Science.gov

Sample records for zalesny rein rm

  1. RM-CLEAN: RM spectra cleaner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, George

    2017-08-01

    RM-CLEAN reads in dirty Q and U cubes, generates rmtf based on the frequencies given in an ASCII file, and cleans the RM spectra following the algorithm given by Brentjens (2007). The output cubes contain the clean model components and the CLEANed RM spectra. The input cubes must be reordered with mode=312, and the output cubes will have the same ordering and thus must be reordered after being written to disk. RM-CLEAN runs as a MIRIAD (ascl:1106.007) task and a Python wrapper is included with the code.

  2. Length and elasticity of side reins affect rein tension at trot.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Hilary M; Larson, Britt; Kaiser, LeeAnn J; Lavagnino, Michael

    2011-06-01

    This study investigated the horse's contribution to tension in the reins. The experimental hypotheses were that tension in side reins (1) increases biphasically in each trot stride, (2) changes inversely with rein length, and (3) changes with elasticity of the reins. Eight riding horses trotted in hand at consistent speed in a straight line wearing a bit and bridle and three types of side reins (inelastic, stiff elastic, compliant elastic) were evaluated in random order at long, neutral, and short lengths. Strain gauge transducers (240 Hz) measured minimal, maximal and mean rein tension, rate of loading and impulse. The effects of rein type and length were evaluated using ANOVA with Bonferroni post hoc tests. Rein tension oscillated in a regular pattern with a peak during each diagonal stance phase. Within each rein type, minimal, maximal and mean tensions were higher with shorter reins. At neutral or short lengths, minimal tension increased and maximal tension decreased with elasticity of the reins. Short, inelastic reins had the highest maximal tension and rate of loading. Since the tension variables respond differently to rein elasticity at different lengths, it is recommended that a set of variables representing different aspects of rein tension should be reported. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects on behaviour and rein tension on horses ridden with or without martingales and rein inserts.

    PubMed

    Heleski, C R; McGreevy, P D; Kaiser, L J; Lavagnino, M; Tans, E; Bello, N; Clayton, H M

    2009-07-01

    Unsteady hand position can cause discomfort to the horse, potentially leading to conflict behaviours (CB) such as head tossing or tail lashing. Some instructors feel that martingales or elastic rein inserts can reduce discomfort caused by inexperienced and unsteady hands. Others consider these devices to be inappropriate 'crutches'. Four horses and nine riders were tested under three conditions in random order: plain reins, adjustable training martingales (TM), and elasticised rein inserts (RI). Rein-tension data (7s) and behavioural data (30s) were collected in each direction. Rein-tension data were collected via strain-gauge transducers. Behavioural data were assessed using an ethogram of defined behaviours. No differences in the number of CB were observed. Mean rein tension for TM was higher than that of RI or controls. Relative to the withers, the head was lower for horses ridden with martingales. Carefully fitted martingales may have a place in riding schools that teach novices.

  4. A little rein on addiction.

    PubMed

    Mathuru, Ajay S

    2018-06-01

    Rewarding and aversive experiences influence emotions, motivate specific behaviors, and modify future action in animals. Multiple conserved vertebrate neural circuits have been discovered that act in a species-specific manner to reinforce behaviors that are rewarding, while attenuating those with an adverse outcome. A growing body of research now suggests that malfunction of the same circuits is an underlying cause for many human disorders and mental ailments. The habenula (Latin for "little rein") complex, an epithalamic structure that regulates midbrain monoaminergic activity has emerged in recent years as one such region in the vertebrate brain that modulates behavior. Its dysfunction, on the other hand, is implicated in a spectrum of psychiatric disorders in humans such as schizophrenia, depression and addiction. Here, I review the progress in identification of potential mechanisms involving the habenula in addiction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. RM2: rms error comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    The root-mean-square error performance measure is used to compare the relative performance of several widely known source coding algorithms with the RM2 image data compression system. The results demonstrate that RM2 has a uniformly significant performance advantage.

  6. Rein tension acceptance in young horses in a voluntary test situation.

    PubMed

    Christensen, J W; Zharkikh, T L; Antoine, A; Malmkvist, J

    2011-03-01

    During riding, horses are frequently exposed to pressure from the rider, e.g. through the bit and reins, but few studies have investigated at which point rein tension becomes uncomfortable for the horse. To investigate how much rein tension young inexperienced horses are willing to accept in order to obtain a food reward; whether the tension acceptance changes during 3 consecutive test days; and whether rein tension correlates with the expression of conflict behaviour and heart rate. Pressure-naïve horses will apply only little rein tension in the first voluntary trial, but their acceptance will gradually increase. High levels of rein tension will lead to expression of conflict behaviour and increases in heart rate. Fifteen 2-year-old, bridle-naïve mares were encouraged to stretch their head forward (across a 0.95 m high metal bar) to obtain a food reward in a voluntary test situation. On each test day, each horse was exposed to 2 control sessions (loose reins), an intermediate and a short rein session (1 min/session). Rein tension, heart rate and behaviour were recorded. The horses applied significantly more tension on the first day (mean rein tension: 10.2 N), compared to the second and third test day (Day 2: 6.0 and Day 3: 5.7 N). The horses showed significantly more conflict behaviour in the short rein treatment. There was no treatment effect on heart rate. The horses applied the highest rein tension on the first day, and apparently learned to avoid the tension, rather than habituate to it. Rein tension correlated with expression of conflict behaviour, indicating that the horses found the tension aversive. Further studies should focus on the correlation between rein tension and conflict behaviour in ridden horses. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  7. Stride-related rein tension patterns in walk and trot in the ridden horse.

    PubMed

    Egenvall, Agneta; Roepstorff, Lars; Eisersiö, Marie; Rhodin, Marie; van Weeren, René

    2015-12-30

    The use of tack (equipment such as saddles and reins) and especially of bits because of rein tension resulting in pressure in the mouth is questioned because of welfare concerns. We hypothesised that rein tension patterns in walk and trot reflect general gait kinematics, but are also determined by individual horse and rider effects. Six professional riders rode three familiar horses in walk and trot. Horses were equipped with rein tension meters logged by inertial measurement unit technique. Left and right rein tension data were synchronized with the gait. Stride split data (0-100 %) were analysed using mixed models technique to elucidate the left/right rein and stride percentage interaction, in relation to the exercises performed. In walk, rein tension was highest at hindlimb stance. Rein tension was highest in the suspension phase at trot, and lowest during the stance phase. In rising trot there was a significant difference between the two midstance phases, but not in sitting trot. When turning in trot there was a significant statistical association with the gait pattern with the tension being highest in the inside rein when the horse was on the outer fore-inner hindlimb diagonal. Substantial between-rider variation was demonstrated in walk and trot and between-horse variation in walk. Biphasic rein tensions patterns during the stride were found mainly in trot.

  8. Rein and Zheng Elected to American Academy of Microbiology | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Earlier this year, Alan Rein, Ph.D., and Zhi-Ming (Thomas) Zheng, M.D., Ph.D., were elected to fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology, the honorific leadership group within the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). They were among 88 microbiologists who were elected to the academy “through a highly selective, peer-review process,

  9. Rein and Zheng Elected to American Academy of Microbiology | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Earlier this year, Alan Rein, Ph.D., and Zhi-Ming (Thomas) Zheng, M.D., Ph.D., were elected to fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology, the honorific leadership group within the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). They were among 88 microbiologists who were elected to the academy “through a highly selective, peer-review process, based on their records of scientific achievement and original contributions that have advanced microbiology,” according to the society’s website.

  10. R/M Analysis of Electromechanical Equipments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    modifying existing R/M prediction and demonstration techniques to account for considerations of R/M performance of E/M equipments in the C31 systems...00 a’a - CC C a a a a’ a a ~ a’ a a’ a 000 CeCa’ 0Ca’Ca’ OCOtOaC CC a’ a-, C’.a’ CC a’a’ a S -C a’ a’ -~ a~g a’a a’ C C C~ CC fla’C - acCa ’ CCOCa~. 00...any of the other systems studied. The data are also higher quality because of the command interest in this high cost system and because of the safety

  11. RM-10A robotic manipulator system

    SciT

    White, J.R.; Coughlan, J.B.; Harvey, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    The REMOTE RM-10A is a man-replacement manipulator system that has been developed specifically for use in radioactive and other hazardous environments. It can be teleoperated, with man-in-the-loop, for unstructured tasks or programmed to perform routine tasks automatically much like robots in the automated manufacturing industry. The RM-10A is a servomanipulator utilizing a closed-loop, microprocessor-based control system. The system consists of a slave assembly, master control station, and interconnecting cabling. The slave assembly is the part of the system that enters the hostile environment. It is man-like is size and configuration with two identical arms attached to a torso structure. Eachmore » arm attaches to the torso using two captive screws and two guide pins. The guide pins position and stabilize an arm during removal and reinstallation and also align the two electrical connectors located in the arm support plate and torso. These features allow easy remote replacement of an arm, and commonality of the arms allow interchangeability. The water-resistant slave assembly is equipped with gaskets and O-ring seals in the torso and arm and camera assemblies. In addition, each slave arm's elbow, wrist, and tong are protected by replaceable polyurethane boots. An upper camera assembly, consisting of a color television (TV) camera, 6:1 zoom lens, and a pan/tilt unit, mount to the torso to provide remote viewing capability.« less

  12. Prise en charge des traumatismes graves du rein

    PubMed Central

    Lakmichi, Mohamed Amine; Jarir, Redouane; Sadiki, Bader; Zehraoui; Bentani; Wakrim, Bader; Dahami, Zakaria; Moudouni; Sarf, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Les traumatismes graves du rein de grade III, IV et V selon la classification de l'Amercan Society for Surgery For Trauma (ASST) sont plus rares et se retrouvent dans 5% des cas en moyenne. Leur prise en charge est souvent délicate, nécessitant alors des centres expérimentés dotés de moyen adéquats d'imagerie (scanner spiralé). Cependant, durant ces dernières années, la prise en charge de ces traumatismes a évolué vers une attitude de moins en moins chirurgicale grâce à l’évolution des techniques de la radiologie interventionnelle, de l'endourologie et des moyens de surveillance aux urgences et de réanimation. L'objectif de cette étude est d’évaluer notre expérience dans la prise en charge des traumatismes rénaux de haut grade. Notre étude rétrospective porte sur 25 cas de traumatismes grave du rein de grade III, IV et V selon la classification de l'ASST, colligés entre Janvier 2002 et Juin 2009 au service d'urologie du centre Hospitalier Universitaire Mohammed VI, Université Cadi Ayyad de Marrakech, Maroc. Nous avons étudié les données épidémiologiques, les signes cliniques et biologiques à l'admission (état de choc hémorragique, taux d'hémoglobine), les données radiologiques (échographie et scanner), les lésions associées, la prise en charge thérapeutique et les complications. L’âge moyen de nos patients était de 24,9 ans 15 et 58 ans, avec une prédominance masculine (sex-ratio = 7, 3). Le rein droit était intéressé dans 15 cas (60%). Le traumatisme rénal était fermé dans 15 cas, et ouvert par arme blanche dans 10 cas. Huit patients se sont présentés en état de choc hémorragique (32%). Une anémie inférieur à 10g /100ml a été observée dans 10 cas (40%). L'uroscanner fait systématiquement à l'admission a retrouvé un grade III (10 cas), grade IV (13 cas) et grade V (2 cas). La prise en charge a consisté en une exploration chirurgicale avec néphrectomie chez 2 cas de Grade IV pour une instabilité h

  13. Conclusions and future directions for the REiNS International Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Blakeley, Jaishri O.; Dombi, Eva; Fisher, Michael J.; Hanemann, Clemens O.; Walsh, Karin S.; Wolters, Pamela L.; Plotkin, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    The Response Evaluation in Neurofibromatosis and Schwannomatosis (REiNS) International Collaboration was established with the goal to develop consensus recommendations for the use of endpoints in neurofibromatosis (NF) clinical trials. This supplement includes the first series of REiNS recommendations for the use of patient-reported, functional, and visual outcomes, and for the evaluation of imaging response in NF clinical trials. Recommendations for neurocognitive outcome measures, the use of whole-body MRI in NF, the evaluation of potential biomarkers of disease, and the comprehensive evaluation of functional and patient-reported outcomes in NF are in development. The REiNS recommendations are made based on current knowledge. Experience with the use of the recommended endpoints in clinical trials, development of new tools and technologies, new knowledge of the natural history of NF, and advances in the methods used to analyze endpoints will likely lead to modifications of the currently proposed guidelines, which will be shared with the NF research community through the REiNS Web site www.reinscollaboration.org. Due to the clinical complexity of NF, there is a need to seek expertise from multiple medical disciplines, regulatory agencies, and industry to develop trial endpoints and designs, which will lead to the identification and approval of effective treatments for NF tumor and nontumor manifestations. The REiNS Collaboration welcomes anyone interested in providing his or her expertise toward this effort. PMID:24249805

  14. The population dynamics of bacteria, phage and RM Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guet, Calin; Levin, Bruce; Pleska, Maros

    Viruses drive and mediate bacterial evolution as parasites and vectors of horizontal gene transfer, respectively. Temperate bacteriophages, defined by the ability to lysogenize a fraction of hosts and to transmit horizontally as well as vertically in the form of prophages, frequently carry genes that increase fitness or contribute to bacterial pathogenicity. Restriction-modification (RM) systems, which are widely diverse and ubiquitous among bacteria, can prevent infections leading to lysis, but their effect on lysogeny is not clear. We show that RM systems prevent lytic and lysogenic infections to the same extent and therefore represent a molecular barrier to prophage acquisition. Surprisingly, we find that this negative effect can be overcome and even reversed at the population level, as a consequence of dynamic interactions between viruses, hosts and RM systems. Thus the population dynamics of bacteria carrying RM systems impacts bacterial genome-wide evolution. .

  15. Using the load-velocity relationship for 1RM prediction.

    PubMed

    Jidovtseff, Boris; Harris, Nigel K; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Cronin, John B

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of the load-velocity relationship to accurately predict a bench press 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Data from 3 different bench press studies (n = 112) that incorporated both 1RM assessment and submaximal load-velocity profiling were analyzed. Individual regression analysis was performed to determine the theoretical load at zero velocity (LD0). Data from each of the 3 studies were analyzed separately and also presented as overall group mean. Thereafter, correlation analysis provided quantification of the relationships between 1RM and LD0. Practically perfect correlations (r = ∼0.95) were observed in our samples, confirming the ability of the load-velocity profile to accurately predict bench press 1RM.

  16. The lateral crural rein flap: a novel technique for management of tip rotation in primary rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Kuran, Ismail; Öreroğlu, Ali Rıza; Efendioğlu, Kamran

    2014-09-01

    An important consideration in rhinoplasty is maintenance of the applied tip rotation. Different techniques have been proposed to accomplish this. Loss of rotation after surgery not only results in a derotated tip but also can create a supratip deformity. As a supplement to dorsal reconstruction, the authors introduced and applied the lateral crural rein flap technique, whereby cartilage flaps are created from the cephalic portion of the lateral crura to control and stabilize tip rotation. Eleven patients underwent primary open-approach rhinoplasty that included the lateral crural rein technique; the mean follow-up time was 18 months. Excess cephalic portions of the lateral crura were prepared as medial crura-based cartilaginous flaps and were incorporated into the nasal dorsum (similar to spreader grafts) and stabilized to achieve the desired tip rotation. The lateral crural rein flap technique provided stability to the nasal tip while minimizing derotation in the postoperative period. Long-term follow-up revealed maintenance of the nasal tip rotation and symmetric dorsal aesthetic lines. The lateral crural rein flap technique is effective for controlling nasal tip rotation while reducing lateral crural cephalic excess. Longevity of the applied tip rotation is reinforced by secure attachment of the lower nasal cartilage complex to the midvault structures. 4. © 2014 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  17. Yersinia ruckeri sp. nov., the redmouth (RM) bacterium

    Ewing, W.H.; Ross, A.J.; Brenner, Don J.; Fanning, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Cultures of the redmouth (RM) bacterium, one of the etiological agents of redmouth disease in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and certain other fishes, were characterized by means of their biochemical reactions, by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization, and by determination of guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) ratios in DNA. The DNA relatedness studies confirmed the fact that the RM bacteria are members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and that they comprise a single species that is not closely related to any other species of Enterobacteriaceae. They are about 30% related to species of both Serratia and Yersinia. A comparison of the biochemical reactions of RM bacteria and serratiae indicated that there are many differences between these organisms and that biochemically the RM bacteria are most closely related to yersiniae. The G+C ratios of RM bacteria were approximated to be between 47.5 and 48.5% These values are similar to those of yersiniae but markedly different from those of serratiae. On the basis of their biochemical reactions and their G+C ratios, the RM bacteria are considered to be a new species of Yersinia, for which the name Yersinia ruckeri is proposed. Strain 2396-61 (= ATCC 29473) is designated the type strain of the species.

  18. Alternatives to conventional evaluation of rideability in horse performance tests: suitability of rein tension and behavioural parameters.

    PubMed

    König von Borstel, Uta; Glißman, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Rideability, i.e. the ease and comfort with which a horse can be ridden, is considered to be one of the most important traits in riding horses. However, at present rideability is evaluated rather subjectively in breeding horse performance tests. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role horse behaviour as well as degree and quality of rein tension might play in judges' evaluation of horses' rideability. Mares (n=33) and stallions (n=13) from two different mare- and one stallion-testing station were observed twice during their performance test dressage training. During these rides, rein tension was measured continuously, and frequency of behaviour patterns such as head-tossing, tail swishing, and snorting was recorded. Rein tension parameters showed reasonable repeatabilities within horse-rider pairs (e.g. mean rein tension: r(2)=0.61 ± 0.11; variance of rein tension: r(2)=0.52 ± 0.14). Regression analysis revealed that a larger proportion of variance in rideability scores could be explained by maximum (17%), mean (16%) and variance (15%) of rein tension compared to horses' or riders' behavioural parameters (tail-swishing: 5% and rider's use of hands: 5%, respectively). According to mixed model analysis, rideability scores dropped (all P<0.05) with increasing mean, maximum and variability in rein tension (e.g. -0.37 ± 0.14 scores per additional 10 Newton in mean tension). However, mean rein tension differed between testing stations (P<0.0001) ranging between 9.1 ± 1.6 N in one station and 21.7 ± 1.3 N in another station. These results indicate that quantity and consistency of rein tension is either directly or indirectly an important factor for judges to derive rideability scores. Given the importance of rein tension parameters to both rider comfort and horse welfare, potentially, measurements of rein tension along with behaviour observations assessing the quality of rein contact (e.g. distinguishing a light contact from attempts to evade contact

  19. The use of a rein tension device to compare different training methods for neck flexion in base-level trained Warmblood horses at the walk.

    PubMed

    Veen, I; Killian, D; Vlaminck, L; Vernooij, J C M; Back, W

    2018-03-08

    Debate surrounds the use of high rein tension for obtaining different head and neck positions in the training of sport horses on account of possible welfare issues. To compare auxiliary rein tension in two methods (Draw Reins and Concord Leader) for obtaining a standardised head and neck position on a hard and a soft surface. Intervention study. Left and right rein tensions were measured in 11 base-level trained client-owned sport horses (mean age ± s.d.; 10 ± 3.2 years) exercised in-hand with, in a random order, conventional draw reins or the newly developed Concord Leader in a standardised head and neck position. Rein tension was measured using a calibrated device operating at 10 Hz during six runs of 15 s in a straight line for each training method on both a hard and a soft surface. A linear mixed model and grouped logistic regression analysis were applied to compare the two methods (P<0.05). The odds of a tension of 0 N were lower with draw reins than with the Concord Leader. The rein tension (mean sum of the force applied, in N) of the draw reins was 13.8 times higher than that of the Concord Leader. This study was performed on horses exercised in-hand; however, these auxiliary aids are normally used when lungeing. Possible redirection of rein tension towards the poll was not measured. We showed that when using the Concord Leader a similar head and neck position is achieved with a much lower rein tension than with the draw reins and, more importantly, with a much greater likelihood of 0 N. It is unnecessary to use high auxiliary rein tension to obtain a standard, flexed head and neck position. © 2018 The Authors. Equine Veterinary Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of EVJ Ltd.

  20. [The development of Rein van Bemmelens (1904-1983) undation theory: forty years of Dutch geology].

    PubMed

    Barzilay, Willemjan

    2009-01-01

    The Dutch geologist Rein van Bemmelen was the greatest opponent of plate tectonics in The Netherlands. He lived and worked during an important period in the history of earth sciences. He had studied geology when Wegeners theory was introduced and enthusiastically received in the Netherlands and he worked as a geologists during the period in which, after Wegeners theory was rejected in The Netherlands, several Dutch geologists came with their own theories to explain the origin of continents and oceans and in which plate tectonics was introduced in The Netherlands. He had proposed his own theory, the undation theory, at the beginning of the 1930s and kept on developing it during the following years. He continued to do so until his death in 1983. The history of the undation theory thus sheds light on the history of geology in The Netherlands. I will trace the history of geology in The Netherlands using Rein van Bemmelen and his undation theory as a lens.

  1. System overview of the fully implantable destination therapy--ReinHeart-total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Benedikt; Spiliopoulos, Sotirios; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Graef, Felix; Kuipers, Kristin; Laumen, Marco; Guersoy, Dilek; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Koerfer, Reiner; Tenderich, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the lack of suitable allografts, the demand for long-term mechanical circulatory support in patients with biventricular end-stage heart failure is rising. Currently available Total Artificial Heart (TAH) systems consist of pump units with only limited durability, percutaneous tubes and bulky external equipment that limit the quality of life. Therefore we are focusing on the development of a fully implantable, highly durable destination therapy total artificial heart. The ReinHeart-TAH system consists of a passively filling pump unit driven by a low-wear linear drive between two artificial ventricles, an implantable control unit and a compliance chamber. The TAH is powered by a transcutaneous energy transmission system. The flow distribution inside the ventricles was analysed by fluid structure interaction simulation and particle image velocimetry measurements. Along with durability tests, the hydrodynamic performance and flow balance capability were evaluated in a mock circulation loop. Animal trials are ongoing. Based on fluid structure interaction simulation and particle image velocimetry, blood stagnation areas have been significantly reduced. In the mock circulation loop the ReinHeart-TAH generated a cardiac output of 5 l/min at an operating frequency of 120 bpm and an aortic pressure of 120/80 mmHg. The highly effective preload sensitivity of the passively filling ventricles allowed the sensorless integration of the Frank Starling mechanism. The ReinHeart-TAH effectively replaced the native heart's function in animals for up to 2 days. In vitro and in vivo testing showed a safe and effective function of the ReinHeart-TAH system. This has the potential to become an alternative to transplantation. However, before a first-in-man implant, chronic animal trials still have to be completed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  2. Von Kármán between Aachen and Pasadena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Egon; Kalkmann, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    In the Introduction the reader is referred back to the academic ceremonials held after Theodore von Kármán's death in Aachen in May 1963. His work as the first director of the Aerodynamisches Institut (Institute of Aerodynamics) of the RWTH Aachen University of Technology from 1913 on and his initiative to re-establish international cooperation after World War I, resulting in the International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (IUTAM), are commented on. The following chapter describes von Kármán's relation to his former teacher Ludwig Prandtl. Some of von Kármán's scientific contributions during his time in Aachen are briefly reviewed. Thereafter, his first contacts to the California Institute of Technology are covered. Finally, the scientific and political circumstances, which led to von Kármán's decision to leave Germany in the early thirties, are elucidated in some detail. The English translation of the titles of the Aachen papers is given in Appendix I.

  3. Morphodynamic Modeling Using The SToRM Computational System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoes, F.

    2016-12-01

    The framework of the work presented here is the open source SToRM (System for Transport and River Modeling) eco-hydraulics modeling system, which is one of the models released with the iRIC hydraulic modeling graphical software package (http://i-ric.org/). SToRM has been applied to the simulation of various complex environmental problems, including natural waterways, steep channels with regime transition, and rapidly varying flood flows with wetting and drying fronts. In its previous version, however, channel bed was treated as static and the ability of simulating sediment transport rates or bed deformation was not included. The work presented here reports SToRM's newly developed extensions to expand the system's capability to calculate morphological changes in alluvial river systems. The sediment transport module of SToRM has been developed based on the general recognition that meaningful advances depend on physically solid formulations and robust and accurate numerical solution methods. The basic concepts of mass and momentum conservation are used, where the feedback mechanisms between the flow of water, the sediment in transport, and the bed changes are directly incorporated in the governing equations used in the mathematical model. This is accomplished via a non-capacity transport formulation based on the work of Cao et al. [Z. Cao et al., "Non-capacity or capacity model for fluvial sediment transport," Water Management, 165(WM4):193-211, 2012], where the governing equations are augmented with source/sink terms due to water-sediment interaction. The same unsteady, shock-capturing numerical schemes originally used in SToRM were adapted to the new physics, using a control volume formulation over unstructured computational grids. The presentation will include a brief overview of these methodologies, and the result of applications of the model to a number of relevant physical test cases with movable bed, where computational results are compared to experimental data.

  4. Rehabilitation Medicine Educational Experiences: A Retrospective Study of Exposure to RM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobmeyer, Thomas W.

    1979-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine: the effect of rehabilitation medicine (RM) educational experiences during medical school on physicians' awareness of RM; attitude toward RM; the management of long-term care; and the tendency to seek expert consultation and patient referral when necessary. (Author/MH)

  5. Complete genome sequence of Campylobacter jejuni RM1246-ERRC that exhibits resistance to Quaternary Ammonium Compounds

    Campylobacter jejuni strain RM1246-ERRC is a clinical isolate. In laboratory experiments RM1246-ERRC exhibited resistance to the antimicrobial effects of quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) when compared to other C. jejuni strains. The chromosome of RM1246-ERRC was determined to be 1,659,694 bp w...

  6. Heavy Resistance Training in Hypoxia Enhances 1RM Squat Performance

    PubMed Central

    Inness, Mathew W. H.; Billaut, François; Walker, Emily J.; Petersen, Aaron C.; Sweeting, Alice J.; Aughey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if heavy resistance training in hypoxia (IHRT) is more effective at improving strength, power, and increasing lean mass than the same training in normoxia. Methods: A pair-matched, placebo-controlled study design included 20 resistance-trained participants assigned to IHRT (FIO2 0.143) or placebo (FIO2 0.20), (n = 10 per group). Participants were matched for strength and training. Both groups performed 20 sessions over 7 weeks either with IHRT or placebo. All participants were tested for 1RM, 20-m sprint, body composition, and countermovement jump pre-, mid-, and post-training and compared via magnitude-based inferences. Presentation of Results: Groups were not clearly different for any test at baseline. Training improved both absolute (IHRT: 13.1 ± 3.9%, effect size (ES) 0.60, placebo 9.8 ± 4.7%, ES 0.31) and relative 1RM (IHRT: 13.4 ± 5.1%, ES 0.76, placebo 9.7 ± 5.3%, ES 0.48) at mid. Similarly, at post both groups increased absolute (IHRT: 20.7 ± 7.6%, ES 0.74, placebo 14.1 ± 6.0%, ES 0.58) and relative 1RM (IHRT: 21.6 ± 8.5%, ES 1.08, placebo 13.2 ± 6.4%, ES 0.78). Importantly, the change in IHRT was greater than placebo at mid for both absolute [4.4% greater change, 90% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.0:8.0%, ES 0.21, and relative strength (5.6% greater change, 90% CI 1.0:9.4%, ES 0.31 (relative)]. There was also a greater change for IHRT at post for both absolute (7.0% greater change, 90% CI 1.3:13%, ES 0.33), and relative 1RM (9.2% greater change, 90% CI 1.6:14.9%, ES 0.49). Only IHRT increased countermovement jump peak power at Post (4.9%, ES 0.35), however the difference between IHRT and placebo was unclear (2.7, 90% CI –2.0:7.6%, ES 0.20) with no clear differences in speed or body composition throughout. Conclusion: Heavy resistance training in hypoxia is more effective than placebo for improving absolute and relative strength. PMID:27857693

  7. Reliability and Validity of the Load-Velocity Relationship to Predict the 1RM Back Squat.

    PubMed

    Banyard, Harry G; Nosaka, Kazunori; Haff, G Gregory

    2017-07-01

    Banyard, HG, Nosaka, K, and Haff, GG. Reliability and validity of the load-velocity relationship to predict the 1RM back squat. J Strength Cond Res 31(7): 1897-1904, 2017-This study investigated the reliability and validity of the load-velocity relationship to predict the free-weight back squat one repetition maximum (1RM). Seventeen strength-trained males performed three 1RM assessments on 3 separate days. All repetitions were performed to full depth with maximal concentric effort. Predicted 1RMs were calculated by entering the mean concentric velocity of the 1RM (V1RM) into an individualized linear regression equation, which was derived from the load-velocity relationship of 3 (20, 40, 60% of 1RM), 4 (20, 40, 60, 80% of 1RM), or 5 (20, 40, 60, 80, 90% of 1RM) incremental warm-up sets. The actual 1RM (140.3 ± 27.2 kg) was very stable between 3 trials (ICC = 0.99; SEM = 2.9 kg; CV = 2.1%; ES = 0.11). Predicted 1RM from 5 warm-up sets up to and including 90% of 1RM was the most reliable (ICC = 0.92; SEM = 8.6 kg; CV = 5.7%; ES = -0.02) and valid (r = 0.93; SEE = 10.6 kg; CV = 7.4%; ES = 0.71) of the predicted 1RM methods. However, all predicted 1RMs were significantly different (p ≤ 0.05; ES = 0.71-1.04) from the actual 1RM. Individual variation for the actual 1RM was small between trials ranging from -5.6 to 4.8% compared with the most accurate predictive method up to 90% of 1RM, which was more variable (-5.5 to 27.8%). Importantly, the V1RM (0.24 ± 0.06 m·s) was unreliable between trials (ICC = 0.42; SEM = 0.05 m·s; CV = 22.5%; ES = 0.14). The load-velocity relationship for the full depth free-weight back squat showed moderate reliability and validity but could not accurately predict 1RM, which was stable between trials. Thus, the load-velocity relationship 1RM prediction method used in this study cannot accurately modify sessional training loads because of large V1RM variability.

  8. Superfluid high REynolds von Kármán experiment.

    PubMed

    Rousset, B; Bonnay, P; Diribarne, P; Girard, A; Poncet, J M; Herbert, E; Salort, J; Baudet, C; Castaing, B; Chevillard, L; Daviaud, F; Dubrulle, B; Gagne, Y; Gibert, M; Hébral, B; Lehner, Th; Roche, P-E; Saint-Michel, B; Bon Mardion, M

    2014-10-01

    The Superfluid High REynolds von Kármán experiment facility exploits the capacities of a high cooling power refrigerator (400 W at 1.8 K) for a large dimension von Kármán flow (inner diameter 0.78 m), which can work with gaseous or subcooled liquid (He-I or He-II) from room temperature down to 1.6 K. The flow is produced between two counter-rotating or co-rotating disks. The large size of the experiment allows exploration of ultra high Reynolds numbers based on Taylor microscale and rms velocity [S. B. Pope, Turbulent Flows (Cambridge University Press, 2000)] (Rλ > 10000) or resolution of the dissipative scale for lower Re. This article presents the design and first performance of this apparatus. Measurements carried out in the first runs of the facility address the global flow behavior: calorimetric measurement of the dissipation, torque and velocity measurements on the two turbines. Moreover first local measurements (micro-Pitot, hot wire,…) have been installed and are presented.

  9. Superfluid high REynolds von Kármán experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, B.; Bonnay, P.; Diribarne, P.; Girard, A.; Poncet, J. M.; Herbert, E.; Salort, J.; Baudet, C.; Castaing, B.; Chevillard, L.; Daviaud, F.; Dubrulle, B.; Gagne, Y.; Gibert, M.; Hébral, B.; Lehner, Th.; Roche, P.-E.; Saint-Michel, B.; Bon Mardion, M.

    2014-10-01

    The Superfluid High REynolds von Kármán experiment facility exploits the capacities of a high cooling power refrigerator (400 W at 1.8 K) for a large dimension von Kármán flow (inner diameter 0.78 m), which can work with gaseous or subcooled liquid (He-I or He-II) from room temperature down to 1.6 K. The flow is produced between two counter-rotating or co-rotating disks. The large size of the experiment allows exploration of ultra high Reynolds numbers based on Taylor microscale and rms velocity [S. B. Pope, Turbulent Flows (Cambridge University Press, 2000)] (Rλ > 10000) or resolution of the dissipative scale for lower Re. This article presents the design and first performance of this apparatus. Measurements carried out in the first runs of the facility address the global flow behavior: calorimetric measurement of the dissipation, torque and velocity measurements on the two turbines. Moreover first local measurements (micro-Pitot, hot wire,…) have been installed and are presented.

  10. SToRM: A Model for 2D environmental hydraulics

    Simões, Francisco J. M.

    2017-01-01

    A two-dimensional (depth-averaged) finite volume Godunov-type shallow water model developed for flow over complex topography is presented. The model, SToRM, is based on an unstructured cell-centered finite volume formulation and on nonlinear strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta time stepping schemes. The numerical discretization is founded on the classical and well established shallow water equations in hyperbolic conservative form, but the convective fluxes are calculated using auto-switching Riemann and diffusive numerical fluxes. Computational efficiency is achieved through a parallel implementation based on the OpenMP standard and the Fortran programming language. SToRM’s implementation within a graphical user interface is discussed. Field application of SToRM is illustrated by utilizing it to estimate peak flow discharges in a flooding event of the St. Vrain Creek in Colorado, U.S.A., in 2013, which reached 850 m3/s (~30,000 f3 /s) at the location of this study.

  11. Free Rein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galley, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    This article presents Fairhaven School, located in a still-bucolic area near Washington, which operates in a way that would baffle many educators, much less the public. Known as a "free school," Fairhaven offers students a radical alternative to the demands of traditional education since it was founded in 1998. In this article, the author…

  12. REINS Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Paul, Rand [R-KY

    2013-02-26

    Senate - 02/26/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. REINS Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Paul, Rand [R-KY

    2011-02-07

    Senate - 07/20/2011 Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 112-220. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. SToRM: A numerical model for environmental surface flows

    Simoes, Francisco J.

    2009-01-01

    SToRM (System for Transport and River Modeling) is a numerical model developed to simulate free surface flows in complex environmental domains. It is based on the depth-averaged St. Venant equations, which are discretized using unstructured upwind finite volume methods, and contains both steady and unsteady solution techniques. This article provides a brief description of the numerical approach selected to discretize the governing equations in space and time, including important aspects of solving natural environmental flows, such as the wetting and drying algorithm. The presentation is illustrated with several application examples, covering both laboratory and natural river flow cases, which show the model’s ability to solve complex flow phenomena.

  15. Characterization and application of enterocin RM6, a bacteriocin from Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Huang, En; Zhang, Liwen; Chung, Yoon-Kyung; Zheng, Zuoxing; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2013-01-01

    Use of bacteriocins in food preservation has received great attention in recent years. The goal of this study is to characterize enterocin RM6 from Enterococcus faecalis OSY-RM6 and investigate its efficacy against Listeria monocytogenes in cottage cheese. Enterocin RM6 was purified from E. faecalis culture supernatant using ion exchange column, multiple C18-silica cartridges, followed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The molecular weight of enterocin RM6 is 7145.0823 as determined by mass spectrometry (MS). Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis revealed that enterocin RM6 is a 70-residue cyclic peptide with a head-to-tail linkage between methionine and tryptophan residues. The peptide sequence of enterocin RM6 was further confirmed by sequencing the structural gene of the peptide. Enterocin RM6 is active against Gram-positive bacteria, including L. monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Enterocin RM6 (final concentration in cottage cheese, 80 AU/mL) caused a 4-log reduction in population of L. monocytogenes inoculated in cottage cheese within 30 min of treatment. Therefore, enterocin RM6 has potential applications as a potent antimicrobial peptide against foodborne pathogens in food.

  16. Characterization and Application of Enterocin RM6, a Bacteriocin from Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yoon-Kyung; Yousef, Ahmed E.

    2013-01-01

    Use of bacteriocins in food preservation has received great attention in recent years. The goal of this study is to characterize enterocin RM6 from Enterococcus faecalis OSY-RM6 and investigate its efficacy against Listeria monocytogenes in cottage cheese. Enterocin RM6 was purified from E. faecalis culture supernatant using ion exchange column, multiple C18-silica cartridges, followed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The molecular weight of enterocin RM6 is 7145.0823 as determined by mass spectrometry (MS). Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis revealed that enterocin RM6 is a 70-residue cyclic peptide with a head-to-tail linkage between methionine and tryptophan residues. The peptide sequence of enterocin RM6 was further confirmed by sequencing the structural gene of the peptide. Enterocin RM6 is active against Gram-positive bacteria, including L. monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Enterocin RM6 (final concentration in cottage cheese, 80 AU/mL) caused a 4-log reduction in population of L. monocytogenes inoculated in cottage cheese within 30 min of treatment. Therefore, enterocin RM6 has potential applications as a potent antimicrobial peptide against foodborne pathogens in food. PMID:23844357

  17. Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Bone Fracture - Bone Fracture Risk Module (BFxRM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Licata, Angelo; Myers, Jerry G.; Lewandowski, Beth

    2013-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the concepts, development, and application of NASA's Bone Fracture Risk Module (BFxRM). The overview includes an assessmnet of strenghts and limitations of the BFxRM and proposes a numebr of discussion questions to the panel regarding future development avenues for this simulation system.

  18. Complete genome sequence of salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Thompson Strain RM6836

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson (S. Thompson) strain RM6836 was isolated from lettuce in 2002. We report the complete sequence and annotation of the genome of S. Thompson strain RM6836. This is the first reported complete genome sequence for S. Thompson and will provide a point ...

  19. A new method used in laparoscopic hysterectomy for uterine manipulation: uterine rein technique.

    PubMed

    Boztosun, Abdullah; Atılgan, Remzi; Pala, Şehmus; Olgan, Şafak

    2018-03-22

    The aim of this study is to define a new method of manipulating the uterus during laparoscopic hysterectomy. A total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) with the newly defined technique was performed in 29 patients between July 2016 and July 2017. In this new technique, the uterus was bound from uterine corpus and fundus like a bridle with polyester tape, to allow abdominal manipulation. The technique was successfully performed at the first attempt in 93.1% of cases. It was repeated in two cases (6.9%) since the polyester tape departed away from the uterus at the first attempt. The mean application time was 11.2 min. The vaginal manipulator was not required in any of the cases. There were no intraoperative complications. In conclusion, this method has the advantages of not requiring any vaginal manipulator, reducing the number of people required during operation, permitting a near maximum manipulation of the uterus in all three dimensions, and giving the control of these manipulations directly to the surgeon. On the other hand, the technique also has some inadequacies which should be discussed and improved on in the future. Impact of statement What is already known on this subject? In a laparoscopic hysterectomy, manipulation of the uterus is essential for anatomical dissection of the regions and completion of the operation without complications. An ideal uterine manipulator is defined as inexpensive, as convenient, fast and suitable for injecting solutions, removing the need for an assistant and most importantly offering the most suitable range of motion. In this study, we describe a new and different technique (rein technique) allowing the abdominal manipulation of the uterus in a laparoscopic hysterectomy and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this method. What do the results of this study add? The procedure was easily accomplished in most patients. We did not need to use an extra uterine manipulator in any of the cases. What are the implications of these

  20. The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Edouard; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost; Pisoni, Ron L; Robinson, Bruce M; Massy, Ziad A

    2014-08-01

    While much has been learned about the epidemiology and treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the last 30 years, chronic kidney disease (CKD) before the end-stage has been less investigated. Not enough is known about factors associated with CKD progression and complications, as well as its transition to ESRD. We designed the CKD-renal epidemiology and information network (REIN) cohort to provide a research platform to address these key questions and to assess clinical practices and costs in patients with moderate or advanced CKD. A total of 46 clinic sites and 4 renal care networks participate in the cohort. A stratified selection of clinic sites yields a sample that represents a diversity of settings, e.g. geographic region, and public versus for-profit and non-for-profit private clinics. In each site, 60-90 patients with CKD are enrolled at a routine clinic visit during a 12-month enrolment phase: 3600 total, including 1800 with Stage 3 and 1800 with Stage 4 CKD. Follow-up will continue for 5 years, including after initiation of renal replacement therapy. Data will be collected from medical records at inclusion and at yearly intervals, as well as from self-administered patient questionnaires and provider-level questionnaires. Patients will also be interviewed at baseline, and at 1, 3 and 5 years. Healthcare costs will also be determined. Blood and urine samples will be collected and stored for future studies on all patients at enrolment and at study end, and at 1 and 3 years in a subsample of 1200. The CKD-REIN cohort will serve to improve our understanding of the biological, clinical and healthcare system determinants associated with CKD progression and adverse outcomes as well as of international variations in collaboration with the CKD Outcome and Practice Pattern Study (CKDopps). It will foster CKD epidemiology and outcomes research and provide evidence to improve the health and quality of life of patients with CKD and the performances of the

  1. Development of 1RM Prediction Equations for Bench Press in Moderately Trained Men.

    PubMed

    Macht, Jordan W; Abel, Mark G; Mullineaux, David R; Yates, James W

    2016-10-01

    Macht, JW, Abel, MG, Mullineaux, DR, and Yates, JW. Development of 1RM prediction equations for bench press in moderately trained men. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2901-2906, 2016-There are a variety of established 1 repetition maximum (1RM) prediction equations, however, very few prediction equations use anthropometric characteristics exclusively or in part, to estimate 1RM strength. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop an original 1RM prediction equation for bench press using anthropometric and performance characteristics in moderately trained male subjects. Sixty male subjects (21.2 ± 2.4 years) completed a 1RM bench press and were randomly assigned a load to complete as many repetitions as possible. In addition, body composition, upper-body anthropometric characteristics, and handgrip strength were assessed. Regression analysis was used to develop a performance-based 1RM prediction equation: 1RM = 1.20 repetition weight + 2.19 repetitions to fatigue - 0.56 biacromial width (cm) + 9.6 (R = 0.99, standard error of estimate [SEE] = 3.5 kg). Regression analysis to develop a nonperformance-based 1RM prediction equation yielded: 1RM (kg) = 0.997 cross-sectional area (CSA) (cm) + 0.401 chest circumference (cm) - 0.385%fat - 0.185 arm length (cm) + 36.7 (R = 0.81, SEE = 13.0 kg). The performance prediction equations developed in this study had high validity coefficients, minimal mean bias, and small limits of agreement. The anthropometric equations had moderately high validity coefficient but larger limits of agreement. The practical applications of this study indicate that the inclusion of anthropometric characteristics and performance variables produce a valid prediction equation for 1RM strength. In addition, the CSA of the arm uses a simple nonperformance method of estimating the lifter's 1RM. This information may be used to predict the starting load for a lifter performing a 1RM prediction protocol or a 1RM testing protocol.

  2. Reference Model 6 (RM6): Oscillating Wave Energy Converter.

    SciT

    Bull, Diana L; Smith, Chris; Jenne, Dale Scott

    This report is an addendum to SAND2013-9040: Methodology for Design and Economic Analysis of Marine Energy Conversion (MEC) Technologies. This report describes an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter reference model design in a complementary manner to Reference Models 1-4 contained in the above report. In this report, a conceptual design for an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter (WEC) device appropriate for the modeled reference resource site was identified, and a detailed backward bent duct buoy (BBDB) device design was developed using a combination of numerical modeling tools and scaled physical models. Our team used the methodology in SAND2013-9040more » for the economic analysis that included costs for designing, manufacturing, deploying, and operating commercial-scale MEC arrays, up to 100 devices. The methodology was applied to identify key cost drivers and to estimate levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for this RM6 Oscillating Water Column device in dollars per kilowatt-hour ($/kWh). Although many costs were difficult to estimate at this time due to the lack of operational experience, the main contribution of this work was to disseminate a detailed set of methodologies and models that allow for an initial cost analysis of this emerging technology. This project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program Office (WWPTO), within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE). Sandia National Laboratories, the lead in this effort, collaborated with partners from National Laboratories, industry, and universities to design and test this reference model.« less

  3. Salient Feature of Haptic-Based Guidance of People in Low Visibility Environments Using Hard Reins.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Anuradha; Sornkarn, Nantachai; Dasgupta, Prokar; Althoefer, Kaspar; Penders, Jacques; Nanayakkara, Thrishantha

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents salient features of human-human interaction where one person with limited auditory and visual perception of the environment (a follower) is guided by an agent with full perceptual capabilities (a guider) via a hard rein along a given path. We investigate several salient features of the interaction between the guider and follower such as: 1) the order of an autoregressive (AR) control policy that maps states of the follower to actions of the guider; 2) how the guider may modulate the pulling force in response to the trust level of the follower; and 3) how learning may successively apportion the responsibility of control across different muscles of the guider. Based on experimental systems identification on human demonstrations from ten pairs of naive subjects, we show that guiders tend to adopt a third-order AR predictive control policy and followers tend to adopt second-order reactive control policy. Moreover, the extracted guider's control policy was implemented and validated by human-robot interaction experiments. By modeling the follower's dynamics with a time varying virtual damped inertial system, we found that it is the coefficient of virtual damping which is most sensitive to the trust level of the follower. We used these experimental insights to derive a novel controller that integrates an optimal order control policy with a push/pull force modulator in response to the trust level of the follower monitored using a time varying virtual damped inertial model.

  4. Effect of Fatigue Upon Performance and Electromyographic Activity in 6-RM Bench Press.

    PubMed

    van den Tillaar, Roland; Saeterbakken, Atle

    2014-03-27

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of fatigue during one set of 6-RM bench pressing upon the muscle patterning and performance. Fourteen resistance-trained males (age 22.5±2.0 years, stature 1.82±0.07 m, body mass 82.0±7.8 kg) conducted a 6-RM bench press protocol. Barbell kinematics and EMG activity of pectoralis major, deltoid anterior, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, rectus abdominis, oblique external and erector spinae were measured in each repetition during the 6-RM bench press. Total lifting time increased and the velocity in the ascending movement decreased (p≤0.001). However, the kinematics in the descending phase deferred: the time decreased and velocity increased during the 6-RM (p≤0.001). Generally, muscles increased their EMG amplitude during the six repetitions in the ascending movement, while only three of the seven measured muscles showed an increase over the six repetitions in the descending part in 6-RM bench pressing. It was concluded that the bench pressing performance decreased (lower barbell velocities and longer lifting times) with increasing fatigue in the 6-RM execution. Furthermore EMG increased in the prime movers and the trunk stabilizers (abdominal and spine), while the antagonist muscle (biceps) activity was not affected by fatigue during the lifting phase in a single set of 6-RM bench pressing.

  5. Effect of Fatigue Upon Performance and Electromyographic Activity in 6-RM Bench Press

    PubMed Central

    van den Tillaar, Roland; Saeterbakken, Atle

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of fatigue during one set of 6-RM bench pressing upon the muscle patterning and performance. Fourteen resistance-trained males (age 22.5±2.0 years, stature 1.82±0.07 m, body mass 82.0±7.8 kg) conducted a 6-RM bench press protocol. Barbell kinematics and EMG activity of pectoralis major, deltoid anterior, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, rectus abdominis, oblique external and erector spinae were measured in each repetition during the 6-RM bench press. Total lifting time increased and the velocity in the ascending movement decreased (p≤0.001). However, the kinematics in the descending phase deferred: the time decreased and velocity increased during the 6-RM (p≤0.001). Generally, muscles increased their EMG amplitude during the six repetitions in the ascending movement, while only three of the seven measured muscles showed an increase over the six repetitions in the descending part in 6-RM bench pressing. It was concluded that the bench pressing performance decreased (lower barbell velocities and longer lifting times) with increasing fatigue in the 6-RM execution. Furthermore EMG increased in the prime movers and the trunk stabilizers (abdominal and spine), while the antagonist muscle (biceps) activity was not affected by fatigue during the lifting phase in a single set of 6-RM bench pressing PMID:25031673

  6. 76 FR 37682 - Airworthiness Directives; Teledyne Continental Motors (TCM) and Rolls-Royce Motors Ltd. (R-RM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... Continental Motors (TCM) and Rolls-Royce Motors Ltd. (R-RM) Series Reciprocating Engines AGENCY: Federal... supersede an existing airworthiness directive (AD) that applies to certain TCM and R-RM series reciprocating... range of magneto S/ Ns affected, and of the need to include certain engines made by R-RM, under license...

  7. 76 FR 78808 - Airworthiness Directives; Teledyne Continental Motors (TCM) and Rolls-Royce Motors Ltd. (R-RM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Teledyne Continental Motors (TCM) and Rolls-Royce Motors Ltd. (R-RM) Series... superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for certain TCM and R-RM series reciprocating engines... adds R-RM C-125, C- 145, O-300, IO-360, TSIO-360, and LTSIO-520-AE series reciprocating engines to the...

  8. The essential of 2012 results from the French Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (REIN) ESRD registry.

    PubMed

    Lassalle, Mathilde; Ayav, Carole; Frimat, Luc; Jacquelinet, Christian; Couchoud, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    The French Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (REIN) registry began in 2002 to provide a tool for public health decision support, evaluation and research related to renal replacement therapies (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It is relying on a network of nephrologists, epidemiologists, patients and public health representatives. Continuous registration covers all dialysis and transplanted patients. In 2012, in France, 10,048 patients started a RRT (154 per million inhabitants). Elders provided majority of new patients (median age at RRT start: 70 years old). New patients had a high and age increasing rate of comorbidities, especially diabetes (42% of the new patients) and cardiovascular comorbidities (>50% of the new patients). Like previous years, incidence is stabilized. On December 31, 2012, 73,491 patients were receiving a RRT in France (1127 per million inhabitants, 56% on dialysis and 44% living with a functional renal transplant). More than 50% of patients were undergoing in-center hemodialysis with significant variations among regions. An increase in medical satellite unit hemodialysis but a decrease in self-care unit hemodialysis rates were noticed across the time, whereas peritoneal dialysis remained stable at 7%. Five years after starting RRT, the overall survival rate was 51% but only 16% among patients over 85 years. Mortality rate was highly dependent on treatment and age; transplanted patients aged 60-69 had a 27/1000 patients-year mortality rate versus 133 for a dialysis patient. Patients who started dialysis had a probability of first wait-listing of 4.8% at the start of dialysis (pre-emptive registrations) and 27% at 72 months. Whatever their diabetes status was, patients older than 60 had poor access to the waiting list. Seventeen percent of the patients received a first renal transplant within 15.4 month median time; 3% had received a pre-emptive graft. Ten years after the start of the French ESRD registry, this report provides

  9. Extraction of $$\\sin^2\\theta^{\\rm lept}_{\\rm eff}$$ and indirect measurement of $$m_w$$ from the 9 fb$$^{-1}$$ full run ii sample of $$\\mu^+\\mu^-$$ events at cdf

    SciT

    Bodek, A.

    2014-09-19

    We report on the extraction ofmore » $$\\sin^2\\theta^{\\rm lept}_{\\rm eff}$$ and indirect measurement of the mass of the W boson from the forward-backward asymmetry of $$\\mu^+\\mu^-$$ events in the $Z$ boson mass region. The data sample collected by the CDF detector corresponds to the full 9 fb$$^{-1}$$ run II sample. We measure $$\\sin^2 \\theta^{\\rm lept}_{\\rm eff} = 0.2315 \\pm 0.0010$$,$$ \\sin^2 \\theta_W = 0.2233 \\pm 0.0009$$ and $$M_W ({\\rm indirect}) = 80.365 \\pm 0.047 \\;{\\rm GeV}/c^2$$, where each uncertainty includes both statistical and systematic contributions.« less

  10. Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in d+Au and p+p collisions at {\\sqrt{s_{{\\rm NN}}} = \\rm {200 \\;GeV} }

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouicer, Rachid; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wyslouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2004-08-01

    The measured pseudorapidity distributions of primary charged particles are presented for d+Au and p+p collisions at {\\sqrt{s_{{\\rm NN}}} = \\rm {200\\;GeV} } over a wide pseudorapidity range of |eegr|les 5.4. The results for d+Au collisions are presented for minimum-bias events and as a function of collision centrality. The measurements for p+p collisions are shown for minimum-bias events. The ratio of the charged particle multiplicity in d+Au and p+A collisions relative to that for inelastic p+p collisions is found to depend only on langNpartrang, and it is remarkably independent of collision energy and system mass. The deuteron and gold fragmentation regions in d+Au collisions are in good agreement with proton nucleus data at lower energies.

  11. PhreeqcRM: A reaction module for transport simulators based on the geochemical model PHREEQC

    Parkhurst, David L.; Wissmeier, Laurin

    2015-01-01

    PhreeqcRM is a geochemical reaction module designed specifically to perform equilibrium and kinetic reaction calculations for reactive transport simulators that use an operator-splitting approach. The basic function of the reaction module is to take component concentrations from the model cells of the transport simulator, run geochemical reactions, and return updated component concentrations to the transport simulator. If multicomponent diffusion is modeled (e.g., Nernst–Planck equation), then aqueous species concentrations can be used instead of component concentrations. The reaction capabilities are a complete implementation of the reaction capabilities of PHREEQC. In each cell, the reaction module maintains the composition of all of the reactants, which may include minerals, exchangers, surface complexers, gas phases, solid solutions, and user-defined kinetic reactants.PhreeqcRM assigns initial and boundary conditions for model cells based on standard PHREEQC input definitions (files or strings) of chemical compositions of solutions and reactants. Additional PhreeqcRM capabilities include methods to eliminate reaction calculations for inactive parts of a model domain, transfer concentrations and other model properties, and retrieve selected results. The module demonstrates good scalability for parallel processing by using multiprocessing with MPI (message passing interface) on distributed memory systems, and limited scalability using multithreading with OpenMP on shared memory systems. PhreeqcRM is written in C++, but interfaces allow methods to be called from C or Fortran. By using the PhreeqcRM reaction module, an existing multicomponent transport simulator can be extended to simulate a wide range of geochemical reactions. Results of the implementation of PhreeqcRM as the reaction engine for transport simulators PHAST and FEFLOW are shown by using an analytical solution and the reactive transport benchmark of MoMaS.

  12. Supramaximal Eccentrics Versus Traditional Loading in Improving Lower-Body 1RM: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Buskard, Andrew N L; Gregg, Heath R; Ahn, Soyeon

    2018-06-11

    Guidelines for improving maximal concentric strength through resistance training (RT) have traditionally included large muscle-group exercises, full ranges of motion, and a load approximating 85% of the 1-repetition maximum (1RM). Supramaximal eccentric training (SME; controlled lowering of loads above the concentric 1RM) has also been shown to be effective at increasing concentric 1RM in the lower body, but concerns regarding injury risk, postexercise soreness, and null benefit over traditional methods (TRAD) may limit the practical utility of this approach. The purpose of this study was to determine whether SME elicits greater lower-body strength improvements than TRAD. Key inclusion criteria were regular exercise modalities typical of nonspecialized exercise facilities (e.g., leg press; key exclusion: isokinetic dynamometer) and at least 6 weeks of RT exposure, leading to 5 studies included in the current meta-analysis. Unbiased effect-size measures that quantify the mean difference in lower-body 1RM between SME and TRAD were extracted. Supramaximal eccentric training did not appear to be more effective than TRAD at increasing lower-body 1RM ([Formula: see text] = .33, SE = .26, z = 1.26, 95% CI [-0.20, 0.79], p = .20, I 2  = 56.78%) under a random-effects model where between-study variance was estimated using maximum likelihood estimation ([Formula: see text] 2 = .25). The selection of SME over TRAD in RT programs designed to increase lower-body 1RM does not appear warranted in all populations. Further research should clarify the merit of periodic SME in TRAD-dominant RT programs as well as whether a differential effect exists in trained individuals.

  13. mRM - multiscale Routing Model for Land Surface and Hydrologic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Thober, S.; Mai, J.; Samaniego, L. E.; Gochis, D. J.; Kumar, R.

    2015-12-01

    Routing streamflow through a river network is a basic step within any distributed hydrologic model. It integrates the generated runoff and allows comparison with observed discharge at the outlet of a catchment. The Muskingum routing is a textbook river routing scheme that has been implemented in Earth System Models (e.g., WRF-HYDRO), stand-alone routing schemes (e.g., RAPID), and hydrologic models (e.g., the mesoscale Hydrologic Model). Most implementations suffer from a high computational demand because the spatial routing resolution is fixed to that of the elevation model irrespective of the hydrologic modeling resolution. This is because the model parameters are scale-dependent and cannot be used at other resolutions without re-estimation. Here, we present the multiscale Routing Model (mRM) that allows for a flexible choice of the routing resolution. mRM exploits the Multiscale Parameter Regionalization (MPR) included in the open-source mesoscale Hydrologic Model (mHM, www.ufz.de/mhm) that relates model parameters to physiographic properties and allows to estimate scale-independent model parameters. mRM is currently coupled to mHM and is presented here as stand-alone Free and Open Source Software (FOSS). The mRM source code is highly modular and provides a subroutine for internal re-use in any land surface scheme. mRM is coupled in this work to the state-of-the-art land surface model Noah-MP. Simulation results using mRM are compared with those available in WRF-HYDRO for the Red River during the period 1990-2000. mRM allows to increase the routing resolution from 100m to more than 10km without deteriorating the model performance. Therefore, it speeds up model calculation by reducing the contribution of routing to total runtime from over 80% to less than 5% in the case of WRF-HYDRO. mRM thus makes discharge data available to land surface modeling with only little extra calculations.

  14. Kinematic α tensors and dynamo mechanisms in a von Kármán swirling flow.

    PubMed

    Ravelet, F; Dubrulle, B; Daviaud, F; Ratié, P-A

    2012-07-13

    We provide experimental and numerical evidence of in-blades vortices in the von Kármán swirling flow. We estimate the associated kinematic α-effect tensor and show that it is compatible with recent models of the von Kármán sodium (VKS) dynamo. We further show that depending on the relative frequency of the two impellers, the dominant dynamo mechanism may switch from α2 to α - Ω dynamo. We discuss some implications of these results for VKS experiments.

  15. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Sunoco Incorporated - R&M Eagle Point Refinery in Westville, New Jersey

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sunoco, Inc. - R&M Eagle Point Refinery is located on Route 295 & 130 in Westville, West Deptford Township, New Jersey. The site is a 1,000-acre oil refinery on the Delaware River, 550 acres of which is an active production area.

  16. Extended Mixed-Efects Item Response Models with the MH-RM Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalmers, R. Philip

    2015-01-01

    A mixed-effects item response theory (IRT) model is presented as a logical extension of the generalized linear mixed-effects modeling approach to formulating explanatory IRT models. Fixed and random coefficients in the extended model are estimated using a Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro (MH-RM) stochastic imputation algorithm to accommodate for…

  17. Complete genome sequence of the Campylobacter iguaniorum strain RM11343, isolated from an alpaca

    Campylobacter iguaniorum is a member of the C. fetus group of campylobacters and is one of two Campylobacter taxa isolated from reptiles. This study describes the whole-genome sequence of the C. iguaniorum strain RM11343, which was isolated from a California alpaca fecal sample....

  18. Expression and characterization of hyperthermostable exo-polygalacturonase RmGH28 from Rhodothermus marinus

    The gene RmGH28 from the organism Rhodothermus marinus putatively encoding a glycosyl hydrolase family 28 polygalacturonase was expressed in E. coli, and the enzyme purified and biochemically characterized. The gene was found to encode an exo- polygalacturonase, with galacturonic acid monomer and th...

  19. RANS Simulation (Virtual Blade Model [VBM]) of Single Lab Scaled DOE RM1 MHK Turbine

    DOE Data Explorer

    Javaherchi, Teymour; Stelzenmuller, Nick; Aliseda, Alberto; Seydel, Joseph

    2014-04-15

    Attached are the .cas and .dat files for the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of a single lab-scaled DOE RM1 turbine implemented in ANSYS FLUENT CFD-package. The lab-scaled DOE RM1 is a re-design geometry, based of the full scale DOE RM1 design, producing same power output as the full scale model, while operating at matched Tip Speed Ratio values at reachable laboratory Reynolds number (see attached paper). In this case study the flow field around and in the wake of the lab-scaled DOE RM1 turbine is simulated using Blade Element Model (a.k.a Virtual Blade Model) by solving RANS equations coupled with k-\\omega turbulence closure model. It should be highlighted that in this simulation the actual geometry of the rotor blade is not modeled. The effect of turbine rotating blades are modeled using the Blade Element Theory. This simulation provides an accurate estimate for the performance of device and structure of it's turbulent far wake. Due to the simplifications implemented for modeling the rotating blades in this model, VBM is limited to capture details of the flow field in near wake region of the device. The required User Defined Functions (UDFs) and look-up table of lift and drag coefficients are included along with the .cas and .dat files.

  20. Spectroscopic Classification of ASASSN-15rm as a Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, W.; Halevi, G.; Shivvers, I.; Yuk, H.; Filippenko, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    We report that inspection of a CCD spectrum (range 350-1050 nm) of ASASSN-15rm (ATel #8192), obtained on Oct. 20.50 UT with the Shane 3-m reflector (+ Kast spectrograph) at Lick Observatory, shows that the object is a normal Type Ia supernova roughly 1 week past maximum brightness.

  1. Chemical Composition of RM_1-390 - Large Magellanic Cloud Red Supergiant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushchenko, Alexander V.; Jeong, Yeuncheol; Gopka, Vira F.; Vasil`eva, Svetlana V.; Andrievsky, Sergey M.; Yushchenko, Volodymyr O.

    2017-09-01

    A high resolution spectroscopic observation of the red supergiant star RM_1-390 in the Large Magellanic Cloud was made from a 3.6 m telescope at the European Southern Observatory. Spectral resolving power was R=20,000, with a signal-to-noise ratio S/N > 100. We found the atmospheric parameters of RM_1-390 to be as follows: the effective temperature Teff = 4,250 ± 50 K, the surface gravity log g = 0.16 ± 0.1, the microturbulent velocity vmicro = 2.5 km/s, the macroturbulence velocity vmacro = 9 km/s and the iron abundance [Fe/H] = -0.73 ± 0.11. The abundances of 18 chemical elements from silicon to thorium in the atmosphere of RM_1-390 were found using the spectrum synthesis method. The relative deficiencies of all elements are close to that of iron. The fit of abundance pattern by the solar system distribution of r- and s-element isotopes shows the importance of the s-process. The plot of relative abundances as a function of second ionization potentials of corresponding chemical elements allows us to find a possibility of convective energy transport in the photosphere of RM_1-390.

  2. Complete genomic sequences of Campylobacter jejuni strains RM3196 (233.94) and RM3197 (308.95) that were isolated from patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    An infection with Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni (Cjj) is a leading cause of foodborne gastroenteritis in humans and also the most prevalent infection preceding Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). This study describes the complete genomic sequences of Cjj HS:41 strains RM3196 (233.94) and RM3197 (308...

  3. Inter-Investigator Reliability of Anthropometric Prediction of 1RM Bench Press in College Football Players

    PubMed Central

    SCHUMACHER, RICHARD M.; ARABAS, JANA L.; MAYHEW, JERRY L.; BRECHUE, WILLIAM F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of inter-investigator differences in anthropometric assessments on the prediction of one-repetition maximum (1RM) bench press in college football players. Division-II players (n = 34, age = 20.4 ± 1.2 y, 182.3 ± 6.6 cm, 99.1 ± 18.4 kg) were measured for selected anthropometric variables and 1RM bench press at the conclusion of a heavy resistance training program. Triceps, subscapular, and abdominal skinfolds were measured in triplicate by three investigators and used to estimate %fat. Arm circumference was measured around a flexed biceps muscle and was corrected for triceps skinfold to estimate muscle cross-sectional area (CSA). Chest circumference was measured at mid-expiration. Significant differences among the testers were evident in six of the nine anthropometric variables, with the least experienced tester being significantly different from the other testers on seven variables, although average differences among investigators ranged from 1–2% for circumferences to 4–9% for skinfolds. The two more experienced testers were significantly different on only one variable. Overall agreement among testers was high (ICC>0.895) for each variable, with low coefficients of variation (CV<10.7%). Predicted 1RMs for testers (126.9 ± 20.6, 123.4 ± 22.0, and 132.1 ± 28.4 kg, respectively) were not significantly different from actual 1RM (129.2 ± 20.6 kg). Individuals with varying levels of experience appear to have an acceptable level of ability to estimate 1RM bench press using a non-performance anthropometric equation. Minimal experience in anthropometry may not impede strength and conditioning specialists from accurately estimating 1RM bench press. PMID:27766130

  4. Inter-Investigator Reliability of Anthropometric Prediction of 1RM Bench Press in College Football Players.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Richard M; Arabas, Jana L; Mayhew, Jerry L; Brechue, William F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of inter-investigator differences in anthropometric assessments on the prediction of one-repetition maximum (1RM) bench press in college football players. Division-II players (n = 34, age = 20.4 ± 1.2 y, 182.3 ± 6.6 cm, 99.1 ± 18.4 kg) were measured for selected anthropometric variables and 1RM bench press at the conclusion of a heavy resistance training program. Triceps, subscapular, and abdominal skinfolds were measured in triplicate by three investigators and used to estimate %fat. Arm circumference was measured around a flexed biceps muscle and was corrected for triceps skinfold to estimate muscle cross-sectional area (CSA). Chest circumference was measured at mid-expiration. Significant differences among the testers were evident in six of the nine anthropometric variables, with the least experienced tester being significantly different from the other testers on seven variables, although average differences among investigators ranged from 1-2% for circumferences to 4-9% for skinfolds. The two more experienced testers were significantly different on only one variable. Overall agreement among testers was high (ICC>0.895) for each variable, with low coefficients of variation (CV<10.7%). Predicted 1RMs for testers (126.9 ± 20.6, 123.4 ± 22.0, and 132.1 ± 28.4 kg, respectively) were not significantly different from actual 1RM (129.2 ± 20.6 kg). Individuals with varying levels of experience appear to have an acceptable level of ability to estimate 1RM bench press using a non-performance anthropometric equation. Minimal experience in anthropometry may not impede strength and conditioning specialists from accurately estimating 1RM bench press.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS-RM project: peak velocities of QSOs (Shen+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y.; Brandt, W. N.; Richards, G. T.; Denney, K. D.; Greene, J. E.; Grier, C. J.; Ho, L. C.; Peterson, B. M.; Petitjean, P.; Schneider, D. P.; Tao, C.; Trump, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    The SDSS-RM quasar sample includes 849 broad-line quasars at 0.1RM project within the SDSS-III (Eisenstein+ 2011AJ....142...72E) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS, Dawson+ 2013AJ....145...10D), using the BOSS spectrograph on the 2.5m SDSS telescope. The wavelength coverage of BOSS spectroscopy is ~3650-10400Å, with a spectral resolution of R~2000. (1 data file).

  6. Galerkin analysis of kinematic dynamos in the von Kármán geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marié, L.; Normand, C.; Daviaud, F.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate dynamo action by solving the kinematic dynamo problem for velocity fields of the von Kármán type between two coaxial counter-rotating propellers in a cylinder. A Galerkin method is implemented that takes advantage of the symmetries of the flow and their subsequent influence on the nature of the magnetic field at the dynamo threshold. Distinct modes of instability have been identified that differ by their spatial and temporal behaviors. Our calculations give the result that a stationary and antisymmetric mode prevails at the dynamo threshold. We then present a quantitative analysis of the results based on the parametric study of four interaction coefficients obtained by reduction of our initially large eigenvalue problem. We propose these coefficients to measure the relative importance of the different mechanisms at play in the von Kármán kinematic dynamo.

  7. Herbimycins D-F, ansamycin analogues from Streptomyces sp. RM-7-15.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Khaled A; Wang, Xiachang; Elshahawi, Sherif I; Ponomareva, Larissa V; Sunkara, Manjula; Copley, Gregory C; Hower, James C; Morris, Andrew J; Kharel, Madan K; Thorson, Jon S

    2013-09-27

    Bacterial strains belonging to the class actinomycetes were isolated from the soil near a thermal vent of the Ruth Mullins coal fire (Appalachian Mountains of eastern Kentucky). High-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and ultraviolet absorption profiles of metabolites from one of the isolates (Streptomyces sp. RM-7-15) revealed the presence of a unique set of metabolites ultimately determined to be herbimycins D-F (1-3). In addition, herbimycin A (4), dihydroherbimycin A (TAN 420E) (7), and the structurally distinct antibiotic bicycylomycin were isolated from the crude extract of Streptomyces sp. RM-7-15. Herbimycins A and D-F (1-3) displayed comparable binding affinities to the Hsp90α. While the new analogues were found to be inactive in cancer cell cytotoxicity and antimicrobial assays, they may offer new insights in the context of nontoxic ansamycin-based Hsp90 inhibitors for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease.

  8. Bioleaching of rare earth and radioactive elements from red mud using Penicillium tricolor RM-10.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yang; Lian, Bin

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate biological leaching of rare earth elements (REEs) and radioactive elements from red mud, and to evaluate the radioactivity of the bioleached red mud used for construction materials. A filamentous, acid-producing fungi named RM-10, identified as Penicillium tricolor, is isolated from red mud. In our bioleaching experiments by using RM-10, a total concentration of 2% (w/v) red mud under one-step bioleaching process was generally found to give the maximum leaching ratios of the REEs and radioactive elements. However, the highest extraction yields are achieved under two-step bioleaching process at 10% (w/v) pulp density. At pulp densities of 2% and 5% (w/v), red mud processed under both one- and two-step bioleaching can meet the radioactivity regulations in China. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An effective XML based name mapping mechanism within StoRM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corso, E.; Forti, A.; Ghiselli, A.; Magnoni, L.; Zappi, R.

    2008-07-01

    In a Grid environment the naming capability allows users to refer to specific data resources in a physical storage system using a high level logical identifier. This logical identifier is typically organized in a file system like structure, a hierarchical tree of names. Storage Resource Manager (SRM) services map the logical identifier to the physical location of data evaluating a set of parameters as the desired quality of services and the VOMS attributes specified in the requests. StoRM is a SRM service developed by INFN and ICTP-EGRID to manage file and space on standard POSIX and high performing parallel and cluster file systems. An upcoming requirement in the Grid data scenario is the orthogonality of the logical name and the physical location of data, in order to refer, with the same identifier, to different copies of data archived in various storage areas with different quality of service. The mapping mechanism proposed in StoRM is based on a XML document that represents the different storage components managed by the service, the storage areas defined by the site administrator, the quality of service they provide and the Virtual Organization that want to use the storage area. An appropriate directory tree is realized in each storage component reflecting the XML schema. In this scenario StoRM is able to identify the physical location of a requested data evaluating the logical identifier and the specified attributes following the XML schema, without querying any database service. This paper presents the namespace schema defined, the different entities represented and the technical details of the StoRM implementation.

  10. Immunodetection of the Bacteriocin Lacticin RM: Analysis of the Influence of Temperature and Tween 80 on Its Expression and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Tomer; Yarmus, Merav; Halevy, Galia; Shapira, Roni

    2004-01-01

    Immunoassays with specific antibodies offer higher sensitivity than do bioassays with indicator strains in the detection and quantification of several bacteriocins. Here we present the purification of lacticin RM and the production of specific polyclonal antibodies to a synthetic peptide resembling an internal fragment of the mature bacteriocin. The specificity and sensitivity of the generated polyclonal antibodies were evaluated in various immunoassays. The detection limits of lacticin RM were found to be 1.9, 0.16, and 0.18 μg ml−1 for Western blot, immuno-dot blot, and noncompetitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, respectively. Immunoassay sensitivities were 12.5-fold higher than that of the agar diffusion test (ADT). The production of lacticin RM showed temperature dependency, with 3, 4.2, 12.7, 28.9, 37.8, and 12 μg ml−1 at 37, 30, 20, 15, 10, and 4°C, respectively. Temperature-stability analysis demonstrated that lacticin RM is sensitive to mild temperature, but the loss of activity does not seem to result from protein degradation. Tween 80 increased the concentration of lacticin RM eightfold and probably affected the results of the ADT either by enhancing the activity of lacticin RM or by increasing the sensitivity of the indicator strain. The use of antibodies for the specific detection and quantification of lacticin RM can expand our knowledge of its production and stability, with important implications for further investigation and future application. PMID:15066801

  11. First Measurement of the Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in $Δ$ Resonance Production by $$Q_{\\rm weak}$$

    SciT

    Nuruzzaman, nfn

    The beam normal single spin asymmetry (more » $$B_{\\rm n}$$) is generated in the scattering of transversely polarized electrons from unpolarized nuclei. The asymmetry arises from the interference of the imaginary part of the two-photon exchange with the one-photon exchange amplitude. The $$Q_{\\rm weak}$$ experiment has made the first measurement of $$B_{\\rm n}$$ in the production of the $$\\Delta$$(1232) resonance, using the $$Q_{\\rm weak}$$ apparatus in Hall-C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The final transverse asymmetry, corrected for backgrounds and beam polarization, is $$B_{\\rm n}$$ = 43 $$\\pm$$ 16 ppm at beam energy 1.16 GeV at an average scattering angle of about 8.3 degrees, and invariant mass of 1.2 GeV. The measured preliminary $$B_{\\rm n}$$ agrees with a preliminary theoretical calculation. $$B_{\\rm n}$$ for the $$\\Delta$$ is the only known observable that is sensitive to the $$\\Delta$$ elastic form-factors ($$\\gamma$$*$$\\Delta\\Delta$$) in addition to the generally studied transition form-factors ($$\\gamma$$*N$$\\Delta$$), but extracting this information will require significant theoretical input.« less

  12. Broadband Photometric Reverberation Mapping Analysis on SDSS-RM and Stripe 82 Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haowen; Yang, Qian; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2018-02-01

    We modified the broadband photometric reverberation mapping (PRM) code, JAVELIN, and tested the availability to get broad-line region time delays that are consistent with the spectroscopic reverberation mapping (SRM) project SDSS-RM. The broadband light curves of SDSS-RM quasars produced by convolution with the system transmission curves were used in the test. We found that under similar sampling conditions (evenly and frequently sampled), the key factor determining whether the broadband PRM code can yield lags consistent with the SRM project is the flux ratio of the broad emission line to the reference continuum, which is in line with the previous findings. We further found a critical line-to-continuum flux ratio, about 6%, above which the mean of the ratios between the lags from PRM and SRM becomes closer to unity, and the scatter is pronouncedly reduced. We also tested our code on a subset of SDSS Stripe 82 quasars, and found that our program tends to give biased lag estimations due to the observation gaps when the R-L relation prior in Markov Chain Monte Carlo is discarded. The performance of the damped random walk (DRW) model and the power-law (PL) structure function model on broadband PRM were compared. We found that given both SDSS-RM-like or Stripe 82-like light curves, the DRW model performs better in carrying out broadband PRM than the PL model.

  13. Functionality of In vitro Reconstituted Group II Intron RmInt1-Derived Ribonucleoprotein Particles.

    PubMed

    Molina-Sánchez, Maria D; García-Rodríguez, Fernando M; Toro, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    The functional unit of mobile group II introns is a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) consisting of the intron-encoded protein (IEP) and the excised intron RNA. The IEP has reverse transcriptase activity but also promotes RNA splicing, and the RNA-protein complex triggers site-specific DNA insertion by reverse splicing, in a process called retrohoming. In vitro reconstituted ribonucleoprotein complexes from the Lactococcus lactis group II intron Ll.LtrB, which produce a double strand break, have recently been studied as a means of developing group II intron-based gene targeting methods for higher organisms. The Sinorhizobium meliloti group II intron RmInt1 is an efficient mobile retroelement, the dispersal of which appears to be linked to transient single-stranded DNA during replication. The RmInt1IEP lacks the endonuclease domain (En) and cannot cut the bottom strand to generate the 3' end to initiate reverse transcription. We used an Escherichia coli expression system to produce soluble and active RmInt1 IEP and reconstituted RNPs with purified components in vitro . The RNPs generated were functional and reverse-spliced into a single-stranded DNA target. This work constitutes the starting point for the use of group II introns lacking DNA endonuclease domain-derived RNPs for highly specific gene targeting methods.

  14. Functionality of In vitro Reconstituted Group II Intron RmInt1-Derived Ribonucleoprotein Particles

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Sánchez, Maria D.; García-Rodríguez, Fernando M.; Toro, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    The functional unit of mobile group II introns is a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) consisting of the intron-encoded protein (IEP) and the excised intron RNA. The IEP has reverse transcriptase activity but also promotes RNA splicing, and the RNA-protein complex triggers site-specific DNA insertion by reverse splicing, in a process called retrohoming. In vitro reconstituted ribonucleoprotein complexes from the Lactococcus lactis group II intron Ll.LtrB, which produce a double strand break, have recently been studied as a means of developing group II intron-based gene targeting methods for higher organisms. The Sinorhizobium meliloti group II intron RmInt1 is an efficient mobile retroelement, the dispersal of which appears to be linked to transient single-stranded DNA during replication. The RmInt1IEP lacks the endonuclease domain (En) and cannot cut the bottom strand to generate the 3′ end to initiate reverse transcription. We used an Escherichia coli expression system to produce soluble and active RmInt1 IEP and reconstituted RNPs with purified components in vitro. The RNPs generated were functional and reverse-spliced into a single-stranded DNA target. This work constitutes the starting point for the use of group II introns lacking DNA endonuclease domain-derived RNPs for highly specific gene targeting methods. PMID:27730127

  15. Reliability improvements on Thales RM2 rotary Stirling coolers: analysis and methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauquil, J. M.; Seguineau, C.; Martin, J.-Y.; Benschop, T.

    2016-05-01

    The cooled IR detectors are used in a wide range of applications. Most of the time, the cryocoolers are one of the components dimensioning the lifetime of the system. The cooler reliability is thus one of its most important parameters. This parameter has to increase to answer market needs. To do this, the data for identifying the weakest element determining cooler reliability has to be collected. Yet, data collection based on field are hardly usable due to lack of informations. A method for identifying the improvement in reliability has then to be set up which can be used even without field return. This paper will describe the method followed by Thales Cryogénie SAS to reach such a result. First, a database was built from extensive expertizes of RM2 failures occurring in accelerate ageing. Failure modes have then been identified and corrective actions achieved. Besides this, a hierarchical organization of the functions of the cooler has been done with regard to the potential increase of its efficiency. Specific changes have been introduced on the functions most likely to impact efficiency. The link between efficiency and reliability will be described in this paper. The work on the two axes - weak spots for cooler reliability and efficiency - permitted us to increase in a drastic way the MTTF of the RM2 cooler. Huge improvements in RM2 reliability are actually proven by both field return and reliability monitoring. These figures will be discussed in the paper.

  16. Meta-Cresol Purple Reference Material® (RM) for Seawater pH Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easley, R. A.; Waters, J. F.; Place, B. J.; Pratt, K. W.

    2016-02-01

    The pH of seawater is a fundamental quantity that governs the carbon dioxide - carbonate system in the world's oceans. High quality pH measurements for long-term monitoring, shipboard studies, and shorter-term biological studies (mesocosm and field experiments) can be ensured through a reference material (RM) that is compatible with existing procedures and which is traceable to primary pH measurement metrology. High-precision spectrophotometric measurements of seawater pH using an indicator dye such as meta-cresol purple (mCP) are well established. However, traceability of these measurements to the International System of Units (SI) additionally requires characterizing the spectrophotometric pH response of the dye in multiple artificial seawater buffers that themselves are benchmarked via primary pH (Harned cell) measurements at a range of pH, salinity, and temperature. NIST is currently developing such a mCP pH RM using this approach. This material will also incorporate new procedures developed at NIST for assessing the purity and homogeneity of the mCP reagent itself. The resulting mCP will provide long-term (years) stability and ease of shipment compared to artificial seawater pH buffers. These efforts will provide the oceanographic user community with a NIST issued mCP (RM), characterized as to its molar absorptivity values and acid dissociation constants (pKa), with uncertainties that comply with the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM).

  17. Update on lifetime tests results and analysis carried out on Thales Cryogenics integral coolers (RM family)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauquil, Jean-Marc; Martin, Jean-Yves; Bruins, Peter; Benschop, A. A. J.

    2003-01-01

    The life time tests realised on the serial production of Rotary Mmonoblock RM2 coolers show a measured MTTF of 4900 hours. The conventional test profile applied to these coolers is representative of operation in typical application. The duration of such life time tests is very long. The results of a design change and its impact on MTTF are available only several months after the assembly of the prototypes. We decided to develop a test method in order to reduce the duration of these life time tests. The principle is to define a test protocol easy to implement, more severe than typical application profile in order to accelerate life time tests. The accelerated test profile was defined and tested successfully. This new technique allows us to reduce life time tests costs and duration and thus the costs involved. As a consequence, we decided to have a screening of our production with this accelerated test. This allows us to master continuously the quality of our serial products and to collect additional data. This paper presents the results of life time tests performed on RM2 coolers according to the conventional and accelerated test profiles as well as the first results on the new RM2 design which show a calculated MTTF of 10000 hours.

  18. Explorative study on the anticancer activity, selectivity and metabolic stability of related analogs of aminosteroid RM-133.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Martin; Maltais, René; Dutour, Raphaël; Poirier, Donald

    2016-11-01

    RM-133 is a key representative of a new family of aminosteroids reported as potent anticancer agents. Although RM-133 produced interesting results in 4 mouse xenograft cancer models when injected subcutaneously, it needs to be improved to increase its in vivo potency. Thus, to obtain an analog of RM-133 with a better drug potential, a structure-activity relationship study was conducted by synthesizing eleven RM-133-related compounds and addressing their antiproliferative activity on 3 human cancer cells (HL-60, OVCAR-3 and PANC-1) and 3 human normal cell lines (primary ovary, pancreas and renal proximal tubule) as well as their metabolic stability in human liver microsomes. When the 2β-tertiary amine of RM-133 was transformed into a salt or moved to position 3β, the anticancer activity was lost. Modifying the orientation of the side chain of RM-133 increased anticancer activity and selectivity, but led to a drastic loss of stability. The protection of the 3α-hydroxyl of RM-133 by the formation of an ester or a carbamate stabilized the molecule against the phase I metabolic enzymes without affecting its anticancer activity. In comparison to RM-133, the 3-dimethylcarbamate derivative 3 is more selective for cancer cells over normal cells and is much more stable in liver microsomes. Those results support the use of a pro-drug strategy targeting the 3α-hydroxyl of RM-133 as an approach to improve its drug properties. The work presented will enable the development of an optimized anticancer drug of the aminosteroid family that is suitable for a future phase I clinical trial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Validity of a Commercial Linear Encoder to Estimate Bench Press 1 RM from the Force-Velocity Relationship.

    PubMed

    Bosquet, Laurent; Porta-Benache, Jeremy; Blais, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity and accuracy of a commercial linear encoder (Musclelab, Ergotest, Norway) to estimate Bench press 1 repetition maximum (1RM) from the force - velocity relationship. Twenty seven physical education students and teachers (5 women and 22 men) with a heterogeneous history of strength training participated in this study. They performed a 1 RM test and a force - velocity test using a Bench press lifting task in a random order. Mean 1 RM was 61.8 ± 15.3 kg (range: 34 to 100 kg), while 1 RM estimated by the Musclelab's software from the force-velocity relationship was 56.4 ± 14.0 kg (range: 33 to 91 kg). Actual and estimated 1 RM were very highly correlated (r = 0.93, p<0.001) but largely different (Bias: 5.4 ± 5.7 kg, p < 0.001, ES = 1.37). The 95% limits of agreement were ±11.2 kg, which represented ±18% of actual 1 RM. It was concluded that 1 RM estimated from the force-velocity relationship was a good measure for monitoring training induced adaptations, but also that it was not accurate enough to prescribe training intensities. Additional studies are required to determine whether accuracy is affected by age, sex or initial level. Key pointsSome commercial devices allow to estimate 1 RM from the force-velocity relationship.These estimations are valid. However, their accuracy is not high enough to be of practical help for training intensity prescription.Day-to-day reliability of force and velocity measured by the linear encoder has been shown to be very high, but the specific reliability of 1 RM estimated from the force-velocity relationship has to be determined before concluding to the usefulness of this approach in the monitoring of training induced adaptations.

  20. Validity of a Commercial Linear Encoder to Estimate Bench Press 1 RM from the Force-Velocity Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Bosquet, Laurent; Porta-Benache, Jeremy; Blais, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity and accuracy of a commercial linear encoder (Musclelab, Ergotest, Norway) to estimate Bench press 1 repetition maximum (1RM) from the force - velocity relationship. Twenty seven physical education students and teachers (5 women and 22 men) with a heterogeneous history of strength training participated in this study. They performed a 1 RM test and a force - velocity test using a Bench press lifting task in a random order. Mean 1 RM was 61.8 ± 15.3 kg (range: 34 to 100 kg), while 1 RM estimated by the Musclelab’s software from the force-velocity relationship was 56.4 ± 14.0 kg (range: 33 to 91 kg). Actual and estimated 1 RM were very highly correlated (r = 0.93, p<0.001) but largely different (Bias: 5.4 ± 5.7 kg, p < 0.001, ES = 1.37). The 95% limits of agreement were ±11.2 kg, which represented ±18% of actual 1 RM. It was concluded that 1 RM estimated from the force-velocity relationship was a good measure for monitoring training induced adaptations, but also that it was not accurate enough to prescribe training intensities. Additional studies are required to determine whether accuracy is affected by age, sex or initial level. Key points Some commercial devices allow to estimate 1 RM from the force-velocity relationship. These estimations are valid. However, their accuracy is not high enough to be of practical help for training intensity prescription. Day-to-day reliability of force and velocity measured by the linear encoder has been shown to be very high, but the specific reliability of 1 RM estimated from the force-velocity relationship has to be determined before concluding to the usefulness of this approach in the monitoring of training induced adaptations. PMID:24149641

  1. End stage renal disease in French Guiana (data from R.E.I.N registry): South American or French?

    PubMed

    Rochemont, Dévi Rita; Meddeb, Mohamed; Roura, Raoul; Couchoud, Cécile; Nacher, Mathieu; Basurko, Célia

    2017-06-30

    End-Stage renal disease (ESRD) causes considerable morbidity and mortality, and significantly alters patients' quality of life. There are very few published data on this problem in the French Overseas territories. The development of a registry on end stage renal disease in French Guiana in 2011 allowed to describe the magnitude of this problem in the region for the first time. Using data from the French Renal Epidemiology and Information Network registry (R.E.I.N). Descriptive statistics on quantitative and qualitative variables in the registry were performed on prevalent cases and incident cases in 2011, 2012 and 2013. French Guiana has one of the highest ESRD prevalence and incidence in France. The two main causes of ESRD were hypertensive and diabetic nephropathies. The French Guianese population had a different demographic profile (younger, more women, more migrants) than in mainland France. Most patients had at least one comorbidity, predominantly (95.3%) hypertension. In French Guiana dialysis was initiated in emergency for 71.3% of patients versus 33% in France (p < 0.001). These first results give important public health information: i) End stage renal disease has a very high prevalence relative to mainland France ii) Patients have a different demographic profile and enter care late in the course of their renal disease. These data are closer to what is observed in the Caribbean or in Latin America than in Mainland France.

  2. Chemical synthesis, NMR analysis and evaluation on a cancer xenograft model (HL-60) of the aminosteroid derivative RM-133.

    PubMed

    Maltais, René; Hospital, Audrey; Delhomme, Audrey; Roy, Jenny; Poirier, Donald

    2014-04-01

    The aminosteroid derivative RM-133 has been reported to be a promising pro-apoptotic agent showing activity on various cancer cell lines. Following the development of solid-phase synthesis that generated a series of libraries of aminosteroid derivatives, we now report the development of a convenient liquid phase chemical synthesis of RM-133, the most promising candidate, in order to obtain sufficient quantities to proceed with the first preclinical assays. A simple and convergent six-step synthesis was designed and allowed the preparation of a gram-quantity scale of RM-133. This aminosteroid derivative was also fully characterized by NMR experiments which revealed an interesting mixture of conformers. Finally, the in vivo potency of RM-133 was evaluated on a xenograft model in nude mice with HL-60 tumors, which has resulted in the blocking of tumor progression by 57%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. High Contrast PET Imaging of GRPR Expression in Prostate Cancer Using Cobalt-Labeled Bombesin Antagonist RM26

    PubMed Central

    Thisgaard, Helge; Rosenström, Ulrika; Dam, Johan Hygum; Larhed, Mats

    2017-01-01

    High gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) expression is associated with numerous cancers including prostate and breast cancer. The aim of the current study was to develop a 55Co-labeled PET agent based on GRPR antagonist RM26 for visualization of GRPR-expressing tumors. Labeling with 57Co and 55Co, stability, binding specificity, and in vitro and in vivo characteristics of 57Co-NOTA-PEG2-RM26 were studied. NOTA-PEG2-RM26 was successfully radiolabeled with 57Co and 55Co with high yields and demonstrated high stability. The radiopeptide showed retained binding specificity to GRPR in vitro and in vivo. 57Co-NOTA-PEG2-RM26 biodistribution in mice was characterized by rapid clearance of radioactivity from blood and normal non-GRPR-expressing organs and low hepatic uptake. The clearance was predominantly renal with a low degree of radioactivity reabsorption. Tumor-to-blood ratios were approximately 200 (3 h pi) and 1000 (24 h pi). The favorable biodistribution of cobalt-labeled NOTA-PEG2-RM26 translated into high contrast preclinical PET/CT (using 55Co) and SPECT/CT (using 57Co) images of PC-3 xenografts. The initial biological results suggest that 55Co-NOTA-PEG2-RM26 is a promising tracer for PET visualization of GRPR-expressing tumors. PMID:29097932

  4. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM1: Experimental Results.

    SciT

    Hill, Craig; Neary, Vincent Sinclair; Gunawan, Budi

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing nonproprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for opensource research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL). Reference Model 1 (RM1) is a 1:40 geometric scale dual-rotor axial flow horizontal axis device withmore » counter-rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter dT = 0.5m. Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM1. Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Qw = 2.425m3s-1, resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately Uhub = 1.05ms-1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Rec ≈ 3.0x105. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing turbulence performance models and their ability to accurately predict device performance metrics, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to predict turbulent inflow environments, reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order turbulent statistics, as well as device performance metrics.« less

  5. Electromyographic activity and 6RM strength in bench press on stable and unstable surfaces.

    PubMed

    Saeterbakken, Atle H; Fimland, Marius S

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare 6-repetition maximum (6RM) loads and muscle activity in bench press on 3 surfaces, namely, stable bench, balance cushion, and Swiss ball. Sixteen healthy, resistance-trained men (age 22.5 ± 2.0 years, stature 1.82 ± 6.6 m, and body mass 82.0 ± 7.8 kg) volunteered for 3 habituation/strength testing sessions and 1 experimental session. In randomized order on the 3 surfaces, 6RM strength and electromyographic activity of pectoralis major, deltoid anterior, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, rectus abdominis, oblique external and erector spinae were assessed. Relative to stable bench, the 6RM strength was approximately 93% for balance cushion (p ≤ 0.001) and approximately 92% for Swiss ball (p = 0.008); the pectoralis major electromyographic (EMG) activity was approximately 90% using the balance cushion (p = 0.080) and approximately 81% using Swiss ball (p = 0.006); the triceps EMG was approximately 79% using the balance cushion (p = 0.028) and approximately 69% using the Swiss ball (p = 0.002). Relative to balance cushion, the EMG activity in pectoralis, triceps, and erector spinae using Swiss ball was approximately 89% (p = 0.016), approximately 88% (p = 0.014) and approximately 80% (p = 0.020), respectively. In rectus abdominis, the EMG activity relative to Swiss ball was approximately 69% using stable bench (p = 0.042) and approximately 65% using the balance cushion (p = 0.046). Similar EMG activities between stable and unstable surfaces were observed for deltoid anterior, biceps brachii, and oblique external. In conclusion, stable bench press had greater 6RM strength and triceps and pectoralis EMG activity compared with the unstable surfaces. These findings have implications for athletic training and rehabilitation, because they demonstrate an inferior effect of unstable surfaces on muscle activation of prime movers and strength in bench press. If an unstable surface in bench press is desirable, a balance cushion should

  6. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM2: Experimental Results

    SciT

    Hill, Craig; Neary, Vincent Sinclair; Gunawan, Budi

    2014-08-01

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing non-proprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for open-source research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN - SAFL) . Reference Model 2 (RM2) is a 1:15 geometric scale dual - rotor crossmore » flow vertical axis device with counter - rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter d T = 0.43m and rotor height, h T = 0.323 m. RM2 is a river turbine designed for a site modeled after a reach in the lower Mississippi River near Baton Rouge, Louisiana (Barone et al. 2014) . Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM2 . Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Q w = 2. 35m 3s -1 , resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately U hub = 1. 2 ms -1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Re c = 6 .1x10 4. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and their ability to accurately simulate turbulent inflow environments, device performance metrics, and to reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order turbulent statistics.« less

  7. von Kármán-Howarth equation for three-dimensional two-fluid plasmas.

    PubMed

    Andrés, N; Mininni, P D; Dmitruk, P; Gómez, D O

    2016-06-01

    We derive the von Kármán-Howarth equation for a full three-dimensional incompressible two-fluid plasma. In the long-time limit and for very large Reynolds numbers we obtain the equivalent of the hydrodynamic "four-fifths" law. This exact law predicts the scaling of the third-order two-point correlation functions, and puts a strong constraint on the plasma turbulent dynamics. Finally, we derive a simple expression for the 4/5 law in terms of third-order structure functions, which is appropriate for comparison with in situ measurements in the solar wind at different spatial ranges.

  8. RPE vs. Percentage 1RM Loading in Periodized Programs Matched for Sets and Repetitions

    PubMed Central

    Helms, Eric R.; Byrnes, Ryan K.; Cooke, Daniel M.; Haischer, Michael H.; Carzoli, Joseph P.; Johnson, Trevor K.; Cross, Matthew R.; Cronin, John B.; Storey, Adam G.; Zourdos, Michael C.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate differences between rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and percentage one-repetition maximum (1RM) load assignment in resistance-trained males (19–35 years) performing protocols with matched sets and repetitions differentiated by load-assignment. Methods: Participants performed squats then bench press 3x/weeks in a daily undulating format over 8-weeks. Participants were counterbalanced by pre-test 1RM then assigned to percentage 1RM (1RMG, n = 11); load-assignment via percentage 1RMs, or RPE groups (RPEG, n = 10); participant-selected loads to reach target RPE ranges. Ultrasonography determined pre and post-test pectoralis (PMT), and vastus lateralis muscle thickness at 50 (VLMT50) and 70% (VLMT70) femur-length. Results: Bench press (1RMG +9.64 ± 5.36; RPEG + 10.70 ± 3.30 kg), squat (1RMG + 13.91 ± 5.89; RPEG + 17.05 ± 5.44 kg) and their combined-total 1RMs (1RMG + 23.55 ± 10.38; RPEG + 27.75 ± 7.94 kg) increased (p < 0.05) in both groups as did PMT (1RMG + 1.59 ± 1.33; RPEG +1.90 ± 1.91 mm), VLMT50 (1RMG +2.13 ± 1.95; RPEG + 1.85 ± 1.97 mm) and VLMT70 (1RMG + 2.40 ± 2.22; RPEG + 2.31 ± 2.27 mm). Between-group differences were non-significant (p > 0.05). Magnitude-based inferences revealed 79, 57, and 72% chances of mean small effect size (ES) advantages for squat; ES 90% confidence limits (CL) = 0.50 ± 0.63, bench press; ES 90% CL = 0.28 ± 0.73, and combined-total; ES 90% CL = 0.48 ± 0.68 respectively, in RPEG. There were 4, 14, and 6% chances 1RMG had a strength advantage of the same magnitude, and 18, 29, and 22% chances, respectively of trivial differences between groups. Conclusions: Both loading-types are effective. However, RPE-based loading may provide a small 1RM strength advantage in a majority of individuals. PMID:29628895

  9. The Native Production of the Sesquiterpene Isopterocarpolone by Streptomyces sp. RM-14-6

    PubMed Central

    Shaaban, Khaled A.; Singh, Shanteri; Elshahawi, Sherif I.; Wang, Xiachang; Ponomareva, Larissa V.; Sunkara, Manjula; Copley, Gregory C.; Hower, James C.; Morris, Andrew J.; Kharel, Madan K.; Thorson, Jon S.

    2013-01-01

    We report the production, isolation and structure elucidation of the sesquiterpene isopterocarpolone from an Appalachian isolate Streptomyces species RM-14-6. While isopterocarpolone was previously put forth as a putative plant metabolite, the current study highlights the first native bacterial production of isopterocarpolone and the first full characterization of isopterocarpolone using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and HR-ESI mass spectrometry. Considering the biosynthesis of closely related metabolites (geosmin or 5-epiaristolochene), the structure of isopterocarpolone also suggests the potential participation of one or more unique enzymatic transformations. In this context, this work also sets the stage for the elucidation of potentially novel bacterial biosynthetic machinery. PMID:24237421

  10. Evaluation of a novel GRPR antagonist for prostate cancer PET imaging: [64Cu]-DOTHA2-PEG-RM26.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Nematallah; Paquette, Michel; Ait-Mohand, Samia; Dumulon-Perreault, Véronique; Guérin, Brigitte

    2018-01-01

    Gastrin releasing peptide receptors (GRPRs) are significantly over-expressed on a large proportion of prostate cancers making them prime candidates for receptor-mediated nuclear imaging by PET. Recently, we synthesized a novel bifunctional chelator (BFC) bearing hydroxamic acid arms (DOTHA 2 ). Here we investigated the potential of a novel DOTHA 2 -conjugated, 64 Cu-radiolabeled GRPR peptide antagonist, [D-Phe 6 -Sta 13 -Leu 14 -NH 2 ]bombesin(6-14) (DOTHA 2 -PEG-RM26) to visualize prostate tumors by PET imaging. DOTHA 2 -PEG-RM26 was conveniently and efficiently assembled on solid support. The compound was radiolabeled with 64 Cu and its affinity, stability, cellular uptake on PC3 prostate cancer cells were evaluated. The in vitro and in vivo behavior of [ 64 Cu]DOTHA 2 -PEG-RM26 was examined by PET imaging using human PC3 prostate cancer xenografts and its behavior was compared to that of the analogous [ 64 Cu]NOTA-PEG-RM26. The inhibition constant of nat Cu-DOTHA 2 -PEG-RM26 was in the low nanomolar range (0.68±0.19 nM). The [ 64 Cu]DOTHA 2 -PEG-RM26 conjugate was prepared with a labeling yield >95% and molar activity of 56±3 GBq/μmol after a 5-min room temperature labeling. [ 64 Cu]-DOTHA 2 -PEG-RM26 demonstrated rapid blood and renal clearance as well as a high tumor uptake. Small animal PET images confirmed high and specific uptake in PC3 tumor. Both [ 64 Cu]-DOTHA 2 -PEG-RM26 and [ 64 Cu]-NOTA-PEG-RM26 displayed similar tumor and normal tissue uptakes at early time point post injection. [ 64 Cu]-DOTHA 2 -PEG-RM26 allows visualization of prostate tumors by PET imaging. DOTHA 2 enables fast 64 Cu chelation under mild condition, and as such could be used advantageously for the development of other 64 Cu-labeled peptide-derived PET tracers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of an Italian RM Y-STR haplotype database: Results of the 2013 GEFI collaborative exercise.

    PubMed

    Robino, C; Ralf, A; Pasino, S; De Marchi, M R; Ballantyne, K N; Barbaro, A; Bini, C; Carnevali, E; Casarino, L; Di Gaetano, C; Fabbri, M; Ferri, G; Giardina, E; Gonzalez, A; Matullo, G; Nutini, A L; Onofri, V; Piccinini, A; Piglionica, M; Ponzano, E; Previderè, C; Resta, N; Scarnicci, F; Seidita, G; Sorçaburu-Cigliero, S; Turrina, S; Verzeletti, A; Kayser, M

    2015-03-01

    Recently introduced rapidly mutating Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (RM Y-STR) loci, displaying a multiple-fold higher mutation rate relative to any other Y-STRs, including those conventionally used in forensic casework, have been demonstrated to improve the resolution of male lineage differentiation and to allow male relative separation usually impossible with standard Y-STRs. However, large and geographically-detailed frequency haplotype databases are required to estimate the statistical weight of RM Y-STR haplotype matches if observed in forensic casework. With this in mind, the Italian Working Group (GEFI) of the International Society for Forensic Genetics launched a collaborative exercise aimed at generating an Italian quality controlled forensic RM Y-STR haplotype database. Overall 1509 male individuals from 13 regional populations covering northern, central and southern areas of the Italian peninsula plus Sicily were collected, including both "rural" and "urban" samples classified according to population density in the sampling area. A subset of individuals was additionally genotyped for Y-STR loci included in the Yfiler and PowerPlex Y23 (PPY23) systems (75% and 62%, respectively), allowing the comparison of RM and conventional Y-STRs. Considering the whole set of 13 RM Y-STRs, 1501 unique haplotypes were observed among the 1509 sampled Italian men with a haplotype diversity of 0.999996, largely superior to Yfiler and PPY23 with 0.999914 and 0.999950, respectively. AMOVA indicated that 99.996% of the haplotype variation was within populations, confirming that genetic-geographic structure is almost undetected by RM Y-STRs. Haplotype sharing among regional Italian populations was not observed at all with the complete set of 13 RM Y-STRs. Haplotype sharing within Italian populations was very rare (0.27% non-unique haplotypes), and lower in urban (0.22%) than rural (0.29%) areas. Additionally, 422 father-son pairs were investigated, and 20.1% of them could

  12. The Aminosteroid Derivative RM-133 Shows In Vitro and In Vivo Antitumor Activity in Human Ovarian and Pancreatic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Kenmogne, Lucie Carolle; Ayan, Diana; Roy, Jenny; Maltais, René; Poirier, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian and pancreatic cancers are two of the most aggressive and lethal cancers, whose management faces only limited therapeutic options. Typically, these tumors spread insidiously accompanied first with atypical symptoms, and usually shift to a drug resistance phenotype with the current pharmaceutical armamentarium. Thus, the development of new drugs acting via a different mechanism of action represents a clear priority. Herein, we are reporting for the first time that the aminosteroid derivative RM-133, developed in our laboratory, displays promising activity on two models of aggressive cancers, namely ovarian (OVCAR-3) and pancreatic (PANC-1) cancers. The IC50 value of RM-133 was 0.8 μM and 0.3 μM for OVCAR-3 and PANC-1 cell lines in culture, respectively. Based on pharmacokinetic studies on RM-133 using 11 different vehicles, we selected two main vehicles: aqueous 0.4% methylcellulose:ethanol (92:8) and sunflower oil:ethanol (92:8) for in vivo studies. Using subcutaneous injection of RM-133 with the methylcellulose-based vehicle, growth of PANC-1 tumors xenografted to nude mice was inhibited by 63%. Quite interestingly, RM-133 injected subcutaneously with the methylcellulose-based or sunflower-based vehicles reduced OVCAR-3 xenograft growth by 122% and 100%, respectively. After the end of RM-133 treatment using the methylcellulose-based vehicle, OVCAR-3 tumor growth inhibition was maintained for ≥ 1 week. RM-133 was also well tolerated in the whole animal, no apparent sign of toxicity having been detected in the xenograft studies.

  13. The Aminosteroid Derivative RM-133 Shows In Vitro and In Vivo Antitumor Activity in Human Ovarian and Pancreatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kenmogne, Lucie Carolle; Ayan, Diana; Roy, Jenny; Maltais, René; Poirier, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian and pancreatic cancers are two of the most aggressive and lethal cancers, whose management faces only limited therapeutic options. Typically, these tumors spread insidiously accompanied first with atypical symptoms, and usually shift to a drug resistance phenotype with the current pharmaceutical armamentarium. Thus, the development of new drugs acting via a different mechanism of action represents a clear priority. Herein, we are reporting for the first time that the aminosteroid derivative RM-133, developed in our laboratory, displays promising activity on two models of aggressive cancers, namely ovarian (OVCAR-3) and pancreatic (PANC-1) cancers. The IC50 value of RM-133 was 0.8 μM and 0.3 μM for OVCAR-3 and PANC-1 cell lines in culture, respectively. Based on pharmacokinetic studies on RM-133 using 11 different vehicles, we selected two main vehicles: aqueous 0.4% methylcellulose:ethanol (92:8) and sunflower oil:ethanol (92:8) for in vivo studies. Using subcutaneous injection of RM-133 with the methylcellulose-based vehicle, growth of PANC-1 tumors xenografted to nude mice was inhibited by 63%. Quite interestingly, RM-133 injected subcutaneously with the methylcellulose-based or sunflower-based vehicles reduced OVCAR-3 xenograft growth by 122% and 100%, respectively. After the end of RM-133 treatment using the methylcellulose-based vehicle, OVCAR-3 tumor growth inhibition was maintained for ≥ 1 week. RM-133 was also well tolerated in the whole animal, no apparent sign of toxicity having been detected in the xenograft studies. PMID:26660672

  14. RANS Simulation (Virtual Blade Model [VBM]) of Single Full Scale DOE RM1 MHK Turbine

    DOE Data Explorer

    Javaherchi, Teymour; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-04-10

    Attached are the .cas and .dat files along with the required User Defined Functions (UDFs) and look-up table of lift and drag coefficients for Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of a single full scale DOE RM1 turbine implemented in ANSYS FLUENT CFD-package. In this case study the flow field around and in the wake of the full scale DOE RM1 turbine is simulated using Blade Element Model (a.k.a Virtual Blade Model) by solving RANS equations coupled with k-\\omega turbulence closure model. It should be highlighted that in this simulation the actual geometry of the rotor blade is not modeled. The effect of turbine rotating blades are modeled using the Blade Element Theory. This simulation provides an accurate estimate for the performance of device and structure of it's turbulent far wake. Due to the simplifications implemented for modeling the rotating blades in this model, VBM is limited to capture details of the flow field in near wake region of the device.

  15. RANS Simulation (Rotating Reference Frame Model [RRF]) of Single Full Scale DOE RM1 MHK Turbine

    DOE Data Explorer

    Javaherchi, Teymour; Stelzenmuller, Nick; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-04-10

    Attached are the .cas and .dat files for the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of a single full scale DOE RM1 turbine implemented in ANSYS FLUENT CFD-package. In this case study taking advantage of the symmetry of the DOE RM1 geometry, only half of the geometry is modeled using (Single) Rotating Reference Frame model [RRF]. In this model RANS equations, coupled with k-\\omega turbulence closure model, are solved in the rotating reference frame. The actual geometry of the turbine blade is included and the turbulent boundary layer along the blade span is simulated using wall-function approach. The rotation of the blade is modeled by applying periodic boundary condition to sets of plane of symmetry. This case study simulates the performance and flow field in both the near and far wake of the device at the desired operating conditions. The results of these simulations showed good agreement to the only publicly available numerical simulation of the device done in the NREL. Please see the attached paper.

  16. Broadband Photometric Reverberation Mapping Analysis on SDSS-RM and Stripe 82 Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haowen; Yang, Qian; Wu, Xuebing; Shen, Yue

    2018-01-01

    We extended the broadband photometric reverberation mapping (PRM) code, JAVELIN and test the availability to get broad line region (BLR) time delays that are consistent with spectroscopic reverberation mapping (SRM) projects. Broadband light curves of SDSS-RM quasars produced by convolution with system transmission curve were used in the test. We find that under similar sampling conditions (evenly and frequently sampled), the key factor determining whether the broadband PRM code can yield lags consistent with spectroscopic projects is the flux ratio of line to the reference continuum, which is in line with the findings in Zu et al. (2016). We further find a crucial line-to-continuum flux ratio, above which the mean of the ratios between the lags from PRM and SRM becomes closer to unity, and the scatter is pronouncedly reduced. Based on this flux ratio criteria, we selected some of the quasars from Hernitschek et al. (2015) and carry out broadband PRM on this subset. The performance of damped random walking (DRW) model and power-law (PL) structure function model on broadband PRM are compared using mock light curves with high, even cadences and low, uneven ones, respectively. We find that DRW model performs better in carrying out broadband PRM than PL model both for high and low cadence light curves with other data qualities similar to SDSS-RM quasars.

  17. Growth performance, blood health, antioxidant status and immune response in red sea bream (Pagrus major) fed Aspergillus oryzae fermented rapeseed meal (RM-Koji).

    PubMed

    Dossou, Serge; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; Yokoyama, Saichiro; Dawood, Mahmoud A O; El Basuini, Mohammed F; Olivier, Adissin; Zaineldin, Amr I

    2018-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of dietary substitution of fishmeal by graded levels of a blend composed of Aspergillus oryzae fermented rapeseed meal [0% (RM0), 25% (RM25), 50% (RM50), 75% (RM75) and 100% (RM100)] on growth performance, haemato-immunological responses and antioxidative status of Pagrus major (average weight 5.5 ± 0.02 g). After 56 days, growth performances were significantly improved in fish fed RM25 diet compared to control (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, up to 50% replacement of fishmeal did not affect growth performance, feed conversion efficiency, protein efficiency ratio, protein apparent digestibility, protease activity, fish somatic indices and survival compared to control. While blood hematocrit and plasma protein were significantly enhanced in groups fed RM0 and RM25 diets, most of the hematological parameters did not change through the trial except glutamic pyruvate transaminase which was significantly increased in RM75 and RM100 groups and blood cholesterol which was gradually decreased with the increasing level of the blend. Interestingly, feeding fish with RM25 and RM50 diets significantly showed enhanced lysozyme, bactericidal and peroxidase activities and fish fed the same diets showed high resistance against oxidative stress (biological antioxidant potential and reactive oxygen metabolites). Additionally, catalase activity and tolerance against low salinity seawater were higher in fish fed RM25 diet. These findings suggested that, at a moderate level (25% and 50%), substitution of fishmeal by the fermented rapeseed meal promoted growth, nutrient utilization, and exerted immune responses and anti-oxidative effects in red sea bream. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. From Decent Work to Decent Lives: Positive Self and Relational Management (PS&RM) in the Twenty-First Century

    PubMed Central

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Kenny, Maureen E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to empirically test the theoretical model, Positive Self and Relational Management (PS&RM), for a sample of 184 Italian university students. The PS&RM model specifies the development of individuals' strengths, potentials, and talents across the lifespan and with regard to the dialect of self in relationship. PS&RM is defined theoretically by three constructs: Positive Lifelong Life Management, Positive Lifelong Self-Management, Positive Lifelong Relational Management. The three constructs are operationalized as follows: Positive Lifelong Life Management is measured by the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), the Meaningful Life Measure (MLM), and the Authenticity Scale (AS); Positive Lifelong Self-Management is measured by the Intrapreneurial Self-Capital Scale (ISC), the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS), and the Life Project Reflexivity Scale (LPRS); and Positive Lifelong Relational Management is measured by the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue), the Multidimensional Scale for Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), and the Positive Relational Management Scale (PRMS). Confirmatory factor analysis of the PS&RM model was completed using structural equation modeling. The theoretical PS&RM model was empirically tested as defined by the three hypothesized constructs. Empirical support for this model offers a framework for further research and the design of preventive interventions to promote decent work and decent lives in the twenty-first century. PMID:27047406

  19. Dispersion of the RmInt1 group II intron in the Sinorhizobium meliloti genome upon acquisition by conjugative transfer.

    PubMed

    Nisa-Martínez, Rafael; Jiménez-Zurdo, José I; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Muñoz-Adelantado, Estefanía; Toro, Nicolás

    2007-01-01

    RmInt1 is a self-splicing and mobile group II intron initially identified in the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, which encodes a reverse transcriptase-maturase (Intron Encoded Protein, IEP) lacking the C-terminal DNA binding (D) and DNA endonuclease domains (En). RmInt1 invades cognate intronless homing sites (ISRm2011-2) by a mechanism known as retrohoming. This work describes how the RmInt1 intron spreads in the S.meliloti genome upon acquisition by conjugation. This process was revealed by using the wild-type intron RmInt1 and engineered intron-donor constructs based on ribozyme coding sequence (DeltaORF)-derivatives with higher homing efficiency than the wild-type intron. The data demonstrate that RmInt1 propagates into the S.meliloti genome primarily by retrohoming with a strand bias related to replication of the chromosome and symbiotic megaplasmids. Moreover, we show that when expressed in trans from a separate plasmid, the IEP is able to mobilize genomic DeltaORF ribozymes that afterward displayed wild-type levels of retrohoming. Our results contribute to get further understanding of how group II introns spread into bacterial genomes in nature.

  20. Behavioral and pathophysiological outcomes associated with caffeine consumption and repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (RmTBI) in adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Glenn R.; Lengkeek, Connor; Salberg, Sabrina; Spanswick, Simon C.; Mychasiuk, Richelle

    2017-01-01

    Given that caffeine consumption is exponentially rising in adolescents and they are at increased risk for repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (RmTBI), we sought to examine the pathophysiological outcomes associated with early life caffeine consumption and RmTBI. Adolescent male and female Sprague Dawley rats received either caffeine in the drinking water or normal water and were then randomly assigned to 3 mild injuries using our lateral impact device or 3 sham procedures. Following injury induction, behavioral outcomes were measured with a test battery designed to examine symptoms consistent with clinical manifestation of PCS (balance and motor coordination, anxiety, short-term working memory, and depressive-like behaviours). In addition, pathophysiological outcomes were examined with histological measures of volume and cellular proliferation in the dentate gyrus, as well as microglia activation in the ventromedial hypothalamus. Finally, modifications to expression of 12 genes (Adora2a, App, Aqp4, Bdnf, Bmal1, Clock, Cry, Gfap, Orx1, Orx2, Per, Tau), in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and/or the hypothalamus were assessed. We found that chronic caffeine consumption in adolescence altered normal developmental trajectories, as well as recovery from RmTBI. Of particular importance, many of the outcomes exhibited sex-dependent responses whereby the sex of the animal modified response to caffeine, RmTBI, and the combination of the two. These results suggest that caffeine consumption in adolescents at high risk for RmTBI should be monitored. PMID:29108016

  1. Behavioral and pathophysiological outcomes associated with caffeine consumption and repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (RmTBI) in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Glenn R; Lengkeek, Connor; Salberg, Sabrina; Spanswick, Simon C; Mychasiuk, Richelle

    2017-01-01

    Given that caffeine consumption is exponentially rising in adolescents and they are at increased risk for repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (RmTBI), we sought to examine the pathophysiological outcomes associated with early life caffeine consumption and RmTBI. Adolescent male and female Sprague Dawley rats received either caffeine in the drinking water or normal water and were then randomly assigned to 3 mild injuries using our lateral impact device or 3 sham procedures. Following injury induction, behavioral outcomes were measured with a test battery designed to examine symptoms consistent with clinical manifestation of PCS (balance and motor coordination, anxiety, short-term working memory, and depressive-like behaviours). In addition, pathophysiological outcomes were examined with histological measures of volume and cellular proliferation in the dentate gyrus, as well as microglia activation in the ventromedial hypothalamus. Finally, modifications to expression of 12 genes (Adora2a, App, Aqp4, Bdnf, Bmal1, Clock, Cry, Gfap, Orx1, Orx2, Per, Tau), in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and/or the hypothalamus were assessed. We found that chronic caffeine consumption in adolescence altered normal developmental trajectories, as well as recovery from RmTBI. Of particular importance, many of the outcomes exhibited sex-dependent responses whereby the sex of the animal modified response to caffeine, RmTBI, and the combination of the two. These results suggest that caffeine consumption in adolescents at high risk for RmTBI should be monitored.

  2. Red mud (RM)-Induced enhancement of iron plaque formation reduces arsenic and metal accumulation in two wetland plant species.

    PubMed

    Yang, J X; Guo, Q J; Yang, J; Zhou, X Y; Ren, H Y; Zhang, H Z; Xu, R X; Wang, X D; Peters, M; Zhu, G X; Wei, R F; Tian, L Y; Han, X K

    2016-01-01

    Human activities have resulted in arsenic (As) and heavy metals accumulation in paddy soils in China. Phytoremediation has been suggested as an effective and low-cost method to clean up contaminated soils. A combined soil-sand pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of red mud (RM) supply on iron plaque formation and As and heavy metal accumulation in two wetland plant species (Cyperus alternifolius Rottb., Echinodorus amazonicus Rataj), using As and heavy metals polluted paddy soil combined with three rates of RM application (0, 2%, 5%). The results showed that RM supply significantly decreased As and heavy metals accumulation in shoots of the two plants due to the decrease of As and heavy metal availability and the enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere. Both wetland plants supplied with RM tended to have more Fe plaque, higher As and heavy metals on roots and in their rhizospheres, and were more tolerant of As and heavy metal toxicity. The results suggest that RM-induced enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere of wetland plants may be significant for remediation of soils contaminated with As and heavy metals.

  3. Dispersion of the RmInt1 group II intron in the Sinorhizobium meliloti genome upon acquisition by conjugative transfer

    PubMed Central

    Nisa-Martínez, Rafael; Jiménez-Zurdo, José I.; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Muñoz-Adelantado, Estefanía; Toro, Nicolás

    2007-01-01

    RmInt1 is a self-splicing and mobile group II intron initially identified in the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, which encodes a reverse transcriptase–maturase (Intron Encoded Protein, IEP) lacking the C-terminal DNA binding (D) and DNA endonuclease domains (En). RmInt1 invades cognate intronless homing sites (ISRm2011-2) by a mechanism known as retrohoming. This work describes how the RmInt1 intron spreads in the S.meliloti genome upon acquisition by conjugation. This process was revealed by using the wild-type intron RmInt1 and engineered intron-donor constructs based on ribozyme coding sequence (ΔORF)-derivatives with higher homing efficiency than the wild-type intron. The data demonstrate that RmInt1 propagates into the S.meliloti genome primarily by retrohoming with a strand bias related to replication of the chromosome and symbiotic megaplasmids. Moreover, we show that when expressed in trans from a separate plasmid, the IEP is able to mobilize genomic ΔORF ribozymes that afterward displayed wild-type levels of retrohoming. Our results contribute to get further understanding of how group II introns spread into bacterial genomes in nature. PMID:17158161

  4. RM-493, a melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) agonist, increases resting energy expenditure in obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kong Y; Muniyappa, Ranganath; Abel, Brent S; Mullins, Katherine P; Staker, Pamela; Brychta, Robert J; Zhao, Xiongce; Ring, Michael; Psota, Tricia L; Cone, Roger D; Panaro, Brandon L; Gottesdiener, Keith M; Van der Ploeg, Lex H T; Reitman, Marc L; Skarulis, Monica C

    2015-04-01

    Activation of the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) with the synthetic agonist RM-493 decreases body weight and increases energy expenditure (EE) in nonhuman primates. The effects of MC4R agonists on EE in humans have not been examined to date. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, we examined the effects of the MC4R agonist RM-493 on resting energy expenditure (REE) in obese subjects in an inpatient setting. Twelve healthy adults (6 men and 6 women) with body mass index of 35.7 ± 2.9 kg/m(2) (mean ± SD) received RM-493 (1 mg/24 h) or placebo by continuous subcutaneous infusion over 72 hours, followed immediately by crossover to the alternate treatment. All subjects received a weight-maintenance diet (50% carbohydrate, 30% fat, and 20% protein) and performed 30 minutes of standardized exercise daily. Continuous EE was measured on the third treatment day in a room calorimeter, and REE in the fasting state was defined as the mean of 2 30-minute resting periods. RM-493 increased REE vs placebo by 6.4% (95% confidence interval, 0.68-13.02%), on average by 111 kcal/24 h (95% confidence interval, 15-207 kcal, P = .03). Total daily EE trended higher, whereas the thermic effect of a test meal and exercise EE did not differ significantly. The 23-hour nonexercise respiratory quotient was lower during RM-493 treatment (0.833 ± 0.021 vs 0.848 ± 0.022, P = .02). No adverse effect on heart rate or blood pressure was observed. Short-term administration of the MC4R agonist RM-493 increases REE and shifts substrate oxidation to fat in obese individuals.

  5. Is the von Kármán constant affected by sediment suspension?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Orgaz, Oscar; GiráLdez, Juan V.; Mateos, Luciano; Dey, Subhasish

    2012-12-01

    Is the von Kármán constant affected by sediment suspension? The presence of suspended sediment in channels and fluvial streams has been known for decades to affect turbulence transfer mechanism in sediment-laden flows, and, therefore, the transport and fate of sediments that determine the bathymetry of natural water courses. This study explores the density stratification effects on the turbulent velocity profile and its impact on the transport of sediment. There is as yet no consensus in the scientific community on the effect of sediment suspension on the von Kármán parameter,κ. Two different theories based on the empirical log-wake velocity profile are currently under debate: One supports a universal value ofκ = 0.41 and a strength of the wake, Π, that is affected by suspended sediment. The other suggests that both κ and Π could vary with suspended sediment. These different theories result in a conceptual problem regarding the effect of suspended sediment on κ, which has divided the research area. In this study, a new mixing length theory is proposed to describe theoretically the turbulent velocity profile. The analytical approach provides added insight defining κas a turbulent parameter which varies with the distance to the bed in sediment-laden flows. The theory is compared with previous experimental data and simulations using ak-ɛturbulence closure to the Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes equations model. The mixing length model indicates that the two contradictory theories incorporate the stratified flow effect into a different component of the log-wake law. The results of this work show that the log-wake fit with a reducedκ is the physically coherent approximation.

  6. Hemodiafiltration Versus Hemodialysis and Survival in Patients With ESRD: The French Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (REIN) Registry.

    PubMed

    Mercadal, Lucile; Franck, Jeanna-Eve; Metzger, Marie; Urena Torres, Pablo; de Cornelissen, François; Edet, Stéphane; Béchade, Clémence; Vigneau, Cécile; Drüeke, Tilman; Jacquelinet, Christian; Stengel, Bénédicte

    2016-08-01

    Recent randomized trials report that mortality is lower with high-convection-volume hemodiafiltration (HDF) than with hemodialysis (HD). We used data from the French national Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (REIN) registry to investigate trends in HDF use and its relationship with mortality in the total population of incident dialysis patients. The study included those who initiated HD therapy from January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2011, and were dialyzed for more than 3 months; follow-up extended to the end of 2012. HDF use at the patient and facility level. All-cause and cardiovascular mortality, using Cox models to estimate HRs of HDF as time-dependent covariate at the patient level, with age as time scale and fully adjusted for comorbid conditions and laboratory data at baseline, catheter use, and facility type as time-dependent covariates. Analyses completed by Cox models for HRs of the facility-level exposure to HDF updated yearly. Of 28,407 HD patients, 5,526 used HDF for a median of 1.2 (IQR, 0.9-1.9) years; 2,254 of them used HDF exclusively. HRs for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality associated with HDF use were 0.84 (95% CI, 0.77-0.91) and 0.73 (95% CI, 0.61-0.88), respectively. In patients treated exclusively with HDF, these HRs were 0.77 (95% CI, 0.67-0.87) and 0.66 (95% CI, 0.50-0.86). At the facility level, increasing the percentage of patients using HDF from 0% to 100% was associated with HRs for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality of 0.87 (95% CI, 0.77-0.99) and 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54-0.96), respectively. Observational study. Whether analyzed as a patient- or facility-level predictor, HDF treatment was associated with better survival. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. LANDSAT-D data format control book. Volume 6, appendix K: Unprocessed multispectral scanner high density tape (HDT-RM/HDT-GM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, K. E.

    1981-01-01

    Unprocessed MSS data which is recorded on HDT-RM (a 28 track, high density tape) and on HDT-GM (a 14 track, nonbias recorded, high density tape) are inputs for the LANDSAT 4 data management system. All MSS data initially recorded on HDT-GM are copied to HDT-RM prior to processing. This specification establishes the requirements for the format of the LANDSAT D HDT-RM/HDT-GM.

  8. The ghrelin agonist RM-131 accelerates gastric emptying of solids and reduces symptoms in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shin, Andrea; Camilleri, Michael; Busciglio, Irene; Burton, Duane; Smith, Steven A; Vella, Adrian; Ryks, Michael; Rhoten, Deborah; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2013-11-01

    RM-131, a synthetic ghrelin agonist, greatly accelerates gastric emptying of solids in patients with type 2 diabetes and delayed gastric emptying (DGE). We investigated the safety and effects of a single dose of RM-131 on gastric emptying and upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in patients with type 1 diabetes and previously documented DGE. In a double-blind cross-over study, 10 patients with type 1 diabetes (age, 45.7 ± 4.4 y; body mass index, 24.1 ± 1.1 kg/m(2)) and previously documented DGE were assigned in random order to receive a single dose of RM-131 (100 μg, subcutaneously) or placebo. Thirty minutes later, they ate a radiolabeled solid-liquid meal containing EggBeaters (ConAgra Foods, Omaha, NE), and then underwent 4 hours of gastric emptying and 6 hours of colonic filling analyses by scintigraphy. Upper GI symptoms were assessed using a daily diary, gastroparesis cardinal symptom index (total GCSI-DD) and a combination of nausea, vomiting, fullness, and pain (NVFP) scores (each rated on a 0-5 scale). At screening, participants' mean level of hemoglobin A1c was 9.1% ± 0.5%; their total GCSI-DD score was 1.66 ± 0.38 (median, 1.71), and their total NVFP score was 1.73 ± 0.39 (median, 1.9). The t1/2 of solid gastric emptying was 84.9 ± 31.6 minutes when subjects were given RM-131 and 118.7 ± 26.7 when they were given a placebo. The median difference (Δ)was 33.9 minutes (interquartile range [IQR] -12, -49), or -54.7% (IQR, -21%,-110%). RM-131 decreased gastric retention of solids at 1 hour (P = .005) and 2 hours (P = .019). Numeric differences in t1/2 for gastric emptying of liquids, solid gastric emptying lag time, and colonic filling at 6 hours were not significant. Total GCSI-DD scores were 0.79 on placebo (IQR, 0.75, 2.08) and 0.17 on RM-131 (IQR, 0.00, 0.67; P = .026); NVFP scores were lower on RM-131 (P = .041). There were no significant adverse effects. RM-131 significantly accelerates gastric emptying of solids and reduces upper GI symptoms

  9. PET Using a GRPR Antagonist 68Ga-RM26 in Healthy Volunteers and Prostate Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Niu, Gang; Fan, Xinrong; Lang, Lixin; Hou, Guozhu; Chen, Libo; Wu, Huanwen; Zhu, Zhaohui; Li, Fang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2018-06-01

    This study was designed to analyze the safety, biodistribution, and radiation dosimetry of a gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) antagonist PET tracer, 68 Ga-RM26; to assess its clinical diagnostic value in prostate cancer patients; and to perform a direct comparison between GRPR antagonist 68 Ga-RM26 and agonist 68 Ga-BBN. Methods: Five healthy volunteers were enrolled to validate the safety of 68 Ga-RM26 and calculate dosimetry. A total of 28 patients with prostate cancer (17 newly diagnosed and 11 posttherapy) were recruited and provided written informed consent. All the cancer patients underwent PET/CT at 15-30 min after intravenous injection of 1.85 MBq (0.05 mCi) per kilogram of body weight of 68 Ga-RM26. Among them, 22 patients (11 newly diagnosed and 11 posttherapy) underwent 68 Ga-BBN PET/CT for comparison within 1 wk. 99m Tc-MDP (methylene diphosphonate) bone scans were obtained within 2 wk for comparison. GRPR immunohistochemical staining of tumor samples was performed. Results: The administration of 68 Ga-M26 was well tolerated by all subjects, with no adverse symptoms being noticed or reported during the procedure and at 2-wk follow-up. The total effective dose equivalent and effective dose were 0.0912 ± 0.0140 and 0.0657 ± 0.0124 mSv/MBq, respectively. In the 17 patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer, 68 Ga-RM26 PET/CT showed positive prostate-confined findings in 15 tumors with an SUV max of 6.49 ± 2.37. In the 11 patients who underwent prostatectomy or brachytherapy with or without androgen deprivation therapy, 68 Ga-RM26 PET/CT detected 8 metastatic lymph nodes in 3 patients with an SUV max of 4.28 ± 1.25 and 21 bone lesions in 8 patients with an SUV max of 3.90 ± 3.07. Compared with 68 Ga-RM26 PET/CT, GRPR agonist 68 Ga-BBN PET/CT detected fewer primary lesions and lymph node metastases as well as demonstrated lower tracer accumulation. There was a significant positive correlation between SUV derived from 68 Ga-RM26 PET and the

  10. 77 FR 46125 - Sunoco, Inc., R&M, Refining Division, Marcus Hook, PA; Sunoco, Inc., 10 Industrial Hwy., MS4...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-81,145; TA-W-81,145A] Sunoco, Inc., R&M, Refining Division, Marcus Hook, PA; Sunoco, Inc., 10 Industrial Hwy., MS4 Building G, Lester, PA; Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration On April 30, 2012, the Department of Labor issued an Affirmative Determination Regarding...

  11. 77 FR 29362 - Sunoco, Inc., R&M Refining Division, Marcus Hook, PA; Sunoco, Inc., 10 Industrial Hwy, MS4...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-81,145; TA-W-81,145A] Sunoco, Inc., R&M Refining Division, Marcus Hook, PA; Sunoco, Inc., 10 Industrial Hwy, MS4 Building G, Lester, PA; Notice of Affirmative Determination Regarding Application for Reconsideration By application dated March 26, 2012, the United Steel Workers Union...

  12. Estimation of 1RM for knee extension based on the maximal isometric muscle strength and body composition.

    PubMed

    Kanada, Yoshikiyo; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiura, Yoshito; Arai, Tomoaki; Koyama, Soichiro; Tanabe, Shigeo

    2017-11-01

    [Purpose] To create a regression formula in order to estimate 1RM for knee extensors, based on the maximal isometric muscle strength measured using a hand-held dynamometer and data regarding the body composition. [Subjects and Methods] Measurement was performed in 21 healthy males in their twenties to thirties. Single regression analysis was performed, with measurement values representing 1RM and the maximal isometric muscle strength as dependent and independent variables, respectively. Furthermore, multiple regression analysis was performed, with data regarding the body composition incorporated as another independent variable, in addition to the maximal isometric muscle strength. [Results] Through single regression analysis with the maximal isometric muscle strength as an independent variable, the following regression formula was created: 1RM (kg)=0.714 + 0.783 × maximal isometric muscle strength (kgf). On multiple regression analysis, only the total muscle mass was extracted. [Conclusion] A highly accurate regression formula to estimate 1RM was created based on both the maximal isometric muscle strength and body composition. Using a hand-held dynamometer and body composition analyzer, it was possible to measure these items in a short time, and obtain clinically useful results.

  13. Bioremediation of heavy metals using an endophytic bacterium Paenibacillus sp. RM isolated from the roots of Tridax procumbens.

    PubMed

    Govarthanan, M; Mythili, R; Selvankumar, T; Kamala-Kannan, S; Rajasekar, A; Chang, Young-Cheol

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the bioremediation potential of endophytic bacteria isolated from roots of Tridax procumbens plant. Five bacterial endophytes were isolated and subsequently tested for minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against different heavy metals. Amongst the five isolates, strain RM exhibited the highest resistance to copper (750 mg/l), followed by zinc (500 mg/l), lead (450 mg/l), and arsenic (400 mg/l). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence suggested that strain RM was a member of genus Paneibacillus. Strain RM also had the capacity to produce secondary metabolites, indole acetic acid, siderophores, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, and biosurfactant and solubilize phosphate. The growth kinetics of strain RM was altered slightly in the presence of metal stress. Temperature and pH influenced the metal removal rate. The results suggest that strain RM can survive under the high concentration of heavy metals and has been identified as a potential candidate for application in bioremediation of heavy metals in contaminated environments.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of the RmInt1 Group II Intronless Sinorhizobium meliloti Strain RMO17

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of the RmInt1 group II intronless Sinorhizobium meliloti strain RMO17 isolated from Medicago orbicularis nodules from Spanish soil. The genome consists of 6.73 Mb distributed between a single chromosome and two megaplasmids (the chromid pSymB and pSymA). PMID:25301650

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of the RmInt1 Group II Intronless Sinorhizobium meliloti Strain RMO17.

    PubMed

    Toro, Nicolás; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael

    2014-10-09

    We report the complete genome sequence of the RmInt1 group II intronless Sinorhizobium meliloti strain RMO17 isolated from Medicago orbicularis nodules from Spanish soil. The genome consists of 6.73 Mb distributed between a single chromosome and two megaplasmids (the chromid pSymB and pSymA). Copyright © 2014 Toro et al.

  16. RANS Simulation (Rotating Reference Frame Model [RRF]) of Single Lab-Scaled DOE RM1 MHK Turbine

    DOE Data Explorer

    Javaherchi, Teymour; Stelzenmuller, Nick; Aliseda, Alberto; Seydel, Joseph

    2014-04-15

    Attached are the .cas and .dat files for the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of a single lab-scaled DOE RM1 turbine implemented in ANSYS FLUENT CFD-package. The lab-scaled DOE RM1 is a re-design geometry, based of the full scale DOE RM1 design, producing same power output as the full scale model, while operating at matched Tip Speed Ratio values at reachable laboratory Reynolds number (see attached paper). In this case study taking advantage of the symmetry of lab-scaled DOE RM1 geometry, only half of the geometry is models using (Single) Rotating Reference Frame model [RRF]. In this model RANS equations, coupled with k-\\omega turbulence closure model, are solved in the rotating reference frame. The actual geometry of the turbine blade is included and the turbulent boundary layer along the blade span is simulated using wall-function approach. The rotation of the blade is modeled by applying periodic boundary condition to sets of plane of symmetry. This case study simulates the performance and flow field in the near and far wake of the device at the desired operating conditions. The results of these simulations were validated against in-house experimental data. Please see the attached paper.

  17. The Experience of Persons With Multiple Sclerosis Using MS INFoRm: An Interactive Fatigue Management Resource.

    PubMed

    Pétrin, Julie; Akbar, Nadine; Turpin, Karen; Smyth, Penelope; Finlayson, Marcia

    2018-04-01

    We aimed to understand participants' experiences with a self-guided fatigue management resource, Multiple Sclerosis: An Interactive Fatigue Management Resource ( MS INFoRm), and the extent to which they found its contents relevant and useful to their daily lives. We recruited 35 persons with MS experiencing mild to moderate fatigue, provided them with MS INFoRm, and then conducted semistructured interviews 3 weeks and 3 months after they received the resource. Interpretive description guided the analysis process. Findings indicate that participants' experience of using MS INFoRm could be understood as a process of change, influenced by their initial reactions to the resource. They reported experiencing a shift in knowledge, expectations, and behaviors with respect to fatigue self-management. These shifts led to multiple positive outcomes, including increased levels of self-confidence and improved quality of life. These findings suggest that MS INFoRm may have a place in the continuum of fatigue management interventions for people with MS.

  18. Complete genomic sequence of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni HS:19 strain RM1285 that was isolated from packaged chicken

    Poultry products serve as the main source of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni (Cjj) infections in humans. Cjj infections are a leading cause of foodborne gastroenteritis and are a prevalent antecedent to Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). This study describes the genome of Cjj HS:19 strain RM1285 isol...

  19. 1RM prediction: a novel methodology based on the force-velocity and load-velocity relationships.

    PubMed

    Picerno, Pietro; Iannetta, Danilo; Comotto, Stefania; Donati, Marco; Pecoraro, Fabrizio; Zok, Mounir; Tollis, Giorgio; Figura, Marco; Varalda, Carlo; Di Muzio, Davide; Patrizio, Federica; Piacentini, Maria Francesca

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of a novel approach for predicting the one-repetition maximum (1RM). The prediction is based on the force-velocity and load-velocity relationships determined from measured force and velocity data collected during resistance-training exercises with incremental submaximal loads. 1RM was determined as the load corresponding to the intersection of these two curves, where the gravitational force exceeds the force that the subject can exert. The proposed force-velocity-based method (FVM) was tested on 37 participants (23.9 ± 3.1 year; BMI 23.44 ± 2.45) with no specific resistance-training experience, and the predicted 1RM was compared to that achieved using a direct method (DM) in chest-press (CP) and leg-press (LP) exercises. The mean 1RM in CP was 99.5 kg (±27.0) for DM and 100.8 kg (±27.2) for FVM (SEE = 1.2 kg), whereas the mean 1RM in LP was 249.3 kg (±60.2) for DM and 251.1 kg (±60.3) for FVM (SEE = 2.1 kg). A high correlation was found between the two methods for both CP and LP exercises (0.999, p < 0.001). Good agreement between the two methods emerged from the Bland and Altman plot analysis. These findings suggest the use of the proposed methodology as a valid alternative to other indirect approaches for 1RM prediction. The mathematical construct is simply based on the definition of the 1RM, and it is fed with subject's muscle strength capacities measured during a specific exercise. Its reliability is, thus, expected to be not affected by those factors that typically jeopardize regression-based approaches.

  20. Improving empirical evidence on differentiating closely related men with RM Y-STRs: A comprehensive pedigree study from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Adnan, Atif; Ralf, Arwin; Rakha, Allah; Kousouri, Nefeli; Kayser, Manfred

    2016-11-01

    Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) markers are commonly used in forensic genetics. Male-specific haplotypes provided by commercial Y-STR kits allow discriminating between many - but not all - unrelated men, while they mostly fail to separate related ones. Aiming to improve male relative and paternal lineage differentiation, a set of 13 rapidly-mutating (RM) Y-STRs was previously identified and introduced to forensic Y-chromosome analysis. Recently, their value was highlighted by separating 99% of over 12,200 unrelated men from 111 global populations, as well as 29% of over 2500 male relative pairs, the vast majority were father-sons. Here, we provide improved empirical evidence on differentiating closely related men with RM Y-STRs, most notably beyond father-sons, where previous data were limited. After careful quality control including genetic relationship testing, we used 572 Pakistani men belonging to 99 2-4 generation pedigrees covering 1568 pairs of men related by 1-6 meioses. Of those, 45% were differentiated by one or more of the 13 RM Y-STR markers. In contrast, only 14.7% of a subset of 1484 pairs from 94 pedigrees were separated by the commercial AmpFlSTR Y-filer kit. Combining previously published and new data, an overall differentiation rate of 35.3% was revealed for the RM Y-STR set based on 4096 pairs of men related by 1-20 meioses, compared to 9.6% with Y-filer based on 3645 pairs. Using father-son pair data from the present and previous studies, we provide updated RM Y-STR mutation rates. Locus-specific mutation rates ranged from 2.0×10 -3 (7.0×10 -4 -4.3×10 -3 ) to 6.9×10 -2 (6.1×10 -2 -7.9×10 -2 ) based on 2741-3143 meioses, with an average rate across all 13 RM Y-STR markers of 1.8×10 -2 (1.7×10 -2 -1.9×10 -2 ) based on 800 mutations from 44,922 meioses. The high haplotype diversity (h=0.9996) we observed among the unrelated men (N=105) underlines the value of this RM Y-STR set to differentiate paternal lineages even from

  1. Structure and stability of the finite-area von Kármán street

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzzatto-Fegiz, Paolo; Williamson, Charles H. K.

    2012-06-01

    By using a recently developed numerical method, we explore in detail the possible inviscid equilibrium flows for a Kármán street comprising uniform, large-area vortices. In order to determine stability, we make use of an energy-based stability argument (originally proposed by Lord Kelvin), whose previous implementation had been unsuccessful in determining stability for the Kármán street [P. G. Saffman and J. C. Schatzman, "Stability of a vortex street of finite vortices," J. Fluid Mech. 117, 171-186 (1982), 10.1017/S0022112082001578]. We discuss in detail the issues affecting this interpretation of Kelvin's ideas, and show that this energy-based argument cannot detect subharmonic instabilities. To find superharmonic instabilities, we employ a recently introduced approach, which constitutes a reliable implementation of Kelvin's stability ideas [P. Luzzatto-Fegiz and C. H. K. Williamson, "Stability of conservative flows and new steady fluid solutions from bifurcation diagrams exploiting a variational argument," Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 044504 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.044504]. For periodic flows, this leads us to organize solutions into families with fixed impulse I, and to construct diagrams involving the flow energy E and horizontal spacing (i.e., wavelength) L. Families of large-I vortex streets exhibit a turning point in L, and terminate with "cat's eyes" vortices (as also suggested by previous investigators). However, for low-I streets, the solution families display a multitude of turning points (leading to multiple possible streets, for given L), and terminate with teardrop-shaped vortices. This is radically different from previous suggestions in the literature. These two qualitatively different limiting states are connected by a special street, whereby vortices from opposite rows touch, such that each vortex boundary exhibits three corners. Furthermore, by following the family of I = 0 streets to small L, we gain access to a large, hitherto unexplored

  2. Interference removals on Pd, Ru and Au with ICP-QQQ-MS in PGE RM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem Hussain Bokhari, Syed; Meisel, Thomas; Walkner, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Gold and platinum group elements (PGE) are essential industrial precious metals with high world demand due to their unique properties. Struggle for natural exploration of PGE is on great pace and recycling from industrial wastes, electronics and catalytic convertor is on the rise for PGE supply chain. Along with these developments it is becoming more challenging for analytical chemists to determine gold and PGE out of complex matrix which causes severe interferences. The current state of art is online analysis coupled with chromatographic separation of interferences. The ICP-QQQ-MS Agilent 8800 has the capability of using multi tunes and mass shifts. We aim to remove interferences on Pd+ (for direct and isotope dilution analysis) Au+ and Ru+ in lieu of chemical separations. YO+, SrOH+, ZnAr+, NiAr+, ZrO+, CuAr+, MoO+ , Ru+and Cd+ are expected interferences on Pd+ while Au+ is interfered by TaO+, HfOH+, GdAr+ and 102Ru+ ,104Ru+ by 102Pd+ ,104Pd+ etc. Initial test were performed on pure solutions of 1mg/l (interfering elements): 1 ng/l (Pd, Ru & Au) respectively. The outcomes of initial tests were applied on PGE reference material (RM) WMG-1 and SARM-7 (digested with Na2O2 sintering). The results obtained show that YO+, SrOH+ interfere (104Pd,105Pd), 104 Ru+ on (104Pd), ZnAr+ has slight interference on (104Pd and106Pd), ZrO+, NiAr+, CuAr+ interferences are negligible, MoO+ has severe interference on (108Pd, 110Pd) and that Cd+ has severe isobaric interference on (106Pd,108Pd, 110Pd). These interference have been removed by formation of Pd(NH3)3+complex. The TaO+, HfOH+ and GdAr+ interferences on Au+ are best removed by formation of Au(NH3)+ and Au(NH3)2+ complexes. 102Pd+,104Pd+interference on 102Ru+ ,104Ru+ can be removed by formation of Ru(NH3)4+ and RuO+ compounds. The results obtained comply with certified values of RM. The developed method is being tested on low concentration PGE reference materials. References: Sugiyama, N. " Removal of complex spectral

  3. [REIN Report 2011--summary].

    PubMed

    Couchoud, C; Lassalle, M; Jacquelinet, C

    2013-09-01

    In 2011, in France, we estimate that 9 400 patients started a treatment by dialysis (incidence of dialysis: 144 per million inhabitants) and 335 patients with a pre-emptive graft without previous dialysis (incidence of pre-emptive graft: 5 per million inhabitants). As in 2010, incidence rate seems to stabilize. Elders provide the majority of new patients (median age at RRT start: 71 years old). New patients present a high rate of disabilities especially diabetes (41% of the new patients) and cardiovascular disabilities (>50% of the new patients) that increase with age. Considering treatment and follow-up, the first treatment remains center's hemodialysis and we do not notice any progression of self-dialysis. RRT started in emergency in 33% of the patients. This finding contrasts with the fact that 56% of patients started hemodialysis on a catheter. This, together with the major inter-region variability, suggests that different strategies of management exist. Finally, the hemoglobin level at RRT start seems to be an interesting indicator of good management and follow-up since 13% of patients presenting an underprovided follow-up have a hemoglobin level under 10g/dl, whereas only 2.5% of patients with an appropriate follow-up presented such a condition. On December 31, 2011, in France, we estimate that 70.700 patients were receiving a renal replacement therapy, 39.600 (56%) on dialysis and 31.100 (44%) living with a functional renal transplant. The overall crude prevalence was 1091 per million inhabitants. It was 1.6 higher in males. Prevalence was subject to regional variations with 5 regions (3 overseas) above the national rate. Renal transplant share varied from 33% in Nord-Pas de Calais to 53% in Pays de Loire, and from 16 to 25% in overseas regions. The study of temporal variations for 18 regions contributing to the registry since 2007 demonstrated a +4% increase in standardized prevalence of ESRD patients with a functional transplant vs. +2% increase for dialysis, resulting in a decreasing gap between dialysis and transplantation prevalence, due to an increase number of renal transplant and a longer survival of transplanted patients. The main dialysis technique was hemodialysis (93.3% of patients). Even if an important inter-region variability remains considering the choices of treatment, more than 50% of the patients are undergoing hemodialysis in a hospital-based incenter unit, and we noticed an increase in hemodialysis in a medical satellite unit with time whereas the rate of self-care hemodialysis decreases. The rate of peritoneal dialysis remains stable. When comparing guidelines to real-life treatments, 77.5% of patients receive adequate dose of treatment (12 H/week, KT/ V>1.2), the rate of patients with a hemoglobin blood-level lower than 10g/dl and without erythropoietin treatment is 1.3%, which confirmed a good management of anemia. On the contrary, 34% of patients have a BMI lower than 23kg/m(2) and only 23% have an albumin blood-level over 40g/l, which underlines that nutritional management of ESRD patients can be improved. Age strongly influences survival on dialysis. Thus, one year survival of patients under age 65 is over 90%. After 5 years, among patients over 85 years, it is more than 15%. The presence of diabetes or one or more cardiovascular comorbidities also significantly worse patient survival. In terms of trend, we do not find significant improvement in the 2-year survival between patients in the cohort 2006-2007 and the 2008-2009 cohort. Cardiovascular diseases account for 27% of causes of death to infectious diseases (12%) and cancer (10%). Life expectancy of patients is highly dependent on their treatment. Thus, a transplant patient aged 30 has a life expectancy of 41 years versus 23 years for a dialysis patient. In 2011, the incidence and the prevalence of ESRD among patients under 20 years old remained stable at 8 and 53 per million inhabitants respectively. The first causes of ESDR remain uropathies and hypodysplasia followed by glomerulonephritis and genetic diseases. Considering the initial treatment, we found a high rate of hemodialysis and a low rate of peritoneal dialysis that is mainly used in younger children. In 2011, 31 preemptive transplantations were performed accounting for 27.7% of new patients. Finally, survival analysis confirm that younger children (under 4 years old) have the highest risk of death (88% survival rate at 2 years vs. 98% in patients over 4 years old) and that the treatment of choice remains the renal transplantation since it increases the expected remaining lifetime of 20 to 40 years depending on the considered age. Access to the waiting list is evaluated on a cohort of 51,846 new patients who started dialysis between 2002 and 2011 in 25 regions. The probability of first wait-listing was of 3.7% at the start of dialysis (pre-emptive registrations), 15% at 12, 22% at 36 and 24% to 60 months. Patient older than 60 had a very poor access to the waiting list, whatever their diabetes status was. Among 13,653 patients less than 60 years old, the probability of being registered was 11% at the start of dialysis, 43% to 12 months, 62% to 36 months and 66% to 60 months (median dialysis duration: 16 months). Seventeen regions with up to 5 years follow-up show an increase of 8 to 15% in pre-emptive registrations between 2007 and 2001, without change at 1 year. Access to kidney transplant is evaluated on a cohort of 53,301 new patients who started a renal replacement therapy (dialysis or pre-emptive renal transplant) between 2002 and 2011 in 25 regions. The probability of first kidney transplant was of 7% at 12, 17% at 36 and 21% at 60 months. 8,633 patients (16,2%) had received a first renal transplant within 14.7 month median time; 1,455 (2.7%) had received a pre-emptive graft. Among the 14.770 new patients less than 60 years old, the probability of being transplanted was of 21% at 12, 46% at 36 and 58% at 60 months (median dialysis duration: 42 months). When pre-emptive graft were excluded, the probability of being transplanted was of 5% at 12, 15% to 36 and 19% to 60 months FLOW BETWEEN TREATMENT MODALITIES: Among the 36.849 patients on dialysis at 31/10/2010, 79% were already on RRT at 31/12/2009. Respectively 91%, 85% and 93% of the patients on HD in-center, HD self-care unit and peritoneal dialysis were in the same modality of treatment the year before. Among the 29.758 patients with a functioning graft at 31/12/2010, 98% were already on RRT at 31/12/2009, 95% of them with a functioning graft.72%, 72% and 74% of the patients with in-center HD, out-center HD and self-care unit were in the same modality of treatment at 31/12/2011. But 37% of the patients on PD at 31/12/2010 were not on PD at 31/12/2011. In 2011, new patients represented 89% of the entries in peritoneal dialysis. Renal transplantation represented 10% of the outcomes of the HD patients in self-care unit or at home. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Implication of STARD5 and cholesterol homeostasis disturbance in the endoplasmic reticulum stress-related response induced by pro-apoptotic aminosteroid RM-133.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Martin; Maltais, René; Kenmogne, Lucie Carolle; Létourneau, Danny; LeHoux, Jean-Guy; Gobeil, Stéphane; Poirier, Donald

    2018-02-01

    The aminosteroid derivative RM-133 is an effective anticancer molecule for which proof of concept has been achieved in several mouse xenograph models (HL-60, MCF-7, PANC-1 and OVCAR-3). To promote this new family of molecules toward a clinical phase 1 trial, the mechanism of action governing the anticancer properties of the representative candidate RM-133 needs to be characterized. In vitro experiments were first used to determine that RM-133 causes apoptosis in cancer cells. Then, using proteomic and transcriptomic experiments, RM-133 cytotoxicity was proven to be achieved via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-related apoptosis, which characterizes RM-133 as an endoplasmic reticulum stress aggravator (ERSA) anticancer drug. Furthermore, an shRNA-genome-wide screening has permitted to identify the steroidogenic acute regulator-related lipid transfer protein 5 (STARD5) as a major player in the RM-133 ER-related apoptosis mechanism, which was validated by an in vitro binding experiment. Altogether, the results presented herein suggest that RM-133 provokes a disturbance of cholesterol homeostasis via the implication of STARD5, which delivers an ERSA molecule to the ER. These results will be a springboard for RM-133 in its path toward clinical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Accounting strategy of tritium inventory in the heavy water detritiation pilot plant from ICIT Rm. Valcea

    SciT

    Bidica, N.; Stefanescu, I.; Cristescu, I.

    2008-07-15

    In this paper we present a methodology for determination of tritium inventory in a tritium removal facility. The method proposed is based on the developing of computing models for accountancy of the mobile tritium inventory in the separation processes, of the stored tritium and of the trapped tritium inventory in the structure of the process system components. The configuration of the detritiation process is a combination of isotope catalytic exchange between water and hydrogen (LPCE) and the cryogenic distillation of hydrogen isotopes (CD). The computing model for tritium inventory in the LPCE process and the CD process will be developedmore » basing on mass transfer coefficients in catalytic isotope exchange reactions and in dual-phase system (liquid-vapour) of hydrogen isotopes distillation process. Accounting of tritium inventory stored in metallic hydride will be based on in-bed calorimetry. Estimation of the trapped tritium inventory can be made by subtraction of the mobile and stored tritium inventories from the global tritium inventory of the plant area. Determinations of the global tritium inventory of the plant area will be made on a regular basis by measuring any tritium quantity entering or leaving the plant area. This methodology is intended to be applied to the Heavy Water Detritiation Pilot Plant from ICIT Rm. Valcea (Romania) and to the Cernavoda Tritium Removal Facility (which will be built in the next 5-7 years). (authors)« less

  6. Biophysical characterization and structure of the Fab fragment from the NIST reference antibody, RM 8671.

    PubMed

    Karageorgos, Ioannis; Gallagher, Elyssia S; Galvin, Connor; Gallagher, D Travis; Hudgens, Jeffrey W

    2017-11-01

    Monoclonal antibody pharmaceuticals are the fastest-growing class of therapeutics, with a wide range of clinical applications. To assure their safety, these protein drugs must demonstrate highly consistent purity and stability. Key to these objectives is higher order structure measurements validated by calibration to reference materials. We describe preparation, characterization, and crystal structure of the Fab fragment prepared from the NIST Reference Antibody RM 8671 (NISTmAb). NISTmAb is a humanized IgG1κ antibody, produced in murine cell culture and purified by standard biopharmaceutical production methods, developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to serve as a reference material. The Fab fragment was derived from NISTmAb through papain cleavage followed by protein A based purification. The purified Fab fragment was characterized by SDS-PAGE, capillary gel electrophoresis, multi-angle light scattering, size exclusion chromatography, mass spectrometry, and x-ray crystallography. The crystal structure at 0.2 nm resolution includes four independent Fab molecules with complete light chains and heavy chains through Cys 223, enabling assessment of conformational variability and providing a well-characterized reference structure for research and engineering applications. This nonproprietary, publically available reference material of known higher-order structure can support metrology in biopharmaceutical applications, and it is a suitable platform for validation of molecular modeling studies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. The peopling of Europe and the cautionary tale of Y chromosome lineage R-M269

    PubMed Central

    Busby, George B. J.; Brisighelli, Francesca; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Ramos-Luis, Eva; Martinez-Cadenas, Conrado; Thomas, Mark G.; Bradley, Daniel G.; Gusmão, Leonor; Winney, Bruce; Bodmer, Walter; Vennemann, Marielle; Coia, Valentina; Scarnicci, Francesca; Tofanelli, Sergio; Vona, Giuseppe; Ploski, Rafal; Vecchiotti, Carla; Zemunik, Tatijana; Rudan, Igor; Karachanak, Sena; Toncheva, Draga; Anagnostou, Paolo; Ferri, Gianmarco; Rapone, Cesare; Hervig, Tor; Moen, Torolf; Wilson, James F.; Capelli, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the debate on the origins of the major European Y chromosome haplogroup R1b1b2-M269 has reignited, and opinion has moved away from Palaeolithic origins to the notion of a younger Neolithic spread of these chromosomes from the Near East. Here, we address this debate by investigating frequency patterns and diversity in the largest collection of R1b1b2-M269 chromosomes yet assembled. Our analysis reveals no geographical trends in diversity, in contradiction to expectation under the Neolithic hypothesis, and suggests an alternative explanation for the apparent cline in diversity recently described. We further investigate the young, STR-based time to the most recent common ancestor estimates proposed so far for R-M269-related lineages and find evidence for an appreciable effect of microsatellite choice on age estimates. As a consequence, the existing data and tools are insufficient to make credible estimates for the age of this haplogroup, and conclusions about the timing of its origin and dispersal should be viewed with a large degree of caution. PMID:21865258

  8. RM-DEMATEL: a new methodology to identify the key factors in PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yafeng; Liu, Jie; Li, Yunpeng; Sadiq, Rehan; Deng, Yong

    2015-04-01

    Weather system is a relative complex dynamic system, the factors of the system are mutually influenced PM2.5 concentration. In this paper, a new method is proposed to quantify the influence on PM2.5 by other factors in the weather system and identify the most important factors for PM2.5 with limited resources. The relation map (RM) is used to figure out the direct relation matrix of 14 factors in PM2.5. The decision making trial and evaluation laboratory(DEMATEL) is applied to calculate the causal relationship and extent to a mutual influence of 14 factors in PM2.5. According to the ranking results of our proposed method, the most important key factors is sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NO(X)). In addition, the other factors, the ambient maximum temperature (T(max)), concentration of PM10, and wind direction (W(dir)), are important factors for PM2.5. The proposed method can also be applied to other environment management systems to identify key factors.

  9. Frenolicins C-G, pyranonaphthoquinones from Streptomyces sp. RM-4-15.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiachang; Shaaban, Khaled A; Elshahawi, Sherif I; Ponomareva, Larissa V; Sunkara, Manjula; Zhang, Yinan; Copley, Gregory C; Hower, James C; Morris, Andrew J; Kharel, Madan K; Thorson, Jon S

    2013-08-23

    Appalachian active coal fire sites were selected for the isolation of bacterial strains belonging to the class actinobacteria. A comparison of high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HRESIMS) and ultraviolet (UV) absorption profiles from isolate extracts to natural product databases suggested Streptomyces sp. RM-4-15 to produce unique metabolites. Four new pyranonaphthoquinones, frenolicins C-F (1-4), along with three known analogues, frenolicin (6), frenolicin B (7), and UCF76-A (8), were isolated from the fermentation of this strain. An additional new analogue, frenolicin G (5), along with two known compounds, deoxyfrenolicin (9) and UCF 13 (10), were isolated from the fermentation supplied with 18 mg/L of scandium chloride, the first example, to the best of our knowledge, wherein scandium chloride supplementation led to the confirmed production of new bacterial secondary metabolites. Structures 1-5 were elucidated on the basis of spectral analysis and chemical modification. While frenolicins are best known for their anticoccidial activity, the current study revealed compounds 6-9 to exhibit moderate cytotoxicity against the human lung carcinoma cell line (A549) and thereby extends the anticancer SAR for this privileged scaffold.

  10. Effect of soft-iron impellers on the von Kármán-sodium dynamo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingtian

    2014-01-01

    The explanation for the observed axisymmetric magnetic field in the von Kármán-sodium (VKS) dynamo experiment is still an unresolved question. In this paper, the integral equation approach is extended to investigate the VKS dynamo action by taking into account the discontinuity of the magnetic permeability and electrical conductivity in the conducting region. When the relative magnetic permeability of the soft-iron impellers is set to 65, a steady toroidal field that is apparently axisymmetric is excited at the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rmc≈27.23, which is close to the experimental result, Rmc≈30. Our results show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number declines as the relative magnetic permeability of the impellers increases. Furthermore, when the relative magnetic permeability is not greater than 37, an equatorial magnetic field with an azimuthal wave number m=1 is the dominant mode, otherwise a steady toroidal field with an azimuthal wave number m=0 predominates the magnetic field generated by the VKS dynamo action.

  11. Dynamo threshold detection in the von Kármán sodium experiment.

    PubMed

    Miralles, Sophie; Bonnefoy, Nicolas; Bourgoin, Mickael; Odier, Philippe; Pinton, Jean-François; Plihon, Nicolas; Verhille, Gautier; Boisson, Jean; Daviaud, François; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2013-07-01

    Predicting dynamo self-generation in liquid metal experiments has been an ongoing question for many years. In contrast to simple dynamical systems for which reliable techniques have been developed, the ability to predict the dynamo capacity of a flow and the estimate of the corresponding critical value of the magnetic Reynolds number (the control parameter of the instability) has been elusive, partly due to the high level of turbulent fluctuations of flows in such experiments (with kinetic Reynolds numbers in excess of 10(6)). We address these issues here, using the von Kármán sodium experiment and studying its response to an externally applied magnetic field. We first show that a dynamo threshold can be estimated from analysis related to critical slowing down and susceptibility divergence, in configurations for which dynamo action is indeed observed. These approaches are then applied to flow configurations that have failed to self-generate magnetic fields within operational limits, and we quantify the dynamo capacity of these configurations.

  12. Risk profile, quality of life and care of patients with moderate and advanced CKD : The French CKD-REIN Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Metzger, Marie; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Ayav, Carole; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Edouard; Morel, Pascal; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost P; Lange, Céline; Legrand, Karine; Speyer, Elodie; Liabeuf, Sophie; Robinson, Bruce M; Massy, Ziad A

    2018-04-09

    The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study was designed to investigate the determinants of prognosis and care of patients referred to nephrologists with moderate and advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). We examined their baseline risk profile and experience. We collected bioclinical and patient-reported information from 3033 outpatients with CKD and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) of 15-60 mL/min/1.73 m2 treated at 40 nationally representative public and private facilities. The patients' median age was 69 (60-76) years, 65% were men, their mean eGFR was 33 mL/min/1.73 m2, 43% had diabetes, 24% had a history of acute kidney injury (AKI) and 57% had uncontrolled blood pressure (BP; >140/90 mmHg). Men had worse risk profiles than women and were more likely to be past or current smokers (73% versus 34%) and have cardiovascular disease (59% versus 42%), albuminuria >30 mg/mmol (or proteinuria > 50) (40% versus 30%) (all P < 0.001) and a higher median risk of end-stage renal disease within 5 years, predicted by the kidney failure risk equation {12% [interquartile range (IQR) 3-37%] versus 9% [3-31%], P = 0.008}. During the previous year, 60% of patients reported one-to-two nephrologist visits and four or more general practitioner visits; only 25% saw a dietician and 75% were prescribed five or more medications daily. Physical and mental quality of life (QoL) were poor, with scores <50/100. The CKD-REIN study highlights high-risk profiles of cohort members and identifies several priorities, including improving BP control and dietary counselling and increasing doctors' awareness of AKI, polypharmacy and QoL. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT03381950.

  13. [The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study: To better understand chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Édouard; Morel, Pascal; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost P; Pisoni, Ron L; Robinson, Bruce M; Massy, Ziad A

    2016-04-01

    Preserving kidney function and improving the transition from chronic kidney disease to end stage is a research and healthcare challenge. The national Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort was established to identify the determinants, biomarkers and practice patterns associated with chronic kidney disease outcomes. The study will include more than 3000 adult patients with moderate to advanced chronic kidney disease from a representative sample of 40 nephrology clinics with respect to regions and legal status, public or private. Patients are recruited during a routine visit and followed for 5 years, before and after starting renal replacement therapy. Patient-level clinical, biological, and lifestyle data are collected annually, as well as provider-level data on clinical practices, coordinated with the International Chronic Kidney Disease Outcomes and Practice Pattern Study. Blood and urine samples are stored in a biobank. Major studied outcomes include survival, patient-reported outcomes, disease progression and hospitalizations. More than 13,000 eligible patients with chronic kidney disease were identified, 60% with stage 3 and 40% with stage 4. Their median age is 72 years [interquartile range, 62-80 years], 60% are men and 38% have diabetes. By the end of December 2015, 2885 patients were included. The CKD-REIN cohort will serve to improve our understanding of chronic kidney disease and provide evidence to improve patient survival and quality of life as well as health care system performances. Copyright © 2016 Association Société de néphrologie. All rights reserved.

  14. Parametric study and optimization trends for the Von-Kármán-sodium dynamo experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.

    2018-05-01

    We present magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of liquid sodium flow performed with the PLUTO compressible MHD code. We investigated the influence of the remanent magnetic field orientation and intensity, the impinging velocity field due to Ekman pumping as well as the impeller dimensions on the magnetic field collimation by helical flows in-between the impeller blades. For a simplified Cartesian geometry, we model the flow dynamics of a multi-blade impeller inspired by the Von-Kármán-Sodium experiment. This study shows that a remanent magnetic field oriented in the toroidal direction is the less efficient configuration to collimate the magnetic field, although if the radial or vertical components are not negligible, the collimation is significantly improved. As the intensity of the remanent magnetic field increases, the system magnetic energy becomes larger, but the magnetic field collimation efficiency remains the same, so the gain of magnetic energy is smaller as the remanent magnetic field intensity increases. The magnetic field collimation is modified if the impinging velocity field changes: the collimation is weaker if the impinging velocity increases from Γ = 0.8 to 0.9 and slightly larger if the impinging velocity decreases from Γ = 0.8 to 0.7. The analysis of the impeller dimensions points out that the most efficient configuration to collimate the magnetic field requires a ratio between the impeller blade height and the base longitude between 0.375 and 0.5. The largest enhancement of the hypothetical α2 dynamo loop, compared to the hypothetical Ω-α dynamo loop, is observed for the model that mimics the TM 73 impeller configuration rotating in the unscooping direction with a remanent magnetic field of 10-3 T orientated in the radial or vertical direction. The optimization trends obtained in the parametric analysis are also confirmed by simulations with a higher resolution and turbulence degree.

  15. H2RM: A Hybrid Rough Set Reasoning Model for Prediction and Management of Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rahman; Hussain, Jamil; Siddiqi, Muhammad Hameed; Hussain, Maqbool; Lee, Sungyoung

    2015-07-03

    Diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by high blood glucose level that results either from a deficiency of insulin produced by the body, or the body's resistance to the effects of insulin. Accurate and precise reasoning and prediction models greatly help physicians to improve diagnosis, prognosis and treatment procedures of different diseases. Though numerous models have been proposed to solve issues of diagnosis and management of diabetes, they have the following drawbacks: (1) restricted one type of diabetes; (2) lack understandability and explanatory power of the techniques and decision; (3) limited either to prediction purpose or management over the structured contents; and (4) lack competence for dimensionality and vagueness of patient's data. To overcome these issues, this paper proposes a novel hybrid rough set reasoning model (H2RM) that resolves problems of inaccurate prediction and management of type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). For verification of the proposed model, experimental data from fifty patients, acquired from a local hospital in semi-structured format, is used. First, the data is transformed into structured format and then used for mining prediction rules. Rough set theory (RST) based techniques and algorithms are used to mine the prediction rules. During the online execution phase of the model, these rules are used to predict T1DM and T2DM for new patients. Furthermore, the proposed model assists physicians to manage diabetes using knowledge extracted from online diabetes guidelines. Correlation-based trend analysis techniques are used to manage diabetic observations. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms the existing methods with 95.9% average and balanced accuracies.

  16. H2RM: A Hybrid Rough Set Reasoning Model for Prediction and Management of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rahman; Hussain, Jamil; Siddiqi, Muhammad Hameed; Hussain, Maqbool; Lee, Sungyoung

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by high blood glucose level that results either from a deficiency of insulin produced by the body, or the body’s resistance to the effects of insulin. Accurate and precise reasoning and prediction models greatly help physicians to improve diagnosis, prognosis and treatment procedures of different diseases. Though numerous models have been proposed to solve issues of diagnosis and management of diabetes, they have the following drawbacks: (1) restricted one type of diabetes; (2) lack understandability and explanatory power of the techniques and decision; (3) limited either to prediction purpose or management over the structured contents; and (4) lack competence for dimensionality and vagueness of patient’s data. To overcome these issues, this paper proposes a novel hybrid rough set reasoning model (H2RM) that resolves problems of inaccurate prediction and management of type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). For verification of the proposed model, experimental data from fifty patients, acquired from a local hospital in semi-structured format, is used. First, the data is transformed into structured format and then used for mining prediction rules. Rough set theory (RST) based techniques and algorithms are used to mine the prediction rules. During the online execution phase of the model, these rules are used to predict T1DM and T2DM for new patients. Furthermore, the proposed model assists physicians to manage diabetes using knowledge extracted from online diabetes guidelines. Correlation-based trend analysis techniques are used to manage diabetic observations. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms the existing methods with 95.9% average and balanced accuracies. PMID:26151207

  17. Transcriptome Analysis of the Role of GlnD/GlnBK in Nitrogen Stress Adaptation by Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021

    PubMed Central

    Yurgel, Svetlana N.; Rice, Jennifer; Kahn, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional changes in the nitrogen stress response (NSR) of wild type S. meliloti Rm1021, and isogenic strains missing both PII proteins, GlnB and GlnK, or carrying a ΔglnD-sm2 mutation were analyzed using whole-genome microarrays. This approach allowed us to identify a number of new genes involved in the NSR and showed that the response of these bacteria to nitrogen stress overlaps with other stress responses, including induction of the fixK2 transcriptional activator and genes that are part of the phosphate stress response. Our data also show that GlnD and GlnBK proteins may regulate many genes that are not part of the NSR. Analysis of transcriptome profiles of the Rm1021 ΔglnD-sm2 strain allowed us to identify several genes that appear to be regulated by GlnD without the participation of the PII proteins. PMID:23516427

  18. Systems biology approach to developing S(2)RM-based "systems therapeutics" and naturally induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Greg; Friedman, Peter

    2015-05-26

    The degree to, and the mechanisms through, which stem cells are able to build, maintain, and heal the body have only recently begun to be understood. Much of the stem cell's power resides in the release of a multitude of molecules, called stem cell released molecules (SRM). A fundamentally new type of therapeutic, namely "systems therapeutic", can be realized by reverse engineering the mechanisms of the SRM processes. Recent data demonstrates that the composition of the SRM is different for each type of stem cell, as well as for different states of each cell type. Although systems biology has been successfully used to analyze multiple pathways, the approach is often used to develop a small molecule interacting at only one pathway in the system. A new model is emerging in biology where systems biology is used to develop a new technology acting at multiple pathways called "systems therapeutics". A natural set of healing pathways in the human that uses SRM is instructive and of practical use in developing systems therapeutics. Endogenous SRM processes in the human body use a combination of SRM from two or more stem cell types, designated as S(2)RM, doing so under various state dependent conditions for each cell type. Here we describe our approach in using state-dependent SRM from two or more stem cell types, S(2)RM technology, to develop a new class of therapeutics called "systems therapeutics." Given the ubiquitous and powerful nature of innate S(2)RM-based healing in the human body, this "systems therapeutic" approach using S(2)RM technology will be important for the development of anti-cancer therapeutics, antimicrobials, wound care products and procedures, and a number of other therapeutics for many indications.

  19. Semiempirical Quantum Chemistry Model for the Lanthanides: RM1 (Recife Model 1) Parameters for Dysprosium, Holmium and Erbium

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Manoel A. M.; Dutra, José Diogo L.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.; Freire, Ricardo O.

    2014-01-01

    Complexes of dysprosium, holmium, and erbium find many applications as single-molecule magnets, as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, as anti-cancer agents, in optical telecommunications, etc. Therefore, the development of tools that can be proven helpful to complex design is presently an active area of research. In this article, we advance a major improvement to the semiempirical description of lanthanide complexes: the Recife Model 1, RM1, model for the lanthanides, parameterized for the trications of Dy, Ho, and Er. By representing such lanthanide in the RM1 calculation as a three-electron atom with a set of 5 d, 6 s, and 6 p semiempirical orbitals, the accuracy of the previous sparkle models, mainly concentrated on lanthanide-oxygen and lanthanide-nitrogen distances, is extended to other types of bonds in the trication complexes’ coordination polyhedra, such as lanthanide-carbon, lanthanide-chlorine, etc. This is even more important as, for example, lanthanide-carbon atom distances in the coordination polyhedra of the complexes comprise about 30% of all distances for all complexes of Dy, Ho, and Er considered. Our results indicate that the average unsigned mean error for the lanthanide-carbon distances dropped from an average of 0.30 Å, for the sparkle models, to 0.04 Å for the RM1 model for the lanthanides; for a total of 509 such distances for the set of all Dy, Ho, and Er complexes considered. A similar behavior took place for the other distances as well, such as lanthanide-chlorine, lanthanide-bromine, lanthanide, phosphorus and lanthanide-sulfur. Thus, the RM1 model for the lanthanides, being advanced in this article, broadens the range of application of semiempirical models to lanthanide complexes by including comprehensively many other types of bonds not adequately described by the previous models. PMID:24497945

  20. von Kármán swirling flow between a rotating and a stationary smooth disk: Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Aryesh; Steinberg, Victor

    2018-01-01

    Precise measurements of the torque in a von Kármán swirling flow between a rotating and a stationary smooth disk in three Newtonian fluids with different dynamic viscosities are reported. From these measurements the dependence of the normalized torque, called the friction coefficient, on Re is found to be of the form Cf=1.17 (±0.03 ) Re-0.46±0.003 where the scaling exponent and coefficient are close to that predicted theoretically for an infinite, unshrouded, and smooth rotating disk which follows from an exact similarity solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, obtained by von Kármán. An error analysis shows that deviations from the theory can be partially caused by background errors. Measurements of the azimuthal Vθ and axial velocity profiles along radial and axial directions reveal that the flow core rotates at Vθ/r Ω ≃0.22 (up to z ≈4 cm from the rotating disk and up to r0/R ≃0.25 in the radial direction) in spite of the small aspect ratio of the vessel. Thus the friction coefficient shows scaling close to that obtained from the von Kármán exact similarity solution, but the observed rotating core provides evidence of the Batchelor-like solution [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 4, 29 (1951), 10.1093/qjmam/4.1.29] different from the von Kármán [Z. Angew. Math. Mech. 1, 233 (1921), 10.1002/zamm.19210010401] or Stewartson [Proc. Camb. Philos. Soc. 49, 333 (1953), 10.1017/S0305004100028437] one.

  1. Combined use of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and Raman microscopy (RM): investigations on EPS-Matrix.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Michael; Ivleva, Natalia P; Haisch, Christoph; Niessner, Reinhard; Horn, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was applied in combination with Raman microscopy (RM) for the characterization of heterotrophic biofilms. Compared to CLSM, RM allows for a deeper insight into the chemical structure of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of the biofilm matrix. A low load of glucose (2 g m(-2)d(-1)) was applied as substrate to ensure small growth rates of the heterotrophic biofilm. To investigate the influence of hydrodynamic conditions on the chemical composition of EPS, a three funnel flow system was used, wherein biofilms were grown at Reynolds numbers of 1000, 2500 and 4000, respectively. 31 and 92 days after inoculation with activated sludge supernatant RM was applied as an additional technique to standard CLSM measurements for a more detailed analysis of the biofilm matrix. Polysaccharide-related Raman bands are in good agreement with the lectin binding analysis from CLSM. For the older biofilm, lectin binding analysis showed no change in the composition of EPS, whereas Raman spectra pointed out a change of EPS composition from predominantly polysaccharides to predominantly (glyco) proteins. For the applied substrate condition no significant influence of the Reynolds number on the chemical properties was observed.

  2. Y-chromosome R-M343 African Lineages and Sickle Cell Disease reveal structured assimilation in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Haber, Marc; Platt, Daniel E; Khoury, Simon; Badro, Danielle A; Abboud, Miguel; Smith, Chris Tyler; Zalloua, Pierre A

    2012-01-01

    We have sought to identify signals of assimilation of African male lines in Lebanon by exploring the association of sickle cell disease in Lebanon with Y-chromosome haplogroups that are informative of the disease origin and its exclusivity to the Muslim community. A total of 732 samples were analyzed including 33 sickle cell disease patients from Lebanon genotyped for 28 binary markers and 19 short tandem repeats on the non-recombinant segment of the Y chromosome. Genetic organization was identified using populations known to have influenced the genetic structure of the Lebanese population, in addition to African populations with high incidence of sickle cell disease. Y-chromosome haplogroup R-M343 sub-lineages distinguish between sub-Saharan African and Lebanese Y chromosomes. We detected a limited penetration of sickle cell disease into Lebanese R-M343 carriers, restricted to Lebanese Muslims. We suggest that this penetration brought the sickle cell gene along with the African R-M343, probably with the Saharan caravan slave trade. PMID:20981037

  3. Analytic approximations of Von Kármán plate under arbitrary uniform pressure—equations in integral form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, XiaoXu; Liao, ShiJun

    2018-01-01

    Analytic approximations of the Von Kármán's plate equations in integral form for a circular plate under external uniform pressure to arbitrary magnitude are successfully obtained by means of the homotopy analysis method (HAM), an analytic approximation technique for highly nonlinear problems. Two HAM-based approaches are proposed for either a given external uniform pressure Q or a given central deflection, respectively. Both of them are valid for uniform pressure to arbitrary magnitude by choosing proper values of the so-called convergence-control parameters c 1 and c 2 in the frame of the HAM. Besides, it is found that the HAM-based iteration approaches generally converge much faster than the interpolation iterative method. Furthermore, we prove that the interpolation iterative method is a special case of the first-order HAM iteration approach for a given external uniform pressure Q when c 1 = - θ and c 2 = -1, where θ denotes the interpolation iterative parameter. Therefore, according to the convergence theorem of Zheng and Zhou about the interpolation iterative method, the HAM-based approaches are valid for uniform pressure to arbitrary magnitude at least in the special case c 1 = - θ and c 2 = -1. In addition, we prove that the HAM approach for the Von Kármán's plate equations in differential form is just a special case of the HAM for the Von Kármán's plate equations in integral form mentioned in this paper. All of these illustrate the validity and great potential of the HAM for highly nonlinear problems, and its superiority over perturbation techniques.

  4. Parameters for the RM1 Quantum Chemical Calculation of Complexes of the Trications of Thulium, Ytterbium and Lutetium

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Manoel A. M.; Dutra, José Diogo L.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2016-01-01

    The RM1 quantum chemical model for the calculation of complexes of Tm(III), Yb(III) and Lu(III) is advanced. Subsequently, we tested the models by fully optimizing the geometries of 126 complexes. We then compared the optimized structures with known crystallographic ones from the Cambridge Structural Database. Results indicate that, for thulium complexes, the accuracy in terms of the distances between the lanthanide ion and its directly coordinated atoms is about 2%. Corresponding results for ytterbium and lutetium are both 3%, levels of accuracy useful for the design of lanthanide complexes, targeting their countless applications. PMID:27223475

  5. [Therapeutic effect of rmIL-12 combined with G-CSF on acute radiation sickness produced by γ-ray irradiation in mice].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhai, Rui-Ren; Pang, Zhao-Xia; Zhang, Chao; Yu, Chang-Lin

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study is to observe the therapeutic effect of recombinant murine interleukin 12 (rmIL-12) combining with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on mice irradiated by γ-rays. 56 BALB/c mice were totally irradiated by 6.0 Gy of (60)Co γ-ray and randomly divided into irradiation control group, rmIL-12 treatment group, G-CSF treatment group and combination therapy (rmIL-12 plus G-CSF) group. rmIL-12 20 µg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally at 1 h following irradiation, and was administrated every 3 days after irradiation for 4 times in rmIL-12 treatment group. G-CSF 100 µg/kg was administrated subcutaneously the 2 h following irradiation for 14 d in G-CSF treatment group. The dose and method of rmIL-12 and G-CSF in combination therapy group were same as in rmIL-12 group and G-CSF group. The general status of mice were observed twice a day, the changes in body weight, peripheral blood cell (WBC and Plt) counts were examined once every three days, bone marrow cells were collected to perform colony cultivation on day 14 and 28 after irradiation. The results showed that WBC count recovery time in combination therapy group was significantly earlier than that of the control group (7 d vs 11 d), WBC count recovery velocity in the combination therapy group was no significant different from that of the G-CSF treatment group. Combined therapy significantly promoted Plt count recovery, resulting in less profound nadirs (16.5% vs 8.1%, P < 0.01) and rapid recovery to normal levels (11 d vs 14 d), Plt count recovery velocity in the combination therapy group was no significant different from that of the rmIL-12 treatment group. Culture of bone marrow cells in semi-solid medium also demonstrated that combination of rmIL-12 and G-CSF could stimulate bone marrow cells to form more CFU-GM and CFU-Mix than those of the irradiation control group in vitro on day 14 and 28 after irradiation (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the combination of rmIL-12 and G

  6. Functional and real-time requirements of a multisensor data fusion (MSDF) situation and threat assessment (STA) resource management (RM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duquet, Jean Remi; Bergeron, Pierre; Blodgett, Dale E.; Couture, Jean; Macieszczak, Maciej; Mayrand, Michel; Chalmers, Bruce A.; Paradis, Stephane

    1998-03-01

    The Research and Development group at Lockheed Martin Canada, in collaboration with the Defence Research Establishment Valcartier, has undertaken a research project in order to capture and analyze the real-time and functional requirements of a next generation Command and Control System (CCS) for the Canadian Patrol Frigates, integrating Multi- Sensor Data Fusion (MSDF), Situation and Threat Assessment (STA) and Resource Management (RM). One important aspect of the project is to define how the use of Artificial Intelligence may optimize the performance of an integrated, real-time MSDF/STA/RM system. A closed-loop simulation environment is being developed to facilitate the evaluation of MSDF/STA/RM concepts, algorithms and architectures. This environment comprises (1) a scenario generator, (2) complex sensor, hardkill and softkill weapon models, (3) a real-time monitoring tool, (4) a distributed Knowledge-Base System (KBS) shell. The latter is being completely redesigned and implemented in-house since no commercial KBS shell could adequately satisfy all the project requirements. The closed- loop capability of the simulation environment, together with its `simulated real-time' capability, allows the interaction between the MSDF/STA/RM system and the environment targets during the execution of a scenario. This capability is essential to measure the performance of many STA and RM functionalities. Some benchmark scenarios have been selected to demonstrate quantitatively the capabilities of the selected MSDF/STA/RM algorithms. The paper describes the simulation environment and discusses the MSDF/STA/RM functionalities currently implemented and their performance as an automatic CCS.

  7. von Kármán–Howarth and Corrsin equations closure based on Lagrangian description of the fluid motion

    SciT

    Divitiis, Nicola de, E-mail: n.dedivitiis@gmail.com

    A new approach to obtain the closure formulas for the von Kármán–Howarth and Corrsin equations is presented, which is based on the Lagrangian representation of the fluid motion, and on the Liouville theorem associated to the kinematics of a pair of fluid particles. This kinematics is characterized by the finite scale separation vector which is assumed to be statistically independent from the velocity field. Such assumption is justified by the hypothesis of fully developed turbulence and by the property that this vector varies much more rapidly than the velocity field. This formulation leads to the closure formulas of von Kármán–Howarthmore » and Corrsin equations in terms of longitudinal velocity and temperature correlations following a demonstration completely different with respect to the previous works. Some of the properties and the limitations of the closed equations are discussed. In particular, we show that the times of evolution of the developed kinetic energy and temperature spectra are finite quantities which depend on the initial conditions.« less

  8. Effects of cyclosporine A pretreatment of deceased organ donors on kidney graft function (Cis-A-rein): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Orban, Jean-Christophe; Fontaine, Eric; Cassuto, Elisabeth; Baumstarck, Karine; Leone, Marc; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Ichai, Carole

    2018-04-17

    Renal transplantation represents the treatment of choice of end-stage kidney disease. Delayed graft function (DGF) remains the most frequent complication after this procedure, reaching more than 30%. Its prevention is essential as it impedes early- and long-term prognosis of transplantation. Numerous pharmacological interventions aiming to prevent ischemia-reperfusion injuries failed to reduce the rate of DGF. We hypothesize that cyclosporine as an early preconditioning procedure in donors would be associated with decreased DGF. The Cis-A-rein study is an investigator-initiated, prospective, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, controlled study performed to assess the effects of a donor preconditioning with cyclosporine A on kidney grafts function in transplanted patients. After randomization, a brain dead donor will receive 2.5 mg kg -1 of cyclosporine A or the same volume of 5% glucose solution. The primary objective is to compare the rate of DGF, defined as the need for at least one dialysis session within the 7 days following transplantation, between both groups. The secondary objectives include rate of slow graft function, mild and severe DGF, urine output and serum creatinine during the first week after transplantation, rate of primary graft dysfunction, renal function and mortality at 1 year. The sample size (n = 648) was determined to obtain 80% power to detect a 10% difference for rate of DGF at day 7 between the two groups (30% of the patients in the placebo group and 20% of the patients in the intervention group). Delayed graft function is a major issue after renal transplantation, impeding long-term prognosis. Cyclosporine A pretreatment in deceased donors could improve the outcome of patients after renal transplantation. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02907554 Registered on 20 September 2016.

  9. [Is cancer incidence different between type 2 diabetes patients compared to non-diabetics in hemodialysis? A study from the REIN registry].

    PubMed

    Le Guillou, Aurélie; Pladys, Adelaide; Kihal, Wahida; Siebert, Muriel; Haddj-Elmrabet, Atman; Cernon, Charlotte; Bernard, Anne; Charasse, Christophe; Mandart, Lise; Hamel, Didier; Tanquerel, Tugdual; Strullu, Bernard; Richer, Christine; Siohan, Pascale; Sawadogo, Théophile; Baleynaud, Juliette; Baluta, Simona; Bayat, Sahar; Vigneau, Cécile

    2018-05-01

    In France, diabetes mellitus is now the second cause of end stage renal disease. In a large previous French national study, we observed that dialyzed diabetics have a significant lower risk of death by cancer. This first study was focused on cancer death but did not investigate cancer incidence. In this context, the aim of this second study was to compare the incidence of cancer in diabetic dialyzed patients compared to non-diabetic dialyzed patients in a French region. This epidemiologic multicentric study included 588 diabetic and non-diabetic patients starting hemodialysis between 2002 and 2007 in Bretagne. Data were issued from REIN registry and cancer incidence were individually collected from medical records. Diabetics and non-diabetics were matched one by one on age, sex and year of dialysis initiation. During the follow-up, we observed 28 cancers (9.4%) in diabetic patients and 26 cancers (8.9%) in non-diabetics patients. The cumulative incidence to develop a cancer 2 years after the dialysis start was approximately 6% in both diabetics and non-diabetics patients. In univariate Fine and Gray analysis, BMI, hemoglobin, statin use had P-value<0.2. However, in the adjusted model, these variables were not significantly associated with cancer incidence. This study lead on a little number of dialyzed patients did not show any significant difference on cancer incidence between diabetic and non-diabetic patients after hemodialysis start. Copyright © 2017 Société francophone de néphrologie, dialyse et transplantation. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Average Skin-Friction Drag Coefficients from Tank Tests of a Parabolic Body of Revolution (NACA RM-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mottard, Elmo J; Loposer, J Dan

    1954-01-01

    Average skin-friction drag coefficients were obtained from boundary-layer total-pressure measurements on a parabolic body of revolution (NACA rm-10, basic fineness ratio 15) in water at Reynolds numbers from 4.4 x 10(6) to 70 x 10(6). The tests were made in the Langley tank no. 1 with the body sting-mounted at a depth of two maximum body diameters. The arithmetic mean of three drag measurements taken around the body was in good agreement with flat-plate results, but, apparently because of the slight surface wave caused by the body, the distribution of the boundary layer around the body was not uniform over part of the Reynolds number range.

  11. Feasibility studies of time-like proton electromagnetic form factors at $$\\overline{\\rm P}$$ANDA at FAIR

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, B.; Erni, W.; Krusche, B.; ...

    2016-10-28

    Simulation results for future measurements of electromagnetic proton form factors atmore » $$\\overline{\\rm P}$$ANDA (FAIR) within the PandaRoot software framework are reported. The statistical precision with which the proton form factors can be determined is estimated. The signal channel p¯p → e +e – is studied on the basis of two different but consistent procedures. The suppression of the main background channel, i.e. p¯p → π +π –, is studied. Furthermore, the background versus signal efficiency, statistical and systematical uncertainties on the extracted proton form factors are evaluated using two different procedures. The results are consistent with those of a previous simulation study using an older, simplified framework. Furthermore, a slightly better precision is achieved in the PandaRoot study in a large range of momentum transfer, assuming the nominal beam conditions and detector performance.« less

  12. Exact nonlinear model reduction for a von Kármán beam: Slow-fast decomposition and spectral submanifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Shobhit; Tiso, Paolo; Haller, George

    2018-06-01

    We apply two recently formulated mathematical techniques, Slow-Fast Decomposition (SFD) and Spectral Submanifold (SSM) reduction, to a von Kármán beam with geometric nonlinearities and viscoelastic damping. SFD identifies a global slow manifold in the full system which attracts solutions at rates faster than typical rates within the manifold. An SSM, the smoothest nonlinear continuation of a linear modal subspace, is then used to further reduce the beam equations within the slow manifold. This two-stage, mathematically exact procedure results in a drastic reduction of the finite-element beam model to a one-degree-of freedom nonlinear oscillator. We also introduce the technique of spectral quotient analysis, which gives the number of modes relevant for reduction as output rather than input to the reduction process.

  13. Feasibility studies of time-like proton electromagnetic form factors at $$\\overline{\\rm P}$$ANDA at FAIR

    SciT

    Singh, B.; Erni, W.; Krusche, B.

    Simulation results for future measurements of electromagnetic proton form factors atmore » $$\\overline{\\rm P}$$ANDA (FAIR) within the PandaRoot software framework are reported. The statistical precision with which the proton form factors can be determined is estimated. The signal channel p¯p → e +e – is studied on the basis of two different but consistent procedures. The suppression of the main background channel, i.e. p¯p → π +π –, is studied. Furthermore, the background versus signal efficiency, statistical and systematical uncertainties on the extracted proton form factors are evaluated using two different procedures. The results are consistent with those of a previous simulation study using an older, simplified framework. Furthermore, a slightly better precision is achieved in the PandaRoot study in a large range of momentum transfer, assuming the nominal beam conditions and detector performance.« less

  14. Probing quantum and classical turbulence analogy in von Kármán liquid helium, nitrogen, and water experiments

    SciT

    Saint-Michel, B.; Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Centrale Marseille, IRPHE UMR 7342, 13384 Marseille; Herbert, E.

    2014-12-15

    We report measurements of the dissipation in the Superfluid helium high REynold number von Kármán flow experiment for different forcing conditions. Statistically steady flows are reached; they display a hysteretic behavior similar to what has been observed in a 1:4 scale water experiment. Our macroscopical measurements indicate no noticeable difference between classical and superfluid flows, thereby providing evidence of the same dissipation scaling laws in the two phases. A detailed study of the evolution of the hysteresis cycle with the Reynolds number supports the idea that the stability of the steady states of classical turbulence in this closed flow ismore » partly governed by the dissipative scales. It also supports the idea that the normal and the superfluid components at these temperatures (1.6 K) are locked down to the dissipative length scale.« less

  15. Enhancing Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Product Commercialization: The Role of Science in Regulatory Decision-Making for the TE/RM Product Development.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Timothy A; Johnson, Peter C; Tawil, Bill J; Van Dyke, Mark; Hellman, Kiki B

    2015-10-01

    TERMIS-AM Industry Committee (TERMIS-AM/IC), in collaboration with the TERMIS-Europe (EU)/IC, conducted a symposium involving the European Medicines Agency and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) toward building an understanding of the rational basis for regulatory decision-making and providing a framework for decisions made during the evaluation of safety and efficacy of TE/RM technologies. This symposium was held in August 2012 during the TERMIS-WC in Vienna, Austria. Emerging from this international initiative by the European Union and the United States, representatives from the respective agencies demonstrated that there are ongoing interagency efforts for developing common national practices toward harmonization of regulatory requirements for the TE/RM products. To extend a broad-based understanding of the role of science in regulatory decision-making, TERMIS-AM/IC, in cooperation with the FDA, organized a symposium at the 2014 TERMIS-AM Annual Meeting, which was held in Washington, DC. This event provided insights from leaders in the FDA and TERMIS on the current status of regulatory approaches for the approved TE/RM products, the use of science in making regulatory decisions, and TE/RM technologies that are in the development pipeline to address unmet medical needs. A far-ranging discussion with FDA representatives, industrialists, physicians, regenerative medicine biologists, and tissue engineers considered the gaps in today's scientific and regulatory understanding of TE/RM technologies. The identified gaps represent significant opportunities to advance TE/RM technologies toward commercialization.

  16. A unified structural/terminological interoperability framework based on LexEVS: application to TRANSFoRm.

    PubMed

    Ethier, Jean-François; Dameron, Olivier; Curcin, Vasa; McGilchrist, Mark M; Verheij, Robert A; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Taweel, Adel; Delaney, Brendan C; Burgun, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical research increasingly relies on the integration of information from multiple heterogeneous data sources. Despite the fact that structural and terminological aspects of interoperability are interdependent and rely on a common set of requirements, current efforts typically address them in isolation. We propose a unified ontology-based knowledge framework to facilitate interoperability between heterogeneous sources, and investigate if using the LexEVS terminology server is a viable implementation method. We developed a framework based on an ontology, the general information model (GIM), to unify structural models and terminologies, together with relevant mapping sets. This allowed a uniform access to these resources within LexEVS to facilitate interoperability by various components and data sources from implementing architectures. Our unified framework has been tested in the context of the EU Framework Program 7 TRANSFoRm project, where it was used to achieve data integration in a retrospective diabetes cohort study. The GIM was successfully instantiated in TRANSFoRm as the clinical data integration model, and necessary mappings were created to support effective information retrieval for software tools in the project. We present a novel, unifying approach to address interoperability challenges in heterogeneous data sources, by representing structural and semantic models in one framework. Systems using this architecture can rely solely on the GIM that abstracts over both the structure and coding. Information models, terminologies and mappings are all stored in LexEVS and can be accessed in a uniform manner (implementing the HL7 CTS2 service functional model). The system is flexible and should reduce the effort needed from data sources personnel for implementing and managing the integration.

  17. A unified structural/terminological interoperability framework based on LexEVS: application to TRANSFoRm

    PubMed Central

    Ethier, Jean-François; Dameron, Olivier; Curcin, Vasa; McGilchrist, Mark M; Verheij, Robert A; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Taweel, Adel; Delaney, Brendan C; Burgun, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Objective Biomedical research increasingly relies on the integration of information from multiple heterogeneous data sources. Despite the fact that structural and terminological aspects of interoperability are interdependent and rely on a common set of requirements, current efforts typically address them in isolation. We propose a unified ontology-based knowledge framework to facilitate interoperability between heterogeneous sources, and investigate if using the LexEVS terminology server is a viable implementation method. Materials and methods We developed a framework based on an ontology, the general information model (GIM), to unify structural models and terminologies, together with relevant mapping sets. This allowed a uniform access to these resources within LexEVS to facilitate interoperability by various components and data sources from implementing architectures. Results Our unified framework has been tested in the context of the EU Framework Program 7 TRANSFoRm project, where it was used to achieve data integration in a retrospective diabetes cohort study. The GIM was successfully instantiated in TRANSFoRm as the clinical data integration model, and necessary mappings were created to support effective information retrieval for software tools in the project. Conclusions We present a novel, unifying approach to address interoperability challenges in heterogeneous data sources, by representing structural and semantic models in one framework. Systems using this architecture can rely solely on the GIM that abstracts over both the structure and coding. Information models, terminologies and mappings are all stored in LexEVS and can be accessed in a uniform manner (implementing the HL7 CTS2 service functional model). The system is flexible and should reduce the effort needed from data sources personnel for implementing and managing the integration. PMID:23571850

  18. Molecular characterization of the recombinant protein RmLTI-BmCG-LTB: Protective immunity against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    The bovine tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is found in several tropical and subtropical regions of the world. This parasite transmits pathogens that cause disease, such as babesiosis (Babesia bovis and B. bigemina) and anaplasmosis (Anaplasma marginale). Tick infestations cause enormous livestock losses, and controlling tick infestations and the transmission of tick-borne diseases remains a challenge for the livestock industry. Because the currently available commercial vaccines offer only partial protection against R. (B.) microplus, there is a need for more efficient vaccines. Several recombinant antigens have been evaluated using different immunization strategies, and they show great promise. This work describes the construction and immunological characterization of a multi-antigen chimera composed of two R. (B.) microplus antigens (RmLTI and BmCG) and one Escherichia coli antigen (B subunit, LTB). The immunogenic regions of each antigen were selected and combined to encode a single polypeptide. The gene was cloned and expressed in E. coli. For all of the experiments, two groups (treated and control) of four Angus heifers (3–6 months old) were used. The inoculation was performed via intramuscular injection with 200 μg of purified recombinant chimeric protein and adjuvated. The chimeric protein was recognized by specific antibodies against each subunit and by sera from cattle inoculated with the chimera. Immunization of RmLTI-BmCG-LTB cattle reduced the number of adult female ticks by 6.29% and vaccination of cattle with the chimeric antigen provided 55.6% efficacy against R. (B.) microplus infestation. The results of this study indicate that the novel chimeric protein is a potential candidate for the future development of a more effective vaccine against R. (B.) microplus. PMID:29415034

  19. Molecular characterization of the recombinant protein RmLTI-BmCG-LTB: Protective immunity against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Csordas, Bárbara Guimarães; Cunha, Rodrigo Casquero; Garcia, Marcos Valério; da Silva, Sérgio Silva; Leite, Fábio Leivas; Andreotti, Renato

    2018-01-01

    The bovine tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is found in several tropical and subtropical regions of the world. This parasite transmits pathogens that cause disease, such as babesiosis (Babesia bovis and B. bigemina) and anaplasmosis (Anaplasma marginale). Tick infestations cause enormous livestock losses, and controlling tick infestations and the transmission of tick-borne diseases remains a challenge for the livestock industry. Because the currently available commercial vaccines offer only partial protection against R. (B.) microplus, there is a need for more efficient vaccines. Several recombinant antigens have been evaluated using different immunization strategies, and they show great promise. This work describes the construction and immunological characterization of a multi-antigen chimera composed of two R. (B.) microplus antigens (RmLTI and BmCG) and one Escherichia coli antigen (B subunit, LTB). The immunogenic regions of each antigen were selected and combined to encode a single polypeptide. The gene was cloned and expressed in E. coli. For all of the experiments, two groups (treated and control) of four Angus heifers (3-6 months old) were used. The inoculation was performed via intramuscular injection with 200 μg of purified recombinant chimeric protein and adjuvated. The chimeric protein was recognized by specific antibodies against each subunit and by sera from cattle inoculated with the chimera. Immunization of RmLTI-BmCG-LTB cattle reduced the number of adult female ticks by 6.29% and vaccination of cattle with the chimeric antigen provided 55.6% efficacy against R. (B.) microplus infestation. The results of this study indicate that the novel chimeric protein is a potential candidate for the future development of a more effective vaccine against R. (B.) microplus.

  20. Model-based observer and feedback control design for a rigid Joukowski foil in a Kármán vortex street.

    PubMed

    Free, Brian A; Paley, Derek A

    2018-03-14

    Obstacles and swimming fish in flow create a wake with an alternating left/right vortex pattern known as a Kármán vortex street and reverse Kármán vortex street, respectively. An energy-efficient fish behavior resembling slaloming through the vortex street is called Kármán gaiting. This paper describes the use of a bioinspired array of pressure sensors on a Joukowski foil to estimate and control flow-relative position in a Kármán vortex street using potential flow theory, recursive Bayesian filtering, and trajectory-tracking feedback control. The Joukowski foil is fixed in downstream position in a flowing water channel and free to move on air bearings in the cross-stream direction by controlling its angle of attack to generate lift. Inspired by the lateral-line neuromasts found in fish, the sensing and control scheme is validated using off-the-shelf pressure sensors in an experimental testbed that includes a flapping device to create vortices. We derive a potential flow model that describes the flow over a Joukowski foil in a Kármán vortex street and identify an optimal path through a Kármán vortex street using empirical observability. The optimally observable trajectory is one that passes through each vortex in the street. The estimated vorticity and location of the Kármán vortex street are used in a closed-loop control to track either the optimally observable path or the energetically efficient gait exhibited by fish. Results from the closed-loop control experiments in the flow tank show that the artificial lateral line in conjunction with a potential flow model and Bayesian estimator allow the robot to perform fish-like slaloming behavior in a Kármán vortex street. This work is a precursor to an autonomous robotic fish sensing the wake of another fish and/or performing pursuit and schooling behavior.

  1. RANS Simulation (Virtual Blade Model [VBM]) of Array of Three Coaxial Lab Scaled DOE RM1 MHK Turbine with 5D Spacing

    DOE Data Explorer

    Javaherchi, Teymour

    2016-06-08

    Attached are the .cas and .dat files along with the required User Defined Functions (UDFs) and look-up table of lift and drag coefficients for the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of three coaxially located lab-scaled DOE RM1 turbine implemented in ANSYS FLUENT CFD-package. The lab-scaled DOE RM1 is a re-design geometry, based of the full scale DOE RM1 design, producing same power output as the full scale model, while operating at matched Tip Speed Ratio values at reachable laboratory Reynolds number (see attached paper). In this case study the flow field around and in the wake of the lab-scaled DOE RM1 turbines in a coaxial array is simulated using Blade Element Model (a.k.a Virtual Blade Model) by solving RANS equations coupled with k-\\omega turbulence closure model. It should be highlighted that in this simulation the actual geometry of the rotor blade is not modeled. The effect of turbine rotating blades are modeled using the Blade Element Theory. This simulation provides an accurate estimate for the performance of each device and structure of their turbulent far wake. The results of these simulations were validated against the developed in-house experimental data. Simulations for other turbine configurations are available upon request.

  2. The Impact of Ebooks on the Reading Motivation and Reading Skills of Children and Young People: A Study of Schools Using RM Books. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picton, Irene; Clark, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The National Literacy Trust is a national charity dedicated to raising literacy levels in the UK. Their research and analysis make them the leading authority on literacy. They run projects in the poorest communities, campaign to make literacy a priority for politicians and parents, and support schools. RM Books is a market-leading ebooks platform…

  3. Pilot Comparison of ⁶⁸Ga-RM2 PET and ⁶⁸Ga-PSMA-11 PET in Patients with Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Hancock, Steven; Schneider, Bernadette; Chin, Frederick T; Jamali, Mehran; Loening, Andreas; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Iagaru, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys-(Ahx)-[(68)Ga(HBED-CC)] ((68)Ga-PSMA-11) is a PET tracer that can detect prostate cancer relapses and metastases by binding to the extracellular domain of PSMA. (68)Ga-labeled DOTA-4-amino-1-carboxymethyl-piperidine-D-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH2 ((68)Ga-RM2) is a synthetic bombesin receptor antagonist that targets gastrin-releasing peptide receptors. We present pilot data on the biodistribution of these PET tracers in a small cohort of patients with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer. Seven men (mean age ± SD, 74.3 ± 5.9 y) with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer underwent both (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT and (68)Ga-RM2 PET/MRI scans. SUVmax and SUVmean were recorded for normal tissues and areas of uptake outside the expected physiologic biodistribution. All patients had a rising level of prostate-specific antigen (mean ± SD, 13.5 ± 11.5) and noncontributory results on conventional imaging. (68)Ga-PSMA-11 had the highest physiologic uptake in the salivary glands and small bowel, with hepatobiliary and renal clearance noted, whereas (68)Ga-RM2 had the highest physiologic uptake in the pancreas, with renal clearance noted. Uptake outside the expected physiologic biodistribution did not significantly differ between (68)Ga-PSMA-11 and (68)Ga-RM2; however, (68)Ga-PSMA-11 localized in a lymph node and seminal vesicle in a patient with no abnormal (68)Ga-RM2 uptake. Abdominal periaortic lymph nodes were more easily visualized by(68)Ga-RM2 in two patients because of lack of interference by radioactivity in the small intestine. (68)Ga-PSMA-11 and (68)Ga-RM2 had distinct biodistributions in this small cohort of patients with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer. Additional work is needed to understand the expression of PSMA and gastrin-releasing peptide receptors in different types of prostate cancer. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  4. Prospective Evaluation of 68Ga-RM2 PET/MRI in Patients with Biochemical Recurrence of Prostate Cancer and Negative Findings on Conventional Imaging.

    PubMed

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Sonni, Ida; Hancock, Steven; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Loening, Andreas; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Iagaru, Andrei

    2018-05-01

    68 Ga-labeled DOTA-4-amino-1-carboxymethyl-piperidine-d-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH 2 ( 68 Ga-RM2) is a synthetic bombesin receptor antagonist that targets gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPr). GRPr proteins are highly overexpressed in several human tumors, including prostate cancer (PCa). We present data from the use of 68 Ga-RM2 in patients with biochemical recurrence (BCR) of PCa and negative findings on conventional imaging. Methods: We enrolled 32 men with BCR of PCa, who were 59-83 y old (mean ± SD, 68.7 ± 6.4 y). Imaging started at 40-69 min (mean, 50.5 ± 6.8 min) after injection of 133.2-151.7 MBq (mean, 140.6 ± 7.4 MBq) of 68 Ga-RM2 using a time-of-flight-enabled simultaneous PET/MRI scanner. T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and diffusion-weighted images were acquired. Results: All patients had a rising level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (range, 0.3-119.0 ng/mL; mean, 10.1 ± 21.3 ng/mL) and negative findings on conventional imaging (CT or MRI, and a 99m Tc-methylene diphosphonate bone scan) before enrollment. The observed 68 Ga-RM2 PET detection rate was 71.8%. 68 Ga-RM2 PET identified recurrent PCa in 23 of the 32 participants, whereas the simultaneous MRI scan identified findings compatible with recurrent PCa in 11 of the 32 patients. PSA velocity was 0.32 ± 0.59 ng/mL/y (range, 0.04-1.9 ng/mL/y) in patients with negative PET findings and 2.51 ± 2.16 ng/mL/y (range, 0.13-8.68 ng/mL/y) in patients with positive PET findings ( P = 0.006). Conclusion: 68 Ga-RM2 PET can be used for assessment of GRPr expression in patients with BCR of PCa. High uptake in multiple areas compatible with cancer lesions suggests that 68 Ga-RM2 is a promising PET radiopharmaceutical for localization of disease in patients with BCR of PCa and negative findings on conventional imaging. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  5. Impact of time-dependent nonaxisymmetric velocity perturbations on dynamo action of von Kármán-like flows.

    PubMed

    Giesecke, André; Stefani, Frank; Burguete, Javier

    2012-12-01

    We present numerical simulations of the kinematic induction equation in order to examine the dynamo efficiency of an axisymmetric von Kármán-like flow subject to time-dependent nonaxisymmetric velocity perturbations. The numerical model is based on the setup of the French von Kármán-sodium dynamo (VKS) and on the flow measurements from a water experiment conducted at the University of Navarra in Pamplona, Spain. The principal experimental observations that are modeled in our simulations are nonaxisymmetric vortexlike structures which perform an azimuthal drift motion in the equatorial plane. Our simulations show that the interactions of these periodic flow perturbations with the fundamental drift of the magnetic eigenmode (including the special case of nondrifting fields) essentially determine the temporal behavior of the dynamo state. We find two distinct regimes of dynamo action that depend on the (prescribed) drift frequency of an (m=2) vortexlike flow perturbation. For comparatively slowly drifting vortices we observe a narrow window with enhanced growth rates and a drift of the magnetic eigenmode that is synchronized with the perturbation drift. The resonance-like enhancement of the growth rates takes place when the vortex drift frequency roughly equals the drift frequency of the magnetic eigenmode in the unperturbed system. Outside of this small window, the field generation is hampered compared to the unperturbed case, and the field amplitude of the magnetic eigenmode is modulated with approximately twice the vortex drift frequency. The abrupt transition between the resonant regime and the modulated regime is identified as a spectral exceptional point where eigenvalues (growth rates and frequencies) and eigenfunctions of two previously independent modes collapse. In the actual configuration the drift frequencies of the velocity perturbations that are observed in the water experiment are much larger than the fundamental drift frequency of the magnetic

  6. A pilot mixed-methods evaluation of MS INFoRm: a self-directed fatigue management resource for individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Nadine; Turpin, Karen; Petrin, Julie; Smyth, Penny; Finlayson, Marcia

    2018-06-01

    Fatigue management interventions for individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) often feature structured programmes requiring repeated, in-person attendance that is not possible for all individuals. We sought to determine whether MS INFoRm, a self-directed fatigue management resource for individuals with MS, was worth further, more rigorous evaluation. Our indicators of worthiness were actual use of the resource by participants over 3 months, reductions in fatigue impact and increases in self-efficacy, and participant reports of changes in fatigue management knowledge and behaviours. This was a single-group, mixed-methods, before-after pilot study in individuals with MS reporting mild to moderate fatigue. Thirty-five participants were provided with MS INFoRm by a USB flash drive to use at home for 3 months, on their own volition. Twenty-three participants completed all standardized questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and study process measures. Participants reported actively using MS INFoRm over the 3-month study period (median total time spent using MS INFoRm=315 min) as well as significantly lower overall fatigue impact (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale: t=2.6, P=0.01), increased knowledge of MS fatigue (z=-2.8, P=0.01) and greater confidence in managing MS fatigue (z=-3.3, P=0.001). Individuals with significant reductions in fatigue impact also reported behavioural changes including tracking fatigue, better communication with others, greater awareness, improved quality of life and being more proactive. This study provides evidence that further rigorous evaluation of MS INFoRm, a self-directed resource for managing fatigue, is worth pursuing.

  7. Bifurcation induced by the aspect ratio in a turbulent von Kármán swirling flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liot, Olivier; Burguete, Javier

    2017-01-01

    We evaluate the effect of the aspect ratio, i.e., the distance between the propellers H divided by the diameter D , on the slow dynamics of a von Kármán swirling flow driven by two propellers in a closed cylinder. We use a cell with a fixed diameter D but where the distance between the propellers can be turned continuously and where the inertia from the propellers can also be changed using different gears. No change on the dynamics is observed when the momentum of inertia is modified. Some dramatic changes of the shear layer position are observed modifying the aspect ratio Γ =H /D . A bifurcation of the shear layer position appears. Whereas for low Γ the shear layer position has a smooth evolution when turning the asymmetry between the rotation frequency of the propellers, for high Γ the transition becomes abrupt and a symmetry breaking appears. Secondly we observe that the spontaneous reversals with large residence times already observed in this experiment for Γ =1 [de la Torre and Burguete, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 054101 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.054101] exist only in a narrow window of aspect ratio. We show using an experimental study of the mean flow structure and a numerical approach based on a Langevin equation with colored noise that the shear layer position seems to be decided by the mean flow structure, whereas the reversals are linked to the spatial distribution of the turbulent fluctuations in the cell.

  8. Optimization of 2-ethylhexyl palmitate production using lipozyme RM IM as catalyst in a solvent-free system.

    PubMed

    Richetti, Aline; Leite, Selma G F; Antunes, Octávio A C; de Souza, Andrea L F; Lerin, Lindomar A; Dallago, Rogério M; Paroul, Natalia; Di Luccio, Marco; Oliveira, J Vladimir; Treichel, Helen; de Oliveira, Débora

    2010-04-01

    This work reports the application of a lipase in the 2-ethylhexyl palmitate esterification in a solvent-free system with an immobilized lipase (Lipozyme RM IM). A sequential strategy was used applying two experimental designs to optimize the 2-ethylhexyl palmitate production. An empirical model was then built so as to assess the effects of process variables on the reaction conversion. Afterwards, the operating conditions that optimized 2-ethylhexyl palmitate production were established as being acid/alcohol molar ratio 1:3, temperature of 70 degrees C, stirring rate of 150 rpm, 10 wt.% of enzyme, leading to a reaction conversion as high as 95%. From this point, a kinetic study was carried out evaluating the effect of acid:alcohol molar ratio, the enzyme concentration and the temperature on product conversion. The results obtained in this step permit to verify that an excess of alcohol (acid to alcohol molar ratio of 1:6), relatively low enzyme concentration (10 wt.%) and temperature of 70 degrees C, led to conversions next to 100%.

  9. Mean-field model of the von Kármán sodium dynamo experiment using soft iron impellers.

    PubMed

    Nore, C; Léorat, J; Guermond, J-L; Giesecke, A

    2015-01-01

    It has been observed that dynamo action occurs in the von-Kármán-Sodium (VKS) experiment only when the rotating disks and the blades are made of soft iron. The purpose of this paper is to numerically investigate the role of soft iron in the VKS dynamo scenario. This is done by using a mean-field model based on an axisymmetric mean flow, a localized permeability distribution, and a localized α effect modeling the action of the small velocity scales between the blades. The action of the rotating blades is modeled by an axisymmetric effective permeability field. Key properties of the flow giving to the numerical magnetic field a geometric structure similar to that observed experimentally are identified. Depending on the permeability of the disks and the effective permeability of the blades, the dynamo that is obtained is either oscillatory or stationary. Our numerical results confirm the leading role played by the ferromagnetic impellers. A scenario for the VKS dynamo is proposed.

  10. Role of boundary conditions in helicoidal flow collimation: Consequences for the von Kármán sodium dynamo experiment.

    PubMed

    Varela, J; Brun, S; Dubrulle, B; Nore, C

    2015-12-01

    We present hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of liquid sodium flow with the PLUTO compressible MHD code to investigate influence of magnetic boundary conditions on the collimation of helicoidal motions. We use a simplified cartesian geometry to represent the flow dynamics in the vicinity of one cavity of a multiblades impeller inspired by those used in the Von-Kármán-sodium (VKS) experiment. We show that the impinging of the large-scale flow upon the impeller generates a coherent helicoidal vortex inside the blades, located at a distance from the upstream blade piloted by the incident angle of the flow. This vortex collimates any existing magnetic field lines leading to an enhancement of the radial magnetic field that is stronger for ferromagnetic than for conducting blades. The induced magnetic field modifies locally the velocity fluctuations, resulting in an enhanced helicity. This process possibly explains why dynamo action is more easily triggered in the VKS experiment when using soft iron impellers.

  11. Frederick Reines and the Neutrino

    the Detection of the Free Neutrino, DOE Technical Report, August 1953 The Free Antineutrino Absorption Cross Section. Part I. Measurement of the Free Antineutrino Absorption Cross Section. Part II. Expected

  12. Professionalism: Teachers Taking the Reins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helterbran, Valeri R.

    2008-01-01

    It is essential that teachers take a proactive look at their profession and themselves to strengthen areas of professionalism over which they have control. In this article, the author suggests strategies that include collaborative planning, reflectivity, growth in the profession, and the examination of certain personal characteristics.

  13. Analyzing large gene expression and methylation data profiles using StatBicRM: statistical biclustering-based rule mining.

    PubMed

    Maulik, Ujjwal; Mallik, Saurav; Mukhopadhyay, Anirban; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2015-01-01

    Microarray and beadchip are two most efficient techniques for measuring gene expression and methylation data in bioinformatics. Biclustering deals with the simultaneous clustering of genes and samples. In this article, we propose a computational rule mining framework, StatBicRM (i.e., statistical biclustering-based rule mining) to identify special type of rules and potential biomarkers using integrated approaches of statistical and binary inclusion-maximal biclustering techniques from the biological datasets. At first, a novel statistical strategy has been utilized to eliminate the insignificant/low-significant/redundant genes in such way that significance level must satisfy the data distribution property (viz., either normal distribution or non-normal distribution). The data is then discretized and post-discretized, consecutively. Thereafter, the biclustering technique is applied to identify maximal frequent closed homogeneous itemsets. Corresponding special type of rules are then extracted from the selected itemsets. Our proposed rule mining method performs better than the other rule mining algorithms as it generates maximal frequent closed homogeneous itemsets instead of frequent itemsets. Thus, it saves elapsed time, and can work on big dataset. Pathway and Gene Ontology analyses are conducted on the genes of the evolved rules using David database. Frequency analysis of the genes appearing in the evolved rules is performed to determine potential biomarkers. Furthermore, we also classify the data to know how much the evolved rules are able to describe accurately the remaining test (unknown) data. Subsequently, we also compare the average classification accuracy, and other related factors with other rule-based classifiers. Statistical significance tests are also performed for verifying the statistical relevance of the comparative results. Here, each of the other rule mining methods or rule-based classifiers is also starting with the same post-discretized data

  14. Analyzing Large Gene Expression and Methylation Data Profiles Using StatBicRM: Statistical Biclustering-Based Rule Mining

    PubMed Central

    Maulik, Ujjwal; Mallik, Saurav; Mukhopadhyay, Anirban; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2015-01-01

    Microarray and beadchip are two most efficient techniques for measuring gene expression and methylation data in bioinformatics. Biclustering deals with the simultaneous clustering of genes and samples. In this article, we propose a computational rule mining framework, StatBicRM (i.e., statistical biclustering-based rule mining) to identify special type of rules and potential biomarkers using integrated approaches of statistical and binary inclusion-maximal biclustering techniques from the biological datasets. At first, a novel statistical strategy has been utilized to eliminate the insignificant/low-significant/redundant genes in such way that significance level must satisfy the data distribution property (viz., either normal distribution or non-normal distribution). The data is then discretized and post-discretized, consecutively. Thereafter, the biclustering technique is applied to identify maximal frequent closed homogeneous itemsets. Corresponding special type of rules are then extracted from the selected itemsets. Our proposed rule mining method performs better than the other rule mining algorithms as it generates maximal frequent closed homogeneous itemsets instead of frequent itemsets. Thus, it saves elapsed time, and can work on big dataset. Pathway and Gene Ontology analyses are conducted on the genes of the evolved rules using David database. Frequency analysis of the genes appearing in the evolved rules is performed to determine potential biomarkers. Furthermore, we also classify the data to know how much the evolved rules are able to describe accurately the remaining test (unknown) data. Subsequently, we also compare the average classification accuracy, and other related factors with other rule-based classifiers. Statistical significance tests are also performed for verifying the statistical relevance of the comparative results. Here, each of the other rule mining methods or rule-based classifiers is also starting with the same post-discretized data

  15. A cluster randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of eHealth-supported patient recruitment in primary care research: the TRANSFoRm study protocol.

    PubMed

    Mastellos, Nikolaos; Andreasson, Anna; Huckvale, Kit; Larsen, Mark; Curcin, Vasa; Car, Josip; Agreus, Lars; Delaney, Brendan

    2015-02-03

    Opportunistic recruitment is a highly laborious and time-consuming process that is currently performed manually, increasing the workload of already busy practitioners and resulting in many studies failing to achieve their recruitment targets. The Translational Medicine and Patient Safety in Europe (TRANSFoRm) platform enables automated recruitment, data collection and follow-up of patients, potentially improving the efficiency, time and costs of clinical research. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of TRANSFoRm in improving patient recruitment and follow-up in primary care trials. This multi-centre, parallel-arm cluster randomised controlled trial will compare TRANSFoRm-supported with standard opportunistic recruitment. Participants will be general practitioners and patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease from 40 primary care centres in five European countries. Randomisation will take place at the care centre level. The intervention arm will use the TRANSFoRm tools for recruitment, baseline data collection and follow-up. The control arm will use web-based case report forms and paper self-completed questionnaires. The primary outcome will be the proportion of eligible patients successfully recruited at the end of the 16-week recruitment period. Secondary outcomes will include the proportion of recruited patients with complete baseline and follow-up data and the proportion of participants withdrawn or lost to follow-up. The study will also include an economic evaluation and measures of technology acceptance and user experience. The study should shed light on the use of eHealth to improve the effectiveness of recruitment and follow-up in primary care research and provide an evidence base for future eHealth-supported recruitment initiatives. Reporting of results is expected in October 2015. EudraCT: 2014-001314-25.

  16. A multiplex PCR system for 13 RM Y-STRs with separate amplification of two different repeat motif structures in DYF403S1a.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Hwan Young; Kwon, So Yeun; Oh, Yu Na; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2017-01-01

    In forensic science and human genetics, Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) have been used as very useful markers. Recently, more Y-STR markers have been analyzed to enhance the resolution power in haplotype analysis, and 13 rapidly mutating (RM) Y-STRs have been suggested as revolutionary tools that can widen Y-chromosomal application from paternal lineage differentiation to male individualization. We have constructed two multiplex PCR sets for the amplification of 13 RM Y-STRs, which yield small-sized amplicons (<400bp) and a more balanced PCR efficiency with minimum PCR cycling. In particular, with the developed multiplex PCR system, we could separate three copies of DYF403S1a into two copies of DYF403S1a and one of DYF403S1b1. This is because DYF403S1b1 possesses distinguishable sequences from DYF403S1a at both the front and rear flanking regions of the repeat motif; therefore, the locus could be separately amplified using sequence-specific primers. In addition, the other copy, defined as DYF403S1b by Ballantyne et al., was renamed DYF403S1b2 because of its similar flanking region sequence to DYF403S1b1. By redefining DYF403S1 with the developed multiplex system, all genotypes of four copies could be successfully typed and more diverse haplotypes were obtained. We analyzed haplotype distributions in 705 Korean males based on four different Y-STR subsets: Yfiler, PowerPlex Y23, Yfiler Plus, and RM Y-STRs. All haplotypes obtained from RM Y-STRs were the most diverse and showed strong discriminatory power in Korean population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. IDA/OSD R&M (Institute for Defense Analyses/Office of the Secretary of Defense Reliability and Maintainability) Study Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    30 -IOLW. c • o:,,tas z ".9’ IM moOm X-272 IDA... 30 -2 • . ,, ... .L.. . .i W . . .’ I".• : V.*.’’. ;, .. . ... ," ... ,. . - 4..; ,,, .,, R&M STUDY,. DOCUMENTS LIST ( by Subject )-.:,’.i AS OF: 22...DE60. Maintainability Standardization Document Program Plan, Revision 1, Draft, DoD, 30 April 1982. DE82. Acquisition and Management of

  18. Improvement of FK506 Production in the High-Yielding Strain Streptomyces sp. RM7011 by Engineering the Supply of Allylmalonyl-CoA Through a Combination of Genetic and Chemical Approach.

    PubMed

    Mo, SangJoon; Lee, Sung-Kwon; Jin, Ying-Yu; Suh, Joo-Won

    2016-02-01

    FK506, a widely used immunosuppressant, is a 23-membered polyketide macrolide that is produced by several Streptomyces species. FK506 high-yielding strain Streptomyces sp. RM7011 was developed from the discovered Streptomyces sp. KCCM 11116P by random mutagenesis in our previous study. The results of transcript expression analysis showed that the transcription levels of tcsA, B, C, and D were increased in Streptomyces sp. RM7011 by 2.1-, 3.1-, 3.3-, and 4.1- fold, respectively, compared with Streptomyces sp. KCCM 11116P. The overexpression of tcsABCD genes in Streptomyces sp. RM7011 gave rise to approximately 2.5-fold (238.1 μg/ml) increase in the level of FK506 production compared with that of Streptomyces sp. RM7011. When vinyl pentanoate was added into the culture broth of Streptomyces sp. RM7011, the level of FK506 production was approximately 2.2-fold (207.7 μg/ml) higher than that of the unsupplemented fermentation. Furthermore, supplementing the culture broth of Streptomyces sp. RM7011 expressing tcsABCD genes with vinyl pentanoate resulted in an additional 1.7-fold improvement in the FK506 titer (498.1 μg/ml) compared with that observed under nonsupplemented condition. Overall, the level of FK506 production was increased approximately 5.2-fold by engineering the supply of allylmalonyl-CoA in the high-yielding strain Streptomyces sp. RM7011, using a combination of overexpressing tcsABCD genes and adding vinyl pentanoate, as compared with Streptomyces sp. RM7011 (95.3 μg/ml). Moreover, among the three precursors analyzed, pentanoate was the most effective precursor, supporting the highest titer of FK506 in the FK506 high-yielding strain Streptomyces sp. RM7011.

  19. Description of European Space Agency (ESA) Remote Manipulator (RM) System Breadboard Currently Under Development for Demonstration of Critical Technology Foreseen to be Used in the Mars Sample Receiving Facility (MSRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrublevskis, J.; Duncan, S.; Berthoud, L.; Bowman, P.; Hills, R.; McCulloch, Y.; Pisla, D.; Vaida, C.; Gherman, B.; Hofbaur, M.; Dieber, B.; Neythalath, N.; Smith, C.; van Winnendael, M.; Duvet, L.

    2018-04-01

    In order to avoid the use of 'double walled' gloves, a haptic feedback Remote Manipulation (RM) system rather than a gloved isolator is needed inside a Double Walled Isolator (DWI) to handle a sample returned from Mars.

  20. Artificial Intelligence Applications to Maintenance Technology Working Group Report (IDA/OSD R&M (Institute for Defense Analyses/Office of the Secretary of Defense Reliability and Maintainability) Study).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    Research and Engineering and Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Mw Reserve Affairs and Logistics) 1WTITR#OR DEFENSE ANALYSES ~~’AND... TITLE (and Subdlee) S.TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Final Artificial Intelligence Applications to Main- July 1982 - August 1983 tenance Technology...of DoD (Short Title : R&M Study). This task order was structured to address the improvement of R&M and readiness through innovative program structuring

  1. Application of a combined approach involving classical random mutagenesis and metabolic engineering to enhance FK506 production in Streptomyces sp. RM7011.

    PubMed

    Mo, SangJoon; Lee, Sung-Kwon; Jin, Ying-Yu; Oh, Chung-Hun; Suh, Joo-Won

    2013-04-01

    FK506 production by a mutant strain (Streptomyces sp. RM7011) induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and ultraviolet mutagenesis was improved by 11.63-fold (94.24 mg/l) compared to that of the wild-type strain. Among three different metabolic pathways involved in the biosynthesis of methylmalonyl-CoA, only expression of propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) pathway led to a 1.75-fold and 2.5-fold increase in FK506 production and the methylmalonyl-CoA pool, respectively, compared to those of the RM7011 strain. Lipase activity of the high FK506 producer mutant increased in direct proportion to the increase in FK506 yield, from low detection level up to 43.1 U/ml (12.6-fold). The level of specific FK506 production and lipase activity was improved by enhancing the supply of lipase inducers. This improvement was approximately 1.88-fold (71.5 mg/g) with the supplementation of 5 mM Tween 80, which is the probable effective stimulator in lipase production, to the R2YE medium. When 5 mM vinyl propionate was added as a precursor for PCC pathway to R2YE medium, the specific production of FK506 increased approximately 1.9-fold (71.61 mg/g) compared to that under the non-supplemented condition. Moreover, in the presence of 5 mM Tween 80, the specific FK506 production was approximately 2.2-fold (157.44 mg/g) higher than that when only vinyl propionate was added to the R2YE medium. In particular, PCC expression in Streptomyces sp. RM7011 (RM7011/pSJ1003) together with vinyl propionate feeding resulted in an increase in the FK506 titer to as much as 1.6-fold (251.9 mg/g) compared with that in RM7011/pSE34 in R2YE medium with 5 mM Tween 80 supplementation, indicating that the vinyl propionate is more catabolized to propionate by stimulated lipase activity on Tween 80, that propionyl-CoA yielded from propionate generates methylmalonyl-CoA, and that the PCC pathway plays a key role in increasing the methylmalonyl-CoA pool for FK506 biosynthesis in RM7011 strain. Overall

  2. Inter-Comparison of WRF Model Simulated Winds and MISR Stereoscopic Winds Embedded within Mesoscale von Kármán Wake Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, A.; Nunalee, C. G.; Mueller, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    Several distinct wake regimes are possible when considering atmospheric flow past a steep mountainous island. Of these regimes, coherent vortex shedding in low-Froude number flow is particularly interesting because it can produce laterally focused paths of counter rotating eddies capable of extending downstream for hundreds of kilometers (i.e., a von Kármán vortex street). Given the spatial scales of atmospheric von Kármán vortices, which typically lies on the interface of the meso-scale and the micro-scale, they are uniquely challenging to model using conventional numerical weather prediction platforms. In this presentation, we present high resolution (1-km horizontally) numerical modeling results using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, of multiple real-world von Kármán vortex shedding events associated with steep islands (e.g., Madeira island, Gran Canaria island, etc.). In parallel, we also present corresponding cloud-motion wind and cloud-top height measurements from the satellite-based Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument. The MISR stereo algorithm enables experimental retrieval of the horizontal wind vector (both along-track and cross-track components) at 4.4-km resolution, in addition to the operational 1.1-km resolution cross-track wind and cloud-top height products. These products offer the fidelity appropriate for inter-comparison with the numerically simulated vortex streets. In general, we find an agreement between the instantaneous simulated cloud level winds and the MISR stereoscopic winds; however, discrepancies in the vortex street length and localized horizontal wind shear were documented. In addition, the simulated fields demonstrate sensitivity to turbulence closure and input terrain height data.

  3. Selfish restriction modification genes: resistance of a resident R/M plasmid to displacement by an incompatible plasmid mediated by host killing.

    PubMed

    Naito, Y; Naito, T; Kobayashi, I

    1998-01-01

    Previous work from this laboratory demonstrated that plasmids carrying a type II restriction-modification gene complex are not easily lost from their bacterial host because plasmid-free segregant cells are killed through chromosome cleavage. Here, we have followed the course of events that takes place when an Escherichia coli rec BC sbcA strain carrying a plasmid coding for the PaeR7I restriction-modification (R/M) gene complex is transformed by a plasmid with an identical origin of replication. The number of transformants that appeared was far fewer than with the restriction-minus (r-) control. Most of the transformants were very small. After prolonged incubation, the number and the size of the colonies increased, but this increase never attained the level of the r- control. Most of the transformed colonies retained the drug-resistance of the resident, r+ m+ plasmid. These results indicate that post-segregational host killing occurs when a plasmid bearing an R/M gene complex is displaced by an incompatible plasmid. Such cell killing eliminates the competitor plasmid along with the host and, thus, would allow persistence of the R/M plasmid in the neighboring, clonal host cells in nature. This phenomenon is reminiscent of mammalian apoptosis and other forms of altruistic cell death strategy against infection. This type of resistance to displacement was also studied in a wild type Escherichia coli strain that was normal for homologous recombination (rec+). A number of differences between the recBC sbcA strain and the rec+ strain were observed and these will be discussed.

  4. The International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWaRM): The United States' Contribution to UNESCO IHP's Global Network of Water Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of a "category 2 center"—i.e., one that is closely affiliated with UNESCO, but not legally part of UNESCO—dates back many decades. However, only in the last decade has the concept been fully developed. Within UNESCO, the International Hydrological Programme (IHP) has led the way in creating a network of regional and global water-related centers.ICIWaRM—the International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management—is one member of this network. Approved by UNESCO's General Conference, the center has been operating since 2009. It was designed to fill a niche in the system for a center that was backed by an institution with on-the-ground water management experience, but that also had strong connections to academia, NGOs and other governmental agencies. Thus, ICIWaRM is hosted by the US Army Corps of Engineers' Institute for Water Resources (IWR), but established with an internal network of partner institutions. Three main factors have contributed to any success that ICIWaRM has achieved in its global work: A focus on practical science and technology which can be readily transferred. This includes the Corps' own methodologies and models for planning and water management, and those of our university and government partners. Collaboration with other UNESCO Centers on joint applied research, capacity-building and training. A network of centers needs to function as a network, and ICIWaRM has worked together with UNESCO-affiliated centers in Chile, Brazil, Paraguay, the Dominican Republic, Japan, China, and elsewhere. Partnering with and supporting existing UNESCO-IHP programs. ICIWaRM serves as the Global Technical Secretariat for IHP's Global Network on Water and Development Information in Arid Lands (G-WADI). In addition to directly supporting IHP, work through G-WADI helps the center to frame, prioritize and integrate its activities. With the recent release of the United Nation's 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, it is clear that

  5. Role of soft-iron impellers on the mode selection in the von kármán-sodium dynamo experiment.

    PubMed

    Giesecke, André; Stefani, Frank; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2010-01-29

    A crucial point for the understanding of the von Kármán-sodium (VKS) dynamo experiment is the influence of soft-iron impellers. We present numerical simulations of a VKS-like dynamo with a localized permeability distribution that resembles the shape of the flow driving impellers. It is shown that the presence of soft-iron material essentially determines the dynamo process in the VKS experiment. An axisymmetric magnetic field mode can be explained by the combined action of the soft-iron disk and a rather small alpha effect parametrizing the induction effects of unresolved small scale flow fluctuations.

  6. Place du traitement chirurgical sous circulation extracorporelle à cœur battant dans les cancers du rein avec envahissement cave supra-diaphragmatique: à propos de sept cas

    PubMed Central

    Lahyani, Mounir; Karmouni, Tarik; Elkhader, Khalid; Koutani, Abdellatif; Andaloussi, Ahmed Ibn Attya

    2014-01-01

    Ce travail vise à analyser les résultats de la néphrectomie avec thrombectomie atrio-cave sous circulation extracorporelle (CEC) chez sept patients ayant un cancer du rein avec envahissement cave supra-diaphragmatique et de discuter les indications opératoires. Sept patients, six hommes et une femme dont l’âge varie entre 46ans et 65ans, ont été opérés d'un cancer du rein avec extension atrio-cave. L’écho-doppler a toujours permis la mise en évidence de l'extension veineuse mais la limite supérieure du thrombus était formellement identifiée par l'examen tomodensitométrique quatre fois, et par la résonance magnétique nucléaire dans tous les cas. Tous les patients ont été opérés sous CEC à cœur battant en normothermie. Un seul décès postopératoire est survenu. La durée du séjour en réanimation a été de 4,5 jours. Cinq patients ont eu à distance une dissémination métastatique. Cinq malades ont eu une médiane de survie de 11,5 mois (de 7 à16). Un malade a subi une métastasectomie pulmonaire 6 mois après la néphrectomie. L'exérèse des thrombi atrio-caves a été facilitée par la CEC avec une mortalité et une morbidité postopératoires acceptables mais les résultats à distance ont été décevants. Cette intervention ne peut être proposée qu'aux patients n'ayant aucune extension locorégionale et générale décelable, ce qui souligne l'importance des examens morphologiques préopératoires. PMID:25995777

  7. Production enhancement and characterization of the polyhydroxyalkanoate produced by Natrinema ajinwuensis (as synonym) ≡ Natrinema altunense strain RM-G10.

    PubMed

    Mahansaria, Riddhi; Dhara, Anusua; Saha, Amit; Haldar, Saubhik; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2018-02-01

    Application of halophiles can decrease the cost of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production or bioplastic which are an alternative to the petroleum-derived plastic. Extremely halophilic archaeon, Natrinema ajinwuensis RM-G10 accumulated 61.02±0.68% PHA of its cell dry mass at 72h in repeated batch cultures yielding 0.210±0.001gL -1 h -1 volumetric productivity after selection of the best cultivation conditions. Transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of PHA granules inside the archaeal cells. Characterization by gas chromatographic analysis, gas chromatographic- mass spectrophotometric analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed the polymer to be poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) with 13.93mol% 3-hydroxyvalerate content and having 35.45% crystallinity, -12.3°C glass transition temperature, 143°C and 157.5°C melting temperatures and 284°C degradation temperature. This is the first report on production enhancement (on a small scale) and characterization of the polyhydroxyalkanoate produced by Natrinema ajinwuensis (as synonym) ≡ Natrinema altunense strain RM-G10 and the Natrinema genus in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Electronic self-organization in the single-layer manganite $$\\rm Pr_{1-x}Ca_{1+x}MnO4$$

    SciT

    Ye, Feng; Chi, Songxue; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A

    We use neutron scattering to investigate the doping evolution of the magnetic correlations in the single-layer manganitemore » $$\\rm Pr_{\\it 1-x}Ca_{\\it 1+x}MnO_4$$, away from the $x=0.5$ composition where the CE-type commensurate antiferromagnetic (AF) structure is stable. We find that short-range incommensurate spin correlations develop as the system is electron doped ($x<0.5$), which coexist with the CE-type AF order. This suggests that electron doping in this system induces an inhomogeneous electronic self-organization, where commensurate AF patches with $x=0.5$ are separated by electron-rich domain walls with short range magnetic correlations. This behavior is strikingly different than for the three-dimensional $$\\rm Pr_{\\it 1-x}Ca_{\\it x}MnO_3$$, where the long-range CE-type commensurate AF structure is stable over a wide range of electron or hole doping around $x=0.5$.« less

  9. Validity and reliability of a novel iPhone app for the measurement of barbell velocity and 1RM on the bench-press exercise.

    PubMed

    Balsalobre-Fernández, Carlos; Marchante, David; Muñoz-López, Mario; Jiménez, Sergio L

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the validity and reliability of a novel iPhone app (named: PowerLift) for the measurement of mean velocity on the bench-press exercise. Additionally, the accuracy of the estimation of the 1-Repetition maximum (1RM) using the load-velocity relationship was tested. To do this, 10 powerlifters (Mean (SD): age = 26.5 ± 6.5 years; bench press 1RM · kg -1  = 1.34 ± 0.25) completed an incremental test on the bench-press exercise with 5 different loads (75-100% 1RM), while the mean velocity of the barbell was registered using a linear transducer (LT) and Powerlift. Results showed a very high correlation between the LT and the app (r = 0.94, SEE = 0.028 m · s -1 ) for the measurement of mean velocity. Bland-Altman plots (R 2  = 0.011) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC = 0.965) revealed a very high agreement between both devices. A systematic bias by which the app registered slightly higher values than the LT (P < 0.05; mean difference (SD) between instruments = 0.008 ± 0.03 m · s -1 ). Finally, actual and estimated 1RM using the app were highly correlated (r = 0.98, mean difference (SD) = 5.5 ± 9.6 kg, P < 0.05). The app was found to be highly valid and reliable in comparison with a LT. These findings could have valuable practical applications for strength and conditioning coaches who wish to measure barbell velocity in the bench-press exercise.

  10. Mullinamides A and B, New Cyclopeptides Produced by the Ruth Mullins Coal Mine Fire Isolate Streptomyces sp. RM-27-46

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiachang; Shaaban, Khaled A.; Elshahawi, Sherif I.; Ponomareva, Larissa V.; Sunkara, Manjula; Copley, Gregory C.; Hower, James C.; Morris, Andrew J.; Kharel, Madan K.; Thorson, Jon S.

    2014-01-01

    Two new cyclopeptides, mullinamides A [cyclo-(-l-Gly-l-Glu-l-Val-l-Ile-l-Pro-)] and B [cyclo-(-l-Glu-l-Met-l-Pro-)] were isolated from the crude extract of terrestrial Streptomyces sp. RM-27-46 along with the three known cyclopeptides surugamide A [cyclo-(-l-Ile-d-Ile-l-Lys-l-Ile-d-Phe-d-Leu-l-Ile-d-Ala-)], cyclo-(-l-Pro-l-Phe-) and cyclo-(-l-Pro-l-Leu-). The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by the cumulative analyses of NMR spectroscopy and high resolution mass spectrometry. While mullinamides A and B displayed no appreciable antimicrobial/fungal activity or cytotoxicity, this study highlights the first reported antibacterial activity of surugamide A. PMID:24713874

  11. Effects of turbulence, resistivity and boundary conditions on helicoidal flow collimation: Consequences for the Von-Kármán-Sodium dynamo experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.; Brun, S.; Dubrulle, B.; Nore, C.

    2017-05-01

    We present hydrodynamic and magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of a liquid sodium flow using the compressible MHD code PLUTO to investigate the magnetic field regeneration in the Von-Kármán-Sodium dynamo experiment. The aim of the study is to analyze the influence of the fluid resistivity and turbulence level on the collimation by helicoidal motions of a remnant magnetic field. We use a simplified Cartesian geometry to represent the flow dynamics in the vicinity of one cavity of a multi-blades impeller inspired by those used in the Von-Kármán-Sodium (VKS) experiment. We perform numerical simulations with kinetic Reynolds numbers up to 1000 for magnetic Prandtl numbers between 30 and 0.1. Our study shows that perfect ferromagnetic walls favour enhanced collimation of flow and magnetic fields even if the turbulence degree of the model increases. More specifically, the location of the helicoidal coherent vortex in between the blades changes with the impinging velocity. It becomes closer to the upstream blade and the impeller base if the flow incident angle is analogous to the TM73 impeller configuration rotating in the unscooping direction. This result is also obtained at higher kinetic Reynolds numbers when the helicoidal vortex undergoes a precessing motion, leading to a reinforced effect in the vortex evolution and in the magnetic field collimation when using again perfect ferromagnetic boundary conditions. Configurations with different materials used for the impeller blades and the impeller base confirm a larger enhancement of the magnetic field when perfect ferromagnetic boundary conditions are used compared with the perfect conductor case, although smaller compared to a perfect ferromagnetic impeller, as it was observed in the VKS experiment. We further estimate the efficiency of a hypothetical dynamo loop occurring in the vicinity of the impeller and discuss the relevance of our findings in the context of mean field dynamo theory.

  12. Clinical Evaluation of 68Ga-PSMA-II and 68Ga-RM2 PET Images Reconstructed With an Improved Scatter Correction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wangerin, Kristen A; Baratto, Lucia; Khalighi, Mohammad Mehdi; Hope, Thomas A; Gulaka, Praveen K; Deller, Timothy W; Iagaru, Andrei H

    2018-06-06

    Gallium-68-labeled radiopharmaceuticals pose a challenge for scatter estimation because their targeted nature can produce high contrast in these regions of the kidneys and bladder. Even small errors in the scatter estimate can result in washout artifacts. Administration of diuretics can reduce these artifacts, but they may result in adverse events. Here, we investigated the ability of algorithmic modifications to mitigate washout artifacts and eliminate the need for diuretics or other interventions. The model-based scatter algorithm was modified to account for PET/MRI scanner geometry and challenges of non-FDG tracers. Fifty-three clinical 68 Ga-RM2 and 68 Ga-PSMA-11 whole-body images were reconstructed using the baseline scatter algorithm. For comparison, reconstruction was also processed with modified sampling in the single-scatter estimation and with an offset in the scatter tail-scaling process. None of the patients received furosemide to attempt to decrease the accumulation of radiopharmaceuticals in the bladder. The images were scored independently by three blinded reviewers using the 5-point Likert scale. The scatter algorithm improvements significantly decreased or completely eliminated the washout artifacts. When comparing the baseline and most improved algorithm, the image quality increased and image artifacts were reduced for both 68 Ga-RM2 and for 68 Ga-PSMA-11 in the kidneys and bladder regions. Image reconstruction with the improved scatter correction algorithm mitigated washout artifacts and recovered diagnostic image quality in 68 Ga PET, indicating that the use of diuretics may be avoided.

  13. Impact of sex and glucose-lowering treatments on hypoglycaemic symptoms in people with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. The French Chronic Kidney Disease - Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) Study.

    PubMed

    Balkau, B; Metzger, M; Andreelli, F; Frimat, L; Speyer, E; Combe, C; Laville, M; Jacquelinet, C; Briançon, S; Ayav, C; Massy, Z; Pisoni, R L; Stengel, B; Fouque, D

    2018-04-06

    To describe current practices of glucose-lowering treatments in people with diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD), the associated glucose control and hypoglycaemic symptoms, with an emphasis on sex differences. Among the 3033 patients with CKD stages 3-5 recruited into the French CKD-REIN study, 645 men and 288 women had type 2 diabetes and were treated by glucose-lowering drugs. Overall, 31% were treated only with insulin, 28% with combinations of insulin and another drug, 42% with non-insulin glucose-lowering drugs. In CKD stage 3, 40% of patients used metformin, 12% at stages 4&5, similar for men and women; in CKD stage 3, 53% used insulin, similar for men and women, but at stages 4&5, 59% of men and 77% of women used insulin. Patients were reasonably well controlled, with a median HbA1c of 7.1% (54mmol/mol) in men, 7.4% (57mmol/mol) in women (P=0.0003). Hypoglycaemic symptoms were reported by 40% of men and 59% of women; they were not associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate, nor with albuminuria or with HbA1c in multivariable analyses, but they were more frequent in people treated with insulin, particularly with fast-acting and pre-mixed insulins. Glucose-lowering treatment, HbA1c and hypoglycaemic symptoms were sex dependent. Metformin use was similar in men and women, but unexpectedly low in CKD stage 3; its use could be encouraged rather than resorting to insulin. Hypoglycaemic symptoms were frequent and need to be more closely monitored, with appropriate patient-education, especially in women. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Sinorhizobium meliloti strains TII7 and A5 by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) have chromsomes identical with Rm1021 and form an effective and ineffective symbiosis with Medicago truncatula line Jemalong A17, respectively

    The strains TII7 and A5 formed an effective and ineffective symbiosis with Medicago truncatula Jemalong A17, respectively. Both were shown to have identical chromsomes with strains Rm1021 and RCR2011 using a Multilocus Sequence Typing method. The 2260 bp segments of DNA stretching from the 3’ end ...

  15. Investigation of the In Vitro and In Vivo efficiency of RM-532-105, a 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3 inhibitor, in LAPC-4 prostate cancer cell and tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Kenmogne, Lucie Carolle; Roy, Jenny; Maltais, René; Rouleau, Mélanie; Neveu, Bertrand; Pouliot, Frédéric; Poirier, Donald

    2017-01-01

    In the fight against androgen-sensitive prostate cancer, the enzyme 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3 (17β-HSD3) is an attractive therapeutic target considering its key role in the formation of androgenic steroids. In this study, we attempted to assess the in vivo efficacy of the compound RM-532-105, an androsterone derivative developed as an inhibitor of 17β-HSD3, in the prostate cancer model of androgen-sensitive LAPC-4 cells xenografted in nude mice. RM-532-105 did not inhibit the tumor growth induced by 4-androstene-3,17-dione (4-dione); rather, the levels of the androgens testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) increased within the tumors. In plasma, however, DHT levels increased but T levels did not. In troubleshooting experiments, the non-androgenic potential of RM-532-105 was confirmed by two different assays (LAPC-4 proliferation and androgen receptor transcriptional activity assays). The enzyme 5α-reductase was also revealed to be the predominant enzyme metabolizing 4-dione in LAPC-4 cells, yielding 5α-androstane-3,17-dione and not T. Other 17β-HSDs than 17β-HSD3 seem responsible in the androgen synthesis. From experiments with LAPC-4 cells, we fortuitously came across the interesting finding that 17β-HSD3 inhibitor RM-532-105 is concentrated inside tumors. PMID:28182747

  16. A search for an excited muon decaying to a muon and two jets in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}\\;=\\;8\\;{\\rm{TeV}}$$ with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-07-11

    In this study, a new search signature for excited leptons is explored. Excited muons are sought in the channelmore » $${pp}\\to \\mu {\\mu }^{* }\\to \\mu \\mu \\ {\\rm{jet}}\\;{\\rm{jet}}$$, assuming both the production and decay occur via a contact interaction. The analysis is based on 20.3 fb –1 of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of $$\\sqrt{s}\\;=\\;8\\;{\\rm{TeV}}$$ taken with the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. No evidence of excited muons is found, and limits are set at the 95% confidence level on the cross section times branching ratio as a function of the excited-muon mass $${m}_{{\\mu }^{* }}$$. For $${m}_{{\\mu }^{* }}$$ between 1.3 and 3.0 TeV, the upper limit on $$\\sigma B({\\mu }^{* }\\to \\mu q\\bar{q}$$) is between 0.6 and 1 fb. Limits on $$\\sigma B$$ are converted to lower bounds on the compositeness scale Λ. In the limiting case $${\\rm{\\Lambda }}={m}_{{\\mu }^{* }}$$, excited muons with a mass below 2.8 TeV are excluded. With the same model assumptions, these limits at larger $${\\mu }^{* }$$ masses improve upon previous limits from traditional searches based on the gauge-mediated decay $${\\mu }^{* }\\to \\mu \\gamma $$.« less

  17. Thermostable proteins bioprocesses: The activity of restriction endonuclease-methyltransferase from Thermus thermophilus (RM.TthHB27I) cloned in Escherichia coli is critically affected by the codon composition of the synthetic gene.

    PubMed

    Krefft, Daria; Papkov, Aliaksei; Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Skowron, Piotr M

    2017-01-01

    Obtaining thermostable enzymes (thermozymes) is an important aspect of biotechnology. As thermophiles have adapted their genomes to high temperatures, their cloned genes' expression in mesophiles is problematic. This is mainly due to their high GC content, which leads to the formation of unfavorable secondary mRNA structures and codon usage in Escherichia coli (E. coli). RM.TthHB27I is a member of a family of bifunctional thermozymes, containing a restriction endonuclease (REase) and a methyltransferase (MTase) in a single polypeptide. Thermus thermophilus HB27 (T. thermophilus) produces low amounts of RM.TthHB27I with a unique DNA cleavage specificity. We have previously cloned the wild type (wt) gene into E. coli, which increased the production of RM.TthHB27I over 100-fold. However, its enzymatic activities were extremely low for an ORF expressed under a T7 promoter. We have designed and cloned a fully synthetic tthHB27IRM gene, using a modified 'codon randomization' strategy. Codons with a high GC content and of low occurrence in E. coli were eliminated. We incorporated a stem-loop circuit, devised to negatively control the expression of this highly toxic gene by partially hiding the ribosome-binding site (RBS) and START codon in mRNA secondary structures. Despite having optimized 59% of codons, the amount of produced RM.TthHB27I protein was similar for both recombinant tthHB27IRM gene variants. Moreover, the recombinant wt RM.TthHB27I is very unstable, while the RM.TthHB27I resulting from the expression of the synthetic gene exhibited enzymatic activities and stability equal to the native thermozyme isolated from T. thermophilus. Thus, we have developed an efficient purification protocol using the synthetic tthHB27IRM gene variant only. This suggests the effect of co-translational folding kinetics, possibly affected by the frequency of translational errors. The availability of active RM.TthHB27I is of practical importance in molecular biotechnology, extending

  18. Lipozyme RM IM-catalyzed acidolysis of Cinnamomum camphora seed oil with oleic acid to produce human milk fat substitutes enriched in medium-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xian-Guo; Hu, Jiang-Ning; Zhao, Man-Li; Zhu, Xue-Mei; Li, Hong-Yan; Liu, Xiao-Ru; Liu, Rong; Deng, Ze-Yuan

    2014-10-29

    In the present study, a human milk fat substitute (HMFS) enriched in medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) was synthesized through acidolysis reaction from Cinnamomum camphora seed oil (CCSO) with oleic acid in a solvent-free system. A commercial immobilized lipase, Lipozyme RM IM, from Rhizomucor miehei, was facilitated as a biocatalyst. Effects of different reaction conditions, including substrate molar ratio, enzyme concentration, reaction temperature, and reaction time were investigated using response surface methodology (RSM) to obtain the optimal oleic acid incorporation. After optimization, results showed that the maximal incorporation of oleic acid into HMFS was 59.68%. Compared with CCSO, medium-chain fatty acids at the sn-2 position of HMFS accounted for >70%, whereas oleic acid was occupied predominantly at the sn-1,3 position (78.69%). Meanwhile, triacylglycerol (TAG) components of OCO (23.93%), CCO (14.94%), LaCO (13.58%), OLaO (12.66%), and OOO (11.13%) were determined as the major TAG species in HMFS. The final optimal reaction conditions were carried out as follows: substrate molar ratio (oleic acid/CCSO), 5:1; enzyme concentration, 12.5% (w/w total reactants); reaction temperature, 60 °C; and reaction time, 28 h. The reusability of Lipozyme RM IM in the acidolysis reaction was also evaluated, and it was found that it could be reused up to 9 times without significant loss of activities. Urea inclusion method was used to separate and purify the synthetic product. As the ratio of HMFS/urea increased to 1:2, the acid value lowered to the minimum. In a scale-up experiment, the contents of TAG and total tocopherols in HMFS (modified CCSO) were 77.28% and 12.27 mg/100 g, respectively. All of the physicochemical indices of purified product were within food standards. Therefore, such a MCFA-enriched HMFS produced by using the acidolysis method might have potential application in the infant formula industry.

  19. Spoxazomicin D and Oxachelin C, Potent Neuroprotective Carboxamides from the Appalachian Coal Fire-Associated Isolate Streptomyces sp. RM-14-6.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Khaled A; Saunders, Meredith A; Zhang, Yinan; Tran, Tuan; Elshahawi, Sherif I; Ponomareva, Larissa V; Wang, Xiachang; Zhang, Jianjun; Copley, Gregory C; Sunkara, Manjula; Kharel, Madan K; Morris, Andrew J; Hower, James C; Tremblay, Matthew S; Prendergast, Mark A; Thorson, Jon S

    2017-01-27

    The isolation and structure elucidation of six new bacterial metabolites [spoxazomicin D (2), oxachelins B and C (4, 5), and carboxamides 6-8] and 11 previously reported bacterial metabolites (1, 3, 9-12a, and 14-18) from Streptomyces sp. RM-14-6 is reported. Structures were elucidated on the basis of comprehensive 1D and 2D NMR and mass spectrometry data analysis, along with direct comparison to synthetic standards for 2, 11, and 12a,b. Complete 2D NMR assignments for the known metabolites lenoremycin (9) and lenoremycin sodium salt (10) were also provided for the first time. Comparative analysis also provided the basis for structural revision of several previously reported putative aziridine-containing compounds [exemplified by madurastatins A1, B1, C1 (also known as MBJ-0034), and MBJ-0035] as phenol-dihydrooxazoles. Bioactivity analysis [including antibacterial, antifungal, cancer cell line cytotoxicity, unfolded protein response (UPR) modulation, and EtOH damage neuroprotection] revealed 2 and 5 as potent neuroprotectives and lenoremycin (9) and its sodium salt (10) as potent UPR modulators, highlighting new functions for phenol-oxazolines/salicylates and polyether pharmacophores.

  20. On the Kelvin-Helmholtz and von Kármán vortices in the near-wake of semicircular cylinders with flaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Boshen; Hamed, Ali M.; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2018-01-01

    The signatures of the Kelvin-Helmoltz (K-H) and von Kármán (VK) vortices shed from a semicircular cylinder with flaps of length L/d = 0, 1/3, 1, 2, and 3 were investigated using hotwire anemometry. Here, L and d denote the flap length and diameter of the semi-circular cylinder, respectively. Experiments were performed at Reynolds numbers spanning one order of magnitude, Re ∈ [8.4 × 103, 6.7 × 104]. The results highlight the impact of the flow modulation through rigid flaps on the wake characteristics and dominant vortex shedding. The increase of flap length resulted in reduced mean shear in the near-wake, which influenced the onset and coherence of the K-H instability. Indeed, these motions are less likely to be present in the wake of the L/d = 3 case. The flaps also impacted the frequency of the VK shedding; the associated Strouhal number increased from 0.2 to 0.3 for flaps L/d ≳ 1. Only the cases without with the shortest flaps (L/d = 1/3) followed St = 0.2. There is a distinctive dependence of the fK - H/fVK on Reynolds number and flap length. This ratio followed the well-known power-law relationship of circular cylinders in the case without flaps. However, the Reynolds number exponent decreased with increased flap length.

  1. On the generation of a reverse von Kármán street for the controlled cylinder wake in the laminar regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Michel; Cordier, Laurent; Brancher, Jean-Pierre

    2006-02-01

    In this Brief Communication we are interested in the maximum mean drag reduction that can be achieved under rotary sinusoidal control for the circular cylinder wake in the laminar regime. For a Reynolds number equal to 200, we give numerical evidence that partial control restricted to an upstream part of the cylinder surface may considerably increase the effectiveness of the control. Indeed, a maximum value of relative mean drag reduction equal to 30% is obtained when applying a specific sinusoidal control to the whole cylinder, where up to 75% of reduction can be obtained when the same control law is applied only to a well-selected upstream part of the cylinder. This result suggests that a mean flow correction field with negative drag is observable for this controlled flow configuration. The significant thrust force that is locally generated in the near wake corresponds to a reverse von Kármán vortex street as commonly observed in fish-like locomotion or flapping wing flight. Finally, the energetic efficiency of the control is quantified by examining the power saving ratio: it is shown that our approach is energetically inefficient. However, it is also demonstrated that for this control scheme the improvement of the effectiveness generally occurs along with an improvement of the efficiency.

  2. Possible Correlation Between Bile Salt Hydrolysis and AHL Deamidation: Staphylococcus epidermidis RM1, a Potent Quorum Quencher and Bile Salt Hydrolase Producer.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Ruchira; Prabhune, Asmita

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present work was to isolate a bile salt hydrolase (BSH) producer from fermented soy curd and explore the ability of the BSH produced to cleave bacterial quorum sensing signals. Bacterial isolates with possible ability to deconjugate bile salts were enriched and isolated on De Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) medium containing 0.2% bile salts. BSH-producing positive isolate with orange-pink-pigmented colonies was isolated and was identified as a strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis using biochemical and phylogenetic tools. S. epidermidis RM1 was shown to possess both potent BSH and N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) cleavage activity. Genetic basis of this dual-enzyme activity was explored by means of specific primers designed using S. epidermidis ATCC 12228 genome as template. It was observed that a single enzyme was not responsible for both the activity. Two different genetic elements corresponding to each of the enzymatic activity were successfully amplified from the genomic DNA of the isolate.

  3. The production process of "Étude sur le Rein des Urinaires", doctoral thesis of Joaquin María Albarrán at the Faculty of Medicine in Paris.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Arias, M; Otero, I; Pérez-Albacete, M; Fariña, L A; Angulo, J C

    2014-01-01

    The manuscript of the Doctoral Thesis of Joaquín Albarrán in the Faculty of Medicine in Paris "Étudesur le Rein des Urinaires" has been donated to Asociación Española de Urología. Direct comparison of the original and printed material gives information of the production process of this master work. Direct comparison between the original hand-written work, a single hard bound volume covered with loin cloth and water paper composed of 145 numbered pages plus 206 newly numbered pages of clinico-pathological (37 subjects) and experimental (19 assays in 20 rabbits) data, and the printed work edited by Georges Steinheil in 1889. Prints included 4 plates with 14 figures, 9 temperature charts and 5 tables describing urine examinations. Figures were trichromic and charts and tables black & white. Chromolithographs were produced by Mr. Leuba in the printing owned by Lemercier et Cie, Paris. The original work was completed in 1887 without any correction or deletion. Differences are noticeable between the text in the master and printed works: rearrangement of data and inclusion of a new clinical observation, 5 new experiments, summary and dedications. Changes in iconography are noticeable. The masterwork included 24 plates (numbered from 1 to 22, 13bis, 16bis) with 46 figures (44 colored) integrated within the text and 26 double-page temperature registries that accompany clinical observations. Anatomical, histological and microbiological illustrations, including culture media, microbiological stains and histobacteriological preparations were depicted as watercolors (44%), watercolors mixed with pencil or ink (52%) or pencil drawings (4%). Four (9%) were signed by the author, 5 (11%) had numerical annotations and only 14 (30%) were definitely printed with loss of the black component and redrawn of 4/14 (29%) images. The largest images were not printed. Joaquín Albarrán described and beautifully illustrated himself the role "pyogenic bacillus" (E. coli) played in renal

  4. Comparison of the efficacy of Neethling lumpy skin disease virus and x10RM65 sheep-pox live attenuated vaccines for the prevention of lumpy skin disease - The results of a randomized controlled field study.

    PubMed

    Ben-Gera, J; Klement, E; Khinich, E; Stram, Y; Shpigel, N Y

    2015-09-11

    Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is a viral disease of cattle and buffalo, caused by a Capripox virus. A field study was performed during an LSD epidemic which occurred in 2012-2013 in Israel, in order to assess the efficacy of two commercial vaccines for protection against LSD. Fifteen dairy herds, vaccinated 2-5 months prior to study onset with a single dose of 10(2.5) TCID50 of RM65 attenuated sheep-pox vaccine, and not affected previously, were enrolled in the study. 4694 cows were randomized to be either vaccinated with a 10(3.5) TCID50/dose of RM65 vaccine (x10RM65) or with a same dose of an attenuated Neethling LSD virus vaccine. A case of LSD was defined as the appearance of at least 5 lesions typical to LSD and a severe case was defined if this sign was accompanied by either fever (>39.5°C) or/and a 20% reduction in milk production. Deep lesion biopsies and blood samples were collected from 64.5% of the cases in an attempt to detect DNA of LSD virus by PCR and to differentiate between the wild strain and the vaccine Neethling strain. Seventy-six cows were affected by LSD in 8 herds with an incidence of 0.3-5.7%. Mantel-Haenszel relative risk (RRMH) for LSD morbidity at least 15 days after vaccination in x10RM65 vs. Neethling was 2.635 (CI95%=1.44-4.82) and 11.2 (2.3-54.7) for severe morbidity. RRMH for laboratory confirmed cases was 4.28 (1.59-11.53). An incidence of 0.38% (9/2356) of Neethling associated disease was observed among Neethling vaccinated cows while no such disease occurred in x10RM65 vaccinated cows. We conclude that the Neethling vaccine is significantly more effective than x10RM65 in preventing LSD morbidity, though it might cause a low incidence of Neethling associated disease. No transmission of the Neethling strain to non-Neethling vaccinated cows was observed in this study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The radiative decay {{\\rm{D}}}^{{\\rm{0}}}\\to {\\bar{{\\rm{K}}}}^{{\\rm{* 0}}}\\gamma with vector meson dominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, J. M.; Debastiani, V. R.; Xie, Ju-Jun; Oset, E.

    2018-04-01

    Motivated by the experimental measurements of D0 radiative decay modes, we have proposed a model to study the {{{D}}}{{0}}\\to {\\bar{{{K}}}}{{* 0}}γ decay, by establishing a link with {{{D}}}{{0}}\\to {\\bar{{{K}}}}{{* 0}}{{V}} (V=ρ0, ω) decays through the vector meson dominance hypothesis. In order to do this properly, we have used the Lagrangians from the local hidden gauge symmetry approach to account for Vγ conversion. As a result, we have found the branching ratio {\\mathcal B} [{{{D}}}{{0}}\\to { \\bar{{{K}}}}{{* 0}}γ ]{{=}}({{1}}.{{55-3}}.{{44}})× {{{10}}}{{-4}}, which is in fair agreement with the experimental values reported by the Belle and BaBar collaborations. J. M. Dias would like to thank the Brazilian funding agency FAPESP for the financial support (2016/22561-2), V. R. Debastiani wishes to acknowledge the support from the Programa Santiago Grisolia of Generalitat Valenciana (Exp. GRISOLIA/2015/005). This work is also partly supported by the Spanish Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad and European FEDER funds (FIS2014-57026- REDT, FIS2014-51948-C2-1-P, FIS2014-51948-C2-2-P), and the Generalitat Valenciana in the program Prometeo II-2014/068. This work is partly supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475227, 11735003) and the Youth Innovation Promotion Association CAS (2016367)

  6. Self-consistent simulations of a von Kármán type dynamo in a spherical domain with metallic walls.

    PubMed

    Guervilly, Céline; Brummell, Nicholas H

    2012-10-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of boundary-driven dynamos using a three-dimensional nonlinear magnetohydrodynamical model in a spherical shell geometry. A conducting fluid of magnetic Prandtl number Pm=0.01 is driven into motion by the counter-rotation of the two hemispheric walls. The resulting flow is of von Kármán type, consisting of a layer of zonal velocity close to the outer wall and a secondary meridional circulation. Above a certain forcing threshold, the mean flow is unstable to non-axisymmetric motions within an equatorial belt. For fixed forcing above this threshold, we have studied the dynamo properties of this flow. The presence of a conducting outer wall is essential to the existence of a dynamo at these parameters. We have therefore studied the effect of changing the material parameters of the wall (magnetic permeability, electrical conductivity, and thickness) on the dynamo. In common with previous studies, we find that dynamos are obtained only when either the conductivity or the permeability is sufficiently large. However, we find that the effect of these two parameters on the dynamo process are different and can even compete to the detriment of the dynamo. Our self-consistent approach allow us to analyze in detail the dynamo feedback loop. The dynamos we obtain are typically dominated by an axisymmetric toroidal magnetic field and an axial dipole component. We show that the ability of the outer shear layer to produce a strong toroidal field depends critically on the presence of a conducting outer wall, which shields the fluid from the vacuum outside. The generation of the axisymmetric poloidal field, on the other hand, occurs in the equatorial belt and does not depend on the wall properties.

  7. A heterodimeric [RGD-Glu-[(64)Cu-NO2A]-6-Ahx-RM2] αvβ3/GRPr-targeting antagonist radiotracer for PET imaging of prostate tumors.

    PubMed

    Durkan, Kubra; Jiang, Zongrun; Rold, Tammy L; Sieckman, Gary L; Hoffman, Timothy J; Bandari, Rajendra Prasad; Szczodroski, Ashley F; Liu, Liqin; Miao, Yubin; Reynolds, Tamila Stott; Smith, Charles J

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, we describe a (64)Cu-radiolabeled heterodimeric peptide conjugate for dual αvβ3/GRPr (αvβ3 integrin/gastrin releasing peptide receptor) targeting of the form [RGD-Glu-[(64)Cu-NO2A]-6-Ahx-RM2] (RGD: the amino acid sequence [Arg-Gly-Asp], a nonregulatory peptide used for αvβ3 integrin receptor targeting; Glu: glutamic acid; NO2A: 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetic acid; 6-Ahx: 6-amino hexanoic acid; and RM2: (D-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH2), an antagonist analogue of bombesin (BBN) peptide used for GRPr targeting). RGD-Glu-6Ahx-RM2] was conjugated to a NOTA (1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid) complexing agent to produce [RGD-Glu-[NO2A]-6-Ahx-RM2], which was purified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and characterized by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Radiolabeling of the conjugate with (64)Cu produced [RGD-Glu-[(64)Cu-NO2A]-6-Ahx-RM2 in high radiochemical yield (≥95%). In vivo behavior of the radiolabeled peptide conjugate was investigated in normal CF-1 mice and in the PC-3 human prostate cancer experimental model. A competitive displacement receptor binding assay in human prostate PC-3 cells using (125)I-[Tyr(4)]BBN as the radioligand showed high binding affinity of [RGD-Glu-[(nat)Cu-NO2A]-6-Ahx-RM2] conjugate for the GRPr (3.09±0.34 nM). A similar assay in human, glioblastoma U87-MG cells using (125)I-Echistatin as the radioligand indicated a moderate receptor-binding affinity for the αvβ3 integrin (518±37.5 nM). In vivo studies of [RGD-Glu-[(64)Cu-NO2A]-6-Ahx-RM2] showed high accumulation (4.86±1.01 %ID/g, 1h post-intravenous injection (p.i.)) and prolonged retention (4.26±1.23 %ID/g, 24h p.i.) of tracer in PC-3 tumor-bearing mice. Micro-positron emission tomography (microPET) molecular imaging studies produced high-quality, high contrast images in PC-3 tumor-bearing mice at 4h p.i. The favorable pharmacokinetics and enhanced tumor uptake of (64)Cu

  8. Taking the Reins: Preservice Teachers Practicing Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Karen; Hansen-Thomas, Holly

    2011-01-01

    What makes the difference between a good teacher and a great one? Knowing one's content is important, but having strong leadership skills can tip the scales from mediocrity to excellence. The best time to begin practicing being a teacher leader is during the preservice years. By practicing leadership skills, one can begin to view oneself not only…

  9. States Eye Looser Rein on Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    The push to give school districts greater operating flexibility--a grassroots rallying cry eclipsed in recent years by the charter school movement--is seeing a resurgence, as states seek to spur innovation that will help raise student achievement. In Georgia, Governor Sonny Perdue is proposing "performance contracts" that would free…

  10. Chromolaena odorata (L.) R.M. King & H. Rob. (Asteraceae) in sub-Saharan Africa: A synthesis and review of its medicinal potential.

    PubMed

    Omokhua, Aitebiremen G; McGaw, Lyndy J; Finnie, Jeffrey F; Van Staden, Johannes

    2016-05-13

    Chromolaena odorata (L.) R.M. King & H. Rob. (Asteraceae) is a scrambling perennial shrub that originated in the Americas, but is now common in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and Oceania, where it has become a serious weed. The species, particularly the biotype found in Asia and West Africa, has many ethnopharmacological uses, including treatment of malaria, wounds, diarrhoea, skin infection, toothache, dysentery, stomach ache, sore throat, convulsions, piles, coughs and colds. Furthermore, no attempt has been made to synthesise and review the available literature on the usefulness of the plant in the sub-Saharan African region, hence this paper examines the beneficial attributes of C. odorata in sub-Saharan Africa. Published information on the species was gathered by the use of different database platforms, including Google Scholar, ScienceDirect, SciFinder and Scopus. Records indicate that two biotypes of C. odorata are present in sub-Saharan Africa viz. the more widespread Asian/West African C. odorata biotype (AWAB) and the southern African biotype (SAB). While the usefulness of the former is well elucidated in the literature, such information on the latter is still scarce. Although the importance of AWAB C. odorata as a fallow species and as a soil fertility improvement plant in the slash and burn rotation system of agriculture in West Africa is increasingly being recognised, its usage in traditional medicinal practice is far more appreciated. The species has a wide range of ethnopharmacological uses, possibly because of the presence of flavonoids, essential oils, phenolics, tannins and saponins. The plant is reported to have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anthelminthic, antifungal, cytotoxic, anticonvulsant, antiprotozoal, antispasmodic, antipyretic and analgesic properties. While the results of this review suggest that the AWAB plant can be exploited as an alternative to other threatened plant species known to possess similar medicinal potential

  11. Triangle singularity enhancing isospin violation in {\\bar{{\\rm{B}}}}_{{\\rm{s}}}^{0}\\to {\\rm{J}}/{\\rm{\\psi }}{\\pi }^{0}{{\\rm{f}}}_{0}(980)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wei-Hong; Sakai, S.; Xie, Ju-Jun; Oset, E.

    2018-04-01

    We perform calculations for the {\\bar{{{B}}}}{{s}}0\\to {{J}}/{{\\psi }}{π }0{{{f}}}0(980) and {\\bar{{{B}}}}{{s}}0\\to {{J}}/{{\\psi }}{π }0{{{a}}}0(980) reactions, showing that the first is isospin-suppressed while the second is isospin-allowed. The reaction proceeds via a triangle mechanism, with {\\bar{{{B}}}}{{s}}0\\to {{J}}/{{\\psi }}{{{K}}}{{* }}\\bar{{{K}}}+{{c}}.{{c}}., followed by the decay K* → Kπ and a further fusion of {{K}}\\bar{{{K}}} into the {{{f}}}0(980) or a0(980). We show that the mechanism develops a singularity around the π0 f0(980) or π0 a0(980) invariant mass of 1420 MeV, where the π0 f0 and π0 a0 decay modes are magnified and also the ratio of π0 f0 to π0 a0 production. Using experimental information for the {\\bar{{{B}}}}{{s}}0\\to {{J}}/{{\\psi }}{{{K}}}{{* }}\\bar{{{K}}}+{{c}}.{{c}}. decay, we are able to obtain absolute values for the reactions studied which fall into the experimentally accessible range. The reactions proposed and the observables evaluated, when contrasted with actual experiments, should be very valuable to obtain information on the nature of the low lying scalar mesons. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11565007, 11747307, 11647309, 11735003, 11475227), the Youth Innovation Promotion Association CAS (2016367). This work is also partly supported by the Spanish Ministerio de Economia y Com- petitividad and European FEDER funds (FIS2011-28853-C02-01, FIS2011-28853-C02-02, FIS2014-57026-REDT, FIS2014-51948-C2-1-P, FIS2014-51948-C2-2-P) and the Generalitat Valenciana in the program Prometeo (II-2014/068)

  12. Does using a polyethylene RM press-fit cup modify the preparation of the acetabulum and acetabular offset in primary hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Erivan, R; Aubret, S; Villatte, G; Mulliez, A; Descamps, S; Boisgard, S

    2017-09-01

    When performing total hip arthroplasty (THA), it is important to maintain the femoral and acetabular offsets to ensure good joint stability and to restore the function of the hip abductor muscles. In our practice, we mainly use a lateralized stem and hollow out the acetabulum to the quadrilateral plate to accommodate a press-fit polyethylene cup. However, the repercussions of this preparation method, which is driven by the cup's design, are not known. We carried out a retrospective study to assess: (1) the changes in the femoral and acetabular offset; (2) the height of the center of rotation; and (3) the repercussions on wear. We hypothesized there would be no significant differences between the preoperative and postoperative femoral and acetabular offsets. We reviewed 88 primary THA cases performed with the RM Pressfit™ cup that had a minimum of 5 years' follow-up. A lateralized self-locking Muller-type cemented femoral stem was used in 92.0% of cases and a standard stem in 8.0%. Measurements were done on plain radiographs with MHP™ and Mesurim Pro™ software. The average follow-up was 6.5 years (5-8). On average, the acetabular offset was reduced by 2.75mm±5.9 mm (range: -17.5 to +10.6 mm) (P<0.001) and the femoral offset was increased by 0.01mm±5.5 mm (range: -17.8 to +11.0 mm) (P=0.99). In terms of total offset, medialization of 2.74mm±7 mm (range: -17.7 to +18.2mm) was found (P=0.001). The acetabular center of rotation was on average 4.77mm±5.1 mm higher (P<0.001). The mean annual wear at the more recent follow-up (min.: 5 years) was 0.068mm (range: 0.01 to 0.25mm) per year. The wear was not impacted by having more than 5mm change in offset. Measurements of acetabular offset revealed statistically significant medialization due to the type of implant used and the surgical technique. The anatomical technique consists of positioning the cup in subchondral bone without contacting the quadrilateral plate. This preserves bone stock, which may be

  13. Selective ethanolysis of sunflower oil with Lipozyme RM IM, an immobilized Rhizomucor miehei lipase, to obtain a biodiesel-like biofuel, which avoids glycerol production through the monoglyceride formation.

    PubMed

    Calero, Juan; Verdugo, Cristóbal; Luna, Diego; Sancho, Enrique D; Luna, Carlos; Posadillo, Alejandro; Bautista, Felipa M; Romero, Antonio A

    2014-12-25

    The obtaining of Ecodiesel, a biofuel applicable to diesel engines which keeps the glycerin as monoglyceride (MG), was achieved through a selective ethanolysis process of sunflower oil, by application of Lipozyme RM IM, a Rhizomucor miehei lipase immobilized on macroporous anion exchange resins. This biocatalyst that was already described in the synthesis of conventional biodiesel has also shown its efficiency in the present selective enzymatic process, after optimization of the influence of various reaction parameters. Thus, an adequate activity is obtained that is maintained throughout five successive reuses. Quantitative conversions of triglycerides (TG) with high yields to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) were obtained under mild reaction conditions that correspond to the transformation of TG in a mixture of two moles of FAEE and a mole of MG, thus avoiding the glycerol production. Thus, the selective transesterification reaction of sunflower oil with absolute ethanol can be carried out under standard conditions with oil/ethanol volume ratio 12/3.5 (mL), at constant pH obtained by the addition of 50 μl of aqueous solution of 10 N NaOH, reaction temperature of 40 °C and 40 mg of Lipozyme RM IM. Under these experimental conditions six successive reactions can be efficiently carried out. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Aerodynamic characteristics of NACA RM-10 missile in 8- by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel at Mach numbers from 1.49 to 1.98 I : presentation and analysis of pressure measurements (stabilizing fins removed)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luidens, Roger W; Simon, Paul C

    1950-01-01

    Experimental investigation of flow about a slender body of revolution (NACA RM-10 missile) aligned and inclined to a supersonic stream was conducted at Mach numbers from 1.49 to 1.98 at a Reynolds number of approximately 30,000,000. Boundary-layer measurements at zero angle of attack are correlated with subsonic formulations for predicting boundary-layer thickness and profile. Comparison of pressure coefficients predicted by theory with experimental values showed close agreement at zero angle of attack and angle of attack except over the aft leeward side of body. At angle of attack, pitot pressure measurements in plane of model base indicated a pair of symmetrically disposed vortices on leeward side of body.

  15. Single-wave-number representation of nonlinear energy spectrum in elastic-wave turbulence of the Föppl-von Kármán equation: energy decomposition analysis and energy budget.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Naoto; Takaoka, Masanori

    2014-12-01

    A single-wave-number representation of a nonlinear energy spectrum, i.e., a stretching-energy spectrum, is found in elastic-wave turbulence governed by the Föppl-von Kármán (FvK) equation. The representation enables energy decomposition analysis in the wave-number space and analytical expressions of detailed energy budgets in the nonlinear interactions. We numerically solved the FvK equation and observed the following facts. Kinetic energy and bending energy are comparable with each other at large wave numbers as the weak turbulence theory suggests. On the other hand, stretching energy is larger than the bending energy at small wave numbers, i.e., the nonlinearity is relatively strong. The strong correlation between a mode a(k) and its companion mode a(-k) is observed at the small wave numbers. The energy is input into the wave field through stretching-energy transfer at the small wave numbers, and dissipated through the quartic part of kinetic-energy transfer at the large wave numbers. Total-energy flux consistent with energy conservation is calculated directly by using the analytical expression of the total-energy transfer, and the forward energy cascade is observed clearly.

  16. The effect of paraquat inhalation on parkinsonism, organ morphology and anatomy of mice and its recovery with the application of etliringea hemisphaerica (blume, r.m. smith) crude extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muslim, Choirul; Nurul Kamila, Santi

    2018-03-01

    This research is aimed to understand the effect of paraquat herbicide inhalation on Parkinsonism, morphology and anatomy change in mice, and its recovery with Etliringea hemisphaerica crude extract application. Sixty mice were placed into three following groups: group R0 were mice receiving standard food ransom, R1 were a group of mice receiving the regular food ransom plus inhalation of 1% paraquat, and R2 were a group of R1 plus obtaining 0,39mg/bw extract E. hemisphaerica (Bl.) R.M. Smith). After 2 X 7 days of sub-sequential application of both paraquat and “helani tulip” extract, we observed the effects. The examination included bradikinesia attitude, postural instability and rigidity, morphology and anatomy of brain, liver, blood, lung, and kidney. The data were tabulated and analyzed qualitative and semi quantitative description on the behavioural disorder, the alteration of morphology and anatomy, and their remedy based on Sander 2004, Junqueira and Carneiro, 2007. The results showed that the application of paraquat caused strong bradikinesia, postural instability and rigidity. The treatment of the extract was only resulting in the bradikinesia removal but was minor improving the consequence of postural instability and rigidity. Paraquat was not affecting the morphology of neural brain but was altering the morphology and anatomy of lung, liver, blood, and the kidney. In general, the negative impact of the paraquat was weakly eliminated by the treatment of “helani tulip” extract.

  17. Crystal Growth and Scintillation Properties of $${\\rm Cs}_{2}{\\rm NaGdBr}_{6}{:}{\\rm Ce}^{3+}$$

    SciT

    Yang, Pin; Zhou, Xiaowang; Deng, Haoran

    2013-04-02

    Single crystals of Cs 2NaGdBr 6 with different Ce +3 activator concentrations were grown by a two-zone Bridgman method. This new compound belongs to a large elpasolite halide (A 2BLnX 6) family. Many of these elpasolite compounds have shown high luminosity, good energy resolution and excellent proportionality in comparison to traditional scintillators such as CsI and NaI; therefore, they are particularly attractive for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications. This study investigated the scintillator properties of Cs 2NaGdBr 6:Ce +3 crystals as a new material for radiation detection. Special focus has been placed on the effects of activator concentration (0 to 50 mol.%)more » on the photoluminescence responses. Results of structural refinement, photoluminescence, radioluminescence, lifetime and proportionality measurements for this new compound are reported.« less

  18. The {{\\rm{D}}\\bar{{\\rm{D}}}}^{{\\rm{* }}} interaction with isospin zero in an extended hidden gauge symmetry approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bao-Xi; Wan, Da-Ming; Zhao, Si-Yu

    2018-05-01

    The {{{D}}\\bar{{{D}}}}{{* }} interaction via a ρ or ω exchange is constructed within an extended hidden gauge symmetry approach, where the strange quark is replaced by the charm quark in the SU(3) flavor space. With this {{{D}}\\bar{{{D}}}}{{* }} interaction, a bound state slightly lower than the {{{D}}\\bar{{{D}}}}{{* }} threshold is generated dynamically in the isospin zero sector by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation in the coupled-channel approximation, which might correspond to the X(3872) particle announced by many collaborations. This formulism is also used to study the {{{B}}\\bar{{{B}}}}{{* }} interaction, and a {{{B}}\\bar{{{B}}}}{{* }} bound state with isospin zero is generated dynamically, which has no counterpart listed in the review of the Particle Data Group. Furthermore, the one-pion exchange between the D meson and the {\\bar{{{D}}}}{{* }} is analyzed precisely, and we do not think the one-pion exchange potential need be considered when the Bethe-Salpeter equation is solved.

  19. Effects of ΛΛ ‑ ΞN mixing in the decay of {}_{{\\rm{\\Lambda }}{\\rm{\\Lambda }}}{}^{6}{\\rm{H}}{\\rm{e}}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneu, J.; Parreño, A.; Ramos, A.

    2018-05-01

    A one-meson exchange model including the ground state of the pseudoscalar octet is used to describe the weak two-body interactions responsible for the decay of {}{{Λ }{{Λ }}}{}6{{H}}{{e}}. Strong interaction effects are taken into account by a microscopic study based on the solution of G-matrix and T-matrix equations for the initial and final interacting pairs respectively. Results for the decay induced by {{Λ }}{{Λ }}\\to {{Λ }}N({{Σ }}N) transitions are given.

  20. {{\\rm{\\Lambda }}}_{c}^{+} physics at BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiping; BESIII collaboration

    2018-05-01

    Based on the data sets collected by the BESIII detector near the {{{Λ }}}c+{\\bar{{{Λ }}}}c- production threshold, i.e. at \\sqrt{s}=4574.5,4580.0,4590.0, and 4599.5 MeV, we report the preliminary study of the production behaviour of {e}+{e}-\\to {{{Λ }}}c+{\\bar{{{Λ }}}}c- process, including the Born cross section and electromagnetic form factor ratios. Using the large statistic data at \\sqrt{s}=4599.5 {{MeV}}, we measured the absolute branching fractions of Cabibbo-favored hadronic decays of {{{Λ }}}c+ baryon with a double-tag technique. The branching fractions for 12 hadronic decay modes are significantly improved. We also report the model-independent measurement of the branching fraction of {{{Λ }}}c+\\to {{Λ }}{e}+{v}e and {{{Λ }}}c+\\to {{Λ }}{μ }+{v}μ semi-leptonic decays.

  1. The Juno Radiation Monitoring (RM) Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, H. N.; Alexander, J. W.; Adriani, A.; Mura, A.; Cicchetti, A.; Noschese, R.; Jørgensen, J. L.; Denver, T.; Sushkova, J.; Jørgensen, A.; Benn, M.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Bolton, S. J.; Allison, J.; Watts, S.; Adumitroaie, V.; Manor-Chapman, E. A.; Daubar, I. J.; Lee, C.; Kang, S.; McAlpine, W. J.; Di Iorio, T.; Pasqui, C.; Barbis, A.; Lawton, P.; Spalsbury, L.; Loftin, S.; Sun, J.

    2017-11-01

    The Radiation Monitoring Investigation of the Juno Mission will actively retrieve and analyze the noise signatures from penetrating radiation in the images of Juno's star cameras and science instruments at Jupiter. The investigation's objective is to profile Jupiter's >10-MeV electron environment in regions of the Jovian magnetosphere which today are still largely unexplored. This paper discusses the primary instruments on Juno which contribute to the investigation's data suite, the measurements of camera noise from penetrating particles, spectral sensitivities and measurement ranges of the instruments, calibrations performed prior to Juno's first science orbit, and how the measurements may be used to infer the external relativistic electron environment.

  2. RM Methods for Multiple Fare Structure Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    110 9 LIST OF FIGURES 1 INTRODUCTION Figure 1-1: Revenue Losses due to Overprotection and Dilution... overprotection or dilution. If an airline’s objective is to focus on high-yield business travelers and charge only a single high fare for the...Lost Revenue from Customer Surplus Captured Revenue Rejected Passengers Overprotection Dilution Figure 1-1: Revenue Losses due to Overprotection

  3. State-to-state dynamics of {\\rm{F}}({}^{2}{\\rm{P}})+{\\rm{HO}}({}^{2}{\\rm{\\Pi }})\\to {\\rm{O}}({}^{3}{\\rm{P}})+{\\rm{HF}}({}^{1}{\\rm{\\Sigma }}^{+}) reaction on {1}^{3}{{\\rm{A}}}^{\\prime\\prime} potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan; Wu, Hui; Sun, Hai-Bo; Wang, Li-Fei

    2018-02-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11504206 and 11404049), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (CPSF) (Grant No. 2014M561259), and the Ph. D. Research Start-up Fund of Shandong Jiaotong University.

  4. Porter Takes Reins of the FNL Green Team | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Courtesy of the FNL Green Team Melissa Porter, who recently joined the staff of Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., director, Office of Scientific Operations, as administrative manager, has stepped forward to lead the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNL) Green Team in its efforts to promote a “green” work environment. “I am excited to lead the FNL Green Team and have

  5. Loosening the Reins: How Flexibility Policies Contribute to Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    Many states give individual schools the authority to make decisions in response to local conditions while still meeting state and district goals. Providing flexibility to local decision-makers is also a potential means for improving student achievement. This report provides a snapshot of several states' recent experiences with flexibility and…

  6. Pakistan’s Nuclear Future: Reining in the Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Pakistan has developed gaps between average yields and yields obtained by the best farmers; between the best farmers and those obtained by research... yield gap —outputs of the current livestock population compared with the output obtained in more developed systems—at between 60 to 80 percent. The...unprecedented increase in rate of inflation, a significant increase in the incidence of poverty, a widening in the already large regional income gap

  7. High Court Case Could Rein in Private Placements under IDEA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Mark

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on starkly contrasting portraits of special education that the justices are sure to hear on the first day of the new U.S. Supreme Court term. In a case from New York City, the 1.1 million-student district argues that school officials made every attempt to provide an appropriate education plan under the federal Individuals with…

  8. Porter Takes Reins of the FNL Green Team | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Courtesy of the FNL Green Team Melissa Porter, who recently joined the staff of Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., director, Office of Scientific Operations, as administrative manager, has stepped forward to lead the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNL) Green Team in its efforts to promote a “green” work environment. “I am excited to lead the FNL Green Team and have been impressed by the enthusiasm and commitment of the FNL Green Team,” Porter said.

  9. The Correlated Variations of {\\rm{C}}\\,{\\rm{IV}} Narrow Absorption Lines and Quasar Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Fu; Pang, Ting-Ting; He, Bing; Huang, Yong

    2018-06-01

    We assemble 207 variable quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, all with at least 3 observations, to analyze C IV narrow absorption doublets, and obtain 328 C IV narrow absorption line systems. We find that 19 out of 328 C IV narrow absorption line systems were changed by | {{Δ }}{W}rλ 1548| ≥slant 3{σ }{{Δ }{W}rλ 1548} on timescales from 15.9 to 1477 days at rest-frame. Among the 19 obviously variable C IV systems, we find that (1) 14 systems have relative velocities {\\upsilon }r> 0.01c and 4 systems have {\\upsilon }r> 0.1c, where c is the speed of light; (2) 13 systems are accompanied by other variable C IV systems; (3) 9 systems were changed continuously during multiple observations; and (4) 1 system with {\\upsilon }r = 16,862 km s‑1 was enhanced by {{Δ }}{W}rλ 1548=2.7{σ }{{Δ }{W}rλ 1548} in 0.67 day at rest-frame. The variations of absorption lines are inversely correlated with the changes in the ionizing continuum. We also find that large variations of C IV narrow absorption lines are form differently over a short timescale.

  10. Determination of $${{\\rm{\\Lambda }}}_{\\overline{{\\rm{MS}}}}$$ at five loops from holographic QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.

    2017-08-25

    Here, the recent determination of themore » $$\\beta$$--function of the QCD running coupling $$\\alpha_{\\overline{MS}}(Q^2)$$ to five-loops, provides a verification of the convergence of a novel method for determining the fundamental QCD parameter $$\\Lambda_s$$ based on the Light-Front Holographic approach to nonperturbative QCD. The new 5-loop analysis, together with improvements in determining the holographic QCD nonperturbative scale parameter $$\\kappa$$ from hadronic spectroscopy, leads to an improved precision of the value of $$\\Lambda_s$$ in the $${\\overline{MS}}$$ scheme close to a factor of two; we find $$\\Lambda^{(3)}_{\\overline{MS}}=0.339\\pm0.019$$ GeV for $$n_{f}=3$$, in excellent agreement with the world average, $$\\Lambda_{\\overline{MS}}^{(3)}=0.332\\pm0.017$$ GeV. Lastly, we also discuss the constraints imposed on the scale dependence of the strong coupling in the nonperturbative domain by superconformal quantum mechanics and its holographic embedding in anti-de Sitter space.« less

  11. Progress in the Long $${\\rm Nb}_{3}{\\rm Sn}$$ Quadrupole R&D by LARP

    DOE PAGES

    Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Anerella, M.; ...

    2011-11-14

    After the successful test of the first long Nb 3Sn quadrupole (LQS01) the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP, a collaboration of BNL, FNAL, LBNL and SLAC) is assessing training memory, reproducibility, and other accelerator quality features of long Nb 3Sn quadrupole magnets. LQS01b (a reassembly of LQS01 with more uniform and higher pre-stress) was subjected to a full thermal cycle and reached the previous plateau of 222 T/m at 4.5 K in two quenches. A new set of four coils, made of the same type of conductor used in LQS01 (RRP 54/61 by Oxford Superconducting Technology), was assembled inmore » the LQS01 structure and tested at 4.5 K and lower temperatures. The new magnet (LQS02) reached the target gradient (200 T/m) only at 2.6 K and lower temperatures, at intermediate ramp rates. The preliminary test analysis, here reported, showed a higher instability in the limiting coil than in the other coils of LQS01 and LQS02.« less

  12. A data-driven approach to {{\\rm{\\pi }}}^{0},{\\rm{\\eta }} and {{\\rm{\\eta }}}^{\\prime} single and double Dalitz decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escribano, Rafel; Gonzàlez-Solís, Sergi

    2018-01-01

    The dilepton invariant mass spectra and integrated branching ratios of the single and double Dalitz decays {\\mathscr{P}}\\to {{{l}}}+{{{l}}}-{{γ }} and {\\mathscr{P}}\\to {{{l}}}+{{{l}}}-{{{l}}}+{{{l}}}- ({\\mathscr{P}}={{{π }}}0,{{η }},{{{η }}}\\prime; {{l}}={{e}} or {{μ }}) are predicted by means of a data-driven approach based on the use of rational approximants applied to {{{π }}}0,{{η }} and {{{η }}}\\prime transition form factor experimental data in the space-like region. Supported by the FPI scholarship BES-2012-055371 (S.G-S), the Secretaria d’Universitats i Recerca del Departament d’Economia i Coneixement de la Generalitat de Catalunya under grant 2014 SGR 1450, the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación under grant FPA2011-25948, the Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad under grants CICYT-FEDER-FPA 2014-55613-P and SEV-2012-0234, the Spanish Consolider-Ingenio 2010 Program CPAN (CSD2007-00042), and the European Commission under program FP7-INFRASTRUCTURES-2011-1 (283286) S.G-S also Received Support from the CAS President’s International Fellowship Initiative for Young International Scientist (2017PM0031)

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Armando Oliu, Final Inspection Team lead for the Shuttle program, speaks to reporters about the aid the Image Analysis Lab is giving the FBI in a kidnapping case. Behind him at right is Mike Rein, External Affairs division chief. Oliu oversees the image lab that is using an advanced SGI® TP9500 data management system to review the tape of the kidnapping in progress in Sarasota, Fla. KSC installed the new $3.2 million system in preparation for Return to Flight of the Space Shuttle fleet. The lab is studying the Sarasota kidnapping video to provide any new information possible to law enforcement officers. KSC is joining NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama in reviewing the tape.

    2004-02-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Armando Oliu, Final Inspection Team lead for the Shuttle program, speaks to reporters about the aid the Image Analysis Lab is giving the FBI in a kidnapping case. Behind him at right is Mike Rein, External Affairs division chief. Oliu oversees the image lab that is using an advanced SGI® TP9500 data management system to review the tape of the kidnapping in progress in Sarasota, Fla. KSC installed the new $3.2 million system in preparation for Return to Flight of the Space Shuttle fleet. The lab is studying the Sarasota kidnapping video to provide any new information possible to law enforcement officers. KSC is joining NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama in reviewing the tape.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

  16. R&M (Reliability and Maintainability) Program Cost Drivers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    Specific data points used to develop the models (i.e., labor hours mid associated systems and task application characteristics) were obtained from three...study data base used to generate the CER’s em be expanded by adding project data points to the input data given in Appendix 13, adjusting the CER...FRACAS, worst-case/ thermal analyses, stress screening and R-growth. However, the studies did not assign benefits to specific task areas. c. Task

  17. Reference Model 5 (RM5): Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter

    SciT

    Yu, Y. H.; Jenne, D. S.; Thresher, R.

    This report is an addendum to SAND2013-9040: Methodology for Design and Economic Analysis of Marine Energy Conversion (MEC) Technologies. This report describes an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter (OSWEC) reference model design in a complementary manner to Reference Models 1-4 contained in the above report. A conceptual design for a taut moored oscillating surge wave energy converter was developed. The design had an annual electrical power of 108 kilowatts (kW), rated power of 360 kW, and intended deployment at water depths between 50 m and 100 m. The study includes structural analysis, power output estimation, a hydraulic power conversionmore » chain system, and mooring designs. The results were used to estimate device capital cost and annual operation and maintenance costs. The device performance and costs were used for the economic analysis, following the methodology presented in SAND2013-9040 that included costs for designing, manufacturing, deploying, and operating commercial-scale MEC arrays up to 100 devices. The levelized cost of energy estimated for the Reference Model 5 OSWEC, presented in this report, was for a single device and arrays of 10, 50, and 100 units, and it enabled the economic analysis to account for cost reductions associated with economies of scale. The baseline commercial levelized cost of energy estimate for the Reference Model 5 device in an array comprised of 10 units is $1.44/kilowatt-hour (kWh), and the value drops to approximately $0.69/kWh for an array of 100 units.« less

  18. Laboratory Gas-phase Infrared Spectra of Two Astronomically Relevant PAH Cations: Diindenoperylene, {{\\rm{C}}}_{32}{{\\rm{H}}}_{16}^{+} and Dicoronylene, {{\\rm{C}}}_{48}{{\\rm{H}}}_{20}^{+}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Junfeng; Candian, Alessandra; Castellanos, Pablo; Bouwman, Jordy; Linnartz, Harold; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2018-02-01

    The first gas-phase infrared spectra of two isolated astronomically relevant and large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cations—diindenoperylene (DIP) and dicoronylene (DC)—in the 530–1800 cm‑1 (18.9‑5.6 μm) range—are presented. Vibrational band positions are determined for comparison to the aromatic infrared bands. The spectra are obtained via infrared multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy of ions stored in a quadrupole ion trap using the intense and tunable radiation of the free electron laser for infrared experiments (FELIX). DIP+ shows its main absorption peaks at 737 (13.57), 800 (12.50), 1001 (9.99), 1070 (9.35), 1115 (8.97), 1152 (8.68), 1278 (7.83), 1420 (7.04), and 1550 (6.45) cm‑1(μm), in good agreement with density functional theory (DFT) calculations that are uniformly scaled to take anharmonicities into account. DC+ has its main absorption peaks at 853 (11.72), 876 (11.42), 1032 (9.69), 1168 (8.56), 1300 (7.69), 1427 (7.01), and 1566 (6.39) cm‑1(μm), which also agree well with the scaled DFT results presented here. The DIP+ and DC+ spectra are compared with the prominent infrared features observed toward NGC 7023. This results both in matches and clear deviations. Moreover, in the 11.0–14.0 μm region, specific bands can be linked to CH out-of-plane (oop) bending modes of different CH edge structures in large PAHs. The molecular origin of these findings and their astronomical relevance are discussed.

  19. Circumnuclear Star Formation and AGN Activity: Clues from Surface Brightness Radial Profile of PAHs and [{\\rm{S}}\\,{\\rm{IV}}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esparza-Arredondo, Donaji; González-Martín, Omaira; Dultzin, Deborah; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Ramos Almeida, Cristina; Díaz-Santos, Tanio; García-Bernete, Ismael; Martinez-Paredes, Mariela; Rodríguez-Espinosa, Jose Miguel

    2018-06-01

    We studied the circumnuclear mid-IR emission in a sample of 19 local active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with high spatial resolution spectra using T-ReCS (Gemini) and CanariCam (GTC), together with Spitzer/IRS observations. We measured the flux and the equivalent width for the 11.3 μm PAH feature and the [S IV] line emission as a function of galactocentric distance. This allowed us to study the star formation (SF) at subkiloparsec scales from the nucleus for a large sample of nearby AGNs. The [S IV] line emission could be tracing the AGN radiation field within a few thousand times the sublimation radius (R sub), but it often peaks at distances greater than 1000 R sub. One possibility is that the SF is contributing to the [S IV] total flux. We found an 11.3 μm PAH emission deficit within the inner few tens of parsecs from the AGN. This deficit might be due to the destruction of the molecules responsible for this feature or the lack of SF at these distances. We found a sensible agreement in the expected shift of the relation of the AGN bolometric luminosity and the SF rate. This indicates that numerical models attributing the link between AGN activity and host galaxy growth to mergers are in agreement with our data, for most inner galaxy parts.

  20. Velocity-resolved [{\\rm{C}}\\,{\\rm{II}}] Emission from Cold Diffuse Clouds in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Pineda, Jorge L.; Neufeld, David A.; Wolfire, Mark G.; Risacher, Christophe; Simon, Robert

    2018-04-01

    We have combined emission from the 158 μm fine structure transition of C+ observed with the GREAT and upGREAT instruments on SOFIA with 21 cm absorption spectra and visual extinction to characterize the diffuse interstellar clouds found along the lines of sight. The weak [C II] emission is consistent in velocity and line width with the strongest H I component produced by the cold neutral medium. The H I column density and kinetic temperature are known from the 21 cm data and, assuming a fractional abundance of ionized carbon, we calculate the volume density and thermal pressure of each source, which vary considerably, with 27 {cm}}-3≤slant n({{{H}}}0) ≤slant 210 cm‑3 considering only the atomic hydrogen along the lines of sight to be responsible for the C+, while 13 {cm}}-3≤slant n({{{H}}}0+{{{H}}}2)≤slant 190 cm‑3 including the hydrogen in both forms. The thermal pressure varies widely with 1970 cm‑3 K ≤slant {P}th}/k≤slant 10,440 cm‑3 K for H0 alone and 750 cm‑3 K ≤ P th/k ≤ 9360 cm‑3 K including both H0 and H2. The molecular hydrogen fraction varies between 0.10 and 0.67. Photoelectric heating is the dominant heating source, supplemented by a moderately enhanced cosmic ray ionization rate, constrained by the relatively low 45 K to 73 K gas temperatures of the clouds. The resulting thermal balance for the two lower-density clouds is satisfactory, but for the two higher-density clouds, the combined heating rate is insufficient to balance the observed C+ cooling.

  1. Studies of $${\\rm Nb}_{3}{\\rm Sn}$$ Strands Based on the Restacked-Rod Process for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Barzi, E.; Bossert, M.; Gallo, G.; ...

    2011-12-21

    A major thrust in Fermilab's accelerator magnet R&D program is the development of Nb 3Sn wires which meet target requirements for high field magnets, such as high critical current density, low effective filament size, and the capability to withstand the cabling process. The performance of a number of strands with 150/169 restack design produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology was studied for round and deformed wires. To optimize the maximum plastic strain, finite element modeling was also used as an aid in the design. Results of mechanical, transport and metallographic analyses are presented for round and deformed wires.

  2. Photoionization of tungsten ions: experiment and theory for $${{\\rm{W}}}^{2+}$$ and $${{\\rm{W}}}^{3+}$$

    SciT

    McLaughlin, B. M.; Ballance, C. P.; Schippers, S.

    2016-02-22

    Experimental and theoretical results are reported for single-photon single ionization of W 2+ and W 3+ tungsten ions. Experiments were performed at the photon-ion merged-beam setup of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley. Absolute cross sections and detailed energy scans were measured over an energy range 20-90 eV at a bandwidth of 100 meV. Broad peak features with widths typically around 5 eV have been observed with almost no narrow resonances present in the investigated energy range. Theoretical results were obtained from a Dirac-Coulomb R-matrix approach. The calculations were carried out for the lowest-energy terms of the investigated tungsten ionsmore » with levels 5s 25p 65d 4 5D J J = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 for W 2+ and 5s 25p 65d 3 4F J' J ' = 3/2, 5/2, 7/2, 9/2 for W 3+. Assuming a statistically weighted distribution of ions in the initial ground-term levels there is good agreement of theory and experiment for W 3+ ions. However, for W 2+ ions at higher energies there is a factor of approximately two difference between experimental and theoretical cross sections.« less

  3. Empirical Modeling of the Redshift Evolution of the [{\\rm{N}}\\,{\\rm{II}}]/Hα Ratio for Galaxy Redshift Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisst, Andreas L.; Masters, Daniel; Wang, Yun; Merson, Alexander; Capak, Peter; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.

    2018-03-01

    We present an empirical parameterization of the [N II]/Hα flux ratio as a function of stellar mass and redshift valid at 0 < z < 2.7 and 8.5< {log}(M/{M}ȯ )< 11.0. This description can (i) easily be applied to simulations for modeling [N II]λ6584 line emission, (ii) deblend [N II] and Hα in current low-resolution grism and narrow-band observations to derive intrinsic Hα fluxes, and (iii) reliably forecast the number counts of Hα emission-line galaxies for future surveys, such as those planned for Euclid and the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST). Our model combines the evolution of the locus on the Baldwin, Phillips & Terlevich (BPT) diagram measured in spectroscopic data out to z ∼ 2.5 with the strong dependence of [N II]/Hα on stellar mass and [O III]/Hβ observed in local galaxy samples. We find large variations in the [N II]/Hα flux ratio at a fixed redshift due to its dependency on stellar mass; hence, the assumption of a constant [N II] flux contamination fraction can lead to a significant under- or overestimate of Hα luminosities. Specifically, measurements of the intrinsic Hα luminosity function derived from current low-resolution grism spectroscopy assuming a constant 29% contamination of [N II] can be overestimated by factors of ∼8 at {log}(L)> 43.0 for galaxies at redshifts z ∼ 1.5. This has implications for the prediction of Hα emitters for Euclid and WFIRST. We also study the impact of blended Hα and [N II] on the accuracy of measured spectroscopic redshifts.

  4. Taking the reins: the effects of new leader status and leadership style on team performance.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Stephen J

    2011-05-01

    New leaders face a challenging task when they take charge of their teams. They have to determine how best to guide the work process, and they must understand how their behaviors will affect the members of their team. This research examines how a newly assigned team leader's status moderates subordinates' reactions to different leadership styles to affect assessments of the leader's self-confidence and effectiveness, and how this impacts team performance. Across 2 experimental studies, results demonstrate that low-status leaders are rated as more effective when they use a directive style, whereas high-status leaders are viewed as more effective when they use a participative style, and this relationship is mediated by perceptions of self-confidence. In addition, teams whose leaders are viewed more favorably perform better on a complex group task. These findings imply that low-status individuals are able to enhance their level of personal power by drawing on whatever positional power they hold, whereas high-status individuals are better off relying solely on their personal power to influence others. This research also provides a clear demonstration that assessments of new leaders' behaviors are subject to an appraisal that is clouded by observers' status perceptions and attributions.

  5. Understanding differences between high- and low-price hospitals: implications for efforts to rein in costs.

    PubMed

    White, Chapin; Reschovsky, James D; Bond, Amelia M

    2014-02-01

    Private insurers pay widely varying prices for inpatient care across hospitals. Previous research indicates that certain hospitals use market clout to obtain higher payment rates, but there have been few in-depth examinations of the relationship between hospital characteristics and pricing power. This study used private insurance claims data to identify hospitals receiving inpatient prices significantly higher or lower than the median in their market. High-price hospitals, compared to other hospitals, tend to be larger; be major teaching hospitals; belong to systems with large market shares; and provide specialized services, such as heart transplants and Level I trauma care. High-price hospitals also receive significant revenues from nonpatient sources, such as state Medicaid disproportionate-share hospital funds, and they enjoy healthy total financial margins. Quality indicators for high-price hospitals were mixed: High-price hospitals fared much better than low-price hospitals did in U.S. News & World Report rankings, which are largely based on reputation, while generally scoring worse on objective measures of quality, such as postsurgical mortality rates. Thus, insurers may face resistance if they attempt to steer patients away from high-price hospitals because these facilities have good reputations and offer specialized services that may be unique in their markets.

  6. Leading Change to Improve Student Achievement: Novice Leaders Take the Reins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazer, S. David; Bauer, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the effects of education leadership candidates' experiences taking a non-traditional research course in which they identify a specific instructional performance gap in their school sites, then engage in action research, consult published literature, and develop an action plan to address the gap. Candidates are required to…

  7. "Relinquish the reins": persuasion and consensus in the discourse of pregnancy and childbirth advice literature.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Ornaith

    2015-03-01

    Popular pregnancy and childbirth advice books constitute an important source of information for pregnant women. These texts shape women's perceptions of pregnancy, childbirth and the medical care they will receive during this time. This article reports on a study of the enactment of power relations between pregnant women and their medical caregivers in the discourse of pregnancy and childbirth advice literature and its implications for practice. The study focuses on the discursive positioning of women in relation to medical personnel through a critical discourse analysis of two popular advice books, one in English and one in French. The article suggests that through the use of a number of key discursive strategies, pregnant women are constructed as under the control of the medical institution in these texts. However, this control is not achieved by an overt oppressive discourse, instead it is achieved through persuasion and consensus by generating the consent of pregnant women to comply with medical norms. The medical institution is represented in these texts as a dominant force while women are constructed as powerless recipients of medical care. Medical professionals should firstly consider whether the power relations represented in these texts correspond to those enacted in clinics and delivery rooms. Secondly, caregivers should be cautious about recommending popular pregnancy and childbirth advice books to women as the relationship between pregnant women and their caregivers may be undermined by the negative power asymmetry enacted in these texts. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. New Therapeutic Targets in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. Aiming to Rein in Runaway Wound-Healing Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, Neil; Shea, Barry S.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating disease, with a median survival as short as 3 years from the time of diagnosis and no pharmacological therapies yet approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. To address the great unmet need for effective IPF therapy, a number of new drugs have recently been, or are now being, evaluated in clinical trials. The rationales for most of these therapeutic candidates are based on the current paradigm of IPF pathogenesis, in which recurrent injury to the alveolar epithelium is believed to drive aberrant wound healing responses, resulting in fibrosis rather than repair. Here we discuss drugs in recently completed or currently ongoing phase II and III IPF clinical trials in the context of their putative mechanisms of action and the aberrant repair processes they are believed to target: innate immune activation and polarization, fibroblast accumulation and myofibroblast differentiation, or extracellular matrix deposition and stiffening. Placed in this context, the positive results of recently completed trials of pirfenidone and nintedanib, and results that will come from ongoing trials of other agents, should provide valuable insights into the still-enigmatic pathogenesis of this disease, in addition to providing benefits to patients with IPF. PMID:25090037

  9. Keeping a tight grip on the reins: donor control over aid coordination and management in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Buse, K

    1999-09-01

    A long-standing consensus that aid coordination should be owned by recipient authorities has been eclipsed by accord on the desirability of recipient management of aid along-side domestic resources. Nonetheless, in many low and lower-middle income countries, donors remain remarkably uncoordinated; where attempts at coordination are made, they are often donor-driven, and only a small proportion of aid is directly managed by recipients. This paper draws on evidence from an in-depth review of aid to the health sector in Bangladesh to analyze the systems by which external resources are managed. Based on interviews with key stakeholders, a questionnaire survey and analysis of documentary sources, the factors constraining the government from assuming a more active role in aid management are explored. The results suggest that donor perceptions of weak government capacity, inadequate accountability and compromised integrity only partially account for the propensity for donor leadership. Equally important is the consideration that aid coordination has a markedly political dimension. Stakeholders are well aware of the power, influence and leverage which aid coordination confers, an awareness which colours the desire of some stakeholders to lead aid coordination processes, and conditions the extent and manner by which others wish to be involved. It is argued that recipient management of external aid is dependent on major changes in the attitudes and behaviours of recipients and donors alike.

  10. Taking the Reins: Institutional Transformation in Higher Education. The ACE Series on Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckel, Peter D.; Kezar, Adrianna

    2011-01-01

    Peter Eckel and Adrianna Kezar have written this book to offer insight to campus leaders who face transformational change--to help them mount a proactive, rather than a reactive, process to effect transformation. They believe that most institutional leaders have little to no experience with implementing large-scale change and lack a solid…

  11. Amid Fiscal Crisis, L.A. Gives Site Councils Budget Reins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    At Jefferson High School, a governing body made up of teachers, nonclassroom-based educators, parents, and Principal Michael Taft appears to be living the dream, to the extent such a thing is possible during a staggering fiscal crisis. The leadership team, officially known as a "school site council," has mainly used an infusion of…

  12. One Way to Rein in the Cost of Textbooks: Make Them Free

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delespinasse, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    The prices for college texts have soared way beyond inflation for the last quarter-century. As such, they have become a burden on today's financially strapped students. From the point of students and of faculty members who are concerned about their students' welfare, the important question is what can be done to drive text prices back down. In…

  13. Surgical inflammatory stress: the embryo takes hold of the reins again

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The surgical inflammatory response can be a type of high-grade acute stress response associated with an increasingly complex trophic functional system for using oxygen. This systemic neuro-immune-endocrine response seems to induce the re-expression of 2 extraembryonic-like functional axes, i.e. coelomic-amniotic and trophoblastic-yolk-sac-related, within injured tissues and organs, thus favoring their re-development. Accordingly, through the up-regulation of two systemic inflammatory phenotypes, i.e. neurogenic and immune-related, a gestational-like response using embryonic functions would be induced in the patient’s injured tissues and organs, which would therefore result in their repair. Here we establish a comparison between the pathophysiological mechanisms that are produced during the inflammatory response and the physiological mechanisms that are expressed during early embryonic development. In this way, surgical inflammation could be a high-grade stress response whose pathophysiological mechanisms would be based on the recapitulation of ontogenic and phylogenetic-related functions. Thus, the ultimate objective of surgical inflammation, as a gestational process, is creating new tissues/organs for repairing the injured ones. Since surgical inflammation and early embryonic development share common production mechanisms, the factors that hamper the wound healing reaction in surgical patients could be similar to those that impair the gestational process. PMID:23374964

  14. Executive Director Fred Spilhaus Steps Down; Interim Leader Takes AGU Reins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Peter

    2009-02-01

    After 39 years as AGU executive director, Fred Spilhaus has stepped down from his post; he will become executive director emeritus. At a 27 January 2009 staff meeting at AGU headquarters, in Washington, D. C., three of the Union officers introduced Robert T. Van Hook, who will serve as interim executive director while AGU conducts a worldwide search for a new executive director. The search is expected to start in the summer of 2009 and to take from 6 to 18 months. ``AGU is a growing, vibrant organization that wishes to thoughtfully chart its course for the coming decades,'' Van Hook said. ``I am a professional interim executive, here to build on Fred Spilhaus's legacy. I want to help this extraordinary Union of researchers, teachers, and students take careful stock of where it is today, where it wants to go tomorrow, and what kind of staff leader it needs to help it get there,'' he said. ``My job is to get you ready for the next executive director,'' Van Hook told AGU staff, noting that he is not a candidate for the position himself.

  15. Putting reins on the brain. How the body and environment use it

    PubMed Central

    Dotov, Dobromir G.

    2014-01-01

    Radical embodied cognitive neuroscience (RECN) will probably rely on dynamical systems theory (DST) and complex systems theory for methods and formalism. Yet, there have been plenty of non-radical neurodynamicists out there for quite some time. How much of their work fits with radical embodied cognitive science, what do they need RECN for, and what are the inconsistencies between RECN and established neurodynamics that would have to be resolved? This paper is both theoretical hypothesis and review. First, it provides a brief overview of the typical, purely structural considerations why the central nervous systems (CNS) should be treated as a nonlinear dynamical system and what this entails. The reader will learn about the circular causality enclosing brain and behavior and different attempts to formalize this circularity. Then, three different attempts at linking dynamics and theory of brain function are described in more detail and criticized. A fourth method based on ecological psychology could fix some of the issues that the others encounter. It is argued that studying self-organization of the brain without taking its ecological embedding into account is insufficient. Finally, based on existing theoretical work we propose two roles that the CNS has to be fulfilling in order to allow an animal to behave adequately in its niche. In its first role the CNS has to be enslaved easily by patterns of behavior that guide the animal through its environment. In the second role the brain has to flexibly switch among patterns, what can be called the metastable circuit breaker. The relevance of this idea is supported using certain motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). These symptoms can be explained as consequent to an excessive stability of the (metastable) circuit breaker. PMID:25346675

  16. Take the Reins on Model Quality with ModelCHECK and Gatekeeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Corey

    2012-01-01

    Model quality and consistency has been an issue for us due to the diverse experience level and imaginative modeling techniques of our users. Fortunately, setting up ModelCHECK and Gatekeeper to enforce our best practices has helped greatly, but it wasn't easy. There were many challenges associated with setting up ModelCHECK and Gatekeeper including: limited documentation, restrictions within ModelCHECK, and resistance from end users. However, we consider ours a success story. In this presentation we will describe how we overcame these obstacles and present some of the details of how we configured them to work for us.

  17. Application of MRIL-WD (Magnetic Resonance Imaging Logging While Drilling) for irreducible water saturation, total reservoir, free-fluid, bound-fluid porosity measurements and its value for the petrophysical analysis of RT/RM data from the Shah Deniz well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirov, Elnur

    2016-04-01

    of MRIL-WD can help many engineers to differentiate between the immovable and movable water in oil reservoirs in many fields. Sometimes MRIL-WD have also been capable of providing better formation permeability than conventional logs, a feature which can save time and expense in well-completion decisions. The RT & RM bound fluid and total porosity measurements can provide a tremendous new insight into the formation evaluation of shaly sands and low resistivity pays. Unlike traditional porosity devices, which are affected by rock matrix changes, the MRIL-WD tool can be used in complex or mixed lithology sequences and provide measurements of porosity that are lithology independent.

  18. Combinatorial Problems of Applied Discrete Mathematics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    204 .I (30) 3. Steiner, Combinatorische Aufgabe, Z. Reine Angew. Math. 45 (1853) 18 1—182. (31) IC. Takeuchi, A table of difference sets generating...Assoc. Fr. Ay. Sd . 1 (1900) 122— 123; 2 (1901) 170—203. • (33) R.M. Wilson, Cyclotomy and difference fam ilies in elementary Abelian groups , 3. Number...the differe nt cliques containing either A or B. Let us first introduce the following notations. If A is a vertex in G, then 1(A) denotes the set of

  19. {{\\rm{H}}}_{2}\\,X{}^{1}{{\\rm{\\Sigma }}}_{g}^{+}-c{}^{3}{{\\rm{\\Pi }}}_{u} Excitation by Electron Impact: Energies, Spectra, Emission Yields, Cross-sections, and H(1s) Kinetic Energy Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianming; Shemansky, Donald E.; Yoshii, Jean; Liu, Melinda J.; Johnson, Paul V.; Malone, Charles P.; Khakoo, Murtadha A.

    2017-10-01

    The c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state of the hydrogen molecule has the second largest triplet-state excitation cross-section, and plays an important role in the heating of the upper thermospheres of outer planets by electron excitation. Precise energies of the H2, D2, and HD c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u-(v,N) levels are calculated from highly accurate ab initio potential energy curves that include relativistic, radiative, and empirical non-adiabatic corrections. The emission yields are determined from predissociation rates and refined radiative transition probabilities. The excitation function and excitation cross-section of the c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state are extracted from previous theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. The emission cross-section is determined from the calculated emission yield and the extracted excitation cross-section. The kinetic energy (E k ) distributions of H atoms produced via the predissociation of the c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state, the c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u- - b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ dissociative emission by the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole, and the c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u - a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ - b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ cascade dissociative emission by the electric dipole are obtained. The predissociation of the c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u+ and c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u- states both produce H(1s) atoms with an average E k of ˜4.1 eV/atom, while the c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u- - b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ dissociative emissions by the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole give an average E k of ˜1.0 and ˜0.8 eV/atom, respectively. The c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u - a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ - b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ cascade and dissociative emission gives an average E k of ˜1.3 eV/atom. On average, each H2 excited to the c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state in an H2-dominated atmosphere deposits ˜7.1 eV into the atmosphere while each H2 directly excited to the a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ and d{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u states contribute ˜2.3 and ˜3.3 eV, respectively, to the atmosphere. The spectral distribution of the calculated continuum emission arising from the X{}1{{{Σ }}}g+ - c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u excitation is significantly different from that of direct a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ or d{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u excitations.

  20. Production of Σ(1385)± and Ξ(1530)0 in p-Pb collisions at \\sqrt{{s}_{{\\rm{N}}{\\rm{N}}}}={\\rm{5.02\\; TeV}} measured by ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jihye; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    In order to study the hot hadronic matter created in heavy-ion collisions, it is important to compare particle production in large systems to that in smaller systems, such as proton-proton (pp) and proton-lead (p-Pb) collisions. In particular, resonances with different lifetimes are good candidates to probe the interplay of particle re-scattering and regeneration in the hadronic phase. The yields of the strange and double-strange hyperon resonances Σ(1385)± and Ξ(1530)0 are measured in the rapidity range -0.5 < yCMS < 0 in p-Pb collisions at \\sqrt{{s}{{N}{{N}}}}={{5.02 TeV}} with the ALICE detector at the LHC. We report on the transverse momentum distributions and mean transverse momentum as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity. These results complement the information derived from the measurements of other resonances such as K*(892)0 and ˚(1020). The multiplicity dependence of the integrated yield ratios of excited hyperons to longer-lived particles is discussed and compared to model predictions from pQCD-inspired models such as PYTHIA8 as well as statistical hadronization models.

  1. Temperature dependence of line parameters of {}^{12}\\rm{C}{}^{16}\\rm{O}_{2} near 2.004\\,{\\rm{\\mu }}m studied by tunable diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongliang; Sun, Mingguo; Zha, Shenlong; Liu, Qiang; Cao, Zhensong; Huang, Yinbo; Zhu, Zhu; Rao, Ruizhong

    2018-02-01

    Not Available Project supported by the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41205021 and 61701006), the Youth Innovation Promotion Association of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. 2015264), and the Scientific Research Foundation of the Higher Education Institutions of Anhui Province, China (Grant No. KJ2015A234).

  2. An optimal scheme for top quark mass measurement near the \\rm{t}\\bar{t} threshold at future \\rm{e}^{+}{e}^{-} colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Guo; Wan, Xia; Wang, You-Kai

    2018-05-01

    A top quark mass measurement scheme near the {{t}}\\bar{{{t}}} production threshold in future {{{e}}}+{{{e}}}- colliders, e.g. the Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC), is simulated. A {χ }2 fitting method is adopted to determine the number of energy points to be taken and their locations. Our results show that the optimal energy point is located near the largest slope of the cross section v. beam energy plot, and the most efficient scheme is to concentrate all luminosity on this single energy point in the case of one-parameter top mass fitting. This suggests that the so-called data-driven method could be the best choice for future real experimental measurements. Conveniently, the top mass statistical uncertainty can also be calculated directly by the error matrix even without any sampling and fitting. The agreement of the above two optimization methods has been checked. Our conclusion is that by taking 50 fb‑1 total effective integrated luminosity data, the statistical uncertainty of the top potential subtracted mass can be suppressed to about 7 MeV and the total uncertainty is about 30 MeV. This precision will help to identify the stability of the electroweak vacuum at the Planck scale. Supported by National Science Foundation of China (11405102) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (GK201603027, GK201803019)

  3. Gas-phase Absorptions of {{\\rm{C}}}_{42}{{\\rm{H}}}_{18}^{+} near 8300 Å below 10 K: Astronomical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, E. K.; Maier, J. P.

    2017-11-01

    The gas-phase electronic spectrum of {{{C}}}42{{{H}}}18+ ({{HBC}}+) with an origin band at 8281 \\mathringA has been measured below 10 {{K}} by photofragmentation of helium complexes ({{{C}}}42{{{H}}}18+{--}{{He}}n) in a radiofrequency trap. {{HBC}}+ is a medium-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cation, and using an ion trapping technique it has been possible to record a high-quality gas-phase spectrum to directly compare with astronomical observations. No diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) have been reported at the wavelengths of the strongest absorption bands in the {{{C}}}42{{{H}}}18+ spectrum. Measurement of absolute absorption cross sections in the ion trap allows upper limits to the column density of this ion to be {10}12 {{cm}}-2, indicating that even PAH cations of this size, which are believed to be stable in the interstellar medium, should be excluded as candidates for at least the strong DIBs.

  4. Isomeric and Isotopic Effects on the Electronic Spectrum of {{\\rm{C}}}_{60}^{+}–He: Consequences for Astronomical Observations of {{\\rm{C}}}_{60}^{+}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, E. K.; Maier, J. P.

    2018-05-01

    Laboratory measurements are reported that enable a more accurate determination of the characteristics of the near-infrared absorptions of {{{C}}}60+ below 10 K. These data were obtained by photofragmentation of {{{C}}}60+{--}{He} complexes in a cryogenic trap. Asymmetry in the profiles of the observed 9577 and 9632 Å absorption bands of {{{C}}}60+{--}{He} is caused by the attachment of the weakly bound helium atom to hexagonal or pentagonal faces of {{{C}}}60+. The implication is that the FWHM of the bands in the electronic spectrum of {{{C}}}60+ below 10 K is 1.4 Å. The effect of 13C isotopes on the {{{C}}}60+ electronic spectrum is experimentally evaluated by measurement of {}12{{{C}}}60+{--}{He}, {}13{{{C}}}112{{{C}}}59+{--}{He}, and {}13{{{C}}}212{{{C}}}58+{--}{He}. Data on the 9365 Å absorption band indicate a wavelength shift of about 0.3 Å between the former and latter. This result is consistent with models used to interpret the vibrational isotope effect in the Raman spectrum of neutral C60. The influence of 13C isotopes on the 9348, 9365, 9428, 9577, and 9632 Å diffuse interstellar bands is expected to be minor considering other broadening factors that affect astronomical observations. The presented data also provide more accurate relative intensities of the five interstellar bands attributed to {{{C}}}60+.

  5. Disentangling the photodissociation pathways of small lead clusters by time-resolved monitoring of their delayed decays: the case of {{{\\rm{P}}{\\rm{b}}}_{31}}^{+}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfram, Markus; König, Stephan; Bandelow, Steffi; Fischer, Paul; Jankowski, Alexander; Marx, Gerrit; Schweikhard, Lutz

    2018-02-01

    Lead clusters {{{{Pb}}}{n}}+/- in the size range between about n = 15 and 40 have recently shown to exhibit complex dissociation spectra due to sequential and competing decays. In order to disentangle the pathways the exemplary {{{{Pb}}}31}+ clusters have been stored and size selected in a Penning trap and irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses. We present time-resolved measurements at time scales from several tens of microseconds to several hundreds of milliseconds. The study results in strong evidence that {{{{Pb}}}31}+ decays not only by neutral monomer evaporation but also by neutral heptamers breaking off. In addition, the decays are further followed to smaller products. The corresponding decay and growth times show that {{{{Pb}}}30}+ also dissociates by either monomer evaporation or heptamer break-off. Furthermore, the product {{{{Pb}}}17}+ may well be a result of heptamer break-off from {{{{Pb}}}24}+—as the second step of a sequential heptamer decay.

  6. Serendipitous Detection of {\\rm{H}}\\,{\\rm{I}} Absorption Sets the True Redshift of 4C +15.05 to z = 0.833

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. M.; Ghosh, T.; Salter, C. J.

    2018-06-01

    4C+15.05 (also known as NRAO 91, PKS 0202+14, or J0204+15) is a quintessential blazar. It has a luminous, variable radio spectrum, a super-luminal jet, and gamma-ray detections. Arecibo observations with the 700–800 MHz receiver on the 305 m diameter William E. Gordon Telescope detected, serendipitously, H I in absorption against 4C+15.05 while using it as a bandpass calibrator for another object in an H I absorption project. Although the redshift we derive is different from that commonly in use in the literature (nominally z = 0.405), it agrees very well with the value of z = 0.833 determined by Stickel et al. This absorption feature is best fitted by a sum of three Gaussians, which yield an average redshift of z = 0.8336 ± 0.0004, although without corresponding high-resolution imaging it is not possible to say whether the components are parts of outflows or inflows. A total column density of N(H I) = 2.39 ± 0.13 × 1021 cm‑2 is derived, relatively high compared to many radio-loud sources. These results are compared to various relationships in the literature.

  7. Total Ionizing Dose Effects on Ge Channel $p$FETs with Raised $${\\rm Si}_{0.55}{\\rm Ge}_{0.45}$$ Source/Drain

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Liang; Zhang, En Xia; Schrimpf, Ronald D.; ...

    2015-12-17

    Here, the total ionizing dose response of Ge channel pFETs with raised Si 0.55Ge 0.45 source/drain is investigated under different radiation bias conditions. Threshold-voltage shifts and transconductance degradation are noticeable only for negative-bias (on state) irradiation, and are mainly due to negative bias-temperature instability (NBTI). Nonmonotonic leakage changes during irradiation are observed, which are attributed to the competition of radiation-induced field transistor leakage and S/D junction leakage.

  8. Pills, shots, implants, vaccines: can the elusive sperm be reined in? Male contraceptive research extremely slow, but promising.

    PubMed

    1995-08-01

    Although it may be 20 years before a male contraceptive is marketed, researchers continue to explore various options. Part of the difficulty with male contraception is the fact that the oral contraceptives were so successful in women that they cornered the market. Another problem is that it is easier to control one egg per month than hundreds of millions of sperm cells each day. Another is that it is more expensive to do research on male than on female rats since the males require separate cages. The physiologic targets for male birth control are 1) the process of spermatogenesis, 2) the process of sperm maturation, and 3) the process of capacitation. The substance gossypol, which suppresses sperm without affecting androgen levels, has been the subject of male contraceptive research in the US since the 1970s. Clinical trials of gossypol are planned by a collaborative groups of investigators from developing countries. Research has also continued for more than 20 years on compounds to alter male hormone levels. The use of one such compound, testosterone enanthate, required weekly injections, so current research is centered on finding a more marketable product, such as a 3-month injectable that uses testosterone buciclate. The combination of testosterone enanthate with cyproterone acetate is also showing promise in achieving complete azoospermia in trials in men. The dosing schedule makes this regimen unmarketable, however. Protocols have also been completed for a clinical trial using two implanted rods to deliver a GnRH analog and a specially developed androgen. Work is also proceeding on the development of a GnRH vaccine and on a vaccine specific only to follicle-stimulating hormone. Other avenues of research are focusing on nifedipine, a drug used to treat high blood pressure, on mifepristone (RU-486) which temporarily blocks calcium, and on etoprine, which suppresses rapidly dividing sperm cells. Research has halted on two compounds that protect cells from oxidative damage (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) because of the potential damage to sperm DNA, which could cause early miscarriage or birth defects.

  9. Chinese Students in Canadian Higher Education: A Case for Reining in Our Use of the Term "Generation 1.5"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Steve; Lee, Ena

    2017-01-01

    Roberge defines the 1.5 Generation as "those who immigrate as young children and have life experiences that span two or more countries, cultures and languages" (2009, p. 4). In US and Canadian higher education, the term has gained considerable recognition, with the scope of the term broadening among some educators to include…

  10. Holding the Reins of the Professional Learning Community: Eight Themes from Research on Principals' Perceptions of Professional Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranston, Jerome

    2009-01-01

    Using a naturalistic inquiry approach and thematic analysis, this paper outlines the findings of a research study that examined 12 Manitoba principals' conceptions of professional learning communities. The study found that these principals consider the development of professional learning communities to be a normative imperative within the…

  11. "My reins admonish me at night" (Psalm 16:7): the kidneys in ancient and medieval Jewish sources.

    PubMed

    Kottek, Samuel S

    2010-01-01

    David Macht already stated that in several ancient languages the same term is used for kidneys and testes. "Preparation or elaboration of the semen was considered to be one of the functions of the kidneys in man". In the Bible, however, this confusion does not exist, at least not on the anatomical level. Together with the heart, the kidneys are paradigmatic of the innermost organs, wherefrom result their metaphoric association in being the seat of emotions and of wisdom. Some of these aspects will be delineated in the present study, briefly in Bible and Talmud, while stressing medieval Jewish sources, including the works of Shabtai Donnolo, Judah Halevi, Shem-Tov Falaquera, and Meir ibn Aldabi.

  12. The flaw-detected coating and its applications in R&M of aircrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Feng; Liu, Mabao; Lü, Zhigang

    2009-07-01

    A monitoring method called ICM (Intelligent Coating Monitoring), which is based mainly on the intelligent coating sensors, has the capability to monitor crack initiation and growth in fatigue test coupons has been suggested in this study. The intelligent coating sensor is normally consisted of three layers: driving layer, sensing layer and protective layer where necessary. Fatigue tests with ICM for various materials demonstrate the capability to detect cracks with l<300μm, corresponding to the increment of the sensing layer's resistance at the level of 0.05Ω. Also, ICM resistance measurements correlate with crack length, permitting crack length monitoring. Numerous applications are under evaluation for ICM in difficult-to-access locations on commercial and military aircrafts. The motivation for the permanently flaw-detected coating monitoring is either (i) to replace an existing inspection that requires substantial disassembly and surface preparation (e.g. inside the fuel tank of an aircraft), or (ii) to take advantage of early detection and apply less invasive life-extension repairs, as well as reduce interruption of service when flaws are detected. Implementation of ICM is expected to improve fleet management practices and modify damage tolerance assumptions.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS-RM project: velocity dispersions of QSOs (Shen+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y.; Greene, J. E.; Ho, L. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Denney, K. D.; Horne, K.; Jiang, L.; Kochanek, C. S.; McGreer, I. D.; Merloni, A.; Peterson, B. M.; Petitjean, P.; Schneider, D. P.; Schulze, A.; Strauss, M. A.; Tao, C.; Trump, J. R.; Pan, K.; Bizyaev, D.

    2015-09-01

    The spectra were taken as part of the SDSS-III BOSS survey (Eisenstein et al. 2011AJ....142...72E; Dawson et al. 2013AJ....145...10D) from 2014 January to July. The wavelength coverage of BOSS spectroscopy is 3650-10400Å, with a spectral resolution of R~2000. (2 data files).

  14. Crisis Communication in the Area of Risk Management: The CriCoRM Project

    PubMed Central

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Antonelli, Laura; Orizio, Grazia; Rossmann, Costanze; Ziegler, Lena; Meyer, Lisa; Garcia-Jimenez, Leonarda; Losada, Jose Carlos; Correia, Joao; Soares, Joana; Covolo, Loredana; Lirangi, Enrico; Gelatti, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Background During the last H1N1 pandemic has emerged the importance of crisis communication as an essential part of health crisis management. The Project aims specifically to improve the understanding of crisis communication dynamics and effective tools and to allow public health institutions to communicate better with the public during health emergencies. Design and methods The Project will perform different activities: i) state of the art review; ii) identification of key stakeholders; iii) communicational analysis performed using data collected on stakeholder communication activities and their outcomes considering the lessons learnt from the analysis of the reasons for differing public reactions during pandemics; iv) improvement of the existing guidelines; v) development of Web 2.0 tools as web-platform and feed service and implementation of impact assessment algorithms; vi) organization of exercises and training on this issues. Expected impact of the study for public health In the context of health security policies at an EU level, the project aims to find a common and innovative approach to health crisis communication that was displayed by differing reactions to the H1N1 pandemic policies. The focus on new social media tools aims to enhance the role of e-health, and the project aims to use these tools in the specific field of health institutions and citizens. The development of Web 2.0 tools for health crisis communication will allow an effective two-way exchange of information between public health institutions and citizens. An effective communication strategy will increase population compliance with public health recommendations. Significance for public health The specific aim of the project is to develop a European strategy approach on how to communicate with the population and with different stakeholders groups involved in the crisis management process, based on an analysis of the communication process during the H1N1 pandemic (content analysis of press releases, press coverage and forum discussions) and on interviews with key stakeholders in health crisis communication. The development of web 2.0 tools, providing rapid responses will allow real-time verification of awareness of social trends and citizens’ response. Furthermore, the project would like to offer these resources to the EU Public Health Institutions and EU citizens to improve their interaction, and hence reinforce citizens’ right to patient-centred health care. The project proposal has been designed in accordance with the general principles of ethics and the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights with regard to human rights, values, freedom, solidarity, and better protection of European citizens. PMID:25170491

  15. Crisis Communication in the Area of Risk Management: The CriCoRM Project.

    PubMed

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Antonelli, Laura; Orizio, Grazia; Rossmann, Costanze; Ziegler, Lena; Meyer, Lisa; Garcia-Jimenez, Leonarda; Losada, Jose Carlos; Correia, Joao; Soares, Joana; Covolo, Loredana; Lirangi, Enrico; Gelatti, Umberto

    2013-09-02

    During the last H1N1 pandemic has emerged the importance of crisis communication as an essential part of health crisis management. The Project aims specifically to improve the understanding of crisis communication dynamics and effective tools and to allow public health institutions to communicate better with the public during health emergencies. THE PROJECT WILL PERFORM DIFFERENT ACTIVITIES: i) state of the art review; ii) identification of key stakeholders; iii) communicational analysis performed using data collected on stakeholder communication activities and their outcomes considering the lessons learnt from the analysis of the reasons for differing public reactions during pandemics; iv) improvement of the existing guidelines; v) development of Web 2.0 tools as web-platform and feed service and implementation of impact assessment algorithms; vi) organization of exercises and training on this issues. In the context of health security policies at an EU level, the project aims to find a common and innovative approach to health crisis communication that was displayed by differing reactions to the H1N1 pandemic policies. The focus on new social media tools aims to enhance the role of e-health, and the project aims to use these tools in the specific field of health institutions and citizens. The development of Web 2.0 tools for health crisis communication will allow an effective two-way exchange of information between public health institutions and citizens. An effective communication strategy will increase population compliance with public health recommendations. Significance for public healthThe specific aim of the project is to develop a European strategy approach on how to communicate with the population and with different stakeholders groups involved in the crisis management process, based on an analysis of the communication process during the H1N1 pandemic (content analysis of press releases, press coverage and forum discussions) and on interviews with key stakeholders in health crisis communication. The development of web 2.0 tools, providing rapid responses will allow real-time verification of awareness of social trends and citizens' response. Furthermore, the project would like to offer these resources to the EU Public Health Institutions and EU citizens to improve their interaction, and hence reinforce citizens' right to patient-centred health care. The project proposal has been designed in accordance with the general principles of ethics and the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights with regard to human rights, values, freedom, solidarity, and better protection of European citizens.

  16. Current Methodologies of Identifying R&M (Reliability and Maintainability) Problems in Fielded Weapon Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    applies to a one Air Transport Rack (ATR) volume LRU in an airborne, uninhabited, fighter environment.) The goal is to have a 2000 hour mean time between...benefits of applying reliability and 11 maintainability improvements to these weapon systems or components. Examples will be given in this research of...where the Pareto Principle applies . The Pareto analysis applies 25 to field failure types as well as to shop defect types. In the following automotive

  17. STS-45 crewmembers during LINHOF camera briefing in JSC's Bldg 4 rm 2026A

    1992-01-14

    S92-26522 (Feb 1992) --- Crewmembers assigned to NASA's STS-45 mission are briefed on the use of the Linhof camera in the flight operations facility at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). Charles F. Bolden, mission commander, stands at left. Other crewmembers (seated clockwise around the table from lower left) are Dirk Frimout of Belgium representing the European Space Agency as payload specialist; Charles R. (Rick) Chappell, backup payload specialist; Brian Duffy, pilot; Kathryn D. Sullivan, payload commander; David C. Leestma, mission specialist; Byron K. Lichtenberg, payload specialist; and C. Michael Foale, mission specialist. James H. Ragan (far right), head of the flight equipment section of the flight systems branch in JSC's Man Systems Division, briefs the crewmembers. Donald C. Carico, of the crew training staff and Rockwell International, stands near Bolden. The camera, used for out-the-window observations, is expected to be used frequently on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS-1) mission, scheduled for a March date with the Space Shuttle Atlantis.

  18. Environmental Health Assessment for Work Unit RM 08-03, Ammonium Perchlorate Alternatives (Ionic Liquids)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    measured experimentally but are estimated by QSAR models such as TOPKAT® or EPI Suite™ used to predict physical, chemical and toxicological properties...IONIC LIQUIDS) TOXICOLOGY REPORT NO. 87-XE-OBMEa-10 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Preventive Medicine Surveys: 40-5f1 0...Include area code) 39 U U U UU 410-436-7169 Stand.ard Form 298 lKev. 8/98) Prescnbed by ANSI Std. Z39.1 B Toxicology Report No. 87-XE-OBMEa-10

  19. Strong Effect of Azodye Layer Thickness on RM-Stabilized Photoalignment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-21

    to thicker layers (~40 nm). Author Keywords photoalignment; azodye; reactive mesogen 1. Introduction Photoalignment of liquid crystals by azodye...Polymerizable azodyes[3] as well as passivation of the azodye film by spin-coating with a layer of reactive mesogen[4] are currently proposed solutions...thick alignment film rather than a ~40 nm thick alignment film ; cells with thin alignment layers are stable to exposure to polarized light for at

  20. How Can You Support RIDM/CRM/RM Through the Use of PRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DoVemto. Tpmu

    2011-01-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is one of key Risk Informed Decision Making (RIDM) tools. It is a scenario-based methodology aimed at identifying and assessing Safety and Technical Performance risks in complex technological systems.

  1. High-accuracy calculations of the rotation-vibration spectrum of {{\\rm{H}}}_{3}^{+}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Alijah, Alexander; Császár, Attila G.

    2017-12-01

    Calculation of the rotation-vibration spectrum of {{{H}}}3+, as well as of its deuterated isotopologues, with near-spectroscopic accuracy requires the development of sophisticated theoretical models, methods, and codes. The present paper reviews the state-of-the-art in these fields. Computation of rovibrational states on a given potential energy surface (PES) has now become standard for triatomic molecules, at least up to intermediate energies, due to developments achieved by the present authors and others. However, highly accurate Born-Oppenheimer energies leading to highly accurate PESs are not accessible even for this two-electron system using conventional electronic structure procedures (e.g. configuration-interaction or coupled-cluster techniques with extrapolation to the complete (atom-centered Gaussian) basis set limit). For this purpose, highly specialized techniques must be used, e.g. those employing explicitly correlated Gaussians and nonlinear parameter optimizations. It has also become evident that a very dense grid of ab initio points is required to obtain reliable representations of the computed points extending from the minimum to the asymptotic limits. Furthermore, adiabatic, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamic correction terms need to be considered to achieve near-spectroscopic accuracy during calculation of the rotation-vibration spectrum of {{{H}}}3+. The remaining and most intractable problem is then the treatment of the effects of non-adiabatic coupling on the rovibrational energies, which, in the worst cases, may lead to corrections on the order of several cm-1. A promising way of handling this difficulty is the further development of effective, motion- or even coordinate-dependent, masses and mass surfaces. Finally, the unresolved challenge of how to describe and elucidate the experimental pre-dissociation spectra of {{{H}}}3+ and its isotopologues is discussed.

  2. Gas-phase Absorption of {{\\rm{C}}}_{70}^{2+} below 10 K: Astronomical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, E. K.; Holz, M.; Maier, J. P.

    2017-02-01

    The electronic spectrum of the fullerene dication {{{C}}}702+ has been measured in the gas phase at low temperature in a cryogenic radiofrequency ion trap. The spectrum consists of a strong origin band at 7030 Å and two weaker features to higher energy. The bands have FWHMs of 35 Å indicating an excited state lifetime on the order of one-tenth of a picosecond. Absorption cross-section measurements yield (2 ± 1) × 10-15 cm2 at 7030 Å. These results are used to predict the depth of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) due to the absorption by {{{C}}}702+. At an assumed column density of 2 × 1012 cm-2 the attenuation of starlight at 7030 Å is around 0.4% and thus the detection of such a shallow and broad interstellar band would be difficult. The electronic spectrum of {{{C}}}602+ shows no absorptions in the visible. Below 4000 Å the spectra of C60, {{{C}}}60+ and {{{C}}}602+ are similar. The large intrinsic FWHM of the features in this region, ˜200 Å for the band near 3250 Å, make them unsuitable for DIB detection.

  3. UV TREATMENT FOR CONTROL OF AEROMONAS (RM.C.M.6)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The data and related interpretations that will be developed in this research will form the scientific basis for analysis, design, and regulation of polychromatic UV disinfection systems. At present, only minimal data regarding the wavelength-specific nature of microbial dose-resp...

  4. The Effects of Rm-CSF and Ril-6 Therapy on Immunosuppressed Antiorthostatically Suspended Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstong, Jason W.; Kirby-Dobbels, Kathy; Chapes, Steven K.

    1995-01-01

    Antiorthostatically suspended mice had suppressed macrophage development in both unloaded and loaded bones, indicating a systemic effect. Bone marrow cells from those mice secreted less macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) than did control mice. Because M-CSF and IL-6 are important to bone marrow macrophage maturation, we formulated the hypothesis that suppressed macrophage development occurred as a result of the depressed levels of either M-CSF or IL-6. To test the hypothesis, mice were administered recombinant M-CSF or IL-6 intraperitoneally. We showed that recombinant M-CSF therapy, but not recombinant IL-6 therapy, reversed the suppressive effects of orthostatic suspension on macrophage development. These data suggest that bone marrow cells that produce M-CSF are affected by antiorthostatic suspension and may contribute to the inhibited maturation of bone marrow macrophage progenitors.

  5. Succinoglycan Production Contributes to Acidic pH Tolerance in Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Justin P; Geddes, Barney A; Oresnik, Ivan J

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the hypothesis that exopolysaccharide plays a role in the survival of Sinorhizobium meliloti at low pH levels is addressed. When S. meliloti was grown at pH 5.75, synthesis of succinoglycan increased, whereas synthesis of galactoglucan decreased. Succinoglycan that was isolated from cultures grown at low pH had a lower degree of polymerization relative to that which was isolated from cultures grown at neutral pH, suggesting that low-molecular weight (LMW) succinoglycan might play a role in adaptation to low pH. Mutants unable to produce succinoglycan or only able to produce high-molecular weight polysaccharide were found to be sensitive to low pH. However, strains unable to produce LMW polysaccharide were 10-fold more sensitive. In response to low pH, transcription of genes encoding proteins for succinoglycan, glycogen, and cyclic β(1-2) glucans biosynthesis increased, while those encoding proteins necessary for the biosynthesis of galactoglucan decreased. While changes in pH did not affect the production of glycogen or cyclic β(1-2) glucan, it was found that the inability to produce cyclic β(1-2) glucan did contribute to pH tolerance in the absence of succinoglycan. Finally, in addition to being sensitive to low pH, a strain carrying mutations in exoK and exsH, which encode the glycanases responsible for the cleavage of succinoglycan to LMW succinoglycan, exhibited a delay in nodulation and was uncompetitive for nodule occupancy. Taken together, the data suggest that the role for LMW succinoglycan in nodule development may be to enhance survival in the colonized curled root hair.

  6. Prefabricated RM Façade Panels - Search for the Safe Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulimka, Jacek; Kubica, Jan; Kałuża, Marta; Galman, Iwona

    2017-10-01

    The problem, which appeared during the design works on the untypical masonry openwork of the front elevation of the academic building in Poland was presented and discussed in this paper. The original solution of masonry external façade was too risky and practically impossible for realization from the workmanship point of view. For this reason authors were proposed to make this elevation wall as prefabricated construction consisted of medium scale prefabricated elevation panels made of openwork clinker units and masonry joints with reinforcement. Two solutions of prefabricated panels were elaborated: first by the design office and second one, significantly modified, proposed by the authors. Taking into consideration fact that proposed prefabricated panels are not the typical reinforced masonry possible to design based on Eurocode 6, the methodology of “supporting design by test” was accepted to verify the correctness of proposed solutions. The carried out tests of both types of prefabricated panels with results and their discussion are also presented here. The results have shown the lack of safety for the first type of prefabricates and good behaviour, safety and durability of the final, modified solution.

  7. Analysis of R&M Technology Improvement Rationale for Maintainability Index Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Pon" I . 2-57404/OR-52553 NONOI CIITSAALGUSE 4. T171;9 rid Sie) S. Type or REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Analysis of R &M Technology...77/02/04 Single Element Structure Systems o.. 58 iv [ I .. . . ., -... ,. - . .. .111l . ... . . ... . ... r . .... ,-.. . .... .. I . TABLE OF CONTENTS...reasonable and whether the Reliability and Maintainability ( R &M) design ’features stated in a contractor’s proposal could result in a 34% reduction i

  8. von Kármán–Howarth Equation for Hall Magnetohydrodynamics: Hybrid Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, Petr; Verdini, Andrea; Landi, Simone; Franci, Luca; Matteini, Lorenzo

    2018-04-01

    A dynamical vectorial equation for homogeneous incompressible Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence together with the exact scaling law for third-order correlation tensors, analogous to that for the incompressible MHD, is rederived and applied to the results of two-dimensional hybrid simulations of plasma turbulence. At large (MHD) scales the simulations exhibit a clear inertial range where the MHD dynamic law is valid. In the sub-ion range the cascade continues via the Hall term, but the dynamic law derived in the framework of incompressible Hall-MHD equations is obtained only in a low plasma beta simulation. For a higher beta plasma the cascade rate decreases in the sub-ion range and the change becomes more pronounced as the plasma beta increases. This break in the cascade flux can be ascribed to nonthermal (kinetic) features or to others terms in the dynamical equation that are not included in the Hall-MHD incompressible approximation.

  9. Intrinsic optical conductivity of a {{\\rm{C}}}_{2v} symmetric topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Parijat; Matsubara, Masahiko; Bellotti, Enrico; Shi, Junxia

    2017-07-01

    In this work we analytically investigate the longitudinal optical conductivity of the {{{C}}}2v symmetric topological insulator. The conductivity expressions at T = 0 are derived using the Kubo formula and expressed as a function of the ratio of the Dresselhaus and Rashba parameters that characterize the low-energy Hamiltonian. We find that the longitudinal inter-band conductivity vanishes when Dresselhaus and Rashba parameters are equal in strength, also called the persistent spin helix state. The calculations are extended to obtain the frequency-dependent real and imaginary components of the optical conductivity for the topological Kondo insulator SmB6 which exhibits {{{C}}}2v symmetric and anisotropic Dirac cones hosting topological states at \\overline{X} point on the surface Brillouin zone.

  10. The Complete Genome of the Human Clinical Isolate Campylobacter upsaliensis RM3195

    INTRODUCTION: Significant interest in studying the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) of Campylobacter jejuni stemmed from its potential role in post-infection paralytic disorders. METHODS: In this study we present PCR screening of five LOS locus classes (A, B, C, D, and E), for a collection of 116 C. jeju...

  11. A method for spectral DNS of low Rm channel flows based on the least dissipative modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornet, Kacper; Pothérat, Alban

    2015-10-01

    We put forward a new type of spectral method for the direct numerical simulation of flows where anisotropy or very fine boundary layers are present. The main idea is to take advantage of the fact that such structures are dissipative and that their presence should reduce the number of degrees of freedom of the flow, when paradoxically, their fine resolution incurs extra computational cost in most current methods. The principle of this method is to use a functional basis with elements that already include these fine structures so as to avoid these extra costs. This leads us to develop an algorithm to implement a spectral method for arbitrary functional bases, and in particular, non-orthogonal ones. We construct a basic implementation of this algorithm to simulate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) channel flows with an externally imposed, transverse magnetic field, where very thin boundary layers are known to develop along the channel walls. In this case, the sought functional basis can be built out of the eigenfunctions of the dissipation operator, which incorporate these boundary layers, and it turns out to be non-orthogonal. We validate this new scheme against numerical simulations of freely decaying MHD turbulence based on a finite volume code and it is found to provide accurate results. Its ability to fully resolve wall-bounded turbulence with a number of modes close to that required by the dynamics is demonstrated on a simple example. This opens the way to full-blown simulations of MHD turbulence under very high magnetic fields. Until now such simulations were too computationally expensive. In contrast to traditional methods the computational cost of the proposed method, does not depend on the intensity of the magnetic field.

  12. RM-SORN: a reward-modulated self-organizing recurrent neural network.

    PubMed

    Aswolinskiy, Witali; Pipa, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Neural plasticity plays an important role in learning and memory. Reward-modulation of plasticity offers an explanation for the ability of the brain to adapt its neural activity to achieve a rewarded goal. Here, we define a neural network model that learns through the interaction of Intrinsic Plasticity (IP) and reward-modulated Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). IP enables the network to explore possible output sequences and STDP, modulated by reward, reinforces the creation of the rewarded output sequences. The model is tested on tasks for prediction, recall, non-linear computation, pattern recognition, and sequence generation. It achieves performance comparable to networks trained with supervised learning, while using simple, biologically motivated plasticity rules, and rewarding strategies. The results confirm the importance of investigating the interaction of several plasticity rules in the context of reward-modulated learning and whether reward-modulated self-organization can explain the amazing capabilities of the brain.

  13. SToRM: A Model for Unsteady Surface Hydraulics Over Complex Terrain

    Simoes, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    A two-dimensional (depth-averaged) finite volume Godunov-type shallow water model developed for flow over complex topography is presented. The model is based on an unstructured cellcentered finite volume formulation and a nonlinear strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme. The numerical discretization is founded on the classical and well established shallow water equations in hyperbolic conservative form, but the convective fluxes are calculated using auto-switching Riemann and diffusive numerical fluxes. The model’s implementation within a graphical user interface is discussed. Field application of the model is illustrated by utilizing it to estimate peak flow discharges in a flooding event of historic significance in Colorado, U.S.A., in 2013.

  14. Mathematical, theoretical and experimental confirmations of IRS and IBS by R.M. Santilli

    SciT

    Kohale, Ritesh L.

    The objective of present work is to put forward the Santilli’s experimental, physical and mathematical conception of IsoRedShift (IRS), IsoBlueShift (IBS) and NoIsoShift (NIS). Santilli has carried out a step-by step isotopic lifting of the physical laws of special relativity resulting in a new theory today specifically known Santilli isorelativity. In his 1991 hypothesis Santilli established the requirement to realize the light as electromagnetic waves propagating within a universal substratum. Furthermore Santilli has carried out a step-by step isotopic lifting of the physical laws of special relativity resulting in a new theory today specifically known Santilli isorelativity.

  15. Formation, stability and dissociation dynamics of {{\\rm{N}}}_{2}{}^{{\\rm{n}}+} cations (n = 1 - 2) in 3.5 keV e - -N2 collisions studied using the energy resolved electron-ion coincidence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Prajapati, S.; Singh, B.; Singh, B. K.; Shanker, R.

    2018-04-01

    Coincidences between energy selected electrons and ions produced in the decay of a core hole ionized (excited) state in a free nitrogen molecule have been measured at three specified energies of emitted electrons to reveal the individual pathways produced in 3.5 keV electron-induced fragmentation processes. From these measurements, it has been possible to show, for the first time, that in addition to the normal Auger decay, the resonant Auger excitation channels also share their appreciable contributions in producing singly charged parent ions in an electron-induced collision system. The correlations between ion fragmentation products and electronic structures with a hole configuration in singly-, doubly- and possibly in triply charged molecular electronic states populated in the electronic decay of the initial core hole have been studied and discussed. KER values obtained from our experiments are found to be consistent with the previous results of photo absorption experiments for fragmentation channel {{{{N}}}2}2+ → N+ + N+ however, N2+ fragment ions are found to arise mainly from the fragmentation channel {{{{N}}}2}2+ → N2+ + N and to possess relatively low kinetic energies in the considered region of binding energies.

  16. γ-decay of {}_{8}^{16}{{\\rm{O}}}_{8}\\,{and}\\,{}_{7}^{16}{{\\rm{N}}}_{9} in proton-neutron Tamm-Dancoff and random phase approximations with optimized surface δ interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavani, M. R.; Firoozi, B.

    2016-09-01

    γ-ray transitions from excited states of {}16{{N}} and {}16{{O}} isomers that appear in the γ spectrum of the {}616{{{C}}}10\\to {}716{{{N}}}9\\to {}816{{{O}}}8 beta decay chain are investigated. The theoretical approach used in this research starts with a mean-field potential consisting of a phenomenological Woods-Saxon potential including spin-orbit and Coulomb terms (for protons) in order to obtain single-particle energies and wave functions for nucleons in a nucleus. A schematic residual surface delta interaction is then employed on the top of the mean field and is treated within the proton-neutron Tamm-Dancoff approximation (pnTDA) and the proton-neutron random phase approximation. The goal is to use an optimized surface delta interaction interaction, as a residual interaction, to improve the results. We have used artificial intelligence algorithms to establish a good agreement between theoretical and experimental energy spectra. The final results of the ‘optimized’ calculations are reasonable via this approach.

  17. Intensities and spectral features of the {}^{4}{\\rm{I}}_{13/2}-{}^{4}{\\rm{I}}_{15/2} potential laser transition of Er3+ centers in CaF2-CeF3 disordered crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing-Guo; Su, Liangbi; Liu, Jun-Fang; Liu, Bin; Wu, Feng; Luo, Ping; Zhao, Heng-Yu; Shi, Jiao-Jiao; Xue, Yan-Yan; Xu, Xiao-Dong; Ryba-Romanowski, Witold; Solarz, Piotr; Lisiecki, Radoslaw; Wang, Zhan-Shan; Tang, Hui-Li; Xu, Jun

    2017-10-01

    Not Available Project supported by Shanghai Engineering Research Center for Sapphire Crystals, China (Grant No. 14DZ2252500), the Fund of Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. 2008DP17301), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China and China Academy of Engineering Physics Joint Fund (Grant No. U1530152), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61475177 and 61621001), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai Municiple, China (Grant No. 13ZR1446100), and the MOE Key Laboratory of Advanced Micro-Structured Materials of China.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Space telescope RM project. V. NGC5548 sp. monitoring (Pei+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, L.; Fausnaugh, M. M.; Barth, A. J.; Peterson, B. M.; Bentz, M. C.; De Rosa, G.; Denney, K. D.; Goad, M. R.; Kochanek, C. S.; Korista, K. T.; Kriss, G. A.; Pogge, R. W.; Bennert, V. N.; Brotherton, M.; Clubb, K. I.; Dalla Bonta, E.; Filippenko, A. V.; Greene, J. E.; Grier, C. J.; Vestergaard, M.; Zheng, W.; Adams, S. M.; Beatty, T. G.; Bigley, A.; Brown, J. E.; Brown, J. S.; Canalizo, G.; Comerford, J. M.; Coker, C. T.; Corsini, E. M.; Croft, S.; Croxall, K. V.; Deason, A. J.; Eracleous, M.; Fox, O. D.; Gates, E. L.; Henderson, C. B.; Holmbeck, E.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Jensen, J. J.; Johnson, C. A.; Kelly, P. L.; Kim, S.; King, A.; Lau, M. W.; Li, M.; Lochhaas, C.; Ma, Z.; Manne-Nicholas, E. R.; Mauerhan, J. C.; Malkan, M. A.; McGurk, R.; Morelli, L.; Mosquera, A.; Mudd, D.; Sanchez, F. M.; Nguyen, M. L.; Ochner, P.; Ou-Yang, B.; Pancoast, A.; Penny, M. T.; Pizzella, A.; Poleski, R.; Runnoe, J.; Scott, B.; Schimoia, J. S.; Shappee, B. J.; Shivvers, I.; Simonian, G. V.; Siviero, A.; Somers, G.; Stevens, D. J.; Strauss, M. A.; Tayar, J.; Tejos, N.; Treu, T.; van Saders, J.; Vican, L.; Villanueva, S.; Yuk, H.; Zakamska, N. L.; Zhu, W.; Anderson, M. D.; Arevalo, P.; Bazhaw, C.; Bisogni, S.; Borman, G. A.; Bottorff, M. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Breeveld, A. A.; Cackett, E. M.; Carini, M. T.; Crenshaw, D. M.; de Lorenzo-Caceres, A.; Dietrich, M.; Edelson, R.; Efimova, N. V.; Ely, J.; Evans, P. A.; Ferland, G. J.; Flatland, K.; Gehrels, N.; Geier, S.; Gelbord, J. M.; Grupe, D.; Gupta, A.; Hall, P. B.; Hicks, S.; Horenstein, D.; Horne, K.; Hutchison, T.; Im, M.; Joner, M. D.; Jones, J.; Kaastra, J.; Kaspi, S.; Kelly, B. C.; Kennea, J. A.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. C.; Klimanov, S. A.; Lee, J. C.; Leonard, D. C.; Lira, P.; Macinnis, F.; Mathur, S.; McHardy, I. M.; Montouri, C.; Musso, R.; Nazarov, S. V.; Netzer, H.; Norris, R. P.; Nousek, J. A.; Okhmat, D. N.; Papadakis, I.; Parks, J. R.; Pott, J.-U.; Rafter, S. E.; Rix, H.-W.; Saylor, D. A.; Schnulle, K.; Sergeev, S. G.; Siegel, M.; Skielboe, A.; Spencer, M.; Starkey, D.; Sung, H.-I.; Teems, K. G.; Turner, C. S.; Uttley, P.; Villforth, C.; Weiss, Y.; Woo, J.-H.; Yan, H.; Young, S.; Zu, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Spectroscopic data were obtained from five telescopes: the McGraw-Hill 1.3m telescope at the MDM Observatory (4225-5775Å; median S/N=118), the Shane 3m telescope at the Lick Observatory (Kast Double Spectrograph: 3250-7920Å; median S/N=194), the 1.22m Galileo telescope at the Asiago Astrophysical Observatory (3250-7920Å; median S/N=160), the 3.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory (APO; Dual Imaging Spectrograph: 4180-5400Å, median S/N =160), and the 2.3m telescope at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO; 5599-4399Å; median S/N=217). The optical spectroscopic monitoring targeting NGC 5548 began on 2014 January 4 and continued through 2014 July 6 with approximately daily cadence. MDM contributed the largest number of spectra with 143 epochs. (1 data file).

  19. On the stability of von Kármán rotating-disk boundary layers with radial anisotropic surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, S. J.; Cooper, A. J.; Harris, J. H.; Özkan, M.; Segalini, A.; Thomas, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    We summarise results of a theoretical study investigating the distinct convective instability properties of steady boundary-layer flow over rough rotating disks. A generic roughness pattern of concentric circles with sinusoidal surface undulations in the radial direction is considered. The goal is to compare predictions obtained by means of two alternative, and fundamentally different, modelling approaches for surface roughness for the first time. The motivating rationale is to identify commonalities and isolate results that might potentially represent artefacts associated with the particular methodologies underlying one of the two modelling approaches. The most significant result of practical relevance obtained is that both approaches predict overall stabilising effects on type I instability mode of rotating disk flow. This mode leads to transition of the rotating-disk boundary layer and, more generally, the transition of boundary-layers with a cross-flow profile. Stabilisation of the type 1 mode means that it may be possible to exploit surface roughness for laminar-flow control in boundary layers with a cross-flow component. However, we also find differences between the two sets of model predictions, some subtle and some substantial. These will represent criteria for establishing which of the two alternative approaches is more suitable to correctly describe experimental data when these become available.

  20. Case Studies of Successful Schoolwide Enrichment Model-Reading (SEM-R) Classroom Implementations. Research Monograph Series. RM10204

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Sally M.; Little, Catherine A.; Fogarty, Elizabeth; Housand, Angela M.; Housand, Brian C.; Sweeny, Sheelah M.; Eckert, Rebecca D.; Muller, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the scaling up of the Schoolwide Enrichment Model in Reading (SEM-R) in 11 elementary and middle schools in geographically diverse sites across the country. Qualitative comparative analysis was used in this study, with multiple data sources compiled into 11 in-depth school case studies…

  1. Characterization of 137 Genomic DNA Reference Materials for 28 Pharmacogenetic Genes: A GeT-RM Collaborative Project.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Victoria M; Everts, Robin E; Aggarwal, Praful; Beyer, Brittany N; Broeckel, Ulrich; Epstein-Baak, Ruth; Hujsak, Paul; Kornreich, Ruth; Liao, Jun; Lorier, Rachel; Scott, Stuart A; Smith, Chingying Huang; Toji, Lorraine H; Turner, Amy; Kalman, Lisa V

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacogenetic testing is increasingly available from clinical laboratories. However, only a limited number of quality control and other reference materials are currently available to support clinical testing. To address this need, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-based Genetic Testing Reference Material Coordination Program, in collaboration with members of the pharmacogenetic testing community and the Coriell Cell Repositories, has characterized 137 genomic DNA samples for 28 genes commonly genotyped by pharmacogenetic testing assays (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP4F2, DPYD, GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, NAT1, NAT2, SLC15A2, SLC22A2, SLCO1B1, SLCO2B1, TPMT, UGT1A1, UGT2B7, UGT2B15, UGT2B17, and VKORC1). One hundred thirty-seven Coriell cell lines were selected based on ethnic diversity and partial genotype characterization from earlier testing. DNA samples were coded and distributed to volunteer testing laboratories for targeted genotyping using a number of commercially available and laboratory developed tests. Through consensus verification, we confirmed the presence of at least 108 variant pharmacogenetic alleles. These samples are also being characterized by other pharmacogenetic assays, including next-generation sequencing, which will be reported separately. Genotyping results were consistent among laboratories, with most differences in allele assignments attributed to assay design and variability in reported allele nomenclature, particularly for CYP2D6, UGT1A1, and VKORC1. These publicly available samples will help ensure the accuracy of pharmacogenetic testing. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. FairMQ for Online Reconstruction - An example on \\overline{{\\rm{P}}}ANDA test beam data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockmanns, Tobias; PANDA Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    One of the large challenges of future particle physics experiments is the trend to run without a first level hardware trigger. The typical data rates exceed easily hundreds of GBytes/s, which is way too much to be stored permanently for an offline analysis. Therefore a strong data reduction has to be done by selection of only those data, which are physically interesting. This implies that all detector data are read out and have to be processed with the same rate as it is produced. Several different hardware approaches from FPGAs, GPUs to multicore CPUs and mixtures of these systems are under study. Common to all of them is the need to process the data in massive parallel systems. One very convenient way to realize parallel systems on heterogeneous systems is the usage of message queue based multiprocessing. One package that allow development of such application is the FairMQ module in the FairRoot simulation framework developed at GSI. FairRoot is used by several different experiments at and outside the GSI including the \\overline{{{P}}}ANDA experiment. FairMQ is an abstract layer for message queue base application, it has up to now two implementations: ZeroMQ and nanomsg. For the \\overline{{{P}}}ANDA experiment, FairMQ is under test in two different ways. On the one hand side for online processing test beam data of prototypes of sub-detectors of \\overline{{{P}}}ANDA and, in a more generalized way, on time-based simulated data of the complete detector system. The first test on test beam data is presented in this paper.

  3. RM12-2703 Advanced Rooftop Unit Control Retrofit Kit Field Demonstration: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    SciT

    Doebber, I.; Dean, J.; Dominick, J.

    2014-03-01

    As part of its overall strategy to meet its energy goals, the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to rapidly demonstrate and deploy cost-effective renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. This was one of several demonstrations of new and underutilized commercial energy efficiency technologies. The consistent year-round demand for air conditioning and dehumidification in Hawaii provides an advantageous demonstration location for advanced rooftop control (ARC) retrofit kits to packaged rooftop units (RTUs). This report summarizes the field demonstration of ARCs installed on nine RTUs serving a 70,000-ft 2 exchangemore » store (large retail) and two RTUs, each serving small office buildings located on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH).« less

  4. Charged particle multiplicity fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200\\, {\\rm GeV}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Krzysztof; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J. L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyslouch, B.

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the first PHOBOS results on charged particle multiplicity fluctuations measured for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy within a wide pseudorapidity range of |eegr| < 3. The dependence on collision geometry is removed in the analysis by using the normalized difference between the number of particles in separate eegr bins. We compare our data to HIJING model predictions.

  5. Measurement of the integrated Luminosities of cross-section scan data samples around the $${\\rm{\\psi }}$$(3770) mass region

    SciT

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.

    To investigate the nature of the (3770) resonance and to measure the cross section for e +e -→Dmore » $$\\bar{D}$$, a cross-section scan data sample, distributed among 41 center-of-mass energy points from 3.73 to 3.89 GeV, was taken with the BESIII detector operated at the BEPCII collider in the year 2010. By analyzing the large angle Bhabha scattering events, we measure the integrated luminosity of the data sample at each center-of-mass energy point. The total integrated luminosity of the data sample is 76.16±0.04±0.61 pb -1, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.« less

  6. Using a Combination of UML, C2RM, XML, and Metadata Registries to Support Long-Term Development/Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Authenticat’n (XCBF) Authorizat’n (XACML) (SAML) Privacy (P3P) Digital Rights Management (XrML) Content Mngmnt (DASL) (WebDAV) Content Syndicat’n...Registry/ Repository BPSS eCommerce XML/EDI Universal Business Language (UBL) Internet & Computing Human Resources (HR-XML) Semantic KEY XML SPECIFICATIONS

  7. Strong CO+ and {{\\rm{N}}}_{2}^{+} Emission in Comet C/2016 R2 (Pan-STARRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, Anita L.; McKay, Adam J.

    2018-02-01

    We report on imaging and spectroscopic observations of comet C/2016 R2 (Pan-STARRS) obtained with the 0.8 m and 2.7 m telescopes of McDonald Observatory in 2017 November and December, respectively. The comet was at a heliocentric distance greater than 3 au during both sets of observations. The images showed a well-developed tail with properties that suggested it was an ion tail. The spectra confirmed that we were observing well-developed bands of CO+ and {{{N}}}2+. The {{{N}}}2+ detection was unequivocally cometary and was one of the strongest bands of {{{N}}}2+ detected in a comet spectrum. We derived the ratio of these two ions and from that we were able to derive that N2/CO = 0.15. This is the highest such ratio reported for a comet. This Letter includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  8. Glycan characterization of the NIST RM monoclonal antibody using a total analytical solution: From sample preparation to data analysis.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, Mark; Alley, William R; McManus, Ciara A; Yu, Ying Qing; Hallinan, Sinead; Gebler, John; Rudd, Pauline M

    Glycosylation is an important attribute of biopharmaceutical products to monitor from development through production. However, glycosylation analysis has traditionally been a time-consuming process with long sample preparation protocols and manual interpretation of the data. To address the challenges associated with glycan analysis, we developed a streamlined analytical solution that covers the entire process from sample preparation to data analysis. In this communication, we describe the complete analytical solution that begins with a simplified and fast N-linked glycan sample preparation protocol that can be completed in less than 1 hr. The sample preparation includes labelling with RapiFluor-MS tag to improve both fluorescence (FLR) and mass spectral (MS) sensitivities. Following HILIC-UPLC/FLR/MS analyses, the data are processed and a library search based on glucose units has been included to expedite the task of structural assignment. We then applied this total analytical solution to characterize the glycosylation of the NIST Reference Material mAb 8761. For this glycoprotein, we confidently identified 35 N-linked glycans and all three major classes, high mannose, complex, and hybrid, were present. The majority of the glycans were neutral and fucosylated; glycans featuring N-glycolylneuraminic acid and those with two galactoses connected via an α1,3-linkage were also identified.

  9. Data on crystal organization in the structure of the Fab fragment from the NIST reference antibody, RM 8671.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, D T; Karageorgos, I; Hudgens, J W; Galvin, C V

    2018-02-01

    The reported data describe the crystallization, crystal packing, structure determination and twinning of the unliganded Fab (antigen-binding fragment) from the NISTmAb (standard reference material 8671). The raw atomic coordinates are available as Protein Data Bank structure 5K8A and biological aspects are described in the article, (Karageorgos et al., 2017) [1]. Crystal data show that the packing is unique, and show the basis for the crystal's twinned growth. Twinning is a common and often serious problem in protein structure determination by x-ray crystallography [2]. In the present case the twinning is due to a small deviation (about 0.3 nm) from 4-fold symmetry in the primary intermolecular interface. The deviation produces pseudosymmetry, generating slightly different conformations of the protein, and alternating strong and weak forms of key packing interfaces throughout the lattice.

  10. Measurement of the integrated Luminosities of cross-section scan data samples around the {\\rm{\\psi }}(3770) mass region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Albrecht, M.; Alekseev, M.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, Y.; Bakina, O.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Begzsuren, K.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chai, J.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, W. L.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, P. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cossio, F.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Fegan, S.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. G.; Gao, Z.; Garillon, B.; Garzia, I.; Gilman, A.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, L. M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y. P.; Guskov, A.; Haddadi, Z.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, X. Q.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Holtmann, T.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Irshad, M.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jin, Y.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Khan, T.; Khoukaz, A.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Koch, L.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuemmel, M.; Kuessner, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kurth, M.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Lavezzi, L.; Leiber, S.; Leithoff, H.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, J. W.; Li, K. J.; Li, Kang; Li, Ke; Li, Lei; Li, P. L.; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, L. Z.; Libby, J.; Lin, C. X.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, D. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. L.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, Huanhuan; Liu, Huihui; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Ke; Liu, L. D.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Long, Y. F.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, X. L.; Lusso, S.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mangoni, A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Meng, Z. X.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mezzadri, G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Morello, G.; Muchnoi, N. Yu; Muramatsu, H.; Mustafa, A.; Nakhoul, S.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Papenbrock, M.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Pellegrino, J.; Peng, H. P.; Peng, Z. Y.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Pitka, A.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qi, T. Y.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Richter, M.; Ripka, M.; Rolo, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schnier, C.; Schoenning, K.; Shan, W.; Shan, X. Y.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shi, X.; Song, J. J.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Sowa, C.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, L.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. K.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tan, Y. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, G. Y.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Tiemens, M.; Tsednee, B.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, C. W.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, Dan; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, Meng; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Zongyuan; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, X.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Y. J.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xie, Y. H.; Xiong, X. A.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, F.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, S. L.; Yang, Y. H.; Yang, Y. X.; Yang, Yifan; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; You, Z. Y.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. F.; Zhang, T. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Q.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, A. N.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; BESIII Collaboration

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the nature of the {{\\psi }}(3770) resonance and to measure the cross section for {{{e}}}+{{{e}}}-\\to {{D}}\\bar{{{D}}}, a cross-section scan data sample, distributed among 41 center-of-mass energy points from 3.73 to 3.89 GeV, was taken with the BESIII detector operated at the BEPCII collider in the year 2010. By analyzing the large angle Bhabha scattering events, we measure the integrated luminosity of the data sample at each center-of-mass energy point. The total integrated luminosity of the data sample is 76.16+/- 0.04+/- 0.61 {pb}}-1, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856700), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (11235011, 11335008, 11425524, 11625523, 11635010), the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Large-Scale Scientific Facility Program, the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP), Joint Large-Scale Scientific Facility Funds of the NSFC and CAS (U1332201, U1532257, U1532258), CAS Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences (QYZDJ-SSW-SLH003, QYZDJ-SSW-SLH040), 100 Talents Program of CAS, National 1000 Talents Program of China, INPAC and Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology, German Research Foundation DFG under Contracts Nos. Collaborative Research Center CRC 1044, FOR 2359, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy, Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen (KNAW) (530-4CDP03), Ministry of Development of Turkey (DPT2006K-120470), National Science and Technology fund, The Swedish Research Council, U. S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-05ER41374, DE-SC-0010118, DE-SC-0010504, DE-SC-0012069), University of Groningen (RuG) and the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (GSI), Darmstadt, WCU Program of National Research Foundation of Korea (R32-2008-000-10155-0)

  11. Measurement of the integrated Luminosities of cross-section scan data samples around the $${\\rm{\\psi }}$$(3770) mass region

    DOE PAGES

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; ...

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the nature of the (3770) resonance and to measure the cross section for e +e -→Dmore » $$\\bar{D}$$, a cross-section scan data sample, distributed among 41 center-of-mass energy points from 3.73 to 3.89 GeV, was taken with the BESIII detector operated at the BEPCII collider in the year 2010. By analyzing the large angle Bhabha scattering events, we measure the integrated luminosity of the data sample at each center-of-mass energy point. The total integrated luminosity of the data sample is 76.16±0.04±0.61 pb -1, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.« less

  12. Getting back in the race. Retired healthcare executives are being lured back into the office as organizations look for experienced leaders to take the reins.

    PubMed

    Jaklevic, Mary Chris

    2003-09-15

    All the young whippersnappers better look out--the veterans are coming back to show how it's done. More and more as of late, executives who chucked the 80-hour workweek grind are coming out of retirement to take the helm at beleaguered healthcare systems. MedCath Corp. board Chairman Steve Puckett, at left, says experience counts for a lot when handing over such responsibility.

  13. Ten-years trends in renal replacement therapy for end-stage renal disease in mainland France: Lessons from the French Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (REIN) registry.

    PubMed

    Vigneau, Cécile; Kolko, Anne; Stengel, Bénédicte; Jacquelinet, Christian; Landais, Paul; Rieu, Philippe; Bayat, Sahar; Couchoud, Cécile

    2017-06-01

    The incidence rate of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is decreasing in several countries, but not in France. We studied the RRT trends in mainland France from 2005 to 2014 to understand the reasons for this discrepancy and determine the effects of ESRD management changes. Data were extracted from the French Renal Epidemiology and Information Network registry. Time trends of RRT incidence and prevalence rates, patients' clinical and treatment characteristics were analysed using the Joinpoint regression program and annual percentage changes. Survival within the first year of RRT was analysed using Kaplan-Meier estimates for 4 periods of time. The overall age- and gender-adjusted RRT incidence rate increased from 144 to 159 individuals per million inhabitants (pmi) (+0.8% per year; 95% CI: 0.5-1.2) and the prevalence from 903 to 1141 pmi (+2.4% per year; 95% CI: 2.2-2.7). This increase concerned exclusively ESRD associated with type 2 diabetes (+4.0%; 3.4-4.6) and mostly elderly men. Despite patient aging and increasing comorbidity burden and a persistent 30% rate of emergency dialysis start, the one-year survival rate slightly improved from 82.1% (81.4-82.8) to 83.8% (83.3-84.4). Pre-emptive wait listing for renal transplantation and the percentage of wait-listed patients within one year after dialysis start strongly increased (from 5.6% to 15.5% and from 29% to 39%, respectively). Kidney transplantation and survival significantly improved despite the heavier patient burden. However, the rise in type 2 diabetes-related ESRD and the stable high rate of emergency dialysis start remain major issues. Copyright © 2016 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. The Analysis and Clustering of Navy Ratings Based on Social Interaction Characteristics: A Literature Review and Conceptual Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    frequency of contact, identity of the initiator of the interaction (Eisenberg, Monge, & Farace , 1984) or the use of various strategies, such as...But most important are the cues the physical environment gives about the social environment (Thomas & Griffin, 1983; Zalesny, Farace , & Kurchner...and Ghana. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 15(4), 477-4 5. Eisenberg, E. M., Monge, P. R., Farace , R. V. (1984). Coorientation on communication

  15. Performance of Hispanic Educable Mentally Retarded, Learning Disabled, and Nonclassified Students on the WISC-RM, SOMPA, and S-KABC: Short-Term Study One. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueda, Robert; And Others

    The study examined performance of limited-English proficient Hispanic students on a battery of psychometric instruments designed to appropriately assess linguistic minority students. Subjects consisted of three groups: 44 nonhandicapped, 45 learning-disabled, and 39 mildly mentally retarded elementary-level students. Instruments included the…

  16. Measurement of Vector Boson Plus $$D^{*}(2010)^+$$ Meson Production in $$\\bar{p}p$$ Collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\, {\\rm TeV}$$

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.

    2016-03-21

    Our study of vector boson (V ) production in conjunction with a D*(2010) + meson is presented. Using a data sample correponding to 9.7 fb -1 p of proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 1:96 TeV produced by the Fermilab Tevatron, we reconstruct V +D *+ samples with the CDF II detector. The D *+ is fully reconstructed in the D*(2010) + → D 0(→ K - π +)π + decay mode. This technique is sensitive to the associated production of vector boson plus charm or bottom mesons. We measure the ratio of production cross sections σ(W +D *)/more » σ(W) = [1.75±0.13(stat)±0:09(syst)]% and σ(Z +D *)/ σ(Z) = [1:5±0:4(stat)_0:2(syst)]%. Event properties are utilized to determine the fraction of V +D *(2010) + events originating from different production processes. Our results are in agreement with the predictions obtained with the pythia program, limiting possible contribution from non-standard-model physics processes.« less

  17. Combination of CDF and D0 results on the mass of the top quark using up $$9.7\\:{\\rm fb}^{-1}$$ at the Tevatron

    SciT

    Tevatron Electroweak Working Group, Tevatron Group; Aaltonen, T.

    2016-08-05

    We summarize the current top quark mass (m t) measurements from the CDF and D0 experiments at Fermilab. We combine published results from Run I (1992–1996) with the most precise published and preliminary Run II (2001–2011) measurements based onmore » $$p\\bar{p}$$ data corresponding to up to 9.7 fb $-$1 of $$p\\bar{p}$$ collisions. Taking correlations of uncertainties into account, and combining the statistical and systematic contributions in quadrature, the preliminary Tevatron average mass value for the top quark is m t = 174.30 ± 0.65 GeV/c 2, corresponding to a relative precision of 0.37%.« less

  18. Effects of the essential oil of Alpinia zerumbet (Pers.) B.L. Burtt & R.M. Sm. on healing and tissue repair after partial Achilles tenotomy in rats.

    PubMed

    Santos-Júnior, Luciano; Oliveira, Tassia Virgínia de Carvalho; Cândido, Janaína Farias; Santana, Danielle Souza de; Pereira, Rose Nely; Pereyra, Beatriz Benny Sungaila; Gomes, Margarete Zanardo; Lima, Sônia Oliveira; Albuquerque-Júnior, Ricardo Luiz Cavalcanti de; Cândido, Edna Aragão Farias

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the cellular response to injury, analyzing histopathologic changes associated with increased cellularity, degeneration and disorganization of collagen fibers. Thirty wistar rats were divided in two groups after partial Achilles tenotomy: the right hind paw were treated with the essential oil of Alpinia zerumbet (EOAz), diluted to 33% (0.3 mL kg-1), and the left hind paw received sunflower oil for 3, 14, 30 and 90 days. Statistical significance was determined using a Chi-square and Pearson Correlation qualitative variables test. Moreover, Mann-Whitney U-test test for comparison between different groups of the same cell, one-way ANOVA, and Tukey's test of quantitative measurement. A decrease hyperemia (p < 0.001) was observed in the acute phase of inflammatory cell number (p < 0.001), whereas sub-acute phase was marked by significant correlation with macrophages in fibroblasts (r = 0.17, p = 0.03), with probable induction a dense and modeled tissue. At chronic phase, it was found an increase in the number of fibroblasts and a higher percentage of type I collagen fibers (78%) compared with control collagen fibers (55%). Oil of Alpinia zerumbet stimulated the process of maturation, organization and tissue repair which gave it greater resistance.

  19. Enhanced radiation-induced narrow channel effects in 0.13-{\\boldsymbol{\\mu }}{\\rm{m}} PDSOI nMOSFETs with shallow trench isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng-Ying; Hu, Zhi-Yuan; Bi, Da-Wei; Dai, Li-Hua; Zhang, Zheng-Xuan

    2018-02-01

    Not Available Project supported by the Weapon Equipment Pre-Research Foundation of China (Grant No. 9140A11020114ZK34147) and the Shanghai Municipal Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 15ZR1447100).

  20. Long-term Study of the Solar Filaments from the Synoptic Maps as Derived from {{\\rm{H}}}_{\\alpha } Spectroheliograms of the Kodaikanal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhamoy; Hegde, Manjunath; Banerjee, Dipankar; Ravindra, B.

    2017-11-01

    The century long (1914-2007) {{{H}}}α (656.28 nm) spectroheliograms from the Kodaikanal Solar Observatory (KSO) have been recently digitized. Using these newly calibrated, processed images we study the evolution of dark elongated on-disk structures called filaments, which are potential representatives of magnetic activities on the Sun. To our knowledge, this is the oldest uniform digitized data set with daily images available today in {{{H}}}α . We generate Carrington maps for the entire time duration and try to find the correlations with maps of the same Carrington rotation from the Ca II K KSO data. Filaments are segmented from the Carrington maps using a semi-automated technique and are studied individually to extract their centroids and tilts. We plot the time-latitude distribution of the filament centroids, producing a butterfly diagram which clearly shows the presence of poleward migration. We separate polar filaments for each cycle and try to estimate the delay between the polar filament number cycle and the sunspot number cycle peaks. We correlate this delay with the delay between polar reversal and sunspot number maxima. This provides new insight on the role of polar filaments on polar reversal.

  1. Ensemble of European regional climate simulations for the winter of 2013 and 2014 from HadAM3P-RM3P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Nathalie; Sparrow, Sarah N.; Massey, Neil R.; Bowery, Andy; Miller, Jonathan; Wilson, Simon; Wallom, David C. H.; Otto, Friederike E. L.

    2018-04-01

    Large data sets used to study the impact of anthropogenic climate change on the 2013/14 floods in the UK are provided. The data consist of perturbed initial conditions simulations using the Weather@Home regional climate modelling framework. Two different base conditions, Actual, including atmospheric conditions (anthropogenic greenhouse gases and human induced aerosols) as at present and Natural, with these forcings all removed are available. The data set is made up of 13 different ensembles (2 actual and 11 natural) with each having more than 7500 members. The data is available as NetCDF V3 files representing monthly data within the period of interest (1st Dec 2013 to 15th February 2014) for both a specified European region at a 50 km horizontal resolution and globally at N96 resolution. The data is stored within the UK Natural and Environmental Research Council Centre for Environmental Data Analysis repository.

  2. Directed Energy Technology Working Group Report (IDA/OSD R&M (Institute for Defense Analyses/Office of the Secretary of Defense Reliability and Maintainability) Study).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    Missile (SLBM) Defense Scenario ............................................ B-1 C Space-Based Anti-Ballistic Missile ( ABM ) Defense Scenario...Ballistic Missile (SLBM) Defense Scenario, and at Strategic Space-Based Anti-Ballistic Missile ( ABM ) Defense Scenario. These case studies are provided...of flight. 3.5.3 Spaced-Based ABM Defense Scenario In this scenario, an orbiting battle station is operating as an element of GBMD System, and it is

  3. Power Supply Technology Working Group Report (IDA/OSD R&M (Institute for Defense Analyses/Office of the Secretary of Defense Reliability and Maintainability) Study).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    DIVISION ! - s .., ff FI f 84 02 e 085s r,.~ .O Leg.m . No. o NO -. W M The work repored In this document was conducted under contract MCA U3 79 C 3018...DOCUMENTATION PAGE EFoRE COIPLNT G UIOM 1. EPORT GUME OVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (nod 5bds) S . TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD...Document D-40 7. AUTHOR.) 6. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMMER(e) . Donald Hornbeck, EG&G Almond Instruments NM 903 79 C 0018 Working Group Chairman S . PERFORMING

  4. (e, 2e) simple ionization of {{\\rm{H}}}_{3}^{+} by fast electron impact: use of triangular three-center continuum and bound state wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeid, S.; Chuluunbaatar, O.; Joulakian, B. B.

    2017-07-01

    The variation of the multiply differential cross section of the (e, 2e) simple ionization of {{{H}}}3+, with the incident and ejection energy values, as well as the directions of the ejected and scattered electrons, is studied. The calculations have been performed in the frame of the perturbative first Born procedure, which has required the development of equilateral triangular three center bound and continuum state wave functions. The results explore the optimal conditions and the particularities of the triangular targets, such as the appearance of interference patterns in the variation of the four fold differential cross section (FDCS) with the scattering angle for a fixed orientation of the molecule. The comparison between the results obtained by two H3 + ground wave functions, with and without a correlation term r 12, shows that the effect of correlation on the magnitude of the triple differential cross section is not large, but it produces some modification in the structure of the FDCS.

  5. Structural analysis of DNA binding by C.Csp231I, a member of a novel class of R-M controller proteins regulating gene expression

    SciT

    Shevtsov, M. B.; Streeter, S. D.; Thresh, S.-J.

    2015-02-01

    The structure of the new class of controller proteins (exemplified by C.Csp231I) in complex with its 21 bp DNA-recognition sequence is presented, and the molecular basis of sequence recognition in this class of proteins is discussed. An unusual extended spacer between the dimer binding sites suggests a novel interaction between the two C-protein dimers. In a wide variety of bacterial restriction–modification systems, a regulatory ‘controller’ protein (or C-protein) is required for effective transcription of its own gene and for transcription of the endonuclease gene found on the same operon. We have recently turned our attention to a new class ofmore » controller proteins (exemplified by C.Csp231I) that have quite novel features, including a much larger DNA-binding site with an 18 bp (∼60 Å) spacer between the two palindromic DNA-binding sequences and a very different recognition sequence from the canonical GACT/AGTC. Using X-ray crystallography, the structure of the protein in complex with its 21 bp DNA-recognition sequence was solved to 1.8 Å resolution, and the molecular basis of sequence recognition in this class of proteins was elucidated. An unusual aspect of the promoter sequence is the extended spacer between the dimer binding sites, suggesting a novel interaction between the two C-protein dimers when bound to both recognition sites correctly spaced on the DNA. A U-bend model is proposed for this tetrameric complex, based on the results of gel-mobility assays, hydrodynamic analysis and the observation of key contacts at the interface between dimers in the crystal.« less

  6. Measurement of Vector Boson Plus $$D^{*}(2010)^+$$ Meson Production in $$\\bar{p}p$$ Collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\, {\\rm TeV}$$

    SciT

    Aaltonen, T.

    Our study of vector boson (V ) production in conjunction with a D*(2010) + meson is presented. Using a data sample correponding to 9.7 fb -1 p of proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 1:96 TeV produced by the Fermilab Tevatron, we reconstruct V +D *+ samples with the CDF II detector. The D *+ is fully reconstructed in the D*(2010) + → D 0(→ K - π +)π + decay mode. This technique is sensitive to the associated production of vector boson plus charm or bottom mesons. We measure the ratio of production cross sections σ(W +D *)/more » σ(W) = [1.75±0.13(stat)±0:09(syst)]% and σ(Z +D *)/ σ(Z) = [1:5±0:4(stat)_0:2(syst)]%. Event properties are utilized to determine the fraction of V +D *(2010) + events originating from different production processes. Our results are in agreement with the predictions obtained with the pythia program, limiting possible contribution from non-standard-model physics processes.« less

  7. CAD/CAM Technology Working Group Report IDA/OSD R&M (Institute for Defense Analyses/Office of the Secretary of Defense Research and Maintainability) Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    remain a major force in the military tracked vehicle market . ABC Corporation is about to begin a sixteen-month effort to design a new amphibious tracked...in industry and efforts within DOD itself. Each system, many proprietary and very marketable , has been developed with major investments in dollars...A good systems person will tell you very quickly the solution is to go through a data base. The problem then simplifies 5 like this. 75 CAE . .’-.M

  8. Effects of turbulence, resistivity and boundary conditions on helicoidal flow collimation: Consequences for the Von-Kármán-Sodium dynamo experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Varela, J.; Oak Ridge National Lab.; Brun, S.; ...

    2017-05-01

    We present hydrodynamic and magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of a liquid sodium flow using the compressible MHD code PLUTO to investigate the magnetic field regeneration in the Von-Karman-Sodium dynamo experiment. The aim of the study is to analyze influence of the fluid resistivity and turbulence level on the collimation by helicoidal motions of a remnant magnetic field. We use a simplified cartesian geometry to represent the flow dynamics in the vicinity of one cavity of a multi-blades impeller inspired by those used in the Von-Karman-Sodium (VKS) experiment. We perform numerical simulations with kinetic Reynolds numbers up to 1000 for magnetic Prandtl numbersmore » between 30 and 0.1. Our study shows that perfect ferromagnetic walls favour enhanced collimation of flow and magnetic fields even if the turbulence degree of the model increases. More specifically the location of the helicoidal coherent vortex in between the blades changes with the impinging velocity. It becomes closer to the upstream blade and impeller base if the flow incident angle is analogous to the TM73 impeller configuration rotating in the unscooping direction. This result is also obtained at higher kinetic Reynolds numbers when the helicoidal vortex undergoes a precessing motion, leading to a reinforced effect in the vortex evolution and in the magnetic field collimation when using again perfect ferromagnetic boundary conditions. Configurations with different materials used for the impeller blades and impeller base confirm a larger enhancement of the magnetic field when perfect ferromagnetic boundary conditions are used compared with the perfect conductor case, although smaller than with a perfect ferromagnetic impeller, as it was observed in the VKS experiment. We further estimate the efficiency of a hypothetical dynamo loop occurring in the vicinity of the impeller and discuss the relevance of our findings in the context of mean field dynamo theory.« less

  9. Effects of turbulence, resistivity and boundary conditions on helicoidal flow collimation: Consequences for the Von-Kármán-Sodium dynamo experiment

    SciT

    Varela, J.; Oak Ridge National Lab.; Brun, S.

    We present hydrodynamic and magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of a liquid sodium flow using the compressible MHD code PLUTO to investigate the magnetic field regeneration in the Von-Karman-Sodium dynamo experiment. The aim of the study is to analyze influence of the fluid resistivity and turbulence level on the collimation by helicoidal motions of a remnant magnetic field. We use a simplified cartesian geometry to represent the flow dynamics in the vicinity of one cavity of a multi-blades impeller inspired by those used in the Von-Karman-Sodium (VKS) experiment. We perform numerical simulations with kinetic Reynolds numbers up to 1000 for magnetic Prandtl numbersmore » between 30 and 0.1. Our study shows that perfect ferromagnetic walls favour enhanced collimation of flow and magnetic fields even if the turbulence degree of the model increases. More specifically the location of the helicoidal coherent vortex in between the blades changes with the impinging velocity. It becomes closer to the upstream blade and impeller base if the flow incident angle is analogous to the TM73 impeller configuration rotating in the unscooping direction. This result is also obtained at higher kinetic Reynolds numbers when the helicoidal vortex undergoes a precessing motion, leading to a reinforced effect in the vortex evolution and in the magnetic field collimation when using again perfect ferromagnetic boundary conditions. Configurations with different materials used for the impeller blades and impeller base confirm a larger enhancement of the magnetic field when perfect ferromagnetic boundary conditions are used compared with the perfect conductor case, although smaller than with a perfect ferromagnetic impeller, as it was observed in the VKS experiment. We further estimate the efficiency of a hypothetical dynamo loop occurring in the vicinity of the impeller and discuss the relevance of our findings in the context of mean field dynamo theory.« less

  10. Influence of strain relaxation in axial {{In}}_{x}{{Ga}}_{1-x}{\\rm{N}}/{GaN} nanowire heterostructures on their electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, Oliver; Krause, Thilo; Kaganer, Vladimir; Martín-Sánchez, Javier; Hanke, Michael; Brandt, Oliver

    2017-05-01

    We present a systematic theoretical study of the influence of elastic strain relaxation on the built-in electrostatic potentials and the electronic properties of axial {{In}}x{{Ga}}1-x{{N}}/{GaN} nanowire (NW) heterostructures. Our simulations reveal that for a sufficiently large ratio between the thickness of the {{In}}x{{Ga}}1-x{{N}} disk and the diameter of the NW, the elastic relaxation leads to a significant reduction of the built-in electrostatic potential in comparison to a planar system of similar layer thickness and In content. In this case, the ground state transition energies approach constant values with increasing thickness of the disk and only depend on the In content, a behavior usually associated to that of a quantum well free of built-in electrostatic potentials. We show that the structures under consideration are by no means field-free, and the built-in potentials continue to play an important role even for ultrathin NWs. In particular, strain and the resulting polarization potentials induce complex confinement features of electrons and holes, which depend on the In content, shape, and dimensions of the heterostructure.

  11. Investigation and control of the {{\\rm{O}}}_{3}- to {NO}-transition in a novel sub-atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansemer, Robert; Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; van Rienen, Ursula; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2017-06-01

    A novel flow-driven dielectric barrier discharge concept is presented, which uses a Venturi pump to transfer plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species from a sub-atmospheric pressure (200{--}600 {mbar}) discharge region to ambient pressure and can be operated with air. By adjusting the working pressure of the device, the plasma chemistry can be tuned continuously from an ozone ({{{O}}}3)-dominated mode to a nitrogen oxides ({{NO}}x)-only mode. The plasma source is characterized focusing on the mechanisms effecting this mode change. The composition of the device’s output gas was determined using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results are correlated to measurements of discharge chamber pressure and temperature as well as of input power. It is found that the mode-change temperature can be controlled by the discharge chamber pressure. The source concept is capable of generating an {{NO}}x-dominated plasma chemistry at gas temperatures distinctly below 400 {{K}}. Through mixing of the processed gas stream with a second flow of pressurized air required for the operation of the Venturi pump, the resulting product gas stream remains close to room temperature. A reduced zero-dimensional reaction kinetics model with only seven reactions is capable of describing the observed pressure- and temperature-dependence of the {{{O}}}3 to {{NO}}x mode-change.

  12. Nondestructive Evaluation Technology Working Group Report (IDA/OSD R&M (Institute for Defense Analyses/Office of the Secretary of Defense Reliability and Maintainability Study).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    evaluating surface residual stresses in ferromagnetic materials, but until recently has - been considered too time consuming for production application. Fast...generic residual stress , X-ray, image processing, neutron processing, neutron radiography, vibrothermography, nuclear magnetic resonance 20. ABSTRACT...studied, this technology study effort would not have been possible within the time and resources available. P-3 i La

  13. Investigating the Relevance and Importance of English Language Arts Content Knowledge Areas for Beginning Elementary School Teachers. Research Memorandum No. RM-16-08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Raugh, Michelle P.; Reese, Clyde M.; Phelps, Geoffrey C.; Tannenbaum, Richard J.; Steinberg, Jonathan H.; Xu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to explore the content-related validity evidence supporting the English language arts (ELA) components of the "ETS"® National Observational Teaching Exam (NOTE) assessment series, a kindergarten through 6th-grade teacher licensure assessment. To establish the content knowledge required for the effective…

  14. Investigating the Relevance and Importance of Mathematical Content Knowledge Areas for Beginning Elementary School Teachers. Research Memorandum No. RM-16-10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Raugh, Michelle P.; Reese, Clyde M.; Howell, Heather; Tannenbaum, Richard J.; Steinberg, Jonathan H.; Xu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to explore the content-related validity evidence supporting the mathematics components of the "ETS"® National Observational Teaching Exam (NOTE) assessment series, a kindergarten through 6th grade teacher licensure assessment. To establish the content knowledge required for the effective teaching of…

  15. Hyperfine induced transition probabilities from 4{f}^{14}5s5p{}^{3}{{\\rm{P}}}_{0,2}^{o} states in Sm-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fuyang; Li, Jiguang; Qu, Yizhi; Wang, Jianguo

    2017-11-01

    The hyperfine induced 4{f}145s5p{}3{{{P}}}0,2o-4{f}145{s}2{}1{{{S}}}0 transition probabilities for highly charged Sm-like ions are calculated within the framework of the multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method. Electron correlation, the Breit interaction and quantum electrodynamical effects are taken into account. For ions ranging from Z = 79 to Z=94,4{f}145s5p{}3{{{P}}}0o is the first excited state, and the hyperfine induced transition (HIT) is a dominant decay channel. For the 4{f}145s5p{}3{{{P}}}2o state, the HIT rates of Sm-like ions with Z=82-94 are reported as well as the magnetic dipole (M1) {}3{{{P}}}2o-{}3{{{P}}}1o, the electric quadrupole (E2) {}3{{{P}}}2o-{}3{{{P}}}0,1o, and the magnetic quadrupole (M2) {}3{{{P}}}2o-{}1{{{S}}}0 transition probabilities. It is found that M1 transition from the 4{f}145s5p{}3{{{P}}}2o state is the most important decay channel in this range on Z≥slant 82.

  16. Modeling and Explaining Content: Definition, Research Support, and Measurement of the "ETS"® National Observational Teaching Examination (NOTE) Assessment Series. Research Memorandum No. RM-16-07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickler, Leslie; Sykes, Gary

    2016-01-01

    This report reviews the scholarly and research evidence supporting the construct labeled modeling and explaining content (MEC), which is measured via a performance assessment in the "ETS"® National Observational Teaching Examination (NOTE) assessment series. This construct involves practices at the heart of teaching that deal with how…

  17. Eliciting Student Thinking: Definition, Research Support, and Measurement of the "ETS"® National Observational Teaching Examination (NOTE) Assessment Series. Research Memorandum No. RM-16-06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qi, Yi; Sykes, Gary

    2016-01-01

    This report describes and provides research and scholarly support for a core practice of teaching--eliciting student thinking (EST)--that is the target for a performance assessment contributing one component of the "ETS"® National Observational Teaching Examination (NOTE) assessment series. The purpose of this report is to review the…

  18. Leading a Classroom Discussion: Definition, Supportive Evidence, and Measurement of the "ETS"® National Observational Teaching Examination (NOTE) Assessment Series. Research Memorandum No. RM-16-09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witherspoon, Margaret; Sykes, Gary; Bell, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a description and rationale for a performance assessment of a teaching practice--leading a classroom discussion (LCD)--included in the ETS® National Observational Teaching Examination (NOTE) assessment series. In this assessment, candidates interact with a small class of virtual students represented by avatars in a…

  19. What Works in Gifted Education Mathematics Study: Impact of Pre-Differentiated and Enriched Curricula on General Education Teachers and Their Students. Research Monograph Series. RM13242

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubbins, E. Jean; McCoach, D. Betsy; Foreman, Jennifer L.; Gilson, Cindy M.; Bruce-Davis, Micah N.; Rubenstein, Lisa DaVia; Savino, Jennifer; Rambo, Karen; Waterman, Craig

    2013-01-01

    The present study seeks to determine how exposure to pre-differentiated and enriched curricula incorporating educative curriculum materials affects students' achievement as well as teacher and administrator responses to the intervention. A 2-year multi-site cluster randomized control trial study recruited a national sample of 4,530 grade 3…

  20. Controlling particle properties in {{YBa}}_{2}{{Cu}}_{3}{{\\rm{O}}}_{7-\\delta } nanocomposites by combining PLD with an inert gas condensation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparing, M.; Reich, E.; Hänisch, J.; Gottschall, T.; Hühne, R.; Fähler, S.; Rellinghaus, B.; Schultz, L.; Holzapfel, B.

    2017-10-01

    The critical current density {J}{{c}} in {{YBa}}2{{Cu}}3{{{O}}}7-δ thin films, which limits their application in external magnetic fields, can be enhanced by the introduction of artificial pinning centers such as non-superconducting nanoparticles inducing additional defects and local strain in the superconducting matrix. To understand the correlation between superconductivity, defect structures and particles, a controlled integration of particles with adjustable properties is essential. A powerful technique for the growth of isolated nanoparticles in the range of 10 nm is dc-magnetron sputtering in an inert gas flow. The inert gas condensation (IGC) of particles allows for an independent control of both the particle diameter distribution and the areal density. We report on the integration of such gas-phase-condensed {{HfO}}2 nanoparticles into pulsed laser deposited (PLD) {{YBa}}2{{Cu}}3{{{O}}}7-δ thin film multilayers with a combined PLD-IGC system. The particles and the structure of the multilayers are analyzed by transmission electron microscopy on cross-sectional FIB lamellae. As a result of the IGC particle implementation, randomly as well as biaxially oriented {{BaHfO}}3 precipitates are formed in the {{YBa}}2{{Cu}}3{{{O}}}7-δ thin films. With as few as three interlayers of nanoparticles, the pinning force density is enhanced in the low-field region.

  1. Search for $WH$ associated production in $$p \\bar{p}$$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\,{\\rm TeV}$$

    SciT

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath

    2012-03-01

    This report describes a search for associated production of W and Higgs bosons based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L {approx} 5.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. Events containing a W {yields} {ell}{nu} candidate (with {ell} corresponding to e or {mu}) are selected in association with two or three reconstructed jets. One or two of the jets are required to be consistent with having evolved from a b quark. A multivariate discriminant technique is used to improve the separation of signal and backgrounds. Expected and observed upper limitsmore » are obtained for the product of the WH production cross section and branching ratios and reported in terms of ratios relative to the prediction of the standard model as a function of the mass of the Higgs boson (M{sub H}). The observed and expected 95% C.L. upper limits obtained for an assumed M{sub H} = 115 GeV are, respectively, factors of 4.5 and 4.8 larger than the value predicted by the standard model.« less

  2. Students' Perceptions of the Social/Emotional Implications of Participation in Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Programs. Research Monograph Series. RM09238

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foust, Regan Clark; Hertberg-Davis, Holly; Callahan, Carolyn M.

    2009-01-01

    Using qualitative methods, the researchers explored student perceptions of the social and emotional advantages and disadvantages of Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) program participation, differences between the AP and IB programs in those perceptions, and whether or not students report experiencing a "forced-choice…

  3. General Urban Warfare Amphibious Logistics Applications. Volume 4. Operational Plans.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-23

    region. b. Enemy Forces (1) Enem Situation. Survivors and stragglers from the MRB (Rein) that originally defended SYN City are still present in the city in...requirements and priorities in this region. b. Enemy Forces (1) Enem Situation. Survivors and stragglers from the MRB (Rein) that originally defended SYN City

  4. An Analysis and Comparison of Two Short Writings: "Inaugural Address at the University of St. Andrew's" by J.S. Mill and "The University of Utopia" by R.M. Hutchins, Based on Five Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poirier, Jeannine M.

    Focusing on the concept of education for work vs. education for living, the author presents a comparative analysis of two works on liberal education, each of which was originally delivered orally to university students: "The Inaugural Address at the University of St. Andrew" by John Stuart Mill and "The University of Utopia" by…

  5. Mechanical Systems Conditioning Monitoring Technology Working Group Report (IDA/OSD R&M (Institute for Defense Analyses/Office of the Secretary of Defense Reliability and Maintainability) Study).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    Results .4-, C. RECOMMENDED IMPROVEMENTS IN DIAGNOSTICS 1. OIL ANALYSIS 2. CREW AND PROGRAM MAINTENANCE 3. ON BOARD * Ferrography 0 Training in Debris...I" $&ANSU. 225x 1-1loom-4 REF: BOWEN AND WESTCOTT. "WEAR PARTICLE ATLAS ," FOXBORO FOR NAEC. JULY 1976 jv-35 zu oi cc z 0 I- .40 0 0 0c 00 IL W L0 IV...19 6.2.3 Filter Analysis ................................. 19 6.2.4 Ferrography ............................ 20 6.2.5 Colorimetric Oil Analysis

  6. Implementation of the VGM Graphics System on the PDP-11/50 under the RSX-11M Operating System and Construction of a Compatible Software Driver for the Ramtek RM-9400.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    no other. is the field of computer grapnIcs expanded, such limitations became a real liability. The inability to use one program at more tnan one...terms of these environmental factors. For example, some programs may be portable from one device to another as long as the computing environment is not...PemPOMMIN OROANI&ATIO NAMI AND A00RESS IQ. PROGRAM CLEMENT. PROJECT. TASK AREA a WORK UNiT muN9ERS Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 93940

  7. Effects of mean-field and softening of equation of state on elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{{s}_{\\rm{NN}}}=5\\,{GeV} from the JAM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiamin; Luo, Xiaofeng; Liu, Feng; Nara, Yasushi

    2018-01-01

    We perform a systematic study of elliptic flow (v 2) in Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{{s}NN}}=5 {GeV} by using a microscopic transport model, JAM. The centrality, pseudorapidity, transverse momentum and beam energy dependence of v 2 for charged as well as identified hadrons are studied. We investigate the effects of both the hadronic mean-field and the softening of equation of state (EoS) on elliptic flow. The softening of the EoS is realized by imposing attractive orbits in two body scattering, which can reduce the pressure of the system. We found that the softening of the EoS leads to the enhancement of v 2, while the hadronic mean-field suppresses v 2 relative to the cascade mode. It indicates that elliptic flow at high baryon density regions is highly sensitive to the EoS and the enhancement of v 2 may probe the signature of a first-order phase transition in heavy-ion collisions at beam energies of a strong baryon stopping region. Supported by the MoST of China 973-Project (2015CB856901), NSFC (11575069, 11221504). Y. N. is supported by the Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research from JSPS (15K05079, 15K05098)

  8. Integrated Systems of Manufacture (Robotics) Technology Working Group Report (IDA/OSD R&M (Institute for Defense Analyses/Office of the Secretary of Defense Reliability and Maintainability) Study)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    INSTRUMENTATION ;(U) FORKLIFT VEHICLES ;(U) EXPERIMENTAL DATA IDENTIFIERS: OBJECTIVE: (U) SUPPORT INHOUSE RESEARCH FOR- ACQUISITION AND ANALYSIS OF...ROBOTIC RECONNAISSANCE VEHICLE DEMONSTRATOR WITH TERRAIN ANALYSIS . THIS WORK WILL SPECIFY THE BASE LINE HARDWARE, SOFTWARE, DATA BASE, AND SYSTEM...THE DATA ANALYSIS . THIS IS ALSO TRUE OF INFLIGMT DATA THAT THE PILOT IS REQUIRED TO ANALYZE. THIS RESEARCH IS CONCERNED WITH THE REPORT NO. CX7419

  9. Direct measurement of the 3d{}^{2}{D}_{3/2} to 3d{}^{2}{D}_{5/2} lifetime ratio in a single trapped {}^{40}{{\\rm{Ca}}}^{+}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Guan, H.; Gao, K.

    2018-02-01

    We present for the first time a direct measurement of the lifetime ratio between the 3d{}2{D}3/2 and 3d{}2{D}5/2 metastable states in a single trapped 40Ca+. A high-efficiency quantum state detection technique is adopted to monitor the quantum jumps, and a high precision and synchronized measurement sequence is used for laser control to study the rule of spontaneous decay. Our method shows that the lifetime ratio is a constant and is irrelevant to the dwell time; it is only determined by the spontaneous decay probabilities of the two metastable states at one random decay time, independent of the lifetimes of the two metastable states. Systematic errors such as collisions with background gases, heating effects, impurity components, the shelving and pumping rates and the photon counts are analyzed, and the lifetime ratio between the 3d{}2{D}3/2 and 3d{}2{D}5/2 states is directly measured to be 1.0257(43) with an uncertainty of 0.42%. Our result is in good agreement with the most precise many-body atomic structure calculations. Our method can be used to obtain the lifetime of a state which is usually difficult to measure and can be used to determine the magnetic dipole transition matrix elements in heavy ions such as Ba+ and Ra+, and can also be universally applied to lifetime ratio measurements of other single atoms and ions with a similar structure.

  10. Inhibitory effect of the Pseudobrickellia brasiliensis (Spreng) R.M. King & H. Rob. aqueous extract on human lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ and TNF-α production in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, V.G.; Avelar-Freitas, B.A.; Santos, M.G.; Costa, L.A.; Silva, T.J.; Pereira, W.F.; Amorim, M.L.L.; Grael, C.F.F.; Gregório, L.E.; Rocha-Vieira, E.; Brito-Melo, G.E.A.

    2017-01-01

    Pseudobrickellia brasiliensis (Asteraceae) is a plant commonly known as arnica-do-campo and belongs to the native flora of the Brazilian Cerrado. The alcoholic extract of the plant has been used as an anti-inflammatory agent in folk medicine, but the biological mechanism of action has not been elucidated. The present study evaluated the composition of P. brasiliensis aqueous extract and its effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine production and lymphocyte proliferation. The extracts were prepared by sequential maceration of P. brasiliensis leaves in ethanol, ethyl acetate, and water. Extract cytotoxicity was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion assay, and apoptosis and necrosis were measured by staining with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide. The ethanolic (ETA) and acetate (ACE) extracts showed cytotoxic effects. The aqueous extract (AQU) was not cytotoxic. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin and treated with AQU (100 μg/mL) showed reduced interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression. AQU also inhibited lymphocyte proliferative response after nonspecific stimulation with phytohemagglutinin. The aqueous extract was analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection and mass spectrometry. Quinic acid and its derivatives 5-caffeoylquinic acid and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, as well as the flavonoids luteolin and luteolin dihexoside, were detected. All these compounds are known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that P. brasiliensis aqueous extract can inhibit the pro-inflammatory cytokine production and proliferative response of lymphocytes. These effects may be related to the presence of chemical substances with anti-inflammatory actions previously reported in scientific literature. PMID:28700031

  11. The electron-phonon interaction with forward scattering peak is dominant in high T c superconductors of FeSe films on {{\\rm{SrTiO}}}_{3} (TiO2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulić, M. L.; Dolgov, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    The theory of the electron-phonon interaction (EPI) with strong forward scattering peak (FSP) in an extreme delta-peak limit (Kulić and Zeyher 1994 Phys. Rev. B 49 4395; Kulić 2000 Phys. Rep. 38 1-264 Kulić and Dolgov 2005 Phys. Status Solidi b 242 151; Danylenko et al 1999 Eur. Phys. J. B 9 201) is recently applied in (Lee et al 2014 Nature 515 245; Rademaker et al 2016 New J. Phys. 18 022001; Wang et al 2016 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 29 054009) for the explanation of high {T}{{c}}(˜ 100 {{K}}) in a monolayer FeSe grown on {{{SrTiO}}}3 (Lee et al 2014 Nature 515 245) and TiO2 (Rebec et al 2016 arXiv:1606.09358v1) substrates. The EPI is due to a long-range dipolar electric field created by high-energy oxygen vibrations ({{Ω }}˜ 90 meV) at the interface (Lee et al 2014 Nature 515 245; Rademaker et al 2016 New J. Phys. 18 022001; Wang et al 2016 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 29 054009). In leading order (with respect to {T}{{c}0}/{{Ω }}) the mean-field critical temperature {T}{{c}0}={< {V}{{epi}}(q)> }q/4) ˜ {({{aq}}{{c}})}2{V}{{epi}}(0) and the gap {{{Δ }}}0=2{T}{{c}0\\text{}} are due to an interplay between the maximal EPI pairing potential {V}{{epi}}(0) and the FSP-width q c. For {T}{{c}0}˜ 100 K one has {{{Δ }}}0˜ 16 meV in a satisfactory agreement with ARPES experiments. In leading order T c0 is mass-independent and a very small oxygen isotope effect is expected in next to leading order. In clean systems T c0 for s-wave and d-wave pairing is degenerate but both are affected by non-magnetic impurities, which are pair-weakening in the s-channel and pair-breaking in the d-channel. The self-energy and replica bands at T = 0 and at the Fermi surface are calculated and compared with experimental results at T> 0 ( Rademaker et al 2016 New J. Phys. 18 022001; Wang et al 2016 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 29 054009). The EPI coupling constant {λ }{{m}}={< {V}{{epi}}(q)> }q/2{{Ω }} is mass-dependent ({M}1/2) and at ω (\\ll {{Ω }}) makes the slope of the self-energy {{Σ }}(k,ω )(≈ -{λ }{{m}}ω ) and the replica intensities {A}i(˜ {λ }{{m}}) mass-dependent. This result, overlooked in the literature, is contrary to the prediction of the standard Migdal-Eliashberg theory for EPI. The small oxygen isotope effect in {T}{{c}0} and pronounced isotope effect in {{Σ }}(k,ω ) and ARPES spectra A i of the replica bands in FeSe films on SrTiO3 and TiO2 is a smoking-gun experiment for validity of the EPI-FSP theory to these systems. The EPI-FSP theory predicts a large number of low-laying pairing states, thus causing internal pair fluctuations. The latter reduce T c0 additionally, by creating a pseudogap state for {T}{{c}}< T< {T}{{c}0}. Possibilities to increase T c0, by designing novel structures are discussed in the framework of the EPI-FSP theory.

  12. Inhibitory effect of the Pseudobrickellia brasiliensis (Spreng) R.M. King & H. Rob. aqueous extract on human lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ and TNF-α production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Almeida, V G; Avelar-Freitas, B A; Santos, M G; Costa, L A; Silva, T J; Pereira, W F; Amorim, M L L; Grael, C F F; Gregório, L E; Rocha-Vieira, E; Brito-Melo, G E A

    2017-07-10

    Pseudobrickellia brasiliensis (Asteraceae) is a plant commonly known as arnica-do-campo and belongs to the native flora of the Brazilian Cerrado. The alcoholic extract of the plant has been used as an anti-inflammatory agent in folk medicine, but the biological mechanism of action has not been elucidated. The present study evaluated the composition of P. brasiliensis aqueous extract and its effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine production and lymphocyte proliferation. The extracts were prepared by sequential maceration of P. brasiliensis leaves in ethanol, ethyl acetate, and water. Extract cytotoxicity was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion assay, and apoptosis and necrosis were measured by staining with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide. The ethanolic (ETA) and acetate (ACE) extracts showed cytotoxic effects. The aqueous extract (AQU) was not cytotoxic. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin and treated with AQU (100 μg/mL) showed reduced interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression. AQU also inhibited lymphocyte proliferative response after nonspecific stimulation with phytohemagglutinin. The aqueous extract was analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection and mass spectrometry. Quinic acid and its derivatives 5-caffeoylquinic acid and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, as well as the flavonoids luteolin and luteolin dihexoside, were detected. All these compounds are known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that P. brasiliensis aqueous extract can inhibit the pro-inflammatory cytokine production and proliferative response of lymphocytes. These effects may be related to the presence of chemical substances with anti-inflammatory actions previously reported in scientific literature.

  13. F/A-18 AN/APG-65 Radar Case Study Report (IDA/OSD R&M (Institute for Defense Analyses/Office of the Secretary of Defense Reliability and Maintainability) Study)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    LOOK DOWN F-4J/AWG-10 • ADDED PULSE DOPPLER • GOOD HEAD ON PERFORMANCE • POOR TAIL PERFORMANCE F-14/AWG-9 • ADDED TWS • HIGHER POWER • INCREASED...returned to NAS Lemoore for I level repair retested good . 45B/8-2 ^° F/A-18 YUMA DEPLOYMENT 45A/3-9 • MOST RECENT OF MANY NAVY DEPLOYMENTS...THERMAL ANALYSIS AND DESIGN Following the design process to minimize the parts count, and a selection/screening process to obtain good quality

  14. Impact of 10-Minute Interval Roller Massage on Performance and Active Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, D D; Quigley, P J; Whitten, J H D; Reid, J C; Behm, David G

    2017-11-16

    Hodgson, DD, Quigley, PJ, Whitten, JHD, Reid, JC, and Behm, DG. Impact of 10-minute interval roller massage on performance and active range of motion. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2017-Roller massage (RM) has been shown to increase range of motion (ROM) without subsequent performance deficits. However, prolonged static stretching (SS) can induce performance impairments. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of combining SS and RM with and without subsequent RM on ROM and neuromuscular performance. Subjects (n = 12) participated in 5 sessions: (a) SS only (SS_rest), (b) SS + RM (SS + RM_rest), (c) SS with RM at 10 and 20 minutes after stretch (SS_RM), (d) SS + RM with RM at 10 and 20 minutes after stretch (SS + RM_RM), and (e) control. For the SS conditions, the quadriceps and hamstrings received passive SS for 2 × 30 seconds each. For the SS + RM conditions, SS was applied to the quadriceps and hamstrings for 30 seconds each, and RM was performed for 30 seconds per muscle. SS_RM and SS + RM_RM conditions received an additional 30-second RM at 10 and 20 minutes after warm-up, whereas sessions without additional RM rested for the same duration. Testing measures included hip flexion (HF) and knee flexion (KF) active and passive ROM, hurdle jump height and contact time, countermovement jump height, and maximal voluntary isometric contraction force. Initial KF and HF ROM improvements provided by SS_RM and SS + RM_RM were sustained up to 30 minutes after intervention. Furthermore, SS_RM exhibited greater ROM compared with sessions lacking additional RM in active and passive HF as well as active and passive KF. Similarly, SS + RM_RM elicited greater KF and HF ROM improvements than SS_rest. In conclusion, active KF and HF ROM improvements were prolonged by additional RM, whereas neuromuscular performance remained relatively unaffected.

  15. The Astronomical Almanac Online - Glossary

    Astronomical Almanac. Δ A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z $\\boldmath{\\Delta {\\rm T}}$: the difference between Terrestrial Time (TT) and Universal Time (UT): $\\Delta {\\rm T} = {\\rm TT} - {\\rm UT}1 $. $\\boldmath{\\Delta {\\rm UT1}}$ (or $\\boldmath{\\Delta {\\rm UT}}$): the value of the difference between

  16. Lungeing on hard and soft surfaces: Movement symmetry of trotting horses considered sound by their owners.

    PubMed

    Pfau, T; Jennings, C; Mitchell, H; Olsen, E; Walker, A; Egenvall, A; Tröster, S; Weller, R; Rhodin, M

    2016-01-01

    Lungeing is often part of the clinical lameness examination. The difference in movement symmetry, which is a commonly employed lameness measure, has not been quantified between surfaces. To compare head and pelvic movement symmetry between surfaces and reins during lungeing. Quantitative gait analysis in 23 horses considered sound by their owners. Twenty-three horses were assessed in-hand and on the lunge on both reins on hard and soft surfaces with inertial sensors. Seven movement symmetry parameters were quantified and used to establish 2 groups, namely symmetrical (n = 9) and forelimb-lame horses (n = 14), based on values from straight-line assessment. Movement symmetry values for left rein measurements were side corrected to allow comparison of the amount of movement symmetry between reins. A mixed model (P<0.05) was used to study effects on movement symmetry of surface (hard/soft) and rein (inside/outside with respect to movement symmetry on the straight). In forelimb-lame horses, surface and rein were identified as significantly affecting all head movement symmetry measures (rein, all P<0.0001; surface, all P<0.042). In the symmetrical group, no significant influence of surface or rein was identified for head movement symmetry (rein, all P>0.245; surface, all P>0.073). No significant influence of surface or rein was identified for any of the pelvic movement symmetry measures in either group. While more symmetrical horses showed a consistent amount of movement symmetry across surfaces/reins, horses objectively quantified as lame on the straight showed decreased movement symmetry during lungeing, in particular with the lame limb on the inside of a hard circle. The variation within group questions straight-line movement symmetry as a sole measure of lameness without quantification of movement symmetry on the lunge, ideally on hard and soft surfaces to evaluate differences between reins and surfaces. In future, thresholds for lungeing need to be determined using

  17. The activation of OsEIL1 on YUC8 transcription and auxin biosynthesis is required for ethylene-inhibited root elongation in rice early seedling development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Wei, Pengcheng; Huang, Rongfeng

    2017-01-01

    Rice is an important monocotyledonous crop worldwide; it differs from the dicotyledonous plant Arabidopsis in many aspects. In Arabidopsis, ethylene and auxin act synergistically to regulate root growth and development. However, their interaction in rice is still unclear. Here, we report that the transcriptional activation of OsEIL1 on the expression of YUC8/REIN7 and indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA)-dependent auxin biosynthesis is required for ethylene-inhibited root elongation. Using an inhibitor of YUC activity, which regulates auxin biosynthesis via the conversion of IPA to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), we showed that ethylene-inhibited primary root elongation is dependent on YUC-based auxin biosynthesis. By screening phenotypes of seedling primary root from mutagenesis libraries following ethylene treatment, we identified a rice ethylene-insensitive mutant, rein7-1, in which YUC8/REIN7 is truncated at its C-terminus. Mutation in YUC8/REIN7 reduced auxin biosynthesis in rice, while YUC8/REIN7 overexpression enhanced ethylene sensitivity in the roots. Moreover, YUC8/REIN7 catalyzed the conversion of IPA to IAA, truncated version at C-terminal end of the YUC8/REIN7 resulted in significant reduction of enzymatic activity, indicating that YUC8/REIN7 is required for IPA-dependent auxin biosynthesis and ethylene-inhibited root elongation in rice early seedlings. Further investigations indicated that ethylene induced YUC8/REIN7 expression and promoted auxin accumulation in roots. Addition of low concentrations of IAA rescued the ethylene response in the rein7-1, strongly demonstrating that ethylene-inhibited root elongation depends on IPA-dependent auxin biosynthesis. Genetic studies revealed that YUC8/REIN7-mediated auxin biosynthesis functioned downstream of OsEIL1, which directly activated the expression of YUC8/REIN7. Thus, our findings reveal a model of interaction between ethylene and auxin in rice seedling primary root elongation, enhancing our understanding of

  18. 75 FR 41179 - Sunshine Act Notices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    .... Laham, Esq., and D. Mark Renaud, Esq., of Wiley Rein LLP. Draft Advisory Opinion 2010-10: National Right... Ten, by its counsel, Marc E. Elias, Esq., and Ezra Reese, Esq., of Perkins Coie LLP. Management and...

  19. 75 FR 44792 - Sunshine Act Notices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ...: Club for Growth, by its counsel, Carol A. Laham, Esq., and D. Mark Renaud, Esq., of Wiley Rein LLP. Draft Advisory Opinion 2010-11: Commonsense Ten, by its counsel, Marc E. Elias, Esq., and Ezra Reese...

  20. 75 FR 42444 - Sunshine Act Notices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... Opinion 2010-09: Club for Growth, by its counsel, Carol A. Laham, Esq., and D. Mark Renaud, Esq., of Wiley Rein LLP. Draft Advisory Opinion 2010-11: Commonsense Ten, by its counsel, Marc E. Elias, Esq., and...

  1. 75 FR 43983 - Sunshine Act Notices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ...: Club for Growth, by its counsel, Carol A. Laham, Esq., and D. Mark Renaud, Esq., of Wiley Rein LLP. Draft Advisory Opinion 2010-11: Commonsense Ten, by its counsel, Marc E. Elias, Esq., and Ezra Reese...

  2. Stages of Development in Poverty Program Neighborhood Action Committees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurcher, Louis A., Jr.

    1969-01-01

    Two discussion papers, commenting on the main article, are included: (1) "Community Action: The Limits of a Developmental Framework by Martin Rein, and (2) "For the Advocate and the Innovator by Franklin M. Zweig.

  3. 77 FR 2242 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 [MB Docket No. 08-85; RM-11427, RM-11517, RM-11518, RM-11519; DA 11- 2059] Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ, and Needles, CA AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed...

  4. The Institutionalization of Drug Trafficking Organizations: Comparing Colombia and Brazil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Shifter, “Latin America’s Drug Problem,” Current History (February 2007): 58. 6 Henry Veltmeyer and James Petras , “Social Structure and Change in Latin...In The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, by Michael Moran, Martin Rein and Robert E. Goodwin (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2008), 691...Johan P. Olsen, “Chapter 34: The Logic of Appropriateness.” In The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, by Michael Moran, Martin Rein and Robert E

  5. Armed Helicopters: How the Army Fought Its Way into Attack Aviation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    the Graduation Requirements for the Degree of MASTER OF OPERATIONAL ARTS AND SCIENCES Advisor: Dr. Christopher M. Rein Maxwell Air...and firepower.68 Colonel Trevor Dupuy accurately described the critical nature of capturing these developments during the Vietnam war when he said...Washington D.C.: United States Air Force, 1987. Rein, Dr Christopher M., ACSC/DEL. To the author. E-mail, 26 November 2014. Stockfisch, J.A

  6. Law Enforcement Support Office (LESO) 1999 National Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-04

    State Coordinators • Advises State Coordinators on how to manage the State programs - Denver , Colorado Rome, New York - Paul Reining and Robert...Rocky Mountain~(Univ. Denver ) Interoperability, crime mapping, EOD, excess, (Paul Reining and Mike McGee) 20 Tech Beat How to obtain copies How...State Coordinator Room 3331 Colorado State Patrol Ft. Belvoir, VA 22066-6221 700 Kipling (800) 532-9946 (703) 767-3083 Lakewood, CO 80228 (303

  7. Analysis and application of a velocity command motor as a reaction mass actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulla, Jeffrey L.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Horta, Lucas G.

    1990-01-01

    A commercially available linear stepper motor is applied as a reaction mass (RM) actuator. With the actuator operating in the (RM) relative-velocity command mode, open-loop and closed-loop testing is performed to determine operational limits. With the actuator mounted on a simple beam structure, root strain, RM acceleration, or beam acceleration is used in the feedback loop to augment the structural damping. The RM relative position is also used as feedback to ensure that the RM remains centered.

  8. A compiled catalog of rotation measures of radio point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Han, Jin-Lin

    2014-08-01

    We compiled a catalog of Faraday rotation measures (RMs) for 4553 extragalactic radio point sources published in literature. These RMs were derived from multi-frequency polarization observations. The RM data are compared to those in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) RM catalog. We reveal a systematic uncertainty of about 10.0 ± 1.5 rad m-2 in the NVSS RM catalog. The Galactic foreground RM is calculated through a weighted averaging method by using the compiled RM catalog together with the NVSS RM catalog, with careful consideration of uncertainties in the RM data. The data from the catalog and the interface for the Galactic foreground RM calculations are publicly available on the webpage: http://zmtt.bao.ac.cn/RM/.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Rotation measures of radio point sources (Xu+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Han, J.-L.

    2015-04-01

    We compiled a catalog of Faraday rotation measures (RMs) for 4553 extragalactic radio point sources published in literature. These RMs were derived from multi-frequency polarization observations. The RM data are compared to those in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) RM catalog. We reveal a systematic uncertainty of about 10.0+/-1.5rad/m2 in the NVSS RM catalog. The Galactic foreground RM is calculated through a weighted averaging method by using the compiled RM catalog together with the NVSS RM catalog, with careful consideration of uncertainties in the RM data. The data from the catalog and the interface for the Galactic foreground RM calculations are publicly available on the webpage: http://zmtt.bao.ac.cn/RM/ . (2 data files).

  10. Simulation of a class of hazardous situations in the ICS «INM RAS - Baltic Sea»

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, Natalia; Agoshkov, Valery; Aseev, Nikita; Parmuzin, Eugene; Sheloput, Tateana; Shutyaev, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Development of Informational Computational Systems (ICS) for data assimilation procedures is one of multidisciplinary problems. To study and solve these problems one needs to apply modern results from different disciplines and recent developments in mathematical modeling, theory of adjoint equations and optimal control, inverse problems, numerical methods theory, numerical algebra, scientific computing and processing of satellite data. In this work the results on the ICS development for PC-ICS "INM RAS - Baltic Sea" are presented. We discuss practical problems studied by ICS. The System includes numerical model of the Baltic Sea thermodynamics, the new oil spill model describing the propagation of a slick at the Sea surface (Agoshkov, Aseev et al., 2014) and the optimal ship route calculating block (Agoshkov, Zayachkovsky et al., 2014). The ICS is based on the INMOM numerical model of the Baltic Sea thermodynamics (Zalesny et al., 2013). It is possible to calculate main hydrodynamic parameters (temperature, salinity, velocities, sea level) using user-friendly interface of the ICS. The System includes data assimilation procedures (Agoshkov, 2003, Parmuzin, Agoshkov, 2012) and one can use the block of variational assimilation of the sea surface temperature in order to obtain main hydrodynamic parameters. Main possibilities of the ICS and several numerical experiments are presented in the work. By the problem of risk control is meant a problem of determination of optimal resources quantity which are necessary for decreasing the risk to some acceptable value. Mass of oil slick is chosen as a function of control. For the realization of the random variable the quadratic "functional of cost" is introduced. It comprises cleaning costs and deviation of damage of oil pollution from its acceptable value. The problem of minimization of this functional is solved based on the methods of optimal control and the theory of adjoint equations. The solution of this problem is

  11. Variational data assimilation problem for the thermodynamics model with displaced pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmuzin, Eugene; Agosgkov, Valery; Zakharova, Natalia

    2017-04-01

    The most versatile and promising technology for solving problems of monitoring and analysis of the natural environment is a four-dimensional variational data assimilation of observation data. The development of computational algorithms for the solution of data assimilation problems in geophysical hydrodynamics is important in the contemporary computation and informational science to improve the quality of long-term prediction by using the hydrodynamics sea model. These problems are applied to close and solve in practice the appropriate inverse problems of the geophysical hydrodynamics. In this work the variational data assimilation problems in the Baltic Sea water area with displaced pole were formulated and studied [1]. We assume, that the unique function which is obtained by observation data processing is the function and we permit that the function is known only on a part of considering area (for example, on a part of the Baltic Sea). Numerical experiments on restoring the ocean heat flux and obtaining solution of the system (temperature, salinity, velocity, and sea surface height) in the Baltic Sea primitive equation hydrodynamics model [2] with assimilation procedure were carried out. In the calculations we used daily sea surface temperature observation from Danish meteorological Institute, prepared on the basis of measurements of the radiometer (AVHRR, AATSR and AMSRE) and spectroradiometer (SEVIRI and MODIS). The spatial resolution of the model grid with respect to the horizontal variables is uniform on latitude (0.2 degree) and varies on longitude from 0.04 to 0.0004 degree . The results of the numerical experiments are presented. This study was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project №16-01-00548) and project №14-11-00609 by the Russian Science Foundation. References: [1] Agoshkov V.I., Parmuzin E.I., Zakharova N.B., Zalesny V.B., Shutyaev V.P., Gusev A.V. Variational assimilation of observation data in the mathematical model of

  12. Effects of pre-conditioning on behavior and physiology of horses during a standardised learning task

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Holly; Starling, Melissa J.; Freire, Rafael; Buckley, Petra; McGreevy, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    Rein tension is used to apply pressure to control both ridden and unridden horses. The pressure is delivered by equipment such as the bit, which may restrict voluntary movement and cause changes in behavior and physiology. Managing the effects of such pressure on arousal level and behavioral indicators will optimise horse learning outcomes. This study examined the effect of training horses to turn away from bit pressure on cardiac outcomes and behavior (including responsiveness) over the course of eight trials in a standardised learning task. The experimental procedure consisted of a resting phase, treatment/control phase, standardised learning trials requiring the horses (n = 68) to step backwards in response to bit pressure and a recovery phase. As expected, heart rate increased (P = 0.028) when the handler applied rein tension during the treatment phase. The amount of rein tension required to elicit a response during treatment was higher on the left than the right rein (P = 0.009). Total rein tension required for trials reduced (P < 0.001) as they progressed, as did time taken (P < 0.001) and steps taken (P < 0.001). The incidence of head tossing decreased (P = 0.015) with the progression of the trials and was higher (P = 0.018) for the control horses than the treated horses. These results suggest that preparing the horses for the lesson and slightly raising their arousal levels, improved learning outcomes. PMID:28358892

  13. Assessment of environmental risk for red mud storage facility in China: a case study in Shandong Province.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhi-Chao; Ma, Shu-Hua; Zheng, Shi-Li; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Red mud storage facility (RM-SF) pollution remains a serious problem in China mainly due to the RM's huge quantity, little recyclability, and high alkalinity. And, there is also a risk of dam failure because almost all RM-SFs are processed by damming. In order to address this challenge and improve the level of risk management, it is necessary to evaluate the environmental risk of RM-SFs systematically. So, this paper firstly designs a comprehensive evaluation index system with a three-level evaluation index in the terms of RM characteristics, RM-SF characteristics, ambient environment of RM-SF, the management of RM-SF, and the application aspect of RM by the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method. Then, a case of RM-SF from a typical alumina production enterprise is studied according to this system, as is assisted by several experts from different fields when determining the weights of all indicators. The results show that the risk of selected RM-SF primarily depends on the former factors, that is, RM and RM-SF characteristics, while the contributions of the other factors are quite smaller.

  14. Anomalous scaling of Δ C versus T c in the Fe-based superconductors: the $${S}_{\\pm }$$-wave pairing state model

    DOE PAGES

    Bang, Yunkyu; Stewart, G. R.

    2016-02-01

    The strong power law behavior of the specific heat jumpmore » $${\\rm{\\Delta }}C\\;$$ versus T c $$({\\rm{\\Delta }}C/{T}_{{\\rm{c}}}\\sim {T}_{{\\rm{c}}}^{\\alpha },\\alpha \\approx 2)$$, first observed by Bud'ko et al (2009 Phys. Rev. B 79 220516), has been confirmed with several families of the Fe-based superconducting compounds with various dopings. We tested a minimal two band BCS model to understand this anomalous behavior and showed that this non-BCS relation between $${\\rm{\\Delta }}C\\;$$ versus T c is a generic property of the multiband superconducting state paired by a dominant interband interaction ($${V}_{\\mathrm{inter}}\\gt {V}_{\\mathrm{intra}}$$) reflecting the relation $$\\frac{{{\\rm{\\Delta }}}_{{\\rm{h}}}}{{{\\rm{\\Delta }}}_{{\\rm{e}}}}\\sim \\sqrt{\\frac{{N}_{{\\rm{e}}}}{{N}_{{\\rm{h}}}}}$$ near T c, as in the $${S}_{\\pm }$$-wave pairing state. We also found that this $${\\rm{\\Delta }}C\\;$$ versus T c power law can continuously change from the ideal BNC scaling to a considerable deviation by a moderate variation of the impurity scattering rate $${{\\rm{\\Gamma }}}_{0}$$ (non-pair-breaking). Finally, as a result, our model provides a consistent explanation why the electron-doped Fe-based superconductors follow the ideal BNC scaling very well while the hole-doped systems often show varying degree of deviations.« less

  15. Lasp1 gene disruption is linked to enhanced cell migration and tumor formation Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: C. S. Chew, Inst. of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Sanders R&E Bldg., Rm. CB 2803, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912-3175 (e-mail: cchew@mcg.edu).

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Chen, Xunsheng; Bollag, Wendy B.; Bollag, Roni J.; Sheehan, Daniel J.; Chew, Catherine S.

    2009-01-01

    Lasp1 is an actin-binding, signaling pathway-regulated phosphoprotein that is overexpressed in several cancers. siRNA knockdown in cell lines retards cell migration, suggesting the possibility that Lasp1 upregulation influences cancer metastasis. Herein, we utilized a recently developed gene knockout model to assess the role of Lasp1 in modulating nontransformed cell functions. Wound healing and tumor initiation progressed more rapidly in Lasp1−/− mice compared with Lasp1+/+ controls. Embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from Lasp1−/− mice also migrated more rapidly in vitro. These MEFs characteristically possessed increased focal adhesion numbers and displayed more rapid attachment compared with wild-type MEFs. Differential microarray analyses revealed alterations in message expression for proteins implicated in cell migration, adhesion, and cytoskeletal organization. Notably, the focal adhesion protein, lipoma preferred partner (LPP), a zyxin family member and putative Lasp1 binding protein, was increased about twofold. Because LPP gene disruption reduces cell migration, we hypothesize that LPP plays a role in enhancing the migratory capacity of Lasp1−/− MEFs, perhaps by modifying the subcellular localization of other motility-associated proteins. The striking contrast in the functional effects of loss of Lasp1 in innate cells compared with cell lines reveals distinct differences in mechanisms of motility and attachment in these models. PMID:19531578

  16. [A családorvosok alvási apnoéval kapcsolatos ismeretei és attitűdjei. Megvalósul-e az OSAS szűrése a járművezetők egészségi alkalmasságának vizsgálata során?

    PubMed

    Csatlós, Dalma; Ferenci, Tamás; Kalabay, László; László, Andrea; Hargittay, Csenge; Márkus, Bernadett; Szakács, Zoltán; Torzsa, Péter

    2017-03-30

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) without treatment can cause serious cardiovascular, cardiorespiratory, neurological and other complications. Family physicians have an important role in recognizing the disease. The aim of the study is to assess the knowledge and attitude of family physicians related to sleep apnea. Whether OSAS screening is realized during the general medical checkup for drivers. In the cross-sectional study we used a validated OSAKA questionnaire in mandatory continuous medical education courses, supplemented with four additional questions. 116 family physicians and 103 family medicine residents filled out the questionnaire. Hungarian family physicians, especially male doctors lack the adequate knowledge of sleep apnea. The average score of female physicians was significantly higher than that of males (13.4±1.8 vs. 11.7±2.6, p=0.005). The more specializations the doctor has, the higher the score. Zero or one special examination holders reached 12.5±2.3 points, two special examination holders 12.7±2.2 points. three or four special examination holders reached 14.0±2.1 (p=0.05). Residents' average score was 12.1±2.4 points, which is higher than that of family doctors (p=0.012). Female residents also had higher average points than male residents (12.6±2.0 vs. 11.3±2.7; p=0.008). The size, location and type of the practice or the doctor's age did not show any statistically significant correlation with the number of points achieved. According to our regression analysis, corrected to variables in the model, we found correlation between gender and medical knowledge, but there was no correlation between age, number of specialities, body mass index and the theoretical knowledge of the doctors. In terms of attitude female GPs had higher average scores than male GPs (3.5±0.6 vs. 2.9±0.6, p<0.001). Despite the modification of the 13/1992 regulation only 39% of the practices carried out regularly the required OSAS screening as part of the medical examination for a driving licence. Despite the high prevalence and clinical importance of OSAS, GPs often do not recognize sleep apnea and they have difficulty in treating their patients for this problem.

  17. Transmission electron microscopy study of microstructural properties and dislocation characterization in the GaN film grown on the cone-shaped patterned Al2O3 substrate.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Sik; Yang, Jun-Mo; Park, Kyung Jin; Park, Yun Chang; Yoo, Jung Ho; Jeong, Chil Seong; Park, Jucheol; He, Yinsheng; Shin, Keesam

    2014-02-01

    Growing a GaN film on a patterned Al2O3 substrate is one of the methods of reducing threading dislocations (TDs), which can significantly deteriorate the performance of GaN-based LEDs. In this study, the microstructural details of the GaN film grown on a cone-shaped patterned Al2O3 substrate were investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and weak-beam dark-field techniques. Various defects such as misfit dislocations (MDs), recrystallized GaN (R-GaN) islands and nano-voids were observed on the patterned Al2O3 surfaces, i.e. the flat surface (FS), the inclined surface (IS) and the top surface (TS), respectively. Especially, the crystallographic orientation of R-GaN between the GaN film and the inclined Al2O3 substrate was identified as $[\\overline 1 2\\overline 1 0]_{{\\rm GaN}} \\hbox{//}[\\overline 1 101]_{{\\rm R - GaN} \\,{\\rm on}\\,{\\rm IS}} \\hbox{//}[\\overline 1 100]_{ {{\\rm Al}} _{\\rm 2} {\\rm O}_{\\rm 3}} $, $(\\overline 1 012)_{{\\rm GaN}} \\hbox{//}(1\\overline 1 02)_{{\\rm R - Ga}\\,{\\rm Non}\\,{\\rm IS}} \\hbox{//}(\\overline {11} 26)_{ {{\\rm Al}} _{\\rm 2} {\\rm O}_{\\rm 3}} $. In addition, a rotation by 9° between $(10\\overline 1 1)_{{\\rm R - GaN}} $ and $(0002)_{{\\rm GaN}} $ and between $(10\\overline 1 1)_{{\\rm R - GaN}} $ and $(0006)_{ {{\\rm Al}} _{\\rm 2} {\\rm O}_{\\rm 3}} $ was found to reduce the lattice mismatch between the GaN film and the Al2O3 substrate. Many TDs in the GaN film were observed on the FS and TS of Al2O3. However, few TDs were observed on the IS. Most of the TDs generated from the FS of Al2O3 were bent to the inclined facet rather than propagating to the GaN surface, resulting in a reduction in the dislocation density. Most of the TDs generated from the TS of Al2O3 were characterized as edge dislocations.

  18. 78 FR 25320 - Advisory Committee on the Medical Uses of Isotopes: Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... handouts, will be available at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/acmui/meetings/2013.html . The... summary will be available at ( http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/acmui/meetings/2013.html...

  19. Meckel diverticulum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kleigman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Intestinal duplications, meckel diverticulum, and other remnants of ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  20. Hartnup disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Defects in metabolism of amino acids. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  1. Intussusception - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF. Ileus, adhesions, intussusception, and closed-loop obstructions. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  2. Hyperglycemia - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Electrolyte and acid-base disorders. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  3. Spitting up - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  4. Hirschsprung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Motility disorders and Hirschsprung disease. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  5. Aminoaciduria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Defects in metabolism of amino acids. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  6. Absent pulmonary valve

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  7. Waardenburg syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Defects in metabolism of amino acids. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  8. Ebstein anomaly

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Cyanotic congenital heart lesions. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  9. Rectal prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF. Surgical conditions of the anus and rectum. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  10. Anal fissure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Surgical conditions of anus and rectum. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  11. Selective mutism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  12. Phenylketonuria

    MedlinePlus

    Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Defects in metabolism of amino acids. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  13. Maple syrup urine disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Defects in metabolism of amino acids. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  14. Myelomeningocele

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  15. Knock knees

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Torsional and angular deformities. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  16. Phonological disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  17. Imperforate anus

    MedlinePlus

    Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Surgical conditions of the anus and rectum. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  18. Methylmalonic acidemia

    MedlinePlus

    Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Defects in metabolism of amino acids. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  19. Hypocalcemia - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Electrolyte and acid-base disorders. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  20. 76 FR 68810 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Farm-to-Market 1626 in Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ..., from Ranch-to-Market (RM) 967 to Brodie Lane in Hays and Travis Counties, Texas. Those actions grant... (FM) 1626 from Ranch-to-Market (RM) 967 to Brodie Lane in Hays and Travis Counties; Project Reference...

  1. 21 CFR 807.37 - Inspection of establishment registration and device listings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 66, rm. 3521, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. In addition, there will be available for.... 66, rm. 3521, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. (3) Requests for device listing information not...

  2. Choking - adult or child over 1 year

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  3. Breathing - slowed or stopped

    MedlinePlus

    ... Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  4. Unconsciousness - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  5. Paint, lacquer, and varnish remover poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  6. Pine oil poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: chorea-acanthocytosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Danek A, Rampoldi L, Hardie RJ, Chalmers RM, Wood NW, Bohlega S, Dotti MT, Federico A, Shizuka M, ... Stone C, Rubio JP, Danek A, Chalmers RM, Wood NW, Verellen C, Ferrer X, Malandrini A, Fabrizi ...

  8. 75 FR 77862 - Sunshine Act Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... RM10-25-000......... Five-Year Review of Oil Pipeline Pricing Index. G-2 RM11-4-000 Storage Reporting............ Version One Regional Reliability Standards for Facilities Design, Connections, and Maintenance; Protection...

  9. Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of malabsorption. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 338. Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Defects in the metabolism ...

  10. Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIA) National Institutes of Health, DHHS 31 Center Drive, Rm. 5C27 MSC 2292 Bethesda MD Bethesda, MD ... NIA) National Institutes of Health, DHHS 31 Center Drive, Rm. 5C27 MSC 2292 Bethesda MD Bethesda, MD ...

  11. Lomotil overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  12. Facial swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ... Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  13. Acceptance of Safety and Mission Success Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    NASA has developed an objectives based hierarchy for guiding Reliability and Maintainability (RM) activities. This presentation overviews the hierarchy and proposes to the international trilateral partners to formulate a task force to consider the elements of the NASA RM framework, as captured in the hierarchy of RM considerations, to identify commonalities and differences in the way RM is addressed by the flight projects among the partners.

  14. 40 CFR 725.60 - Withdrawal of submission by the submitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., OPPT Document Control Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington... Control Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington, DC 20004. (ii... Document Control Office (DCO), EPA East Bldg., 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Rm. 6428, Washington, DC 20004...

  15. Do Students Who Get Low Grades Only in Research Methods Need the Same Help as Students Who Get Low Grades in All Topics in Psychology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Some psychology students achieve high grades in all classes except for research methods (RM). Previous research has usually treated low levels of achievement in RM as a unitary phenomenon, without reference to the grades the student is achieving in other subjects. The present internet survey explored preferences for learning RM in 140 psychology…

  16. 78 FR 17394 - Filing via the Internet; Electronic Tariff Filings; Revisions to Electric Quarterly Report Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket Nos. RM07-16-000; RM01-5-000; RM12-3-000] Filing via the Internet; Electronic Tariff Filings; Revisions to Electric Quarterly Report Filing Process; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that on April 16, 2013, the staff of the...

  17. Hyperfine structure and isotope shift analysis of singly ionized titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouazza, Safa

    2013-04-01

    The even-parity low configuration system of Ti II has been considered on the basis of the experimental data found in the literature, and its fine structure has been reanalyzed by simultaneous parameterization of one- and two-body interactions for the model space (3d + 4s)3. Furthermore, the main one-electron hyperfine structure parameters for these configurations have been evaluated. For instance, for 3d24s1, a_{3{\\rm{d}}}^{01} = - {\\rm{63}}.{\\rm{2}}\\left( {{\\rm{3}}.{\\rm{1}}} \\right)\\,{\\rm{MHz}} and a_{4{\\rm{s}}}^{10} = - {\\rm{984}}.{\\rm{1}}\\left( {{\\rm{7}}.{\\rm{1}}} \\right)\\,{\\rm{MHz}} . Field shifts (FS) and specific mass shifts (SMS) of the main Ti II configurations are deduced by means of ab initio estimates combined with a small quantity of experimental isotope shift data available in the literature: FS(3d3) = -63.3 MHz, FS(3d24p1) = -49.7 MHz, FS(3d14s2) = 98.2 MHz, FS(4s24P1) = 163.4 MHz and SMS(3d3) = 1453.3 MHz, SMS(3d14s2) = -2179.7 MHz, …, referred to 3d24s1 for the pair Ti46-Ti48.

  18. Tropospheric GOM at the Pic du Midi Observatory-Correcting Bias in Denuder Based Observations.

    PubMed

    Marusczak, Nicolas; Sonke, Jeroen E; Fu, Xuewu; Jiskra, Martin

    2017-01-17

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM, Hg) emissions are transformed to divalent reactive Hg (RM) forms throughout the troposphere and stratosphere. RM is often operationally quantified as the sum of particle bound Hg (PBM) and gaseous oxidized Hg (GOM). The measurement of GOM and PBM is challenging and under mounting criticism. Here we intercompare six months of automated GOM and PBM measurements using a Tekran (TK) KCl-coated denuder and quartz regenerable particulate filter method (GOM TK , PBM TK , and RM TK ) with RM CEM collected on cation exchange membranes (CEMs) at the high altitude Pic du Midi Observatory. We find that RM TK is systematically lower by a factor of 1.3 than RM CEM . We observe a significant relationship between GOM TK (but not PBM TK ) and Tekran flush TK blanks suggesting significant loss (36%) of labile GOM TK from the denuder or inlet. Adding the flush TK blank to RM TK results in good agreement with RM CEM (slope = 1.01, r 2 = 0.90) suggesting we can correct bias in RM TK and GOM TK . We provide a bias corrected (*) Pic du Midi data set for 2012-2014 that shows GOM* and RM* levels in dry free tropospheric air of 198 ± 57 and 229 ± 58 pg m -3 which agree well with in-flight observed RM and with model based GOM and RM estimates.

  19. Lung recruitment maneuver effects on respiratory mechanics and extravascular lung water index in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Guo; Chen, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Fen; Zeng, Zhen-Guo; Qian, Ke-Jian

    2011-01-01

    Animal experiments showed that recruitment maneuver (RM) and protective ventilation strategy of the lung could improve oxygenation and reduce extravascular lung water. This study was to investigate the effects of RM on respiratory mechanics and extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Thirty patients with ARDS were randomized into a RM group and a non-RM group. In the RM group, after basic mechanical ventilation stabilized for 30 minutes, RM was performed and repeated once every 12 hours for 3 days. In the non-RM group, lung protective strategy was conducted without RM. Oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2), peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), Plateau pressure (Pplat), static pulmonary compliance (Cst) and EVLWI of patients before treatment and at 12, 24, 48, 72 hours after the treatment were measured and compared between the groups. Hemodynamic changes were observed before and after RM. One-way ANOVA, Student's t test and Fisher's exact test were used to process the data. The levels of PaO2/FiO2 and Cst increased after treatment in the two groups, but they were higher in the RM group than in the non-RM group (P<0.05). The PIP and Pplat decreased after treatment in the two groups, but they were lower in the RM group than in the non-RM group (P<0.05). The EVLWI in the two groups showed downward trend after treatment (P<0.05), and the differences were signifcant at all time points (P<0.01); the EVLWI in the RM group was lower than that in the non-RM group at 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Compared with pre-RM, hemodynamics changes during RM were significantly different (P<0.01); compared with pre-RM, the changes were not significantly different at 120 seconds after the end of RM (P>0.05). RM could reduce EVLWI, increase oxygenation and lung compliance. The effect of RM on hemodynamics was transient.

  20. Operation Plan I-45 ICEBERG

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1945-02-01

    8217COmIIAND OF MAJOR- GENERAL del VALLE: R. O, BARE, Col, USMC, ·C of S. ANNEXES: ABLE - Distribution B1iKER - Intelligence CHARLIE - Naval Gunfire Support Plan...3. ABLE Annex BAKER to Opn Plan 1-45, 1st MarDiv-(Rein) INTELLIGENCE 00015 1st Mar Div (Rein). 1990-5-80 In The Field 475/355 . 1100, 1OFeb, 1945. AP...distributed. (c) JANIS No. 86, August, 1944; JANIS No. 86 (Change 1), October 1944. (d) Engineer Intelligence Information of OKINAWA SHIMA prepared by Eng

  1. Whistler turbulence heating of electrons and ions: Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simuations

    DOE PAGES

    Gary, S. Peter; Hughes, R. Scott; Wang, Joseph

    2016-01-14

    In this study, the decay of whistler turbulence in a collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized plasma is studied using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations are initialized with a narrowband, relatively isotropic distribution of long wavelength whistler modes. A first ensemble of simulations at electron betamore » $${\\beta }_{{\\rm{e}}}$$ = 0.25 and ion-to-electron mass ratio $${m}_{{\\rm{i}}}$$/$${m}_{{\\rm{e}}}$$ = 400 is carried out on a domain cube of dimension $$L{\\omega }_{\\mathrm{pi}}$$/c = 5.12 where $${\\omega }_{\\mathrm{pi}}$$ is the ion plasma frequency. The simulations begin with a range of dimensionless fluctuating field energy densities, $${\\epsilon }_{{\\rm{o}}}$$, and follow the fluctuations as they cascade to broadband, anisotropic turbulence which dissipates at shorter wavelengths, heating both electrons and ions. The electron heating is stronger and preferentially parallel/antiparallel to the background magnetic field $${{\\boldsymbol{B}}}_{{\\rm{o}}};$$ the ion energy gain is weaker and is preferentially in directions perpendicular to $${{\\boldsymbol{B}}}_{{\\rm{o}}}$$. The important new results here are that, over 0.01 < $${\\epsilon }_{{\\rm{o}}}$$ < 0.25, the maximum rate of electron heating scales approximately as $${\\epsilon }_{{\\rm{o}}}$$, and the maximum rate of ion heating scales approximately as $${\\epsilon }_{{\\rm{o}}}^{1.5}$$. A second ensemble of simulations at $${\\epsilon }_{{\\rm{o}}}$$ = 0.10 and $${\\beta }_{{\\rm{e}}}$$ = 0.25 shows that, over 25 < $${m}_{{\\rm{i}}}$$/$${m}_{{\\rm{e}}}\\;$$< 1836, the ratio of the maximum ion heating rate to the maximum electron heating rate scales approximately as $${m}_{{\\rm{e}}}$$/$${m}_{{\\rm{i}}}$$.« less

  2. Effects of temperature on power output and contraction kinetics in the locomotor muscle of the regionally endothermic common thresher shark (Alopias vulpinus).

    PubMed

    Donley, Jeanine M; Sepulveda, Chugey A; Aalbers, Scott A; McGillivray, David G; Syme, Douglas A; Bernal, Diego

    2012-10-01

    The common thresher shark (Alopias vulpinus) is a pelagic species with medially positioned red aerobic swimming musculature (RM) and regional RM endothermy. This study tested whether the contractile characteristics of the RM are functionally similar along the length of the body and assessed how the contractile properties of the common thresher shark compare with those of other sharks. Contractile properties of the RM were examined at 8, 16 and 24 °C from anterior and posterior axial positions (0.4 and 0.6 fork length, respectively) using the work loop technique. Experiments were performed to determine whether the contractile properties of the RM are similar along the body of the common thresher shark and to document the effects of temperature on muscle power. Axial differences in contractile properties of RM were found to be small or absent. Isometric twitch kinetics of RM were ~fivefold slower than those of white muscle, with RM twitch durations of about 1 s at 24 °C and exceeding 5 s at 8 °C, a Q(10) of nearly 2.5. Power increased approximately tenfold with the 16 °C increase in temperature, while the cycle frequency for maximal power only increased from about 0.5-1.0 Hz over this temperature range. These data support the hypothesis that the RM is functionally similar along the body of the common thresher shark and corroborate previous findings from shark species both with and without medial RM. While twitch kinetics suggest the endothermic RM is not unusually temperature sensitive, measures of power suggest that the RM is not well suited to function at cool temperatures. The cycle frequency at which power is maximized appeared relatively insensitive to temperature in RM, which may reflect the relatively cooler temperature of the thresher RM compared to that observed in lamnid sharks as well as the relatively slow RM phenotype in these large fish.

  3. Remote monitoring for active cardiovascular implantable electronic devices: a European survey.

    PubMed

    Halimi, Franck; Cantù, Francesco

    2010-12-01

    This survey sampled today's European practices in the use of remote monitoring (RM) for the follow-up of active cardiovascular implantable electronic devices. Eighty-five per cent of the responding centres are currently using RM. For the majority, RM is expected to increase importantly within 5 years, and it has already led to a new organization of care based on dedicated allied professionals and/or the creation of RM units. There are still major limitations for the development of RM, such as ethical and legal aspects, reimbursement issues, and the lack of specific national- and European-updated guidelines which need to be informed.

  4. Strength tests for elite rowers: low- or high-repetition?

    PubMed

    Lawton, Trent W; Cronin, John B; McGuigan, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate the utility of low- and high-repetition maximum (RM) strength tests used to assess rowers. Twenty elite heavyweight males (age 23.7 ± 4.0 years) performed four tests (5 RM, 30 RM, 60 RM and 120 RM) using leg press and seated arm pulling exercise on a dynamometer. Each test was repeated on two further occasions; 3 and 7 days from the initial trial. Per cent typical error (within-participant variation) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated using log-transformed repeated-measures data. High-repetition tests (30 RM, 60 RM and 120 RM), involving seated arm pulling exercise are not recommended to be included in an assessment battery, as they had unsatisfactory measurement precision (per cent typical error > 5% or ICC < 0.9). Conversely, low-repetition tests (5 RM) involving leg press and seated arm pulling exercises could be used to assess elite rowers (per cent typical error ≤ 5% and ICC ≥ 0.9); however, only 5 RM leg pressing met criteria (per cent typical error = 2.7%, ICC = 0.98) for research involving small samples (n = 20). In summary, low-repetition 5 RM strength testing offers greater utility as assessments of rowers, as they can be used to measure upper- and lower-body strength; however, only the leg press exercise is recommended for research involving small squads of elite rowers.

  5. The impact of aerosol composition on the particle to gas partitioning of reactive mercury.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Andrew P; Schauer, James J

    2007-06-01

    A laboratory system was developed to study the gas-particle partitioning of reactive mercury (RM) as a function of aerosol composition in synthetic atmospheric particulate matter. The collection of RM was achieved by filter- and sorbent-based methods. Analyses of the RM collected on the filters and sorbents were performed using thermal extraction combined with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CVAFS), allowing direct measurement of the RM load on the substrates. Laboratory measurements of the gas-particle partitioning coefficients of RM to atmospheric aerosol particles revealed a strong dependence on aerosol composition, with partitioning coefficients that varied by orders of magnitude depending on the composition of the particles. Particles of sodium nitrate and the chlorides of potassium and sodium had high partitioning coefficients, shifting the RM partitioning toward the particle phase, while ammonium sulfate, levoglucosan, and adipic acid caused the RM to partition toward the gas phase and, therefore, had partitioning coefficients that were lower by orders of magnitude.

  6. The effects of respiratory-muscle training on exercise in older women.

    PubMed

    Watsford, Mark; Murphy, Arona

    2008-07-01

    This research examined the effects of respiratory-muscle (RM) training on RM function and exercise performance in older women. Twenty-six women (60-69 yr of age) were assessed for spirometry, RM strength (maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure), inspiratory-muscle endurance, and walking performance to a perceived exertion rating of "hard." They were randomly allocated to a threshold RM training group (RMT) or a nonexercising control group (CON) for 8 wk.After training, the 22% (inspiratory) and 30% (expiratory) improvements in RM strength in the RMT group were significantly higher than in the CON group (p < .05). The RMT group also displayed several significant performance improvements, including improved within-group treadmill performance time (12%) and reductions in submaximal heart rate (5%), percentage of maximum voluntary ventilation (16%), and perceived exertion for breathing (8%). RM training appears to improve RM function in older women. Furthermore, these improvements appear to be related to improved submaximal exercise performance.

  7. Comparison of muscle force production using the Smith machine and free weights for bench press and squat exercises.

    PubMed

    Cotterman, Michael L; Darby, Lynn A; Skelly, William A

    2005-02-01

    The Smith machine (SM) (vertical motion of bar on fixed path; fixed-form exercise) and free weights (FWs) (free-form path) are commonly used strength training modes. Exercisers may need to alternate between types of equipment, depending on testing, training, rehabilitation, and/or the exercisers' goals. The purposes of this study were to compare muscle force production for SM and FWs using a 1 repetition maximum (1RM) for the parallel back squat and supine bench press exercises and to predict the 1RM for one mode from 1RM on the other mode. Men (n = 16) and women (n = 16) alternately completed 1RM testing for squat and bench press using SM and FWs. Analyses of variance (type of equipment x sex) and linear regression models were calculated. A significant difference was found between bench press and squat 1RMs for each mode of equipment for all participants. The squat 1RM was greater for the SM than the FWs; conversely, the bench 1RM was greater for FWs than the SM. When sex was considered, bench 1RM for FWs was greater than SM for men and women. The squat 1RM was greater for SM than FWs for women only. The 1RM on one mode of equipment was the best predictor of 1RM for the other mode. For both sexes, the equation SM bench 1RM (in kilograms) = -6.76 + 0.95 (FW bench 1RM) can be used. For women only, SM squat 1RM (in kilograms) = 28.3 + 0.73 (FW squat 1RM). These findings provide equations for converting between SM and FW equipment for training.

  8. Using Design-Based Research in Informal Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisman, Molly

    2008-01-01

    Design-Based Research (DBR) has been a tool of the learning sciences since the early 1990s, used as a way to improve and study learning environments. Using an iterative process of design with the goal of reining theories of learning, researchers and educators now use DBR seek to identify "how" to make a learning environment work. They then draw…

  9. Understanding Soviet Foreign Policy. The Tradition of Change in Soviet Foreign Policy. Two Schools of Soviet Diplomacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    the works of Victor Hugo, :he Russian classics, and the works of other writers. Isaac Deutscher, Stalin: A Political Biography, New York, Oxford... panache and the scope of the gesture further rein- force the Soviet leader’s ascension and his auctoritas. It vastly adds to the feeling of confidence which

  10. Tyche 3.0 Simulation Engine Project Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-09

    la Reine (en droit du Canada), telle que représentée par le ministre de la Défense nationale, 2014 DRDC-RDDC-2014-C220 Page 2 RECORD OF...During the technical evaluation, it was found that the representation of internal data as class objects and collections had performance drawbacks and

  11. In Iowa, a Life of the Mind, Heart, and Soul

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selingo, Jefery

    2005-01-01

    When Dr. Skorton was tapped as Iowa's president, in 2003, his appointment was widely favored by faculty and staff members. Unlike most academics who give up their day jobs when they become college presidents, Dr. David J. Skorton 55, kept his when he took the reins at Iowa two years ago. A cardiologist by training, he still sees patients with…

  12. Focusing on function to mine cancer genome data | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    CCR scientists have devised a strategy to sift through the tens of thousands of mutations in cancer genome data to find mutations that actually drive the disease. They have used the method to discover that the JNK signaling pathway, which in different contexts can either spur cancerous growth or rein it in, acts as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancers. 

  13. Realistic interpretation of quantum mechanics and encounter-delayed-choice experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, GuiLu; Qin, Wei; Yang, Zhe; Li, Jun-Lin

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a realistic interpretation (REIN) of the wave function in quantum mechanics is briefly presented. We demonstrate that in the REIN, the wave function of a microscopic object is its real existence rather than a mere mathematical description. Specifically, the quantum object can exist in disjointed regions of space just as the wave function is distributed, travels at a finite speed, and collapses instantly upon a measurement. Furthermore, we analyze the single-photon interference in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) using the REIN. Based on this, we propose and experimentally implement a generalized delayed-choice experiment, called the encounter-delayed-choice experiment, where the second beam splitter is decided whether or not to insert at the encounter of two sub-waves along the arms of the MZI. In such an experiment, the parts of the sub-waves, which do not travel through the beam splitter, show a particle nature, whereas the remaining parts interfere and thus show a wave nature. The predicted phenomenon is clearly demonstrated in the experiment, thus supporting the REIN idea.

  14. Act Now or Risk HIV Rebounding.

    PubMed

    Kresge, Kristen Jill

    Long-time pharmaceutical company veteran Emilio Emini took over the reins of the HIV program at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation over a year ago. Here, he describes the Foundation's efforts to combat HIV and why this task is more important than ever.

  15. Order and Containment in Concurrent System Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Simple. I created O.C. Jones with the help of Marshell D. Jones. iv Contents List of Figures vi List of Tables viii 1 Managing Inconsistency And Complexity...chapter. My extended family and friends provided immeasurable support. Marshell D. Jones re- minded me to take graduate school and life by the reins

  16. Report on Spending Trends Highlights Inequities in Model for Financing Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of spending trends that is designed to discourage policy makers' focus on finding new revenue rather than reining in spending suggests that the model for financing colleges has reinforced educational inequities and failed to increase the rate at which students graduate. According to the analysis, "serious fault lines" in the current…

  17. A Fine Reach Home: Excerpts from a Sailor's Wind Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fels, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Sailing, a harnessing of wind with canvas to propel a sailboat across distances of water, in winds shaped by landforms, airflow and temperature, requires constant renegotiation by skipper and crew in response to the wind's changeable presence. In a choreography of movement, sails secured by sheets are loosened or reined in by hand to allow wind…

  18. The Case for Case-Based Transfer Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Thorndike and Woodworth 1901; Perkins and Salomon 1994; Bransford, Brown, and Cocking 2000), among other disciplines. Transfer learning uses knowledge...Transfer Learning for Rein- forcement Learning Domains: A Survey. Journal of Machine Learning Research 10(1): 1633–1685. Thorndike , E. L., and

  19. Linking Costs and Postsecondary Degrees: Key Issues for Policymakers. Working Paper 2011-03

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nate

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the author offers practical advice for decision-makers who are struggling to rein in college costs while improving productivity. He provides a step-by-step guide to different approaches for calculating costs, highlights the tremendous variability in cost across programs within institutions, and documents some of the "hidden costs" of…

  20. 75 FR 22179 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Renewals; Vision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... Federal vision exemptions for Alberto Blanco, Michael B. Canedy, Larry A. Cossin, Charles W. Cox, Gary W. Ellis, Dennis J. Evers, Hector O. Flores, W. Roger Goold, Lee Guse, Steven W. Halsey, Clifford J. Harris, John C. Henricks, Thomas M. Leadbitter, John L. Lewis, Jonathan P. Lovel, Kent S. Reining, Enrique G...

  1. Endoscopic Removal of a Giant Gastric Bezoar in a Gastric pouch Diverticulum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-15

    hair ), pharmacobezoars (medications), mid laclobezoars (milk). This is a case of a giant phytobezoar. requiring endoscopic rein oval. 1S. SUBJECT...classified into four types, depending on the material constituting the indigestible mass of the bezoar: phytobezoars (plants), trichobezoars ( hair

  2. KSC-04PD-1959

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The Damage Assessment Recovery Team (DART) meets at the NASA KSC News Center following Hurricane Jeanne. At left (red shirt) is Center Director Jim Kennedy and Media Services Division Chief Mike Rein. A category 3 storm, Jeanne barreled through Central Florida Sept. 25-26, the fourth hurricane in 6 weeks to batter the state.

  3. KSC-04pd1959

    2004-09-27

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Damage Assessment Recovery Team (DART) meets at the NASA KSC News Center following Hurricane Jeanne. At left (red shirt) is Center Director Jim Kennedy and Media Services Division Chief Mike Rein. A category 3 storm, Jeanne barreled through Central Florida Sept. 25-26, the fourth hurricane in 6 weeks to batter the state.

  4. A Good Fit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Violino, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Outsourcing has evolved into a strategic imperative at a growing number of community colleges, especially as administrators rein in spending and streamline operations in the face of shrinking budgets. Across the country, more colleges are outsourcing a range of functions, including information technology (IT), course instruction, food service,…

  5. Hybrid PV HgCdTe Detectors: Technology Reliability and Failure Physics Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    interconnect reliability. 3-1 8912-16 SECTION 4 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to thank Dr. Marion Reine, Dr. Andrei Szilagyi , Nancy Hartle... Szilagyi , Mat. Res. Soc. Syrnp. Proc. 69, 257, (1986) 9. Private communications with Andrei Szilagy. 10. R.J. Briggs, J.W. Marciniec, P.H. Zimmermann and

  6. Affirmative Action Redux: Who Is behind the Latest Effort to End the Consideration of Race in College Admissions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The homepage of the Project on Fair Representation (POFR) features a smiling photo of Abigail Fisher, the young White woman at the center of "Fisher v. the University of Texas," which could end race as a criterion in university admissions. Edward Blum, founder of POFR, a conservative advocacy group, connected Fisher with Wiley Rein LLP,…

  7. Maritime Science and Technology Experimentation Capability Project: Maritime Capability Evaluation Laboratory (MCEL) Data Centre Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    as represented by the Minister of National Defence, 2014 © Sa Majesté la Reine (en droit du Canada), telle que représentée par le ministre de la...12 2.2 Recommended Internal LAN Connections...35 vi 6.1 External Noise Reduction............................................................................................ 35 6.2 Internal

  8. 75 FR 66781 - Habitat Conservation Plan for Pacific Gas & Electric Company's Operation, Maintenance, and Minor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... Dunes evening-primrose E Oenotherawolfii Wolf's evening-primrose -- Orcuttiapilosa Hairy orcutt grass E Orcuttiatenuis Slender orcutt grass T Orcuttiaviscida Sacramento orcutt grass E Packeralayneae Layne's ragwort T... Monterey pine -- Piperiayadonii Yadon's rein orchid E Pleuropogonhooverianus North Coast semaphore grass...

  9. "Finger Kits:" An Interactive Demonstration of Biomaterials and Engineering for Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canavan, Heather E.; Stanton, Michael; Lopez, Kaori; Grubin, Catherine; Graham, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a hands-on activity and demonstration developed at the University of Washington and further reined at the University of New Mexico. In this activity, the authors present a real-world problem to the student: Someone has an injured finger joint, and the students in the class need to design an implant to replace it. After…

  10. The Management of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hersey, Paul; Blanchard, Kenneth H.

    1972-01-01

    Second of three articles cites research indicating employee productivity is usually higher under employee-centered" supervisors who keep a loose rein than under job-centered" ones who exercise close supervision. Since high expectations lead to increasingly high performance, and vice versa, authors suggest ways to turn around low-producing…

  11. Charters as a Solution?: So Far, States and Districts Have Opted for Anything But

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nelson

    2007-01-01

    "Reopening the school as a public charter school" is Option #1 on the list of NCLB's restructuring alternatives for failing schools. But this has not proved a popular choice. NCLB made the bold assumption that states and districts would voluntarily turn over the reins to charter operators. The authors of the legislation must have…

  12. Early Retirement Payoff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Maria D.; Lovenheim, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    As public budgets have grown tighter over the past decade, states and school districts have sought ways to control the growth of spending. One increasingly common strategy employed to rein in costs is to offer experienced teachers with high salaries financial incentives to retire early. Although early retirement incentive (ERI) programs have been…

  13. Unintended Consequences: An Uncertain Future for Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halfond, Jay A.

    2011-01-01

    While most in the academic community know about the attempt to rein in the for-profits, few are aware of its collateral damage. In October, the Department of Education (DOE) issued its Program Integrity Rules, intended to protect federal funds especially from those for-profit institutions with high student loan default rates. Well-intentioned…

  14. Morality as a Yardstick of Educational Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roepke, William J.

    1995-01-01

    Ponders the role of journalism and mass communication education in America and its apparent failure to impress the importance of leadership and morality on some of its students. Discusses how journalism schools can take up the reins of moral leadership, with applications in the professional curriculum, non-major course selection, faculty…

  15. Changing Course: Thurgood Marshall College Fund President Johnny Taylor Seeks New Partnerships and Avenues of Support for Public HBCUs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2011-01-01

    When veteran educator Dr. N. Joyce Payne handed the reins of the organization she founded, the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, to entertainment lawyer and board member Johnny Taylor, Taylor began pursuing a remake of the prestigious group that has turned it on its head in just a matter of months. Today, with just more than a year of leading the…

  16. You're a CEO--Now What? Veteran Advice for a New Generation of Community College Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullman, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    What does it take to be an effective leader? That's a question 146 first-time community college presidents will be attempting to answer as they take the reins at their respective institutions this fall. Whether it's figuring out how to be a better listener or how to form relationships with trustees and board members and other stakeholders in the…

  17. Manual for Teaching Western Riding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Elizabeth

    This manual for teaching western riding is divided into two parts. Part one is composed of discussions of general aspects of riding instruction. Included are discussions of the basic goals of riding, characteristics of a basic position, styles of holding reins, standing position, and elementary control. Part two is composed of 20 suggested lesson…

  18. Tightening the Purchasing Process: Superintendents Get More Involved in Buying Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 18 months, school district purchasing offices across the country have been tightening the reins like never before while more top-level administrators get involved in the budget process. "When the economy really hit the skids, states got hit hard, so a lot of school districts were forced to make severe budget cuts," says John Musso,…

  19. Five Uncommon but Useful Knots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisnall, Rob

    1997-01-01

    Describes five useful, little-known knots: mooring hitch for securing a line to a stump or post; highwayman's cutaway for securing canoe lines or horses' reins; taut-line hitch or midshipman's hitch for securing tent guys; and Hedden knot and C&F belay hitch, used by rock climbers and mountaineers, which combine in a simple rescue haul system.…

  20. Hung out to Dry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluviose, David

    2006-01-01

    It was only three years ago that Dr. R. Wayne Branch was tapped to take over the reins at Clark College, a 70-year-old private college in Vancouver, Washington. As president of the Community College of Baltimore County-Essex, Branch oversaw the reorganization of the college after it was folded into a three-college system. Those organizational…

  1. The Untamed Imagination: Creative Writing in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Gillian

    1999-01-01

    Offers thoughts on mastering creative writing, and why a good teacher is essential to the process. Asserts that students must ultimately satisfy themselves and not their teachers, and that a pupil's innermost imagination must be nurtured and given free-rein. Makes emphatic the view that good teaching is one of the most unselfish activities that…

  2. Behind the habits of the hermit nation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElligott, Thomas J.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed the conflict of Ireland's religious orders and their stranglehold on the reins of education versus the rising discontent of parents, the decline of religious personnel and the wan of the influence of religion on the development of education in the "hermit nation ". (RK)

  3. Beating Swords into . . . Chips?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Eliot

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are the efforts of the Pentagon to help U.S. companies remain competitive in high-tech civilian markets. The tug-of-war for these companies between Congress, which has come to view them as a vehicle for pork-barrel funding, and the administration, which is trying to rein them in, is described. (KR)

  4. Enterprising Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2006-01-01

    A master's-degree program blends courses in education and business to prepare leaders for the entrepreneurial world of charter schooling. Verree D. Laughlin wants to launch a network of small, community-oriented charter schools, starting with one near the Mexican border in Yuma, Arizona. Katheryn Crayton-Shay recently took the reins of a…

  5. In Canada: Under the Rainbow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Heather-jane

    2005-01-01

    Inclusive education seeks to provide a welcoming environment for all students, not by ignoring gender, race, disability, or sexual identities, but by recognizing and validating difference. It is precisely this validation that alarms those who are attempting to rein in schools that have initiated anti-heterosexist programs. But no one is satisfied…

  6. Pity the Poor Professor of Educational Administration: The Puzzlements of Knowledge and of Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlingame, Martin

    1985-01-01

    Professors of educational administration are being pressed to hold one of three conflicting viewpoints about knowledge and practice: "behavioral science,""symbolic," or "critical." Using Rein's notion of stories, the author urges professors to debate these viewpoints among themselves but use stories to study…

  7. Schools in the New Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Schools and universities across the United States have been forced to cope with a grim financial situation that has left them without adequate resources. Administrators are cutting programs, reining in salaries and jettisoning employees to keep operating budgets in line. Education institutions also have had to shutter facilities or postpone,…

  8. Prescriptions for Change: Can Ideas from Health Care Cure Higher Education's Ills?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckel, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Higher education is facing a series of tough questions: (1) Is its business model broken beyond repair?; (2) How can costs that are fast outpacing median family income be reined in?; (3) How can higher education demonstrate that students are getting the quality education they expect and deserve?; and (4) Is higher education competing in ways that…

  9. Developing Expatriates for the Asia-Pacific Region: A Comparative Analysis of Multinational Enterprise Managers from Five Countries across Three Continents. [and] Invited Reaction: Developing Expatriates for the Asia-Pacific Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osman-Gani, AAhad M.; van Reine, Peter Prud'homme; Trompenaars, Fons

    2000-01-01

    Osman-Gani's study surveyed 501 U.S., Germany, Japanese, Korean, and Singaporean managers working abroad, finding significant differences in views of types of training (pre- and postarrival, repatriation, language, cross-cultural) and appropriate delivery methods. Van Reine and Trompenaars' reaction article highlights how cultural background,…

  10. Interfacial contributions in lignocellulosic fiber-reinforced polyurethane composites

    Timothy G. Rials; Michael P. Wolcott; John M. Nassar

    2001-01-01

    Whereas lignocellulosic fibers have received considerable attention as a rein- forcing agent in thermoplastic composites, their applicability to reactive polymer systems remains of considerable interest. The hydroxyl-rich nature of natural lignocellulosic fibers suggests that they are particularly useful in thermosetting systems such as polyurethanes. To further this...

  11. The Election of 1800: Teaching about a Critical Moment in the History of American Constitutional Democracy. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, William A.

    In 1800 the U.S. democracy faced a challenge when Republican Thomas Jefferson defeated Federalist President John Adams. The Federalists handed over the reins of power to their hated rivals, setting a precedent that has guided U.S. politics ever since. This precedent established the tradition of the peaceful transfer of power. The bicentennial of…

  12. Can We Choose a Management Style?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Thomas O.

    1985-01-01

    Options in management style from corporate administration literature available to educational institutions include the choices of Theory X vs. Theory Y, the managerial vs. academic grid, management by objectives, autocratic vs. bureaucratic vs. participative vs. free-rein leadership styles, situational leadership, presidential role, leadership…

  13. Ohio Vote to Scrap Bargaining a Labor Victory--For Now

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Voters in Ohio sent an unequivocal message to the state's Republican governor and lawmakers that they went too far in reining in collective bargaining for teachers and other public employees. But analysts say the conflict between the GOP and teachers' unions in Ohio and elsewhere is not over. By an overwhelming, 22-percentage-point margin,…

  14. Automated System Organizations Under Spatial Grasp Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Schade, M. R Hieb, “Formalizing Battle Management Language: A Grammar for Specifying Orders”, Paper 06S- SIW -068, 2006 Spring Simulation...Interoperability Workshop (Paper 06S- SIW -068), Huntsville, Alabama, April 2006. [13] U. Schade, M. R. Hieb, M. Frey, K. Rein, “Command and Control Lexical

  15. Prospective Health: Duke's Approach to Improving Employee Health and Managing Health Care Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, H. Clint, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    If developing a healthy workforce is critical to reining in the skyrocketing cost of health care, then why have so many attempts at preventive health or disease management fallen short? How can employers connect with employees to engage them in changing unhealthy habits or lifestyles? Duke University has launched an innovative new approach called…

  16. Fuller Employment with Less Inflation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Irving H.

    This series of 10 essays, written at various times since the mid-1960s, explores the U.S. economy's proneness to both high inflation and high unemployment during this period. The essays present ideas that the author believes could have reined in price increases in the early stages, and that presently could speed the reduction of inflation and…

  17. Mayoral School Leadership and Integrated Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The past two decades have seen an emerging trend in urban school governance: mayors taking the reins of school district leadership. The impetus for putting the mayor in charge of a city's schools usually stems from at least one of the following being documented or generally perceived about an urban school district: (1) Lack of accountability; (2)…

  18. A Critical Feminist and Race Critique of Thomas Piketty's "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeller, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Thomas Piketty's "Capital in the Twenty-first Century" documents the foreboding nature of rising wealth inequality in the twenty-first century. In an effort to promote a more just and democratic global society and rein in the unfettered accumulation of wealth by the few, Piketty calls for a global progressive annual tax on corporate…

  19. Last Step to Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Ed

    2016-01-01

    First-time community college presidents are typically chosen from the senior ranks of two-year colleges' administrations, so they know what the job entails to some extent--at least from a close secondhand perspective. Leaders of community colleges who have taken the reins in the mid-2010s say that a close secondhand view only goes so far in…

  20. External Validation of a risk stratification model to assist shared decision making for patients starting renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Patrick; Van Biesen, Wim; Veys, Nic; Lemahieu, Wim; De Moor, Bart; De Meester, Johan

    2016-04-07

    Shared decision making is nowadays acknowledged as an essential step when deciding on starting renal replacement therapy. Valid risk stratification of prognosis is, besides discussing quality of life, crucial in this regard. We intended to validate a recently published risk stratification model in a large cohort of incident patients starting renal replacement therapy in Flanders. During 3 years (2001-2003), the data set collected for the Nederlandstalige Belgische Vereniging voor Nefrologie (NBVN) registry was expanded with parameters of comorbidity. For all incident patients, the abbreviated REIN score(aREIN), being the REIN score without the parameter "mobility", was calculated, and prognostication of mortality at 3, 6 and 12 month after start of renal replacement therapy (RRT) was evaluated. Three thousand four hundred seventy-two patients started RRT in Flanders during the observation period (mean age 67.6 ± 14.3, 56.7 % men, 33.6 % diabetes). The mean aREIN score was 4.1 ± 2.8, and 56.8, 23.1, 12.6 and 7.4 % of patients had a score of ≤4, 5-6, 7-8 or ≥9 respectively. Mortality at 3, 6 and 12 months was 8.6, 14.1 and 19.6 % in the overall and 13.2, 21.5 and 31.9 % in the group with age >75 respectively. In RoC analysis, the aREIN score had an AUC of 0.74 for prediction of survival at 3, 6 and 12 months. There was an incremental increase in mortality with the aREIN score from 5.6 to 45.8 % mortality at 6 months for those with a score ≤4 or ≥9 respectively. The aREIN score is a useful tool to predict short term prognosis of patients starting renal replacement therapy as based on comorbidity and age, and delivers meaningful discrimination between low and high risk populations. As such, it can be a useful instrument to be incorporated in shared decision making on whether or not start of dialysis is worthwhile.

  1. Trigger-happy resident memory CD4+ T cells inhabit the human lungs.

    PubMed

    Oja, A E; Piet, B; Helbig, C; Stark, R; van der Zwan, D; Blaauwgeers, H; Remmerswaal, E B M; Amsen, D; Jonkers, R E; Moerland, P D; Nolte, M A; van Lier, R A W; Hombrink, P

    2018-05-01

    Resident memory T cells (T RM ) reside in the lung epithelium and mediate protective immunity against respiratory pathogens. Although lung CD8 + T RM have been extensively characterized, the properties of CD4 + T RM remain unclear. Here we determined the transcriptional signature of CD4 + T RM , identified by the expression of CD103, retrieved from human lung resection material. Various tissue homing molecules were specifically upregulated on CD4 + T RM , whereas expression of tissue egress and lymph node homing molecules were low. CD103 + T RM expressed low levels of T-bet, only a small portion expressed Eomesodermin (Eomes), and although the mRNA levels for Hobit were increased, protein expression was absent. On the other hand, the CD103 + T RM showed a Notch signature. CD4 + CD103 + T RM constitutively expressed high transcript levels of numerous cytotoxic mediators that was functionally reflected by a fast recall response, magnitude of cytokine production, and a high degree of polyfunctionality. Interestingly, the superior cytokine production appears to be because of an accessible interferon-γ (IFNγ) locus and was partially because of rapid translation of preformed mRNA. Our studies provide a molecular understanding of the maintenance and potential function of CD4 + T RM in the human lung. Understanding the specific properties of CD4 + T RM is required to rationally improve vaccine design.

  2. Regenerative medicine in Brazil: small but innovative.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Dominique S; Singer, Peter A; Daar, Abdallah S; Thorsteinsdóttir, Halla

    2010-11-01

    Although Brazil has received attention for conducting one of the world's largest stem cell clinical trials for heart disease, little has been published regarding Brazil's regenerative medicine (RM) sector. Here we present a comprehensive case study of RM in Brazil, including analysis of the current activity, the main motivations for engaging in RM and the remaining challenges to development in this field. Our case study is primarily based on semi-structured interviews with experts on RM in Brazil, including researchers, policymakers, clinicians, representatives of firms and regulators. Driven by domestic health needs and strategic government support, Brazil is producing innovative RM research, particularly for clinical research in cardiology, orthopedics, diabetes and neurology. We describe the main RM research currently taking place in Brazil, as well as some of the economic, regulatory and policy events that have created a favorable environment for RM development. Brazilian RM researchers need to overcome several formidable challenges to research: research funding is inconsistent, importation of materials is costly and slow, and weak linkages between universities, hospitals and industry impede translational research. Although Brazil's contribution to the RM sector is small, its niche emphasis on clinical applications may become of global importance, particularly if Brazil manages to address the challenges currently impinging on RM innovation.

  3. Ectopic pregnancy in women with recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Ticconi, Carlo; Capogna, Maria V; Martelli, Federica; Borelli, Barbara; Bruno, Valentina; Ergasti, Raffaella; Sorge, Roberto; Piccione, Emilio; Pietropolli, Adalgisa

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association between recurrent miscarriage (RM) and ectopic pregnancy (EP). In this case-control retrospective study, the clinical cards of women followed as outpatients in the RM and low-risk pregnancy offices of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit at the Policlinico Tor Vergata University Hospital were carefully reviewed for the occurrence of EP. Overall, 598 women with RM and 2043 normal women without RM (controls) were included in the study. Among these women, 4974 pregnancies were analyzed, in which 2028 miscarriages occurred. The EP rate (3.51%) was significantly higher in RM than in control women (1.51%) [odds ratio = 2.31 (95% confidence interval: 2.3-2.4)]; it was particularly high in women with primary RM (5.11%). However, when EP rates were calculated not by women but by overall pregnancies, no differences could be found between RM and control women. In control women, the absence of a miscarriage in the reproductive history was associated with a lower rate of EP. Women with RM, particularly primary RM, are at increased risk of EP. This increased risk seems to be dependent on the high number of pregnancies occurring in women with RM rather than to specific characteristics of these women. © 2018 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  4. Selective effects of different fatigue protocols on the function of upper body muscles assessed through the force-velocity relationship.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, Amador; Torrejón, Alejandro; Feriche, Belén; Morales-Artacho, Antonio J; Pérez-Castilla, Alejandro; Padial, Paulino; Jaric, Slobodan

    2018-02-01

    This study explored the feasibility of the force-velocity relationship (F-V) to detect the acute effects of different fatigue protocols on the selective changes of the maximal capacities of upper body muscles to produce force, velocity, and power. After determining the bench press one-repetition maximum (1RM), participants' F-V relationships were assessed during the bench press throw exercise on five separate sessions after performing one of the following fatiguing protocols: 60%1RM failure, 60%1RM non-failure, 80%1RM failure, 80%1RM non-failure, and no-fatigue. In the non-failure protocols, participants performed half the maximum number of repetitions than in their respective failure protocols. The main findings revealed that (1) all F-V relationships were highly linear (median r = 0.997 and r = 0.982 for averaged across participants and individual data, respectively), (2) the fatiguing protocols were ranked based on the magnitude of power loss as follows: 60%1RM failure > 80%1RM failure > 60%1RM non-failure > 80%1RM non-failure, while (3) the assessed maximum force and velocity outputs showed a particularly prominent reduction in the protocols based on the lowest and highest levels of fatigue (i.e., 80%1RM non-failure and 60%1RM failure), respectively. The results support the use of F-V to assess the effects of fatigue on the distinctive capacities of the muscles to produce force, velocity, and power output while performing multi-joint tasks, while the assessed maximum force and velocity capacities showed a particularly prominent reduction in the protocols based on the lowest and highest levels of fatigue (i.e., 80%1RM non-failure and 60%1RM failure), respectively.

  5. Comparative studies of high performance swimming in sharks I. Red muscle morphometrics, vascularization and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Bernal, D; Sepulveda, C; Mathieu-Costello, O; Graham, J B

    2003-08-01

    Tunas (family Scombridae) and sharks in the family Lamnidae are highly convergent for features commonly related to efficient and high-performance (i.e. sustained, aerobic) swimming. High-performance swimming by fishes requires adaptations augmenting the delivery, transfer and utilization of O(2) by the red myotomal muscle (RM), which powers continuous swimming. Tuna swimming performance is enhanced by a unique anterior and centrally positioned RM (i.e. closer to the vertebral column) and by structural features (relatively small fiber diameter, high capillary density and greater myoglobin concentration) increasing O(2) flux from RM capillaries to the mitochondria. A study of the structural and biochemical features of the mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) RM was undertaken to enable performance-capacity comparisons of tuna and lamnid RM. Similar to tunas, mako RM is positioned centrally and more anterior in the body. Another lamnid, the salmon shark (Lamna ditropis), also has this RM distribution, as does the closely related common thresher shark (Alopias vulpinus; family Alopiidae). However, in both the leopard shark (Triakis semifasciata) and the blue shark (Prionace glauca), RM occupies the position where it is typically found in most fishes; more posterior and along the lateral edge of the body. Comparisons among sharks in this study revealed no differences in the total RM quantity (approximately 2-3% of body mass) and, irrespective of position within the body, RM scaling is isometric in all species. Sharks thus have less RM than do tunas (4-13% of body mass). Relative to published data on other shark species, mako RM appears to have a higher capillary density, a greater capillary-to-fiber ratio and a higher myoglobin concentration. However, mako RM fiber size does not differ from that reported for other shark species and the total volume of mitochondria in mako RM is similar to that reported for other sharks and for tunas. Lamnid RM properties thus suggest a higher

  6. sin 2 θ eff lept and M W(indirect) extracted from 9 fb -1 μ +μ - event sample at CDF

    SciT

    Bodek, A.

    2016-05-31

    Here, we report on the extraction ofmore » $$\\sin^2\\theta^{\\rm lept}_{\\rm eff}$$ and indirect measurement of the mass of the W boson from the forward-backward asymmetry of $$\\mu^+\\mu^-$$ events in the $Z$ boson mass region. The data sample collected by the CDF detector corresponds to the full 9 fb$$^{-1}$$ run II sample. We measure $$\\sin^2 \\theta^{\\rm lept}_{\\rm eff} = 0.2315 \\pm 0.0010$$, $$ \\sin^2 \\theta_W = 0.2233 \\pm 0.0009$$ and $$M_W ({\\rm indirect}) = 80.365 \\pm 0.047 \\;{\\rm GeV}/c^2$$, where each uncertainty includes both statistical and systematic contributions. Comparison with the results of the D0 collaboration are presented.« less

  7. Gestational age of pregnancy loss in women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Ticconi, Carlo; Giuliani, Emma; Sorge, Roberto; Patrizi, Lodovico; Piccione, Emilio; Pietropolli, Adalgisa

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the gestational age (GA) of pregnancy loss in women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage (RM) and to determine whether the miscarriages occur at similar GA in RM women. This retrospective study was carried out in a university hospital and included 288 women with unexplained RM. The GA at which each miscarriage occurred was carefully determined. Overall, 739 miscarriages were analyzed. RM women had miscarriages at a median GA of 7 weeks (range: 3-20). In RM women, 47.2% (n = 136) experienced miscarriages within a 1-week range of GA and 53.4% (n = 154) had miscarriages in the same period of fetal development (pre-embryonic, embryonic or fetal). Women with unexplained RM tend to have miscarriages at the same GA, which is characteristic for each patient. © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. "We as Human Beings Get Farther and Farther Apart": the experiences of patients with remote monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Ottenberg, Abigale L; Swetz, Keith M; Mueller, Luke A; Gerhardson, Samantha; Mueller, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    To explore the experiences of patients living with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) who had received remote monitoring (RM). Anecdotal evidence suggests that not all patients with RM use the technology. Focus groups of patients with an ICD who received an RM system. Transcripts reviewed using thematic analysis. Nine patients (3 women and 6 men; median [range] age, 73 [58-91] years) received an RM system. Patients were assigned to a group in regard to RM system use (nonusers, n = 5; users, n = 4). Few nonusers recalled having prior conversations about the system. Users described it as "simple" and "easy" to use. Nonusers often were unsure whether their system was correctly transmitting information. System benefits perceived by users included convenience and security. Nonusers expressed mistrust. Recommendations included early education and help lines. Patient adherence to RM systems can be improved by explaining perceived benefits and addressing barriers to use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. One-Dimensional RuO2/Mn2O3 Hollow Architectures as Efficient Bifunctional Catalysts for Lithium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ki Ro; Lee, Gil Yong; Jung, Ji-Won; Kim, Nam-Hoon; Kim, Sang Ouk; Kim, Il-Doo

    2016-03-09

    Rational design and massive production of bifunctional catalysts with fast oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) kinetics are critical to the realization of highly efficient lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries. Here, we first exploit two types of double-walled RuO2 and Mn2O3 composite fibers, i.e., (i) phase separated RuO2/Mn2O3 fiber-in-tube (RM-FIT) and (ii) multicomposite RuO2/Mn2O3 tube-in-tube (RM-TIT), by controlling ramping rate during electrospinning process. Both RM-FIT and RM-TIT exhibited excellent bifunctional electrocatalytic activities in alkaline media. The air electrodes using RM-FIT and RM-TIT showed enhanced overpotential characteristics and stable cyclability over 100 cycles in the Li-O2 cells, demonstrating high potential as efficient OER and ORR catalysts.

  10. Present-day plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minster, J. B.; Jordan, T. H.

    1977-01-01

    A data set comprising 110 spreading rates, 78 transform fault azimuths and 142 earthquake slip vectors was inverted to yield a new instantaneous plate motion model, designated RM2. The mean averaging interval for the relative motion data was reduced to less than 3 My. A detailed comparison of RM2 with angular velocity vectors which best fit the data along individual plate boundaries indicates that RM2 performs close to optimally in most regions, with several notable exceptions. On the other hand, a previous estimate (RM1) failed to satisfy an extensive set of new data collected in the South Atlantic Ocean. It is shown that RM1 incorrectly predicts the plate kinematics in the South Atlantic because the presently available data are inconsistent with the plate geometry assumed in deriving RM1. It is demonstrated that this inconsistency can be remedied by postulating the existence of internal deformation with the Indian plate, although alternate explanations are possible.

  11. The influence of isometric preload on power expressed during bench press in strength-trained men.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, Sandro; Fukuda, David H; Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Merni, Franco

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the power expressed during the bench press exercise in resistance-trained men following different pre-activation conditions. Twenty-two trained men (age 24.1 ± 1.7 years, height 178.6 ± 6.1 cm, body mass 81.1 ± 10.6 kg) completed a maximal effort bench press (1-RM) test (100.0 kg ± 8.1 kg). In a subsequent assessment, each participant performed concentric bench press movements with loads of 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% of their 1-RM preceded by either a concentric contraction (CC), a low isometric preload (LIP; 70% 1-RM) or a high isometric preload (HIP; 100% 1-RM) conditions. All movements were performed in a Smith machine with a settable quick-release device. Participants performed all three conditions in randomized fashion. Results indicated that power outputs during the bench press exercise following HIP were significantly (p < 0.05) greater than CC at 20% 1-RM (+9%), 30% 1-RM (+16%) and 40% 1-RM (+14%), and LIP at 20% 1-RM (+4%), 30% 1-RM (+20%) and 40% 1-RM (+15%). No differences were found between conditions at 50% 1-RM. Area under the force-power curve with HIP was greater (p < 0.05) than with CC and LIP. In conclusion, results of this study indicate that the use of a HIP (100% 1-RM) in trained participants results in significantly greater power output during the concentric phase of a multi-joint exercise when compared to standard concentric movement.

  12. Semi-empirical scaling for ion–atom single charge exchange cross sections in the intermediate velocity regime

    DOE PAGES

    Friedman, B.; DuCharme, G.

    2017-05-11

    We present a semi-empirical scaling law for non-resonant ion–atom single charge exchange cross sections for collisions with velocities frommore » $${10}^{7}\\,{\\rm{t}}{\\rm{o}}\\,{10}^{9}\\,\\mathrm{cm}\\,{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$$ and ions with positive charge $$q\\lt 8$$. Non-resonant cross sections tend to have a velocity peak at collision velocities $$v\\lesssim 1\\ {\\rm{a}}{\\rm{u}}$$ with exponential decay around this peak. We construct a scaling formula for the location of this peak then choose a functional form for the cross section curve and scale it. The velocity at which the cross section peaks, v m, is proportional to the energy defect of the collision, $${\\rm{\\Delta }}E$$, which we predict with the decay approximation. The value of the cross section maximum is proportional to the charge state q, inversely proportional to the target ionization energy I T, and inversely proportional to v m. For the shape of the cross section curve, we use a function that decays exponentially asymptotically at high and low velocities. We scale this function with parameters $${v}_{{\\rm{m}}},{I}_{{\\rm{T}}},{Z}_{{\\rm{T}}},\\mathrm{and}\\ {Z}_{{\\rm{P}}}$$, where the $${Z}_{{\\rm{T}},{\\rm{P}}}$$ are the target and projectile atomic numbers. In conclusion, for the more than 100 cross section curves that we use to find the scaling rules, the scaling law predicts cross sections within a little over a factor of 2 on average.« less

  13. Survey of heating and current drive for K-DEMO

    DOE PAGES

    Mikkelsen, D. R.; Kessel, C. E.; Poli, F. M.; ...

    2018-01-22

    Here, we present calculations of heating and current drive by neutral injection and by electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron, helicon, lower hybrid, and electron cyclotron frequency ranges for the steady state burn conditions in a K-DEMO configuration withmore » $$I_{\\rm p}=12.3$$ MA, a = 2.1 m, $$R_{\\rm o}=6.8$$ m, $$B_{\\rm o}=7.4$$ T, $$ \

  14. Survey of heating and current drive for K-DEMO

    SciT

    Mikkelsen, D. R.; Kessel, C. E.; Poli, F. M.

    Here, we present calculations of heating and current drive by neutral injection and by electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron, helicon, lower hybrid, and electron cyclotron frequency ranges for the steady state burn conditions in a K-DEMO configuration withmore » $$I_{\\rm p}=12.3$$ MA, a = 2.1 m, $$R_{\\rm o}=6.8$$ m, $$B_{\\rm o}=7.4$$ T, $$ \

  15. Structural and biochemical insights into the substrate-binding mechanism of a novel glycoside hydrolase family 134 β-mannanase.

    PubMed

    You, Xin; Qin, Zhen; Li, Yan-Xiao; Yan, Qiao-Juan; Li, Bin; Jiang, Zheng-Qiang

    2018-06-01

    Mannan is one of the major constituent groups of hemicellulose, which is a renewable resource from higher plants. β-Mannanases are enzymes capable of degrading lignocellulosic biomass. Here, an endo-β-mannanase from Rhizopus microsporus (RmMan134A) was cloned and expressed. The recombinant RmMan134A showed maximal activity at pH 5.0 and 50 °C, and exhibited high specific activity towards locust bean gum (2337 U/mg). To gain insight into the substrate-binding mechanism of RmMan134A, four complex structures (RmMan134A-M3, RmMan134A-M4, RmMan134A-M5 and RmMan134A-M6) were further solved. These structures showed that there were at least seven subsites (-3 to +4) in the catalytic groove of RmMan134A. Mannose in the -1 subsite hydrogen bonded with His113 and Tyr131, revealing a unique conformation. Lys48 and Val159 formed steric hindrance, which impedes to bond with galactose branches. In addition, the various binding modes of RmMan134A-M5 indicated that subsites -2 to +2 are indispensable during the hydrolytic process. The structure of RmMan134A-M4 showed that mannotetrose only binds at subsites +1 to +4, and RmMan134A could therefore not hydrolyze mannan oligosaccharides with degree of polymerization ≤4. Through rational design, the specific activity and optimal conditions of RmMan134A were significantly improved. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the structure and function of fungal GH family 134 β-1,4-mannanases, and substrate-binding mechanism of GH family 134 members. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Strength, power, and muscular endurance exercise and elite rowing ergometer performance.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Trent W; Cronin, John B; McGuigan, Michael R

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the relationship between weight room exercises and various rowing performance measures is limited; this information would prove useful for sport-specific assessment of individual needs and exercise prescription. The purpose of this study was to establish strength, power, and muscular endurance exercises for weight room training, which are strong determinants of success in specific performance measures used to assess elite rowers. Nineteen heavyweight elite males determined their repetition maximum (RM) loads for exercises using a Concept 2 DYNO [5, 30, 60 and 120RM leg pressing and seated arm pulling (in Joules)] and free weights [1RM power clean (in kilograms) and 6RM bench pull (in kilograms and watts)]. Rowing performance measures included a 7-stage blood lactate response ergometer test (aerobic condition), time trials (500, 2000, and 5000 m), a peak stroke power test, and a 60-minute distance trial. Pearson correlation moments (r ≥ 0.7) and stepwise multiple linear regression calculations (R ≥ 50%) were used to establish strong common variances between weight room exercises and rowing ergometer performance (p ≤ 0.05). Weight room exercises were strong predictors of 2000-m, 500-m time (in seconds), and peak stroke power performance measures only. Bench pull power (in watts) and 1RM power clean (in kilograms) were the best 2-factor predictors of peak stroke power (R = 73%; standard error of the estimates [SEE] = 59.6 W) and 500 m (R = 70%; SEE = 1.75 seconds); while 5RM leg pressing (in Joules) and either 6RM bench pull (kg) or 60RM seated arm pulling (in Joules) the best predictors of 2000 m (R = 59%; SEE = 6.3 seconds and R = 57%; SEE = 6.4 seconds, respectively). Recommended exercises for weight room training include a 1RM power clean, 6RM bench pull, 5RM leg press, and 60RM seated arm pulling.

  17. Additional boundary conditions and surface exciton dispersion relations

    SciT

    Rimbey, P.R.

    1977-01-15

    The surface-exciton dispersion curves in ZnO are derived from the surface impedances developed by Fuchs and Kliewer (FK) and Rimbey and Mahan (RM) including retardation. There exists a distinctive splitting between the two dispersions, the FK additional boundary conditions having longitudinal character, the RM additional boundary conditions being transverse. Surface-mode attenuation due to spatial dispersion is more pronouced in the RM formalism, although inclusion of a phenomenological damping parameter does not alter either dispersion curve. (AIP)

  18. SciT

    Friedman, B.; DuCharme, G.

    We present a semi-empirical scaling law for non-resonant ion–atom single charge exchange cross sections for collisions with velocities frommore » $${10}^{7}\\,{\\rm{t}}{\\rm{o}}\\,{10}^{9}\\,\\mathrm{cm}\\,{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$$ and ions with positive charge $$q\\lt 8$$. Non-resonant cross sections tend to have a velocity peak at collision velocities $$v\\lesssim 1\\ {\\rm{a}}{\\rm{u}}$$ with exponential decay around this peak. We construct a scaling formula for the location of this peak then choose a functional form for the cross section curve and scale it. The velocity at which the cross section peaks, v m, is proportional to the energy defect of the collision, $${\\rm{\\Delta }}E$$, which we predict with the decay approximation. The value of the cross section maximum is proportional to the charge state q, inversely proportional to the target ionization energy I T, and inversely proportional to v m. For the shape of the cross section curve, we use a function that decays exponentially asymptotically at high and low velocities. We scale this function with parameters $${v}_{{\\rm{m}}},{I}_{{\\rm{T}}},{Z}_{{\\rm{T}}},\\mathrm{and}\\ {Z}_{{\\rm{P}}}$$, where the $${Z}_{{\\rm{T}},{\\rm{P}}}$$ are the target and projectile atomic numbers. In conclusion, for the more than 100 cross section curves that we use to find the scaling rules, the scaling law predicts cross sections within a little over a factor of 2 on average.« less

  19. Open lung approach versus standard protective strategies: Effects on driving pressure and ventilatory efficiency during anesthesia - A pilot, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Carlos; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Tusman, Gerardo; León, Irene; Romero, Esther; Gracia, Estefania; Mugarra, Ana; Arocas, Blanca; Pozo, Natividad; Soro, Marina; Belda, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    Low tidal volume (VT) during anesthesia minimizes lung injury but may be associated to a decrease in functional lung volume impairing lung mechanics and efficiency. Lung recruitment (RM) can restore lung volume but this may critically depend on the post-RM selected PEEP. This study was a randomized, two parallel arm, open study whose primary outcome was to compare the effects on driving pressure of adding a RM to low-VT ventilation, with or without an individualized post-RM PEEP in patients without known previous lung disease during anesthesia. Consecutive patients scheduled for major abdominal surgery were submitted to low-VT ventilation (6 ml·kg-1) and standard PEEP of 5 cmH2O (pre-RM, n = 36). After 30 min estabilization all patients received a RM and were randomly allocated to either continue with the same PEEP (RM-5 group, n = 18) or to an individualized open-lung PEEP (OL-PEEP) (Open Lung Approach, OLA group, n = 18) defined as the level resulting in maximal Cdyn during a decremental PEEP trial. We compared the effects on driving pressure and lung efficiency measured by volumetric capnography. OL-PEEP was found at 8±2 cmH2O. 36 patients were included in the final analysis. When compared with pre-RM, OLA resulted in a 22% increase in compliance and a 28% decrease in driving pressure when compared to pre-RM. These parameters did not improve in the RM-5. The trend of the DP was significantly different between the OLA and RM-5 groups (p = 0.002). VDalv/VTalv was significantly lower in the OLA group after the RM (p = 0.035). Lung recruitment applied during low-VT ventilation improves driving pressure and lung efficiency only when applied as an open-lung strategy with an individualized PEEP in patients without lung diseases undergoing major abdominal surgery. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02798133.

  20. Behavior of restriction–modification systems as selfish mobile elements and their impact on genome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2001-01-01

    Restriction–modification (RM) systems are composed of genes that encode a restriction enzyme and a modification methylase. RM systems sometimes behave as discrete units of life, like viruses and transposons. RM complexes attack invading DNA that has not been properly modified and thus may serve as a tool of defense for bacterial cells. However, any threat to their maintenance, such as a challenge by a competing genetic element (an incompatible plasmid or an allelic homologous stretch of DNA, for example) can lead to cell death through restriction breakage in the genome. This post-segregational or post-disturbance cell killing may provide the RM complexes (and any DNA linked with them) with a competitive advantage. There is evidence that they have undergone extensive horizontal transfer between genomes, as inferred from their sequence homology, codon usage bias and GC content difference. They are often linked with mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, viruses, transposons and integrons. The comparison of closely related bacterial genomes also suggests that, at times, RM genes themselves behave as mobile elements and cause genome rearrangements. Indeed some bacterial genomes that survived post-disturbance attack by an RM gene complex in the laboratory have experienced genome rearrangements. The avoidance of some restriction sites by bacterial genomes may result from selection by past restriction attacks. Both bacteriophages and bacteria also appear to use homologous recombination to cope with the selfish behavior of RM systems. RM systems compete with each other in several ways. One is competition for recognition sequences in post-segregational killing. Another is super-infection exclusion, that is, the killing of the cell carrying an RM system when it is infected with another RM system of the same regulatory specificity but of a different sequence specificity. The capacity of RM systems to act as selfish, mobile genetic elements may underlie the structure and