximately 12% of the proven oil global reserves. The distribution of the oil and gas fields results from the area extent of six identified source rock layers, their thermal history and reservoir, cap rock and trap availability. In this paper, the emphasis is three of the layers of Cretaceous sources rocks. The Garau facies was deposited during the Neocomian to Albian intervalmore » over Lurestan, Northeast Khuzestan and extends over the extreme northeast part of Fars, the Kazhdumi source rock which deposited over the Dezful Embayment, and eventually the Senonian Gurpi Formation which has marginal source rock characteristics in limited areas of Khuzestan and Northern Fars. The deposition environment of these source rock layers corresponds to semipermanent depressions, included in an overall shallow water intracratonic basin communicating with the South Tethys Ocean. These depressions became anoxic when climatic oceanographical and geological conditions were adequate, i.e., humid climate, high stand water, influxes of fine grained clastics and the existence of sills separating the depression from the open sea. Distribution maps of these source rock layers resulting from extensive field work and well control are also given. The maturation history of source rocks is reconstructed from a set of isopachs. It was found that the main contributor to the oil reserves is the Kazhdumi source rock which is associated with excellent calcareous reservoirs.« less

  2. Belt attachment and system

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, Abraham D.; Davidson, Erick M.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein is a belt assembly including a flexible belt with an improved belt attachment. The belt attachment includes two crossbars spaced along the length of the belt. The crossbars retain bearings that allow predetermined movement in six degrees of freedom. The crossbars are connected by a rigid body that attaches to the bearings. Implements that are attached to the rigid body are simply supported but restrained in pitching rotation.

  3. Belt attachment and system

    SciT

    Schneider, Abraham D.; Davidson, Erick M.

    Disclosed herein is a belt assembly including a flexible belt with an improved belt attachment. The belt attachment includes two crossbars spaced along the length of the belt. The crossbars retain bearings that allow predetermined movement in six degrees of freedom. The crossbars are connected by a rigid body that attaches to the bearings. Implements that are attached to the rigid body are simply supported but restrained in pitching rotation.

  4. Reply to Comments on "the Cenozoic Fold-and-Thrust Belt of Eastern Sardinia: Evidences from the Integration of Field Data With Numerically Balanced Geological Cross Section" by Arragoni et al. (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvini, F.; Arragoni, S.; Cianfarra, P.; Maggi, M.

    2017-10-01

    The comment by Berra et al. (2017) on the evidence of Alpine tectonics in Eastern Sardinia proposed by Arragoni et al. (2016) is based on the sedimentological interpretations of few local outcrops in a marginal portion of the study area. The Cenozoic Alpine fold-and-thrust setting, which characterizes this region, presents flat-over-flat shear planes acting along originally stratigraphic contacts, where stratigraphic continuity is obviously maintained. The ramp sectors present steeply dipping bedding attitudes, and there is no need to invoke and to force prograding clinoforms with unrealistic angles to justify them. The balanced geological cross section proposed by Arragoni et al. (2016) is fully supported by robust newly collected structural data and is compatible with the overall tectonic setting, while the interpretation proposed by Berra et al. (2017) lacks a detailed structural investigation. We believe that the partial application of the techniques available to modern geology may lead to incorrect interpretations, thus representing an obstacle for the progress of knowledge in the Earth sciences.

  5. Late Miocene Coral faunas of Iran (Zagros, Aghar, Firuz abad, Fars) palaeoecology and palaeobiogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehbozorgi, M.; Yazdi, M.; Torabi, H.

    2009-04-01

    Late Miocene Corals assemblage from Zagros Iran are investigated with respect to their palaeoecology and palaeobiogeography implications. This Corals are compared with fauna from Mediterranean Tethys and the Indopacific. Small foraminifers are used for biogeography and to support paleoecology interpretation. The studied section situated in the Zagros Mishan F.m is last depositions sea. A distinct horizon characterized by Porites- Antiguastrea assemblage associated Milliolid and Rotalia is interpreted a shallow bioclastic shoal. Patch reef with a porites and faviidae assemblage are a common feature of Oligocene and Miocene coral occurrence and indicate water depth of less than 20m. The diversity of corals in this area are low and all corals are hematypic. Miocene Corals from Mishan F.m Comprise 7 genera and occur in the single horizon or patch reef. This Corals and patch reefs are compared with corals and patch reefs in Qom F.m Central Iran. This corals report from this section: Antiguastrea sp., Monastrea sp., Favites sp., Porites sp., Dichocoenia sp., Asterohelia sp., Leptoria sp. Keywords: Miocene- Iran- Mishan-Zagros- Formation- Tethys seaway- Corals- Palaeoecology- palaeobiogeography.

  6. Synaptic ribbon. Conveyor belt or safety belt?

    PubMed

    Parsons, T D; Sterling, P

    2003-02-06

    The synaptic ribbon in neurons that release transmitter via graded potentials has been considered as a conveyor belt that actively moves vesicles toward their release sites. But evidence has accumulated to the contrary, and it now seems plausible that the ribbon serves instead as a safety belt to tether vesicles stably in mutual contact and thus facilitate multivesicular release by compound exocytosis.

  7. Cap rock efficiency of geothermal systems in fold-and-thrust belts: Evidence from paleo-thermal and structural analyses in Rosario de La Frontera geothermal area (NW Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffucci, R.; Corrado, S.; Aldega, L.; Bigi, S.; Chiodi, A.; Di Paolo, L.; Giordano, G.; Invernizzi, C.

    2016-12-01

    Cap rock characterization of geothermal systems is often neglected despite fracturing may reduce its efficiency and favours fluid migration. We investigated the siliciclastic cap rock of Rosario de La Frontera geothermal system (NW Argentina) in order to assess its quality as a function of fracture patterns and related thermal alteration. Paleothermal investigations (XRD on fine-grained fraction of sediments, organic matter optical analysis and fluid inclusions on veins) and 1D thermal modelling allowed us to distinguish the thermal fingerprint associated to sedimentary burial from that related to fluid migration. The geothermal system is hosted in a Neogene N-S anticline dissected by high angle NNW- and ENE-striking faults. Its cap rock can be grouped into two quality categories: rocks acting as good insulators, deformed by NNW-SSE and E-W shear fractures, NNE-SSW gypsum- and N-S-striking calcite-filled veins that developed during the initial stage of anticline growth. Maximum paleo-temperatures (< 60 °C) were experienced during deposition to folding phases. rocks acting as bad insulators, deformed by NNW-SSE fault planes and NNW- and WNW-striking sets of fractures associated to late transpressive kinematics. Maximum paleo-temperatures higher than about 115 °C are linked to fluid migration from the reservoir to surface (with a reservoir top at maximum depths of 2.5 km) along fault damage zones. This multi-method approach turned out to be particularly useful to trace the main pathways of hot fluids and can be applied in blind geothermal systems where either subsurface data are scarce or surface thermal anomalies are lacking.

  8. Source Parameters for Moderate Earthquakes in the Zagros Mountains with Implications for the Depth Extent of Seismicity

    SciT

    Adams, A; Brazier, R; Nyblade, A

    2009-02-23

    Six earthquakes within the Zagros Mountains with magnitudes between 4.9 and 5.7 have been studied to determine their source parameters. These events were selected for study because they were reported in open catalogs to have lower crustal or upper mantle source depths and because they occurred within an area of the Zagros Mountains where crustal velocity structure has been constrained by previous studies. Moment tensor inversion of regional broadband waveforms have been combined with forward modeling of depth phases on short period teleseismic waveforms to constrain source depths and moment tensors. Our results show that all six events nucleated withinmore » the upper crust (<11 km depth) and have thrust mechanisms. This finding supports other studies that call into question the existence of lower crustal or mantle events beneath the Zagros Mountains.« less

  9. Folding of a detachment and fault - Modified detachment folding along a lateral ramp, southwestern Montana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christopher; Whisner, S. Christopher; Whisner, Jennifer B.

    2014-12-01

    The inversion of the Middle Proterozoic Belt sedimentary basin during Late Cretaceous thrusting in Montana produced a large eastwardly-convex salient, the southern boundary of which is a 200 km-long oblique to lateral ramp subtended by a detachment between the Belt rocks and Archean basement. A 10 km-long lateral ramp segment exposes the upper levels of the detachment where hanging wall Belt rocks have moved out over the Paleozoic and Mesozoic section. The hanging wall structure consists of a train of high amplitude, faulted, asymmetrical detachment folds. Initial west-east shortening produced layer parallel shortening fabrics and dominantly strike slip faulting followed by symmetrical detachment folding. 'Lock-up' of movement on the detachment surface produced regional simple shear and caused the detachment folds to become asymmetrical and faulted. Folding of the detachment surface after lock-up modified the easternmost detachment folds further into a southeast-verging, overturned fold pair with a ramp-related fault along the base of the stretched mutual limb.

  10. Geotechnical Risk Classification for Underground Mines / Klasyfikacja Poziomu Zagrożenia Geotechnicznego W Kopalniach Podziemnych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ritesh Kumar; Rinne, Mikael

    2015-03-01

    Underground mining activities are prone to major hazards largely owing to geotechnical reasons. Mining combined with the confined working space and uncertain geotechnical data leads to hazards having the potential of catastrophic consequences. These incidents have the potential of causing multiple fatalities and large financial damages. Use of formal risk assessment in the past has demonstrated an important role in the prediction and prevention of accidents in risk prone industries such as petroleum, nuclear and aviation. This paper proposes a classification system for underground mining operations based on their geotechnical risk levels. The classification is done based on the type of mining method employed and the rock mass in which it is carried out. Mining methods have been classified in groups which offer similar geotechnical risk. The rock mass classification has been proposed based on bulk rock mass properties which are collected as part of the routine mine planning. This classification has been subdivided for various stages of mine planning to suit the extent of available data. Alpha-numeric coding has been proposed to identify a mining operation based on the competency of rock and risk of geotechnical failures. This alpha numeric coding has been further extended to identify mining activity under `Geotechnical Hazard Potential (GHP)'. GHP has been proposed to be used as a preliminary tool of risk assessment and risk ranking for a mining activity. The aim of such classification is to be used as a guideline for the justification of a formal geotechnical risk assessment. Górnictwo podziemne pociąga za sobą różnorakie zagrożenia spowodowane przez uwarunkowania geotechniczne. Urabianie złoża w połączeniu z pracą w zamkniętej przestrzeni oraz z niepewnymi danymi geotechnicznymi powodować może zagrożenia, które w konsekwencji prowadzić mogą do wypadków, a te potencjalnie powodować mogą skutki śmiertelne dla osób oraz

  11. Dynamics and structure of the Alpine Fold Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, H. G.

    1985-01-01

    The structure and present-day dynamics of the Alps interms of geodesy and gravimetry are discusssed. A strong correlation of precise leveling and isostatic gravity along the central Alpine chain, especially in Canton Graubunden, East Switzerland are shown. It is assumed that the uplift is partly controlled by isostatic rebound effects. Field observations indicate that these phenomena are still active in the Alps. The study of the uplift processes by applying a number of geodetic and gravimetric measuring techniques, such as the determination of nonperiodic secular variations of gravity, of the deflections of the vertical and tilt changes monitored by hydrostatic leveling is proposed.

  12. Biomechanics of 4-point seat belt systems in frontal impacts.

    PubMed

    Rouhana, Stephen W; Bedewi, Paul G; Kankanala, Sundeep V; Prasad, Priya; Zwolinski, Joseph J; Meduvsky, Alex G; Rupp, Jonathan D; Jeffreys, Thomas A; Schneider, Lawrence W

    2003-01-01

    The biomechanical behavior of 4-point seat belt systems was investigated through MADYMO modeling, dummy tests and post mortem human subject tests. This study was conducted to assess the effect of 4-point seat belts on the risk of thoracic injury in frontal impacts, to evaluate the ability to prevent submarining under the lap belt using 4-point seat belts, and to examine whether 4-point belts may induce injuries not typically observed with 3-point seat belts. The performance of two types of 4-point seat belts was compared with that of a pretensioned, load-limited, 3-point seat belt. A 3-point belt with an extra shoulder belt that "crisscrossed" the chest (X4) appeared to add constraint to the torso and increased chest deflection and injury risk. Harness style shoulder belts (V4) loaded the body in a different biomechanical manner than 3-point and X4 belts. The V4 belt appeared to shift load to the clavicles and pelvis and to reduce traction of the shoulder belt across the chest, resulting in a reduction in chest deflection by a factor of two. This is associated with a 5 to 500-fold reduction in thoracic injury risk, depending on whether one assumes 4-point belts apply concentrated or distributed load. In four of six post mortem human subjects restrained by V4 belts during 40 km/h sled tests, chest compression was zero or negative and rib fractures were nearly eliminated. Submarining was not observed in any test with post mortem human subjects. Though lumbar, sacral and pelvic injuries were noted, they are believed to be due to the artificial restraint environment (no knee bolsters, instrument panels, steering systems or airbags). While they show significant potential to reduce thoracic injury risk, there are still many issues to be resolved before 4-point belts can be considered for production vehicles. These issues include, among others, potential effects on hard and soft neck tissues, of interaction with inboard shoulder belts in farside impacts and potential

  13. Canopy Density Mapping on Ultracam-D Aerial Imagery in Zagros Woodlands, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanifard, Y.; Khodaee, Z.

    2013-09-01

    Canopy density maps express different characteristics of forest stands, especially in woodlands. Obtaining such maps by field measurements is so expensive and time-consuming. It seems necessary to find suitable techniques to produce these maps to be used in sustainable management of woodland ecosystems. In this research, a robust procedure was suggested to obtain these maps by very high spatial resolution aerial imagery. It was aimed to produce canopy density maps by UltraCam-D aerial imagery, newly taken in Zagros woodlands by Iran National Geographic Organization (NGO), in this study. A 30 ha plot of Persian oak (Quercus persica) coppice trees was selected in Zagros woodlands, Iran. The very high spatial resolution aerial imagery of the plot purchased from NGO, was classified by kNN technique and the tree crowns were extracted precisely. The canopy density was determined in each cell of different meshes with different sizes overlaid on the study area map. The accuracy of the final maps was investigated by the ground truth obtained by complete field measurements. The results showed that the proposed method of obtaining canopy density maps was efficient enough in the study area. The final canopy density map obtained by a mesh with 30 Ar (3000 m2) cell size had 80% overall accuracy and 0.61 KHAT coefficient of agreement which shows a great agreement with the observed samples. This method can also be tested in other case studies to reveal its capability in canopy density map production in woodlands.

  14. Mandatory seat belt use.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1984-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to review mandatory seat belt use laws as they have been used around the world, to forecast the impact of such a law in Virginia, and, if appropriate, to propose a mandatory seat belt law for inclusion in the Code of V...

  15. Greenstone belts: Their components and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vearncombe, J. R.; Barton, J. M., Jr.; Vanreenen, D. D.; Phillips, G. N.; Wilson, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Greenstone sucessions are defined as the nongranitoid component of granitoid-greenstone terrain and are linear to irregular in shape and where linear are termed belts. The chemical composition of greenstones is described. Also discussed are the continental environments of greenstone successions. The effects of contact with granitoids, geophysical properties, recumbent folds and late formation structures upon greenstones are examined. Large stratigraphy thicknesses are explained.

  16. Variations in the kinematics of deformation along the Zagros inclined transpression zone, Iran: Implications for defining a curved inclined transpression zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Partabian, Abdolreza; Faghih, Ali

    2013-03-01

    The combination of inclined collision and plate boundary shape can control the nature of deformation and the sense of shear along a transpression zone. The present study investigated the effects of a boundary zone with curvilinear shape along a transpression zone on the kinematics of deformation. The kinematics of the Zagros transpression zone varies with the orientation of the zone boundary. Detailed structural and microstructural studies showed sinistral sense of shear on the southeastern part of the Zagros inclined transpression zone (Fars Arc), but dextral sense of shear on the northwestern part of the zone. It is inferred that the both senses of shear were developed coevally under a bulk general shear, regional-scale deformation along a curved inclined transpression miming the shape of the Fras Arc of the Zagros and the reentrant of the Bandar Abbas Syntaxis. The Zagros transpression zone formed by inclined continental collision between the Afro-Arabian continent and Iranian microcontinent.

  17. Belt conveyor apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, David J.; Bogart, Rex L.

    1987-01-01

    A belt conveyor apparatus according to this invention defines a conveyance path including a first pulley and at least a second pulley. An endless belt member is adapted for continuous travel about the pulleys and comprises a lower portion which engages the pulleys and an integral upper portion adapted to receive objects therein at a first location on said conveyance path and transport the objects to a second location for discharge. The upper belt portion includes an opposed pair of longitudinally disposed crest-like members, biased towards each other in a substantially abutting relationship. The crest-like members define therebetween a continuous, normally biased closed, channel along the upper belt portion. Means are disposed at the first and second locations and operatively associated with the belt member for urging the normally biased together crest-like members apart in order to provide access to the continuous channel whereby objects can be received into, or discharged from the channel. Motors are in communication with the conveyance path for effecting the travel of the endless belt member about the conveyance path. The conveyance path can be configured to include travel through two or more elevations and one or more directional changes in order to convey objects above, below and/or around existing structures.

  18. Plains tectonism on Venus: The deformation belts of Lavinia Planitia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, Steven W.; Jankowski, David G.; Simons, Mark; Solomon, Sean C.; Hager, Bradford H.; Mcgill, George E.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution radar images from the Magellan spacecraft have revealed the first details of the morphology of the Lavinia Planitia region of Venus. A number of geologic units can be distinguished, including volcanic plains units with a range of ages. Transecting these plains over much of the Lavinia region are two types of generally orthogonal features that we interpret to be compressional wrinkle ridges and extensional grooves. The dominant tectonic features of Lavinia are broad elevated belts of intense deformation that transect the plains with complex geometry. They are many tens to a few hundred kilometers wide, as much as 1000 km long, and elevated hundreds of meters above the surrounding plains. Two classes of deformation belts are seen in the Lavinia region. 'Ridge belts' are composed of parallel ridges, each a few hundred meters in elevation, that we interpret to be folds. Typical fold spacings are 5-10 km. 'Fracture belts' are dominated instead by intense faulting, with faults in some instances paired to form narrow grabens. There is also some evidence for modest amounts of horizontal shear distributed across both ridge and fracture belts. Crosscutting relationships among the belts show there to be a range in belt ages. In western Lavinia, in particular, many ridge and fracture belts appear to bear a relationship to the much smaller wrinkle ridges and grooves on the surrounding plains: ridge morphology tends to dominate belts that lie more nearly parallel to local plains wrinkle ridges, and fracture morphology tends to dominate belts that lie more nearly parallel to local plains grooves. We use simple models to explore the formation of ridge and fracture belts. We show that convective motions in the mantle can couple to the crust to cause horizontal stresses of a magnitude sufficient to induce the formation of deformation belts like those observed in Lavinia. We also use the small-scale wavelengths of deformation observed within individual ridge belts to

  19. Paper Folding Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a paper folding activity that can be used for teaching fractions. This activity can be used to describe areas of folded polygons in terms of a standard unit of measure. A paper folding fractions worksheet and its corresponding solutions are also presented in this article. (Contains 2 figures.)

  20. A Computerized Tomography Study of Vocal Tract Setting in Hyperfunctional Dysphonia and in Belting.

    PubMed

    Saldias, Marcelo; Guzman, Marco; Miranda, Gonzalo; Laukkanen, Anne-Maria

    2018-04-03

    Vocal tract setting in hyperfunctional patients is characterized by a high larynx and narrowing of the epilaryngeal and pharyngeal region. Similar observations have been made for various singing styles, eg, belting. The voice quality in belting has been described to be loud, speech like, and high pitched. It is also often described as sounding "pressed" or "tense". The above mentioned has led to the hypothesis that belting may be strenuous to the vocal folds. However, singers and teachers of belting do not regard belting as particularly strenuous. This study investigates possible similarities and differences between hyperfunctional voice production and belting. This study concerns vocal tract setting. Four male patients with hyperfunctional dysphonia and one male contemporary commercial music singer were registered with computerized tomography while phonating on [a:] in their habitual speaking pitch. Additionally, the singer used the pitch G4 in belting. The scannings were studied in sagittal and transversal dimensions by measuring lengths, widths, and areas. Various similarities were found between belting and hyperfunction: high vertical larynx position, small hypopharyngeal width, and epilaryngeal outlet. On the other hand, belting differed from dysphonia (in addition to higher pitch) by a wider lip and jaw opening, and larger volumes of the oral cavity. Belting takes advantage of "megaphone shape" of the vocal tract. Future studies should focus on modeling and simulation to address sound energy transfer. Also, they should consider aerodynamic variables and vocal fold vibration to evaluate the "price of decibels" in these phonation types. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Seismic behaviour of mountain belts controlled by plate convergence rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Zilio, Luca; van Dinther, Ylona; Gerya, Taras V.; Pranger, Casper C.

    2018-01-01

    The relative contribution of tectonic and kinematic processes to seismic behaviour of mountain belts is still controversial. To understand the partitioning between these processes we developed a model that simulates both tectonic and seismic processes in a continental collision setting. These 2D seismo-thermo-mechanical (STM) models obtain a Gutenberg-Richter frequency-magnitude distribution due to spontaneous events occurring throughout the orogen. Our simulations suggest that both the corresponding slope (b value) and maximum earthquake magnitude (MWmax) correlate linearly with plate convergence rate. By analyzing 1D rheological profiles and isotherm depths we demonstrate that plate convergence rate controls the brittle strength through a rheological feedback with temperature and strain rate. Faster convergence leads to cooler temperatures and also results in more larger seismogenic domains, thereby increasing both MWmax and the relative number of large earthquakes (decreasing b value). This mechanism also predicts a more seismogenic lower crust, which is confirmed by a transition from uni- to bi-modal hypocentre depth distributions in our models. This transition and a linear relation between convergence rate and b value and MWmax is supported by our comparison of earthquakes recorded across the Alps, Apennines, Zagros and Himalaya. These results imply that deformation in the Alps occurs in a more ductile manner compared to the Himalayas, thereby reducing its seismic hazard. Furthermore, a second set of experiments with higher temperature and different orogenic architecture shows the same linear relation with convergence rate, suggesting that large-scale tectonic structure plays a subordinate role. We thus propose that plate convergence rate, which also controls the average differential stress of the orogen and its linear relation to the b value, is the first-order parameter controlling seismic hazard of mountain belts.

  2. The Idaho cobalt belt

    Bookstrom, Arthur A.

    2013-01-01

    The Idaho cobalt belt (ICB) is a northwest-trending belt of cobalt (Co) +/- copper (Cu)-bearing deposits and prospects in the Salmon River Mountains of east-central Idaho, U.S.A. The ICB is about 55 km long and 10 km long in its central part, which contains multiple strata-bound ore zones in the Blackbird mine area. The Black Pine and Iron Creek Co-Cu prospects are southeast of Blackbird, and the Tinkers Pride, Bonanza Copper, Elk Creek, and Salmon Canyon Copper prospects are northwest of Blackbird.

  3. Moving belt radiator development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. Alan

    1988-01-01

    Development of the Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) as an advanced space radiator concept is discussed. The ralative merits of Solid Belt (SBR), Liquid Belt (LBR), and Hybrid Belt (HBR) Radiators are described. Analytical and experimental efforts related to the dynamics of a rotating belt in microgravity are reviewed. The development of methods for transferring heat to the moving belt is discussed, and the results from several experimental investigations are summarized. Limited efforts related to the belt deployment and stowage, and to fabrication of a hybrid belt, are also discussed. Life limiting factors such as seal wear and micrometeroid resistance are identified. The results from various MBR point design studies for several power levels are compared with advanced Heat Pipe Radiator technology. MBR designs are shown to compare favorable at both 300 and 1000 K temperature levels. However, additional effort will be required to resolve critical technology issues and to demonstrate the advantage of MBR systems.

  4. Seat belt injuries in impact.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1969-03-01

    Although the seat belt has been demonstrated to provide effective reduction of injuries and fatalities in automobile accidents by preventing ejection, a pattern of injuries directly attributable to impingement on the belt itself is becoming evident. ...

  5. Effects of dust on forest tree health in Zagros oak forests.

    PubMed

    Moradi, A; Taheri Abkenar, K; Afshar Mohammadian, M; Shabanian, N

    2017-10-10

    Dust is one of the most devastating factors for the environment threatening all animal and plant species. In many regions, the ecological and economic impact of microdust on scarce species is critical. In the western region of Iran, the Zagros forests have been exposed to dust storms for many years. In this study, the effect of dust on oak trees, the most important trees of Zagros forests, is investigated. For this purpose, 3-year-old seedlings of three species of oak trees under natural conditions were exposed to dust during spring and summer months. Seedlings were divided into two groups; one group was assigned as dust treatment and the other as control that the control group washed regularly to remove dust. Anatomical characteristics of leaves and dust deposits on leaves during the study period were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The rate of photosynthesis and gas exchange in control and treated plants was examined by IRGA, LCI. SEM images showed that stomata structure, trichome density, and epicuticular waxes of leaves are different in all three species. This difference in micromorphology of species influences the effects of dust deposited on the leaves. A comparison of leaf species images in control and dust treatment showed that in dust treatment the percentage of stomata blocked by dust in three species (per unit area) of Quercus infectoria, Q. libni, and Q. brantii were 61/6, 48/4, and 38/1%, respectively. The results of leaf gas exchange investigation indicated that stomatal occlusion by dust had a negative impact on the examined parameters of three oak species (P ≤ 0.01). Thus, gas exchange and photosynthetic rates of the treated species were significantly reduced. The results of both parts of the study showed the vulnerability of the three species to dust as Q. infectoria > Q. libni > Q. brantii. Therefore, based on these findings, dust can disrupt the physiological activities of the studied species and the continuation of the

  6. A combined magnetometry and gravity study across Zagros orogeny in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Maysam; Oskooi, Behrooz

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the structural geology and the tectonic conditions of the Zagros orogeny along the route of Qom to Kermanshah cities were investigated using the combined geophysical methods of the airborne magnetometry and the ground-based gravity data. Airborne magnetometry data of Iran with a line space of survey, 7.5 km, were used to model the magnetic susceptibility property along the route. At first, the airborne magnetic data were stably 500-m downward continued to the ground surface in order to enhance minor changes of the Earth's magnetic field over the studied region. Afterward, 3D inverse modeling of the magnetic data was implemented to the downward continued data, and subsequently the section of magnetic susceptibility variation along the desired route was extracted and imaged at depth. The acquired model could appropriately predict the observed magnetic data, showing low misfit values between the observation and the predicted data. The analytic signal filter was applied to the reduced-to-pole (RTP) magnetic data leading to the determination of the active and probable hidden faults in the structural zones of the Zagros, such as Sanandaj-Sirjan, Central Domain (CD) and Urumieh-Dokhtar based upon the generated peaks along the profile of analytic signal filter. In addition, the density variations of the subsurface geological layers were determined by 3D inverting of the ground-based gravity data over the whole study area, and extracting this property along the route. The joint models of magnetic susceptibility and density variation could appropriately localize the traces of faults along with the geologically and tectonically structural boundaries in the region. The locations of faults correspond well to the variation of geophysical parameters on the inverted sections. Probable direction, slope and extension at depth of these faults were also determined on the sections, indicating a high tectonized zone of the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) parallel to the zone of

  7. Conveyor belt care.

    PubMed

    1989-07-08

    Nurses, doctors, politicians and public have reacted to the prospect of high-volume hospital bed usage - conveyor belt care - by warning of a future-shock scenario of 'pro[Illegible Word] pea' patients whipped through dehumanising hospital treatment and promptly dumped crutchless into the community.

  8. Sinkholes, collapse structures and large landslides in an active salt dome submerged by a reservoir: The unique case of the Ambal ridge in the Karun River, Zagros Mountains, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Francisco; Lizaga, Iván

    2016-02-01

    Ambal ridge, covering 4 km2, is a salt pillow of Gachsaran Formation with significant salt exposures in direct contact with the Karun River, Zagros Mountains. The highly cavernous salt dome is currently being flooded by the Gotvand Reservoir, second largest in Iran. Geomorphic evidence, including the sharp deflection of the Karun River and defeated streams indicate that Ambal is an active halokinetic structure, probably driven by erosional unloading. Around 30% of the salt dome is affected by large landslides up to ca. 50 × 106 m3 in volume. Slope oversteepening related to fluvial erosion and halokinetic rise seems to be the main controlling factor. A total of 693 sinkholes have been inventoried (170 sinkholes/km2), for which a scaling relationship has been produced. The depressions occur preferentially along a belt with a high degree of clustering. This spatial distribution is controlled by the proximity to the river, slope gradient and halite content in the bedrock. A large compound depression whose bottom lies below the normal maximum level of the reservoir will likely be flooded by water table rise forming a lake. The impoundment of the reservoir has induced peculiar collapse structures 220-280 m across, expressed by systems of arcuate fissures and scarps. Rapid subsurface salt dissolution is expected to generate and reactivate a large number of sinkholes and may reactivate landslides with a significant vertical component due to lack of basal support.

  9. Protein folding by NMR.

    PubMed

    Zhuravleva, Anastasia; Korzhnev, Dmitry M

    2017-05-01

    Protein folding is a highly complex process proceeding through a number of disordered and partially folded nonnative states with various degrees of structural organization. These transiently and sparsely populated species on the protein folding energy landscape play crucial roles in driving folding toward the native conformation, yet some of these nonnative states may also serve as precursors for protein misfolding and aggregation associated with a range of devastating diseases, including neuro-degeneration, diabetes and cancer. Therefore, in vivo protein folding is often reshaped co- and post-translationally through interactions with the ribosome, molecular chaperones and/or other cellular components. Owing to developments in instrumentation and methodology, solution NMR spectroscopy has emerged as the central experimental approach for the detailed characterization of the complex protein folding processes in vitro and in vivo. NMR relaxation dispersion and saturation transfer methods provide the means for a detailed characterization of protein folding kinetics and thermodynamics under native-like conditions, as well as modeling high-resolution structures of weakly populated short-lived conformational states on the protein folding energy landscape. Continuing development of isotope labeling strategies and NMR methods to probe high molecular weight protein assemblies, along with advances of in-cell NMR, have recently allowed protein folding to be studied in the context of ribosome-nascent chain complexes and molecular chaperones, and even inside living cells. Here we review solution NMR approaches to investigate the protein folding energy landscape, and discuss selected applications of NMR methodology to studying protein folding in vitro and in vivo. Together, these examples highlight a vast potential of solution NMR in providing atomistic insights into molecular mechanisms of protein folding and homeostasis in health and disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  10. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  11. A galaxy of folds.

    PubMed

    Alva, Vikram; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas; Lupas, Andrei N; Söding, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Many protein classification systems capture homologous relationships by grouping domains into families and superfamilies on the basis of sequence similarity. Superfamilies with similar 3D structures are further grouped into folds. In the absence of discernable sequence similarity, these structural similarities were long thought to have originated independently, by convergent evolution. However, the growth of databases and advances in sequence comparison methods have led to the discovery of many distant evolutionary relationships that transcend the boundaries of superfamilies and folds. To investigate the contributions of convergent versus divergent evolution in the origin of protein folds, we clustered representative domains of known structure by their sequence similarity, treating them as point masses in a virtual 2D space which attract or repel each other depending on their pairwise sequence similarities. As expected, families in the same superfamily form tight clusters. But often, superfamilies of the same fold are linked with each other, suggesting that the entire fold evolved from an ancient prototype. Strikingly, some links connect superfamilies with different folds. They arise from modular peptide fragments of between 20 and 40 residues that co-occur in the connected folds in disparate structural contexts. These may be descendants of an ancestral pool of peptide modules that evolved as cofactors in the RNA world and from which the first folded proteins arose by amplification and recombination. Our galaxy of folds summarizes, in a single image, most known and many yet undescribed homologous relationships between protein superfamilies, providing new insights into the evolution of protein domains.

  12. Epsilon Eridani Inner Asteroid Belt

    2017-09-14

    SCI2017_0004: Artist's illustration of the Epsilon Eridani system showing Epsilon Eridani b, right foreground, a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting its parent star at the outside edge of an asteroid belt. In the background can be seen another narrow asteroid or comet belt plus an outermost belt similar in size to our solar system's Kuiper Belt. The similarity of the structure of the Epsilon Eridani system to our solar system is remarkable, although Epsilon Eridani is much younger than our sun. SOFIA observations confirmed the existence of the asteroid belt adjacent to the orbit of the Jovian planet. Credit: NASA/SOFIA/Lynette Cook

  13. The empty primordial asteroid belt

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Sean N.; Izidoro, Andre

    2017-01-01

    The asteroid belt contains less than a thousandth of Earth’s mass and is radially segregated, with S-types dominating the inner belt and C-types the outer belt. It is generally assumed that the belt formed with far more mass and was later strongly depleted. We show that the present-day asteroid belt is consistent with having formed empty, without any planetesimals between Mars and Jupiter’s present-day orbits. This is consistent with models in which drifting dust is concentrated into an isolated annulus of terrestrial planetesimals. Gravitational scattering during terrestrial planet formation causes radial spreading, transporting planetesimals from inside 1 to 1.5 astronomical units out to the belt. Several times the total current mass in S-types is implanted, with a preference for the inner main belt. C-types are implanted from the outside, as the giant planets’ gas accretion destabilizes nearby planetesimals and injects a fraction into the asteroid belt, preferentially in the outer main belt. These implantation mechanisms are simple by-products of terrestrial and giant planet formation. The asteroid belt may thus represent a repository for planetary leftovers that accreted across the solar system but not in the belt itself. PMID:28924609

  14. The empty primordial asteroid belt.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Sean N; Izidoro, Andre

    2017-09-01

    The asteroid belt contains less than a thousandth of Earth's mass and is radially segregated, with S-types dominating the inner belt and C-types the outer belt. It is generally assumed that the belt formed with far more mass and was later strongly depleted. We show that the present-day asteroid belt is consistent with having formed empty, without any planetesimals between Mars and Jupiter's present-day orbits. This is consistent with models in which drifting dust is concentrated into an isolated annulus of terrestrial planetesimals. Gravitational scattering during terrestrial planet formation causes radial spreading, transporting planetesimals from inside 1 to 1.5 astronomical units out to the belt. Several times the total current mass in S-types is implanted, with a preference for the inner main belt. C-types are implanted from the outside, as the giant planets' gas accretion destabilizes nearby planetesimals and injects a fraction into the asteroid belt, preferentially in the outer main belt. These implantation mechanisms are simple by-products of terrestrial and giant planet formation. The asteroid belt may thus represent a repository for planetary leftovers that accreted across the solar system but not in the belt itself.

  15. Folding Automaton for Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subashini, N.; Thiagarajan, K.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we observed the definition of folding technique in graph theory and we derived the corresponding automaton for trees. Also derived some propositions on symmetrical structure tree, non-symmetrical structure tree, point symmetrical structure tree, edge symmetrical structure tree along with finite number of points. This approach provides to derive one edge after n’ number of foldings.

  16. Metamorphic belts of Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhänsli, Roland; Prouteau, Amaury; Candan, Osman; Bousquet, Romain

    2015-04-01

    Investigating metamorphic rocks from high-pressure/low-temperature (HP/LT) belts that formed during the closure of several oceanic branches, building up the present Anatolia continental micro-plate gives insight to the palaeogeography of the Neotethys Ocean in Anatolia. Two coherent HP/LT metamorphic belts, the Tavşanlı Zone (distal Gondwana margin) and the Ören-Afyon-Bolkardağ Zone (proximal Gondwana margin), parallel their non-metamorphosed equivalent (the Tauride Carbonate Platform) from the Aegean coast in NW Anatolia to southern Central Anatolia. P-T conditions and timing of metamorphism in the Ören-Afyon-Bolkardağ Zone (>70?-65 Ma; 0.8-1.2 GPa/330-420°C) contrast those published for the overlying Tavşanlı Zone (88-78 Ma; 2.4 GPa/500 °C). These belts trace the southern Neotethys suture connecting the Vardar suture in the Hellenides to the Inner Tauride suture along the southern border of the Kirşehir Complex in Central Anatolia. Eastwards, these belts are capped by the Oligo-Miocene Sivas Basin. Another HP/LT metamorphic belt, in the Alanya and Bitlis regions, outlines the southern flank of the Tauride Carbonate Platform. In the Alanya Nappes, south of the Taurides, eclogites and blueschists yielded metamorphic ages around 82-80 Ma (zircon U-Pb and phengite Ar-Ar data). The Alanya-Bitlis HP belt testifies an additional suture not comparable to the northerly Tavşanlı and Ören-Afyon belts, thus implying an additional oceanic branch of the Neotethys. The most likely eastern lateral continuation of this HP belt is the Bitlis Massif, in SE Turkey. There, eclogites (1.9-2.4 GPa/480-540°C) occur within calc-arenitic meta-sediments and in gneisses of the metamorphic (Barrovian-type) basement. Zircon U-Pb ages revealed 84.4-82.4 Ma for peak metamorphism. Carpholite-bearing HP/LT metasediments representing the stratigraphic cover of the Bitlis Massif underwent 0.8-1.2 GPa/340-400°C at 79-74 Ma (Ar-Ar on white mica). These conditions compares to the Tav

  17. Deconstructing the conveyor belt.

    PubMed

    Lozier, M Susan

    2010-06-18

    For the past several decades, oceanographers have embraced the dominant paradigm that the ocean's meridional overturning circulation operates like a conveyor belt, transporting cold waters equatorward at depth and warm waters poleward at the surface. Within this paradigm, the conveyor, driven by changes in deepwater production at high latitudes, moves deep waters and their attendant properties continuously along western boundary currents and returns surface waters unimpeded to deepwater formation sites. A number of studies conducted over the past few years have challenged this paradigm by revealing the vital role of the ocean's eddy and wind fields in establishing the structure and variability of the ocean's overturning. Here, we review those studies and discuss how they have collectively changed our view of the simple conveyor-belt model.

  18. The levantine amber belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissenbaum, A.; Horowitz, A.

    1992-02-01

    Amber, a fossil resin, is found in Early Cretaceous sanstones and fine clastics in Lebanon, Jordan, and Israel. The term "Levantine amber belt" is coined for this amber-containing sediment belt. The amber occurs as small nodules of various colors and frequently contains inclusions of macro- and microorganisms. The Lebanese amber contains Lepidoptera and the amber from southern Israel is rich in fungal remains. The source of the amber, based on geochemical and palynological evidence, is assumed to be from a conifer belonging to the Araucariaceae. The resins were produced by trees growing in a tropical near shore environment. The amber was transported into small swamps and was preserved there together with lignite. Later reworking of those deposits resulted in redeposition of the amber in oxidized sandstones.

  19. Trapped belt variations and their effects on human space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, Donald E.; Badhwar, Gautam D.

    1993-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and its subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an 18-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within 18 months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20 percent. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  20. Jupiter's Colorful Cloud Belts

    2018-01-12

    Colorful swirling cloud belts dominate Jupiter's southern hemisphere in this image captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft. Jupiter appears in this color-enhanced image as a tapestry of vibrant cloud bands and storms. The dark region in the far left is called the South Temperate Belt. Intersecting the belt is a ghost-like feature of slithering white clouds. This is the largest feature in Jupiter's low latitudes that's a cyclone (rotating with clockwise motion). This image was taken on Dec. 16, 2017 at 10:12 PST (1:12 p.m. EST), as Juno performed its tenth close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 8,453 miles (13,604 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet at a latitude of 27.9 degrees south. The spatial scale in this image is 5.6 miles/pixel (9.1 kilometers/pixel). Citizen scientist Kevin M. Gill processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21974

  1. Folding of polyglutamine chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Manan; Reddy, Allam S.; Abbott, N. L.; de Pablo, J. J.

    2008-10-01

    Long polyglutamine chains have been associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases. These include Huntington's disease, where expanded polyglutamine (PolyQ) sequences longer than 36 residues are correlated with the onset of symptoms. In this paper we study the folding pathway of a 54-residue PolyQ chain into a β-helical structure. Transition path sampling Monte Carlo simulations are used to generate unbiased reactive pathways between unfolded configurations and the folded β-helical structure of the polyglutamine chain. The folding process is examined in both explicit water and an implicit solvent. Both models reveal that the formation of a few critical contacts is necessary and sufficient for the molecule to fold. Once the primary contacts are formed, the fate of the protein is sealed and it is largely committed to fold. We find that, consistent with emerging hypotheses about PolyQ aggregation, a stable β-helical structure could serve as the nucleus for subsequent polymerization of amyloid fibrils. Our results indicate that PolyQ sequences shorter than 36 residues cannot form that nucleus, and it is also shown that specific mutations inferred from an analysis of the simulated folding pathway exacerbate its stability.

  2. Effects of Heterogeniety on Spatial Pattern Analysis of Wild Pistachio Trees in Zagros Woodlands, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanifard, Y.; Rezayan, F.

    2014-10-01

    Vegetation heterogeneity biases second-order summary statistics, e.g., Ripley's K-function, applied for spatial pattern analysis in ecology. Second-order investigation based on Ripley's K-function and related statistics (i.e., L- and pair correlation function g) is widely used in ecology to develop hypothesis on underlying processes by characterizing spatial patterns of vegetation. The aim of this study was to demonstrate effects of underlying heterogeneity of wild pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf.) trees on the second-order summary statistics of point pattern analysis in a part of Zagros woodlands, Iran. The spatial distribution of 431 wild pistachio trees was accurately mapped in a 40 ha stand in the Wild Pistachio & Almond Research Site, Fars province, Iran. Three commonly used second-order summary statistics (i.e., K-, L-, and g-functions) were applied to analyse their spatial pattern. The two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test showed that the observed pattern significantly followed an inhomogeneous Poisson process null model in the study region. The results also showed that heterogeneous pattern of wild pistachio trees biased the homogeneous form of K-, L-, and g-functions, demonstrating a stronger aggregation of the trees at the scales of 0-50 m than actually existed and an aggregation at scales of 150-200 m, while regularly distributed. Consequently, we showed that heterogeneity of point patterns may bias the results of homogeneous second-order summary statistics and we also suggested applying inhomogeneous summary statistics with related null models for spatial pattern analysis of heterogeneous vegetations.

  3. SLH Timing Belt Powertrain

    SciT

    Schneider, Abe

    2014-04-09

    The main goal of this proposal was to develop and test a novel powertrain solution for the SLH hydroEngine, a low-cost, efficient low-head hydropower technology. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. renewable electricity is produced by hydropower (EIA 2010). According to the U.S. Department of Energy; this amount could be increased by 50% with small hydropower plants, often using already-existing dams (Hall 2004). There are more than 80,000 existing dams, and of these, less than 4% generate power (Blankinship 2009). In addition, there are over 800 irrigation districts in the U.S., many with multiple, non-power, low-head drops. These existing, non-power dams andmore » irrigation drops could be retrofitted to produce distributed, baseload, renewable energy with appropriate technology. The problem is that most existing dams are low-head, or less than 30 feet in height (Ragon 2009). Only about 2% of the available low-head hydropower resource in the U.S. has been developed, leaving more than 70 GW of annual mean potential low-head capacity untapped (Hall 2004). Natel Energy, Inc. is developing a low-head hydropower turbine that operates efficiently at heads less than 6 meters and is cost-effective for deployment across multiple low-head structures. Because of the unique racetrack-like path taken by the prime-movers in the SLH, a flexible powertrain is required. Historically, the only viable technological solution was roller chain. Despite the having the ability to easily attach blades, roller chain is characterized by significant drawbacks, including high cost, wear, and vibration from chordal action. Advanced carbon- fiber-reinforced timing belts have been recently developed which, coupled with a novel belt attachment system developed by Natel Energy, result in a large reduction in moving parts, reduced mass and cost, and elimination of chordal action for increased fatigue life. The work done in this project affirmatively addressed each of the following 3 major uncertainties

  4. Moving belt metal detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Carl V.; Mendat, Deborah P.; Huynh, Toan B.

    2006-05-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) has developed a prototype metal detection survey system that will increase the search speed of conventional technology while maintaining high sensitivity. Higher search speeds will reduce the time to clear roads of landmines and improvised explosive devices (IED) and to locate unexploded ordnance (UXO) at Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) sites, thus reducing remediation costs. The new survey sensor system is called the moving belt metal detector (MBMD) and operates by both increasing sensor speed over the ground while maintaining adequate sensor dwell time over the target for good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and reducing motion-induced sensor noise. The MBMD uses an array of metal detection sensors mounted on a flexible belt similar to a tank track. The belt motion is synchronized with the forward survey speed so individual sensor elements remain stationary relative to the ground. A single pulsed transmitter coil is configured to provide a uniform magnetic field along the length of the receivers in ground contact. Individual time-domain electromagnetic induction (EMI) receivers are designed to sense a single time-gate measurement of the total metal content. Each sensor module consists of a receiver coil, amplifier, digitizing electronics and a low power UHF wireless transmitter. This paper presents the survey system design concepts and metal detection data from various targets at several survey speeds. Although the laboratory prototype is designed to demonstrate metal detection survey speeds up to 10 m/s, higher speeds are achievable with a larger sensor array. In addition, the concept can be adapted to work with other sensor technologies not previously considered for moving platforms.

  5. Radiation Belt Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-27

    is unlimited. 15 DISTRIBUTION LIST DTIC/OCP 8725 John J. Kingman Rd, Suite 0944 Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117... AFRL -RV-PS- AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2016-0007 TR-2016-0007 RADIATION BELT DYNAMICS Jay M. Albert, et al. 27 December 2015 Final Report APPROVED FOR... KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, NM 87117-5776 DTIC COPY NOTICE AND SIGNATURE PAGE Using Government drawings, specifications, or other data included in this

  6. Programmable matter by folding

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, E.; An, B.; Benbernou, N. M.; Tanaka, H.; Kim, S.; Demaine, E. D.; Rus, D.; Wood, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Programmable matter is a material whose properties can be programmed to achieve specific shapes or stiffnesses upon command. This concept requires constituent elements to interact and rearrange intelligently in order to meet the goal. This paper considers achieving programmable sheets that can form themselves in different shapes autonomously by folding. Past approaches to creating transforming machines have been limited by the small feature sizes, the large number of components, and the associated complexity of communication among the units. We seek to mitigate these difficulties through the unique concept of self-folding origami with universal crease patterns. This approach exploits a single sheet composed of interconnected triangular sections. The sheet is able to fold into a set of predetermined shapes using embedded actuation. To implement this self-folding origami concept, we have developed a scalable end-to-end planning and fabrication process. Given a set of desired objects, the system computes an optimized design for a single sheet and multiple controllers to achieve each of the desired objects. The material, called programmable matter by folding, is an example of a system capable of achieving multiple shapes for multiple functions. PMID:20616049

  7. Programmable matter by folding.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, E; An, B; Benbernou, N M; Tanaka, H; Kim, S; Demaine, E D; Rus, D; Wood, R J

    2010-07-13

    Programmable matter is a material whose properties can be programmed to achieve specific shapes or stiffnesses upon command. This concept requires constituent elements to interact and rearrange intelligently in order to meet the goal. This paper considers achieving programmable sheets that can form themselves in different shapes autonomously by folding. Past approaches to creating transforming machines have been limited by the small feature sizes, the large number of components, and the associated complexity of communication among the units. We seek to mitigate these difficulties through the unique concept of self-folding origami with universal crease patterns. This approach exploits a single sheet composed of interconnected triangular sections. The sheet is able to fold into a set of predetermined shapes using embedded actuation. To implement this self-folding origami concept, we have developed a scalable end-to-end planning and fabrication process. Given a set of desired objects, the system computes an optimized design for a single sheet and multiple controllers to achieve each of the desired objects. The material, called programmable matter by folding, is an example of a system capable of achieving multiple shapes for multiple functions.

  8. Provenance of the Walash-Naopurdan back-arc-arc clastic sequences in the Iraqi Zagros Suture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sarmad A.; Sleabi, Rajaa S.; Talabani, Mohammad J. A.; Jones, Brian G.

    2017-01-01

    Marine clastic rocks occurring in the Walash and Naopurdan Groups in the Hasanbag and Qalander areas, Kurdistan region, Iraqi Zagros Suture Zone, are lithic arenites with high proportions of volcanic rock fragments. Geochemical classification of the Eocene Walash and Oligocene Naopurdan clastic rocks indicates that they were mainly derived from associated sub-alkaline basalt and andesitic basalt in back-arc and island arc tectonic settings. Major and trace element geochemical data reveal that the Naopurdan samples are chemically less mature than the Walash samples and both were subjected to moderate weathering. The seaway in the southern Neotethys Ocean was shallow during both Eocene and Oligocene permitting mixing of sediment from the volcanic arcs with sediment derived from the Arabian continental margin. The Walash and Naopurdan clastic rocks enhance an earlier tectonic model of the Zagros Suture Zone with their deposition occurring during the Eocene Walash calc-alkaline back-arc magmatism and Early Oligocene Naopurdan island arc magmatism in the final stages of intra-oceanic subduction before the Miocene closure and obduction of the Neotethys basin.

  9. Tectono-sedimentary evolution of the Permian-Triassic extension event in the Zagros basin (Iran): results from analogue modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani-kivi, M.; Zulauf, G.

    2015-12-01

    Since the 1970s, the largest oil and gas reservoirs have been discovered in the Permian-Early Triassic formationsin Saudi Arabia. Thus, this time period is important for the discovery of new oil reserves in Iran. The Arabian passivecontinental margin has undergone lithospheric extension during the Permian-Triassic, which led to the formation of theNeo-Tethys. The aim of this paper is to describe the development of the continental rift basin in the Zagros region basedon the tectono-sedimentological evolution. We have studied well-log data to specify the distribution of synrift depositsin the Zagros and have related this information to the modelling. Environmental changes indicated by various sedimentarysequences, from a siliciclastic basin to a carbonate platform setting, are described. The Cambrian Hormuz salt, whichoverlies the metamorphosed Precambrian basement, becomes effective as a basal detachment layer influencing the styleof overburden deformation during the Permian-Triassic extension event. We have investigated the formation of variousstructures linked to the presence or absence of the Hormuz layer by analogue modelling and relating these structures to theLate Palaeozoic sedimentation. Based on results of the analogue modelling, we argue that the basal detachment layer (Hormuzseries) has contributed to the various structural styles of the extensional basin development in the Fars domain and theLorestan domain.

  10. The Oligocene carbonate platform of the Zagros Basin, SW Iran: An assessment of highly-complex geological heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Tahereh; Ruban, Dmitry A.

    2017-05-01

    North Africa and the Middle East possess rich geological heritage, but the latter is yet to be fully identified and described. The Oligocene carbonate platform of the Zagros Basin in southwest Iran, which corresponds to the lower part of the Asmari Formation, has significant potential for geoconservation and geotourism. The types of the geological heritage, their value, and the possible geosites have been assessed. The studied deposits are interesting because of lithology (carbonate rocks), fossils (larger foraminifera, other microfossils, diverse marine invertebrates, fish microremains, and trace fossils), biostratigraphical developments, facies (homoclinal carbonate ramp) and signature of global events (glacioeustatic fluctuations), and outstanding hydrocarbon resources. The five main geological heritage types are sedimentary, palaeontological, stratigraphical, palaeogeographical, and economical, from which the palaeontological, palaeogeographical, and economical types are of global rank. The Khollar and Kavar sections in the Fars Province of Iran are recommended as geosites suitable for research, education, and tourism. The high complexity of the geological heritage linked to the Oligocene carbonate platform of the Zagros Basin implies the phenomenon of geodiversity should be understood with regard to the relationships between types and their values.

  11. Synthesizing folded band chaos.

    PubMed

    Corron, Ned J; Hayes, Scott T; Pethel, Shawn D; Blakely, Jonathan N

    2007-04-01

    A randomly driven linear filter that synthesizes Lorenz-like, reverse-time chaos is shown also to produce Rössler-like folded band wave forms when driven using a different encoding of the random source. The relationship between the topological entropy of the random source, dissipation in the linear filter, and the positive Lyapunov exponent for the reverse-time wave form is exposed. The two drive encodings are viewed as grammar restrictions on a more general encoding that produces a chaotic superset encompassing both the Lorenz butterfly and Rössler folded band paradigms of nonlinear dynamics.

  12. Chronometric investigations of the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition in the Zagros Mountains using AMS radiocarbon dating and Bayesian age modelling.

    PubMed

    Becerra-Valdivia, Lorena; Douka, Katerina; Comeskey, Daniel; Bazgir, Behrouz; Conard, Nicholas J; Marean, Curtis W; Ollé, Andreu; Otte, Marcel; Tumung, Laxmi; Zeidi, Mohsen; Higham, Thomas F G

    2017-08-01

    The Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition is often linked with a bio-cultural shift involving the dispersal of modern humans outside of Africa, the concomitant replacement of Neanderthals across Eurasia, and the emergence of new technological traditions. The Zagros Mountains region assumes importance in discussions concerning this period as its geographic location is central to all pertinent hominin migration areas, pointing to both east and west. As such, establishing a reliable chronology in the Zagros Mountains is crucial to our understanding of these biological and cultural developments. Political circumstance, coupled with the poor preservation of organic material, has meant that a clear chronological definition of the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition for the Zagros Mountains region has not yet been achieved. To improve this situation, we have obtained new archaeological samples for AMS radiocarbon dating from three sites: Kobeh Cave, Kaldar Cave, and Ghār-e Boof (Iran). In addition, we have statistically modelled previously published radiocarbon determinations for Yafteh Cave (Iran) and Shanidar Cave (Iraqi Kurdistan), to improve their chronological resolution and enable us to compare the results with the new dataset. Bayesian modelling results suggest that the onset of the Upper Paleolithic in the Zagros Mountains dates to 45,000-40,250 cal BP (68.2% probability). Further chronometric data are required to improve the precision of this age range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Multi-phase inversion tectonics related to the Hendijan-Nowrooz-Khafji Fault activity, Zagros Mountains, SW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazem Shiroodi, Sadjad; Ghafoori, Mohammad; Faghih, Ali; Ghanadian, Mostafa; Lashkaripour, Gholamreza; Hafezi Moghadas, Naser

    2015-11-01

    Distinctive characteristics of inverted structures make them important criteria for the identification of certain structural styles of folded belts. The interpretation of 3D seismic reflection and well data sheds new light on the structural evolution and age of inverted structures associated to the Hendijan-Nowrooz-Khafji Fault within the Persian Gulf Basin and northeastern margin of Afro-Arabian plate. Analysis of thickness variations of growth strata using "T-Z plot" (thickness versus throw plot) method revealed the kinematics of the fault. Obtained results show that the fault has experienced a multi-phase evolutionary history over six different extension and compression deformation events (i.e. positive and negative inversion) between 252.2 and 11.62 Ma. This cyclic activity of the growth fault was resulted from alteration of sedimentary processes during continuous fault slip. The structural development of the study area both during positive and negative inversion geometry styles was ultimately controlled by the relative motion between the Afro-Arabian and Central-Iranian plates.

  14. Teaching Science: Seat Belt Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Describes activities that will help students understand how car seat belts work, the limited reaction time available to passengers in an automobile accident, and the force of impact in a car collision. These activities will provide students with hands-on experiences that demonstrate the importance of always wearing seat belts while in an…

  15. Geography of the asteroid belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, B. H.

    1978-01-01

    The CSM classification serves as the starting point on the geography of the asteroid belt. Raw data on asteroid types are corrected for observational biases (against dark objects, for instance) to derive the distribution of types throughout the belt. Recent work on family members indicates that dynamical families have a true physical relationship, presumably indicating common origin in the breakup of a parent asteroid.

  16. Mandatory seat belt use laws.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1985-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to review mandatory seat belt use laws as they have been used around the world, to forecast the impact of such a law in Virginia, and, if appropriate, to propose a mandatory seat belt law for inclusion in the Code of V...

  17. Folds and Etudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about "Folds" and "Etudes" which are images derived from anonymous typing exercises that he found in a used copy of "Touch Typing Made Simple". "Etudes" refers to the musical tradition of studies for a solo instrument, which is a typewriter. Typing exercises are repetitive attempts to type words and phrases…

  18. Seamount subduction at seismogenic depths: structural and metamorphic evidence from the Zagros suture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, G.; Agard, P.; Angiboust, S.; Fournier, M.; Omrani, J.

    2017-12-01

    Large-scale seafloor topographic features, such as seamounts, are for the most part subducted with the downgoing oceanic plate. They are expected to critically impact the seismogenic and mechanic behavior of subduction zones, but their exact role is strongly debated (i.e., as to whether they represent barriers to propagation or asperities promoting nucleation). Rare natural examples of metamorphosed seamounts, which got sliced off the slab along the plate interface and escaped recycling into the mantle, are therefore precious witnesses to document processes operating at depths of 0-30 km. We herein report the existence of a large-scale oceanic topographic structure sandwiched in the Zagros suture zone (Siah Kuh - SK - unit), most probably a former seamount, along with other blueschist units (Angiboust et al., EPSL 2016). The main criteria for identifying this seamount are its: (1) shape: the SK unit is a 1.5-2 km thick, rounded-shaped body with a 15-20 km diameter, (2) lithologies: it is made mainly of a regular succession of massive basaltic flows, commonly as pillow basalts, minor ophiolite-type gabbros and serpentinite, together with subordinate more differenciated volcanic and plutonic rocks. (3) sedimentary cover: basalts are overlain by shallowly deposited reef limestone and deepening-up sediments with the occurrence of cherts and pelagic limestones (which points to possible subsidence). Basalts have been analyzed for trace elements and have usually a N-MORB to OIB signature, which might be explained by its potential origin as a mid-oceanic ridge seamount. HP-LT minerals (lawsonite, aragonite, blue amphiboles) found across the whole structure, particularly in zones of localized compressive deformation, indicate that this seamount was shallowly subducted at 20 km. This deformation, interpreted to be syn-subduction, is assisted by a décollement rooting in serpentinite and/or oceanic metasediments and is associated with rare cataclase in magmatic rocks. We

  19. Folding and fracturing of rock adjacent to salt diapirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, Mark G.

    2017-04-01

    When John Ramsay wrote his groundbreaking book in 1967, deformation around salt diapirs was not something he covered. At the time, most geologists considered diapirs to form due to density inversion, rising through thick overlying strata due to buoyancy. In doing so, salt was thought to shove aside the younger rocks, shearing and fracturing them in drag folds and supposedly producing "salt gouge". Even after it was realized that the majority of diapirs spend most of their history growing at or just beneath the surface, the relative rise of salt and sinking of minibasins were (and are) still thought by many to be accommodated in part by shear and fracturing of rocks in a collar zone around the salt. There are two arguments against this model. The first is mechanical: whereas halite behaves as a viscous fluid, even young sediment deforms as a brittle material with layer anisotropy. Thus, the salt-sediment interface is the outer margin of an intrasalt shear zone caused by viscous drag against the diapir margin. The velocity of salt flow decreases dramatically toward the edge of the diapir, so that the outermost salt effectively doesn't move. Hence, no shear or fracturing is expected in surrounding strata. The second and more important argument is that empirical field data do not support the idea of drag folds and associated deformation. Certainly, strata are typically folded and thinned adjacent to diapirs. However, stratal upturn is generated by monoclinal drape folding of the diapir roof over the edge of the rising salt, and thinning is caused by deposition onto the bathymetric highs formed by the diapirs, often supplemented by roof erosion and slumping. Halokinetic sequences observed in numerous salt basins (e.g., Paradox Basin, La Popa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees, Sivas Basin, Zagros Mountains, Kuqa Basin) contain no diapir-parallel shear zones and minimal thinning and fracturing caused by diapir rise. Even megaflaps, in which strata extend for kilometers up the sides

  20. The uteroglobin fold.

    PubMed

    Callebaut, I; Poupon, A; Bally, R; Demaret, J P; Housset, D; Delettré, J; Hossenlopp, P; Mornon, J P

    2000-01-01

    Uteroglobin (UTG) forms a fascinating homodimeric structure that binds small- to medium-sized ligands through an internal hydrophobic cavity, located at the interface between the two monomers. Previous studies have shown that UTG fold is not limited to the UTG/CC10 family, whose sequence/structure relationships are highlighted here, but can be extended to the cap domain of Xanthobacter autotrophicus haloalkane dehalogenase. We show here that UTG fold is adopted by several other cap domains within the alpha/beta hydrolase family, making it a well-suited "geode" structure allowing it to sequester various hydrophobic molecules. Additionally, some data about a new crystal form of oxidized rabbit UTG are presented, completing previous structural studies, as well as results from molecular dynamics, suggesting an alternative way for the ligand to reach the internal cavity.

  1. Physics of protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, A. V.; Galzitskaya, O. V.

    2004-04-01

    Protein physics is grounded on three fundamental experimental facts: protein, this long heteropolymer, has a well defined compact three-dimensional structure; this structure can spontaneously arise from the unfolded protein chain in appropriate environment; and this structure is separated from the unfolded state of the chain by the “all-or-none” phase transition, which ensures robustness of protein structure and therefore of its action. The aim of this review is to consider modern understanding of physical principles of self-organization of protein structures and to overview such important features of this process, as finding out the unique protein structure among zillions alternatives, nucleation of the folding process and metastable folding intermediates. Towards this end we will consider the main experimental facts and simple, mostly phenomenological theoretical models. We will concentrate on relatively small (single-domain) water-soluble globular proteins (whose structure and especially folding are much better studied and understood than those of large or membrane and fibrous proteins) and consider kinetic and structural aspects of transition of initially unfolded protein chains into their final solid (“native”) 3D structures.

  2. The protein folding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Francesco; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2004-03-01

    Networks are everywhere. The conformation space of a 20-residue antiparallel beta-sheet peptide [1], sampled by molecular dynamics simulations, is mapped to a network. Conformations are nodes of the network, and the transitions between them are links. As previously found for the World-Wide Web as well as for social and biological networks , the conformation space contains highly connected hubs like the native state which is the most populated free energy basin. Furthermore, the network shows a hierarchical modularity [2] which is consistent with the funnel mechanism of folding [3] and is not observed for a random heteropolymer lacking a native state. Here we show that the conformation space network describes the free energy landscape without requiring projections into arbitrarily chosen reaction coordinates. The network analysis provides a basis for understanding the heterogeneity of the folding transition state and the existence of multiple pathways. [1] P. Ferrara and A. Caflisch, Folding simulations of a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet peptide, PNAS 97, 10780-10785 (2000). [2] Ravasz, E. and Barabási, A. L. Hierarchical organization in complex networks. Phys. Rev. E 67, 026112 (2003). [3] Dill, K. and Chan, H From Levinthal to pathways to funnels. Nature Struct. Biol. 4, 10-19 (1997)

  3. Folded waveguide coupler

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1988-03-01

    A resonant cavity waveguide coupler for ICRH of a magnetically confined plasma. The coupler consists of a series of inter-leaved metallic vanes disposed withn an enclosure analogous to a very wide, simple rectangular waveguide that has been "folded" several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a polarizing plate is provided which has coupling apertures aligned with selected folds of the waveguide through which rf waves are launched with magnetic fields of the waves aligned in parallel with the magnetic fields confining the plasma being heated to provide coupling to the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma in the frequency usage of from about 50-200 mHz. A shorting plate terminates the back of the cavity at a distance approximately equal to one-half the guide wavelength from the mouth of the coupler to ensure that the electric field of the waves launched through the polarizing plate apertures are small while the magnetic field is near a maximum. Power is fed into the coupler folded cavity by means of an input coaxial line feed arrangement at a point which provides an impedance match between the cavity and the coaxial input line.

  4. Paediatric vocal fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Lopez, Isabel; Peñorrocha-Teres, Julio; Perez-Ortin, Magdalena; Cerpa, Mauricio; Rabanal, Ignacio; Gavilan, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Vocal fold paralysis (VFP) is a relatively common cause of stridor and dysphonia in the paediatric population. This report summarises our experience with VFP in the paediatric age group. All patients presenting with vocal fold paralysis over a 12-month period were included. Medical charts were revised retrospectively. The diagnosis was performed by flexible endoscopic examination. The cases were evaluated with respect to aetiology of the paralysis, presenting symptoms, delay in diagnosis, affected side, vocal fold position, need for surgical treatment and outcome. The presenting symptoms were stridor and dysphonia. Iatrogenic causes formed the largest group, followed by idiopathic, neurological and obstetric VFP. Unilateral paralysis was found in most cases. The median value for delay in diagnosis was 1 month and it was significantly higher in the iatrogenic group. Surgical treatment was not necessary in most part of cases. The diagnosis of VFP may be suspected based on the patient's symptoms and confirmed by flexible endoscopy. Infants who develop stridor or dysphonia following a surgical procedure have to be examined without delay. The surgeon has to keep in mind that there is a possibility of late spontaneous recovery or compensation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Geodynamic processes and deformation in orogenic belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, John G.; Jacoby, Wolfgang R.

    1980-03-01

    The development of geosynclines and orogenic belts is related to lithosphere convergence. Initial sediment accumulation implying subsidence, and volcanic activity implying extension and rise of geotherms, are in most cases followed by folding and thrusting suggesting compression and by uplift. In terms of recent analogs, sediment accumulation and crustal extension are characteristic of back-arc spreading; subsequent compression would indicate continent—continent collision; and rise of geotherms most likely requires localized thermal flow (convection) in the asthenosphere. These events are here shown to agree with Andrews and Sleep's (1974) numerical model of asthenosphere flow at converging plate margins. Orthogeosynclinal subsidence appears to be a consequence of subcrustal ablation and lithosphere extension and thinning in active marginal basins. Arc and Andean type magmatism mark the reappearance of ablated and transported, relatively low-density subcrustal material. Collision slows and eventually stops the local convection cell, resulting in local heat accumulation and hence high- T, low- P metamorphism and granitization while marginal basin (orthogeosynclinal) deposits are being compressed into Alpine style orogenic structures. Moreover, closing of the marginal basin leads to subsidiary subduction, which in turn may be responsible for some Alpine style structures. Oceanic trench deposits may become incorporated in orogenic zones, as high- P, low- T metamorphic belts (thalassogeosynclines). Dynamic uplift is a fundamental characteristic of orogeny. Most rising and sinking in orogenic zones can be linked to those asthenosphere processes which are a consequence of Andrews-Sleep convection.

  6. Safety Belt Use: Traffic Safety Tips

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-01-01

    This fact sheet, NHTSA Facts: Summer 1996, discusses traffic safety tips for wearing seat belts. It describes the correct way to wear a seat belt, how to sit, and differentiates between lap belts and shoulder belts. It points out that air bags provid...

  7. Dillon cutoff-Basement-involved tectonic link between the disturbed belt of west-central Montana and the overthrust belt of extreme southwestern Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, J. Michael; Schmidt, Christopher J.; Genovese, Paul W.

    1990-11-01

    The front of the Cordilleran fold and thrust belt in western Montana follows the disturbed belt in the north, merges with the southwest Montana transverse zone in the west-central part of the region, and in southwestern Montana is marked by a broad zone characterized by complex interaction between thrust belt structures and basement uplifts. The front margin of the thrust belt in Montana reflects mainly thin-skinned tectonic features in the north, an east-trending lateral ramp that curves southwest in the central part into the Dillon cutoff, an oblique-slip, thick-skinned displacement transfer zone that cuts through basement rocks of the Lima recess, and a zone of overlap between thin- and thick-skinned thrusts in extreme southwestern Montana. The transverse ramp and basement-involved thrust faults are controlled by Proterozoic structures.

  8. 30 CFR 75.1731 - Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor....1731 Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor entries. (a) Damaged rollers, or other damaged belt conveyor components, which pose a fire hazard must be immediately repaired or replaced. All other...

  9. The earth's trapped radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, R. B.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1975-01-01

    The near-earth charged particle environment is discussed in terms of spacecraft design criteria. Models are presented of the trapped radiation belts and based on in-situ data obtained from spacecraft.

  10. Safety belt usage attitude study

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1979-02-01

    Despite increasing evidence that occupant restraint laws are effective in getting people to wear safety belts and an extremely cost-effective measure for reducing highway deaths and injuries, strong opposition at the state-level has prevented passage...

  11. Strengthening seat belt use laws

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-09-01

    Traffic crashes are a leading cause : of death in the United States. : Wearing seat belts is the easiest and : most effective way of cutting the : highway death tolland strong : occupant protection laws are the most : effective way of increasing s...

  12. Chaos on the conveyor belt.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Bulcsú; Járai-Szabó, Ferenc; Tél, Tamás; Néda, Zoltán

    2013-04-01

    The dynamics of a spring-block train placed on a moving conveyor belt is investigated both by simple experiments and computer simulations. The first block is connected by a spring to an external static point and, due to the dragging effect of the belt, the blocks undergo complex stick-slip dynamics. A qualitative agreement with the experimental results can be achieved only by taking into account the spatial inhomogeneity of the friction force on the belt's surface, modeled as noise. As a function of the velocity of the conveyor belt and the noise strength, the system exhibits complex, self-organized critical, sometimes chaotic, dynamics and phase transition-like behavior. Noise-induced chaos and intermittency is also observed. Simulations suggest that the maximum complexity of the dynamical states is achieved for a relatively small number of blocks (around five).

  13. Revealing the significance and polyphase tectonothermal evolution of a major metamorphic unit in an orogen: the central Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, Zagros Mts., Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakerardakani, Farzaneh; Neubauer, Franz; Genser, Johann; Liu, Xiaoming; Dong, Yunpeng; Monfaredi, Behzad; Benroider, Manfred; Finger, Fritz; Waitzinger, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Dorud-Azna region in the central Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic belt plays a key role in promoting the tectonic evolution of Zagros orogen, within the frame of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone. From footwall to hangingwall, structural data combined with the U-Pb zircon and extensive 40Ar-39Ar mineral dating survey demonstrate three metamorphosed tectonic units, which include: (1) The Triassic June complex is metamorphosed within greenschist facies conditions, overlain by (2) the amphibolite-grade metamorphic Galeh-Doz orthogneiss, which is intruded by mafic dykes, and (3) the Amphibolite-Metagabbro unit. To the east, these units were intruded by the Jurassic Darijune gabbro. We present U-Pb detrital zircon ages of a garnet-micaschist from the Amphibolite-Metagabbro unit, which yield six distinctive age groups, including a previously unrecognized Late Grenvillian age population at ~0.93 to 0.99 Ga. We speculate that this unique Late Grenvillian group coupled with biogeographic evidence suggests either relationship with the South China craton or to the "Gondwana superfan". The laser ablation ICP-MS U-Pb zircon ages of 608 ± 18 Ma and 588 ± 41 Ma of the granitic Galeh-Doz orthogneiss reveals a Panafrican basement same as known from the Yazd block of Central Iran. Geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopes of alkaline and subalkaline mafic dykes within the Galeh-Doz orthogneiss show OIB-type to MORB-type and indicate involvement of both depleted and enriched sources for its genesis. The new 40Ar-39Ar amphibole age of ca. 322.2 ± 3.9 Ma from the alkaline mafic dyke implies Carboniferous cooling age after intrusion. The metagabbros (including the Dare-Hedavand metagabbro with a 206Pb/238U age of 314.6 ± 3.7 Ma) and amphibolites with E-MORB geochemical signature of the Amphibolite-Metagabbro unit represent an Upper Paleozoic rift. The geochemical composition of the Triassic greenschist facies metamorphosed June complex, implying formation in a same, but younger tectonic

  14. Propeller Belts of Saturn

    2017-05-10

    This view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft is the sharpest ever taken of belts of the features called propellers in the middle part of Saturn's A ring. The propellers are the small, bright features that look like double dashes, visible on both sides of the wave pattern that crosses the image diagonally from top to bottom. The original discovery of propellers in this region in Saturn's rings was made using several images taken from very close to the rings during Cassini's 2004 arrival at Saturn. Those discovery images were of low resolution and were difficult to interpret, and there were few clues as to how the small propellers seen in those images were related to the larger propellers Cassini observed later in the mission. This image, for the first time, shows swarms of propellers of a wide range of sizes, putting the ones Cassini observed in its Saturn arrival images in context. Scientists will use this information to derive a "particle size distribution" for propeller moons, which is an important clue to their origins. The image was taken using the Cassini spacecraft's narrow-angle camera on April 19. The view was has an image scale of 0.24 mile (385 meters) per pixel, and was taken at a sun-ring-spacecraft angle, or phase angle, of 108 degrees. The view looks toward a point approximately 80,000 miles (129,000 kilometers) from Saturn's center. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21448

  15. The thrust belt in Southwest Montana and east-central Idaho

    Ruppel, Edward T.; Lopez, David A.

    1984-01-01

    The leading edge of the Cordilleran fold and thrust in southwest Montana appears to be a continuation of the edge of the Wyoming thrust belt, projected northward beneath the Snake River Plain. Trces of the thrust faults that form the leading edge of the thrust belts are mostly concealed, but stratigraphic and structural evidence suggests that the belt enters Montana near the middle of the Centennial Mountains, continues west along the Red Rock River valley, and swings north into the Highland Mountains near Butte. The thrust belt in southwest Montana and east-central Idaho includes at least two major plates -- the Medicine Lodge and Grasshopper thrust plates -- each of which contains a distinctive sequence of rocks, different in facies and structural style from those of the cratonic region east of the thrust belt. The thrust plates are characterized by persuasive, open to tight and locally overturned folds, and imbricate thrust faults, structural styles unusual in Phanerozoic cratonic rocks. The basal decollement zones of the plates are composed of intensely sheared, crushed, brecciated, and mylonitized rocks, the decollement at the base of the Medicine Lodge plate is as much as 300 meters thick. The Medicine Lodge and Grasshopper thrust plates are fringed on the east by a 10- to 50-kilometer-wide zone of tightly folded rocks cut by imbricate thrust fauls, a zone that forms the eastern margin of the thrust belt in southwest Montana. The frontal fold and thrust zone includes rocks that are similar to those of the craton, even though they differ in details of thickness, composition, or stratigraphic sequence. The zone is interpreted to be one of terminal folding and thrusting in cratonic rocks overridden by the major thrust plates from farther west. The cratonic rocks were drape-folded over rising basement blocks that formed a foreland bulge in front of the thrust belt. The basement blocks are bounded by steep faults of Proterozoic ancestry, which also moved as tear

  16. Pilot tests of a seat belt gearshift delay on the belt use of commercial fleet drivers.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-12-01

    the seat belt was buckled. Participants, commercial drivers from the United States and Canada who did not consistently wear their seat belts, could avoid the delay by fastening their seat belts. Unbelted participants experienced a delay of either a c...

  17. Structural style and hydrocarbon trap of Karbasi anticline, in the Interior Fars region, Zagros, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Z.; Arian, M.; Solgi, A.

    2014-07-01

    Karbasi anticline between west-northwest parts of Jahrom town is located in northwest 40 km distance of Aghar gas anticline in interior Fars region. This anticline has asymmetric structure and some faults with large strike separation observed in its structure. The operation of Nezamabad sinistral strike slip fault in west part of this anticline caused fault plunge change in this region. Because of complication increasing of structures geometry in Fars region and necessity to exploration activities for deeper horizons especially the Paleozoic ones, the analysis of fold style elements, which is known as one of the main parts in structural studies seems necessary. In this paper because of some reasons such as Karbasi anticline structural complication, importance of drilling and hydrocarbon explorations in Fars region, it is proceed to analysis and evaluation of fold style elements and geometry with emphasis on Nezamabad fault operation in Interior Fars region. According to fold style elements analysis results, it became clear that in east part of anticline the type of fold horizontal moderately inclined and in west part it is upright moderately plunging, so west evaluation of anticline is affected by more deformation. In this research the relationship present faults especially the Nezamabad sinistral strike slip one with folding and its affection on Dehram horizon and Bangestan group were modeled. Based on received results may be the Nezamabad fault is located between G-G' and E-E' structural sections and this fault in this area operated same as fault zone. In different parts of Karbasi anticline, Dashtak formation as a middle detachment unit plays an important role in connection to folding geometry, may be which is affected by Nezamabad main fault.

  18. Influence of tectonic folding on rockfall susceptibility, American Fork Canyon, Utah, USA

    Coe, J.A.; Harp, E.L.

    2007-01-01

    We examine rockfall susceptibility of folded strata in the Sevier fold-thrust belt exposed in American Fork Canyon in north-central Utah. Large-scale geologic mapping, talus production data, rock-mass-quality measurements, and historical rockfall data indicate that rockfall susceptibility is correlated with limb dip and curvature of the folded, cliff-forming Mississippian limestones. On fold limbs, rockfall susceptibility increases as dip increases. This relation is controlled by several factors, including an increase in adverse dip conditions and apertures of discontinuities, and shearing by flexural slip during folding that has reduced the friction angles of discontinuities by smoothing surface asperities. Susceptibility is greater in fold hinge zones than on adjacent limbs primarily because there are greater numbers of discontinuities in hinge zones. We speculate that susceptibility increases in hinge zones as fold curvature becomes tighter.

  19. The Complexity of Folding Self-Folding Origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Menachem; Pinson, Matthew B.; Murugan, Arvind

    2017-10-01

    Why is it difficult to refold a previously folded sheet of paper? We show that even crease patterns with only one designed folding motion inevitably contain an exponential number of "distractor" folding branches accessible from a bifurcation at the flat state. Consequently, refolding a sheet requires finding the ground state in a glassy energy landscape with an exponential number of other attractors of higher energy, much like in models of protein folding (Levinthal's paradox) and other NP-hard satisfiability (SAT) problems. As in these problems, we find that refolding a sheet requires actuation at multiple carefully chosen creases. We show that seeding successful folding in this way can be understood in terms of subpatterns that fold when cut out ("folding islands"). Besides providing guidelines for the placement of active hinges in origami applications, our results point to fundamental limits on the programmability of energy landscapes in sheets.

  20. Beginning of foreland subsidence in the Columbian-Sevier belts, southern Canada and northwest Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Janice M.; Heller, Paul L.

    1995-08-01

    Subsidence analysis and geometry of Jurassic-Cretaceous foreland strata in northwestern Montana and southern Alberta and British Columbia suggest that loading by the fold-thrust belt in Canada began as much as 40 m.y. earlier than in Montana. In Canada, early foreland basin deposits are Late Jurassic age, thicken rapidly westward, and are restricted to a narrow belt within 30 km of the thrust belt. In western Montana, contemporaneous deposits are widespread and do not increase markedly in thickness toward the thrust belt. The unconformity overlying these deposits also changes from Canada, where it is angular, to a disconformity in western Montana near Great Falls. Between these two areas, foreland geometry is transitional over a distance of <250 km. Beyond the transition zone, early foreland basin geometries are broadly consistent, showing Late Jurassic foreland subsidence in southern Canada and Early Cretaceous initial subsidence in the United States.

  1. Architecture of orogenic belts and convergent zones in Western Ishtar Terra, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James W.; Vorderbruegge, R. W.; Crumpler, L. S.

    1989-01-01

    Linear mountain belts in Ishtar Terra were recognized from Pioneer-Venus topography, and later Arecibo images showed banded terrain interpreted to represent folds. Subsequent analyses showed that the mountains represented orogenic belts, and that each had somewhat different features and characteristics. Orogenic belts are regions of focused shortening and compressional deformation and thus provide evidence for the nature of such deformation, processes of crustal thickening (brittle, ductile), and processes of crustal loss. Such information is important in understanding the nature of convergent zones on Venus (underthrusting, imbrication, subduction), the implications for rates of crustal recycling, and the nature of environments of melting and petrogenesis. The basic elements of four convergent zones and orogenic belts in western Ishtar Terra are identified and examined, and then assess the architecture of these zones (the manner in which the elements are arrayed), and their relationships. The basic nomenclature of the convergent zones is shown.

  2. OUTER RADIATION BELT AND AURORAS

    SciT

    Gorchakov, E.V.

    1961-01-01

    Data obtained from Sputnik IH were used to determine the high-latitude boundary of the outer radiation belt and to interpret the nature of auroras. At the heights at which the auroras were observed, the outer boundary of the belt (69 deg north geomagnetic latitude) practically coincides with the auroral zone maximum (70 deg north geomagnetic latitude), while the maximum intensity of the outer belt near the earth lies at about 55 deg north geomagnetic latitude, i.e., at latitudes 15 deg below the auroral maximum. Consequently, auroras near the zone of maximum cannot be caused by the penetration into the atmospheremore » of electrons from the outer belt with energies on the order of 0.1 Mev (the mean energy of electrons in the outer belt). Other investigators have reported the detection of lowenergy streams at 55,000 to 75,000 km from the center of the earth in the equatorial plane. Moving toward the surface of the earth along the force lines of the magnetic field, electron streams of this type will reach the earth precisely in the region of the auroral zone maximum. It is considered possible that the electron streams are trapped at these distances from the earth and are at least partially responsible for auroras in the region of maximum. The existence of two maxima in the latitudinal distribution of auroral frequency, which attests to differert mechanisms of aurora formation, favors this hypothesis. In the region of the basic auroral maximum (70 deg north geomagnetic latitude) the auroras are the result of the invasion of belt particles, while in the region of the additional maximum (about 80 deg north geomagnetic latitude) they are caused by the direct penetration of corpuscular streams into the atmosphere. (OTS)« less

  3. RNA folding: structure prediction, folding kinetics and ion electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhijie; Zhang, Wenbing; Shi, Yazhou; Wang, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the "traditional" functions such as gene storage, transport and protein synthesis, recent discoveries reveal that RNAs have important "new" biological functions including the RNA silence and gene regulation of riboswitch. Such functions of noncoding RNAs are strongly coupled to the RNA structures and proper structure change, which naturally leads to the RNA folding problem including structure prediction and folding kinetics. Due to the polyanionic nature of RNAs, RNA folding structure, stability and kinetics are strongly coupled to the ion condition of solution. The main focus of this chapter is to review the recent progress in the three major aspects in RNA folding problem: structure prediction, folding kinetics and ion electrostatics. This chapter will introduce both the recent experimental and theoretical progress, while emphasize the theoretical modelling on the three aspects in RNA folding.

  4. Partitioning N2O emissions within the US Corn Belt using an inverse modeling approach

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions within the US Corn Belt have been estimated to be 2- to 9-11 fold larger than predictions from emission inventories, implying that one or more source 12 categories in bottom-up approaches are underestimated. Here we interpret hourly N2O 13 mixing ratios measured during ...

  5. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless the...

  6. Effectiveness of high school safety belt instruction

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1982-12-01

    The Effectiveness of High School Safety Belt Instruction was developed during a two-phased project. In Phase I, Focus Group Activities were conducted to determine whether audiovisual safety belt instructional materials assembled by the National Highw...

  7. 2010 safety belt usage survey in Kentucky.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to establish 2010 safety belt and child safety seat usage rates in Kentucky. The 2010 survey continues to document the results after enactment of the original "second enforcement" statewide mandatory safety belt law in...

  8. 2009 safety belt usage survey in Kentucky.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to establish 2009 safety belt and child safety seat usage rates in Kentucky. The 2009 survey continues to document the results after enactment of original "secondary enforcement" statewide mandatory safety belt law in ...

  9. Scenarios for the Evolution of Asteroid Belts

    2012-11-01

    This illustration shows three possible scenarios for the evolution of asteroid belts. At the top, a Jupiter-size planet migrates through the asteroid belt, scattering material and inhibiting the formation of life on planets.

  10. 2002 safety belt usage survey in Kentucky.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this study was to establish 2002 safety belt and child safety seat usage rates in Kentucky. The 2002 survey continues to document the results after enactment of original "secondary enforcement" statewide mandatory safety belt law in ...

  11. 2007 safety belt usage survey in Kentucky.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish 2007 safety belt and child safety seat usage rates in Kentucky. The 2007 survey continues to document the results after enactment of the initial "second enforcement" statewide mandatory safety belt law in ...

  12. 2001 safety belt usage survey in Kentucky.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish 2001 safety belt and child safety seat usage rates in Kentucky. The 2001 survey continues to document the results after enactment of original "secondary enforcement" statewide mandatory safety belt law in ...

  13. 2006 safety belt usage survey in Kentucky.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish 2006 safety belt and child safety seat usage rates in Kentucky. The 2006 survey continues to document the results after enactment of the initial "second enforcement" statewide mandatory safety belt law in ...

  14. 2008 safety belt usage survey in Kentucky.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish 2008 safety belt and child safety seat usage rates in Kentucky. The 2008 survey continues to document the results after enactment of the initial "second enforcement" statewide mandatory safety belt law in ...

  15. 2005 safety belt usage survey in Kentucky.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish 2005 safety belt and child safety seat usage rates in Kentucky. The 2005 survey continues to document the results after enactment of the initial "second enforcement" statewide mandatory safety belt law in ...

  16. Elemental geochemistry and strontium-isotope stratigraphy of Cenomanian to Santonian neritic carbonates in the Zagros Basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navidtalab, Amin; Rahimpour-Bonab, Hossain; Huck, Stefan; Heimhofer, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    A Neo-Tethyan upper Cenomanian-Santonian neritic carbonate ramp succession (Sarvak and Ilam formations), drilled in the Zagros Basin in southwest Iran, was investigated via detailed sedimentology, microfacies analysis, elemental geochemistry and Sr-isotope stratigraphy (SIS). The succession contains two exposure surfaces, which are known as the CT-ES and mT-ES (Cenomanian-Turonian and middle Turonian, respectively), and associated prominent negative carbon-isotope excursions that represent important regional stratigraphic marker horizons. Precise knowledge about the onset of platform exposure and the duration of the exposure-related hiatus, however, is currently lacking due to a rather low-resolved shallow-water biostratigraphic framework and a bulk carbonate carbon-isotope pattern that clearly differs from global Late Cretaceous reference curves. Therefore, the existing bio-chemostratigraphic framework was complemented by bulk carbonate strontium-isotope stratigraphy (SIS). As bulk carbonate material is in particular prone to diagenetic alteration, a careful selection of least altered samples has been carried out by means of elemental geochemistry and petrography. In contrast to what could be expected, the meteoric alteration of limestones beneath both exposure surfaces is not clearly expressed by increasing iron and manganese and coeval decreasing strontium contents. On the contrary, the impact of meteoric diagenesis is well illustrated via pronounced increases in Rb concentrations and concomitant prominent positive shifts to radiogenic strontium-isotope values, an observation that clearly reflects the decay of continentally derived 87Rb into 87Sr. Rubidium corrected strontium-isotope values place the CT-ES around the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary and point to an exposure duration of less than 0.4 Myr. This rather short-term CT-ES related hiatus is supported by petrographic evidence, which indicates a youth karstification stage of strata beneath the CT

  17. Small Main-Belt Asteroid Lightcurve Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, Richard P.; Xu, Shui; Bus, Schelte J.; Bowell, Edward

    1992-01-01

    The Small Main-Belt Asteroid Lightcurve Survey is the first to measure main-belt asteroid lightcurve properties for bodies with diameters smaller than 5 km. Attention is given to CCD lightcurves for 32 small main-belt asteroids. The objects of this sample have a mean rotational frequency which is faster than that of larger main-belt asteroids. All lightcurves were investigated for nonperiodic variations ascribable to free precession; no conclusive detection of this phenomenon has been made, however.

  18. 49 CFR 393.93 - Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages. 393.93 Section 393.93 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... § 393.93 Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages. (a) Buses—(1) Buses...

  19. 49 CFR 393.93 - Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages. 393.93 Section 393.93 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... § 393.93 Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages. (a) Buses—(1) Buses...

  20. 49 CFR 393.93 - Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages. 393.93 Section 393.93 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... § 393.93 Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages. (a) Buses—(1) Buses...

  1. 49 CFR 393.93 - Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages. 393.93 Section 393.93 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... § 393.93 Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages. (a) Buses—(1) Buses...

  2. 49 CFR 393.93 - Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages. 393.93 Section 393.93 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... § 393.93 Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages. (a) Buses—(1) Buses...

  3. Comfort and convenience specifications for safety belts : shoulder belt fit, pressure and pullout forces

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1980-04-30

    A three-part study was conducted to further define comfort requirements for seat belt systems with respect to shoulder belt fit, shoulder belt contact pressure, and 3-point restraint system pullout forces. Objective of the belt-fit portion of the stu...

  4. Why style matters - uncertainty and structural interpretation in thrust belts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Rob; Bond, Clare; Watkins, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    Structural complexity together with challenging seismic imaging make for significant uncertainty in developing geometric interpretations of fold and thrust belts. Here we examine these issues and develop more realistic approaches to building interpretations. At all scales, the best tests of the internal consistency of individual interpretations come from structural restoration (section balancing), provided allowance is made for heterogeneity in stratigraphy and strain. However, many existing balancing approaches give misleading perceptions of interpretational risk - both on the scale of individual fold-thrust (trap) structures and in regional cross-sections. At the trap-scale, idealised models are widely cited - fault-bend-fold, fault-propagation folding and trishear. These make entirely arbitrary choices for fault localisation and layer-by-layer deformation: precise relationships between faults and fold geometry are generally invalidated by real-world conditions of stratigraphic variation and distributed strain. Furthermore, subsurface predictions made using these idealisations for hydrocarbon exploration commonly fail the test of drilling. Rarely acknowledged, the geometric reliability of seismic images depends on the assigned seismic velocity model, which in turn relies on geological interpretation. Thus iterative approaches are required between geology and geophysics. The portfolio of commonly cited outcrop analogues is strongly biased to examples that simply conform to idealised models - apparently abnormal structures are rarely described - or even photographed! Insight can come from gravity-driven deep-water fold-belts where part of the spectrum of fold-thrust complexity is resolved through seismic imaging. This imagery shows deformation complexity in fold forelimbs and backlimbs. However, the applicability of these, weakly lithified systems to well-lithified successions (e.g. carbonates) of many foreland thrust belts remains conjectural. Examples of

  5. 46 CFR 169.723 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Safety belts. 169.723 Section 169.723 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.723 Safety belts. Each vessel must carry a harness type safety belt conforming to Offshore Racing Council (ORC) standards for each person on watch or...

  6. 36 CFR 4.15 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety belts. 4.15 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.15 Safety belts. (a) Each operator and passenger occupying any seating position of a motor vehicle in a park area will have the safety belt or child restraint system properly fastened at...

  7. 14 CFR 31.63 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety belts. 31.63 Section 31.63 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.63 Safety belts. (a) There must be a safety belt...

  8. 14 CFR 27.1413 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety belts. 27.1413 Section 27.1413 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1413 Safety belts. Each safety belt...

  9. Grinding Glass Disks On A Belt Sander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, James J., III

    1995-01-01

    Small machine attached to table-top belt sander makes possible to use belt sander to grind glass disk quickly to specified diameter within tolerance of about plus or minus 0.002 in. Intended to be used in place of production-shop glass grinder. Held on driveshaft by vacuum, glass disk rotated while periphery ground by continuous sanding belt.

  10. 46 CFR 169.723 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Safety belts. 169.723 Section 169.723 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.723 Safety belts. Each vessel must carry a harness type safety belt conforming to Offshore Racing Council (ORC) standards for each person on watch or...

  11. 36 CFR 4.15 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety belts. 4.15 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.15 Safety belts. (a) Each operator and passenger occupying any seating position of a motor vehicle in a park area will have the safety belt or child restraint system properly fastened at...

  12. 14 CFR 31.63 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety belts. 31.63 Section 31.63 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.63 Safety belts. (a) There must be a safety belt...

  13. 14 CFR 27.1413 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety belts. 27.1413 Section 27.1413 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1413 Safety belts. Each safety belt...

  14. Seat belt use-inducing system effectiveness

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-04-01

    Seat belt use inducing system effectiveness was measured in fleet automobiles of a private business and in rental automobiles at a large airport. There were three parts to the activity: 1. Seat belt use inducing systems and seat belt use counting sys...

  15. The constitutionality of mandatory seat belt laws.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1986-01-01

    Low seat belt usage rates have persisted for years despite efforts to educate people about belts' benefits. There is ample documentation of the contribution of seat belts to saving lives and reducing injury. The emotional and pecuniary toll of the fa...

  16. 2003 safety belt usage survey in Kentucky.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish 2003 safety belt and child safety seat usage rates in Kentucky. The 2003 survey continues to document the results after enactment of a statewide mandatory safety belt law in 1994 and safety belt enforcemen...

  17. 2004 safety belt usage survey in Kentucky.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2004-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish 2004 safety belt and child safety seat usage rates in Kentucky. The 2004 survey continues to document the results after enactment of a statewide mandatory safety belt law in 1994 and safety belt enforcemen...

  18. 30 CFR 77.1107 - Belt conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Belt conveyors. 77.1107 Section 77.1107 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY... § 77.1107 Belt conveyors. Belt conveyors in locations where fire would create a hazard to personnel...

  19. Seat Belts: 1949-1956

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1979-04-01

    The study assesses the impact of the consumer misconceptions, the lack of a seat belt standard, corporate attitudes towards safety, and the role of safety advocates. In addition, the study assesses the validity of the oft-stated hypothesis "safety do...

  20. Folding superfunnel to describe cooperative folding of interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Smeller, László

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a generalization of the well-known folding funnel concept of proteins. In the funnel model the polypeptide chain is treated as an individual object not interacting with other proteins. Since biological systems are considerably crowded, protein-protein interaction is a fundamental feature during the life cycle of proteins. The folding superfunnel proposed here describes the folding process of interacting proteins in various situations. The first example discussed is the folding of the freshly synthesized protein with the aid of chaperones. Another important aspect of protein-protein interactions is the folding of the recently characterized intrinsically disordered proteins, where binding to target proteins plays a crucial role in the completion of the folding process. The third scenario where the folding superfunnel is used is the formation of aggregates from destabilized proteins, which is an important factor in case of several conformational diseases. The folding superfunnel constructed here with the minimal assumption about the interaction potential explains all three cases mentioned above. Proteins 2016; 84:1009-1016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. 40Ar 39Ar Ages and tectonic setting of ophiolite from the Neyriz area, southeast Zagros Range, Iran

    Lanphere, M.A.; Pamic, J.

    1983-01-01

    An ophiolite, considered to be an allochthonous fragment of Tethyan oceanic crust and mantle, crops out near Neyriz in the Zagros Range, Iran. 40Ar 39Ar ages ranging from 76.8 ?? 23.8 Ma to 105 ?? 23.3 Ma were measured on hornblende from five samples of plagiogranite and diabase from the ophiolite. The most precise ages are 85.9 ?? 3.8 Ma for a diabase and 83.6 ?? 8.4 Ma for a plagiogranite. The weighted mean age of hornblende from the five samples is 87.5 ?? 7.2 Ma which indicates that the igneous part of the Neyriz ophiolite formed during the early part of the Late Cretaceous. Pargasite from amphibolite below peridotite of the Neyriz ophiolite has a 40Ar 39Ar age of 94.9 ?? 7.6 Ma. The pargasite age agrees within analytical uncertainty with the ages measured on diabase and plagiogranite. Comparable ages have been measured on igneous rocks from the Samail ophiolite of Oman and on amphibolite below peridotite of the Samail ophiolite. ?? 1983.

  2. Seat Belt Sign and Its Significance

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Amit; Inamadar, Praveenkumar Ishwarappa; Subrahmanyam, Bhattara Vishweswar

    2013-01-01

    Safety belts are the most important safety system in motor vehicles and when worn intend to prevent serious injuries. However, in unusual circumstances (high velocity motor vehicle collisions) these safety measures (seat belts) can be the source and cause of serious injuries. The seat belt syndrome was first described as early by Garrett and Braunste in but the term “seat belt sign” was discussed by Doersch and Dozier. Medical personnel's involved in emergency care of trauma patients should be aware of seat belt sign and there should a higher index of suspicion to rule out underlying organ injuries. PMID:24479100

  3. Tectonics of some Amazonian greenstone belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Greenstone belts exposed amid gneisses, granitoid rocks, and less abundant granulites along the northern and eastern margins of the Amazonian Craton yield Trans-Amazonican metamorphic ages of 2.0-2.1 Ga. Early proterozoic belts in the northern region probably originated as ensimatic island arc complexes. The Archean Carajas belt in the southeastern craton probably formed in an extensional basin on older continental basement. That basement contains older Archean belts with pillow basalts and komatiites. Belts of ultramafic rocks warrant investigatijon as possible ophiolites. A discussion follows.

  4. Seat belt use on interstate highways.

    PubMed Central

    Wells, J K; Williams, A F; Lund, A K

    1990-01-01

    More than 5,000 miles of limited-access highways in the eastern United States and Canada were traveled to observe seat belt use. Overall belt use was 58 percent in the United States and 79 percent in Canada. The data indicate that belt use in the United States follows a different pattern on interstate highways than on other streets and roads, with relatively high belt use rates (over 50 percent) appearing to be somewhat independent of belt use law provisions. PMID:2343969

  5. Structural Bridges through Fold Space.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Hannah; Deane, Charlotte M

    2015-09-01

    Several protein structure classification schemes exist that partition the protein universe into structural units called folds. Yet these schemes do not discuss how these units sit relative to each other in a global structure space. In this paper we construct networks that describe such global relationships between folds in the form of structural bridges. We generate these networks using four different structural alignment methods across multiple score thresholds. The networks constructed using the different methods remain a similar distance apart regardless of the probability threshold defining a structural bridge. This suggests that at least some structural bridges are method specific and that any attempt to build a picture of structural space should not be reliant on a single structural superposition method. Despite these differences all representations agree on an organisation of fold space into five principal community structures: all-α, all-β sandwiches, all-β barrels, α/β and α + β. We project estimated fold ages onto the networks and find that not only are the pairings of unconnected folds associated with higher age differences than bridged folds, but this difference increases with the number of networks displaying an edge. We also examine different centrality measures for folds within the networks and how these relate to fold age. While these measures interpret the central core of fold space in varied ways they all identify the disposition of ancestral folds to fall within this core and that of the more recently evolved structures to provide the peripheral landscape. These findings suggest that evolutionary information is encoded along these structural bridges. Finally, we identify four highly central pivotal folds representing dominant topological features which act as key attractors within our landscapes.

  6. How Does Your Protein Fold? Elucidating the Apomyoglobin Folding Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, H. Jane; Wright, Peter E.

    2017-01-01

    Conspectus Although each type of protein fold and in some cases individual proteins within a fold classification can have very different mechanisms of folding, the underlying biophysical and biochemical principles that operate to cause a linear polypeptide chain to fold into a globular structure must be the same. In an aqueous solution, the protein takes up the thermodynamically most stable structure, but the pathway along which the polypeptide proceeds in order to reach that structure is a function of the amino acid sequence, which must be the final determining factor, not only in shaping the final folded structure, but in dictating the folding pathway. A number of groups have focused on a single protein or group of proteins, to determine in detail the factors that influence the rate and mechanism of folding in a defined system, with the hope that hypothesis-driven experiments can elucidate the underlying principles governing the folding process. Our research group has focused on the folding of the globin family of proteins, and in particular on the monomeric protein apomyoglobin. Apomyoglobin (apoMb) folds relatively slowly (~2 seconds) via an ensemble of obligatory intermediates that form rapidly after the initiation of folding. The folding pathway can be dissected using rapid-mixing techniques, which can probe processes in the millisecond time range. Stopped-flow measurements detected by circular dichroism (CD) or fluorescence spectroscopy give information on the rates of folding events. Quench-flow experiments utilize the differential rates of hydrogen-deuterium exchange of amide protons protected in parts of the structure that are folded early; protection of amides can be detected by mass spectrometry or proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). In addition, apoMb forms an intermediate at equilibrium at pH ~ 4, which is sufficiently stable for it to be structurally characterized by solution methods such as CD, fluorescence and NMR spectroscopies

  7. Triple junction orogeny: tectonic evolution of the Pan-African Northern Damara Belt, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Jérémie; Saalmann, Kerstin; Naydenov, Kalin V.; Milani, Lorenzo; Charlesworth, Eugene G.; Kinnaird, Judith A.; Frei, Dirk; Kramers, Jan D.; Zwingmann, Horst

    2014-05-01

    Trench-trench-trench triple junctions are generally geometrically and kinematically unstable and therefore can result at the latest stages in complicated collisional orogenic belts. In such geodynamic sites, mechanism and timescale of deformations that accommodate convergence and final assembly of the three colliding continental plates are poorly studied. In western Namibia, Pan-African convergence of three cratonic blocks led to pene-contemporaneous closure of two highly oblique oceanic domains and formation of the triple junction Damara Orogen where the NE-striking Damara Belt abuts to the west against the NNW-striking Kaoko-Gariep Belt. Detailed description of structures and microstructures associated with remote sensing analysis, and dating of individual deformation events by means of K-Ar, Ar-Ar (micas) and U-Pb (zircon) isotopic studies from the Northern Damara Belt provide robust constraints on the tectonic evolution of this palaeo-triple junction orogeny. There, passive margin sequences of the Neoproterozoic ocean were polydeformed and polymetamorphosed to the biotite zone of the greenschist facies to up to granulite facies and anatexis towards the southern migmatitic core of the Central Damara Belt. Subtle relict structures and fold pattern analyses reveal the existence of an early D1 N-S shortening event, tentatively dated between ~635 Ma and ~580 Ma using published data. D1 structures were almost obliterated by pervasive and major D2 E-W coaxial shortening, related to the closure of the Kaoko-Gariep oceanic domain and subsequent formation of the NNW-striking Kaoko-Gariep Belt to the west of the study area. Early, km-scale D1 E-W trending steep folds were refolded during this D2 event, producing either Type I or Type II fold interference patterns visible from space. The D2 E-W convergence could have lasted until ~533 Ma based on published and new U-Pb ages. The final D3 NW-SE convergence in the northernmost Damara Belt produced a NE-striking deformation

  8. Fold-up concrete construction.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-01-01

    The fold-up method of concrete construction is a relatively new method of precasting a variety of structural shapes on a single flat surface and then folding portions up to form a three-dimensional shape. Structural members as beams, girders, columns...

  9. Problem Solving through Paper Folding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wares, Arsalan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a couple of challenging mathematical problems that involve paper folding. These problem-solving tasks can be used to foster geometric and algebraic thinking among students. The context of paper folding makes some of the abstract mathematical ideas involved relatively concrete. When implemented…

  10. The Southeast Asian Tin Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, M. O.; Rajah, S. S.; Askury, A. K.; Putthapiban, P.; Djaswadi, S.

    1995-07-01

    The Southeast Asian Tin Belt is a north-south elongate zone 2800 km long and 400 km wide, extending from Burma (Myanmar) and Thailand to Peninsular Malaysia and the Indonesian Tin Islands. Altogether 9.6 million tonnes of tin, equivalent to 54% of the world's tin production is derived from this region. Most of the granitoids in the region can be grouped geographically into elongate provinces or belts, based on petrographic and geochronological features. - The Main Range Granitoid Province in western Peninsular Malaysia, southern Peninsular Thailand and central Thailand is almost entirely made up of biotite granite (184-230 Ma). Tin deposits associated with these granites contributed 55% of the historic tin production of Southeast Asia. - The Northern Granitoid Province in northern Thailand (0.1% of tin production) also has dominant biotite granite (200-269 Ma) but it is distinguished by abundant post-intrusion deformation. - The Eastern Granitoid Province extends from eastern Peninsular Malaysia to eastern Thailand. The Malaysian part is subdivided into the East Coast Belt (220-263 Ma), Boundary Range Belt (197-257 Ma) and Central Belt (79-219 Ma). The granitoids cover a wide compositional range from biotite granite to hornblende-biotite granite/granodiorite and diorite-gabbro. Tin deposits are associated with biotite granite in the East Coast Belt (3% of tin production). The granitoids in the other areas of the Eastern Granitoid Province are barren. - The Western Granitoid Province (22-149 Ma) in northern Peninsular Thailand, western Thailand and Burma has biotite granite and hornblende-biotite granite/granodiorite. Tin deposits are associated with biotite granite, which probably is the dominant phase (14% of tin production). The granitoids of the Indonesian Tin Islands (193-251 Ma) do not permit grouping into geographically distinct units. Main Range-type and Eastern Province-type plutons occur next to each other. Most of the tin deposits are associated with Main

  11. Periodic folding of viscous sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribe, Neil M.

    2003-09-01

    The periodic folding of a sheet of viscous fluid falling upon a rigid surface is a common fluid mechanical instability that occurs in contexts ranging from food processing to geophysics. Asymptotic thin-layer equations for the combined stretching-bending deformation of a two-dimensional sheet are solved numerically to determine the folding frequency as a function of the sheet’s initial thickness, the pouring speed, the height of fall, and the fluid properties. As the buoyancy increases, the system bifurcates from “forced” folding driven kinematically by fluid extrusion to “free” folding in which viscous resistance to bending is balanced by buoyancy. The systematics of the numerically predicted folding frequency are in good agreement with laboratory experiments.

  12. Drivers' assessment of Ford's belt reminder system.

    PubMed

    Williams, Allan F; Wells, Joann K

    2003-12-01

    In recent model years, Ford vehicles have been equipped with a supplementary seat belt reminder system that flashes and chimes intermittently for up to 5 min if the driver is unbelted. Sound- and light-based belt reminder systems of various types are beginning to appear in the market place, and it is important to learn about their acceptance and ability to increase belt use. The present study was designed to ascertain consumer reaction and reported belt use regarding the Ford system. Personal interviews were conducted with 405 drivers of vehicles with the reminder system. Among the drivers, 67% said they had activated the belt reminder one or more times, 73% said that the last time this happened they fastened their belts, 46% said their belt use had increased since driving this vehicle, 78% said they liked the reminder system, and 79% said they wanted a reminder system like this in their next vehicle. Five percent had disabled the system. Part-time users were responsive to the reminder, for example, of those who said they currently used belts usually but not on some occasions, 70% said they fastened their seat belts the last time the reminder was activated and 76% said their belt use had increased. Five percent spontaneously mentioned the belt reminder as an especially disliked feature of their new vehicles, and 2% said their belt use had decreased since having it. The 7% of respondents who reported they used belts never or very occasionally were least responsive to the system. Overall, the Ford belt reminder system is being favorably received.

  13. The Scattered Kuiper Belt Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, C. A.; Jewitt, D. C.; Luu, J. X.

    1999-09-01

    We describe a continuing survey of the Kuiper Belt conducted at the 3.6-m Canada France Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The survey employs a 12288 x 8192 pixel CCD mosaic to image the sky to red magnitude 24. All detected objects are targeted for systematic follow-up observations, allowing us to determine their orbital characteristics. Three new members of the rare Scattered Kuiper Belt Object class have been identified, bringing the known population of such objects to four. The SKBOs are thought to have been scattered outward by Neptune, and are a potential source of the short-period comets. Using a Maximum Likelihood method, we place observational constraints on the total number and mass of the SKBOs.

  14. Evidence for a complex archean deformational history; southwestern Michipicoten Greenstone Belt, Ontario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgill, George E.; Shrady, Catherine H.

    1986-01-01

    The Michipicoten Greenstone Belt extends for about 150 km ENE from the northeastern angle of Lake Superior. In common with many other Archean greenstone belts, it is characterized by generally steep bedding dips and a distribution of major lithologic types suggesting a crudely synclinal structure for the belt as a whole. Detailed mapping and determination of structural sequence demonstrates that the structure is much more complex. The Archean history of the belt includes formation of at least three regionally significant cleavages, kilometer-scale overturning, extensive shearing, and diabase intrusion. Most well defined, mappable 'packages' of sedimentary rocks appear to be bounded by faults. These faults were active relatively early in the structural history of the belt, when extensive overturning also occurred. Steepening of dips, NW-SE shortening, development of steep NE cleavage, and pervasive shearing all postdate the early faulting and the regional overturning, obscuring much of the detail needed to define the geometry of the earlier structures. The results obtained so far suggest, however, that the Michipicoten Greenstone Belt underwent an early stage of thrusting and associated isoclinal folding, probably in a convergent tectonic environment.

  15. Liquid belt radiator design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teagan, W. P.; Fitzgerald, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    The Liquid Belt Radiator (LBR) is an advanced concept developed to meet the needs of anticipated future space missions. A previous study documented the advantages of this concept as a lightweight, easily deployable alternative to present day space heat rejection systems. The technical efforts associated with this study concentrate on refining the concept of the LBR as well as examining the issues of belt dynamics and potential application of the LBR to intermediate and high temperature heat rejection applications. A low temperature point design developed in previous work is updated assuming the use of diffusion pump oil, Santovac-6, as the heat transfer media. Additional analytical and design effort is directed toward determining the impact of interface heat exchanger, fluid bath sealing, and belt drive mechanism designs on system performance and mass. The updated design supports the earlier result by indicating a significant reduction in system specific system mass as compared to heat pipe or pumped fluid radiator concepts currently under consideration (1.3 kg/sq m versus 5 kg/sq m).

  16. New Criteria to Assess Seismic and Rock Burst Hazard in Coal Mines / Nowe Kryteria Dla Oceny Zagrożenia Sejsmicznego I Tąpaniami W Kopalniach Węgla Kamiennego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutke, Grzegorz; Dubiński, Józef; Lurka, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents new criteria of seismic and rock burst hazard assessment in Polish hard coal mines where longwall mining system is common practice. The presented criteria are based on the results of continuous recording of seismic events and analysis of selected seismological parameters: spatial location of seismic event in relation to mining workings, seismic energy, seismic energy release per unit coal face advance, b-value of Gutenberg-Richter law, seismic energy index EI, seismic moment M0, weighted value of peak particle velocity PPVW. These parameters are determined in a moving daily time windows or time windows with fixed number of seismic tremors. Time changes of these parameters are then compared with mean value estimated in the analyzed area. This is the basis to indicate the zones of high seismic and rock burst hazard in specific moment in time during mining process. Additionally, the zones of high seismic and rock burst hazard are determined by utilization of passive seismic tomography method. All the calculated seismic parameters in moving time windows are used to quantify seismic and rock burst hazard by four level scales. In practice, assessment of seismic and rock burst hazard is used to make daily decision about using rock burst prevention activities and correction of further exploitation of monitored coal panel. Zagrożenie sejsmiczne i związane z nim genetycznie zagrożenie tąpnięciem w dalszym ciągu należą do najgroźniejszych zagrożeń naturalnych występujących w polskich kopalniach węgla kamiennego. W ostatnich latach w kopalniach Górnośląskiego Zagłębia Węglowego (GZW) rocznie rejestrowano 1000÷1500 wstrząsów o energii sejsmicznej Es ≥ 1·105J (magnituda lokalna ML ≥ 1.7), a najsilniejsze z nich osiągały energię Es = 4 ·109J (ML = 4.1). W latach 1991-2010 odnotowano w GZW 101 tąpnięć, z których około 66% miało miejsce w wyrobiskach chodnikowych, powodując ich uszkodzenia lub całkowite zniszczenie, a w

  17. Structural analysis of the Hasan-Robat marbles as traces of folded basement in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadimi, Alireza

    2015-11-01

    Cherty marbles of Hasan-Robat area, northwest of Isfahan, in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone of Iran preserves evidences of multiple deformational events. The Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone is the inner crystalline zone of the Zagros Orogen, which has been highly deformed and exhumed during continental collision between the Arabian Plate and Central Iran. The Hasan-Robat area is an example of the exposed Precambrian-Paleozoic basement rocks that stretched along two NW-SE-trending faults and located in the inner part of the HasanRobat positive flower strcuture. The Hasan-Robat marbles record a complex shortening and shearing history. This lead to the development of disharmonic ptygmatic folds with vertical to sub-vertical axes and some interference patterns of folding that may have been created from deformations during the Pan-African Orogeny and later phases. Based on this research, tectonic evolution of the Hasan-Robat area is interpreted as the product of three major geotectonic events that have been started after Precambrian to Quaternary: (1) old deformation phases (2) contractional movements and (3) strike-slip movements. Different sets and distributions of joints, faults and folds are confirmed with effect of several deformational stages of the area and formation of the flower structure.

  18. Effective Potentials for Folding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nan-Yow; Su, Zheng-Yao; Mou, Chung-Yu

    2006-02-01

    A coarse-grained off-lattice model that is not biased in any way to the native state is proposed to fold proteins. To predict the native structure in a reasonable time, the model has included the essential effects of water in an effective potential. Two new ingredients, the dipole-dipole interaction and the local hydrophobic interaction, are introduced and are shown to be as crucial as the hydrogen bonding. The model allows successful folding of the wild-type sequence of protein G and may have provided important hints to the study of protein folding.

  19. Hydrothermal dolomitization of the Bekhme formation (Upper Cretaceous), Zagros Basin, Kurdistan Region of Iraq: Record of oil migration and degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansurbeg, Howri; Morad, Daniel; Othman, Rushdy; Morad, Sadoon; Ceriani, Andrea; Al-Aasm, Ihsan; Kolo, Kamal; Spirov, Pavel; Proust, Jean Noel; Preat, Alain; Koyi, Hemin

    2016-07-01

    The common presence of oil seepages in dolostones is widespread in Cretaceous carbonate successions of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. This integrated field, petrographic, chemical, stable C, O and Sr isotopes, and fluid inclusion study aims to link dolomitization to the origin and geochemical evolution of fluids and oil migration in the Upper Cretaceous Bekhme carbonates. Flux of hot basinal (hydrothermal) brines, which is suggested to have occurred during the Zagros Orogeny, resulted in dolomitization and cementation of vugs and fractures by coarse-crystalline saddle dolomite, equant calcite and anhydrite. The saddle dolomite and host dolostones have similar stable isotopic composition and formed prior to oil migration from hot (81-115 °C) basinal NaCl-MgCl2-H2O brines with salinities of 18-22 wt.% NaCl eq. The equant calcite cement, which surrounds and hence postdates saddle dolomite, has precipitated during oil migration from cooler (60-110 °C) NaCl-CaCl2-H2O brines (14-18 wt.% NaCl eq). The yellowish fluorescence color of oil inclusions in the equant calcite indicates that the oil had API gravity of 15-25° composition, which is lighter than present-day oil in the reservoirs (API of 10-17°). This difference in oil composition is attributed to oil degradation by the flux of meteoric water, which is evidenced by the low δ13C values (- 8.5‰ to - 3.9‰ VPDB) as well as by nil salinity and low temperature in fluid inclusions of late columnar calcite cement. This study demonstrates that linking fluid flux history and related diagenesis to the tectonic evolution of the basin provides important clues to the timing of oil migration, degradation and reservoir evolution.

  20. Patterns of folding and fold interference in oblique contraction of layered rocks of the inverted Cobar Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. V.; Marshall, B.

    1992-12-01

    The inverted Cobar Basin, within the Lachlan Fold Belt of New South Wales, Australia, comprises a mid-Palaeozoic cover sequence, originally deposited in a NNW-trending basin. The pattern of F 1 folding in the layered cover rocks changes from east to west; from tight well-cleaved folds parallel to the NNW-trending basin margin on the east, to open poorly cleaved en echelon folds at about 35° to the margin, further to the west. The change in fold trend and strain intensity has been repeatedly ascribed to the differing behaviour of discrete zones, decoupled across a north-trending strike-slip fault boundary. New field data show that the changes in orientation and strain intensity of F 1 structures are progressively developed, that an abrupt boundary between discrete zones cannot be substantiated, and that interpretations involving decoupled blocks are not supported by the evidence. Conversely, the data require coherent behaviour across the basin, such that the overall pattern of F 1 folding must be explained by strain compatible processes. This new interpretation of the F 1 deformation pattern has been modelled and quantitatively analysed. Theoretical predictions of the orientation of structures in unlayered isotropic material undergoing oblique contraction are inapplicable to layered anisotropic material. The style of deformation in layered material will reflect the interaction of the bulk strain pattern due to convergence together with the influence of the layering anisotropy. The orientations of the finite strain axes inferred from the folding need not match those of the bulk deformation; the amount of strain recorded by folding may be unrepresentative of that developed in the deformed tract. Oblique contraction at a range of convergence angles was simulated by models employing layers of wet tissue paper. Quantitative analysis of the strain patterns in this layered anisotropic material showed consistent departures from the theoretical predictions for isotropic

  1. The mechanics of fault-bend folding and tear-fault systems in the Niger Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benesh, Nathan Philip

    This dissertation investigates the mechanics of fault-bend folding using the discrete element method (DEM) and explores the nature of tear-fault systems in the deep-water Niger Delta fold-and-thrust belt. In Chapter 1, we employ the DEM to investigate the development of growth structures in anticlinal fault-bend folds. This work was inspired by observations that growth strata in active folds show a pronounced upward decrease in bed dip, in contrast to traditional kinematic fault-bend fold models. Our analysis shows that the modeled folds grow largely by parallel folding as specified by the kinematic theory; however, the process of folding over a broad axial surface zone yields a component of fold growth by limb rotation that is consistent with the patterns observed in natural folds. This result has important implications for how growth structures can he used to constrain slip and paleo-earthquake ages on active blind-thrust faults. In Chapter 2, we expand our DEM study to investigate the development of a wider range of fault-bend folds. We examine the influence of mechanical stratigraphy and quantitatively compare our models with the relationships between fold and fault shape prescribed by the kinematic theory. While the synclinal fault-bend models closely match the kinematic theory, the modeled anticlinal fault-bend folds show robust behavior that is distinct from the kinematic theory. Specifically, we observe that modeled structures maintain a linear relationship between fold shape (gamma) and fault-horizon cutoff angle (theta), rather than expressing the non-linear relationship with two distinct modes of anticlinal folding that is prescribed by the kinematic theory. These observations lead to a revised quantitative relationship for fault-bend folds that can serve as a useful interpretation tool. Finally, in Chapter 3, we examine the 3D relationships of tear- and thrust-fault systems in the western, deep-water Niger Delta. Using 3D seismic reflection data and new

  2. Safety belt promotion: theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G D; Moffit, P B

    1988-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide practitioners a rationale and description of selected theoretically based approaches to safety belt promotion. Theory failure is a threat to the integrity and effectiveness of safety belt promotion. The absence of theory driven programs designed to promote safety belt use is a concern of this paper. Six theoretical models from the social and behavioral sciences are reviewed with suggestions for application to promoting safety belt use and include Theory of Reasoned Action, the Health Belief Model, Fear Arousal, Operant Learning, Social Learning Theory, and Diffusion of Innovations. Guidelines for the selection and utilization of theory are discussed.

  3. Investigation of Moving Belt Radiator Technology Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teagan, W. Peter; Aguilar, Jerry L.

    1994-01-01

    The development of an advanced spacecraft radiator technology is reported. The moving belt radiator is a thermal radiator concept with the promise of lower specific mass (per kW rejected) than that afforded by existing technologies. The results of a parametric study to estimate radiator mass for future space power systems is presented. It is shown that this technology can be scaled up to 200 MW for higher rejection temperatures. Several aspects of the design concept are discussed, including the dynamics of a large rotating belt in microgravity. The results of a computer code developed to model the belt dynamics are presented. A series of one-g experiments to investigate the dynamics of small belts is described. A comprehensive test program to investigate belt dynamics in microgravity aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft is discussed. It was found that the desired circular shape can readily be achieved in microgravity. It is also shown that a rotating belt is stable when subjected to simulated attitude control maneuvers. Heat exchanger design is also investigated. Several sealing concepts were examined experimentally, and are discussed. Overall heat transfer coefficients to the rotating belt are presented. Material properties for various belt materials, including screen meshes, are also presented. The results presented in this report indicate that the moving belt radiator concept is technically feasible.

  4. Continuous Mass Measurement on Conveyor Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomobe, Yuki; Tasaki, Ryosuke; Yamazaki, Takanori; Ohnishi, Hideo; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Kurosu, Shigeru

    The continuous mass measurement of packages on a conveyor belt will become greatly important. In the mass measurement, the sequence of products is generally random. An interesting possibility of raising throughput of the conveyor line without increasing the conveyor belt speed is offered by the use of two or three conveyor belt scales (called a multi-stage conveyor belt scale). The multi-stage conveyor belt scale can be created which will adjust the conveyor belt length to the product length. The conveyor belt scale usually has maximum capacities of less than 80kg and 140cm, and achieves measuring rates of more than 150 packages per minute and more. The output signals from the conveyor belt scale are always contaminated with noises due to vibrations of the conveyor and the product to be measured in motion. In this paper an employed digital filter is of Finite Impulse Response (FIR) type designed under the consideration on the dynamics of the conveyor system. The experimental results on the conveyor belt scale suggest that the filtering algorithms are effective enough to practical applications to some extent.

  5. Workshop on Techtonic Evolution of Greenstone Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewit, M. J. (Editor); Ashwal, Lewis D. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Topics addressed include: greenstone belt externalities; boundaries; rock terranes; synthesis and destiny; tectonic evolution; rock components and structure; sedimentology; stratigraphy; volcanism; metamorphism; and geophysics.

  6. Condition-Based Conveyor Belt Replacement Strategy in Lignite Mines with Random Belt Deterioration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazej, Ryszard; Jurdziak, Leszek

    2017-12-01

    In Polish lignite surface mines, condition-based belt replacement strategies are applied in order to assure profitable refurbishment of worn out belts performed by external firms specializing in belt maintenance. In two of three lignite mines, staff asses belt condition subjectively during visual inspections. Only one mine applies specialized diagnostic device (HRDS) allowing objective magnetic evaluation of belt core condition in order to choose the most profitable moment for the dismantling of worn out belt segments from conveyors and sending them to the maintenance firm which provides their refurbishment. This article describes the advantages of a new diagnostic device called DiagBelt. It was developed at the Faculty of Geoengineering, Mining and Geology, Wroclaw University of Science and Technology. Economic gains from its application are calculated for the lignite mine and for the belt maintenance firm, taking into account random life (durability) of new and reconditioned belts (after the 1st and the 2nd refurbishment). Recursive calculations for following years allow the estimation of the length and costs of replaced, reconditioned and purchased belts on an annual basis, while the use of the Monte Carlo method allows the estimation of their variability caused by random deterioration of belts. Savings are obtained due to better selection of moments (times) for the replacement of belt segments and die to the possibility to qualify worn out belts for refurbishment without the need to remove their covers. In effect, increased belt durability and lowered share of waste belts (which were not qualified for reconditioning) create savings which can quickly cover expenditures on new diagnostic tools and regular belt inspections in the mine.

  7. Repairing the vibratory vocal fold.

    PubMed

    Long, Jennifer L

    2018-01-01

    A vibratory vocal fold replacement would introduce a new treatment paradigm for structural vocal fold diseases such as scarring and lamina propria loss. This work implants a tissue-engineered replacement for vocal fold lamina propria and epithelium in rabbits and compares histology and function to injured controls and orthotopic transplants. Hypotheses were that the cell-based implant would engraft and control the wound response, reducing fibrosis and restoring vibration. Translational research. Rabbit adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC) were embedded within a three-dimensional fibrin gel, forming the cell-based outer vocal fold replacement (COVR). Sixteen rabbits underwent unilateral resection of vocal fold epithelium and lamina propria, as well as reconstruction with one of three treatments: fibrin glue alone with healing by secondary intention, replantation of autologous resected vocal fold cover, or COVR implantation. After 4 weeks, larynges were examined histologically and with phonation. Fifteen rabbits survived. All tissues incorporated well after implantation. After 1 month, both graft types improved histology and vibration relative to injured controls. Extracellular matrix (ECM) of the replanted mucosa was disrupted, and ECM of the COVR implants remained immature. Immune reaction was evident when male cells were implanted into female rabbits. Best histologic and short-term vibratory outcomes were achieved with COVR implants containing male cells implanted into male rabbits. Vocal fold cover replacement with a stem cell-based tissue-engineered construct is feasible and beneficial in acute rabbit implantation. Wound-modifying behavior of the COVR implant is judged to be an important factor in preventing fibrosis. NA. Laryngoscope, 128:153-159, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Cleavage strain in the Variscan fold belt, County Cork, Ireland, estimated from stretched arsenopyrite rosettes

    Ford, M.; Ferguson, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    In south-west Ireland, hydrothermally formed arsenopyrite crystals in a Devonian mudstone have responded to Variscan deformation by brittle extension fracture and fragment separation. The interfragment gaps and terminal extension zones of each crystal are infilled with fibrous quartz. Stretches within the cleavage plane have been calculated by the various methods available, most of which can be modified to incorporate terminal extension zones. The Strain Reversal Method is the most accurate currently available but still gives a minimum estimate of the overall strain. The more direct Hossain method, which gives only slightly lower estimates with this data, is more practical for field use. A strain ellipse can be estimated from each crystal rosette composed of three laths (assuming the original interlimb angles were all 60??) and, because actual rather than relative stretches are estimated, this provides a lower bound to the area increase in the plane of cleavage. Based on the average of our calculated strain ellipses this area increase is at least 114% and implies an average shortening across the cleavage of at least 53%. However, several lines of evidence suggest that the cleavage deformation was more intense and more oblate than that calculated, and we argue that a 300% area increase in the cleavage plane and 75% shortening across the cleavage are more realistic estimates of the true strain. Furthermore, the along-strike elongation indicated is at least 80%, which may be regionally significant. Estimates of orogenic contraction derived from balanced section construction should therefore take into account the possibility of a substantial strike elongation, and tectonic models that can accommodate such elongations need to be developed. ?? 1985.

  9. Preliminary structural model for the southwestern part of the Michipicoten greenstone belt, Ontario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgill, G. E.; Shrady, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The southwestern part of the Michipicoten Greenstone Belt includes a 100 sq km fume kill extending northeastwards from the twon of Wawa, Ontario. Except for a strip along the Magpie River that is covered by Pleistocene gravels, outcrop in the fume kill averages about 30-50%. Within this area are all the major lithologic belts characteristic of the southwestern fourth of the Michipicoten Greenstone Belt. All of the area mapped to date lies within Chabenel Township, recently mapped at 4" = 1 mile. Following a brief reconnaissance in 1983, mapping at a scale of 1" = 400' was begun within and adjacent to the fume kill in 1984. Two objectives are sought (1) determinaion of the geometry and sequence of folding, faulting, cleavage development, and intrusion; and (2) defining and tracing lithologic packages, and evaluating the nature of the contacts between these packages. Results for objective (1) are discussed in a companion abstract; this abstract will present tentative results for objective.

  10. Study of Upper Miocene Oysters(Plecypoda) From the Mishan Formation in south west of Firuzabad, Fars, Iran(Zagros mountain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehbozorgi, Mehdi; Sabouhi, Mostafa; Nabavi, Hamid

    2010-05-01

    The out crapes of Mishan Formation located in Aghar area(Firuzabad city) south west of Fars and 70km south west of Firuzabad. this Formation mostly consist of limestone, marly limestone and marlstone with 800m thickness. 6key beds distinctive from limestone beds are recognized in this area. this key beds are useful for local and regional correlation in Zagros mountains. the key beds from base to top are: Red algae, Bryozoa, Gastropoda and Plecypoda, Crabs and Oysters. Mishan Formation in this area is between Gachsaran F.M(Under Formation), Conformable and Aghajari F.M(Upper Formation), Conformable. With due attention to rang and distribution of the Macrofossils, 5 local assmblage biozone were recognized, that is confirming time limit from Early- Upper Miocene. this research cheked and controled a biostrom Plecypoda(Oysters) level by thickness 3- 4m. this biostrom located around 550m the base of section. Ofcurse more of this Plecypoda be assinged to order pterriodia and Genus Oyster. Along with Oysters, Pecten and Venus can be see. This biostrom made up a bioclastic shoal shallow deep in the margin of sea Miocene. This Oysters report from Mishan Formation of Firuzabad, Fars, Zagros, Iran: Ostrea virleti var. crassicostat, Ostrea virleti Desh var. persica, Ostrea digitatai Echiwald var. rohlfsi, Ostrea lamellose. Ostrea cf. biowwondeli. Master of science in Geology (Paleontology), University of Isfahan, Iran.

  11. Trio of Neptunes and their Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-05-01

    Using the ultra-precise HARPS spectrograph on ESO's 3.6-m telescope at La Silla (Chile), a team of European astronomers have discovered that a nearby star is host to three Neptune-mass planets. The innermost planet is most probably rocky, while the outermost is the first known Neptune-mass planet to reside in the habitable zone. This unique system is likely further enriched by an asteroid belt. ESO PR Photo 18a/06 ESO PR Photo 18a/06 Planetary System Around HD 69830 (Artist's Impression) "For the first time, we have discovered a planetary system composed of several Neptune-mass planets", said Christophe Lovis, from the Geneva Observatory and lead-author of the paper presenting the results [1]. During more than two years, the astronomers carefully studied HD 69830, a rather inconspicuous nearby star slightly less massive than the Sun. Located 41 light-years away towards the constellation of Puppis (the Stern), it is, with a visual magnitude of 5.95, just visible with the unaided eye. The astronomers' precise radial-velocity measurements [2] allowed them to discover the presence of three tiny companions orbiting their parent star in 8.67, 31.6 and 197 days. "Only ESO's HARPS instrument installed at the La Silla Observatory, Chile, made it possible to uncover these planets", said Michel Mayor, also from Geneva Observatory, and HARPS Principal Investigator. "Without any doubt, it is presently the world's most precise planet-hunting machine" [3]. ESO PR Photo 18d/06 ESO PR Photo 18d/06 Phase Folded Measurements of HD 69830 The detected velocity variations are between 2 and 3 metres per second, corresponding to about 9 km/h! That's the speed of a person walking briskly. Such tiny signals could not have been distinguished from 'simple noise' by most of today's available spectrographs. The newly found planets have minimum masses between 10 and 18 times the mass of the Earth. Extensive theoretical simulations favour an essentially rocky composition for the inner planet, and

  12. Kinetic Folding Mechanism of Erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Douglas D.; Scavezze, Joanna L.; Siska, Christine C.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes what to our knowledge is the first kinetic folding studies of erythropoietin, a glycosylated four-helical bundle cytokine responsible for the regulation of red blood cell production. Kinetic responses for folding and unfolding reactions initiated by manual mixing were monitored by far-ultraviolet circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy, and folding reactions initiated by stopped-flow mixing were monitored by fluorescence. The urea concentration dependence of the observed kinetics were best described by a three-state model with a transiently populated intermediate species that is on-pathway and obligatory. This folding scheme was further supported by the excellent agreement between the free energy of unfolding and m-value calculated from the microscopic rate constants derived from this model and these parameters determined from separate equilibrium unfolding experiments. Compared to the kinetics of other members of the four-helical bundle cytokine family, erythropoietin folding and unfolding reactions were slower and less susceptible to aggregation. We tentatively attribute these slower rates and protection from association events to the large amount of carbohydrate attached to erythropoietin at four sites. PMID:19450492

  13. 47. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF CONVEYOR BELT SYSTEM SYSTEM WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF CONVEYOR BELT SYSTEM SYSTEM WITH BACK BELT DROPPING HARDENED NAILS ON THE FRONT BELT TO BE TEMPERED; MOTION STOPPED - LaBelle Iron Works, Thirtieth & Wood Streets, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  14. Overrepresentation of seat belt non-users in traffic crashes

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1988-04-01

    This study used observations of driver belt use linked with driver history information to conclude that non-users of belts are overrepresented in traffic crashes. Examining average numbers of accidents and violations per observed belted and unbelted ...

  15. States upgrade to primary enforcement seat belt laws : traffic tech.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-09-01

    States with primary seat belt enforcement laws consistently : have higher observed daytime seat belt use rates than secondary : law States. Secondary belt law States, on the other : hand, consistently have more motor vehicle fatalities who : were not...

  16. Documenting How States Recently Upgraded to Primary Seat Belt Laws

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-09-01

    States with primary seat belt enforcement laws consistently have higher observed daytime belt use rates than : secondary law States. Secondary belt law States, on the other hand, consistently have more occupant fatalities who : were not restrained th...

  17. Using haptic feedback to increase seat belt use : traffic tech.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-07-01

    The legacy of research on increasing seat belt use has : focused on enactment of seat belt legislation, public education, : high-visibility police enforcement, and seat belt : reminder systems. Several behavioral programs have : produced large, susta...

  18. Exploring the Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Chatzichristou, E. T.; Ropokis, G.; Giannakis, O.

    2012-09-01

    We present the outreach efforts of the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Loss and Energization) project, intended to provide the general public with simplified information concerning the scientific objectives of the project, its focus and its expected outcomes. MAARBLE involves monitoring of the geospace environment through space and ground-based observations, in order to understand various aspects of the radiation belts (torus-shaped regions encircling the Earth, in which high-energy charged particles are trapped by the geomagnetic field), which have direct impact on human endeavors in space (spacecraft and astronauts exposure). The public outreach website of MAARBLE, besides regular updates with relevant news, also employs a variety of multimedia (image and video galleries) and impressive sounds of space (characteristic sounds such as whistlers or tweeks) related to very low and ultra low frequency (VLF/ULF) electromagnetic waves. It also provides links to some of the most interesting relevant educational activities, including those at partner institutions such as the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at UCLA, the University of Alberta, the Swedish Institute of Space Physics and the Institute of Atmospheric Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.

  19. NoFold: RNA structure clustering without folding or alignment.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Sarah A; Kim, Junhyong

    2014-11-01

    Structures that recur across multiple different transcripts, called structure motifs, often perform a similar function-for example, recruiting a specific RNA-binding protein that then regulates translation, splicing, or subcellular localization. Identifying common motifs between coregulated transcripts may therefore yield significant insight into their binding partners and mechanism of regulation. However, as most methods for clustering structures are based on folding individual sequences or doing many pairwise alignments, this results in a tradeoff between speed and accuracy that can be problematic for large-scale data sets. Here we describe a novel method for comparing and characterizing RNA secondary structures that does not require folding or pairwise alignment of the input sequences. Our method uses the idea of constructing a distance function between two objects by their respective distances to a collection of empirical examples or models, which in our case consists of 1973 Rfam family covariance models. Using this as a basis for measuring structural similarity, we developed a clustering pipeline called NoFold to automatically identify and annotate structure motifs within large sequence data sets. We demonstrate that NoFold can simultaneously identify multiple structure motifs with an average sensitivity of 0.80 and precision of 0.98 and generally exceeds the performance of existing methods. We also perform a cross-validation analysis of the entire set of Rfam families, achieving an average sensitivity of 0.57. We apply NoFold to identify motifs enriched in dendritically localized transcripts and report 213 enriched motifs, including both known and novel structures. © 2014 Middleton and Kim; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  20. Mesoscale Modeling of Chromatin Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlick, Tamar

    2009-03-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is the fundamental protein/nucleic acid unit that stores the genetic material. Understanding how chromatin fibers fold and unfold in physiological conditions is important for interpreting fundamental biological processes like DNA replication and transcription regulation. Using a mesoscopic model of oligonucleosome chains and tailored sampling protocols, we elucidate the energetics of oligonucleosome folding/unfolding and the role of each histone tail, linker histones, and divalent ions in regulating chromatin structure. The resulting compact topologies reconcile features of the zigzag model with straight linker DNAs with the solenoid model with bent linker DNAs for optimal fiber organization and reveal dynamic and energetic aspects involved.

  1. Seat belt use in cars with air bags.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A F; Wells, J K; Lund, A K

    1990-01-01

    Seat belt use was observed in 1,628 cars with air bags and manual belts and 34,223 cars with manual seat belts only. Sixty-six percent of drivers in cars with air bags wore seat belts compared to 63 percent of drivers in cars with manual belts only. The study found no evidence for the speculation that drivers with air bags will reduce their seat belt use because they believe an air bag alone provides sufficient protection. PMID:2240346

  2. Tensioning of a belt around a drum using membrane element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. H. S.

    1980-01-01

    An application of the membrane element to the problem of the tensioning of a conveyer belt which wraps around a drum is presented. Two cases were investigated: (1) belt tension increase due to drum edge wear; and (2) material trapped between the drum and the belt. In both cases it was found that the increase in belt tension was due to the additional stretching of the belt resulting from the drum radius change rather than from the transverse deflection of the belt.

  3. 36 CFR 1004.15 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety belts. 1004.15 Section 1004.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.15 Safety... administered by the Presidio Trust will have the safety belt or child restraint system properly fastened at all...

  4. 36 CFR 1004.15 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety belts. 1004.15 Section 1004.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.15 Safety... administered by the Presidio Trust will have the safety belt or child restraint system properly fastened at all...

  5. Understanding Quaternions and the Dirac Belt Trick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staley, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Dirac belt trick is often employed in physics classrooms to show that a 2n rotation is not topologically equivalent to the absence of rotation whereas a 4n rotation is, mirroring a key property of quaternions and their isomorphic cousins, spinors. The belt trick can leave the student wondering if a real understanding of quaternions and spinors…

  6. 2017 safety belt usage survey in Kentucky.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-08-01

    The use of safety belts and child safety seats is a proven means of reducing injuries to motor vehicle occupants involved in traffic crashes. There have been various methods used in efforts to increase safety belt and safety seat usage. Past efforts ...

  7. 2016 safety belt usage survey in Kentucky.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-08-01

    The use of safety belts and child safety seats is a proven means of reducing injuries to motor vehicle occupants involved in traffic crashes. There have been various methods used in efforts to increase safety belt and safety seat usage. Past efforts ...

  8. 2015 safety belt usage survey in Kentucky.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-08-01

    The use of safety belts and child safety seats has been shown to be an effective means of : reducing injuries to motor-vehicle occupants involved in traffic crashes. There have been various : methods used in efforts to increase safety belt and safety...

  9. 2001 Safety belt usage survey in Kentucky

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish 2001 safety belt and child safety seat usage rates in Kentucky. The 2001 survey continues to document the results after enactment of a statewide mandatory safety belt law in 1994. It also documented the lo...

  10. 2002 safety belt usage survey in Kentucky

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this study was to establish 2002 safety belt and child safety seat usage rates in Kentucky. The 2002 survey continues to document the results after enactment of a statewide mandatory safety belt law in 1994. Data were collected at 20...

  11. 2000 Safety belt usage survey in Kentucky

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish 2000 safety belt and child safety seat usage rates in Kentucky. The 2000 survey continues to document the results after enactment of a statewide mandatory safety belt law in 1994. Data were collected at 20...

  12. Early Clearing of the Asteroid Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Wm. R.

    2005-03-01

    The ensemble of embryos destined to become the Jovian core may have excited the primordial asteroid belt and initiated a fragmentation cascade there. Thus, the majority of the belt mass may have drifted via gas drag into the terrestrial zone prior to the formation of Jupiter.

  13. Belt separation system under slat in fattening pig housing: effect of belt type and extraction frequency.

    PubMed

    Alonso, F; Vázquez, J; Ovejero, I; Garcimartín, M A; Mateos, A; Sánchez, E

    2010-08-01

    The efficiency of manure separation by a conveyor belt under a partially slatted floor for fattening pigs was determined for two types of belts, a flat belt with an incline of up to 6 degrees transversely and a concave belt with an incline of up to 1 degrees longitudinally. A 31.20% and 23.75% dry matter content of the solid fraction was obtained for the flat and concave belt, respectively. The flat belt was more efficient at 6 degrees than other slope angles. The residence time of the manure on the two belt types influenced the separation efficiency from a live weight of 63.00 kg upwards. The quantity of residue produced with this system was reduced to 25-40% with respect to a pit system under slat. This could mean a remarkable reduction in costs of storage, transport and application of manure. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effectiveness of Ford's belt reminder system in increasing seat belt use

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A; Wells, J; Farmer, C

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: The study investigated the effectiveness in increasing seat belt use of Ford's belt reminder system, a supplementary system that provides intermittent flashing lights and chimes for five minutes if drivers are not belted. Methods: Seat belt use of drivers in relatively new cars with and without the reminder system was unobtrusively observed as vehicles were brought to dealerships for service. Results: Overall use rates were estimated at 71% for drivers in vehicles without the reminder system and 76% for drivers in vehicles with belt reminders (p<0.01). Conclusions: Seat belt use is relatively low in the United States. The present study showed that vehicle based reminder systems can be at least modestly effective in increasing belt use, which may encourage further development of such systems. PMID:12460965

  15. Synfolding magnetization in the Jurassic Preuss Sandstone, Wyoming- Idaho-Utah thrust belt

    Hudson, M.R.; Reynolds, R.L.; Fishman, N.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Jurassic Preuss Sandstone, exposed in five thrust plates of the Wyoming-Idaho-Utah thrust belt, carried directions of remanent magnetization that group most tightly after only partial unfolding. Field, petrographic, and rock magnetic evidence indicates that the carrier of this magnetization is detrital, low-Ti titanomagnetite. The detrital titanomagnetite was remagnetized at low temperatures (75??-150??C) probably completely during folding. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and petrographic observations indicate that the detrital titanomagnetite has been affected by tectonic strain. The locus of acquisition of synfolding magnetization in the Preuss migrated in conjunction with deformation in the thrust belt. A model is presented in which synfolding magnetization was acquired during cooling and folding as strata moved up thrust ramps. A lack of reverse-polarity directions remains a puzzling feature of the remanence. -from Authors

  16. Inner Radiation Belt Dynamics and Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, P. P.; Looper, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    We present preliminary results of inner belt proton data assimilation using an augmented version of the Selesnick et al. Inner Zone Model (SIZM). By varying modeled physics parameters and solar particle injection parameters to generate many ensembles of the inner belt, then optimizing the ensemble weights according to inner belt observations from SAMPEX/PET at LEO and HEO/DOS at high altitude, we obtain the best-fit state of the inner belt. We need to fully sample the range of solar proton injection sources among the ensemble members to ensure reasonable agreement between the model ensembles and observations. Once this is accomplished, we find the method is fairly robust. We will demonstrate the data assimilation by presenting an extended interval of solar proton injections and losses, illustrating how these short-term dynamics dominate long-term inner belt climatology.

  17. Cause of vocal fold scar.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jacqui

    2010-12-01

    The prolonged debilitation, loss of income, and decrement in quality of life caused by vocal fold scar is exacerbated by our inability to successfully treat this difficult problem. As technology focuses on developing innovative treatments, we need to fully appreciate and understand the mechanisms giving rise to glottal scar, on both a macroscopic and microscopic level. This review examines recent literature pertaining to the gross and molecular mechanisms which give rise to vocal fold scar. Mechanisms of vocal fold scar production have been examined in both macroscopic and microscopic detail. Trauma and injury involving any aspect of the lamina propria, particularly the deeper layers, may result in epithelial tethering and scar formation. At the molecular level, early inflammatory cytokines activate and recruit fibroblasts which then drive the fibrotic cascade. Transforming growth factor-β enhances fibrosis and is balanced by tissue matrix metalloproteinases and hepatocyte growth factor activity. Molecular signaling offers novel opportunities to intervene in scar formation. New work investigating the cause of vocal fold scar identifies complex molecular processes leading to fibrosis in the lamina propria. Improved mechanistic understanding offers insight into prevention strategies and possible targets for antifibrotic therapies that may help prevent or treat this debilitating condition.

  18. Predicting RNA pseudoknot folding thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-01-01

    Based on the experimentally determined atomic coordinates for RNA helices and the self-avoiding walks of the P (phosphate) and C4 (carbon) atoms in the diamond lattice for the polynucleotide loop conformations, we derive a set of conformational entropy parameters for RNA pseudoknots. Based on the entropy parameters, we develop a folding thermodynamics model that enables us to compute the sequence-specific RNA pseudoknot folding free energy landscape and thermodynamics. The model is validated through extensive experimental tests both for the native structures and for the folding thermodynamics. The model predicts strong sequence-dependent helix-loop competitions in the pseudoknot stability and the resultant conformational switches between different hairpin and pseudoknot structures. For instance, for the pseudoknot domain of human telomerase RNA, a native-like and a misfolded hairpin intermediates are found to coexist on the (equilibrium) folding pathways, and the interplay between the stabilities of these intermediates causes the conformational switch that may underlie a human telomerase disease. PMID:16709732

  19. Semiempirical prediction of protein folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel; Colubri, Andrés; Appignanesi, Gustavo

    2001-08-01

    We introduce a semiempirical approach to predict ab initio expeditious pathways and native backbone geometries of proteins that fold under in vitro renaturation conditions. The algorithm is engineered to incorporate a discrete codification of local steric hindrances that constrain the movements of the peptide backbone throughout the folding process. Thus, the torsional state of the chain is assumed to be conditioned by the fact that hopping from one basin of attraction to another in the Ramachandran map (local potential energy surface) of each residue is energetically more costly than the search for a specific (Φ, Ψ) torsional state within a single basin. A combinatorial procedure is introduced to evaluate coarsely defined torsional states of the chain defined ``modulo basins'' and translate them into meaningful patterns of long range interactions. Thus, an algorithm for structure prediction is designed based on the fact that local contributions to the potential energy may be subsumed into time-evolving conformational constraints defining sets of restricted backbone geometries whereupon the patterns of nonbonded interactions are constructed. The predictive power of the algorithm is assessed by (a) computing ab initio folding pathways for mammalian ubiquitin that ultimately yield a stable structural pattern reproducing all of its native features, (b) determining the nucleating event that triggers the hydrophobic collapse of the chain, and (c) comparing coarse predictions of the stable folds of moderately large proteins (N~100) with structural information extracted from the protein data bank.

  20. Use of seatbelts in cars with automatic belts.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A F; Wells, J K; Lund, A K; Teed, N J

    1992-01-01

    Use of seatbelts in late model cars with automatic or manual belt systems was observed in suburban Washington, DC, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Philadelphia. In cars with automatic two-point belt systems, the use of shoulder belts by drivers was substantially higher than in the same model cars with manual three-point belts. This finding was true in varying degrees whatever the type of automatic belt, including cars with detachable nonmotorized belts, cars with detachable motorized belts, and especially cars with nondetachable motorized belts. Most of these automatic shoulder belts systems include manual lap belts. Use of lap belts was lower in cars with automatic two-point belt systems than in the same model cars with manual three-point belts; precisely how much lower could not be reliably estimated in this survey. Use of shoulder and lap belts was slightly higher in General Motors cars with detachable automatic three-point belts compared with the same model cars with manual three-point belts; in Hondas there was no difference in the rates of use of manual three-point belts and the rates of use of automatic three-point belts. PMID:1561301

  1. Structural profile reconstructions and thermal metamorphic evolution in the slate belt of southern Hsuehshan Range in the active Taiwan mountain belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu; Chen, Chih-Tung; Lee, Jian-Cheng; Shyu, J. Bruce H.

    2017-04-01

    The fate of passive continental margin in collisional orogens is crucial in understanding tectonic evolution of mountain belts. The active arc-continent collision of Taiwan is considered as a model case in studying mountain building processes, and largely consists of deformed margin basement and cover series. Among the whole orogeny belt, the slate belt of the Hsuehshan Range (HR) is a prominent large-scale pop-up structural on the prowedge part of the orogen, and is composed of metamorphosed Eocene to Miocene sediments which experienced only the Neogene Taiwan orogeny after diagenesis in margin graben. Characterizing the metamorphic history of the HR is essential for reconstructing its geological evolution during the mountain building processes. However, previous studies were mostly focused on northern and central HR, structural investigation coupled with metamorphic documentation in the southern part of HR, which is the most active part of the orogeny belt, is therefore targeted in this work. Since carbonaceous material is common in pelitic protolith of HR slates, the Raman spectrum of carbonaceous material (RSCM) measuring the rock peak temperature is chosen for quantitative thermal metamorphic documentation. In this study, we reconstruct a geological structural profile in western central Taiwan across the prowedge part of the mountain belt containing the southern HR by combining the surface geological data, well log records and published seismic reflection profiles. Although most of the existing data are concentrated in the fold-and-thrust belt, they are now reinforced by new field structural measurements and RSCM samples in the southern HR. In total 27 RSCM samples were collected along 2 transects perpendicular to the average strike with a dense interval about 2 km. The results allow us to map peak temperature distribution across southern HR, and provide new constraints for structural profile reconstruction and reappraisal of the structural evolution of the HR

  2. Origin of the asteroid belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherill, George W.

    1989-01-01

    Earlier and current concepts relevant to the origin of the asteroid belt are discussed and are considered in the framework of the solar system origin. Numerical and analytical solutions of the dynamical theory of planetesimal accumulation are characterized by bifurcations into runaway and nonrunaway solutions, and it is emphasized that the differences in time scales resulting from runaway and nonrunaway growth can be more important than conventional time scale differences determined by heliocentric distances. It is concluded that, in principle, it is possible to combine new calculations with previous work to formulate a theory of the asteroidal accumulation consistent with the meteoritic record and with work on the formation of terrestrial planets. Problems remaining to be addressed before a mature theory can be formulated are discussed.

  3. Control of syntectonic erosion and sedimentation on kinematic evolution of a multidecollement fold and thrust zone: Analogue modeling of folding in the southern subandean of Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnault, Romain; Callot, Jean-Paul; Ballard, Jean-François; Fraisse, Guillaume; Mengus, Jean-Marie; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2016-08-01

    Several analogue modeling studies have been conducted during the past fifteen years with the aim to discuss the effects of sedimentation and erosion on Foreland Fold and Thrust Belt, among which a few have analyzed these processes at kilometric scale (Malavieille et al., 1993; Nalpas et al., 1999; Barrier et al., 2002; Pichot and Nalpas, 2009). The influence of syn-deformation sedimentation and erosion on the structural evolution of FFTB has been clearly demonstrated. Here, we propose to go further in this approach by the study of a more complex system with a double decollement level. The natural study case is the Bolivian sub-Andean thrust and fold belt, which present all the required criteria, such as the double decollement level. A set of analogue models performed under a CT-scan have been used to test the influence of several parameters on a fold and thrust belt system, among which: (i) the spatial variation of the sediment input, (ii) the spatial variation of the erosion rate, (iii) the relative distribution of sedimentation between foreland and hinterland. These experiments led to the following observations: 1. The upper decollement level acts as a decoupling level in case of increased sedimentation rate: it results in the verticalization of the shallower part (above the upper decollement level), while the deeper parts are not impacted. 2. Similarly, the increase of the erosion rate involves the uplift of the deeper part (below the upper decollement level), whereas the shallower parts are not impacted. 3. A high sedimentation rate in the foreland involves a fault and fold vergence reversal, followed by a back-thrusting of the shallower part. 4. A high sedimentation rate in the hinterland favours thrust development toward the foreland in the shallower parts.

  4. Structure and kinematics of a major tectonic contact, Michipicoten greenstone belt, Ontario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgill, George E.

    1992-01-01

    The Michipicoten greenstone belt, Ontario, experienced a complex history of folding, faulting, and fabric development. Near Wawa, a major east-west contact, here named the Steep Hill Falls (SHF) contact, extends entirely across the belt. The SHF contact is both an angular unconformity and a fault and is interpreted to be a regionally significant tectonic contact separating distinct northern and southern terranes, both of which include volcanic rocks of probable island-arc origin. The amount of horizontal transport involved in bringing the two terranes together along the SHF contact is not known. Mapping and structural analysis suggest that regionally significant horizontal displacements took place, with movement vectors that changed with time. Early faults, folds, and fabrics imply north-south to northeast-southwest (with respect to present directions) convergence, with a vergence reversal occurring during this complex event. The most likely models infer early south vergence and later north vergence. Transecting the earliest structures are younger (but still Archean) northeast-striking steep cleavages with associated upright folds that may relate to northwest-southeast assembly of the Superior Province craton. The craton assembly event thus involved a transport direction at a high angle to that inferred for the earlier assembly of the Michipicoten greenstone belt.

  5. Observed use of automatic seat belts in 1987 cars.

    PubMed

    Williams, A F; Wells, J K; Lund, A K; Teed, N

    1989-10-01

    Usage of the automatic belt systems supplied by six large-volume automobile manufacturers to meet the federal requirements for automatic restraints were observed in suburban Washington, D.C., Chicago, Los Angeles, and Philadelphia. The different belt systems studied were: Ford and Toyota (motorized, nondetachable automatic shoulder belt), Nissan (motorized, detachable shoulder belt), VW and Chrysler (nonmotorized, detachable shoulder belt), and GM (nonmotorized detachable lap and shoulder belt). Use of automatic belts was significantly greater than manual belt use in otherwise comparable late-model cars for all manufacturers except Chrysler; in Chrysler cars, automatic belt use was significantly lower than manual belt use. The automatic shoulder belts provided by Ford, Nissan, Toyota, and VW increased use rates to about 90%. Because use rates were lower in Ford cars with manual belts, their increase was greater. GM cars had the smallest increase in use rates; however, lap belt use was highest in GM cars. The other manufacturers supply knee bolsters to supplement shoulder belt protection; all--except VW--also provide manual lap belts, which were used by about half of those who used the automatic shoulder belt. The results indicate that some manufacturers have been more successful than others in providing automatic belt systems that result in high use that, in turn, will mean fewer deaths and injuries in those cars.

  6. Folded supersymmetry with a twist

    DOE PAGES

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Lou, Hou Keong; ...

    2016-03-30

    Folded supersymmetry (f-SUSY) stabilizes the weak scale against radiative corrections from the top sector via scalar partners whose gauge quantum numbers differ from their Standard Model counterparts. This non-trivial pairing of states can be realized in extra-dimensional theories with appropriate supersymmetry-breaking boundary conditions. We present a class of calculable f-SUSY models that are parametrized by a non-trivial twist in 5D boundary conditions and can accommodate the observed Higgs mass and couplings. Although the distinctive phenomenology associated with the novel folded states should provide strong evidence for this mechanism, the most stringent constraints are currently placed by conventional supersymmetry searches. Asmore » a result, these models remain minimally fine-tuned in light of LHC8 data and provide a range of both standard and exotic signatures accessible at LHC13.« less

  7. Force generation by titin folding.

    PubMed

    Mártonfalvi, Zsolt; Bianco, Pasquale; Naftz, Katalin; Ferenczy, György G; Kellermayer, Miklós

    2017-07-01

    Titin is a giant protein that provides elasticity to muscle. As the sarcomere is stretched, titin extends hierarchically according to the mechanics of its segments. Whether titin's globular domains unfold during this process and how such unfolded domains might contribute to muscle contractility are strongly debated. To explore the force-dependent folding mechanisms, here we manipulated skeletal-muscle titin molecules with high-resolution optical tweezers. In force-clamp mode, after quenching the force (<10 pN), extension fluctuated without resolvable discrete events. In position-clamp experiments, the time-dependent force trace contained rapid fluctuations and a gradual increase of average force, indicating that titin can develop force via dynamic transitions between its structural states en route to the native conformation. In 4 M urea, which destabilizes H-bonds hence the consolidated native domain structure, the net force increase disappeared but the fluctuations persisted. Thus, whereas net force generation is caused by the ensemble folding of the elastically-coupled domains, force fluctuations arise due to a dynamic equilibrium between unfolded and molten-globule states. Monte-Carlo simulations incorporating a compact molten-globule intermediate in the folding landscape recovered all features of our nanomechanics results. The ensemble molten-globule dynamics delivers significant added contractility that may assist sarcomere mechanics, and it may reduce the dissipative energy loss associated with titin unfolding/refolding during muscle contraction/relaxation cycles. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  8. Evolutionary Strategies for Protein Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy Gopal, Srinivasa; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    The free energy approach for predicting the protein tertiary structure describes the native state of a protein as the global minimum of an appropriate free-energy forcefield. The low-energy region of the free-energy landscape of a protein is extremely rugged. Efficient optimization methods must therefore speed up the search for the global optimum by avoiding high energy transition states, adapt large scale moves or accept unphysical intermediates. Here we investigate an evolutionary strategies(ES) for optimizing a protein conformation in our all-atom free-energy force field([1],[2]). A set of random conformations is evolved using an ES to get a diverse population containing low energy structure. The ES is shown to balance energy improvement and yet maintain diversity in structures. The ES is implemented as a master-client model for distributed computing. Starting from random structures and by using this optimization technique, we were able to fold a 20 amino-acid helical protein and 16 amino-acid beta hairpin[3]. We compare ES to basin hopping method. [1]T. Herges and W. Wenzel,Biophys.J. 87,3100(2004) [2] A. Verma and W. Wenzel Stabilization and folding of beta-sheet and alpha-helical proteins in an all-atom free energy model(submitted)(2005) [3] S. M. Gopal and W. Wenzel Evolutionary Strategies for Protein Folding (in preparation)

  9. Depletion of the Outer Asteroid Belt

    PubMed

    Liou; Malhotra

    1997-01-17

    During the early history of the solar system, it is likely that the outer planets changed their distance from the sun, and hence, their influence on the asteroid belt evolved with time. The gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn on the orbital evolution of asteroids in the outer asteroid belt was calculated. The results show that the sweeping of mean motion resonances associated with planetary migration efficiently destabilizes orbits in the outer asteroid belt on a time scale of 10 million years. This mechanism provides an explanation for the observed depletion of asteroids in that region.

  10. Electric filter with movable belt electrode

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1983-09-20

    A method and apparatus for removing airborne contaminants entrained in a gas or airstream includes an electric filter characterized by a movable endless belt electrode, a grounded electrode, and a filter medium sandwiched there between. Inclusion of the movable, endless belt electrode provides the driving force for advancing the filter medium through the filter, and reduces frictional drag on the filter medium, thereby permitting a wide choice of filter medium materials. Additionally, the belt electrode includes a plurality of pleats in order to provide maximum surface area on which to collect airborne contaminants. 4 figs.

  11. Electric filter with movable belt electrode

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1983-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing airborne contaminants entrained in a gas or airstream includes an electric filter characterized by a movable endless belt electrode, a grounded electrode, and a filter medium sandwiched therebetween. Inclusion of the movable, endless belt electrode provides the driving force for advancing the filter medium through the filter, and reduces frictional drag on the filter medium, thereby permitting a wide choice of filter medium materials. Additionally, the belt electrode includes a plurality of pleats in order to provide maximum surface area on which to collect airborne contaminants.

  12. Depletion of the Outer Asteroid Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Malhotra, Renu

    1997-01-01

    During the early history of the solar system, it is likely that the outer planets changed their distance from the sun, and hence, their influence on the asteroid belt evolved with time. The gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn on the orbital evolution of asteroids in the outer asteroid belt was calculated. The results show that the sweeping of mean motion resonances associated with planetary migration efficiently destabilizes orbits in the outer asteroid belt on a time scale of 10 million years. This mechanism provides an explanation for the observed depletion of asteroids in that region.

  13. Models of fold-related hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtern, Vladimir

    2018-05-01

    Hysteresis is a strongly nonlinear physics phenomenon observed in many fluid mechanics flows. This paper composes evolution equations of the minimal nonlinearity and dimension which describe three hysteresis kinds related to a fold catastrophe formed by (i) two fold bifurcations, (ii) fold and transcritical bifurcations, and (iii) fold and subcritical bifurcations.

  14. Ventricular-Fold Dynamics in Human Phonation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailly, Lucie; Bernardoni, Nathalie Henrich; Müller, Frank; Rohlfs, Anna-Katharina; Hess, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed (a) to provide a classification of the ventricular-fold dynamics during voicing, (b) to study the aerodynamic impact of these motions on vocal-fold vibrations, and (c) to assess whether ventricular-fold oscillations could be sustained by aerodynamic coupling with the vocal folds. Method: A 72-sample…

  15. Health risk appraisal and safety belt use

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1987-05-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of health risk appraisal (HRA) programs for increasing claimed and observed safety belt use. HRA programs were field tested with and without supplemental educational materials on ...

  16. Automatic safety belt usage in 1981 Toyotas

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1982-02-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effectiveness of automatic restraint systems provided in Toyota Cressidas in increasing use of seat belts, and to evaluate attitude of owners toward those systems. Data were collected through telephone...

  17. Radiation Belt and Plasma Model Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Radiation belt and plasma model environment. Environment hazards for systems and humans. Need for new models. How models are used. Model requirements. How can space weather community help?

  18. Safety belt laws and disparities in safety belt use among US high-school drivers.

    PubMed

    García-España, J Felipe; Winston, Flaura K; Durbin, Dennis R

    2012-06-01

    We compared reported safety belt use, for both drivers and passengers, among teenagers with learner's permits, provisional licenses, and unrestricted licenses in states with primary or secondary enforcement of safety belt laws. Our data source was the 2006 National Young Driver Survey, which included a national representative sample of 3126 high-school drivers. We used multivariate, log-linear regression analyses to assess associations between safety belt laws and belt use. Teenaged drivers were 12% less likely to wear a safety belt as drivers and 15% less likely to wear one as passengers in states with a secondary safety belt law than in states with a primary law. The apparent reduction in belt use among teenagers as they progressed from learner to unrestricted license holder occurred in only secondary enforcement states. Groups reporting particularly low use included African American drivers, rural residents, academically challenged students, and those driving pickup trucks. The results provided further evidence for enactment of primary enforcement provisions in safety belt laws because primary laws are associated with higher safety belt use rates and lower crash-related injuries and mortality.

  19. Safety Belt Laws and Disparities in Safety Belt Use Among US High-School Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Winston, Flaura K.; Durbin, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We compared reported safety belt use, for both drivers and passengers, among teenagers with learner’s permits, provisional licenses, and unrestricted licenses in states with primary or secondary enforcement of safety belt laws. Methods. Our data source was the 2006 National Young Driver Survey, which included a national representative sample of 3126 high-school drivers. We used multivariate, log-linear regression analyses to assess associations between safety belt laws and belt use. Results. Teenaged drivers were 12% less likely to wear a safety belt as drivers and 15% less likely to wear one as passengers in states with a secondary safety belt law than in states with a primary law. The apparent reduction in belt use among teenagers as they progressed from learner to unrestricted license holder occurred in only secondary enforcement states. Groups reporting particularly low use included African American drivers, rural residents, academically challenged students, and those driving pickup trucks. Conclusions. The results provided further evidence for enactment of primary enforcement provisions in safety belt laws because primary laws are associated with higher safety belt use rates and lower crash-related injuries and mortality. PMID:22515851

  20. Chaperonin-mediated Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Horwich, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    We have been studying chaperonins these past twenty years through an initial discovery of an action in protein folding, analysis of structure, and elucidation of mechanism. Some of the highlights of these studies were presented recently upon sharing the honor of the 2013 Herbert Tabor Award with my early collaborator, Ulrich Hartl, at the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in Boston. Here, some of the major findings are recounted, particularly recognizing my collaborators, describing how I met them and how our great times together propelled our thinking and experiments. PMID:23803606

  1. Seat-belt message and the law?

    PubMed

    Sengupta, S K; Patil, N G; Law, G

    1989-09-01

    This paper attempts to draw together available information on the use of seat belts, one of the most important safety devices for a person in a car. Considering the high rate of mortality and morbidity due to road traffic accidents in Papua New Guinea the authors strongly feel that seat-belt usage should be made compulsory. When one looks at the history of the implementation of such a successful countermeasure in other countries it seems that legislation is the only answer.

  2. Jupiter's radiation belts: Can Pioneer 10 survive?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, W. N.; Birmingham, T. J.; Mead, G. D.

    1973-01-01

    Model calculations of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts indicate that the Galilean satellites can reduce particle fluxes in certain regions of the inner magnetosphere by as much as six orders of magnitude. Average fluxes should be reduced by a factor of 100 or more along the Pioneer 10 trajectory through the heart of Jupiter's radiation belts in early December. This may be enough to prevent serious radiation damage to the spacecraft.

  3. Jupiter's Radiation Belts: Can Pioneer 10 Survive?

    PubMed

    Hess, W N; Birmingham, T J; Mead, G D

    1973-12-07

    Model calculations of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts indicate that the Galilean satellites can reduce particle fluxes in certain regions of the inner magnetosphere by as much as six orders of magnitude. Average fluxes should be reduced by a factor of 100 or more along the Pioneer 10 trajectory through the heart of Jupiter's radiation belts in early December. This may be enough to prevent serious radiation damage to the spacecraft.

  4. A photometric survey of outer belt asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimartino, M.; Gonano-Beurer, M.; Mottola, Stefano; Neukum, G.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1989, we have been conducting a research program devoted to the study of the Trojans and outer belt asteroids (Hilda and Cybele groups), in order to characterize their rotational properties and shapes. As an outcome of several observational campaigns, we determined rotational periods and lightcurve amplitudes for 23 distant asteroids, using both CCD and photoelectric photometry. In this paper, we compare the rotational properties of main belt asteroids and Trojans, based on the preliminary results of this survey.

  5. Atomic-level description of ubiquitin folding

    PubMed Central

    Piana, Stefano; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Shaw, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, in which proteins spontaneously and repeatedly fold and unfold, have recently been used to help elucidate the mechanistic principles that underlie the folding of fast-folding proteins. The extent to which the conclusions drawn from the analysis of such proteins, which fold on the microsecond timescale, apply to the millisecond or slower folding of naturally occurring proteins is, however, unclear. As a first attempt to address this outstanding issue, we examine here the folding of ubiquitin, a 76-residue-long protein found in all eukaryotes that is known experimentally to fold on a millisecond timescale. Ubiquitin folding has been the subject of many experimental studies, but its slow folding rate has made it difficult to observe and characterize the folding process through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Here we determine the mechanism, thermodynamics, and kinetics of ubiquitin folding through equilibrium atomistic simulations. The picture emerging from the simulations is in agreement with a view of ubiquitin folding suggested from previous experiments. Our findings related to the folding of ubiquitin are also consistent, for the most part, with the folding principles derived from the simulation of fast-folding proteins, suggesting that these principles may be applicable to a wider range of proteins. PMID:23503848

  6. Jupiter's magnetosphere and radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1979-01-01

    Radioastronomy and Pioneer data reveal the Jovian magnetosphere as a rotating magnetized source of relativistic particles and radio emission, comparable to astrophysical cosmic ray and radio sources, such as pulsars. According to Pioneer data, the magnetic field in the outer magnetosphere is radially extended into a highly time variable disk-shaped configuration which differs fundamentally from the earth's magnetosphere. The outer disk region, and the energetic particles confined in it, are modulated by Jupiter's 10 hr rotation period. The entire outer magnetosphere appears to change drastically on time scales of a few days to a week. In addition to its known modulation of the Jovian decametric radio bursts, Io was found to absorb some radiation belt particles and to accelerate others, and most importantly, to be a source of neutral atoms, and by inference, a heavy ion plasma which may significantly affect the hydrodynamic flow in the magnetosphere. Another important Pioneer finding is that the Jovian outer magnetosphere generates, or permits to escape, fluxes of relativistic electrons of such intensities that Jupiter may be regarded as the dominant source of 1 to 30 MeV cosmic ray electrons in the heliosphere.

  7. Structure, metamorphism, and geochronology of the Cosmos Hills and Ruby Ridge, Brooks Range schist belt, Alaska

    Christiansen, Peter B.; Snee, Lawrence W.

    1994-01-01

    The boundary of the internal zones of the Brooks Range orogenic belt (the schist belt) is a fault contact that dips toward the hinterland (the Yukon-Koyukuk province). This fault, here referred to as the Cosmos Hills fault zone, juxtaposes oceanic rocks and unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks structurally above blueschist-to-greenschist facies metamorphic rocks of the schist belt. Near the fault contact, schist belt rocks are increasingly affected by a prominent, subhorizontal transposition foliation that is locally mylonitic in the fault zone. Structural and petrologic observations combined with 40Ar/39Ar incremental-release geochronology give evidence for a polyphase metamorphic and deformational history beginning in the Middle Jurassic and continuing until the Late Cretaceous. Our 40Ar/39Ar cooling age for Jurassic metamorphism is consistent with stratigraphic and other evidence for the onset of Brooks Range orogenesis. Jurassic metamorphism is nearly everywhere overprinted by a regional greenschist-facies event dated at 130–125 Ma. Near the contact with the Cosmos Hills fault zone, the schist belt is increasingly affected by a younger greenschist metamorphism that is texturally related to a prominent foliation that folds and transposes an older fabric. The 40Ar/39Ar results on phengite and fuchsite that define this younger fabric give recrystallization ages ranging from 103 to less than 90 Ma. We conclude that metamorphism that formed the transposition fabric peaked around 100 Ma and may have continued until well after 90 Ma. This age for greenschist metamorphism is broadly synchronous with the depositional age of locally derived, shallow-marine clastic sedimentary strata in the hanging wall of the fault zone and thus substantiates the interpretation that the fault zone accommodated extension in the Late Cretaceous. This extension unroofed and exhumed the schist belt during relative subsidence of the Yukon-Koyukuk province.

  8. Annular folded electrowetting liquid lens.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Liu, Chao; Ren, Hongwen; Deng, Huan; Wang, Qiong-Hua

    2015-05-01

    We report an annular folded electrowetting liquid lens. The front surface of the lens is coated with a circular reflection film, while the back surface of the lens is coated with a ring-shaped reflection film. This approach allows the lens to get optical power from the liquid-liquid interface three times so that the optical power is tripled. An analysis of the properties of the annular folded electrowetting liquid lens is presented along with the design, fabrication, and testing of a prototype. Our results show that the optical power of the proposed liquid lens can be enhanced from ∼20.1 to ∼50.2  m(-1) in comparison with that of the conventional liquid lens (aperture ∼3.9  mm). It can reduce the operating voltage by ∼10  V to reach the same diopter as a conventional liquid lens. Our liquid lens has the advantages of compact structure, light weight, and improved optical resolution.

  9. Effects of gravity in folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkel, Donald Howe

    Effects of gravity on buckle folding are studied using a Newtonian fluid finite element model of a single layer embedded between two thicker less viscous layers. The methods allow arbitrary density jumps, surface tension coefficients, resistance to slip at the interfaces, and tracking of fold growth to a large amplitudes. When density increases downward in two equal jumps, a layer buckles less and thickens more than with uniform density. When density increases upward in two equal jumps, it buckles more and thickens less. A low density layer with periodic thickness variations buckles more, sometimes explosively. Thickness variations form, even if not present initially. These effects are greater with; smaller viscosities, larger density jump, larger length scale, and slower shortening rate. They also depend on wavelength and amplitude, and these dependencies are described in detail. The model is applied to the explosive growth of the salt anticlines of the Paradox Basin, Colorado and Utah. There, shale (higher density) overlies salt (lower density). Methods for simulating realistic earth surface erosion and deposition conditions are introduced. Growth rates increase both with ease of slip at the salt-shale interface, and when earth surface relief stays low due to erosion and deposition. Model anticlines grow explosively, attaining growth rates and amplitudes close to those of the field examples. Fastest growing wavelengths are the same as seen in the field. It is concluded that a combination of partial-slip at the salt-shale interface, with reasonable earth surface conditions, promotes sufficiently fast buckling of the salt-shale interface due to density inversion alone. Neither basement faulting, nor tectonic shortening is required to account for the observed structures. Of fundamental importance is the strong tendency of gravity to promote buckling in low density layers with thickness variations. These develop, even if not present initially. folds

  10. Overdrive and Edge as Refiners of "Belting"?: An Empirical Study Qualifying and Categorizing "Belting" Based on Audio Perception, Laryngostroboscopic Imaging, Acoustics, LTAS, and EGG.

    PubMed

    McGlashan, Julian; Thuesen, Mathias Aaen; Sadolin, Cathrine

    2017-05-01

    We aimed to study the categorizations "Overdrive" and "Edge" from the pedagogical method Complete Vocal Technique as refiners of the often ill-defined concept of "belting" by means of audio perception, laryngostroboscopic imaging, acoustics, long-term average spectrum (LTAS), and electroglottography (EGG). This is a case-control study. Twenty singers were recorded singing sustained vowels in a "belting" quality refined by audio perception as "Overdrive" and "Edge." Two studies were performed: (1) a laryngostroboscopic examination using a videonasoendoscopic camera system (Olympus) and the Laryngostrobe program (Laryngograph); (2) a simultaneous recording of the EGG and acoustic signals using Speech Studio (Laryngograph). The images were analyzed based on consensus agreement. Statistical analysis of the acoustic, LTAS, and EGG parameters was undertaken using the Student paired t test. The two modes of singing determined by audio perception have visibly different laryngeal gestures: Edge has a more constricted setting than that of Overdrive, where the ventricular folds seem to cover more of the vocal folds, the aryepiglottic folds show a sharper edge in Edge, and the cuneiform cartilages are rolled in anteromedially. LTAS analysis shows a statistical difference, particularly after the ninth harmonic, with a coinciding first formant. The combined group showed statistical differences in shimmer, harmonics-to-noise ratio, normalized noise energy, and mean sound pressure level (P ≤ 0.05). "Belting" sounds can be categorized using audio perception into two modes of singing: "Overdrive" and "Edge." This study demonstrates consistent visibly different laryngeal gestures between these modes and with some correspondingly significant differences in LTAS, EGG, and acoustic measures. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Microfluidic magnetic bead conveyor belt.

    PubMed

    van Pelt, Stijn; Frijns, Arjan; den Toonder, Jaap

    2017-11-07

    Magnetic beads play an important role in the miniaturization of clinical diagnostics systems. In lab-on-chip platforms, beads can be made to link to a target species and can then be used for the manipulation and detection of this species. Current bead actuation systems utilize complex on-chip coil systems that offer low field strengths and little versatility. We demonstrate a novel system based on an external rotating magnetic field and on-chip soft-magnetic structures to focus the field locally. These structures were designed and optimized using finite element simulations in order to create a number of local flux density maxima. These maxima, to which the magnetic beads are attracted, move over the chip surface in a continuous way together with the rotation of the external field, resulting in a mechanism similar to that of a conveyor belt. A prototype was fabricated using PDMS molding techniques mixed with iron powder for the magnetic structures. In the subsequent experiments, a quadrupole electromagnet was used to create the rotating external field. We observed that beads formed agglomerates that rolled over the chip surface, just above the magnetic structures. Field rotation frequencies between 0.1-50 Hz were tested resulting in magnetic bead speeds of over 1 mm s -1 for the highest frequency. With this, we have shown that our novel concept works, combining a simple design and simple operation with a powerful and versatile method for bead actuation. This makes it a promising method for further research and utilization in lab-on-chip systems.

  12. Geological mapping of the Schuppen belt of north-east India using geospatial technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Tanaya; Basu, Surajit; Hazra, Sugata

    2014-01-01

    A revised geologic map of the Schuppen belt of northeast India has been prepared based on interpretation of digitally enhanced satellite images. The satellite image interpretation is supported by limited field work and existing geologic maps. Available geological maps of this fold thrust belt are discontinuous and multi-scaled. The authors are of multiple opinions regarding the trajectory of formation boundaries and fault contacts. Digital image processing of satellite images and limited field surveys have been used to reinterpret and modify the existing geological maps of this fold thrust belt. Optical data of Landsat Thematic Mapper, Enhanced Thematic Mapper and elevation data of ASTER have been used to prepare this revised geological map. The study area extends from Hajadisa in south to Digboi oilfield in north, bounded by Naga thrust in the west and Disang thrust in the east. PCA, Image fusion, Linear Contrast stretch, Histogram Equalization and Painted relief algorithms have been used for the delineation of major geological lineaments like lithological boundary, thrust and strike slip faults. Digital elevation maps have enabled in the discrimination between thrust contacts and lithological boundaries, with the former being located mostly in the valleys. Textural enhancements of PCA, colour composites and Painted relief algorithm have been used to discriminate between different rock types. Few geological concepts about the terrain have been revisited and modified. It is assumed that this revised map should be of practical use as this terrain promises unexploited hydrocarbon reserves.

  13. Structural development and stress evolution of an arcuate fold-and-thrust system, southwestern Greater Caucasus, Republic of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaldi, A.; Bonali, F. L.; Russo, E.; Pasquarè Mariotto, F. A.

    2018-05-01

    The southern front of the Greater Caucasus is quite rectilinear in plan view, with the exception of part of the Rioni Basin, where marine and continental deposits of Cretaceous-Neogene age were locally folded and uplifted; this resulted in the formation of an arcuate fold-and-thrust system that extends 45 km into the foreland. Although previous studies suggested that this system has developed only since Miocene times, our new detailed and systematic field measurements of brittle and ductile structures show a very complex history, consisting in four main phases of brittle deformation and folding, dated from Eocene to Quaternary times. We collected microtectonic data at 248 faults, and calculated the related paleostress tensors. The first two phases which we document here, predated folding and were characterised by dominant transcurrent faulting and subordinate reverse motions; the greatest principal stress σ1 was perpendicular and later parallel to the mountain belt. Afterwards, NW-SE, E-W and NE-SW trending, south-vergent asymmetrical folds started to form. In the western sector of the study area, folds are sinuous in plan view, whereas to the east they show a left-stepping, en-échelon geometry. Another two, brittle deformation phases took place after the folding, due to the activity of a set of right-lateral, strike-slip faults that strike NW-SE and NE-SW, respectively, as well as by left-lateral strike-slip faults, mostly striking NW-SE, NE-SW and NNE-SSW. These two additional phases were produced by a NE-SW to N-S trending σ1. The arcuate belt is marked by along-strike variations in the tectonic regime and deformation geometry, plus belt-parallel stretching. Based on our field data, integrated with published analogue models, we suggest a possible explanation for the Rioni structure, in terms of the oblique, asymmetric indentation of an upper crustal blocks moving to the SSW.

  14. Deformation of the Eastern Franciscan Belt, northern California

    Jayko, A.S.; Blake, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    The late Jurassic and Cretaceous Eastern Franciscan belt of the northern California Coast Range consists of two multiply deformed, blueschist-facies terranes; the Pickett Peak and Yolla Bolly terranes. Four deformations have been recognized in the Pickett Peak terrane, and three in the Yolla Bolly terrane. The earliest recognized penetrative fabric, D1, occurs only in the Pickett Peak terrane. The later penetrative fabrics, D2 and D3, occur in both the Yolla Bolly and Pickett Peak terranes. D1 and D2 apparently represent fabrics that formed during subduction and accretion of the terranes. Fabrics from both D1 and D2 are consistent with SW-NE movement directions with respect to their present geographic positions. D3 postdates blueschist-facies metamorphism of the terranes and may be related to emplacement of the terranes to higher structural levels. A broad regional warping, D4, is evident from the map pattern and folding of large metamorphosed thrust sheets. D4 folds may be related to deformation associated with oblique convergence along the continental margin in late Cretaceous and (or) early Tertiary time. ?? 1989.

  15. The parallel universe of RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Batey, R T; Doudna, J A

    1998-05-01

    How do large RNA molecules find their active conformations among a universe of possible structures? Two recent studies reveal that RNA folding is a rapid and ordered process, with surprising similarities to protein folding mechanisms.

  16. Dynamics of Folds in the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krylov, Nikolai A.; Rogers, Edwin L.

    2011-01-01

    Take a strip of paper and fold a crease intersecting the long edges, creating two angles. Choose one edge and consider the angle with the crease. Fold the opposite edge along the crease, creating a new crease that bisects the angle. Fold again, this time using the newly created crease and the initial edge, creating a new angle along the chosen…

  17. Extracting Information from Folds in Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudleston, Peter John

    1986-01-01

    Describes the three processes of folding in rocks: buckling, bending, and passive folding. Discusses how geometrical properties and strain distributions help to identify which processes produce natural folds, and also provides information about the mechanical properties of rocks, and the sense of shear in shear zones. (TW)

  18. Energy landscape of knotted protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Sułkowska, Joanna I.; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experiments have conclusively shown that proteins are able to fold from an unknotted, denatured polypeptide to the knotted, native state without the aid of chaperones. These experiments are consistent with a growing body of theoretical work showing that a funneled, minimally frustrated energy landscape is sufficient to fold small proteins with complex topologies. Here, we present a theoretical investigation of the folding of a knotted protein, 2ouf, engineered in the laboratory by a domain fusion that mimics an evolutionary pathway for knotted proteins. Unlike a previously studied knotted protein of similar length, we see reversible folding/knotting and a surprising lack of deep topological traps with a coarse-grained structure-based model. Our main interest is to investigate how evolution might further select the geometry and stiffness of the threading region of the newly fused protein. We compare the folding of the wild-type protein to several mutants. Similarly to the wild-type protein, all mutants show robust and reversible folding, and knotting coincides with the transition state ensemble. As observed experimentally, our simulations show that the knotted protein folds about ten times slower than an unknotted construct with an identical contact map. Simulated folding kinetics reflect the experimentally observed rollover in the folding limbs of chevron plots. Successful folding of the knotted protein is restricted to a narrow range of temperature as compared to the unknotted protein and fits of the kinetic folding data below folding temperature suggest slow, nondiffusive dynamics for the knotted protein. PMID:22891304

  19. Storm-time radiation belt electron dynamics: Repeatability in the outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. R.; Mann, I. R.; Rae, J.; Watt, C.; Boyd, A. J.; Turner, D. L.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    During intervals of enhanced solar wind driving the outer radiation belt becomes extremely dynamic leading to geomagnetic storms. During these storms the flux of energetic electrons can vary by over 4 orders of magnitude. Despite recent advances in understanding the nature of competing storm-time electron loss and acceleration processes the dynamic behavior of the outer radiation belt remains poorly understood; the outer radiation belt can exhibit either no change, an enhancement, or depletion in radiation belt electrons. Using a new analysis of the total radiation belt electron content, calculated from the Van Allen probes phase space density (PSD), we statistically analyze the time-dependent and global response of the outer radiation belt during storms. We demonstrate that by removing adiabatic effects there is a clear and repeatable sequence of events in storm-time radiation belt electron dynamics. Namely, the relativistic (μ=1000 MeV/G) and ultra-relativistic (μ=4000 MeV/G) electron populations can be separated into two phases; an initial phase dominated by loss followed by a second phase dominated by acceleration. At lower energies, the radiation belt seed population of electrons (μ=150 MeV/G) shows no evidence of loss but rather a net enhancement during storms. Further, we investigate the dependence of electron dynamics as a function of the second adiabatic invariant, K. These results demonstrate a global coherency in the dynamics of the source, relativistic and ultra-relativistic electron populations as function of the second adiabatic invariant K. This analysis demonstrates two key aspects of storm-time radiation belt electron dynamics. First, the radiation belt responds repeatably to solar wind driving during geomagnetic storms. Second, the response of the radiation belt is energy dependent, relativistic electrons behaving differently than lower energy seed electrons. These results have important implications in radiation belt research. In particular

  20. Security Belt for Wireless Implantable Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Kulaç, Selman

    2017-09-19

    In this study, a new protective design compatible with existing non-secure systems was proposed, since it is focused on the secure communication of wireless IMD systems in all transmissions. This new protector is an external wearable device and appears to be a belt fitted around for the patients IMD implanted. However, in order to provide effective full duplex transmissions and physical layer security, some sophisticated transceiver antennas have been placed on the belt. In this approach, beam-focused multi-antennas in optimal positions on the belt are randomly switched when transmissions to the IMD are performed and multi-jammer switching with MRC combining or majority-rule based receiving techniques are applied when transmissions from the IMD are carried out. This approach can also reduce the power consumption of the IMDs and contribute to the prolongation of the IMD's battery life.

  1. Belt-MRF for large aperture mirrors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kai; Luo, Xiao; Zheng, Ligong; Bai, Yang; Li, Longxiang; Hu, Haixiang; Zhang, Xuejun

    2014-08-11

    With high-determinacy and no subsurface damage, Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) has become an important tool in fabricating high-precision optics. But for large mirrors, the application of MRF is restricted by its small removal function and low material removal rate. In order to improve the material removal rate, shorten the processing cycle, we proposed a new MRF concept, named Belt-MRF to expand the application of MRF to large mirrors and made a prototype with a large remove function, using a belt instead of a very large polishing wheel to expand the polishing length. A series of experimental results on Silicon carbide (SiC) and BK 7 specimens and fabrication simulation verified that the Belt-MRF has high material removal rates, stable removal function and high convergence efficiency which makes it a promising technology for processing large aperture optical elements.

  2. Protein Folding Using a Vortex Fluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Britton, Joshua; Smith, Joshua N; Raston, Colin L; Weiss, Gregory A

    2017-01-01

    Essentially all biochemistry and most molecular biology experiments require recombinant proteins. However, large, hydrophobic proteins typically aggregate into insoluble and misfolded species, and are directed into inclusion bodies. Current techniques to fold proteins recovered from inclusion bodies rely on denaturation followed by dialysis or rapid dilution. Such approaches can be time consuming, wasteful, and inefficient. Here, we describe rapid protein folding using a vortex fluidic device (VFD). This process uses mechanical energy introduced into thin films to rapidly and efficiently fold proteins. With the VFD in continuous flow mode, large volumes of protein solution can be processed per day with 100-fold reductions in both folding times and buffer volumes.

  3. Folding of viscous sheets and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorobogatiy, M.; Mahadevan, L.

    2000-12-01

    We consider the nonlinear folding behavior of a viscous filament or a sheet under the influence of an external force such as gravity. Everyday examples of this phenomenon are provided by the periodic folding of a sheet of honey as it impinges on toast, or the folding of a stream of shampoo as it falls on one's hand. To understand the evolution of a fold, we formulate and solve a free-boundary problem for the phenomenon, give scaling laws for the size of the folds and the frequency with which they are laid out, and verify these experimentally.

  4. Succession of structural events in the Goren greenstone belt (Burkina Faso): Implications for West African tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Kim A. A.

    2010-02-01

    Ten years after field investigations in the SE Goren greenstone belt (GGB) of Burkina Faso by the Sanmatenga J.V., sponsored field studies conducted in 2007 have significantly enhanced structural datasets. The studies in 2007 were conducted across an expanded area of the GGB that included both southwestern and northeastern domains, and portions of the Pissila batholith to the west of the GGB. A revision of tectonic models proposed by Hein et al. [Hein, K.A.A., Morel, V., Kagoné, O., Kiemde, F., Mayes, K., 2004. Birimian lithological succession and structural evolution in the Goren Segment of the Boromo-Goren Greenstone Belt, Burkina Faso. Journal of African Earth Sciences 39, 1-23] is now possible. Three deformation events characterise the Goren greenstone belt. The deformation, D1 (previously D3) resulted in the formation of NW to NNW-trending steeply-dipping dextral-reverse shear zones folds and a penetrative S1-C schistosity that formed during a period of NE-SW shortening. The event is termed the Tangaean Event because it can be correlated across NE Burkina Faso in the Boromo, Bouroum, Yalago and Oudalan-Gorouol greenstone belts. The deformation, D2 (previously D2) resulted in the progressive development of NNE to NE-trending macroscopic to mesoscopic folds and a penetrative axial planar cleavage (S2), which was followed by the formation of dextral- and sinistral-reverse shears and a pervasive schistosity (S2-C). The first-order crustal-scale Sabce Shear Zone, which traverse