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Sample records for zamani huecejre qomeostasinin

  1. Molecular characterization of the ribosomal DNA unit of Sarcocystis singaporensis, Sarcocystis zamani and Sarcocystis zuoi from rodents in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Watthanakaiwan, Vichan; Sukmak, Manakorn; Hamarit, Kriengsak; Kaolim, Nongnid; Wajjwalku, Worawidh; Muangkram, Yuttamol

    2017-08-18

    Sarcocystis species are heteroxenous cyst-forming coccidian protozoan parasites with a wide host range, including rodents. In this study, Sarcocystis spp. samples were isolated from Bandicota indica, Rattus argentiventer, R. tiomanicus and R. norvegicus across five provinces of Thailand. Two major groups of Sarcocystis cysts were determined in this study: large and small cysts. By sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses based on the partial sequences of 28S ribosomal DNA, the large cysts showed the highest identity value (99%) with the S. zamani in GenBank database. While the small cysts could be divided into 2 groups of Sarcocystis: S. singaporensis and presupposed S. zuoi. The further analysis on 18S rDNA supported that the 2 isolates (S2 and B6 no.2) were as identified as S. singaporensis shared a high sequence identity with the S. singaporensis in GenBank database and the unidentified Sarcocystis (4 isolates, i.e., B6 no.10, B6 no.12, B10 no.4 and B10 no.7) showed 96.3-99.5% identity to S. zuoi as well as high distinct identity from others Sarcocystis spp. (≤93%). The result indicated that these four samples should be S. zuoi. In this study, we provided complete sequence of internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), 5.8S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of these three Sarcocystis species and our new primer set could be useful to study the evolution of Sarcocystis.

  2. Molecular characterization of the ribosomal DNA unit of Sarcocystis singaporensis, Sarcocystis zamani and Sarcocystis zuoi from rodents in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    WATTHANAKAIWAN, Vichan; SUKMAK, Manakorn; HAMARIT, Kriengsak; KAOLIM, Nongnid; WAJJWALKU, Worawidh; MUANGKRAM, Yuttamol

    2017-01-01

    Sarcocystis species are heteroxenous cyst-forming coccidian protozoan parasites with a wide host range, including rodents. In this study, Sarcocystis spp. samples were isolated from Bandicota indica, Rattus argentiventer, R. tiomanicus and R. norvegicus across five provinces of Thailand. Two major groups of Sarcocystis cysts were determined in this study: large and small cysts. By sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses based on the partial sequences of 28S ribosomal DNA, the large cysts showed the highest identity value (99%) with the S. zamani in GenBank database. While the small cysts could be divided into 2 groups of Sarcocystis: S. singaporensis and presupposed S. zuoi. The further analysis on 18S rDNA supported that the 2 isolates (S2 and B6 no.2) were as identified as S. singaporensis shared a high sequence identity with the S. singaporensis in GenBank database and the unidentified Sarcocystis (4 isolates, i.e., B6 no.10, B6 no.12, B10 no.4 and B10 no.7) showed 96.3–99.5% identity to S. zuoi as well as high distinct identity from others Sarcocystis spp. (≤93%). The result indicated that these four samples should be S. zuoi. In this study, we provided complete sequence of internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), 5.8S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of these three Sarcocystis species and our new primer set could be useful to study the evolution of Sarcocystis. PMID:28701623

  3. Identification of a coumarin based antihistamine as an anti filoviral entry inhibitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-20

    Gharaibeh2, Tara Kenny2, Cary Retterer2, Rouzbeh Zamani2, Sina Bavari2, Norton P. Peet3 and Lijun Rong1 1. Department of Microbiology and Immunology...authors: Han Cheng, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago, 8040 COMRB, 909 S. Wolcott Avenue, Chicago, IL 60612...Phone: (312)-996-0110 Fax: (312)- 996-6415 Email: hancheng@uic.edu Lijun Rong, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Illinois at

  4. MER SPICE Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayfi, Elias

    2004-01-01

    MER SPICE Interface is a software module for use in conjunction with the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission and the SPICE software system of the Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF) at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. (SPICE is used to acquire, record, and disseminate engineering, navigational, and other ancillary data describing circumstances under which data were acquired by spaceborne scientific instruments.) Given a Spacecraft Clock value, MER SPICE Interface extracts MER-specific data from SPICE kernels (essentially, raw data files) and calculates values for Planet Day Number, Local Solar Longitude, Local Solar Elevation, Local Solar Azimuth, and Local Solar Time (UTC). MER SPICE Interface was adapted from a subroutine, denoted m98SpiceIF written by Payam Zamani, that was intended to calculate SPICE values for the Mars Polar Lander. The main difference between MER SPICE Interface and m98SpiceIf is that MER SPICE Interface does not explicitly call CHRONOS, a time-conversion program that is part of a library of utility subprograms within SPICE. Instead, MER SPICE Interface mimics some portions of the CHRONOS code, the advantage being that it executes much faster and can efficiently be called from a pipeline of events in a parallel processing environment.

  5. Extended geographic distribution of several Indo-Pacific coral reef diseases.

    PubMed

    Weil, E; Irikawa, A; Casareto, B; Suzuki, Y

    2012-03-20

    Other than coral bleaching, few coral diseases or diseases of other reef organisms have been reported from Japan. This is the first report of lesions similar to Porites ulcerative white spots (PUWS), brown band disease (BrB), pigmentation response (PR), and crustose coralline white syndrome (CCWS) for this region. To assess the health status and disease prevalence, qualitative and quantitative surveys (3 belt transects of 100 m² each on each reef) were performed in March and September 2010 on 2 reefs of the Ginowan-Ooyama reef complex off Okinawa, and 2 protected reefs off Zamani Island, in the Kerama Islands 40 km west of Okinawa. Overall, mean (±SD) disease prevalence was higher in Ginowan-Ooyama (9.7 ± 7.9%) compared to Zamami (3.6 ± 4.6%). Porites lutea was most affected by PUWS at Ooyama (23.1 ± 10.4 vs. 4.5 ± 5.2%). White syndrome (WS) mostly affected Acropora cytherea (12. 5 ± 18.0%) in Zamami and Oxipora lacera (10.2 ± 10%) in Ooyama. Growth anomalies (GA) and BrB were only observed on A. cytherea (8.3 ± 6.2%) and A. nobilis (0.8%) at Zamami. Black band disease affected Pachyseris speciosa (6.0 ± 4.6%) in Ooyama only. Pigmentation responses (PR) were common in massive Porites in both localities (2.6 ± 1.9 and 5.6 ± 2.3% respectively). Crustose coralline white syndrome (CCWS) was observed in both localities. These results significantly expand the geographic distribution of PUWS, BrB, PR and CCWS in the Indo-Pacific, indicating that the northernmost coral reefs in the western Pacific are susceptible to a larger number of coral diseases than previously thought.

  6. Examination of Sarcocystis spp. of giant snakes from Australia and Southeast Asia confirms presence of a known pathogen - Sarcocystis nesbitti.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Marion; Raisch, Lisa; Lyons, Jessica Ann; Natusch, Daniel James Deans; Richter, Sarah; Wirth, Mareike; Preeprem, Piyarat; Khoprasert, Yuvaluk; Ginting, Sulaiman; Mackenstedt, Ute; Jäkel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We examined Sarcocystis spp. in giant snakes from the Indo-Australian Archipelago and Australia using a combination of morphological (size of sporocyst) and molecular analyses. We amplified by PCR nuclear 18S rDNA from single sporocysts in order to detect mixed infections and unequivocally assign the retrieved sequences to the corresponding parasite stage. Sarcocystis infection was generally high across the study area, with 78 (68%) of 115 examined pythons being infected by one or more Sarcocystis spp. Among 18 randomly chosen, sporocyst-positive samples (11 from Southeast Asia, 7 from Northern Australia) the only Sarcocystis species detected in Southeast Asian snakes was S. singaporensis (in reticulated pythons), which was absent from all Australian samples. We distinguished three different Sarcocystis spp. in the Australian sample set; two were excreted by scrub pythons and one by the spotted python. The sequence of the latter is an undescribed species phylogenetically related to S. lacertae. Of the two Sarcocystis species found in scrub pythons, one showed an 18S rRNA gene sequence similar to S. zamani, which is described from Australia for the first time. The second sequence was identical/similar to that of S. nesbitti, a known human pathogen that was held responsible for outbreaks of disease among tourists in Malaysia. The potential presence of S. nesbitti in Australia challenges the current hypothesis of a snake-primate life cycle, and would have implications for human health in the region. Further molecular and biological characterizations are required to confirm species identity and determine whether or not the Australian isolate has the same zoonotic potential as its Malaysian counterpart. Finally, the absence of S. nesbitti in samples from reticulated pythons (which were reported to be definitive hosts), coupled with our phylogenetic analyses, suggest that alternative snake hosts may be responsible for transmitting this parasite in Malaysia.