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Sample records for zarizeni lobi rev

  1. Optimized Chemical Probes for REV-ERBα

    PubMed Central

    Trump, Ryan P.; Bresciani, Stefano; Cooper, Anthony W. J.; Tellam, James P.; Wojno, Justyna; Blaikley, John; Orband-Miller, Lisa A.; Kashatus, Jennifer A.; Dawson, Helen C.; Loudon, Andrew; Ray, David; Grant, Daniel; Farrow, Stuart N.; Willson, Timothy M.; Tomkinson, Nicholas C. O.

    2015-01-01

    REV-ERBα has emerged as an important target for regulation of circadian rhythm and its associated physiology. Herein, we report on the optimization of a series of REV-ERBα agonists based on GSK4112 (1) for potency, selectivity, and bioavailability. Potent REV-ERBα agonists 4, 10, 16, and 23 are detailed for their ability to suppress BMAL and IL-6 expression from human cells while also demonstrating excellent selectivity over LXRα. Amine 4 demonstrated in vivo bioavailability after either IV or oral dosing. PMID:23656296

  2. Quicklook overview of model changes in Melcor 2.2: Rev 6342 to Rev 9496

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, Larry L.

    2017-05-01

    MELCOR 2.2 is a significant official release of the MELCOR code with many new models and model improvements. This report provides the code user with a quick review and characterization of new models added, changes to existing models, the effect of code changes during this code development cycle (rev 6342 to rev 9496), a preview of validation results with this code version. More detailed information is found in the code Subversion logs as well as the User Guide and Reference Manuals.

  3. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaula, Sadichha; Billon, Cyrielle; Kamenecka, Theodore M.

    2015-05-08

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks comparedmore » to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Synthetic REV-ERB agonist treatment reduced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB decreased M1 macrophage polarization. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB increased M2 macrophage polarization.« less

  4. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    PubMed Central

    Sitaula, Sadichha; Billon, Cyrielle; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:25800870

  5. Biallelic inactivation of REV7 is associated with Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Bluteau, Dominique; Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Clairmont, Connor; Rousseau, Alix; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Dubois d'Enghien, Catherine; Bluteau, Olivier; Cuccuini, Wendy; Gachet, Stéphanie; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Leblanc, Thierry; Socié, Gérard; Baruchel, André; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; D'Andrea, Alan D; Soulier, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive genetic disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, chromosome instability, progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), and a strong predisposition to cancer. Twenty FA genes have been identified, and the FANC proteins they encode cooperate in a common pathway that regulates DNA crosslink repair and replication fork stability. We identified a child with severe BMF who harbored biallelic inactivating mutations of the translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) gene REV7 (also known as MAD2L2), which encodes the mutant REV7 protein REV7-V85E. Patient-derived cells demonstrated an extended FA phenotype, which included increased chromosome breaks and G2/M accumulation upon exposure to DNA crosslinking agents, γH2AX and 53BP1 foci accumulation, and enhanced p53/p21 activation relative to cells derived from healthy patients. Expression of WT REV7 restored normal cellular and functional phenotypes in the patient's cells, and CRISPR/Cas9 inactivation of REV7 in a non-FA human cell line produced an FA phenotype. Finally, silencing Rev7 in primary hematopoietic cells impaired progenitor function, suggesting that the DNA repair defect underlies the development of BMF in FA. Taken together, our genetic and functional analyses identified REV7 as a previously undescribed FA gene, which we term FANCV.

  6. Biallelic inactivation of REV7 is associated with Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Clairmont, Connor; Rousseau, Alix; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Dubois d’Enghien, Catherine; Bluteau, Olivier; Cuccuini, Wendy; Gachet, Stéphanie; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Leblanc, Thierry; Socié, Gérard; Baruchel, André; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive genetic disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, chromosome instability, progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), and a strong predisposition to cancer. Twenty FA genes have been identified, and the FANC proteins they encode cooperate in a common pathway that regulates DNA crosslink repair and replication fork stability. We identified a child with severe BMF who harbored biallelic inactivating mutations of the translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) gene REV7 (also known as MAD2L2), which encodes the mutant REV7 protein REV7-V85E. Patient-derived cells demonstrated an extended FA phenotype, which included increased chromosome breaks and G2/M accumulation upon exposure to DNA crosslinking agents, γH2AX and 53BP1 foci accumulation, and enhanced p53/p21 activation relative to cells derived from healthy patients. Expression of WT REV7 restored normal cellular and functional phenotypes in the patient’s cells, and CRISPR/Cas9 inactivation of REV7 in a non-FA human cell line produced an FA phenotype. Finally, silencing Rev7 in primary hematopoietic cells impaired progenitor function, suggesting that the DNA repair defect underlies the development of BMF in FA. Taken together, our genetic and functional analyses identified REV7 as a previously undescribed FA gene, which we term FANCV. PMID:27500492

  7. Clean Cities Conference to Rev Up Alternative Fuels Market

    Science.gov Websites

    Cities Conference to Rev Up Alternative Fuels Market For more information contact: George Douglas , 303-275-4096 email: George Douglas Golden, Colo., Jan. 26, 2001 - Cleaner air and greater energy

  8. REV-ERB and ROR nuclear receptors as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Kojetin, Douglas J.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptors REV-ERB (consisting of REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ) and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors (RORs; consisting of RORα, RORβ and RORγ) are involved in many physiological processes, including regulation of metabolism, development and immunity as well as the circadian rhythm. The recent characterization of endogenous ligands for these former orphan nuclear receptors has stimulated the development of synthetic ligands and opened up the possibility of targeting these receptors to treat several diseases, including diabetes, atherosclerosis, autoimmunity and cancer. This Review focuses on the latest developments in ROR and REV-ERB pharmacology indicating that these nuclear receptors are druggable targets and that ligands targeting these receptors may be useful in the treatment of several disorders. PMID:24577401

  9. Altered Sleep Homeostasis in Rev-erbα Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Mang, Géraldine M; La Spada, Francesco; Emmenegger, Yann; Chappuis, Sylvie; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Albrecht, Urs; Franken, Paul

    2016-03-01

    The nuclear receptor REV-ERBα is a potent, constitutive transcriptional repressor critical for the regulation of key circadian and metabolic genes. Recently, REV-ERBα's involvement in learning, neurogenesis, mood, and dopamine turnover was demonstrated suggesting a specific role in central nervous system functioning. We have previously shown that the brain expression of several core clock genes, including Rev-erbα, is modulated by sleep loss. We here test the consequences of a loss of REV-ERBα on the homeostatic regulation of sleep. EEG/EMG signals were recorded in Rev-erbα knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates during baseline, sleep deprivation, and recovery. Cortical gene expression measurements after sleep deprivation were contrasted to baseline. Although baseline sleep/wake duration was remarkably similar, KO mice showed an advance of the sleep/wake distribution relative to the light-dark cycle. After sleep onset in baseline and after sleep deprivation, both EEG delta power (1-4 Hz) and sleep consolidation were reduced in KO mice indicating a slower increase of homeostatic sleep need during wakefulness. This slower increase might relate to the smaller increase in theta and gamma power observed in the waking EEG prior to sleep onset under both conditions. Indeed, the increased theta activity during wakefulness predicted delta power in subsequent NREM sleep. Lack of Rev-erbα increased Bmal1, Npas2, Clock, and Fabp7 expression, confirming the direct regulation of these genes by REV-ERBα also in the brain. Our results add further proof to the notion that clock genes are involved in sleep homeostasis. Because accumulating evidence directly links REV-ERBα to dopamine signaling the altered homeostatic regulation of sleep reported here are discussed in that context. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  10. Proflavine acts as a Rev inhibitor by targeting the high-affinity Rev binding site of the Rev responsive element of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    DeJong, Eric S; Chang, Chia-en; Gilson, Michael K; Marino, John P

    2003-07-08

    Rev is an essential regulatory HIV-1 protein that binds the Rev responsive element (RRE) within the env gene of the HIV-1 RNA genome, activating the switch between viral latency and active viral replication. Previously, we have shown that selective incorporation of the fluorescent probe 2-aminopurine (2-AP) into a truncated form of the RRE sequence (RRE-IIB) allowed the binding of an arginine-rich peptide derived from Rev and aminoglycosides to be characterized directly by fluorescence methods. Using these fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, proflavine has been identified, through a limited screen of selected small heterocyclic compounds, as a specific and high-affinity RRE-IIB binder which inhibits the interaction of the Rev peptide with RRE-IIB. Direct and competitive 2-AP fluorescence binding assays reveal that there are at least two classes of proflavine binding sites on RRE-IIB: a high-affinity site that competes with the Rev peptide for binding to RRE-IIB (K(D) approximately 0.1 +/- 0.05 microM) and a weaker binding site(s) (K(D) approximately 1.1 +/- 0.05 microM). Titrations of RRE-IIB with proflavine, monitored using (1)H NMR, demonstrate that the high-affinity proflavine binding interaction occurs with a 2:1 (proflavine:RRE-IIB) stoichiometry, and NOEs observed in the NOESY spectrum of the 2:1 proflavine.RRE-IIB complex indicate that the two proflavine molecules bind specifically and close to each other within a single binding site. NOESY data further indicate that formation of the 2:1 proflavine.RRE-IIB complex stabilizes base pairing and stacking within the internal purine-rich bulge of RRE-IIB in a manner analogous to what has been observed in the Rev peptide.RRE-IIB complex. The observation that proflavine competes with Rev for binding to RRE-IIB by binding as a dimer to a single high-affinity site opens the possibility for rational drug design based on linking and modifying it and related compounds.

  11. Altered Sleep Homeostasis in Rev-erbα Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mang, Géraldine M.; La Spada, Francesco; Emmenegger, Yann; Chappuis, Sylvie; Ripperger, Jürgen A.; Albrecht, Urs; Franken, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The nuclear receptor REV-ERBα is a potent, constitutive transcriptional repressor critical for the regulation of key circadian and metabolic genes. Recently, REV-ERBα's involvement in learning, neurogenesis, mood, and dopamine turnover was demonstrated suggesting a specific role in central nervous system functioning. We have previously shown that the brain expression of several core clock genes, including Rev-erbα, is modulated by sleep loss. We here test the consequences of a loss of REV-ERBα on the homeostatic regulation of sleep. Methods: EEG/EMG signals were recorded in Rev-erbα knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates during baseline, sleep deprivation, and recovery. Cortical gene expression measurements after sleep deprivation were contrasted to baseline. Results: Although baseline sleep/wake duration was remarkably similar, KO mice showed an advance of the sleep/wake distribution relative to the light-dark cycle. After sleep onset in baseline and after sleep deprivation, both EEG delta power (1–4 Hz) and sleep consolidation were reduced in KO mice indicating a slower increase of homeostatic sleep need during wakefulness. This slower increase might relate to the smaller increase in theta and gamma power observed in the waking EEG prior to sleep onset under both conditions. Indeed, the increased theta activity during wakefulness predicted delta power in subsequent NREM sleep. Lack of Rev-erbα increased Bmal1, Npas2, Clock, and Fabp7 expression, confirming the direct regulation of these genes by REV-ERBα also in the brain. Conclusions: Our results add further proof to the notion that clock genes are involved in sleep homeostasis. Because accumulating evidence directly links REV-ERBα to dopamine signaling the altered homeostatic regulation of sleep reported here are discussed in that context. Citation: Mang GM, La Spada F, Emmenegger Y, Chappuis S, Ripperger JA, Albrecht U, Franken P. Altered sleep homeostasis in Rev

  12. Binding and thermodynamics of REV peptide-ctDNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar

    2017-03-01

    The thermodynamics of DNA-ligand binding is important as it provides useful information to understand the details of binding processes. HIV-1 REV response element (RRE) located in the env coding region of the viral genome is reported to be well conserved across different HIV-1 isolates. In this study, the binding characteristics of Calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) and REV peptide from HIV-1 were investigated using spectroscopic (UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD)) and isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) techniques. Thermal stability and ligand binding properties of the ctDNA revealed that native ctDNA had a T m of 75.5 °C, whereas the ctDNA-REV peptide complex exhibited an incremental shift in the T m by 8 °C, indicating thermal stability of the complex. CD data indicated increased ellipticity due to large conformational changes in ctDNA molecule upon binding with REV peptide and two binding stoichiometric modes are apparent. The ctDNA experienced condensation due to large conformational changes in the presence of REV peptide and positive B→Ψ transition was observed at higher molar charge ratios. Fluorescence studies performed at several ligand concentrations revealed a gradual decrease in the fluorescence intensity of EtBr-bound ctDNA in response to increasing ligand concentrations. The fluorescence data further confirmed two stoichiometric modes of binding for ctDNA-REV peptide complex as previously observed with CD studies. The binding enthalpies were determined using ITC in the temperature range of 293 K-308 K. The ITC binding isotherm was exothermic at all temperatures examined, with low ΔH values indicating that the ctDNA-REV peptide interaction is driven largely by entropy. The heat capacity change (ΔC p ) was insignificant, an unusual finding in the area of DNA-peptide interaction studies. The variation in the values obtained for ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG with temperature further suggests that ctDNA-REV peptide interaction is entropically

  13. REV-ERB and ROR: therapeutic targets for treating myopathies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Ryan D.; Flaveny, Colin A.

    2017-08-01

    Muscle is primarily known for its mechanical roles in locomotion, maintenance of posture, and regulation of cardiac and respiratory function. There are numerous medical conditions that adversely affect muscle, myopathies that disrupt muscle development, regeneration and protein turnover to detrimental effect. Skeletal muscle is also a vital secretory organ that regulates thermogenesis, inflammatory signaling and directs context specific global metabolic changes in energy substrate preference on a daily basis. Myopathies differ in the causative factors that drive them but share common features including severe reduction in quality of life and significantly increased mortality all due irrefutably to the loss of muscle mass. Thus far clinically viable approaches for preserving muscle proteins and stimulating new muscle growth without unwanted side effects or limited efficacy has been elusive. Over the last few decades, evidence has emerged through in vitro and in vivo studies that suggest the nuclear receptors REV-ERB and ROR might modulate pathways involved in myogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis. Hinting that REV-ERB and ROR might be targeted to treat myopathies. However there is still a need for substantial investigation into the roles of these nuclear receptors in in vivo rodent models of degenerative muscle diseases and acute injury. Although exciting, REV-ERB and ROR have somewhat confounding roles in muscle physiology and therefore more studies utilizing in vivo models of skeletal muscle myopathies are needed. In this review we highlight the molecular forces driving some of the major degenerative muscular diseases and showcase two promising molecular targets that may have the potential to treat myopathies: ROR and REV-ERB.

  14. International Space Station Research Plan, Assembly Sequence Rev., F

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    muscles ü Higher risk for bone fracture upon return to Earth ü Potential for “slipped discs” ü Diminished ability to quickly respond to emergencies...Office of Biological and Physical Research International Space Station Research Plan Assembly Sequence Rev. F, Aug. 2000l . , . Report...Organization Name(s) and Address(es) NASA, Office of Biological and Physical Research Performing Organization Report Number Sponsoring/Monitoring Agency

  15. REV, A BRET-Based Sensor of ERK Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chanjuan; Peter, Marion; Bouquier, Nathalie; Ollendorff, Vincent; Villamil, Ignacio; Liu, Jianfeng; Fagni, Laurent; Perroy, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Networks of signaling molecules are activated in response to environmental changes. How are these signaling networks dynamically integrated in space and time to process particular information? To tackle this issue, biosensors of single signaling pathways have been engineered. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-based biosensors have proven to be particularly efficient in that matter due to the high sensitivity of this technology to monitor protein–protein interactions or conformational changes in living cells. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) are ubiquitously expressed and involved in many diverse cellular functions that might be encoded by the strength and spatio-temporal pattern of ERK activation. We developed a BRET-based sensor of ERK activity, called Rluc8-ERKsubstrate-Venus (REV). As expected, BRET changes of REV were correlated with ERK phosphorylation, which is required for its kinase activity. In neurons, the nature of the stimuli determines the strength, the location, or the moment of ERK activation, thus highlighting how acute modulation of ERK may encode the nature of initial stimulus to specify the consequences of this activation. This study provides evidence for suitability of REV as a new biosensor to address biological questions. PMID:23908646

  16. User Instructions for the Systems Assessment Capability, Rev. 1, Computer Codes Volume 3: Utility Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Lopresti, Charles A.

    2004-09-14

    This document contains detailed user instructions for a suite of utility codes developed for Rev. 1 of the Systems Assessment Capability. The suite of computer codes for Rev. 1 of Systems Assessment Capability performs many functions.

  17. Nuclear Export Signal Masking Regulates HIV-1 Rev Trafficking and Viral RNA Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Ryan T; Aligeti, Mounavya; Pocock, Ginger M; Higgins, Christina A; Sherer, Nathan M

    2017-02-01

    HIV-1's Rev protein forms a homo-oligomeric adaptor complex linking viral RNAs to the cellular CRM1/Ran-GTP nuclear export machinery through the activity of Rev's prototypical leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES). In this study, we used a functional fluorescently tagged Rev fusion protein as a platform to study the effects of modulating Rev NES identity, number, position, or strength on Rev subcellular trafficking, viral RNA nuclear export, and infectious virion production. We found that Rev activity was remarkably tolerant of diverse NES sequences, including supraphysiological NES (SNES) peptides that otherwise arrest CRM1 transport complexes at nuclear pores. Rev's ability to tolerate a SNES was both position and multimerization dependent, an observation consistent with a model wherein Rev self-association acts to transiently mask the NES peptide(s), thereby biasing Rev's trafficking into the nucleus. Combined imaging and functional assays also indicated that NES masking underpins Rev's well-known tendency to accumulate at the nucleolus, as well as Rev's capacity to activate optimal levels of late viral gene expression. We propose that Rev multimerization and NES masking regulates Rev's trafficking to and retention within the nucleus even prior to RNA binding. HIV-1 infects more than 34 million people worldwide causing >1 million deaths per year. Infectious virion production is activated by the essential viral Rev protein that mediates nuclear export of intron-bearing late-stage viral mRNAs. Rev's shuttling into and out of the nucleus is regulated by the antagonistic activities of both a peptide-encoded N-terminal nuclear localization signal and C-terminal nuclear export signal (NES). How Rev and related viral proteins balance strong import and export activities in order to achieve optimal levels of viral gene expression is incompletely understood. We provide evidence that multimerization provides a mechanism by which Rev transiently masks its NES peptide

  18. Nuclear Export Signal Masking Regulates HIV-1 Rev Trafficking and Viral RNA Nuclear Export

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Ryan T.; Aligeti, Mounavya; Pocock, Ginger M.; Higgins, Christina A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1's Rev protein forms a homo-oligomeric adaptor complex linking viral RNAs to the cellular CRM1/Ran-GTP nuclear export machinery through the activity of Rev's prototypical leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES). In this study, we used a functional fluorescently tagged Rev fusion protein as a platform to study the effects of modulating Rev NES identity, number, position, or strength on Rev subcellular trafficking, viral RNA nuclear export, and infectious virion production. We found that Rev activity was remarkably tolerant of diverse NES sequences, including supraphysiological NES (SNES) peptides that otherwise arrest CRM1 transport complexes at nuclear pores. Rev's ability to tolerate a SNES was both position and multimerization dependent, an observation consistent with a model wherein Rev self-association acts to transiently mask the NES peptide(s), thereby biasing Rev's trafficking into the nucleus. Combined imaging and functional assays also indicated that NES masking underpins Rev's well-known tendency to accumulate at the nucleolus, as well as Rev's capacity to activate optimal levels of late viral gene expression. We propose that Rev multimerization and NES masking regulates Rev's trafficking to and retention within the nucleus even prior to RNA binding. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 infects more than 34 million people worldwide causing >1 million deaths per year. Infectious virion production is activated by the essential viral Rev protein that mediates nuclear export of intron-bearing late-stage viral mRNAs. Rev's shuttling into and out of the nucleus is regulated by the antagonistic activities of both a peptide-encoded N-terminal nuclear localization signal and C-terminal nuclear export signal (NES). How Rev and related viral proteins balance strong import and export activities in order to achieve optimal levels of viral gene expression is incompletely understood. We provide evidence that multimerization provides a mechanism by which Rev transiently masks

  19. Mutational definition of functional domains within the Rev homolog encoded by human endogenous retrovirus K.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, H P; Wiegand, H L; Yang, J; Cullen, B R

    2000-10-01

    Nuclear export of the incompletely spliced mRNAs encoded by several complex retroviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), is dependent on a virally encoded adapter protein, termed Rev in HIV-1, that directly binds both to a cis-acting viral RNA target site and to the cellular Crm1 export factor. Human endogenous retrovirus K, a family of ancient endogenous retroviruses that is not related to the exogenous retrovirus HIV-1, was recently shown to also encode a Crm1-dependent nuclear RNA export factor, termed K-Rev. Although HIV-1 Rev and K-Rev display little sequence identity, they share the ability not only to bind to Crm1 and to RNA but also to form homomultimers and shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm. We have used mutational analysis to identify sequences in the 105-amino-acid K-Rev protein required for each of these distinct biological activities. While mutations in K-Rev that inactivate any one of these properties also blocked K-Rev-dependent nuclear RNA export, several K-Rev mutants were comparable to wild type when assayed for any of these individual activities yet nevertheless defective for RNA export. Although several nonfunctional K-Rev mutants acted as dominant negative inhibitors of K-Rev-, but not HIV-1 Rev-, dependent RNA export, these were not defined by their inability to bind to Crm1, as is seen with HIV-1 Rev. In total, this analysis suggests a functional architecture for K-Rev that is similar to, but distinct from, that described for HIV-1 Rev and raises the possibility that viral RNA export mediated by the approximately 25 million-year-old K-Rev protein may require an additional cellular cofactor that is not required for HIV-1 Rev function.

  20. UV-induced reversion of his4 frameshift mutations in rad6, rev1, and rev3 mutants of yeast.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, C W; O'Brien, T; Bond, J

    1984-01-01

    The UV-induced reversion of two his4 frameshift alleles was much reduced in rad6 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an observation that is consistent with the hypothesis that RAD6 function is required for the induction of all types of genetic alteration in misrepair mutagenesis. The reversion of these his4 alleles, together with two others of the same type, was also reduced in rev1 and rev3 mutant strains; in these, however, the extent of the reduction varied considerably with test allele used, in a manner analogous to the results in these strains for base repair substitution test alleles. The general features of UV-induced frameshift and substitution mutagenesis therefore appear quite similar, indicating that they may depend on related processes. If this conclusion is correct, greater attention must be given to integrating models which account for the production of nucleotide additions and deletions into those concerning misrepair mutagenesis.

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Fleet Revs up With Natural Gas

    Science.gov Websites

    New Hampshire Fleet Revs up With Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Fleet Revs up With Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Fleet Revs up With Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center

  2. RNA helicase MOV10 functions as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev to facilitate Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export of viral mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Feng; Zhang, Junsong; Zhang, Yijun

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exploits multiple host factors during its replication. The REV/RRE-dependent nuclear export of unspliced/partially spliced viral transcripts needs the assistance of host proteins. Recent studies have shown that MOV10 overexpression inhibited HIV-1 replication at various steps. However, the endogenous MOV10 was required in certain step(s) of HIV-1 replication. In this report, we found that MOV10 potently enhances the nuclear export of viral mRNAs and subsequently increases the expression of Gag protein and other late products through affecting the Rev/RRE axis. The co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. The DEAG-boxmore » of MOV10 was required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export and the DEAG-box mutant showed a dominant-negative activity. Our data propose that HIV-1 utilizes the anti-viral factor MOV10 to function as a co-factor of Rev and demonstrate the complicated effects of MOV10 on HIV-1 life cycle. - Highlights: • MOV10 can function as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev. • MOV10 facilitates Rev/RRE-dependent transport of viral mRNAs. • MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. • The DEAG-box of MOV10 is required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent export.« less

  3. NMR Structure and Dynamics of the C-terminal Domain from Human Rev1 and its Complex with Rev1 Interacting Region of DNA Polymerase η

    PubMed Central

    Pozhidaeva, Alexandra; Pustovalova, Yulia; D'Souza, Sanjay; Bezsonova, Irina; Walker, Graham C.; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.

    2013-01-01

    Rev1 is a translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerase essential for DNA damage tolerance in eukaryotes. In the process of TLS stalled high-fidelity replicative DNA polymerases are temporarily replaced by specialized TLS enzymes that can bypass sites of DNA damage (lesions), thus allowing replication to continue or postreplicational gaps to be filled. Despite its limited catalytic activity, human Rev1 plays a key role in TLS by serving as a scaffold that provides an access of Y-family TLS polymerases polη, ι, and κ to their cognate DNA lesions and facilitates their subsequent exchange to polζ that extends the distorted DNA primer-template. Rev1 interaction with the other major human TLS polymerases, polη, ι, κ and the regulatory subunit Rev7 of polζ, is mediated by Rev1 C-terminal domain (Rev1-CT). We used NMR spectroscopy to determine the spatial structure of the Rev1-CT domain (residues 1157-1251) and its complex with Rev1 interacting region (RIR) from polη (residues 524-539). The domain forms a four-helix bundle with a well-structured N-terminal β-hairpin docking against helices 1 and 2, creating a binding pocket for the two conserved Phe residues of the RIR motif that upon binding folds into an α-helix. NMR spin-relaxation and NMR relaxation dispersion measurements suggest that free Rev1-CT and Rev1-CT/polη-RIR complex exhibit μs-ms conformational dynamics encompassing the RIR binding site, which might facilitate selection of the molecular configuration optimal for binding. These results offer new insights into the control of TLS in human cells by providing a structural basis for understanding the recognition of the Rev1-CT by Y-family DNA polymerases. PMID:22691049

  4. Circadian clock component REV-ERBα controls homeostatic regulation of pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pariollaud, Marie; Gibbs, Julie E; Hopwood, Thomas W; Brown, Sheila; Begley, Nicola; Vonslow, Ryan; Poolman, Toryn; Guo, Baoqiang; Saer, Ben; Jones, D Heulyn; Tellam, James P; Bresciani, Stefano; Tomkinson, Nicholas Co; Wojno-Picon, Justyna; Cooper, Anthony Wj; Daniels, Dion A; Trump, Ryan P; Grant, Daniel; Zuercher, William; Willson, Timothy M; MacDonald, Andrew S; Bolognese, Brian; Podolin, Patricia L; Sanchez, Yolanda; Loudon, Andrew Si; Ray, David W

    2018-06-01

    Recent studies reveal that airway epithelial cells are critical pulmonary circadian pacemaker cells, mediating rhythmic inflammatory responses. Using mouse models, we now identify the rhythmic circadian repressor REV-ERBα as essential to the mechanism coupling the pulmonary clock to innate immunity, involving both myeloid and bronchial epithelial cells in temporal gating and determining amplitude of response to inhaled endotoxin. Dual mutation of REV-ERBα and its paralog REV-ERBβ in bronchial epithelia further augmented inflammatory responses and chemokine activation, but also initiated a basal inflammatory state, revealing a critical homeostatic role for REV-ERB proteins in the suppression of the endogenous proinflammatory mechanism in unchallenged cells. However, REV-ERBα plays the dominant role, as deletion of REV-ERBβ alone had no impact on inflammatory responses. In turn, inflammatory challenges cause striking changes in stability and degradation of REV-ERBα protein, driven by SUMOylation and ubiquitination. We developed a novel selective oxazole-based inverse agonist of REV-ERB, which protects REV-ERBα protein from degradation, and used this to reveal how proinflammatory cytokines trigger rapid degradation of REV-ERBα in the elaboration of an inflammatory response. Thus, dynamic changes in stability of REV-ERBα protein couple the core clock to innate immunity.

  5. The Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbα Controls Circadian Thermogenic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Everett, Logan J.; Loro, Emanuele; Briggs, Erika R.; Bugge, Anne; Hou, Catherine; Ferrara, Christine; Seale, Patrick; Pryma, Daniel A.; Khurana, Tejvir S.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2013-01-01

    Circadian oscillation of body temperature is a basic, evolutionary-conserved feature of mammalian biology1. Additionally, homeostatic pathways allow organisms to protect their core temperatures in response to cold exposure2. However, the mechanism responsible for coordinating daily body temperature rhythm and adaptability to environmental challenges is unknown. Here we show that the nuclear receptor Rev-erbα, a powerful transcriptional repressor, links circadian and thermogenic networks through the regulation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) function. Mice exposed to cold fare dramatically better at 5 AM (Zeitgeber time 22) when Rev-erbα is barely expressed than at 5 PM (ZT10) when Rev-erbα is abundant. Deletion of Rev-erbα markedly improves cold tolerance at 5 PM, indicating that overcoming Rev-erbα-dependent repression is a fundamental feature of the thermogenic response to cold. Physiological induction of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) by cold temperatures is preceded by rapid down-regulation of Rev-erbα in BAT. Rev-erbα represses UCP1 in a brown adipose cell-autonomous manner and BAT UCP1 levels are high in Rev-erbα-null mice even at thermoneutrality. Genetic loss of Rev-erbα also abolishes normal rhythms of body temperature and BAT activity. Thus, Rev-erbα acts as a thermogenic focal point required for establishing and maintaining body temperature rhythm in a manner that is adaptable to environmental demands. PMID:24162845

  6. Human REV3 DNA Polymerase Zeta Localizes to Mitochondria and Protects the Mitochondrial Genome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupendra; Li, Xiurong; Owens, Kjerstin M; Vanniarajan, Ayyasamy; Liang, Ping; Singh, Keshav K

    2015-01-01

    To date, mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) is the only polymerase known to be present in mammalian mitochondria. A dogma in the mitochondria field is that there is no other polymerase present in the mitochondria of mammalian cells. Here we demonstrate localization of REV3 DNA polymerase in the mammalian mitochondria. We demonstrate localization of REV3 in the mitochondria of mammalian tissue as well as cell lines. REV3 associates with POLG and mitochondrial DNA and protects the mitochondrial genome from DNA damage. Inactivation of Rev3 leads to reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced OXPHOS activity, and increased glucose consumption. Conversely, inhibition of the OXPHOS increases expression of Rev3. Rev3 expression is increased in human primary breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. Inactivation of Rev3 decreases cell migration and invasion, and localization of Rev3 in mitochondria increases survival and the invasive potential of cancer cells. Taken together, we demonstrate that REV3 functions in mammalian mitochondria and that mitochondrial REV3 is associated with the tumorigenic potential of cells.

  7. Structural Basis for the Interaction of Mutasome Assembly Factor REV1 with Ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Cui, Gaofeng; Botuyan, Maria Victoria; Mer, Georges

    2018-05-18

    REV1 is an evolutionarily conserved translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerase and an assembly factor key for the recruitment of other TLS polymerases to DNA damage sites. REV1-mediated recognition of ubiquitin in the proliferative cell nuclear antigen is thought to be the trigger for TLS activation. Here we report the solution NMR structure of a 108-residue fragment of human REV1 encompassing the two putative ubiquitin-binding motifs UBM1 and UBM2 in complex with ubiquitin. While in mammals UBM1 and UBM2 are both required for optimal association of REV1 with replication factories after DNA damage, we show that only REV1 UBM2 binds ubiquitin. Structure-guided mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae further highlights the importance of UBM2 for REV1-mediated mutagenesis and DNA damage tolerance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Low Temperature Power Coating (LTPC) Phase 2 Laboratory Test Plan and Procedures for PACAF (Rev D)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2018-03-20

    Δa*, LTPC Phase II Laboratory Test Plan and Procedures Rev D (CDRL A004) BATTELLE | 20 March 2018 | 6 Δb* and ΔE will be calculated post ...BATTELLE | CONTRACT NUMBER: FA8532-17-C-0008 (CDRL A004) LTPC Phase II Laboratory Test Plan and Procedures (Rev D) Prepared by... Test Plan and Procedures Rev D (CDRL A004) BATTELLE | 20 March 2018 | i List of Acronyms AGE Aircraft Ground Equipment ASTM American

  9. The translesion polymerase Rev3L in the tolerance of alkylating anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Roos, Wynand Paul; Tsaalbi-Shtylik, Anastasia; Tsaryk, Roman; Güvercin, Fatma; de Wind, Niels; Kaina, Bernd

    2009-10-01

    Temozolomide and fotemustine, representing methylating and chloroethylating agents, respectively, are used in the treatment of glioma and malignant melanoma. Because chemoresistance of these tumors is a common phenomenon, identification of the underlying mechanisms is needed. Here we show that Rev3L, the catalytic subunit of the translesion DNA polymerase zeta, mediates resistance to both temozolomide and fotemustine. Rev3L knockout cells are hypersensitive to both agents. It is remarkable that cells heterozygous for Rev3L showed an intermediate sensitivity. Rev3L is not involved in the tolerance of the toxic O6-methylguanine lesion. However, a possible role of Rev3L in the tolerance of O6-chloroethylguanine or the subsequently formed N1-guanine-N3-cytosine interstrand cross-link is shown. Rev3L had no influence on base excision repair (BER) of the N-alkylation lesions but is very likely to be involved in the tolerance of N-alkylations or apurinic/apyrimidinic sites originating from them. We also show that Rev3L exerts its protective effect in replicating cells and that loss of Rev3L leads to a significant increase in DNA double-strand breaks after temozolomide and fotemustine treatment. These data show that Rev3L contributes to temozolomide and fotemustine resistance, thus acting in concert with O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, BER, mismatch repair, and double-strand break repair in defense against simple alkylating anticancer drugs.

  10. NREL Fuels and Engines R&D Revs Up Vehicle Efficiency, Performance (Text

    Science.gov Websites

    Version) | News | NREL Fuels and Engines R&D Revs Up Vehicle Efficiency, Performance (Text Version) NREL Fuels and Engines R&D Revs Up Vehicle Efficiency, Performance (Text Version) NREL's combustion to the evolution of how fuels interact with engine and vehicle design. This is a text version of

  11. Biological Characterization of CVRM2-BAC, A Recombinant CV1988 Virus Containing an REV LTR Insertion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It has been previously reported that avian retroviruses, i.e. avian leukosis virus (ALV) and reticoloendotheliosis virus (REV), integrate in the Marek’s disease virus genome affecting MDV pathogenicity. RM-2 is an attenuated serotype 1 MDV virus generated by insertion of the REV LTR in the genome of...

  12. RevManHAL: towards automatic text generation in systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Torres Torres, Mercedes; Adams, Clive E

    2017-02-09

    Systematic reviews are a key part of healthcare evaluation. They involve important painstaking but repetitive work. A major producer of systematic reviews, the Cochrane Collaboration, employs Review Manager (RevMan) programme-a software which assists reviewers and produces XML-structured files. This paper describes an add-on programme (RevManHAL) which helps auto-generate the abstract, results and discussion sections of RevMan-generated reviews in multiple languages. The paper also describes future developments for RevManHAL. RevManHAL was created in Java using NetBeans by a programmer working full time for 2 months. The resulting open-source programme uses editable phrase banks to envelop text/numbers from within the prepared RevMan file in formatted readable text of a chosen language. In this way, considerable parts of the review's 'abstract', 'results' and 'discussion' sections are created and a phrase added to 'acknowledgements'. RevManHAL's output needs to be checked by reviewers, but already, from our experience within the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group (200 maintained reviews, 900 reviewers), RevManHAL has saved much time which is better employed thinking about the meaning of the data rather than restating them. Many more functions will become possible as review writing becomes increasingly automated.

  13. Molecular interaction between K-Ras and H-REV107 in the Ras signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Chang Woo; Jeong, Mi Suk; Jang, Se Bok

    2017-09-16

    Ras proteins are small GTPases that serve as master moderators of a large number of signaling pathways involved in various cellular processes. Activating mutations in Ras are found in about one-third of cancers. H-REV107, a K-Ras binding protein, plays an important role in determining K-Ras function. H-REV107 is a member of the HREV107 family of class II tumor suppressor genes and a growth inhibitory Ras target gene that suppresses cellular growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Expression of H-REV107 was strongly reduced in about 50% of human carcinoma cell lines. However, the specific molecular mechanism by which H-REV107 inhibits Ras is still unknown. In the present study, we suggest that H-REV107 forms a strong complex with activating oncogenic mutation Q61H K-Ras from various biochemical binding assays and modeled structures. In addition, the interaction sites between K-Ras and H-REV107 were predicted based on homology modeling. Here, we found that some structure-based mutants of the K-Ras disrupted the complex formation with H-REV107. Finally, a novel molecular mechanism describing K-Ras and H-REV107 binding is suggested and insights into new K-Ras effector target drugs are provided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. RevBayes: Bayesian Phylogenetic Inference Using Graphical Models and an Interactive Model-Specification Language

    PubMed Central

    Höhna, Sebastian; Landis, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Programs for Bayesian inference of phylogeny currently implement a unique and fixed suite of models. Consequently, users of these software packages are simultaneously forced to use a number of programs for a given study, while also lacking the freedom to explore models that have not been implemented by the developers of those programs. We developed a new open-source software package, RevBayes, to address these problems. RevBayes is entirely based on probabilistic graphical models, a powerful generic framework for specifying and analyzing statistical models. Phylogenetic-graphical models can be specified interactively in RevBayes, piece by piece, using a new succinct and intuitive language called Rev. Rev is similar to the R language and the BUGS model-specification language, and should be easy to learn for most users. The strength of RevBayes is the simplicity with which one can design, specify, and implement new and complex models. Fortunately, this tremendous flexibility does not come at the cost of slower computation; as we demonstrate, RevBayes outperforms competing software for several standard analyses. Compared with other programs, RevBayes has fewer black-box elements. Users need to explicitly specify each part of the model and analysis. Although this explicitness may initially be unfamiliar, we are convinced that this transparency will improve understanding of phylogenetic models in our field. Moreover, it will motivate the search for improvements to existing methods by brazenly exposing the model choices that we make to critical scrutiny. RevBayes is freely available at http://www.RevBayes.com. [Bayesian inference; Graphical models; MCMC; statistical phylogenetics.] PMID:27235697

  15. The orphan receptor Rev-erbα gene is a target of the circadian clock pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Triqueneaux, Gérard; Thenot, Sandrine; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Antoch, Marina P; Safi, Rachid; Takahashi, Joseph S; Delaunay, Franck; Laudet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Rev-erbα is a ubiquitously expressed orphan nuclear receptor which functions as a constitutive transcriptional repressor and is expressed in vertebrates according to a robust circadian rhythm. We report here that two Rev-erbα mRNA isoforms, namely Rev-erbα1 and Rev-erbα2, are generated through alternative promoter usage and that both show a circadian expression pattern in an in vitro system using serum-shocked fibroblasts. Both promoter regions P1 (Rev-erbα1) and P2 (Rev-erbα2) contain several E-box DNA sequences, which function as response elements for the core circadian-clock components: CLOCK and BMAL1. The CLOCK–BMAL1 heterodimer stimulates the activity of both P1 and P2 promoters in transient transfection assay by 3–6-fold. This activation was inhibited by the overexpression of CRY1, a component of the negative limb of the circadian transcriptional loop. Critical E-box elements were mapped within both promoters. This regulation is conserved in vertebrates since we found that the CLOCK–BMAL1 heterodimer also regulates the zebrafish Rev-erbα gene. In line with these data Rev-erbα circadian expression was strongly impaired in the livers of Clock mutant mice and in the pineal glands of zebrafish embryos treated with Clock and Bmal1 antisense oligonucleotides. Together these data demonstrate that CLOCK is a critical regulator of Rev-erbα circadian gene expression in evolutionarily distant vertebrates and suggest a role for Rev-erbα in the circadian clock output. PMID:15591021

  16. RevBayes: Bayesian Phylogenetic Inference Using Graphical Models and an Interactive Model-Specification Language.

    PubMed

    Höhna, Sebastian; Landis, Michael J; Heath, Tracy A; Boussau, Bastien; Lartillot, Nicolas; Moore, Brian R; Huelsenbeck, John P; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-01

    Programs for Bayesian inference of phylogeny currently implement a unique and fixed suite of models. Consequently, users of these software packages are simultaneously forced to use a number of programs for a given study, while also lacking the freedom to explore models that have not been implemented by the developers of those programs. We developed a new open-source software package, RevBayes, to address these problems. RevBayes is entirely based on probabilistic graphical models, a powerful generic framework for specifying and analyzing statistical models. Phylogenetic-graphical models can be specified interactively in RevBayes, piece by piece, using a new succinct and intuitive language called Rev. Rev is similar to the R language and the BUGS model-specification language, and should be easy to learn for most users. The strength of RevBayes is the simplicity with which one can design, specify, and implement new and complex models. Fortunately, this tremendous flexibility does not come at the cost of slower computation; as we demonstrate, RevBayes outperforms competing software for several standard analyses. Compared with other programs, RevBayes has fewer black-box elements. Users need to explicitly specify each part of the model and analysis. Although this explicitness may initially be unfamiliar, we are convinced that this transparency will improve understanding of phylogenetic models in our field. Moreover, it will motivate the search for improvements to existing methods by brazenly exposing the model choices that we make to critical scrutiny. RevBayes is freely available at http://www.RevBayes.com [Bayesian inference; Graphical models; MCMC; statistical phylogenetics.]. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists.

  17. Rev-erb beta regulates the Srebp-1c promoter and mRNA expression in skeletal muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, Sathiya N.; Lau, Patrick; Crowther, Lisa M.

    2009-10-30

    The nuclear hormone receptor, Rev-erb beta operates as a transcriptional silencer. We previously demonstrated that exogenous expression of Rev-erb{beta}{Delta}E in skeletal muscle cells increased Srebp-1c mRNA expression. We validated these in vitro observations by injection of an expression vector driving Rev-erb{beta}{Delta}E expression into mouse tibialis muscle that resulted in increased Srebp-1c mRNA expression. Paradoxically, Rev-erb{beta} siRNA expression in skeletal muscle cells repressed Srebp-1c expression, and indicated that Rev-erb{beta} expression was necessary for Srebp-1c expression. ChIP analysis demonstrated that Rev-erb{beta} was recruited to the Srebp-1c promoter. Moreover, Rev-erb{beta} trans-activated the Srebp-1c promoter, in contrast, Rev-erb{beta} efficiently repressed the Rev-erb{alpha} promoter, amore » previously characterized target gene. Finally, treatment with the Rev-erb agonist (hemin) (i) increased the trans-activation of the Srebp-1c promoter by Rev-erb{beta}; and (ii) increased Rev-erb{beta} and Srebp-1c mRNA expression. These data suggest that Rev-erb{beta} has the potential to activate gene expression, and is a positive regulator of Srebp-1c, a regulator of lipogenesis.« less

  18. RNA helicase MOV10 functions as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev to facilitate Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export of viral mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Zhang, Junsong; Zhang, Yijun; Geng, Guannan; Liang, Juanran; Li, Yingniang; Chen, Jingliang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exploits multiple host factors during its replication. The REV/RRE-dependent nuclear export of unspliced/partially spliced viral transcripts needs the assistance of host proteins. Recent studies have shown that MOV10 overexpression inhibited HIV-1 replication at various steps. However, the endogenous MOV10 was required in certain step(s) of HIV-1 replication. In this report, we found that MOV10 potently enhances the nuclear export of viral mRNAs and subsequently increases the expression of Gag protein and other late products through affecting the Rev/RRE axis. The co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. The DEAG-box of MOV10 was required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export and the DEAG-box mutant showed a dominant-negative activity. Our data propose that HIV-1 utilizes the anti-viral factor MOV10 to function as a co-factor of Rev and demonstrate the complicated effects of MOV10 on HIV-1 life cycle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Tamavidin 2-REV: an engineered tamavidin with reversible biotin-binding capability.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Yoshimitsu; Sofuku, Kozue; Tsunashima, Masako

    2013-03-10

    A biotin-binding protein with reversible biotin-binding capability is of great technical value in the affinity purification of biotinylated biomolecules. Although several proteins, chemically or genetically modified from avidin or streptavidin, with reversible biotin-binding have been reported, they have been problematic in one way or another. Tamavidin 2 is a fungal protein similar to avidin and streptavidin in biotin-binding. Here, a mutein, tamavidin 2-REV, was engineered from tamavidin 2 by replacing the serine at position 36 (S36) with alanine. S36 is thought to form a hydrogen bond with biotin in tamavidin 2/biotin complexes and two hydrogen bonds with V38 within the protein. Tamavidin 2-REV bound to biotin-agarose and was eluted with excess free biotin at a neutral pH. In addition, the model substrate biotinylated bovine serum albumin was efficiently purified from a crude extract from Escherichia coli by means of single-step affinity chromatography with tamavidin 2-REV-immobilized resin. Tamavidin 2-REV thus demonstrated reversible biotin-binding capability. The Kd value of tamavidin 2-REV to biotin was 2.8-4.4×10(-7)M.Tamavidin 2-REV retained other convenient characteristics of tamavidin 2, such as high-level expression in E. coli, resistance to proteases, and a neutral isoelectric point, demonstrating that tamavidin 2-REV is a powerful tool for the purification of biotinylated biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. HIV-1 Rev expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli: purification, polymerization, and conformational properties.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, P T; Stahl, S J; Payton, M A; Venkatesan, S; Misra, M; Steven, A C

    1991-07-30

    The high-level expression of HIV-1 Rev in Escherichia coli is described. Protein in crude bacterial extracts was dissociated from bound nucleic acid with urea. A simple purification and renaturation protocol, monitored by circular dichroism, is described which results in high yields of pure protein. The purified protein binds with high affinity to the Rev-responsive element mRNA and has nativelike spectroscopic properties. The protein exhibits concentration-dependent self-association as judged by analytical ultracentrifugation and gel filtration measurements. Purified Rev showed reversible heat-induced aggregation over the temperature range 0-30 degrees C. This hydrophobic-driven and nonspecific protein association was inhibited by low concentrations of sulfate ions. Rev solutions at greater than 80 micrograms/mL, incubated at 0-4 degrees C, slowly polymerized to form long hollow fibers of 20-nm diameter. Filament formation occurs at a lower protein concentration and more rapidly in the presence of Rev-responsive mRNA. The nucleic acid containing filaments are about 8 nm in diameter and up to 0.4 micron in length. On the basis of physical properties of the purified protein, we have suggested that in the nucleus of infected cells, Rev binding to the Rev-responsive region of env mRNA may be followed by helical polymerization of the protein which results in coating of the nucleic acid. Coated nucleic acid could be protected from splicing in the nucleus and exported to the cytoplasm.

  1. 78 FR 27971 - Determination That REV-EYES (Dapiprazole Hydrochloride Ophthalmic Solution), 0.5%, Was Not...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ...] Determination That REV-EYES (Dapiprazole Hydrochloride Ophthalmic Solution), 0.5%, Was Not Withdrawn From Sale.... SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that REV-EYES (dapiprazole hydrochloride... CFR 314.161)). FDA may not approve an ANDA that does not refer to a listed drug. REV-EYES (dapiprazole...

  2. 75 FR 27840 - NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2010-0080] NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3...: ``NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for General... the existing guidance contained in Supplement 3 to NUREG- 0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, ``Criteria for...

  3. [Construction of Rev-erbβ gene knockout HEK293 cell line with CRISPR/Cas9 system].

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Zhang, Weifeng; Zhao, Junli; Yang, Peiyan; Ma, Rui; Xia, Haibin

    2016-11-01

    Objective To prepare Rev-erbβ knockout HEK293 cells using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) gene editing technology. Methods The knock-in or knockout of Rev-erbβ gene could be realized by single-guide RNA (sgRNA)-mediated Cas9 cutting of target DNA, and followed by DNA homologous recombination or non-homologous end joining-mediated DNA repair. Firstly, four sgRNAs were designed for Rev-erbβ gene. The sgRNA1 and sgRNA2 with the higher activity were respectively used to construct pCMV-hCas9-U6-Rev-erbβ sgRNA1 and pCMV-hCas9-U6-Rev-erbβ sgRNA2. Then, pCMV-hCas9-U6-Rev-erbβ sgRNA1, pCMV-hCas9-U6-Rev-erbβ sgRNA2 and pAd5-E1/hRev-erbβ donor plasmid vectors were co-transfected into HEK293 cells. Through drug screening, cloning and sequencing, the Rev-erbβ gene-knockout HEK293 (Rev-erbβ -/- ) cell lines were obtained with one chain integrated with exogenous gene fragment and the other chain for deletion mutants. Finally, the HEK293 (Rev-erbβ -/- ) cell lines (C3-6) was detected with real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting. Results Expression of Rev-erbβ mRNA and protein was undetectable in HEK293 Rev-erbβ -/- cell line. Conclusion Using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, the HEK293 Rev-erbβ -/- cell line has been successfully constructed, which would provide an effective tool for the study on the function of Rev-erbβ.

  4. Pharmacological Targeting the REV-ERBs in Sleep/Wake Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Ariadna; Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Roberts, Amanda J.; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock maintains appropriate timing for a wide range of behaviors and physiological processes. Circadian behaviors such as sleep and wakefulness are intrinsically dependent on the precise oscillation of the endogenous molecular machinery that regulates the circadian clock. The identical core clock machinery regulates myriad endocrine and metabolic functions providing a link between sleep and metabolic health. The REV-ERBs (REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ) are nuclear receptors that are key regulators of the molecular clock and have been successfully targeted using small molecule ligands. Recent studies in mice suggest that REV-ERB-specific synthetic agonists modulate metabolic activity as well as alter sleep architecture, inducing wakefulness during the light period. Therefore, these small molecules represent unique tools to extensively study REV-ERB regulation of sleep and wakefulness. In these studies, our aim was to further investigate the therapeutic potential of targeting the REV-ERBs for regulation of sleep by characterizing efficacy, and optimal dosing time of the REV-ERB agonist SR9009 using electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. Applying different experimental paradigms in mice, our studies establish that SR9009 does not lose efficacy when administered more than once a day, nor does tolerance develop when administered once a day over a three-day dosing regimen. Moreover, through use of a time response paradigm, we determined that although there is an optimal time for administration of SR9009 in terms of maximal efficacy, there is a 12-hour window in which SR9009 elicited a response. Our studies indicate that the REV-ERBs are potential therapeutic targets for treating sleep problems as those encountered as a consequence of shift work or jet lag. PMID:27603791

  5. RevEcoR: an R package for the reverse ecology analysis of microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zheng, Xiaofei; Li, Fei; Bo, Xiaochen

    2016-07-29

    All species live in complex ecosystems. The structure and complexity of a microbial community reflects not only diversity and function, but also the environment in which it occurs. However, traditional ecological methods can only be applied on a small scale and for relatively well-understood biological systems. Recently, a graph-theory-based algorithm called the reverse ecology approach has been developed that can analyze the metabolic networks of all the species in a microbial community, and predict the metabolic interface between species and their environment. Here, we present RevEcoR, an R package and a Shiny Web application that implements the reverse ecology algorithm for determining microbe-microbe interactions in microbial communities. This software allows users to obtain large-scale ecological insights into species' ecology directly from high-throughput metagenomic data. The software has great potential for facilitating the study of microbiomes. RevEcoR is open source software for the study of microbial community ecology. The RevEcoR R package is freely available under the GNU General Public License v. 2.0 at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/RevEcoR/ with the vignette and typical usage examples, and the interactive Shiny web application is available at http://yiluheihei.shinyapps.io/shiny-RevEcoR , or can be installed locally with the source code accessed from https://github.com/yiluheihei/shiny-RevEcoR .

  6. Discrete Functions of Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbα Couple Metabolism to the Clock

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxiang; Fang, Bin; Emmett, Matthew J.; Damle, Manashree; Sun, Zheng; Feng, Dan; Armour, Sean M.; Remsberg, Jarrett R.; Jager, Jennifer; Soccio, Raymond E.; Steger, David J.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Circadian and metabolic physiology are intricately intertwined, as illustrated by Rev-erbα, a transcription factor (TF) that functions both as a core repressive component of the cell autonomous clock and as a regulator of metabolic genes. Here we show that Rev-erbα modulates the clock and metabolism by different genomic mechanisms. Clock control requires Rev-erbα to bind directly to the genome at its cognate sites, where it competes with activating ROR TFs. By contrast, Rev-erbα regulates metabolic genes primarily by recruiting the HDAC3 corepressor to sites to which it is tethered by cell type-specific transcription factors. Thus, direct competition between Rev-erbα and ROR TFs provides a universal mechanism for self-sustained control of molecular clock across all tissues, whereas Rev-erbα utilizes lineage-determining factors to convey a tissue-specific epigenomic rhythm that regulates metabolism tailored to the specific need of that tissue. PMID:26044300

  7. GENE REGULATION. Discrete functions of nuclear receptor Rev-erbα couple metabolism to the clock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxiang; Fang, Bin; Emmett, Matthew J; Damle, Manashree; Sun, Zheng; Feng, Dan; Armour, Sean M; Remsberg, Jarrett R; Jager, Jennifer; Soccio, Raymond E; Steger, David J; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2015-06-26

    Circadian and metabolic physiology are intricately intertwined, as illustrated by Rev-erbα, a transcription factor (TF) that functions both as a core repressive component of the cell-autonomous clock and as a regulator of metabolic genes. Here, we show that Rev-erbα modulates the clock and metabolism by different genomic mechanisms. Clock control requires Rev-erbα to bind directly to the genome at its cognate sites, where it competes with activating ROR TFs. By contrast, Rev-erbα regulates metabolic genes primarily by recruiting the HDAC3 co-repressor to sites to which it is tethered by cell type-specific transcription factors. Thus, direct competition between Rev-erbα and ROR TFs provides a universal mechanism for self-sustained control of the molecular clock across all tissues, whereas Rev-erbα uses lineage-determining factors to convey a tissue-specific epigenomic rhythm that regulates metabolism tailored to the specific need of that tissue. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Contributions of individual domains to function of the HIV-1 Rev response element.

    PubMed

    O'Carroll, Ina P; Thappeta, Yashna; Fan, Lixin; Ramirez-Valdez, Edric A; Smith, Sean; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan

    2017-08-16

    The HIV-1 Rev response element (RRE) is a 351-base element in unspliced and partially spliced viral RNA; binding of the RRE by the viral Rev protein induces nuclear export of RRE-containing RNAs, as required for virus replication. It contains one long, imperfect double helix (domain I), one branched domain (domain II) containing a high-affinity Rev-binding site, and two or three additional domains. We previously reported that the RRE assumes an "A" shape in solution and suggested that the location of the Rev binding sites in domains I and II, opposite each other on the two legs of the A, is optimal for Rev binding and explains Rev's specificity for RRE-containing RNAs. Using SAXS and a quantitative functional assay, we have now analyzed a panel of RRE mutants. All the results support the essential role of the A shape for RRE function. Moreover, they suggest that the distal portion of domain I and the three crowning domains all contribute to the maintenance of the A shape. Domains I and II are necessary and sufficient for substantial RRE function, provided they are joined by a flexible linker that allows the two domains to face each other. IMPORTANCE Retroviral replication requires that some of the viral RNAs transcribed in the cell nucleus be exported to the cytoplasm without being spliced. To achieve this, HIV-1 encodes a protein, Rev, which binds to a complex, highly structured element within viral RNA, the Rev Response Element (RRE), and escorts RRE-containing RNAs from the nucleus. We previously reported that the RRE is "A"-shaped and suggested that this architecture, with the 2 legs opposite one another, can explain the specificity of Rev for the RRE. We have analyzed the functional contributions of individual RRE domains, and now report that several domains contribute, with some redundancy, to maintenance of the overall RRE shape. The data strongly support the hypothesis that the opposed placement of the 2 legs is essential for RRE function. Copyright © 2017

  9. Contributions of Individual Domains to Function of the HIV-1 Rev Response Element

    PubMed Central

    O'Carroll, Ina P.; Thappeta, Yashna; Fan, Lixin; Ramirez-Valdez, Edric A.; Smith, Sean; Wang, Yun-Xing

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 Rev response element (RRE) is a 351-base element in unspliced and partially spliced viral RNA; binding of the RRE by the viral Rev protein induces nuclear export of RRE-containing RNAs, as required for virus replication. It contains one long, imperfect double helix (domain I), one branched domain (domain II) containing a high-affinity Rev-binding site, and two or three additional domains. We previously reported that the RRE assumes an “A” shape in solution and suggested that the location of the Rev binding sites in domains I and II, opposite each other on the two legs of the A, is optimal for Rev binding and explains Rev's specificity for RRE-containing RNAs. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and a quantitative functional assay, we have now analyzed a panel of RRE mutants. All the results support the essential role of the A shape for RRE function. Moreover, they suggest that the distal portion of domain I and the three crowning domains all contribute to the maintenance of the A shape. Domains I and II are necessary and sufficient for substantial RRE function, provided they are joined by a flexible linker that allows the two domains to face each other. IMPORTANCE Retroviral replication requires that some of the viral RNAs transcribed in the cell nucleus be exported to the cytoplasm without being spliced. To achieve this, HIV-1 encodes a protein, Rev, which binds to a complex, highly structured element within viral RNA, the Rev response element (RRE), and escorts RRE-containing RNAs from the nucleus. We previously reported that the RRE is “A” shaped and suggested that this architecture, with the 2 legs opposite one another, can explain the specificity of Rev for the RRE. We have analyzed the functional contributions of individual RRE domains and now report that several domains contribute, with some redundancy, to maintenance of the overall RRE shape. The data strongly support the hypothesis that the opposed placement of the 2 legs

  10. B23/nucleophosmin interacts with bovine immunodeficiency virus Rev protein and facilitates viral replication.

    PubMed

    Passos-Castilho, Ana Maria; Marchand, Claude; Archambault, Denis

    2018-02-01

    The bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) Rev shuttling protein contains nuclear/nucleolar localization signals and nuclear import/export mechanisms that are novel among lentivirus Rev proteins. Several viral proteins localize to the nucleolus, which may play a role in processes that are essential to the outcome of viral replication. Although BIV Rev localizes to the nucleoli of transfected/infected cells and colocalizes with one of its major proteins, nucleophosmin (NPM1, also known as B23), the role of the nucleolus and B23 in BIV replication remains to be determined. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that BIV Rev interacts with nucleolar phosphoprotein B23 in cells. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology, we show that depletion of B23 expression inhibits virus production by BIV-infected cells, indicating that B23 plays an important role in BIV replication. The interaction between Rev and B23 may represent a potential new target for the development of antiviral drugs against lentiviruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Lessons learned from the recovered heatshield of the USERS REV capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Seiji; Okuyama, Keiichi; Ishii, Nobuaki

    2008-01-01

    The USERS Reentry Vehicle (REV) capsule carried out reentry flight from the low earth orbit and was successfully recovered on the sea in May, 2003. This paper presents the post-flight analysis of the recovered heatshield of REV capsule and summarizes the lessons learned. REV capsule, totally about 670 kg, has the combined shape of the nose hemisphere and the rear cone part, and its size is about 1.5 m in diameter and 1.9 m in length. REV is thermally protected against the aerodynamic heating by the carbon phenolic ablator heatshield. The recovered REV heatshield was scrutinized based on the outside aspect and the cross-sections. In general, the temperature profiles of the heatshield have been compared between the flight data and the prediction. The origin of the surface shallow cracks and slight delamination observed in the heatshield have been investigated based on the flight data and taking account of the ablator internal pyrolysis gas pressure, the thermal stress, and the allowable stress. The heatshield has proven to satisfy thermal protection requirements, and the validity of the designing has been confirmed.

  12. Innocuity and immune response to Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine in camels (Camelus dromedarius)

    PubMed Central

    Benkirane, A.; Idrissi, A.H. El; Doumbia, A.; de Balogh, K.

    2014-01-01

    A field trial was conducted in a camel brucellosis-free herd to evaluate antibody response to the Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine in camels and assess shedding of the vaccine strain in milk. Twenty eight camels were divided into four groups according to their age and vaccination route. Groups A (n=3) and B (n=3) consisted of non-pregnant lactating female camels, vaccinated through subcutaneous and conjunctival routes, respectively. Groups C (n=10) consisted of 8-11 months old calves vaccinated through conjunctival route. The rest of the herd (n=12) composed of female and young camels were not vaccinated and were considered as the control group. Each animal from groups A, B and C was given the recommended dose of 2 × 109 colony forming units of Rev.1 vaccine irrespective of age or route of vaccination. Blood samples were collected from all the animals at the time of vaccination and at weekly, bi-weekly and monthly interval until 32 weeks post vaccination and from controls at weeks 8 and 24. The serological tests used were modified Rose Bengal Test, sero-agglutination test, and an indirect Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Milk samples were collected from all vaccinated female camels and tested for the presence of Rev.1 vaccine strain. Most vaccinated animals started to show an antibody response at week 2 and remained positive until week 16. By week 20 post-vaccination all animals in the three groups were tested negative for Brucella antibodies. Bacteriological analysis of milk samples did not allow any isolation of Brucella melitensis. All samples were found Brucella negative in PCR analysis. The results of this study indicate that the Rev.1 vaccine induces seroconversion in camels. Rev.1 vaccine strain is not excreted in the milk of camels. These findings are promising as to the safe use of the Rev.1 vaccine in camels. PMID:26623347

  13. REV-ERBs agonism suppresses osteoclastogenesis and prevents ovariectomy-induced bone loss partially via FABP4 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Chao; Tan, Peng; Zhang, Zheng; Wu, Wei; Dong, Yonghui; Zhao, Liming; Liu, Huiyong; Guan, Hanfeng; Li, Feng

    2018-01-22

    REV-ERBs (REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ) are transcription repressors and circadian regulators. Previous investigations have shown that REV-ERBs repress the expression of target genes, including MMP9 and CX3CR1, in macrophages. Because MMP9 and CX3CR1 reportedly participate in receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis, we inferred that REV-ERBs might play a role in osteoclastogenesis. In the present study, we found that the REV-ERBα level decreased significantly during RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation from primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). REV-ERBα knockdown by small interfering RNA in BMMs resulted in the enhanced formation of osteoclasts, whereas REV-ERBβ knockdown showed no effect on osteoclast differentiation. Moreover, the REV-ERB agonist SR9009 inhibited osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. Intraperitoneal SR9009 administration prevented ovariectomy-induced bone loss; this effect was accompanied by decreased serum RANKL and C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen levels and increased osteoprotegerin levels. Further investigation revealed that NF-κB and MAPK activation and nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1, and c-fos expression were suppressed by SR9009. The level of reactive oxygen species was also decreased by SR9009, with NADPH oxidase subunits also being down-regulated. In addition, an expression microarray showed that FABP4, an intracellular lipid-binding protein, was up-regulated by REV-ERB agonism. BMS309403, an inhibitor of FABP4, partially prevented the suppression of osteoclastogenesis by SR9009 through stabilizing phosphorylation of p65. To summarize, our results proved that the REV-ERB agonism inhibited osteoclastogenesis partially via FABP4 up-regulation.-Song, C., Tan, P., Zhang, Z., Wu, W., Dong, Y., Zhao, L., Liu, H., Guan, H., Li, F. REV-ERBs agonism suppresses osteoclastogenesis and prevents ovariectomy-induced bone loss partially via FABP4 upregulation.

  14. Unprecedented NES non-antagonistic inhibitor for nuclear export of Rev from Sida cordifolia.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Satoru; Kaneko, Masafumi; Shiomi, Atsushi; Yang, Guang-Ming; Yamaura, Toshiaki; Murakami, Nobutoshi

    2010-03-15

    Bioassay-guided separation from the MeOH extract of the South American medicinal plant Sida cordifolia resulted in isolation of (10E,12Z)-9-hydroxyoctadeca-10,12-dienoic acid (1) as an unprecedented NES non-antagonistic inhibitor for nuclear export of Rev. This mechanism of action was established by competitive experiment by the biotinylated probe derived from leptomycin B, the known NES antagonistic inhibitor. Additionally, structure-activity relationship analysis by use of the synthesized analogs clarified cooperation of several functionalities in the Rev-export inhibitory activity of 1. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rev1 Recruits Ung to Switch Regions and Enhances dU Glycosylation for Immunoglobulin Class Switch DNA Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Hong; White, Clayton A.; Thomas, Lisa M.; Mai, Thach; Li, Guideng; Xu, Zhenming; Zhang, Jinsong; Casali, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY By diversifying the biological effector functions of antibodies, class switch DNA recombination (CSR) plays a critical role in the maturation of the immune response. It is initiated by AID-mediated dC deamination, yielding dUs, and dU glycosylation by Ung in antibody switch (S) region DNA. Here we showed that the translesion DNA synthesis polymerase Rev1 directly interacted with Ung and targeted in an AID-dependent and Ung-independent fashion the S regions undergoing CSR. Rev1–/– Ung+/+ B cells reduced Ung recruitment to S regions, DNA-dU glycosylation and CSR. This together with an S region spectrum of mutations similar to that of Rev1+/+ Ung–/– B cells suggested that Rev1 operated in the same pathway as Ung, as emphasized by further decreased CSR in Rev1–/– Msh2–/– B cells. Rescue of CSR in Rev1–/– B cells by a catalytically inactive Rev1 mutant showed that the important role of Rev1 in CSR is mediated by Rev1 scaffold, not enzymatic function. PMID:23140944

  16. Interaction between the Rev1 C-terminal Domain and the PolD3 Subunit of Polζ Suggests a Mechanism of Polymerase Exchange upon Rev1/Polζ-Dependent Translesion Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pustovalova, Yulia; Magalhães, Mariana T. Q.; D’Souza, Sanjay; Rizzo, Alessandro A.; Korza, George; Walker, Graham C.; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.

    2016-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) is a mutagenic branch of cellular DNA damage tolerance that enables bypass replication over DNA lesions carried out by specialized low-fidelity DNA polymerases. The replicative bypass of most types of DNA damage is performed in a two-step process of Rev1/Polζ-dependent TLS. In the first step, a Y-family TLS enzyme, typically Polη, Polι or Polκ, inserts a nucleotide across DNA lesion. In the second step, a four-subunit B-family DNA polymerase Polζ (Rev3/Rev7/PolD2/PolD3 complex) extends the distorted DNA primer-template. The coordinated action of error-prone TLS enzymes is regulated through their interactions with the two scaffold proteins, the sliding clamp PCNA and the TLS polymerase Rev1. Rev1 interactions with all other TLS enzymes are mediated by its C-terminal domain (Rev1-CT), which can simultaneously bind the Rev7 subunit of Polζ and Rev1-interacting regions (RIRs) from Polη, Polι or Polκ. In this work, we identified a previously unknown RIR motif in the C-terminal part of PolD3 subunit of Polζ whose interaction with the Rev1-CT is among the tightest mediated by RIR motifs. Three-dimensional structure of the Rev1-CT/PolD3-RIR complex determined by NMR spectroscopy revealed a structural basis for the relatively high affinity of this interaction. The unexpected discovery of PolD3-RIR motif suggests a mechanism of 'inserter' to 'extender' DNA polymerase switch upon Rev1/Polζ-dependent TLS, in which the PolD3-RIR binding to the Rev1-CT (i) helps displace the 'inserter' Polη, Polι or Polκ from its complex with Rev1, and (ii) facilitates assembly of the four-subunit 'extender' Polζ through simultaneous interaction of Rev1-CT with Rev7 and PolD3 subunits. PMID:26982350

  17. 48 CFR 53.301-18 - SF 18 (Rev. 6/95), Request for Quotations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false SF 18 (Rev. 6/95), Request for Quotations. 53.301-18 Section 53.301-18 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... for Quotations. EC01MY91.002 [60 FR 34763, July 3, 1995] ...

  18. Did Rev-1 small ruminants vaccination helped improve cattle brucellosis prevalence status in Algeria?

    PubMed

    Kardjadj, Moustafa

    2017-12-01

    In 2006, the Algerian authorities started the Rev-1 vaccination of sheep and goats; consequently, there was a significant improvement of small ruminant brucellosis sanitary status. In this paper, we attempt to study the effect of Rev-1 small ruminants' vaccination on cattle brucellosis prevalence in Algeria. Our results showed an overall cattle herd seroprevalence of 12% (9 positive herds of 75). The risk factor analysis using a logistic regression model indicated that the presence of small ruminants along with cattle in the herd (mixed herds) decreased the odds for brucellosis seropositivity by 1.69 [95% CI 0.54-2.84; P = 0.042] compared to the cattle herds only. Likewise, the present study showed that the presence of Rev-1 vaccinated small ruminants in the herd decreased also the odds for brucellosis seropositivity by 4.10 [95% CI 3.20-5.00; P = 0.003] compared to other herds. This result lead to the assumption that the small ruminants Rev-1 vaccination diminish Brucella microbisme pressure in the mixed herds and help decrease the cattle brucellosis prevalence in these herds.

  19. Comparative Proteome Analysis of Brucella melitensis Vaccine Strain Rev 1 and a Virulent Strain, 16M

    PubMed Central

    Eschenbrenner, Michel; Wagner, Mary Ann; Horn, Troy A.; Kraycer, Jo Ann; Mujer, Cesar V.; Hagius, Sue; Elzer, Philip; DelVecchio, Vito G.

    2002-01-01

    The genus Brucella consists of bacterial pathogens that cause brucellosis, a major zoonotic disease characterized by undulant fever and neurological disorders in humans. Among the different Brucella species, Brucella melitensis is considered the most virulent. Despite successful use in animals, the vaccine strains remain infectious for humans. To understand the mechanism of virulence in B. melitensis, the proteome of vaccine strain Rev 1 was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and compared to that of virulent strain 16M. The two strains were grown under identical laboratory conditions. Computer-assisted analysis of the two B. melitensis proteomes revealed proteins expressed in either 16M or Rev 1, as well as up- or down-regulation of proteins specific for each of these strains. These proteins were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. It was found that certain metabolic pathways may be deregulated in Rev 1. Expression of an immunogenic 31-kDa outer membrane protein, proteins utilized for iron acquisition, and those that play a role in sugar binding, lipid degradation, and amino acid binding was altered in Rev 1. PMID:12193611

  20. Comparative proteome analysis of Brucella melitensis vaccine strain Rev 1 and a virulent strain, 16M.

    PubMed

    Eschenbrenner, Michel; Wagner, Mary Ann; Horn, Troy A; Kraycer, Jo Ann; Mujer, Cesar V; Hagius, Sue; Elzer, Philip; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2002-09-01

    The genus Brucella consists of bacterial pathogens that cause brucellosis, a major zoonotic disease characterized by undulant fever and neurological disorders in humans. Among the different Brucella species, Brucella melitensis is considered the most virulent. Despite successful use in animals, the vaccine strains remain infectious for humans. To understand the mechanism of virulence in B. melitensis, the proteome of vaccine strain Rev 1 was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and compared to that of virulent strain 16M. The two strains were grown under identical laboratory conditions. Computer-assisted analysis of the two B. melitensis proteomes revealed proteins expressed in either 16M or Rev 1, as well as up- or down-regulation of proteins specific for each of these strains. These proteins were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. It was found that certain metabolic pathways may be deregulated in Rev 1. Expression of an immunogenic 31-kDa outer membrane protein, proteins utilized for iron acquisition, and those that play a role in sugar binding, lipid degradation, and amino acid binding was altered in Rev 1.

  1. Erratum: Binary neutron stars with arbitrary spins in numerical relativity [Phys. Rev. D 92, 124012 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacik, Nick; Foucart, Francois; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Haas, Roland; Ossokine, Serguei; Kaplan, Jeff; Muhlberger, Curran; Duez, Matt D.; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilágyi, Béla

    2016-08-01

    The code used in [Phys. Rev. D 92, 124012 (2015)] erroneously computed the enthalpy at the center of the neutron stars. Upon correcting this error, density oscillations in evolutions of rotating neutron stars are significantly reduced (from ˜20 % to ˜0.5 % ). Furthermore, it is possible to construct neutron stars with faster rotation rates.

  2. REV7 counteracts DNA double-strand break resection and impacts PARP inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guotai; Yuan, Jingsong; Mistrik, Martin; Bouwman, Peter; Bartkova, Jirina; Gogola, Ewa; Warmerdam, Daniël; Barazas, Marco; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Watanabe, Kenji; Pieterse, Mark; Kersbergen, Ariena; Sol, Wendy; Celie, Patrick H. N.; Schouten, Philip C.; van den Broek, Bram; Salman, Ahmed; Nieuwland, Marja; de Rink, Iris; de Ronde, Jorma; Jalink, Kees; Boulton, Simon J.; Chen, Junjie; van Gent, Dik C.; Bartek, Jiri; Jonkers, Jos; Borst, Piet; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Summary Error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is achieved by homologous recombination (HR), and BRCA1 is an important factor for this repair pathway1. In the absence of BRCA1-mediated HR, administration of PARP inhibitors induces synthetic lethality of tumor cells of patients with breast or ovarian cancers2,3. Despite the benefit of this tailored therapy, drug resistance can occur by HR restoration4. Genetic reversion of BRCA1-inactivating mutations can be the underlying mechanism of drug resistance, but this does not explain resistance in all cases5. In particular, little is known about BRCA1-independent restoration of HR. Here, we show that loss of REV7 (also known as MAD2L2) re-establishes CtIP-dependent end resection of DSBs in BRCA1-deficient cells, leading to HR restoration and PARP inhibitor resistance, reversed by ATM kinase inhibition. REV7 is recruited to DSBs in a manner dependent on the H2AX-MDC1-RNF8-RNF168-53BP1 chromatin pathway, and appears to block HR and promote end joining in addition to its regulatory role in DNA damage tolerance6. Finally, we establish that REV7 blocks DSB resection to promote non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) during immunoglobulin class switch recombination. Our results reveal an unexpected critical function of REV7 downstream of 53BP1 in coordinating pathological DSB repair pathway choices in BRCA1-deficient cells. PMID:25799992

  3. Circadian Amplitude Regulation via FBXW7-Targeted REV-ERBα Degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuan; Hirota, Tsuyoshi; Han, Xuemei; Cho, Han; Chong, Ling-Wa; Lamia, Katja; Liu, Sihao; Atkins, Annette R; Banayo, Ester; Liddle, Christopher; Yu, Ruth T; Yates, John R; Kay, Steve A; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M

    2016-06-16

    Defects in circadian rhythm influence physiology and behavior with implications for the treatment of sleep disorders, metabolic disease, and cancer. Although core regulatory components of clock rhythmicity have been defined, insight into the mechanisms underpinning amplitude is limited. Here, we show that REV-ERBα, a core inhibitory component of clock transcription, is targeted for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the F-box protein FBXW7. By relieving REV-ERBα-dependent repression, FBXW7 provides an unrecognized mechanism for enhancing the amplitude of clock gene transcription. Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)-mediated phosphorylation of REV-ERBα is necessary for FBXW7 recognition. Moreover, targeted hepatic disruption of FBXW7 alters circadian expression of core clock genes and perturbs whole-body lipid and glucose levels. This CDK1-FBXW7 pathway controlling REV-ERBα repression defines an unexpected molecular mechanism for re-engaging the positive transcriptional arm of the clock, as well as a potential route to manipulate clock amplitude via small molecule CDK1 inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Segregation of Clock and Non-Clock Regulatory Functions of REV-ERB.

    PubMed

    Butler, Andrew A; Burris, Thomas P

    2015-08-04

    The molecular clock is a master controller of circadian cellular processes that affect growth, metabolic homeostasis, and behavior. A report in Science by Zhang et al. (2015) redefines our understanding of how Rev-erba acts as an internal feedback inhibitor that modulates activity of the core clock while simultaneously regulating tissue-specific metabolic processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of Small Molecule Translesion Synthesis Inhibitors That Target the Rev1-CT/RIR Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Sail, Vibhavari; Rizzo, Alessandro A; Chatterjee, Nimrat; Dash, Radha C; Ozen, Zuleyha; Walker, Graham C; Korzhnev, Dmitry M; Hadden, M Kyle

    2017-07-21

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) is an important mechanism through which proliferating cells tolerate DNA damage during replication. The mutagenic Rev1/Polζ-dependent branch of TLS helps cancer cells survive first-line genotoxic chemotherapy and introduces mutations that can contribute to the acquired resistance so often observed with standard anticancer regimens. As such, inhibition of Rev1/Polζ-dependent TLS has recently emerged as a strategy to enhance the efficacy of first-line chemotherapy and reduce the acquisition of chemoresistance by decreasing tumor mutation rate. The TLS DNA polymerase Rev1 serves as an integral scaffolding protein that mediates the assembly of the active multiprotein TLS complexes. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) between the C-terminal domain of Rev1 (Rev1-CT) and the Rev1-interacting region (RIR) of other TLS DNA polymerases play an essential role in regulating TLS activity. To probe whether disrupting the Rev1-CT/RIR PPI is a valid approach for developing a new class of targeted anticancer agents, we designed a fluorescence polarization-based assay that was utilized in a pilot screen for small molecule inhibitors of this PPI. Two small molecule scaffolds that disrupt this interaction were identified, and secondary validation assays confirmed that compound 5 binds to Rev1-CT at the RIR interface. Finally, survival and mutagenesis assays in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells treated with cisplatin and ultraviolet light indicate that these compounds inhibit mutagenic Rev1/Polζ-dependent TLS in cells, validating the Rev1-CT/RIR PPI for future anticancer drug discovery and identifying the first small molecule inhibitors of TLS that target Rev1-CT.

  6. Molecular typing of Brucella melitensis endemic strains and differentiation from the vaccine strain Rev-1.

    PubMed

    Noutsios, Georgios T; Papi, Rigini M; Ekateriniadou, Loukia V; Minas, Anastasios; Kyriakidis, Dimitrios A

    2012-03-01

    In the present study forty-four Greek endemic strains of Br. melitensis and three reference strains were genotyped by Multi locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat (ML-VNTR) analysis based on an eight-base pair tandem repeat sequence that was revealed in eight loci of Br. melitensis genome. The forty-four strains were discriminated from the vaccine strain Rev-1 by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and Denaturant Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). The ML-VNTR analysis revealed that endemic, reference and vaccine strains are genetically closely related, while most of the loci tested (1, 2, 4, 5 and 7) are highly polymorphic with Hunter-Gaston Genetic Diversity Index (HGDI) values in the range of 0.939 to 0.775. Analysis of ML-VNTRs loci stability through in vitro passages proved that loci 1 and 5 are non stable. Therefore, vaccine strain can be discriminated from endemic strains by allele's clusters of loci 2, 4, 6 and 7. RFLP and DGGE were also employed to analyse omp2 gene and reveled different patterns among Rev-1 and endemic strains. In RFLP, Rev-1 revealed three fragments (282, 238 and 44 bp), while endemic strains two fragments (238 and 44 bp). As for DGGE, the electrophoretic mobility of Rev-1 is different from the endemic strains due to heterologous binding of DNA chains of omp2a and omp2b gene. Overall, our data show clearly that it is feasible to genotype endemic strains of Br. melitensis and differentiate them from vaccine strain Rev-1 with ML-VNTR, RFLP and DGGE techniques. These tools can be used for conventional investigations in brucellosis outbreaks.

  7. REV-ERB-ALPHA circadian gene variant associates with obesity in two independent populations: Mediterranean and North American

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite the solid connection between REV-ERB and obesity, the information about whether genetic variations at this locus may be associated with obesity traits is scarce. Therefore our objective was to study the association between REV-ERB-ALPHA1 rs2314339 and obesity in two independent populations. ...

  8. 75 FR 69741 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Rev. Proc. 2007-99 (RP-127367-07), 9100 Relief Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    .... Proc. 2007-99 (RP- 127367-07), 9100 Relief Under Sections 897 and 1445 AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service...)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Rev. Proc. 2007-99 (RP-127367-07), 9100 Relief Under...: Rev. Proc. 2007-99 (RP-127367-07), 9100 Relief Under Sections 897 and 1445. OMB Number: 1545-2098...

  9. Identification of Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine-strain genetic markers: Towards understanding the molecular mechanism behind virulence attenuation.

    PubMed

    Issa, Mohammad Nouh; Ashhab, Yaqoub

    2016-09-22

    Brucella melitensis Rev.1 is an avirulent strain that is widely used as a live vaccine to control brucellosis in small ruminants. Although an assembled draft version of Rev.1 genome has been available since 2009, this genome has not been investigated to characterize this important vaccine. In the present work, we used the draft genome of Rev.1 to perform a thorough genomic comparison and sequence analysis to identify and characterize the panel of its unique genetic markers. The draft genome of Rev.1 was compared with genome sequences of 36 different Brucella melitensis strains from the Brucella project of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. The comparative analyses revealed 32 genetic alterations (30 SNPs, 1 single-bp insertion and 1 single-bp deletion) that are exclusively present in the Rev.1 genome. In silico analyses showed that 9 out of the 17 non-synonymous mutations are deleterious. Three ABC transporters are among the disrupted genes that can be linked to virulence attenuation. Out of the 32 mutations, 11 Rev.1 specific markers were selected to test their potential to discriminate Rev.1 using a bi-directional allele-specific PCR assay. Six markers were able to distinguish between Rev.1 and a set of control strains. We succeeded in identifying a panel of 32 genome-specific markers of the B. melitensis Rev.1 vaccine strain. Extensive in silico analysis showed that a considerable number of these mutations could severely affect the function of the associated genes. In addition, some of the discovered markers were able to discriminate Rev.1 strain from a group of control strains using practical PCR tests that can be applied in resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Computers (Rev.)

    SciTech Connect

    Corliss, William R

    1967-01-01

    This booklet relates how wires, transistors, and human ingenuity are combined to produce machines that surpass all the calculating prodigies that ever lived in speed, accuracy, and stamina, though perhaps not in the matter of mystery.

  11. The REV-ERBs and RORs: molecular links between circadian rhythms and lipid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Solt, Laura A; Kojetin, Douglas J; Burris, Thomas P

    2011-01-01

    Research efforts spanning the past two decades have established a clear link between nuclear receptor function, regulation of the circadian clock and lipid homeostasis. As such, this family of receptors represents an important area of research. Recent advances in the field have identified two nuclear receptor subfamilies, the REV-ERBs and the ‘retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors’ (RORs), as critical regulators of the circadian clock with significant roles in lipid homeostasis. In this review, the latest information garnered from cutting-edge research on these two nuclear receptor subfamilies will be discussed. Through direct targeting of the REV-ERBs and RORs with synthetic ligands, generation of novel tools aimed at characterizing their function in vivo have been developed, which may lead to novel therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:21526899

  12. Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev., an extremely halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, A.; Ginzburg, M.; Ginzburg, B. Z.; Hochstein, L. I.; Volcani, B. E.

    1990-01-01

    An extremely halophilic red archaebacterium isolated from the Dead Sea (Ginzburg et al., J. Gen. Physiol. 55: 187-207, 1970) belongs to the genus Haloarcula and differs sufficiently from the previously described species of the genus to be designated a new species; we propose the name Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev. because of the close resemblance of this organism to "Halobacterium marismortui," which was first described by Volcani in 1940. The type strain is strain ATCC 43049.

  13. Biophysical Characterization of Nucleophosmin Interactions with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Rev and Herpes Simplex Virus US11

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Kazem; Moll, Jens M.; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Hain, Anika; Dvorsky, Radovan; Amin, Ehsan; Lenders, Michael; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Howe, Sebastian; Smits, Sander H. J.; Hengel, Hartmut; Schmitt, Lutz; Münk, Carsten; Brunsveld, Luc; Ahmadian, Mohammad R.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM1, also known as B23, numatrin or NO38) is a pentameric RNA-binding protein with RNA and protein chaperon functions. NPM1 has increasingly emerged as a potential cellular factor that directly associates with viral proteins; however, the significance of these interactions in each case is still not clear. In this study, we have investigated the physical interaction of NPM1 with both human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev and Herpes Simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) US11, two functionally homologous proteins. Both viral proteins show, in mechanistically different modes, high affinity for a binding site on the N-terminal oligomerization domain of NPM1. Rev, additionally, exhibits low-affinity for the central histone-binding domain of NPM1. We also showed that the proapoptotic cyclic peptide CIGB-300 specifically binds to NPM1 oligomerization domain and blocks its association with Rev and US11. Moreover, HIV-1 virus production was significantly reduced in the cells treated with CIGB-300. Results of this study suggest that targeting NPM1 may represent a useful approach for antiviral intervention. PMID:26624888

  14. Chimeric RNase H–Competent Oligonucleotides Directed to the HIV-1 Rev Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Prater, Chrissy E.; Saleh, Anthony D.; Wear, Maggie P.; Miller, Paul S.

    2007-01-01

    Chimeric oligo-2′-O-methylribonucleotides containing centrally located patches of contiguous 2′-deoxyribonucleotides and terminating in a nuclease resistant 3′-methylphosphonate internucleotide linkage were prepared. The oligonucleotides were targeted to the 3′-side of HIV Rev response element (RRE) stem-loop IIB RNA, which is adjacent to the high affinity Rev protein binding site and is critical to virus function. Thermal denaturation experiments showed that chimeric oligonucleotides form very stable duplexes with a complementary single-stranded RNA, and gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) showed that they bind with high affinity and specificity to RRE stem-loop II RNA (KD approximately 200 nM). The chimeric oligonucleotides promote RNase H-mediated hydrolysis of RRE stem-loop II RNA and have half lives exceeding 24 h when incubated in cell culture medium containing 10% fetal calf serum. One of the chimeric oligonucleotides inhibited RRE mediated expression of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) approximately 60% at a concentration of 300 nM in HEK 293T cells co-transfected with p-RRE/CAT and p-Rev mammalian expression vectors. PMID:17566743

  15. Potent Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication by an Intracellular Anti-Rev Single-Chain Antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lingxun; Bagasra, Omar; Laughlin, Mark A.; Oakes, Joseph W.; Pomerantz, Roger J.

    1994-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has a complex life cycle, which has made it a difficult target for conventional therapeutic modalities. A single-chain antibody moiety, directed against the HIV-1 regulatory protein Rev, which rescues unspliced viral RNA from the nucleus of infected cells, has now been developed. This anti-Rev single-chain construct (SFv) consists of both light and heavy chain variable regions of an anti-Rev monoclonal antibody, which, when expressed intracellularly within human cells, potently inhibits HIV-1 replication. This intracellular SFv molecule is demonstrated to specifically antagonize Rev function. Thus, intracellular SFv expression, against a retroviral regulatory protein, may be useful as a gene therapeutic approach to combat HIV-1 infections.

  16. Involvement of the Clock Gene Rev-erb alpha in the Regulation of Glucagon Secretion in Pancreatic Alpha-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Elaine; Marroquí, Laura; Figueroa, Ana Lucia C.; Merino, Beatriz; Fernandez-Ruiz, Rebeca; Nadal, Angel; Burris, Thomas P.; Gomis, Ramon; Quesada, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of pancreatic clock genes impairs pancreatic beta-cell function, leading to the onset of diabetes. Despite the importance of pancreatic alpha-cells in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and in diabetes pathophysiology, nothing is known about the role of clock genes in these cells. Here, we identify the clock gene Rev-erb alpha as a new intracellular regulator of glucagon secretion. Rev-erb alpha down-regulation by siRNA (60–70% inhibition) in alphaTC1-9 cells inhibited low-glucose induced glucagon secretion (p<0.05) and led to a decrease in key genes of the exocytotic machinery. The Rev-erb alpha agonist GSK4112 increased glucagon secretion (1.6 fold) and intracellular calcium signals in alphaTC1-9 cells and mouse primary alpha-cells, whereas the Rev-erb alpha antagonist SR8278 produced the opposite effect. At 0.5 mM glucose, alphaTC1-9 cells exhibited intrinsic circadian Rev-erb alpha expression oscillations that were inhibited by 11 mM glucose. In mouse primary alpha-cells, glucose induced similar effects (p<0.001). High glucose inhibited key genes controlled by AMPK such as Nampt, Sirt1 and PGC-1 alpha in alphaTC1-9 cells (p<0.05). AMPK activation by metformin completely reversed the inhibitory effect of glucose on Nampt-Sirt1-PGC-1 alpha and Rev-erb alpha. Nampt inhibition decreased Sirt1, PGC-1 alpha and Rev-erb alpha mRNA expression (p<0.01) and glucagon release (p<0.05). These findings identify Rev-erb alpha as a new intracellular regulator of glucagon secretion via AMPK/Nampt/Sirt1 pathway. PMID:23936124

  17. HIV-1 Rev protein specifies the viral RNA export pathway by suppressing TAP/NXF1 recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Ichiro; Mabuchi, Naoto; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear RNA export pathways in eukaryotes are often linked to the fate of a given RNA. Therefore, the choice of export pathway should be well-controlled to avoid an unfavorable effect on gene expression. Although some RNAs could be exported by more than one pathway, little is known about how the choice is regulated. This issue is highlighted when the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev protein induces the export of singly spliced and unspliced HIV-1 transcripts. How these RNAs are exported is not well understood because such transcripts should have the possibility of utilizing CRM1-dependent export via Rev or cellular TAP/NXF1-dependent export via the transcription/export (TREX) complex, or both. Here we found that Rev suppressed TAP/NXF1-dependent export of model RNA substrates that recapitulated viral transcripts. In this effect, Rev interacted with the cap-binding complex and inhibited the recruitment of the TREX complex. Thus, Rev controls the identity of the factor occupying the cap-proximal region that determines the RNA export pathway. This ribonucleoprotein remodeling activity of Rev may favor viral gene expression. PMID:24753416

  18. Creating a Community Coalition to Prevent Childhood Obesity in Yakima County, Washington: Rev It Up! 2008

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jessica; Bindler, Ruth C.; Miller, Kris

    2012-01-01

    Background One-third of the US population is obese, and childhood obesity has tripled since the late 1970s. Childhood obesity is a significant health issue requiring interventions on individual, interpersonal, community, organizational, and policy levels. Community coalitions offer successful strategies for engaging community partners with health improvement goals. Community Context In 2008, Yakima County, an agricultural community in eastern Washington, was ranked the eighth fattest city in the United States. Recognizing the obesity problem, the Yakima Health District (YHD) established 2 objectives: to decrease rates of childhood obesity in Yakima County and to recruit and establish a community coalition of key stakeholders and experts to help address the problem. Methods The YHD spearheaded a movement to create a community coalition. The coalition applied for and received state and federal grants. In September 2008, the YHD held the first recruitment event for Rev It Up!, its community-based effort to address the obesity problem in Yakima. YHD invited the Washington State Department of Health to advise the coalition-building and action-planning process. Outcome The community coalition achieved 5 of 7 objectives, including developing a common vision, creating an advisory committee, and conducting a community inventory, prioritization process, and action plan. However, unexpected public health challenges in the YHD delayed coalition efforts. Interpretation Creating the Rev It Up! coalition met a community need and engaged community partners. Some potential partners were dissuaded by the 6-month period required to establish the coalition. Rev It Up! continues as a community effort to reduce rates of obesity in Yakima County. PMID:22765932

  19. Determinants of G quadruplex-induced epigenetic instability in REV1-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Schiavone, Davide; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Murat, Pierre; Papadopoulou, Charikleia; Sarkies, Peter; Prioleau, Marie-Noëlle; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Sale, Julian E

    2014-01-01

    REV1-deficient chicken DT40 cells are compromised in replicating G quadruplex (G4)-forming DNA. This results in localised, stochastic loss of parental chromatin marks and changes in gene expression. We previously proposed that this epigenetic instability arises from G4-induced replication fork stalls disrupting the accurate propagation of chromatin structure through replication. Here, we test this model by showing that a single G4 motif is responsible for the epigenetic instability of the BU-1 locus in REV1-deficient cells, despite its location 3.5 kb from the transcription start site (TSS). The effect of the G4 is dependent on it residing on the leading strand template, but is independent of its in vitro thermal stability. Moving the motif to more than 4 kb from the TSS stabilises expression of the gene. However, loss of histone modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K9/14ac) around the transcription start site correlates with the position of the G4 motif, expression being lost only when the promoter is affected. This supports the idea that processive replication is required to maintain the histone modification pattern and full transcription of this model locus. PMID:25190518

  20. Computational investigation of the HIV-1 Rev multimerization using molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Venken, Tom; Daelemans, Dirk; De Maeyer, Marc; Voet, Arnout

    2012-06-01

    The HIV Rev protein mediates the nuclear export of viral mRNA, and is thereby essential for the production of late viral proteins in the replication cycle. Rev forms a large organized multimeric protein-protein complex for proper functioning. Recently, the three-dimensional structures of a Rev dimer and tetramer have been resolved and provide the basis for a thorough structural analysis of the binding interaction. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) and binding free energy calculations were performed to elucidate the forces thriving dimerization and higher order multimerization of the Rev protein. It is found that despite the structural differences between each crystal structure, both display a similar behavior according to our calculations. Our analysis based on a molecular mechanics-generalized Born surface area (MM/GBSA) and a configurational entropy approach demonstrates that the higher order multimerization site is much weaker than the dimerization site. In addition, a quantitative hot spot analysis combined with a mutational analysis reveals the most contributing amino acid residues for protein interactions in agreement with experimental results. Additional residues were found in each interface, which are important for the protein interaction. The investigation of the thermodynamics of the Rev multimerization interactions performed here could be a further step in the development of novel antiretrovirals using structure based drug design. Moreover, the variability of the angle between each Rev monomer as measured during the MD simulations suggests a role of the Rev protein in allowing flexibility of the arginine rich domain (ARM) to accommodate RNA binding. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. REV-ERB-ALPHA circadian gene variant associates with obesity in two independent populations: Mediterranean and North American.

    PubMed

    Garaulet, Marta; Smith, Caren E; Gomez-Abellán, Purificación; Ordovás-Montañés, María; Lee, Yu-Chi; Parnell, Laurence D; Arnett, Donna K; Ordovás, José M

    2014-04-01

    Despite the solid connection between REV-ERB and obesity, the information about whether genetic variations at this locus may be associated with obesity traits is scarce. Therefore our objective was to study the association between REV-ERB-ALPHA1 rs2314339 and obesity in two independent populations. Participants were 2214 subjects from Spanish Mediterranean (n = 1404) and North American (n = 810) populations. Anthropometric, biochemical, dietary, and genotype analyses were performed. We found novel associations between the REV-ERB-ALPHA1 rs2314339 genotype and obesity in two independent populations: in Spanish Mediterranean and North American groups, the frequency of the minor-allele-carriers (AA+ AG) was significantly lower in the "abdominally obese" group than in those of the "nonabdominally obese" group (p < 0.05). Minor allele carriers had lower probability of abdominal obesity than noncarriers, and the effect was of similar magnitude for both populations (OR ≈ 1.50). There were consistent associations between REV-ERB-ALPHA1 genotype and obesity-related traits (p < 0.05). Energy intake was not significantly associated with REV-ERB-ALPHA1 rs2314339. However, physical activity significantly differed by genotype. A significant interaction between the REV-ERB-ALPHA1 variant and monounsaturated-fatty-acids (MUFA) intake for obesity was also detected in the Mediterranean population. This new discovery highlights the importance of REV-ERB-ALPHA1 in obesity and provides evidence for the connection between our biological clock and obesity-related traits. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A HIV-1 Tat mutant protein disrupts HIV-1 Rev function by targeting the DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min-Hsuan; Sivakumaran, Haran; Jones, Alun; Li, Dongsheng; Harper, Callista; Wei, Ting; Jin, Hongping; Rustanti, Lina; Meunier, Frederic A; Spann, Kirsten; Harrich, David

    2014-12-14

    Previously we described a transdominant negative mutant of the HIV-1 Tat protein, termed Nullbasic, that downregulated the steady state levels of unspliced and singly spliced viral mRNA, an activity caused by inhibition of HIV-1 Rev activity. Nullbasic also altered the subcellular localizations of Rev and other cellular proteins, including CRM1, B23 and C23 in a Rev-dependent manner, suggesting that Nullbasic may disrupt Rev function and trafficking by intervening with an unidentified component of the Rev nucleocytoplasmic transport complex. To seek a possible mechanism that could explain how Nullbasic inhibits Rev activity, we used a proteomics approach to identify host cellular proteins that interact with Nullbasic. Forty-six Nullbasic-binding proteins were identified by mass spectrometry including the DEAD-box RNA helicase, DDX1. To determine the effect of DDX1 on Nullbasic-mediated Rev activity, we performed cell-based immunoprecipitation assays, Rev reporter assays and bio-layer interferometry (BLI) assays. Interaction between DDX1 and Nullbasic was observed by co-immunoprecipitation of Nullbasic with endogenous DDX1 from cell lysates. BLI assays showed a direct interaction between Nullbasic and DDX1. Nullbasic affected DDX1 subcellular distribution in a Rev-independent manner. Interestingly overexpression of DDX1 in cells not only restored Rev-dependent mRNA export and gene expression in a Rev reporter assay but also partly reversed Nullbasic-induced Rev subcellular mislocalization. Moreover, HIV-1 wild type Tat co-immunoprecipitated with DDX1 and overexpression of Tat could rescue the unspliced viral mRNA levels inhibited by Nullbasic in HIV-1 expressing cells. Nullbasic was used to further define the complex mechanisms involved in the Rev-dependent nuclear export of the 9 kb and 4 kb viral RNAs. All together, these data indicate that DDX1 can be sequestered by Nullbasic leading to destabilization of the Rev nucleocytoplasmic transport complex and decreased

  3. Human protein Staufen-2 promotes HIV-1 proliferation by positively regulating RNA export activity of viral protein Rev.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Atoshi; Benjamin, Ronald; Balakrishnan, Kannan; Ghosh, Payel; Banerjee, Sharmistha

    2014-02-13

    The export of intron containing viral RNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is an essential step in the life cycle of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1). As the eukaryotic system does not permit the transport of intron containing RNA out of the nucleus, HIV-1 makes a regulatory protein, Rev, that mediates the transportation of unspliced and partially spliced viral mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, thereby playing a decisive role in the generation of new infectious virus particles. Therefore, the host factors modulating the RNA export activity of Rev can be major determinants of virus production in an infected cell. In this study, human Staufen-2 (hStau-2) was identified as a host factor interacting with HIV-1 Rev through affinity chromatography followed by MALDI analyses. Our experiments involving transient expressions, siRNA mediated knockdowns and infection assays conclusively established that hStau-2 is a positive regulator of HIV-1 pathogenesis. We demonstrated that Rev-hStau-2 interactions positively regulated the RNA export activity of Rev and promoted progeny virus synthesis. The Rev-hStau-2 interaction was independent of RNA despite both being RNA binding proteins. hStau-2 mutant, with mutations at Q314R-A318F-K319E, deficient of binding Rev, failed to promote hStau-2 dependent Rev activity and viral production, validating the essentiality of this protein-protein interaction. The expression of this positive regulator was elevated upon HIV-1 infection in both human T-lymphocyte and astrocyte cell lines. With this study, we establish that human Staufen-2, a host factor which is up-regulated upon HIV-1 infection, interacts with HIV-1 Rev, thereby promoting its RNA export activity and progeny virus formation. Altogether, our study provides new insights into the emerging role of the Staufen family of mRNA transporters in host-pathogen interaction and supports the notion that obliterating interactions between viral and host proteins that positively

  4. LLNL Radiation Protection Program (RPP) Rev 9.2, Implementation of 10 CFR 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection'

    SciTech Connect

    Shingleton, K. L.

    2011-06-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE) originally issued Part 10 CFR 835, Occupational Radiation Protection, on January 1, 1994. This regulation, hereafter referred to as “the Rule”, required DOE contractors to develop and maintain a DOE-approved Radiation Protection Program (RPP); DOE approved the initial Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) RPP (Rev 2) on 6/29/95. DOE issued a revision to the Rule on December 4, 1998 and approved LLNL’s revised RPP (Rev 7.1) on 11/18/99. DOE issued a second Rule revision on June 8, 2007 (effective July 9, 2007) and on June 13, 2008 approved LLNL’s RPP (Rev 9.0) which contained plansmore » and measures for coming into compliance with the 2007 Rule changes. DOE issued a correction to the Rule on April 21, 2009.« less

  5. Numerical modelling of powder caking at REV scale by using DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guessasma, Mohamed; Silva Tavares, Homayra; Afrassiabian, Zahra; Saleh, Khashayar

    2017-06-01

    This work deals with numerical simulation of powder caking process caused by capillary condensation phenomenon. Caking consists in unwanted agglomeration of powder particles. This process is often irreversible and not easy to predict. To reproduce mechanism involved by caking phenomenon we have used the Discrete Elements Method (DEM). In the present work, we mainly focus on the role of capillary condensation and subsequent liquid bridge formation within a granular medium exposed to fluctuations of ambient relative humidity. Such bridges cause an attractive force between particles, leading to the formation of a cake with intrinsic physicochemical and mechanical properties. By considering a Representative Elementary Volume (REV), the DEM is then performed by means of a MULTICOR-3D software tacking into account the properties of the cake (degree of saturation) in order to establish relationships between the microscopic parameters and the macroscopic behaviour (tensile strength).

  6. Temperature inducible β-sheet structure in the transactivation domains of retroviral regulatory proteins of the Rev family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumb, Werner; Graf, Christine; Parslow, Tristram; Schneider, Rainer; Auer, Manfred

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory protein Rev with cellular cofactors is crucial for the viral life cycle. The HIV-1 Rev transactivation domain is functionally interchangeable with analog regions of Rev proteins of other retroviruses suggesting common folding patterns. In order to obtain experimental evidence for similar structural features mediating protein-protein contacts we investigated activation domain peptides from HIV-1, HIV-2, VISNA virus, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) by CD spectroscopy, secondary structure prediction and sequence analysis. Although different in polarity and hydrophobicity, all peptides showed a similar behavior with respect to solution conformation, concentration dependence and variations in ionic strength and pH. Temperature studies revealed an unusual induction of β-structure with rising temperatures in all activation domain peptides. The high stability of β-structure in this region was demonstrated in three different peptides of the activation domain of HIV-1 Rev in solutions containing 40% hexafluoropropanol, a reagent usually known to induce α-helix into amino acid sequences. Sequence alignments revealed similarities between the polar effector domains from FIV and EIAV and the leucine rich (hydrophobic) effector domains found in HIV-1, HIV-2 and VISNA. Studies on activation domain peptides of two dominant negative HIV-1 Rev mutants, M10 and M32, pointed towards different reasons for the biological behavior. Whereas the peptide containing the M10 mutation (L 78E 79→D 78L 79) showed wild-type structure, the M32 mutant peptide (L 78L 81L 83→A 78A 81A 83) revealed a different protein fold to be the reason for the disturbed binding to cellular cofactors. From our data, we conclude, that the activation domain of Rev proteins from different viral origins adopt a similar fold and that a β-structural element is involved in binding to a

  7. Roles of Rev1, Pol ζ, Pol32 and Pol η in the bypass of chromosomal abasic sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Paul A.; Demple, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) on DNA is a process by which potentially cytotoxic replication-blocking lesions are bypassed, but at the risk of increased mutagenesis. The exact in vivo role of the individual TLS enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been difficult to determine from previous studies due to differing results from the variety of systems used. We have generated a series of S.cerevisiae strains in which each of the TLS-related genes REV1, REV3, REV7, RAD30 and POL32 was deleted, and in which chromosomal apyrimidinic sites were generated during normal cell growth by the activity of altered forms of human uracil-DNA glycosylase that remove undamaged cytosines or thymines. Deletion of REV1, REV3 or REV7 resulted in slower growth dependent on (rev3Δ and rev7Δ) or enhanced by (rev1Δ) expression of the mutator glycosylases and a nearly complete abolition of glycosylase-induced mutagenesis. Deletion of POL32 resulted in cell death when the mutator glycosylases were expressed and, in their absence, diminished spontaneous mutagenesis. RAD30 appeared to be unnecessary for mutagenesis in response to abasic sites, as deleting this gene caused no significant change in either the mutation rates or the mutational spectra due to glycosylase expression. PMID:19901007

  8. Conjunctival vaccination of pregnant ewes and goats with Brucella melitensis Rev 1 vaccine: safety and serological responses.

    PubMed

    Zundel, E; Verger, J M; Grayon, M; Michel, R

    1992-01-01

    When Brucella melitensis strain Rev 1 vaccine (Rev 1) is administered by the standard method (1-2 x 10(9) viable bacteria injected subcutaneously), it may induce long-lasting serological responses and/or cause abortion in pregnant animals. The conjunctival route considerably reduces these drawbacks. In the present experiment a 1 x 10(8) CFU dose for both ewes and goats conjunctivally vaccinated at mid-pregnancy was tested for innocuousness (outcome of pregnancy, contamination of unvaccinated contact animals, duration of serological responses) in comparison with 3 x 10(8) CFU (ewes and goats), 1 x 10(9) and 3 x 10(9) CFU (ewes) doses. No reaction was observed at the time of vaccination, and the risk of environmental contamination with Rev 1, due to the conjunctival administration of the vaccine, is negligible. Abortions occurred later at surprisingly severe rates (over 60% of pregnant vaccinated animals), except in the 1 x 10(8) CFU ewes group (20%). Moreover, the serological reactions of the 1 x 10(8) CFU ewes which normally lambed were negative again as early as 12 weeks after vaccination. Although the dose of 1 x 10(8) CFU Rev 1 was safer for pregnancy than the standard dose mainly in ewes as compared to goats, the innocuousness was not yet sufficient to propose the former dose to indiscriminately vaccinate sheep and goats by the conjunctival route, whatever the age or physiological status.

  9. 78 FR 63964 - Request for Comments on Draft NIST Interagency Report (NISTIR) 7628 Rev. 1, Guidelines for Smart...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Grid Cyber Security AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Department of... and Technology (NIST) seeks comments on draft NISTIR 7628 Rev. 1, Guidelines for Smart Grid Cyber... (formerly the Cyber Security Working Group) of the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel. The document has been...

  10. A Comprehensive Experiment for Molecular Biology: Determination of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Human REV3 Gene Using PCR-RFLP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xu; Shao, Meng; Gao, Lu; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Sun, Zixuan; Zhou, Liping; Yan, Yongmin; Shao, Qixiang; Xu, Wenrong; Qian, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory exercise is helpful for medical students to understand the basic principles of molecular biology and to learn about the practical applications of molecular biology. We have designed a lab course on molecular biology about the determination of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in human REV3 gene, the product of which is a subunit of…

  11. 76 FR 13449 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Revenue Procedure 2009-41 (Rev. Proc. 2002-59 Is...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Classification Elections. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before May 10, 2011 to be assured of... Classification Elections. OMB Number: 1545-1771. Revenue Procedure Number: Revenue Procedure 2009-41. (Rev. Proc... Internal Revenue Code for an eligible entity that requests relief for a late classification election filed...

  12. Stochastic Models of Macroscale Quantities for the Prediction of the REV Scale for Multiphase Flow through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, C.; McClure, J. E.; Armstrong, R. T.; Mostaghimi, P.; Hu, Y.; Miller, C. T.

    2017-12-01

    Microscale experimental and computational methods can be used to evaluate fundamental microscale mechanisms and deduce macroscale constitutive relationships and parameter values. The link between the microscale and the macroscale is especially demanding, because technical issues arise regarding the necessary scale of the system needed for a meaningful set of macroscale measures to be insensitive to the size of the system, which is known as a representative elementary volume (REV). While the REV scale is routinely determined for single-phase flow in porous media, no systematic study of the scale of a REV for the comprehensive set of macroscale measures considered here has been reported in the literature. A comprehensive set of measures of the macroscale state is developed. We further develop and apply methods to predict the REV scale and quantify the uncertainty of the estimate for this set of macroscale quantities. We model the system state in terms of standard errors of macroscale quantities as a multivariate Gaussian process dependent on the size of the domain simulated. We determine predictive distributions of function values and a posterior distributions of weights using standard kernels, as well as a kernel constructed using relationships between physical quantities. For each kernel, we discuss the decay of the mean and covariance with increasing domain size, and use cross-validation to facilitate model selection. The procedure yields a model of the domain size needed to achieve a REV with quantifiable uncertainty. We present results in the context of multiphase fluid flow through a highly resolved realization of sandstone imaged using micro-CT. A 1440x1440x4320 section of the full 2520x2520x5280 imaged medium is simulated using the lattice-Boltzmann method. We compare the fidelity of the predictive model with results obtained by an analogous approach using polynomial regression.

  13. The Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA)-interacting Protein (PIP) Motif of DNA Polymerase η Mediates Its Interaction with the C-terminal Domain of Rev1*

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Elizabeth M.; Powers, Kyle T.; Kondratick, Christine M.; Spies, Maria; Houtman, Jon C. D.; Washington, M. Todd

    2016-01-01

    Y-family DNA polymerases, such as polymerase η, polymerase ι, and polymerase κ, catalyze the bypass of DNA damage during translesion synthesis. These enzymes are recruited to sites of DNA damage by interacting with the essential replication accessory protein proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and the scaffold protein Rev1. In most Y-family polymerases, these interactions are mediated by one or more conserved PCNA-interacting protein (PIP) motifs that bind in a hydrophobic pocket on the front side of PCNA as well as by conserved Rev1-interacting region (RIR) motifs that bind in a hydrophobic pocket on the C-terminal domain of Rev1. Yeast polymerase η, a prototypical translesion synthesis polymerase, binds both PCNA and Rev1. It possesses a single PIP motif but not an RIR motif. Here we show that the PIP motif of yeast polymerase η mediates its interactions both with PCNA and with Rev1. Moreover, the PIP motif of polymerase η binds in the hydrophobic pocket on the Rev1 C-terminal domain. We also show that the RIR motif of human polymerase κ and the PIP motif of yeast Msh6 bind both PCNA and Rev1. Overall, these findings demonstrate that PIP motifs and RIR motifs have overlapping specificities and can interact with both PCNA and Rev1 in structurally similar ways. These findings also suggest that PIP motifs are a more versatile protein interaction motif than previously believed. PMID:26903512

  14. Public Data Set: Erratum: "Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment" [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Burke, Marcus G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000176193724); Fonck, Raymond J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000294386762); Bongard, Michael W. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000231609746); Schlossberg, David J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000287139448); Winz, Gregory R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000177627184)

    2016-07-18

    This data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data corresponding to figures published in M.G. Burke et al., 'Erratum: "Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment" [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012)],' Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, 079902 (2016).

  15. Domain- and nucleotide-specific Rev response element regulation of feline immunodeficiency virus production

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hong; Huisman, Willem; Ellestad, Kristofor K.; Phillips, Tom R.; Power, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Computational analysis of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) RNA sequences indicated that common FIV strains contain a rev response element (RRE) defined by a long unbranched hairpin with 6 stem-loop sub-domains, termed stem-loop A (SLA). To examine the role of the RNA secondary structure of the RRE, mutational analyses were performed in both an infectious FIV molecular clone and a FIV CAT-RRE reporter system. These studies disclosed that the stems within SLA (SA1, 2, 3, 4, and 5) of the RRE were critical but SA6 was not essential for FIV replication and CAT expression. These studies also revealed that the secondary structure rather than an antisense protein (ASP) mediates virus expression and replication in vitro. In addition, a single synonymous mutation within the FIV-RRE, SA3/45, reduced viral reverse transcriptase activity and p24 expression after transfection but in addition also showed a marked reduction in viral expression and production following infection. PMID:20570310

  16. In Vitro Metabolic Studies of REV-ERB Agonists SR9009 and SR9011.

    PubMed

    Geldof, Lore; Deventer, Koen; Roels, Kris; Tudela, Eva; Van Eeno, Peter

    2016-10-03

    SR9009 and SR9011 are attractive as performance-enhancing substances due to their REV-ERB agonist effects and thus circadian rhythm modulation activity. Although no pharmaceutical preparations are available yet, illicit use of SR9009 and SR9011 for doping purposes can be anticipated, especially since SR9009 is marketed in illicit products. Therefore, the aim was to identify potential diagnostic metabolites via in vitro metabolic studies to ensure effective (doping) control. The presence of SR9009 could be demonstrated in a black market product purchased over the Internet. Via human liver microsomal metabolic assays, eight metabolites were detected for SR9009 and fourteen metabolites for SR9011 by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Structure elucidation was performed for all metabolites by LC-HRMS product ion scans in both positive and negative ionization mode. Retrospective data analysis was applied to 1511 doping control samples previously analyzed by a full-scan LC-HRMS screening method to verify the presence of SR9009, SR9011 and their metabolites. So far, the presence of neither the parent compound nor the metabolites could be detected in routine urine samples. However, to further discourage use of these potentially harmful compounds, incorporation of SR9009 and SR9011 into screening methods is highly recommended.

  17. In Vitro Metabolic Studies of REV-ERB Agonists SR9009 and SR9011

    PubMed Central

    Geldof, Lore; Deventer, Koen; Roels, Kris; Tudela, Eva; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    SR9009 and SR9011 are attractive as performance-enhancing substances due to their REV-ERB agonist effects and thus circadian rhythm modulation activity. Although no pharmaceutical preparations are available yet, illicit use of SR9009 and SR9011 for doping purposes can be anticipated, especially since SR9009 is marketed in illicit products. Therefore, the aim was to identify potential diagnostic metabolites via in vitro metabolic studies to ensure effective (doping) control. The presence of SR9009 could be demonstrated in a black market product purchased over the Internet. Via human liver microsomal metabolic assays, eight metabolites were detected for SR9009 and fourteen metabolites for SR9011 by liquid chromatography–high resolution mass spectrometry (LC–HRMS). Structure elucidation was performed for all metabolites by LC–HRMS product ion scans in both positive and negative ionization mode. Retrospective data analysis was applied to 1511 doping control samples previously analyzed by a full-scan LC–HRMS screening method to verify the presence of SR9009, SR9011 and their metabolites. So far, the presence of neither the parent compound nor the metabolites could be detected in routine urine samples. However, to further discourage use of these potentially harmful compounds, incorporation of SR9009 and SR9011 into screening methods is highly recommended. PMID:27706103

  18. E4bp4 regulates carboxylesterase 2 enzymes through repression of the nuclear receptor Rev-erbα in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mengjing; Zhang, Tianpeng; Yu, Fangjun; Guo, Lianxia; Wu, Baojian

    2018-06-01

    Carboxylesterases (CES) are a family of phase I enzymes that play an important role in xenobiotic clearance and lipid metabolism. Here, we investigate a potential role of E4 promoter-binding protein 4 (E4bp4) in regulation of Ces and CPT-11 (irinotecan, a first-line drug for treating colorectal cancer) pharmacokinetics in mice. Mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells were transfected with Rev-erbα expression plasmid or siRNA targeting E4bp4. The relative mRNA and protein levels of Ces enzymes in the cells or the livers of wild-type and E4bp4-deficient (E4bp4 -/- ) mice were determined by qPCR and Western blotting, respectively. Transcriptional regulation of Ces by E4bp4/Rev-erbα were investigated using luciferase reporter, mobility shift, and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed with wild-type and E4bp4 -/- mice after intraperitoneal injection of CPT-11. E4bp4 ablation down-regulated an array of hepatic Ces genes in mice. E4bp4 -/- mice also showed reduced Ces-mediated metabolism and elevated systemic exposure of CPT-11, a well-known Ces substrate. Consistently, E4bp4 knockdown reduced the expression of Ces genes (Ces2b, Ces2e and Ces2f) in Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Furthermore, Rev-erbα repressed the transcription of Ces2b, whereas E4bp4 antagonized this repressive action. Co-IP experiment confirmed a direct interaction between E4bp4 and Rev-erbα. Through a combination of promoter analysis and mobility shift assays, we demonstrated that Rev-erbα trans-repressed Ces (Ces2b) through its specific binding to the -767 to-754 bp promoter region. In conclusion, E4bp4 regulates Ces enzymes through inhibition of the transrepression activity of Rev-erbα, thereby impacting the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of Ces substrates. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mapping Wind Farm Loads and Power Production - A Case Study on Horns Rev 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinos, Christos; Dimitrov, Nikolay; Larsen, Torben J.; Natarajan, Anand; Hansen, Kurt S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the development of a wind turbine (WT) component lifetime fatigue load variation map within an offshore wind farm. A case study on the offshore wind farm Horns Rev I is conducted with this purpose, by quantifying wake effects using the Dynamic Wake Meandering (DWM) method, which has previously been validated based on CFD, Lidar and full scale load measurements. Fully coupled aeroelastic load simulations using turbulent wind conditions are conducted for all wind directions and mean wind speeds between cut-in and cut-out using site specific turbulence level measurements. Based on the mean wind speed and direction distribution, the representative 20-year lifetime fatigue loads are calculated. It is found that the heaviest loaded WT is not the same when looking at blade root, tower top or tower base components. The blade loads are mainly dominated by the wake situations above rated wind speed and the highest loaded blades are in the easternmost row as the dominating wind direction is from West. Regarding the tower components, the highest loaded WTs are also located towards the eastern central location. The turbines with highest power production are, not surprisingly, the ones facing a free sector towards west and south. The power production results of few turbines are compared with SCADA data. The results of this paper are expected to have significance for operation and maintenance planning, where the schedules for inspection and service activities can be adjusted to the requirements arising from the varying fatigue levels. Furthermore, the results can be used in the context of remaining fatigue lifetime assessment and planning of decommissioning.

  20. NES consensus redefined by structures of PKI-type and Rev-type nuclear export signals bound to CRM1.

    PubMed

    Güttler, Thomas; Madl, Tobias; Neumann, Piotr; Deichsel, Danilo; Corsini, Lorenzo; Monecke, Thomas; Ficner, Ralf; Sattler, Michael; Görlich, Dirk

    2010-11-01

    Classic nuclear export signals (NESs) confer CRM1-dependent nuclear export. Here we present crystal structures of the RanGTP-CRM1 complex alone and bound to the prototypic PKI or HIV-1 Rev NESs. These NESs differ markedly in the spacing of their key hydrophobic (Φ) residues, yet CRM1 recognizes them with the same rigid set of five Φ pockets. The different Φ spacings are compensated for by different conformations of the bound NESs: in the case of PKI, an α-helical conformation, and in the case of Rev, an extended conformation with a critical proline docking into a Φ pocket. NMR analyses of CRM1-bound and CRM1-free PKI NES suggest that CRM1 selects NES conformers that pre-exist in solution. Our data lead to a new structure-based NES consensus, and explain why NESs differ in their affinities for CRM1 and why supraphysiological NESs bind the exportin so tightly.

  1. Transdominant Rev and Protease Mutant Proteins of HIV-SIV as Potential Antiviral Agents in Vitro and in Vivo (AIDS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-30

    hammerhead ribozymes (7-9) and a hairpin ribozyme (10) directed against HIV-l RNA has been shown to confer significant resistance to HIV-I infection...antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) directed to the Rev Response Element (RRE) and ribozymes that target viral mRNAs. The ribozyme approach, in...particular, has yielded extremely encouraging positive data. We showed that a hairpin ribozyme designed to cleave HIV-1 RNA in the 5’ leader sequence

  2. Treatment with the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide influences the appearance of mutations in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 regulatory protein rev.

    PubMed

    Svicher, Valentina; Alteri, Claudia; D'Arrigo, Roberta; Laganà, Alessandro; Trignetti, Maria; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Callegaro, Anna Paola; Maggiolo, Franco; Mazzotta, Francesco; Ferro, Alfredo; Dimonte, Salvatore; Aquaro, Stefano; di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano; Tommasi, Chiara; Trotta, Maria Paola; Narciso, Pasquale; Antinori, Andrea; Perno, Carlo Federico; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca

    2009-07-01

    The gp41-encoding sequence of the env gene contains in two separate regions the Rev-responsive elements (RRE) and the alternative open reading frame of the second exon of the regulatory protein Rev. The binding of Rev to the RRE allows the transport of unspliced/singly spliced viral mRNAs out of the nucleus, an essential step in the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In this study, we have investigated whether the fusion-inhibitor enfuvirtide (ENF) can induce mutations in Rev and if these mutations correlate with the classical ENF resistance gp41 mutations and with viremia and CD4 cell count. Specific Rev mutations were positively associated with ENF treatment and significantly correlated with classical ENF resistance gp41 mutations. In particular, a cluster was observed for the Rev mutations E57A (E57A(rev)) and N86S(rev) with the ENF resistance gp41 mutations Q40H (Q40H(gp41)) and L45M(gp41). In addition, the presence at week 48 of the E57A(rev) correlates with a significant viremia increase from baseline to week 48 and with a CD4 cell count loss from baseline to week 48. By modeling the RRE structure, we found that the Q40(gp41) and L45(gp41) codons form complementary base pairs in a region of the RRE involved in Rev binding. The conformation of this Rev-binding site is disrupted when Q40H(gp41) and L45M(gp41) occur alone while it is restored when both mutations are present. In conclusion, our study shows that ENF pressure may also affect both Rev and RRE structures and can provide an excellent example of compensatory evolution. This highlights the multiple roles of ENF (and perhaps other entry inhibitors) in modulating the correct interplay between the different HIV-1 genes and proteins during the HIV-1 life cycle.

  3. Addendum: New approach to the resummation of logarithms in Higgs-boson decays to a vector quarkonium plus a photon [Phys. Rev. D 95, 054018 (2017)

    DOE PAGES

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T.; Chung, Hee Sok; Ee, June-Haak; ...

    2017-12-20

    In this addendum to Phys. Rev. D 95, 054018 (2017) we recompute the rates for the decays of the Higgs boson to a vector quarkonium plus a photon, where the vector quarkonium is J/psi, Upsilon(1S) Upsilon(2S). We correct an error in the Abel-Pad'e summation formula that was used to carry out the evolution of the quarkonium light-cone distribution amplitude in Phys. Rev. D 95, 054018 (2017). We also correct an error in the scale of quarkonium wave function at the origin in Phys. Rev. D 95, 054018 (2017) and introduce several additional refinements in the calculation.

  4. Addendum: New approach to the resummation of logarithms in Higgs-boson decays to a vector quarkonium plus a photon [Phys. Rev. D 95, 054018 (2017)

    SciTech Connect

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T.; Chung, Hee Sok; Ee, June-Haak

    In this addendum to Phys. Rev. D 95, 054018 (2017) we recompute the rates for the decays of the Higgs boson to a vector quarkonium plus a photon, where the vector quarkonium is J/psi, Upsilon(1S) Upsilon(2S). We correct an error in the Abel-Pad'e summation formula that was used to carry out the evolution of the quarkonium light-cone distribution amplitude in Phys. Rev. D 95, 054018 (2017). We also correct an error in the scale of quarkonium wave function at the origin in Phys. Rev. D 95, 054018 (2017) and introduce several additional refinements in the calculation.

  5. Cooperativity among Rev-Associated Nuclear Export Signals Regulates HIV-1 Gene Expression and Is a Determinant of Virus Species Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Aligeti, Mounavya; Behrens, Ryan T.; Pocock, Ginger M.; Schindelin, Johannes; Dietz, Christian; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Swanson, Chad M.; Malim, Michael H.; Ahlquist, Paul

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Murine cells exhibit a profound block to HIV-1 virion production that was recently mapped to a species-specific structural attribute of the murine version of the chromosomal region maintenance 1 (mCRM1) nuclear export receptor and rescued by the expression of human CRM1 (hCRM1). In human cells, the HIV-1 Rev protein recruits hCRM1 to intron-containing viral mRNAs encoding the Rev response element (RRE), thereby facilitating viral late gene expression. Here we exploited murine 3T3 fibroblasts as a gain-of-function system to study hCRM1's species-specific role in regulating Rev's effector functions. We show that Rev is rapidly exported from the nucleus by mCRM1 despite only weak contributions to HIV-1's posttranscriptional stages. Indeed, Rev preferentially accumulates in the cytoplasm of murine 3T3 cells with or without hCRM1 expression, in contrast to human HeLa cells, where Rev exhibits striking en masse transitions between the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. Efforts to bias Rev's trafficking either into or out of the nucleus revealed that Rev encoding a second CRM1 binding domain (Rev-2xNES) or Rev-dependent viral gag-pol mRNAs bearing tandem RREs (GP-2xRRE), rescue virus particle production in murine cells even in the absence of hCRM1. Combined, these results suggest a model wherein Rev-associated nuclear export signals cooperate to regulate the number or quality of CRM1's interactions with viral Rev/RRE ribonucleoprotein complexes in the nucleus. This mechanism regulates CRM1-dependent viral gene expression and is a determinant of HIV-1's capacity to produce virions in nonhuman cell types. IMPORTANCE Cells derived from mice and other nonhuman species exhibit profound blocks to HIV-1 replication. Here we elucidate a block to HIV-1 gene expression attributable to the murine version of the CRM1 (mCRM1) nuclear export receptor. In human cells, hCRM1 regulates the nuclear export of viral intron-containing mRNAs through the activity of the viral Rev

  6. Rev-binding aptamer and CMV promoter act as decoys to inhibit HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Konopka, K; Lee, N S; Rossi, J; Düzgüneş, N

    2000-09-19

    We examined whether the antiviral effect of an HIV-1 Rev-binding aptamer [RBE(apt)] could be enhanced by a ribozyme directed against the HIV-1 env gene, and whether the antiviral activity was affected by different promoters. The efficacy of the aptamer and ribozyme DNAs was tested in HeLa cells co-transfected with the HIV-1 proviral clones, HXBDeltaBgl or pNL4-3, using transferrin-lipoplexes. The RBE(apt) and anti-env ribozyme genes were inserted into the pTZU6+27 plasmid, or constructed under the control of the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) or Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) promoters. The parental vector plasmids were used as controls. Co-transfection of the pTZU6+27 RBE(apt) plasmid with HXBDeltaBgl, or pNL4-3, at a weight ratio of 5:1, inhibited p24 production by 70 and 45%, respectively. The RSV RBE(apt) plasmid co-transfected with either HIV clone, at the same weight ratio, reduced viral production by 88%. The addition of the anti-env ribozyme to the RSV RBE(apt) did not enhance its antiviral activity. When the constructs were under the control of the CMV promoter, the expression of the HIV plasmids was very low and was independent of the presence of the RBE(apt). Thus, the effect of the RBE(apt) was strongly dependent on the promoter of the tested construct. The anti-HIV activity of the CMV RBE(apt) construct was non-specific, because co-transfection with either pCMV. SPORT-betagal or pCMVlacZ significantly suppressed HIV production from the HIV proviral clones. The reduction in p24 could not be attributed to the non-specific toxicity of the transfection procedure. Transfection of acutely HIV-infected HeLa-CD4 cells with pCMV.SPORT-betagal reduced the p24 level by 35%, while the expression of the U6 RBE(apt) did not affect p24 production. The suppression of HIV production from the HIV proviral clones by the CMV promoter constructs in the co-transfection assays may be explained by competition for transcription factors (TFs) between HIV and CMV promoters. This

  7. Tissue damage drives co-localization of NF-κB, Smad3, and Nrf2 to direct Rev-erb sensitive wound repair in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Eichenfield, Dawn Z; Troutman, Ty Dale; Link, Verena M; Lam, Michael T; Cho, Han; Gosselin, David; Spann, Nathanael J; Lesch, Hanna P; Tao, Jenhan; Muto, Jun; Gallo, Richard L; Evans, Ronald M; Glass, Christopher K

    2016-01-01

    Although macrophages can be polarized to distinct phenotypes in vitro with individual ligands, in vivo they encounter multiple signals that control their varied functions in homeostasis, immunity, and disease. Here, we identify roles of Rev-erb nuclear receptors in regulating responses of mouse macrophages to complex tissue damage signals and wound repair. Rather than reinforcing a specific program of macrophage polarization, Rev-erbs repress subsets of genes that are activated by TLR ligands, IL4, TGFβ, and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPS). Unexpectedly, a complex damage signal promotes co-localization of NF-κB, Smad3, and Nrf2 at Rev-erb-sensitive enhancers and drives expression of genes characteristic of multiple polarization states in the same cells. Rev-erb-sensitive enhancers thereby integrate multiple damage-activated signaling pathways to promote a wound repair phenotype. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13024.001 PMID:27462873

  8. Analysis of mutagenic DNA repair in a thermoconditional mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. III. Dose-response pattern of mutation induction in UV-irradiated rev2ts cells.

    PubMed

    Siede, W; Eckardt, F

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies regarding the influence of cycloheximide on the temperature-dependent increase in survival and mutation frequencies of a thermoconditional rev2 mutant lead to the suggestion that the REV2-coded mutagenic repair function is UV-inducible. In the present study we show that stationary-phase rev2ts cells are characterized by a biphasic linear-quadratic dose-dependence of mutation induction ("mutation kinetics") of ochre alleles at 23 degrees C (permissive temperature) but linear kinetics at the restrictive temperature of 36 degrees C. Mathematical analysis using a model based on Poisson statistics and a further mathematical procedure, the calculation of "apparent survival", support the assumption that the quadratic component of the reverse mutation kinetics investigated can be attributed to a UV-inducible component of mutagenic DNA repair controlled by the REV2 gene.

  9. Stimulation of nuclear receptor REV-ERBs regulates tumor necrosis factor-induced expression of proinflammatory molecules in C6 astroglial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morioka, Norimitsu, E-mail: mnori@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Tomori, Mizuki; Zhang, Fang Fang

    Under physiological conditions, astrocytes maintain homeostasis in the CNS. Following inflammation and injury to the CNS, however, activated astrocytes produce neurotoxic molecules such as cytokines and chemokines, amplifying the initial molecular-cellular events evoked by inflammation and injury. Nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ (REV-ERBs) are crucial in the regulation of inflammation- and metabolism-related gene transcription. The current study sought to elucidate a role of REV-ERBs in rat C6 astroglial cells on the expression of inflammatory molecules following stimulation with the neuroinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Stimulation of C6 cells with TNF (10 ng/ml) significantly increased the mRNA expression of CCL2, interleukin-6more » (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9, but not fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and MMP-2. Treatment with either REV-ERB agonists GSK4112 or SR9009 significantly blocked TNF-induced upregulation of CCL2 mRNA and MMP-9 mRNA, but not IL-6 mRNA and iNOS mRNA expression. Furthermore, treatment with RGFP966, a selective histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) inhibitor, potently reversed the inhibitory effects of GSK4112 on TNF-induced expression of MMP-9 mRNA, but not CCL2 mRNA. Expression of Rev-erbs mRNA in C6 astroglial cells, primary cultured rat cortical and spinal astrocytes was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Together, the findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory effect, downregulating of MMP-9 and CCL2 transcription, of astroglial REV-ERBs activation through HDAC3-dependent and HDAC3-independent mechanisms. - Highlights: • Rev-erbα mRNA and Rev-erbβ mRNA are expressed in C6 astroglial cells. • TNF increases the expression of CCL2, IL-6, MMP-9 and iNOS mRNA. • REV-ERB activation inhibits CCL2 mRNA and MMP-9 mRNA expression. • HDAC3 activity is involved in the inhibitory effect of REV-ERB on MMP-9

  10. Estimation of the REV Size and Equivalent Permeability Coefficient of Fractured Rock Masses with an Emphasis on Comparing the Radial and Unidirectional Flow Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhechao; Li, Wei; Bi, Liping; Qiao, Liping; Liu, Richeng; Liu, Jie

    2018-05-01

    A method to estimate the representative elementary volume (REV) size for the permeability and equivalent permeability coefficient of rock mass with a radial flow configuration was developed. The estimations of the REV size and equivalent permeability for the rock mass around an underground oil storage facility using a radial flow configuration were compared with those using a unidirectional flow configuration. The REV sizes estimated using the unidirectional flow configuration are much higher than those estimated using the radial flow configuration. The equivalent permeability coefficient estimated using the radial flow configuration is unique, while those estimated using the unidirectional flow configuration depend on the boundary conditions and flow directions. The influences of the fracture trace length, spacing and gap on the REV size and equivalent permeability coefficient were investigated. The REV size for the permeability of fractured rock mass increases with increasing the mean trace length and fracture spacing. The influence of the fracture gap length on the REV size is insignificant. The equivalent permeability coefficient decreases with the fracture spacing, while the influences of the fracture trace length and gap length are not determinate. The applicability of the proposed method to the prediction of groundwater inflow into rock caverns was verified using the measured groundwater inflow into the facility. The permeability coefficient estimated using the radial flow configuration is more similar to the representative equivalent permeability coefficient than those estimated with different boundary conditions using the unidirectional flow configuration.

  11. The circadian gene Rev-erbα improves cellular bioenergetics and provides preconditioning for protection against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Shaon; Yang, Guang; O'Donnell, John C; Hinson, Maurice D; McCormack, Shana E; Falk, Marni J; La, Ping; Robinson, Michael B; Williams, Monica L; Yohannes, Mekdes T; Polyak, Erzsebet; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Dennery, Phyllis A

    2016-04-01

    Diurnal oscillations in the expression of antioxidant genes imply that protection against oxidative stress is circadian-gated. We hypothesized that stabilization of the core circadian gene Rev-erbα (Nr1d1) improves cellular bioenergetics and protects against nutrient deprivation and oxidative stress. Compared to WT, mouse lung fibroblasts (MLG) stably transfected with a degradation resistant Rev-erbα (Ser(55/59) to Asp; hence referred to as SD) had 40% higher protein content, 1.5-fold higher mitochondrial area (confocal microscopy), doubled oxidative phosphorylation by high-resolution respirometry (Oroboros) and were resistant to glucose deprivation for 24h. This resulted from a 4-fold reduction in mitophagy (L3CB co-localized with MitoTracker Red) versus WT. Although PGC1α protein expression was comparable between SD and WT MLG cells, the role of mitochondrial biogenesis in explaining increased mitochondrial mass in SD cells was less clear. Embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from C57Bl/6-SD transgenic mice, had a 9-fold induction of FoxO1 mRNA and increased mRNA of downstream antioxidant targets heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), Mn superoxide dismutase and catalase (1.5, 2 fold and 2 fold respectively) versus WT. This allowed the SD cells to survive 1h incubation with 500 µM H2O2 as well as 24h of exposure to 95% O2 and remain attached whereas most WT cells did not. These observations establish a mechanistic link between the metabolic functions of Rev-erbα with mitochondrial homeostasis and protection against oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Binding mode prediction and MD/MMPBSA-based free energy ranking for agonists of REV-ERBα/NCoR.

    PubMed

    Westermaier, Yvonne; Ruiz-Carmona, Sergio; Theret, Isabelle; Perron-Sierra, Françoise; Poissonnet, Guillaume; Dacquet, Catherine; Boutin, Jean A; Ducrot, Pierre; Barril, Xavier

    2017-08-01

    The knowledge of the free energy of binding of small molecules to a macromolecular target is crucial in drug design as is the ability to predict the functional consequences of binding. We highlight how a molecular dynamics (MD)-based approach can be used to predict the free energy of small molecules, and to provide priorities for the synthesis and the validation via in vitro tests. Here, we study the dynamics and energetics of the nuclear receptor REV-ERBα with its co-repressor NCoR and 35 novel agonists. Our in silico approach combines molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD), solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) and molecular mechanics poisson boltzmann surface area (MMPBSA) calculations. While docking yielded initial hints on the binding modes, their stability was assessed by MD. The SASA calculations revealed that the presence of the ligand led to a higher exposure of hydrophobic REV-ERB residues for NCoR recruitment. MMPBSA was very successful in ranking ligands by potency in a retrospective and prospective manner. Particularly, the prospective MMPBSA ranking-based validations for four compounds, three predicted to be active and one weakly active, were confirmed experimentally.

  13. The HIV-1 Rev/RRE system is required for HIV-1 5' UTR cis elements to augment encapsidation of heterologous RNA into HIV-1 viral particles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The process of HIV-1 genomic RNA (gRNA) encapsidation is governed by a number of viral encoded components, most notably the Gag protein and gRNA cis elements in the canonical packaging signal (ψ). Also implicated in encapsidation are cis determinants in the R, U5, and PBS (primer binding site) from the 5' untranslated region (UTR). Although conventionally associated with nuclear export of HIV-1 RNA, there is a burgeoning role for the Rev/RRE in the encapsidation process. Pleiotropic effects exhibited by these cis and trans viral components may confound the ability to examine their independent, and combined, impact on encapsidation of RNA into HIV-1 viral particles in their innate viral context. We systematically reconstructed the HIV-1 packaging system in the context of a heterologous murine leukemia virus (MLV) vector RNA to elucidate a mechanism in which the Rev/RRE system is central to achieving efficient and specific encapsidation into HIV-1 viral particles. Results We show for the first time that the Rev/RRE system can augment RNA encapsidation independent of all cis elements from the 5' UTR (R, U5, PBS, and ψ). Incorporation of all the 5' UTR cis elements did not enhance RNA encapsidation in the absence of the Rev/RRE system. In fact, we demonstrate that the Rev/RRE system is required for specific and efficient encapsidation commonly associated with the canonical packaging signal. The mechanism of Rev/RRE-mediated encapsidation is not a general phenomenon, since the combination of the Rev/RRE system and 5' UTR cis elements did not enhance encapsidation into MLV-derived viral particles. Lastly, we show that heterologous MLV RNAs conform to transduction properties commonly associated with HIV-1 viral particles, including in vivo transduction of non-dividing cells (i.e. mouse neurons); however, the cDNA forms are episomes predominantly in the 1-LTR circle form. Conclusions Premised on encapsidation of a heterologous RNA into HIV-1 viral particles

  14. X-33 (Rev-F) Aeroheating Results of Test 6770 in NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Kowalkowski, Matthew K.; Liechty, Derek S.

    1999-01-01

    Aeroheating characteristics of the X-33 Rev-F configuration have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel (Test 6770). Global surface heat transfer distributions, surface streamline patterns, and shock shapes were measured on a 0.013-scale model at Mach 6 in air. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 20-deg, 30-deg, and 40-deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 0.9 to 4.9 million; and body-flap deflections of 10-deg and 20-deg. The effects of discrete roughness elements on boundary layer transition, which included trip height, size, and location, both on and off the windward centerline, were investigated. This document is intended to serve as a quick release of preliminary data to the X-33 program; analysis is limited to observations of the experimental trends in order to expedite dissemination.

  15. Amchitka Mud Pit Sites 2006 Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Report, Amchitka Island, Alaska, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Patrick

    2006-09-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA/NSO) remediated six areas associated with Amchitka mud pit release sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. This included the construction of seven closure caps. To ensure the integrity and effectiveness of remedial action, the mud pit sites are to be inspected every five years as part of DOE's long-term monitoring and surveillance program. In August of 2006, the closure caps were inspected in accordance with the ''Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Plan for Amchitka Island Mud Pit Release Sites'' (Rev. 0, November 2005). This post-closure monitoring report provides themore » 2006 cap inspection results.« less

  16. Erratum: “Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment” [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012)

    DOE PAGES

    Burke, Marcus G.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Bongard, Michael W.; ...

    2016-07-18

    This article corrects an error in M.G. Burke et al., 'Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment,' Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012) pertaining to ion temperature. The conclusions of this paper are not altered by the revised ion temperature measurements.

  17. Specificity of RSG-1.2 Peptide Binding to RRE-IIB RNA Element of HIV-1 over Rev Peptide Is Mainly Enthalpic in Origin

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Bose, Debojit; Suryawanshi, Hemant; Sabharwal, Harshana; Mapa, Koyeli; Maiti, Souvik

    2011-01-01

    Rev is an essential HIV-1 regulatory protein which binds to the Rev responsive element (RRE) present within the env gene of HIV-1 RNA genome. This binding facilitates the transport of the RNA to the cytoplasm, which in turn triggers the switch between viral latency and active viral replication. Essential components of this complex have been localized to a minimal arginine rich Rev peptide and stem IIB region of RRE. A synthetic peptide known as RSG-1.2 binds with high binding affinity and specificity to the RRE-IIB than the Rev peptide, however the thermodynamic basis of this specificity has not yet been addressed. The present study aims to probe the thermodynamic origin of this specificity of RSG-1.2 over Rev Peptide for RRE-IIB. The temperature dependent melting studies show that RSG-1.2 binding stabilizes the RRE structure significantly (ΔT m = 4.3°C), in contrast to Rev binding. Interestingly the thermodynamic signatures of the binding have also been found to be different for both the peptides. At pH 7.5, RSG-1.2 binds RRE-IIB with a Ka = 16.2±0.6×107 M−1 where enthalpic change ΔH = −13.9±0.1 kcal/mol is the main driving force with limited unfavorable contribution from entropic change TΔS = −2.8±0.1 kcal/mol. A large part of ΔH may be due to specific stacking between U72 and Arg15. In contrast binding of Rev (Ka = 3.1±0.4×107 M−1) is driven mainly by entropy (ΔH = 0 kcal/mol and TΔS = 10.2±0.2 kcal/mol) which arises from major conformational changes in the RNA upon binding. PMID:21853108

  18. Specificity of RSG-1.2 peptide binding to RRE-IIB RNA element of HIV-1 over Rev peptide is mainly enthalpic in origin.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Bose, Debojit; Suryawanshi, Hemant; Sabharwal, Harshana; Mapa, Koyeli; Maiti, Souvik

    2011-01-01

    Rev is an essential HIV-1 regulatory protein which binds to the Rev responsive element (RRE) present within the env gene of HIV-1 RNA genome. This binding facilitates the transport of the RNA to the cytoplasm, which in turn triggers the switch between viral latency and active viral replication. Essential components of this complex have been localized to a minimal arginine rich Rev peptide and stem IIB region of RRE. A synthetic peptide known as RSG-1.2 binds with high binding affinity and specificity to the RRE-IIB than the Rev peptide, however the thermodynamic basis of this specificity has not yet been addressed. The present study aims to probe the thermodynamic origin of this specificity of RSG-1.2 over Rev Peptide for RRE-IIB. The temperature dependent melting studies show that RSG-1.2 binding stabilizes the RRE structure significantly (ΔT(m) = 4.3°C), in contrast to Rev binding. Interestingly the thermodynamic signatures of the binding have also been found to be different for both the peptides. At pH 7.5, RSG-1.2 binds RRE-IIB with a K(a) = 16.2±0.6×10(7) M(-1) where enthalpic change ΔH = -13.9±0.1 kcal/mol is the main driving force with limited unfavorable contribution from entropic change TΔS = -2.8±0.1 kcal/mol. A large part of ΔH may be due to specific stacking between U72 and Arg15. In contrast binding of Rev (K(a) = 3.1±0.4×10(7) M(-1)) is driven mainly by entropy (ΔH = 0 kcal/mol and TΔS = 10.2±0.2 kcal/mol) which arises from major conformational changes in the RNA upon binding.

  19. Numerical modelling of the flow in the resin infusion process on the REV scale: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, M.; Spangenberg, J.; Hattel, J. H.

    2016-06-08

    The resin infusion process (RIP) has developed as a low cost method for manufacturing large fibre reinforced plastic parts. However, the process still presents some challenges to industry with regards to reliability and repeatability, resulting in expensive and inefficient trial and error development. In this paper, we show the implementation of 2D numerical models for the RIP using the open source simulator DuMu{sup X}. The idea of this study is to present a model which accounts for the interfacial forces coming from the capillary pressure on the so-called representative elementary volume (REV) scale. The model is described in detail andmore » three different test cases — a constant and a tensorial permeability as well as a preform/Balsa domain — are investigated. The results show that the developed model is very applicable for the RIP for manufacturing of composite parts. The idea behind this study is to test the developed model for later use in a real application, in which the preform medium has numerous layers with different material properties.« less

  20. A comprehensive experiment for molecular biology: Determination of single nucleotide polymorphism in human REV3 gene using PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Shao, Meng; Gao, Lu; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Sun, Zixuan; Zhou, Liping; Yan, Yongmin; Shao, Qixiang; Xu, Wenrong; Qian, Hui

    2017-07-08

    Laboratory exercise is helpful for medical students to understand the basic principles of molecular biology and to learn about the practical applications of molecular biology. We have designed a lab course on molecular biology about the determination of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in human REV3 gene, the product of which is a subunit of DNA polymerase ζ and SNPs in this gene are associated with altered susceptibility to cancer. This newly designed experiment is composed of three parts, including genomic DNA extraction, gene amplification by PCR, and genotyping by RFLP. By combining these activities, the students are not only able to learn a series of biotechniques in molecular biology, but also acquire the ability to link the learned knowledge with practical applications. This comprehensive experiment will help the medical students improve the conceptual understanding of SNP and the technical understanding of SNP detection. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(4):299-304, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Rev Up Your Veggies!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Melissa DiGennaro

    2000-01-01

    Teaches concepts such as inertia, gravity, and friction using a "Lunch Box Derby" activity. Uses vegetables for the construction of race cars. Explains student approaches during the design and construction portion. Describes the rubrics used for student evaluation. (YDS)

  2. Rev Your Engines!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Margaret; Sharp, Jennifer; Grable, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    As part of the "Car Lab Project," students constructed rubber band cars, raced them, and worked through a number of automotive activities. The students engaged in this project certainly had fun, but they also used high-tech gear such as motion sensors and graphing calculators to gather data on the distance and time cars traveled and to generate…

  3. EMERALD REV. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Brunot, W.K.; Fray, R.R.; Gillespie, S.G.

    1974-03-01

    The EMERALD program is designed for the calculation of radiation releases and exposures resulting from abnormal operation of a large pressurized water reactor (PWR). The approach used in EMERALD is similar to an analog simulation of a real system. Each component or volume in the plant which contains a radioactive material is represented by a subroutine which keeps track of the production, transfer, decay and absorption of radioactivity in that volume. During the course of the analysis of an accident, activity is transferred from subroutine to subroutine in the program as it would be transferred from place to place inmore » the plant. For example, in the calculation of the doses resulting from a loss-of-coolant accident the program first calculates the activity built up in the fuel before the accident, then releases some of this activity to the containment volume. Some of this activity is then released to the atmosphere. The rates of transfer, leakage, production, cleanup, decay, and release are read in as input to the program. Subroutines are also included which calculate the on-site and off-site radiation exposures at various distances for individual isotopes and sums of isotopes. The program contains a library of physical data for the twenty-five isotopes of most interest in licensing calculations, and other isotopes can be added or substituted. Because of the flexible nature of the simulation approach, the EMERALD program can be used for most calculations involving the production and release of radioactive materials during abnormal operation of a PWR. These include design, operational, and licensing studies.« less

  4. Premixed Supersonic Combustion (Rev)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-20

    the effects of equivalence ratio and inflow gas temperature on flame ignition, propagation, and flameout. This study was performed in collaboration...6 combustor. CFD analysis indicates this feature promotes flame holding in the combustor. The cavity spans the width of the duct and has an...Fig. 1). Figure 2 shows results from a RANS CFD study of several potential strategies based on fuel injection at the upstream end of the isolator

  5. Rathayibacter agropyri (non O'Gara 1916) comb. nov., nom. rev., isolated from western wheatgrass (Pascopyrum smithii).

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Brenda K; Schneider, William L; Luster, Douglas G; Sechler, Aaron; Murray, Timothy D

    2018-05-01

    Aplanobacter agropyri was first described in 1915 by O'Gara and later transferred to the genus Corynebacterium by Burkholder in 1948 but it was not included in the Approved Lists of Bacterial Names in 1980 and, consequently, is not recognized as a validly published species. In the 1980s, bacteria resembling Corynebacterium agropyri were isolated from plant samples stored at the Washington State Mycological Herbarium and from a diseased wheatgrass plant collected in Cardwell, Montana, USA. In the framework of this study, eight additional isolates were recovered from the same herbarium plant samples in 2011. The isolates are slow-growing, yellow-pigmented, Gram-stain-positive and coryneform. The peptidoglycan is type B2γ containing diaminobutyric acid, alanine, glycine and glutamic acid, the cell-wall sugars are rhamnose and mannose, the major respiratory quinone is MK-10, and the major fatty acids are anteiso-15 : 0, anteiso 17 : 0 and iso-16 : 0, all of which are typical of the genus Rathayibacter. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the strains in the genus Rathayibacter and distinguished them from the six other described species of Rathayibacter. DNA-DNA hybridization confirmed that the strains were members of a novel species. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic characterization, it appears that strains CA-1 to CA-12 represent a novel species, and the name Rathayibacter agropyri (non O'Gara 1916) comb. nov., nom. rev. is proposed; the type strain is CA-4 T (=DSM 104101 T ;=ATCC TSD-78 T ).

  6. Final Report - DuraMelter 100 Tests to Support LAW Glass Formulation Correlation Development, VSL-06R6480-1, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Muller, I. S.; Gong, W.

    2013-12-03

    This report describes the results of work and testing specified by Test Specifications 24590-LAW-TSP-RT-04-004, Rev. 0, Test Plans VSL-05T5480-1, Rev. 0 and Text Exceptions 24590-LAW-TEF-RT-05-00002. The work and any associated testing followed established quality assurance requirements and was conducted as authorized. The descriptions provided in this test report are an accurate account of both the conduct of the work and the data collected. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. Also reported are any unusual or anomalous occurences that are different from the starting hypotheses. The test results and this report have been reviewed and verified.

  7. Erratum: Measurement of σ(e+e-→ψ(3770)→hadrons) at Ec.m.=3773MeV [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 092002 (2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Gong, D. T.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Smith, A.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Zweber, P.; Ernst, J.; Arms, K.; Severini, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Love, W.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mueller, J. A.; Savinov, V.; Li, Z.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J.; Huang, G. S.; Miller, D. H.; Pavlunin, V.; Sanghi, B.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Napolitano, J.; He, Q.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H.; Coan, T. E.; Gao, Y. S.; Liu, F.; Artuso, M.; Boulahouache, C.; Blusk, S.; Butt, J.; Li, J.; Menaa, N.; Mountain, R.; Nisar, S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Redjimi, R.; Sia, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Zhang, K.; Csorna, S. E.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Dubrovin, M.; Lincoln, A.; Briere, R. A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J.; Ferguson, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Vogel, H.; Watkins, M. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Adam, N. E.; Alexander, J. P.; Berkelman, K.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ecklund, K. M.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C. D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Mahlke-Krüger, H.; Meyer, T. O.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Phillips, E. A.; Pivarski, J.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Schwarthoff, H.; Shi, X.; Stroiney, S.; Sun, W. M.; Wilksen, T.; Weinberger, M.; Athar, S. B.; Avery, P.; Breva-Newell, L.; Patel, R.; Potlia, V.; Stoeck, H.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Cawlfield, C.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Karliner, I.; Kim, D.; Lowrey, N.; Naik, P.; Sedlack, C.; Selen, M.; White, E. J.; Wiss, J.; Shepherd, M. R.; Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.

    2010-04-01

    We have updated our measurement of the cross section for e^+e^- -> psi(3770) -> hadrons, our publication "Measurement of sigma(e^+e^- -> psi(3770) -> hadrons) at E_{c.m.} = 3773 MeV", arXiv:hep-ex/0512038, Phys.Rev.Lett.96, 092002 (2006). Simultaneous with this arXiv update, we have published an erratum in Phys.Rev.Lett.104, 159901 (2010). There, and in this update, we have corrected a mistake in the computation of the error on the difference of the cross sections for e^+e^- -> psi(3770) -> hadrons and e^+e^- -> psi(3770) -> DDbar. We have also used a more recent CLEO measurement of cross section for e^+e^- -> psi(3770) -> DDbar. From this, we obtain an upper limit on the branching fraction for psi(3770) -> non-DDbar of 9% at 90% confidence level.

  8. Analysis of mutagenic DNA repair in a thermoconditional mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. IV. Influence of DNA replication and excision repair on REV2 dependent UV-mutagenesis and repair.

    PubMed

    Siede, W; Eckardt, F

    1986-01-01

    A double mutant being thermoconditionally defective in mutation induction as well as in repair of pre-lethal UV-induced DNA damage (rev2ts) and deficient in excision repair (rad3-2) was studied in temperature-shift experiments. The influence of inhibitors of DNA replication (hydroxyurea, aphidicolin) was determined. Additionally, an analysis of the dose-response pattern of mutation induction ("mutation kinetics") at several ochre alleles was carried out. It was concluded that the UV-inducible REV2 dependent mutagenic repair process is not induced in excision-deficient cells. In excision-deficient cells, REV2 dependent mutation fixation is slow and mostly post-replicative though not dependent on DNA replication. The REV2 mediated mutagenic process could be separated from the repair function.

  9. Characterization of an internal ribosomal entry segment within the 5' leader of avian reticuloendotheliosis virus type A RNA and development of novel MLV-REV-based retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    López-Lastra, M; Gabus, C; Darlix, J L

    1997-11-01

    The murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related type C viruses constitute a major class of retroviruses that includes numerous endogenous and exogenous mammalian viruses and the related avian spleen necrosis virus (SNV). The MLV-related viruses possess a long and multifunctional 5' untranslated leader involved in key steps of the viral life cycle--splicing, translation, RNA dimerization, encapsidation, and reverse transcription. Recent studies have shown that the 5' leader of Friend murine leukemia virus and Moloney murine leukemia virus can direct cap independent translation of gag precursor proteins (Berlioz et al., 1995; Vagner et al., 1995b). These data, together with structural homology studies (Koning et al., 1992), prompted us to undertake a search for new internal ribosome entry segment (IRES) of retroviral origin. Here we describe an IRES element within the 5' leader of avian reticuloendotheliosis virus type A (REV-A) genomic RNA. Data show that the REV-A 5' IRES element maps downstream of the packaging/dimerization (E/DLS) sequence (Watanabe and Temin, 1982; Darlix et al., 1992) and the minimal IRES sequence appears to be within a 129 nt fragment (nucleotides 452-580) of the 5' leader, immediately upstream of the gag AUG codon. The REV-A IRES has been successfully utilized in the construction of novel high titer MLV-based retroviral vectors, containing one or more IRES elements of retroviral origin. These retroviral constructs, which represent a starting point for the design of novel vectors suitable for gene therapy, are also of interest as a model system of internal translation initiation and its possible regulation during development, cancer, or virus infection.

  10. Model-based investigation of the circadian clock and cell cycle coupling in mouse embryonic fibroblasts: Prediction of RevErb-α up-regulation during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Traynard, Pauline; Feillet, Céline; Soliman, Sylvain; Delaunay, Franck; Fages, François

    2016-11-01

    Experimental observations have put in evidence autonomous self-sustained circadian oscillators in most mammalian cells, and proved the existence of molecular links between the circadian clock and the cell cycle. Some mathematical models have also been built to assess conditions of control of the cell cycle by the circadian clock. However, recent studies in individual NIH3T3 fibroblasts have shown an unexpected acceleration of the circadian clock together with the cell cycle when the culture medium is enriched with growth factors, and the absence of such acceleration in confluent cells. In order to explain these observations, we study a possible entrainment of the circadian clock by the cell cycle through a regulation of clock genes around the mitosis phase. We develop a computational model and a formal specification of the observed behavior to investigate the conditions of entrainment in period and phase. We show that either the selective activation of RevErb-α or the selective inhibition of Bmal1 transcription during the mitosis phase, allow us to fit the experimental data on both period and phase, while a uniform inhibition of transcription during mitosis seems incompatible with the phase data. We conclude on the arguments favoring the RevErb-α up-regulation hypothesis and on some further predictions of the model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Rev7 and 53BP1/Crb2 prevent RecQ helicase-dependent hyper-resection of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Leland, Bryan A; Chen, Angela C; Zhao, Amy Y; Wharton, Robert C; King, Megan C

    2018-04-26

    Poly(ADP ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi) target cancer cells deficient in homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). In preclinical models, PARPi resistance is tied to altered nucleolytic processing (resection) at the 5' ends of a DSB. For example, loss of either 53BP1 or Rev7/MAD2L2/FANCV derepresses resection to drive PARPi resistance, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. Long-range resection can be catalyzed by two machineries: the exonuclease Exo1, or the combination of a RecQ helicase and Dna2. Here, we develop a single-cell microscopy assay that allows the distinct phases and machineries of resection to be interrogated simultaneously in living S. pombe cells. Using this assay, we find that the 53BP1 orthologue and Rev7 specifically repress long-range resection through the RecQ helicase-dependent pathway, thereby preventing hyper-resection. These results suggest that 'rewiring' of BRCA1-deficient cells to employ an Exo1-independent hyper-resection pathway is a driver of PARPi resistance. © 2018, Leland et al.

  12. Iron overload down-regulates the expression of the HIV-1 Rev cofactor eIF5A in infected T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mancone, Carmine; Grimaldi, Alessio; Refolo, Giulia; Abbate, Isabella; Rozera, Gabriella; Benelli, Dario; Fimia, Gian Maria; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Tripodi, Marco; Piacentini, Mauro; Ciccosanti, Fabiola

    2017-01-01

    Changes in iron metabolism frequently accompany HIV-1 infection. However, while many clinical and in vitro studies report iron overload exacerbates the development of infection, many others have found no correlation. Therefore, the multi-faceted role of iron in HIV-1 infection remains enigmatic. RT-qPCR targeting the LTR region, gag , Tat and Rev were performed to measure the levels of viral RNAs in response to iron overload. Spike-in SILAC proteomics comparing i) iron-treated, ii) HIV-1-infected and iii) HIV-1-infected/iron treated T lymphocytes was performed to define modifications in the host cell proteome. Data from quantitative proteomics were integrated with the HIV-1 Human Interaction Database for assessing any viral cofactors modulated by iron overload in infected T lymphocytes. Here, we demonstrate that the iron overload down-regulates HIV-1 gene expression by decreasing the levels of viral RNAs. In addition, we found that iron overload modulates the expression of many viral cofactors. Among them, the downregulation of the REV cofactor eIF5A may correlate with the iron-induced inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression. Therefore, we demonstrated that eiF5A downregulation by shRNA resulted in a significant decrease of Nef levels, thus hampering HIV-1 replication. Our study indicates that HIV-1 cofactors influenced by iron metabolism represent potential targets for antiretroviral therapy and suggests eIF5A as a selective target for drug development.

  13. Convergence of hepcidin deficiency, systemic iron overloading, heme accumulation, and REV-ERBα/β activation in aryl hydrocarbon receptor-elicited hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Fader, Kelly A.; Nault, Rance

    Persistent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists elicit dose-dependent hepatic lipid accumulation, oxidative stress, inflammation, and fibrosis in mice. Iron (Fe) promotes AhR-mediated oxidative stress by catalyzing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. To further characterize the role of Fe in AhR-mediated hepatotoxicity, male C57BL/6 mice were orally gavaged with sesame oil vehicle or 0.01–30 μg/kg 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) every 4 days for 28 days. Duodenal epithelial and hepatic RNA-Seq data were integrated with hepatic AhR ChIP-Seq, capillary electrophoresis protein measurements, and clinical chemistry analyses. TCDD dose-dependently repressed hepatic expression of hepcidin (Hamp and Hamp2), the master regulator of systemic Fe homeostasis, resultingmore » in a 2.6-fold increase in serum Fe with accumulating Fe spilling into urine. Total hepatic Fe levels were negligibly increased while transferrin saturation remained unchanged. Furthermore, TCDD elicited dose-dependent gene expression changes in heme biosynthesis including the induction of aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 (Alas1) and repression of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (Urod), leading to a 50% increase in hepatic hemin and a 13.2-fold increase in total urinary porphyrins. Consistent with this heme accumulation, differential gene expression suggests that heme activated BACH1 and REV-ERBα/β, causing induction of heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) and repression of fatty acid biosynthesis, respectively. Collectively, these results suggest that Hamp repression, Fe accumulation, and increased heme levels converge to promote oxidative stress and the progression of TCDD-elicited hepatotoxicity. - Highlights: • TCDD represses hepatic hepcidin expression, leading to systemic iron overloading. • Dysregulation of heme biosynthesis is consistent with heme and porphyrin accumulation. • Heme-activated REV-ERBα/β repress circadian-regulated hepatic lipid metabolism. • Disruption of iron

  14. Nuclear Receptor Rev-erb Alpha (Nr1d1) Functions in Concert with Nr2e3 to Regulate Transcriptional Networks in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Mollema, Nissa J.; Yuan, Yang; Jelcick, Austin S.; Sachs, Andrew J.; von Alpen, Désirée; Schorderet, Daniel; Escher, Pascal; Haider, Neena B.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of diseases in the retina are caused by genetic mutations affecting the development and function of photoreceptor cells. The transcriptional networks directing these processes are regulated by genes such as nuclear hormone receptors. The nuclear hormone receptor gene Rev-erb alpha/Nr1d1 has been widely studied for its role in the circadian cycle and cell metabolism, however its role in the retina is unknown. In order to understand the role of Rev-erb alpha/Nr1d1 in the retina, we evaluated the effects of loss of Nr1d1 to the developing retina and its co-regulation with the photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor gene Nr2e3 in the developing and mature retina. Knock-down of Nr1d1 expression in the developing retina results in pan-retinal spotting and reduced retinal function by electroretinogram. Our studies show that NR1D1 protein is co-expressed with NR2E3 in the outer neuroblastic layer of the developing mouse retina. In the adult retina, NR1D1 is expressed in the ganglion cell layer and is co-expressed with NR2E3 in the outer nuclear layer, within rods and cones. Several genes co-targeted by NR2E3 and NR1D1 were identified that include: Nr2c1, Recoverin, Rgr, Rarres2, Pde8a, and Nupr1. We examined the cyclic expression of Nr1d1 and Nr2e3 over a twenty-four hour period and observed that both nuclear receptors cycle in a similar manner. Taken together, these studies reveal a novel role for Nr1d1, in conjunction with its cofactor Nr2e3, in regulating transcriptional networks critical for photoreceptor development and function. PMID:21408158

  15. FANC Pathway Promotes UV-Induced Stalled Replication Forks Recovery by Acting Both Upstream and Downstream Polη and Rev1

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Emilie; Rosselli, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    To cope with ultraviolet C (UVC)-stalled replication forks and restart DNA synthesis, cells either undergo DNA translesion synthesis (TLS) by specialised DNA polymerases or tolerate the lesions using homologous recombination (HR)-based mechanisms. To gain insight into how cells manage UVC-induced stalled replication forks, we analysed the molecular crosstalk between the TLS DNA polymerases Polη and Rev1, the double-strand break repair (DSB)-associated protein MDC1 and the FANC pathway. We describe three novel functional interactions that occur in response to UVC-induced DNA lesions. First, Polη and Rev1, whose optimal expression and/or relocalisation depend on the FANC core complex, act upstream of FANCD2 and are required for the proper relocalisation of monoubiquitinylated FANCD2 (Ub-FANCD2) to subnuclear foci. Second, during S-phase, Ub-FANCD2 and MDC1 relocalise to UVC-damaged nuclear areas or foci simultaneously but independently of each other. Third, Ub-FANCD2 and MDC1 are independently required for optimal BRCA1 relocalisation. While RPA32 phosphorylation (p-RPA32) and RPA foci formation were reduced in parallel with increasing levels of H2AX phosphorylation and MDC1 foci in UVC-irradiated FANC pathway-depleted cells, MDC1 depletion was associated with increased UVC-induced Ub-FANCD2 and FANCD2 foci as well as p-RPA32 levels and p-RPA32 foci. On the basis of the previous observations, we propose that the FANC pathway participates in the rescue of UVC-stalled replication forks in association with TLS by maintaining the integrity of ssDNA regions and by preserving genome stability and preventing the formation of DSBs, the resolution of which would require the intervention of MDC1. PMID:23365640

  16. Corrected Article: Thermal stability of the endohedral fullerenes N\\@C60, N\\@C70, and P\\@C60 [Phys. Rev. B 63, 045421 (2001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waiblinger, M.; Lips, K.; Harneit, W.; Weidinger, A.; Dietel, E.; Hirsch, A.

    2001-10-01

    There was a problem with the \\@ sign in the original article (published 9 January 2001). The entire corrected article is republished here. This article should be cited as M. Waiblinger, K. Lips, W. Harneit, A. Weidinger, E. Dietel, and A. Hirsch, Phys. Rev. B 63, 045421 (2001); 64, 159901(E) (2001). Nitrogen and phosphorus atoms enclosed in fullerenes keep their atomic ground-state configuration, and no charge transfer or covalent bonding to the cage occurs. These systems can be dissolved in organic solvents and reacted with addends without losing the atomic character of the guest atom. In this paper we present a detailed study of the annealing behavior of N\\@C60, N\\@C70, and P\\@C60, and of some N\\@C60 adducts. The disintegration of these systems, as recorded by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements, occurs in a temperature range between 400 and 600 K. The results are in qualitative agreement with potential-energy calculations, and confirm the proposed escape mechanism which proceeds via bond formation of the trapped atom with the cage. It is found that other combinations of group-V elements with fullerenes, e.g., N\\@C84, P\\@C70, and As\\@C60, are not stable at room temperature. The escape mechanism and the possibility of disabling this path are discussed.

  17. [Genetically modified crops: promises and good intentions are not enough (refutation to Espinoza et aL 2004, Rev. Biol. Trop. 52 (3): 727-732)].

    PubMed

    García, Jaime E G

    2007-06-01

    The arguments presented by Espinoza et al. in their paper "Relationship of genetically modified crops with the environment and health of the Costa Rican human population" published in this journal (Rev. Biol. Trop. 52: 727-732, 2004) are questioned and refuted. The arguments are confronted with evidence offered by scientists and national and international independent organizations around the world (e.g. World Health Organization, Consumers International, Physicians and Scientists for Responsible Application of Science and Technology, International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, the Council of the University of Costa Rica, and the Independent Science Panel) showing the current uncertainty and limitations of science in this area, as well as those of proposed and applied biosafety approaches. Environment, biodiversity and food security are so important and basic matters, that there is need of serious testing, particularly when promises seem to be based on environmentally dangerous ideas promoted half a century ago by the so called "green revolution". Debate should continue, based on a holistic analysis of facts and with ethical reasoning, avoiding emotional positions that can confuse virtual reality with reality.

  18. Evaluation of plasma sphingosine 1-phosphate, hepcidin and cardiovascular damage biomarkers (cardiac troponin I and homocysteine) in rats infected with brucellosis and vaccinated (Rev-1, RB-51).

    PubMed

    Azimzadeh, Kaveh; Nasrollahi Nargesabad, Reza; Vousooghi, Nasim

    2017-08-01

    Brucellosis is known as one of important zoonosis. Studying the histological and biochemical effects of the disease could help to increase our knowledge about it. The aim of the present study was to evaluate changes of plasma parameters after intraperitoneal injection of two species of Brucella (Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus) and two vaccines (Rev-1, RB-51) in the rat. Forty male rats were divided into five groups (n = 8 in each group). Two groups received suspensions of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis and two other groups were injected intraperitoneally with two mentioned vaccines and the last group received only distilled water. The results showed a significant increase in sphingosine 1-phosphate, Malondialdehyde, hepcidin, homocysteine, cardiac troponin I and copper levels and a considerable decrease in the levels of iron and zinc (P ≤ 0.01) in infected groups compared to the control animals. In vaccinated groups, hepcidin was increased but other parameters were not changed in comparison to the control group. It can be concluded that increase of homocysteine and cardiac troponin I in brucellosis could be a warning for cardiac adverse effects. Besides, increase of sphingosine 1-phosphate probably indicates its stimulant and modulatory effects in anti- Brucellosis biochemical pathways of the host. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. tech-rev_2004.htm

    Science.gov Websites

    November December January 2004 Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 1 Happy New Year! 2 Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Presidents' Day 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 March 2004 Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 1 2

  20. The translesion DNA polymerases Pol ζ and Rev1 are activated independently of PCNA ubiquitination upon UV radiation in mutants of DNA polymerase δ

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Emilie; Veaute, Xavier; Coïc, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Replicative DNA polymerases cannot insert efficiently nucleotides at sites of base lesions. This function is taken over by specialized translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) polymerases to allow DNA replication completion in the presence of DNA damage. In eukaryotes, Rad6- and Rad18-mediated PCNA ubiquitination at lysine 164 promotes recruitment of TLS polymerases, allowing cells to efficiently cope with DNA damage. However, several studies showed that TLS polymerases can be recruited also in the absence of PCNA ubiquitination. We hypothesized that the stability of the interactions between DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ) subunits and/or between Pol δ and PCNA at the primer/template junction is a crucial factor to determine the requirement of PCNA ubiquitination. To test this hypothesis, we used a structural mutant of Pol δ in which the interaction between Pol3 and Pol31 is inhibited. We found that in yeast, rad18Δ-associated UV hypersensitivity is suppressed by pol3-ct, a mutant allele of the POL3 gene that encodes the catalytic subunit of replicative Pol δ. pol3-ct suppressor effect was specifically dependent on the Rev1 and Pol ζ TLS polymerases. This result strongly suggests that TLS polymerases could rely much less on PCNA ubiquitination when Pol δ interaction with PCNA is partially compromised by mutations. In agreement with this model, we found that the pol3-FI allele suppressed rad18Δ-associated UV sensitivity as observed for pol3-ct. This POL3 allele carries mutations within a putative PCNA Interacting Peptide (PIP) motif. We then provided molecular and genetic evidence that this motif could contribute to Pol δ-PCNA interaction indirectly, although it is not a bona fide PIP. Overall, our results suggest that the primary role of PCNA ubiquitination is to allow TLS polymerases to outcompete Pol δ for PCNA access upon DNA damage. PMID:29281621

  1. Publisher’s Note: “Multi-energy x-ray detector calibration for Te and impurity density (nZ) measurements of MCF plasmas” [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, 11E320 (2016)

    SciTech Connect

    Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Efthimion, P.

    2016-10-17

    Correction Original Article: ISSN: 0034-6748, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, (2016) This article was originally published online on 12 August 2016 with the fourth author’s name listed as “L. Delgado”. It should have been “L. Delgado-Aparicio”. The author’s name appears correctly above. All online versions of the article were corrected on 7 September 2016; the article is correct as it appears in the printed version of the journal.

  2. Evolution of the Antisense Overlap between Genes for Thyroid Hormone Receptor and Rev-erbα and Characterization of an Exonic G-Rich Element That Regulates Splicing of TRα2 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Stephen H.; Morales, Christopher H.; Duyck, Tessa H.; Waters, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    The α-thyroid hormone receptor gene (TRα) codes for two functionally distinct proteins: TRα1, the α-thyroid hormone receptor; and TRα2, a non-hormone-binding variant. The final exon of TRα2 mRNA overlaps the 3’ end of Rev-erbα mRNA, which encodes another nuclear receptor on the opposite strand of DNA. To understand the evolution of this antisense overlap, we sequenced these genes and mRNAs in the platypus Orthorhynchus anatinus. Despite its strong homology with other mammals, the platypus TRα/Rev-erbα locus lacks elements essential for expression of TRα2. Comparative analysis suggests that alternative splicing of TRα2 mRNA expression evolved in a stepwise fashion before the divergence of eutherian and marsupial mammals. A short G-rich element (G30) located downstream of the alternative 3’splice site of TRα2 mRNA and antisense to the 3’UTR of Rev-erbα plays an important role in regulating TRα2 splicing. G30 is tightly conserved in eutherian mammals, but is absent in marsupials and monotremes. Systematic deletions and substitutions within G30 have dramatically different effects on TRα2 splicing, leading to either its inhibition or its enhancement. Mutations that disrupt one or more clusters of G residues enhance splicing two- to three-fold. These results suggest the G30 sequence can adopt a highly structured conformation, possibly a G-quadruplex, and that it is part of a complex splicing regulatory element which exerts both positive and negative effects on TRα2 expression. Since mutations that strongly enhance splicing in vivo have no effect on splicing in vitro, it is likely that the regulatory role of G30 is mediated through linkage of transcription and splicing. PMID:26368571

  3. Evaluation of shedding, tissue burdens, and humoral immune response in goats after experimental challenge with the virulent Brucella melitensis strain 16M and the reduced virulence vaccine strain Rev. 1

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Brucella melitensis is the causative agent of brucellosis in small ruminants and is of considerable economic and public health importance in many countries worldwide. The control of disease in humans depends on the control of disease in livestock; however, few counties with endemic B. melitensis infection have been able to successfully eradicate this pathogen. This underscores the need for further research on the pathogenesis of both virulent and vaccine strains of B. melitensis in the small ruminant host. The aim of the present study was to characterize clinical effects, tissue colonization, shedding, and humoral immune response following B. melitensis infection in goats. Both virulent (16M) and reduced virulence (Rev. 1) strains of B. melitensis were studied. Pregnant goats were infected at 11–14 weeks of gestation with 8 x 106 or 8 x 107 CFU of B. melitensis. Infection of goats with B. melitensis 16M resulted in an 86% abortion rate. This strain disseminated widely in pregnant does post-infection with none of the 15 sampled tissues spared from colonization. Importantly, we report the first isolation of B. melitensis from muscle tissue in ruminants. Pathogenesis of Rev. 1 infection was variable with two does showing minimal colonization and one doe exhibiting disease similar to that of animals infected with fully virulent 16M. Shedding of B. melitensis in milk occurred in all 16M- and Rev. 1- infected goats. In pregnant animals challenged with virulent B. melitensis, median time to seroconversion was 21 days; however, 2 animals did not seroconvert until after abortion. PMID:29028813

  4. A novel variant of DNA polymerase ζ, Rev3ΔC, highlights differential regulation of Pol32 as a subunit of polymerase δ versus ζ in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Siebler, Hollie M.; Lada, Artem G.; Baranovskiy, Andrey G.; Tahirov, Tahir H.; Pavlov, Youri I.

    2014-01-01

    Unrepaired DNA lesions often stall replicative DNA polymerases and are bypassed by translesion synthesis (TLS) to prevent replication fork collapse. Mechanisms of TLS are lesion- and species-specific, with a prominent role of specialized DNA polymerases with relaxed active sites. After nucleotide(s) are incorporated across from the altered base(s), the aberrant primer termini are typically extended by DNA polymerase ζ (pol ζ). As a result, pol ζ is responsible for most DNA damage-induced mutations. The mechanisms of sequential DNA polymerase switches in vivo remain unclear. The major replicative DNA polymerase δ (pol δ) shares two accessory subunits, called Pol31/Pol32 in yeast, with pol ζ. Inclusion of Pol31/Pol32 in the pol δ/pol ζ holoenzymes requires a [4Fe–4S] cluster in C-termini of the catalytic subunits. Disruption of this cluster in Pol ζ or deletion of POL32 attenuates induced mutagenesis. Here we describe a novel mutation affecting the catalytic subunit of pol ζ, rev3ΔC, which provides insight into the regulation of pol switches. Strains with Rev3ΔC, lacking the entire C-terminal domain and therefore the platform for Pol31/Pol32 binding, are partially proficient in Pol32-dependent UV-induced mutagenesis. This suggests an additional role of Pol32 in TLS, beyond being a pol ζ subunit, related to pol δ. In search for members of this regulatory pathway, we examined the effects of Maintenance of Genome Stability 1 (Mgs1) protein on mutagenesis in the absence of Rev3–Pol31/Pol32 interaction. Mgs1 may compete with Pol32 for binding to PCNA. Mgs1 overproduction suppresses induced mutagenesis, but had no effect on UV-mutagenesis in the rev3ΔC strain, suggesting that Mgs1 exerts its inhibitory effect by acting specifically on Pol32 bound to pol ζ. The evidence for differential regulation of Pol32 in pol δ and pol ζ emphasizes the complexity of polymerase switches. PMID:24819597

  5. The cicada genus Procollina Metcalf, 1952 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae): redescription including fourteen new species, with a key to the species of the subtribe Dazina Kato, 1932 rev. stat., the description of the Aragualnini n. tribe, and one new combination.

    PubMed

    Sanborn, Allen F

    2018-03-06

    The cicada genus Procollina Metcalf, 1952 is redescribed. Procollina minima n. sp., P. parva n. sp., P. ustulata n. sp. and P. webbi n. sp. are described from Costa Rica, P. guatemalensis n. sp., P. mayaensis n. sp. and P. nigrapilosa n. sp. are described from Guatemala, P. hondurensis n. sp. is described from Honduras, P. convexa n. sp. and P. mesomaculata n. sp. are described from Guatemala and Honduras, P. ulnamaculata n. sp. is described from Guatemala and Mexico, P. nuevoleonensis n. sp. and P. tamaulipasensis n. sp. are described from Mexico, and P. nicaraguaensis n. sp. is described from Nicaragua. The current eighteen species of Procollina are listed along with their synonymies and known distribution of each species. The tribe Dazini Kato, 1932 is moved from the Cicadettinae Buckton, 1889 to the Cicadinae Latreille, 1802, synonymized with the Zammarini Distant, 1905, and revised to the subtribe Dazina rev. stat. based on the morphological characters of the representative genera. A key to the species of the Dazina rev. stat. is provided. Aragualnini n. tribe is erected for the genus Aragualna Champanhet, Boulard Gaiani, 2000 as it exhibits morphological characteristics of the Cicadettinae Buckton, 1889 rather than the Cicadinae as do the rest of the genera previously assigned to the Dazini. Finally, Cicada pennata (Distant, 1881) is reassigned to Neocicada Kato, 1932 to become Neocicada pennata (Distant, 1881) n. comb..

  6. MMW radar enhanced vision systems: the Helicopter Autonomous Landing System (HALS) and Radar-Enhanced Vision System (REVS) are rotary and fixed wing enhanced flight vision systems that enable safe flight operations in degraded visual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Jack; Schneider, John; Cariani, Pete

    2013-05-01

    Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has developed rotary and fixed wing millimeter wave radar enhanced vision systems. The Helicopter Autonomous Landing System (HALS) is a rotary-wing enhanced vision system that enables multi-ship landing, takeoff, and enroute flight in Degraded Visual Environments (DVE). HALS has been successfully flight tested in a variety of scenarios, from brown-out DVE landings, to enroute flight over mountainous terrain, to wire/cable detection during low-level flight. The Radar Enhanced Vision Systems (REVS) is a fixed-wing Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) undergoing prototype development testing. Both systems are based on a fast-scanning, threedimensional 94 GHz radar that produces real-time terrain and obstacle imagery. The radar imagery is fused with synthetic imagery of the surrounding terrain to form a long-range, wide field-of-view display. A symbology overlay is added to provide aircraft state information and, for HALS, approach and landing command guidance cuing. The combination of see-through imagery and symbology provides the key information a pilot needs to perform safe flight operations in DVE conditions. This paper discusses the HALS and REVS systems and technology, presents imagery, and summarizes the recent flight test results.

  7. Translesion Synthesis of the N(2)-2'-Deoxyguanosine Adduct of the Dietary Mutagen IQ in Human Cells: Error-Free Replication by DNA Polymerase κ and Mutagenic Bypass by DNA Polymerases η, ζ, and Rev1.

    PubMed

    Bose, Arindam; Millsap, Amy D; DeLeon, Arnie; Rizzo, Carmelo J; Basu, Ashis K

    2016-09-19

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) of the N(2)-2'-deoxyguanosine (dG-N(2)-IQ) adduct of the carcinogen 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) was investigated in human embryonic kidney 293T cells by replicating plasmid constructs in which the adduct was individually placed at each guanine (G1, G2, or G3) of the NarI sequence (5'-CG1G2CG3CC-3'). TLS efficiency was 38%, 29%, and 25% for the dG-N(2)-IQ located at G1, G2, and G3, respectively, which suggests that dG-N(2)-IQ is bypassed more efficiently by one or more DNA polymerases at G1 than at either G2 or G3. TLS efficiency was decreased 8-35% in cells with knockdown of pol η, pol κ, pol ι, pol ζ, or Rev1. Up to 75% reduction in TLS occurred when pol η, pol ζ, and Rev1 were simultaneously knocked down, suggesting that these three polymerases play important roles in dG-N(2)-IQ bypass. Mutation frequencies (MFs) of dG-N(2)-IQ at G1, G2, and G3 were 23%, 17%, and 11%, respectively, exhibiting a completely reverse trend of the previously reported MF of the C8-dG adduct of IQ (dG-C8-IQ), which is most mutagenic at G3 ( ( 2015 ) Nucleic Acids Res. 43 , 8340 - 8351 ). The major type of mutation induced by dG-N(2)-IQ was targeted G → T, as was reported for dG-C8-IQ. In each site, knockdown of pol κ resulted in an increase in MF, whereas MF was reduced when pol η, pol ι, pol ζ, or Rev1 was knocked down. The reduction in MF was most pronounced when pol η, pol ζ, and Rev1 were simultaneously knocked down and especially when the adduct was located at G3, where MF was reduced by 90%. We conclude that pol κ predominantly performs error-free TLS of the dG-N(2)-IQ adduct, whereas pols η, pol ζ, and Rev1 cooperatively carry out the error-prone TLS. However, in vitro experiments using yeast pol ζ and κ showed that the former was inefficient in full-length primer extension on dG-N(2)-IQ templates, whereas the latter was efficient in both error-free and error-prone extensions. We believe that the observed differences

  8. Translesion Synthesis of the N2-2′-Deoxyguanosine Adduct of the Dietary Mutagen IQ in Human Cells: Error-Free Replication by DNA Polymerase κ and Mutagenic Bypass by DNA Polymerases η, ζ, and Rev1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) of the N2-2′-deoxyguanosine (dG-N2-IQ) adduct of the carcinogen 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) was investigated in human embryonic kidney 293T cells by replicating plasmid constructs in which the adduct was individually placed at each guanine (G1, G2, or G3) of the NarI sequence (5′-CG1G2CG3CC-3′). TLS efficiency was 38%, 29%, and 25% for the dG-N2-IQ located at G1, G2, and G3, respectively, which suggests that dG-N2-IQ is bypassed more efficiently by one or more DNA polymerases at G1 than at either G2 or G3. TLS efficiency was decreased 8–35% in cells with knockdown of pol η, pol κ, pol ι, pol ζ, or Rev1. Up to 75% reduction in TLS occurred when pol η, pol ζ, and Rev1 were simultaneously knocked down, suggesting that these three polymerases play important roles in dG-N2-IQ bypass. Mutation frequencies (MFs) of dG-N2-IQ at G1, G2, and G3 were 23%, 17%, and 11%, respectively, exhibiting a completely reverse trend of the previously reported MF of the C8-dG adduct of IQ (dG-C8-IQ), which is most mutagenic at G3 ((2015) Nucleic Acids Res.43, 8340−835126220181). The major type of mutation induced by dG-N2-IQ was targeted G → T, as was reported for dG-C8-IQ. In each site, knockdown of pol κ resulted in an increase in MF, whereas MF was reduced when pol η, pol ι, pol ζ, or Rev1 was knocked down. The reduction in MF was most pronounced when pol η, pol ζ, and Rev1 were simultaneously knocked down and especially when the adduct was located at G3, where MF was reduced by 90%. We conclude that pol κ predominantly performs error-free TLS of the dG-N2-IQ adduct, whereas pols η, pol ζ, and Rev1 cooperatively carry out the error-prone TLS. However, in vitro experiments using yeast pol ζ and κ showed that the former was inefficient in full-length primer extension on dG-N2-IQ templates, whereas the latter was efficient in both error-free and error-prone extensions. We believe that the observed differences between

  9. Reclassification of Flexibacter tractuosus (Lewin 1969) Leadbetter 1974 and 'Microscilla sericea' Lewin 1969 in the genus Marivirga gen. nov. as Marivirga tractuosa comb. nov. and Marivirga sericea nom. rev., comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Nedashkovskaya, Olga I; Vancanneyt, Marc; Kim, Seung Bum; Bae, Kyung Sook

    2010-08-01

    The taxonomic position of the misclassified strains [Flexibacter] tractuosus KCTC 2958T and '[Microscilla] sericea' LMG 13021 was studied using a polyphasic approach. The two strains shared 99.1% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and 28% DNA-DNA relatedness. On the basis of the phylogenetic evidence supported by genotypic and phenotypic data [Flexibacter] tractuosus KCTC 2958T and '[Microscilla] sericea' LMG 13021 are classified as two distinct species in a novel genus, Marivirga, in the family 'Flammeovirgaceae', as Marivirga tractuosa comb. nov. and Marivirga sericea nom. rev., comb. nov., with strains KCTC 2958T (=ATCC 23168T =CIP 106410T =DSM 4126T =NBRC 15989T =NCIMB 1408T =VKM B-1430T) and LMG 13021T (=ATCC 23182T =NBRC 15983T =NCIMB 1403T), respectively, as the type strains. The type species is Marivirga tractuosa.

  10. The circadian clock regulates autophagy directly through the nuclear hormone receptor Nr1d1/Rev-erbα and indirectly via Cebpb/(C/ebpβ) in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guodong; Zhang, Fanmiao; Ye, Qiang; Wang, Han

    2016-08-02

    Autophagy is a highly conserved intracellular degradation system, and recently was shown to display circadian rhythms in mice. The mechanisms underlying circadian regulation of autophagy, however, are still unclear. Here, we observed that numbers of autophagosomes and autolysosomes exhibit daily rhythms in the zebrafish liver, and cebpb/(c/ebpβ) and various autophagy genes are rhythmically expressed in zebrafish larvae but significantly upregulated in per1b and TALEN-generated nr1d1/rev-erbα mutant fish, indicating that both Per1b and Nr1d1 play critical roles in autophagy rhythms. Luciferase reporter and ChIP assays show that the circadian clock directly regulates autophagy genes through Nr1d1, and also regulates transcription of cebpb through Per1b. We also found that fasting leads to altered expression of both circadian clock genes and autophagy genes in zebrafish adult peripheral organs. Further, transcriptome analysis reveals multiple functions of Nr1d1 in zebrafish. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for how the circadian clock regulates autophagy, imply that nutritional signaling affects both circadian regulation and autophagy activities in peripheral organs, and shed light on how circadian gene mutations act through autophagy to contribute to common metabolic diseases such as obesity.

  11. Comment on {open_quote}{open_quote}Comments on the use of asymmetric monochromators for x-ray diffraction on a synchrotron source{close_quote}{close_quote} [Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 66}, 2174 (1995)

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez del Rio, M.; Cerrina, F.

    1996-10-01

    In the article {open_quote}{open_quote}Comments on the use of asymmetric monochromators for x-ray diffraction on a synchrotron source,{close_quote}{close_quote} by Colin Nave, Ana Gonzalez, Graham Clark, Sean McSweeney, Stewart Cummings, and Michael Hart, Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 66}, 2174 (1995), paragraph II, the authors{close_quote} unfamiliarity with our modeling codes leads them to claim that our approach to treat bent-asymmetrically cut crystals in ray tracing calculations is incorrect. Since SHADOW is a widely used code, it is important to correct any misunderstandings, and we give here arguments to demonstrate that our approach is perfectly valid, and the arguments used by the authors tomore » criticize our method are based on an unwarranted conclusion extracted from one of our previous articles. We show that SHADOW, when properly run, treats the cases raised exactly. Indeed, their arguments provide a nice benchmark test for verifying the accuracy of SHADOW {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}« less

  12. Chandra High Resolution Camera (HRC). Rev. 59

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This monthly report discusses management and general status, mission support and operations, and science activities. A technical memorandum entitled "Failure Analysis of HRC Flight Relay" is included with the report.

  13. Federal Aviation Administration Acquisition Management System (Rev.)

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-06-02

    The Department of Transportation and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1996, : Public Law 104-50 (the "1996 DOT Appropriations Act"), was enacted November 15, : 1995. Section 348 of this Act directed the Administrator to develop and : implement ...

  14. Flexible pavement rehabilitation manual. Rev., June 2001

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-06-01

    This manual delineates the basic design strategies of the 1979 "Asphalt Concrete Overlay Design Manual" plus the many changes in procedures, and incorporates the use of new strategies and materials presently being used by Caltrans. Environmental conc...

  15. Rare Earths; The Fraternal Fifteen (Rev.)

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.

    1966-01-01

    Rare earths are a set of 15 elements: lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium and lutetium. They are not rare and not earths; they are metals and quite abundant. They are studied to develop commercial products which are beneficial to mankind, and because some rare earths are important to fission products.

  16. EMERALD REV.1. PWR Accident Activity Release

    SciTech Connect

    Brunot, W.K.; Fray, R.R.; Gillespie, S.G.

    1975-10-01

    The EMERALD program is designed for the calculation of radiation releases and exposures resulting from abnormal operation of a large pressurized water reactor (PWR). The approach used in EMERALD is similar to an analog simulation of a real system. Each component or volume in the plant which contains a radioactive material is represented by a subroutine which keeps track of the production, transfer, decay and absorption of radioactivity in that volume. During the course of the analysis of an accident, activity is transferred from subroutine to subroutine in the program as it would be transferred from place to place inmore » the plant. For example, in the calculation of the doses resulting from a loss-of-coolant accident the program first calculates the activity built up in the fuel before the accident, then releases some of this activity to the containment volume. Some of this activity is then released to the atmosphere. The rates of transfer, leakage, production, cleanup, decay, and release are read in as input to the program. Subroutines are also included which calculate the on-site and off-site radiation exposures at various distances for individual isotopes and sums of isotopes. The program contains a library of physical data for the twenty-five isotopes of most interest in licensing calculations, and other isotopes can be added or substituted. Because of the flexible nature of the simulation approach, the EMERALD program can be used for most calculations involving the production and release of radioactive materials during abnormal operation of a PWR. These include design, operational, and licensing studies.« less

  17. Nuclear Security: Target Analysis-rev

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Surinder Paul; Gibbs, Philip W.; Bultz, Garl A.

    2014-03-01

    The objectives of this presentation are to understand target identification, including roll-up and protracted theft; evaluate target identification in the SNRI; recognize the target characteristics and consequence levels; and understand graded safeguards.

  18. Improvements in geothermometry. Final technical report. Rev

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.; Dibble, W.; Parks, G.

    1982-08-01

    Alkali and alkaline earth geothermometers are useful for estimating geothermal reservoir temperatures, though a general theoretical basis has yet to be established and experimental calibration needs improvement. Equilibrium cation exchange between feldspars provided the original basis for the Na-K and Na-K-Ca geothermometers (Fournier and Truesdell, 1973), but theoretical, field and experimental evidence prove that neither equilibrium nor feldspars are necessary. Here, evidence is summarized in support of these observations, concluding that these geothermometers can be expected to have a surprisingly wide range of applicability, but that the reasons behind such broad applicability are not yet understood. Early experimental work provedmore » that water-rock interactions are slow at low temperatures, so experimental calibration at temperatures below 150/sup 0/ is impractical. Theoretical methods and field data were used instead for all work at low temperatures. Experimental methods were emphasized for temperatures above 150/sup 0/C, and the simplest possible solid and solution compositions were used to permit investigation of one process or question at a time. Unexpected results in experimental work prevented complete integration of the various portions of the investigation.« less

  19. Stimulus Law Revs up Research on Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul

    2009-01-01

    When President Obama dreams out loud, as he did in a speech last week, of a future when solar panels are as "cheap as paint" and buildings produce their own energy, researchers like the physicist Yang Yang are dreaming right along with him. Mr. Yang's laboratory is among hundreds at colleges around the country that stand to benefit from a new…

  20. ASC FY17 Implementation Plan, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, P. G.

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is an integrated technical program for maintaining the safety, surety, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of experimental facilities and programs, and the computational capabilities to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computationalmore » resources that support annual stockpile assessment and certification, study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balance of resources, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions.« less

  1. 2014 SRNL LDRD Annual Report, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Mcwhorter, S.

    2015-03-15

    Laboratory Directed Research and Development is a congressionally authorized program that provides the ‘innovation inspiration’ from which many of the Laboratory’s multi-discipline advancements are made in both science and engineering technology. The program is the backbone for insuring that scientific, technical and engineering capabilities can meet current and future needs. It is an important tool in reducing the probability of technological surprise by allowing laboratory technical staff room to innovate and keep abreast of scientific breakthroughs. Drawing from the synergism among the EM and NNSA missions, and work from other federal agencies ensures that LDRD is the key element inmore » maintaining the vitality of SRNL’s technical programs. The LDRD program aims to position the Laboratory for new business in clean energy, national security, nuclear materials management and environmental stewardship by leveraging the unique capabilities of the Laboratory to yield foundational scientific research in core business areas, while aligning with SRS strategic initiatives and maintaining a vision for ultimate DOE applications.« less

  2. The eukaryotic cofactor for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev protein, elF-5A, maps to chromosome 17p12-p13: Three elF-5A pseudogenes map to 10q23.3, 17q25, and 19q13.2

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkasserer, A.; Koettnitz, K.; Hauber, J.

    1995-02-10

    The eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) has been identified as an essential cofactor for the HIV-1 transactivator protein Rev. Rev plays a key role in the complex regulation of HIV-1 gene expression and thereby in the generation of infectious virus particles. Expression of eIF-5A is vital for Rev function, and inhibition of this interaction leads to a block of the viral replication cycle. In humans, four different eIF-5A genes have been identified. One codes for the eIF-5A protein and the other three are pseudogenes. Using a panel of somatic rodent-human cell hybrids in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis,more » we show that the four genes map to three different chromosomes. The coding eIF-5A gene (EIF5A) maps to 17p12-p13, and the three pseudogenes EIF5AP1, EIF5AP2, and EIF5AP3 map to 10q23.3, 17q25, and 19q13.2, respectively. This is the first localization report for a eukaryotic cofactor for a regulatory HIV-1 protein. 16 refs., 1 fig.« less

  3. Lactobacillus alimentarius sp. nov., nom rev. and Lactobacillus farciminis sp. nov., nom. rev.

    PubMed

    Reuter, G

    1983-01-01

    In 1970 two new species within the so-called subgenus "Streptobacterium" Orla-Jensen of the genus Lactobacillus were described (Reuter, 1970). They were named L. alimentarius with the type strain "R 13" (DSM 20249) and L. farciminis with the type strain "Rv 4na" (DSM 20184). Since these two names have so far not been included in the "Approved Lists of Bacterial Names" (Skerman et al., 1980) they are revived for the same organisms with the same type strains. Copyright © 1983 Gustav Fischer Verlag, Stuttgart/New York. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  4. A Guide to the Elements, Rev. Edition (by Albert Stwertka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Reviewed By Daniel

    1999-12-01

    This edition is identical in format and content to the 1996 edition, now sold as the "library edition", except that the names and information for elements 104-109 have been updated. My earlier review still applies; a page-by-page comparison found this edition identical to the first except as noted in the previous sentence. The major revision has been in size and price. The 50% price reduction is welcome, but the format was not changed when the size was reduced, and the resulting 9-point font puts readers at risk of eyestrain. I would like to correct one of the criticisms in my earlier review There is excellent discussion of the industrial uses of each element, as well as its most common source minerals. The more economically important elements are given extensive discussions, detailing industrial uses of the element and its compounds. However, biological activity is given spotty coverage. There is no mention - under "iron" or elsewhere - of the central biological role of iron in oxygen transport or of magnesium in photosynthesis. When coverage appears it is not bad: the roles of calcium in vertebrate and invertebrate skeletons, of fluorine in reducing tooth decay by changing hydroxyapatite to fluorapatite, and of cobalt in vitamin B12 are discussed. While information on transuranium elements has been updated, there has been no attempt to correct several minor errors in spelling, placement, or even information. On page 14 the 1s subshell appears as part of the L (n = 2) shell, and upon the electrolysis of molten sodium chloride on page 54, "sodium collects atthe cathode, and chloride [sic] at...the anode." On page 73 the etymology of "potash" is still given as "potassium-rich ash" rather than "ash burned down in pots", though it is obvious that the latter is intended. On page 74, a picture caption claims that black powder ("potassium nitrate, wood charcoal, and sulfur") is used in modern, high-powered rifle cartridges. In spite of the mistakes, which are relatively few, there is much good information in this book. The essential chemical properties of each element are detailed so that periodic trends may be easily seen; important industrial uses are presented in some detail; transuranium elements and radioisotopes are given careful coverage; and biological activity is (occasionally) discussed. The presentation is interesting and eye-catching, designed to hold the interest of a student who knows little about chemistry. And now, the price has been made more reasonable. While the hardcover edition remains $35.00, the paperback edition, at half price, should bring this useful book into wider use.

  5. ADVANTG An Automated Variance Reduction Parameter Generator, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, Scott W.; Johnson, Seth R.; Bevill, Aaron M.

    2015-08-01

    The primary objective of ADVANTG is to reduce both the user effort and the computational time required to obtain accurate and precise tally estimates across a broad range of challenging transport applications. ADVANTG has been applied to simulations of real-world radiation shielding, detection, and neutron activation problems. Examples of shielding applications include material damage and dose rate analyses of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor (Risner and Blakeman 2013) and the ITER Tokamak (Ibrahim et al. 2011). ADVANTG has been applied to a suite of radiation detection, safeguards, and special nuclear materialmore » movement detection test problems (Shaver et al. 2011). ADVANTG has also been used in the prediction of activation rates within light water reactor facilities (Pantelias and Mosher 2013). In these projects, ADVANTG was demonstrated to significantly increase the tally figure of merit (FOM) relative to an analog MCNP simulation. The ADVANTG-generated parameters were also shown to be more effective than manually generated geometry splitting parameters.« less

  6. 188Re(V) Nitrido Radiopharmaceuticals for Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Boschi, Alessandra; Martini, Petra; Uccelli, Licia

    2017-01-01

    The favorable nuclear properties of rhenium-188 for therapeutic application are described, together with new methods for the preparation of high yield and stable 188Re radiopharmaceuticals characterized by the presence of the nitride rhenium core in their final chemical structure. 188Re is readily available from an 188W/188Re generator system and a parallelism between the general synthetic procedures applied for the preparation of nitride technetium-99m and rhenium-188 theranostics radiopharmaceuticals is reported. Although some differences between the chemical characteristics of the two metallic nitrido fragments are highlighted, it is apparent that the same general procedures developed for the labelling of biologically active molecules with technetium-99m can be applied to rhenium-188 with minor modification. The availability of these chemical strategies, that allow the obtainment, in very high yield and in physiological condition, of 188Re radiopharmaceuticals, gives a new attractive prospective to employ this radionuclide for therapeutic applications. PMID:28106830

  7. 188Re(V) Nitrido Radiopharmaceuticals for Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Boschi, Alessandra; Martini, Petra; Uccelli, Licia

    2017-01-19

    The favorable nuclear properties of rhenium-188 for therapeutic application are described, together with new methods for the preparation of high yield and stable 188 Re radiopharmaceuticals characterized by the presence of the nitride rhenium core in their final chemical structure. 188 Re is readily available from an 188 W/ 188 Re generator system and a parallelism between the general synthetic procedures applied for the preparation of nitride technetium-99m and rhenium-188 theranostics radiopharmaceuticals is reported. Although some differences between the chemical characteristics of the two metallic nitrido fragments are highlighted, it is apparent that the same general procedures developed for the labelling of biologically active molecules with technetium-99m can be applied to rhenium-188 with minor modification. The availability of these chemical strategies, that allow the obtainment, in very high yield and in physiological condition, of 188 Re radiopharmaceuticals, gives a new attractive prospective to employ this radionuclide for therapeutic applications.

  8. Travel Demand Model Development and Application Guidelines (Rev.)

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1995-06-01

    There is a new challenge confronting state and regional agencies -- the : selection and development of appropriate analysis tools for application to the : planning problems presented by the 1990 Federal Clear Air Act Amendments (CAAA), : the 1991 Fed...

  9. Multi-pack Disposal Concepts for Spent Fuel (Rev. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    Hadgu, Teklu; Hardin, Ernest; Matteo, Edward N.

    2015-12-01

    At the initiation of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) R&D campaign, international geologic disposal programs and past work in the U.S. were surveyed to identify viable disposal concepts for crystalline, clay/shale, and salt host media (Hardin et al., 2012). Concepts for disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW) from reprocessing are relatively advanced in countries such as Finland, France, and Sweden. The UFD work quickly showed that these international concepts are all “enclosed,” whereby waste packages are emplaced in direct or close contact with natural or engineered materials . Alternative “open” modes (emplacement tunnels are keptmore » open after emplacement for extended ventilation) have been limited to the Yucca Mountain License Application Design (CRWMS M&O, 1999). Thermal analysis showed that, if “enclosed” concepts are constrained by peak package/buffer temperature, waste package capacity is limited to 4 PWR assemblies (or 9-BWR) in all media except salt. This information motivated separate studies: 1) extend the peak temperature tolerance of backfill materials, which is ongoing; and 2) develop small canisters (up to 4-PWR size) that can be grouped in larger multi-pack units for convenience of storage, transportation, and possibly disposal (should the disposal concept permit larger packages). A recent result from the second line of investigation is the Task Order 18 report: Generic Design for Small Standardized Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister Systems (EnergySolution, 2015). This report identifies disposal concepts for the small canisters (4-PWR size) drawing heavily on previous work, and for the multi-pack (16-PWR or 36-BWR).« less

  10. Hydrotreater/Distillation Column Hazard Analysis Report Rev. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, Peter P.; Wagner, Katie A.

    This project Hazard and Risk Analysis Report contains the results of several hazard analyses and risk assessments. An initial assessment was conducted in 2012, which included a multi-step approach ranging from design reviews to a formal What-If hazard analysis. A second What-If hazard analysis was completed during February 2013 to evaluate the operation of the hydrotreater/distillation column processes to be installed in a process enclosure within the Process Development Laboratory West (PDL-West) facility located on the PNNL campus. The qualitative analysis included participation of project and operations personnel and applicable subject matter experts. The analysis identified potential hazardous scenarios, eachmore » based on an initiating event coupled with a postulated upset condition. The unmitigated consequences of each hazardous scenario were generally characterized as a process upset; the exposure of personnel to steam, vapors or hazardous material; a spray or spill of hazardous material; the creation of a flammable atmosphere; or an energetic release from a pressure boundary.« less

  11. Perimeter intrusion alarm systems - May 1980 (Rev. 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This guide describes six types of perimeter intrusion alarm systems and sets forth criteria for their performance and use as a means acceptable to the NRC staff for meeting specified portions of the Commission's regulations. It also references a document (SAND 76-0554) that provides additional information in this area, especially on the subject of combining sensors to yield a better overall performance.

  12. Rev. Bill McLean vs. Arkansas Board of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overton, William R.

    1982-01-01

    The memorandum opinion constituting the district court's findings in the case of Arkansas' state law mandating instruction on creation in public schools is presented. Plaintiffs in the suit include Jewish and Christian individuals and organizations and those concerned with academic freedom issues. Defendants include state education officials and…

  13. Russia’s Approach to Cyber Warfare (1Rev)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-01

    Steinitz, CNA. Approved by: March 2017 Ken E. Gause, RTL International Affairs Group Center for Strategic Studies REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE...the help of information networks.”7 Russian military thinkers on information operations IO and asymmetric military tactics, Col. S.G. Chekinov (Res...adversaries, influence public opinion, and reduce an opponent’s will to resist.8 Cyber IO affords the Russian government covert means to achieve these

  14. International Field Reversible Thermal Connector (RevCon) Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    Design ....................................................................... 80 Figure 74: Pulsating - heat - pipe Embedded Design Delivered by MissStateU...University MissStateU finally delivered a pulsating - heat - pipe thermal connector. However, the performance did not amaze the audiences. The size and...We also cannot observe any oscillating dynamics during heating . Figure 74: Pulsating - heat - pipe Embedded Design Delivered by MissStateU

  15. Active Diagnosis of Navy Machinery Rev 2.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    electrical distribution and potable water supply systems. Because of these dependencies, ship auxiliary system failures can cause combat load failure...buildup generally causes a pipe to disconnect from a junction, causing water to leak . This limits the faults that are testable, since many of the faults...pipes, junctions, pumps, flow meters, thermal loads, check valve, and water tank. Each agent is responsible for maintaining its constraints locally

  16. InterMine Webservices for Phytozome (Rev2)

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Joseph; Goodstein, David; Rokhsar, Dan

    2014-07-10

    A datawarehousing framework for information provides a useful infrastructure for providers and users of genomic data. For providers, the infrastructure give them a consistent mechanism for extracting raw data. While for the users, the web services supported by the software allows them to make complex, and often unique, queries of the data. Previously, phytozome.net used BioMart to provide the infrastructure. As the complexity, scale and diversity of the dataset as grown, we decided to implement an InterMine web service on our servers. This change was largely motivated by the ability to have a more complex table structure and richer webmore » reporting mechanism than BioMart. For InterMine to achieve its more complex database schema it requires an XML description of the data and an appropriate loader. Unlimited one-to-many and many-to-many relationship between the tables can be enabled in the schema. We have implemented support for:1.) Genomes and annotations for the data in Phytozome. This set is the 48 organisms currently stored in a back end CHADO datastore. The data loaders are modified versions of the CHADO data adapters from FlyMine. 2.) Interproscan results from all proteins in the Phytozome database. 3.) Clusters of proteins into a grouped heirarchically by similarity. 4.) Cufflinks results from tissue-specific RNA-Seq data of Phytozome organisms. 5.) Diversity data (GATK and SnpEFF results) from a set of individual organism. The last two datatypes are new in this implementation of our web services. We anticipate that the scale of these data will increase considerably in the near future.« less

  17. Tank 19F Folding Crawler Final Evaluation, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Nance, T.

    2000-10-25

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to removing millions of gallons of high-level radioactive waste from 51 underground waste storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The primary radioactive waste constituents are strontium, plutonium,and cesium. It is recognized that the continued storage of this waste is a risk to the public, workers, and the environment. SRS was the first site in the DOE complex to have emptied and operationally closed a high-level radioactive waste tank. The task of emptying and closing the rest of the tanks will be completed by FY28.

  18. Reserve fleet manual [3rd ed., 1st rev.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-03-17

    The purpose of this document is to provide policy to the Regional Headquarters regarding vessel maintenance in the National Defense Reserve Fleet anchorages (fleet sites). This policy is for the acceptance of ships into, the maintenance of ships in, ...

  19. NASA DEVELOP Students Rev Up Response to Gulf Oil Spill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jason B.; Childs, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    After the April 20th explosion aboard the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico, the world witnessed one of the worst oil spill catastrophes in global history. In an effort to mitigate the disaster, the U.S. government moved quickly to establish a unified command for responding to the spill. Some of the command's most immediate needs were to track the movement of the surface oil slick, establish a baseline measurement of pre-oil coastal ecosystem conditions, and assess potential air quality and water hazards related to the spill. To help address these needs and assist the Federal response to the disaster, NASA deployed several of its airborne and satellite research sensors to collect an unprecedented amount of remotely-sensed data over the Gulf of Mexico region. Although some of these data were shared with the public via the media, much of the NASA data on the disaster was not well known to the Gulf Coast community. The need existed to inform the general public about these datasets and help improve understanding about how NASA's science research was contributing to oil spill response and recovery. With its extensive experience conducting community-oriented remote sensing projects and close ties to organizations around Gulf of Mexico, the NASA DEVELOP National Program stood in a unique position to meet this need.

  20. Foreign Object Debris: FOD Prevention QS210LSK-REV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randolph, Sherry; Seaman, John

    2004-01-01

    Housekeeping in the space industry? You may think the idea isn't technical enough for the shuttle program. Yet, eliminating Foreign Object Debris or FOD is an important goal for USA and NASA. The justification for this effort is based on data from the aeronautics industry. Experience has shown that if debris is not controlled, it may later cause a variety of in-flight issues. FOD can result in material damage, or make systems and equipment inoperable unsafe, or less efficient

  1. Secure Autonomous Automated Scheduling (SAAS). Rev. 1.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walke, Jon G.; Dikeman, Larry; Sage, Stephen P.; Miller, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes network-centric operations, where a virtual mission operations center autonomously receives sensor triggers, and schedules space and ground assets using Internet-based technologies and service-oriented architectures. For proof-of-concept purposes, sensor triggers are received from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) to determine targets for space-based sensors. The Surrey Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL) Disaster Monitoring Constellation satellite, the UK-DMC, is used as the space-based sensor. The UK-DMC's availability is determined via machine-to-machine communications using SSTL's mission planning system. Access to/from the UK-DMC for tasking and sensor data is via SSTL's and Universal Space Network's (USN) ground assets. The availability and scheduling of USN's assets can also be performed autonomously via machine-to-machine communications. All communication, both on the ground and between ground and space, uses open Internet standards

  2. Experimental Plan for EDF Energy Creep Rabbit Graphite Irradiations- Rev. 2 (replaces Rev. 0 ORNL/TM/2013/49).

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2014-07-01

    The experimental results obtained here will assist in the development and validation of future models of irradiation induced creep of graphite by providing the following data: Inert creep stain data from low to lifetime AGR fluence Inert creep-property data (especially CTE) from low to lifetime AGR fluence Effect of oxidation on creep modulus (by indirect comparison with experiment 1 and direct comparison with experiment 3 NB. Experiment 1 and 3 are not covered here) Data to develop a mechanistic understanding, including oAppropriate creep modulus (including pinning and high dose effects on structure) oInvestigation of CTE-creep strain behavior under inert conditionsmore » oInformation on the effect of applied stress/creep strain on crystallite orientation (requires XRD) oEffect of creep strain on micro-porosity (requires tomography & microscopy) This document describes the experimental work planned to meet the requirements of project technical specification [1] and EDF Energy requests for additional Pre-IE work. The PIE work is described in detail in this revision (Section 8 and 9).« less

  3. The Physics Analysis of a Gas Attenuator with Argon as a Working Gas (Rev. 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Bionta, R M; McKernan, M A

    2006-01-03

    A gas attenuator is an important element of the LCLS facility. The attenuator has to operate in a broad range of x-ray energies, provide attenuation coefficient between 1 and 10{sup 4} with the accuracy of 1% and, at the same time, be reliable and allow for many months of un-interrupted operation. A detailed design study of the attenuator based on the use of nitrogen as a working gas has been recently carried out by S. Shen [1]. In this note we assess the features of the attenuator based on the use of argon. We concentrate on the physics issues; themore » design features will probably be not that different from the aforementioned nitrogen attenuator. Although specific results obtained in our note pertain to argon, the general framework (and many equations obtained) are applicable also to the nitrogen attenuator. In the past, an analysis of the attenuator based on the use of a noble gas has already been carried out [2]. This analysis was performed for an extremely stringent set of specifications. In particular, a very large diameter for the unobstructed x-ray beam was set (1 cm) to accommodate the spontaneous radiation; the attenuator was supposed to cover the whole range of energies of the coherent radiation, from 800 eV to 8000 eV; the maximum attenuation was set at the level of 10{sup 4}; the use of solid attenuators was not allowed, as well as the use of rotating shutters. The need to reach a sufficient absorption at the high-energy end of the spectrum predetermined the choice of Xe as the working gas (in order to have a reasonable absorption at a not-too-high pressure). A sophisticated differential pumping system that included a Penning-type ion pump was suggested in order to minimize the gas leak into the undulator/accelerator part of the facility. A high cost of xenon meant also that an efficient (and expensive) gas-recovery system would have to be installed. The main parameter that determined the high cost and the complexity of the system was a large radius of the orifice. The present viewpoint allows for much smaller size of the orifice, a = 1.5 mm. The use of solid attenuators is also allowed for a higher-energy end of the spectrum. It is, therefore, worthwhile to reconsider various parameters of the gas attenuator for these much less stringent conditions. As a working gas we consider now the argon, which, on the one hand, provides reasonable absorption lengths and, on the other hand, is inexpensive enough to be exhausted into the atmosphere (no need for recovery). We concentrate on the processes in the main attenuation cell and just outside it, not touching upon a performance of the differential pumping system. The graphs presented in this report can serve for a general orientation only, not for getting exact numerical values of various parameters.« less

  4. Advanced Simulation & Computing FY15 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Michel; Archer, Bill; Matzen, M. Keith

    2014-09-16

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of experimental facilities and programs, and the computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities andmore » computational resources that support annual stockpile assessment and certification, study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balance of resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. As the program approaches the end of its second decade, ASC is intently focused on increasing predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (sufficient resolution, dimensionality, and scientific details), quantify critical margins and uncertainties, and resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Where possible, the program also enables the use of high-performance simulation and computing tools to address broader national security needs, such as foreign nuclear weapon assessments and counternuclear terrorism.« less

  5. Final Report. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing, VSL-03R3460-1, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Isabelle S.; Pegg, Ian L.; Gan, Hao

    2015-06-18

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  6. Rev. Dr. George W. Kerby: Evangelist for the Home and School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Michael

    1993-01-01

    George W. Kerby--minister, evangelist, and educational reformer--helped lead the Home and School movement in Canada during the 1920s and 1930s. He advocated child-centered relevant curriculum and cooperation between home and school. Kerby used ideas from both the progressive education and New Education movements but contributed to public…

  7. The N/Rev phenomenon in simulating a blade-element rotor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    When a simulation model produces frequencies that are beyond the bandwidth of a discrete implementation, anomalous frequencies appear within the bandwidth. Such is the case with blade element models of rotor systems, which are used in the real time, man in the loop simulation environment. Steady state, high frequency harmonics generated by these models, whether aliased or not, obscure piloted helicopter simulation responses. Since these harmonics are attenuated in actual rotorcraft (e.g., because of structural damping), a faithful environment representation for handling qualities purposes may be created from the original model by using certain filtering techniques, as outlined here. These include harmonic consideration, conventional filtering, and decontamination. The process of decontamination is of special interest because frequencies of importance to simulation operation are not attenuated, whereas superimposed aliased harmonics are.

  8. NREL Fuels and Engines R&D Revs Up Vehicle Efficiency, Performance

    SciTech Connect

    None

    NREL bridges fuels and engines R&D to maximize vehicle efficiency and performance. The lab’s fuels and engines research covers the full spectrum of innovation—from fuel chemistry, conversion, and combustion to the evaluation of how fuels interact with engine and vehicle design. This innovative approach has the potential to positively impact our economy, national energy security, and air quality.

  9. Erratum: Analogous intruder behavior near Ni, Sn, and Pb isotopes [Phys. Rev. C 92, 024319 (2015)

    DOE PAGES

    Liddick, S. N.; Walters, W. B.; Chiara, C. J.; ...

    2016-12-30

    Here, the interpretation of neutron knockout reactions leading to 69Ni, a transcription error was discovered in the third column of Table I in the original paper, reporting the absolute γ -ray intensities of transitions in 69Ni.

  10. High Density Lidar and Orthophotography in UXO Wide Area Assessment (Rev 1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    The demonstration provided important insights regarding the appropriate uses and confidence levels for both lidar and orthophoto technologies. At...Patterns ................................................................................ 3-34 3.7.18 Lidar and Orthophoto Positional Accuracy...02-D-2008 Page iii CONTENTS (Continued) APPENDICES A Lidar and Orthophoto Positional Accuracy Results B Combining Lidar Data from Multiple

  11. Balancing Officer Community Manpower through Decentralization: Granular Programming Revisited (1REV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-01

    supply-demand imbalances Economic theory identifies costs and benefits associated with decentralization. On the benefits side, decentralized decision...patterns rather than costs . Granular programming as a decentralized, market-based initiative The costs and benefits of decentralized (instead of...paygrade-specific rates were based on average MPN costs by paygrade. The benefits of this approach to granular programming are that it is conceptually

  12. Morphology as a basis for taxonomy of large spirochetes symbiotic in wood-eating cockroaches and termites: Pillotina gen. nov., nom. rev.; Pillotina calotermitidis sp. nov., nom. rev.; Diplocalyx gen. nov., nom. rev.; Diplocalyx calotermitidis sp. nov., nom. rev.; Hollandina gen. nov., nom.[TRUNCATED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bermudes, D.; Chase, D.; Margulis, L.

    1988-01-01

    The purposes of this paper are (i) to present a framework for the morphometric analysis of large uncultivable spirochetes that are symbiotic in wood-eating cockroaches and termites; (ii) to revive, in accordance with the rules of the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria, the names of three genera (Pillotina, Diplocalyx, and Hollandina) and three species (Pillotina calotermitidis, Diplocalyx calotermitidis, and Hollandina pterotermitidis) for the same organisms to which the names were originally applied, because these names were not included on the 1980 Approved Lists of Bacterial Names; and (iii) to formally propose the name Clevelandina reticulitermitidis for a new genus and species of spirochetes from the termite Reticulitermes tibialis. None of these genera and species has been cultivated either axenically or in mixed culture; hence, all are based on type-descriptive material.

  13. Advanced Simulation and Computing Fiscal Year 14 Implementation Plan, Rev. 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, Robert; McCoy, Michel; Archer, Bill

    2013-09-11

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of experimental facilities and programs, and the computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities andmore » computational resources that support annual stockpile assessment and certification, study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is now focused on increasing predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (sufficient resolution, dimensionality, and scientific details), quantify critical margins and uncertainties, and resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC’s business model is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools.« less

  14. Fluid Management Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1

    SciTech Connect

    Findlay, Rick

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Offsites Project to characterize the risk posed to human health and the environment as a result of testing at formerly used nuclear sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The scope of this Fluid Management Plan (FMP) is to support the subsurface investigation at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Shoal - Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Spring Range, southmore » of Highway 50, about 39 miles southeast of Fallon, Nevada. (Figure 1-1). This FMP will be used at the PSA in lieu of an individual discharge permit for each well or a general water pollution control permit for management of all fluids produced during the drilling, construction, development, testing, experimentation, and/or sampling of wells conducted by the Offsites Project. The FMP provides guidance for the management of fluids generated during investigation activities and provides the standards by which fluids may be discharged on site. Although the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), Bureau of Federal Facilities (BoFF) is not a signatory to this FMP, it is involved in the negotiation of the contents of this plan and approves the conditions contained within. The major elements of this FMP include: (1) establishment of a well-site operations strategy; (2) site design/layout; (3) monitoring of contamination indicators (monitoring program); (4) sump characterization (sump sampling program); (5) fluid management decision criteria and fluid disposition; and (6) reporting requirements.« less

  15. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev 2

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO 2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samplesmore » for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO 2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO 2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO 2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.47 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.53 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO 2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987°C in Capsule 6 to 1296°C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062°C in UO 2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10 -6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 2 x 10 -6. In the UO 2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10 -7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.« less

  16. Second Line of Defense: Electronic Maintenance Reports, Local Maintenance Provider User Guide, Rev. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, Richard J.

    2012-09-01

    The Electronic Maintenance Report forms allow Local Maintenance Providers (LMP) and other program staff to enter maintenance information into a simple and secure system. This document describes the features and information required to complete the Maintenance Report forms. It is expected that all Corrective Maintenance Reports from LMPs will be submitted electronically into the SLD Portal. As an exception (e.g., when access to the SLD Portal is unavailable), Maintenance Reports can be submitted via a secure Adobe PDF form available through the Sustainability Manager assigned to each country.

  17. TOPEX Software Document Series. Volume 5; Rev. 1; TOPEX GDR Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeffrey; Lockwood, Dennis; Hancock, David W., III

    2003-01-01

    This document is a compendium of the WFF TOPEX Software Development Team's knowledge regarding Geophysical Data Record (GDR) Processing. It includes many elements of a requirements document, a software specification document, a software design document, and a user's manual. In the more technical sections, this document assumes the reader is familiar with TOPEX and instrument files.

  18. Survey of Materials for Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactors Vol 1 Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph Collin

    2007-07-03

    Materials for fusion-fission hybrid reactors fall into several broad categories, including fuels, blanket and coolant materials, cladding, structural materials, shielding, and in the specific case of inertial-confinement fusion systems, laser and optical materials. This report surveys materials in all categories of materials except for those required for lasers and optics. Preferred collants include two molten salt mixtures known as FLIBE (Li2BeF4) and FLINABE (LiNaBeF4). In the case of homogenous liquid fuels, UF4 can be dissolved in these molten salt mixtures. The transmutation of lithium in this coolant produces very corrosive hydrofluoric acid species (HF and TF), which can rapidly degrademore » structural materials. Broad ranges of high-melting radiation-tolerant structural material have been proposed for fusion-fission reactor structures. These include a wide variety of steels and refractory alloys. Ferritic steels with oxide-dispersion strengthening and graphite have been given particular attention. Refractory metals are found in Groups IVB and VB of the periodic table, and include Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, and W, as serve as the basis of refractory alloys. Stable high-melting composites and amorphous metals may also be useful. Since amorphous metals have no lattice structure, neutron bombardment cannot dislodge atoms from lattice sites, and the materials would be immune from this specific mode of degradation. The free energy of formation of fluorides of the alloying elements found in steels and refractory alloys can be used to determine the relative stability of these materials in molten salts. The reduction of lithium transmutation products (H + and T +) drives the electrochemical corrosion process, and liberates aggressive fluoride ions that pair with ions formed from dissolved structural materials. Corrosion can be suppressed through the use of metallic Be and Li, though the molten salt becomes laden with colloidal suspensions of Be and Li corrosion products in the process. Alternatively, imposed currents and other high-temperature cathodic protection systems are envisioned for protection of the structural materials. This novel concept could prove to be enabling technology for such high-temperature molten-salt reactors. The use of UF 4 as a liquid-phase homogenous fuel is also complicated by redox control. For example, the oxidation of tetravalent uranium to hexavalent uranium could result in the formation of volatile UF 6. This too could be controlled through electrochemically manipulated oxidation and reduction reactions. In situ studies of pertinent electrochemical reactions in the molten salts are proposed, and are relevant to both the corrosive attack of structural materials, as well as the volatilization of fuel. Some consideration is given to the potential advantages of gravity fed falling-film blankets. Such systems may be easier to control than vortex systems, but would require that cylindrical reaction vessels be oriented with the centerline normal to the gravitational field.« less

  19. Configuring Eclipse for GMAT Builds: Instructions for Windows Users, Rev. 0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Darrel J.

    2007-01-01

    This document provides instructions about how to configure the Eclipse IDE to build GMAT on Windows based PCs. The current instructions are preliminary; the Windows builds using Eclipse are currently a bit crude. These instructions are intended to give you enough information to get Eclipse setup to build wxWidgets based executables in general, and GMAT in particular.

  20. 75 FR 53738 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Rev. Proc. 2007-35

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... Revenue Procedure Revenue Procedure 2007-35, Statistical Sampling for purposes of Section 199. DATES... through the Internet, at [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Statistical Sampling...: This revenue procedure provides for determining when statistical sampling may be used in purposes of...

  1. 78 FR 63568 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Rev. Proc. 2007-35

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Revenue Procedure 2007-35, Statistical Sampling for purposes of Section 199. DATES: Written comments... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Statistical Sampling for purposes of Section 199. OMB Number: 1545-2072... statistical sampling may be used in purposes of section 199, which provides a deduction for income...

  2. Site-directed Nanotherapeutics to Abrogate RRMS and Promote Remyelination Repair (Rev)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    in the labs additionally delayed the onset of the practical work.  Long lasting defect in freeze / dryer prevented a more in depth investigation of...drug content and reduced functionality of the peptides. Freezing of the NP without cryoprotection leads to disassembly; freezing with a cryoprotectant

  3. Release Fixed Heel Point (FHP) Accommodation Model Verification and Validation (V and V) Plan - Rev A

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-23

    5e. TASK NUMBER N/A 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER N/A 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) RDECOM-TARDEC-ACT Attn...occupant work space, central 90% of the Soldier population, encumbrance, posture and position, verification and validation, computer aided design...factors engineers could benefit by working with vehicle designers to perform virtual assessments in CAD when there is not enough time and/or funding to

  4. In Vivo Monitoring Program Manual, PNL-MA-574, Rev 5.1

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Timothy P.

    2011-09-12

    The following sections provide an overview of the administration for the In Vivo Monitoring Program (IVMP) for Hanford. This includes the organizational structure and program responsibilities; coordination of in vivo measurements; scheduling measurements; performing measurements; reporting results; and quality assurance.

  5. Creating Joint Leaders Today for a Successful Air Force Tomorrow (1REV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    armed force in the same grade and competitive category who are serving on, or have served on, the HQ staff of their armed force; and 2. Officers in the...period from the release of the promotion results and the pin-on date. 5 Department of the Air Force, HQ Air Force Personnel Center, Demographics and...2009), Section 619a. 9 ibid, Section 619a. 10 Department of the Air Force, HQ Air Force Personnel Center, A-1 Manpower Division. 11 Phone

  6. AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel processmore » development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E >0.18 MeV). We’ll say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10 -7 with only one capsule significantly exceeding this value. A maximum R/B of around 2 x 10 -7 was reached at the end of the irradiation in Capsule 5. Several shakedown issues were encountered and resolved during the first three cycles. These include the repair of minor gas line leaks; repair of faulty gas line valves; the need to position moisture monitors in regions of low radiation fields for proper functioning; the enforcement of proper on-line data storage and backup, the need to monitor thermocouple performance, correcting for detector spectral gain shift, and a change in the mass flow rate range of the neon flow controllers.« less

  7. MPT_DOE Final Report 12-15-16 rev1

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, Michael

    The goal of this project was to achieve breakthrough thermal efficiency on a light duty passenger car engine, with minimal impact to emissions. The enabling technology or technologies were to be relatively low cost and integrateable into existing production processes. Through the use of Turbulent Jet Ignition (TJI), an enabling technology for ultra-lean engine operation, the project team was able to meet or exceed all technical goals of this program.

  8. HLW Melter Control Strategy Without Visual Feedback VSL-12R2500-1 Rev 0

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A A.; Joseph, Innocent; Matlack, Keith S.

    2012-11-13

    Plans for the treatment of high level waste (HL W) at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) are based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the pretreatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form [I]. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat and mass transfer and increase glass melting rates. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth ofmore » ~ 1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HL W waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150°C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage.« less

  9. Non-Linear Editing for the Smaller College-Level Production Program, Rev. 2.0.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetzlaff, David

    This paper focuses on a specific topic and contention: Non-linear editing earns its place in a liberal arts setting because it is a superior tool to teach the concepts of how moving picture discourse is constructed through editing. The paper first points out that most students at small liberal arts colleges are not going to wind up working…

  10. Al-Shebab: An Al-Qaeda Affiliate Case Study (2Rev)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    explosives and car bombs . Al-Shebab’s joining Al-Qaeda had mutual benefits: AQ’s presence in East Africa dates to Osama Bin Laden’s time in Sudan...1992–1996) and the establishment of cells that perpetrated the August 7, 1998 bombings of the U.S. embassies in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam...to build an emirate in the Gedo region, but the project was crushed by Ethiopian forces after AIAI perpetrated several bombings in Ethiopia.25 The

  11. TA-3-38 Metals Fab SWPPP Rev 2 Jan 2017-Final

    SciTech Connect

    Burgin, Jillian Elizabeth

    The TA-3-38 MFS is part of LANL’s Utilities and Infrastructures (UI) Facilities Operations Directorate (FOD) with day-to-day management provided by the Logistics Division Central Shops (LOG-CS); which has established a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Team (PPT) whose members are responsible for assisting the facility manager in developing and revising the facility’s SWPPP as well as maintaining control measures and taking corrective actions when required. All PPT members will have access to either a hard copy or an electronic version of this SWPPP. A list of PPT members along with duties and contact information is provided in Appendix A of this SWPPP.

  12. TA-3-38 Carpenter's Shop SWPPP Rev 2 Jan 2017-Final

    SciTech Connect

    Burgin, Jillian Elizabeth

    The TA-3-38 CS is part of LANL’s Utilities and Infrastructure (UI) Facilities Operations Directorate (FOD) with day-to-day management provided by the Logistics Division Central Shops (LOG-CS); which has established a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Team (PPT) whose members are responsible for assisting the facility manager in developing and revising the facility’s SWPPP as well as maintaining control measures and taking corrective actions when required. All PPT members will have access to either a hard copy or an electronic version of this SWPPP. A list of PPT members along with duties and contact information is provided in Appendix A of this SWPPP

  13. Utility Assessment Report for SPIDERS Phase 2: Ft. Carson (Rev 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hadley, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    This document contains the Utility Assessment Report (UAR) for the Phase 2 operational Demonstration (OD) of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD). The UAR for Phase 2 shows that the SPIDERS system was able to meet the requirements of the Implementation Directive at Ft. Carson.

  14. Multiscale Porosity and Mechanical Properties of Mancos Shale: Evaluation of REV and Scale Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, J. E.; Dewers, T. A.; Yoon, H.; Mozley, P.

    2016-12-01

    Heterogeneity from the nanometer to core and larger length scales is a major challenge to understanding coupled processes in shale. To develop methods to address this challenge, we present application of high throughput multi-beam scanning electron microscopy (mSEM) and nano-to-micro-scale mechanics to the Mancos Shale. We use a 61-beam mSEM to collect 6 nm resolution SEM images at the scale of several square millimeters. These images are analyzed for pore size and shape characteristics including spatial correlation and structure. Nano-indentation, micropillar compression, and axisymmetric testing at multiple length scales allows for examining the influence of sampling size on mechanical response. The combined data set is used to: investigate representative elementary volumes (and areas for the 2D images) for the Mancos Shale; determine if scale separation occurs; and determine if transport and mechanical properties at a given length scale can be statistically defined. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Computer program FPIP-REV calculates fission product inventory for U-235 fission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. S.; Call, D. W.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program calculates fission product inventories and source strengths associated with the operation of U-235 fueled nuclear power reactor. It utilizes a fission-product nuclide library of 254 nuclides, and calculates the time dependent behavior of the fission product nuclides formed by fissioning of U-235.

  16. Erratum: Nonlinear Dirac equation solitary waves in external fields [Phys. Rev. E 86, 046602 (2012)

    DOE PAGES

    Mertens, Franz G.; Quintero, Niurka R.; Cooper, Fred; ...

    2016-05-10

    In Sec. IV of our original paper, we assumed a particular conservation law Eq. (4.6), which was true in the absence of external potentials, to derive some particular potentials for which we obtained solutions to the nonlinear Dirac equation (NLDE). Because the conservation law of Eq. (4.6) for the component T 11 of the energy-momentum tensor is not true in the presence of these external potentials, the solutions we found do not satisfy the NLDEs in the presence of these potentials. Thus all the equations from Eq. (4.6) through Eq. (4.44) are not correct, since the exact solutions that followedmore » in that section presumed Eq. (4.6) was true. Also Eqs. (A3)–(A5) are a restatement of Eq. (4.6) and also are not correct. These latter equations are also not used in Sec. V and beyond. The rest of our original paper (starting with Sec. V) was not concerned with exact solutions, rather it was concerned with how the exact solitary-wave solutions to the NLDE in the absence of an external potential responded to being in the presence of various external potentials. This Erratum corrects this mistake.« less

  17. Erratum: Three-cluster dynamics within an ab initio framework [Phys. Rev. C 88 , 034320 (2013)

    DOE PAGES

    Quaglioni, Sofia; Romero-Redondo, Carolina; Navrátil, Petr

    2016-07-14

    In this study, we have discovered a typographical error in the portion of code used in our original article to compute the probability distribution of Figs. 7–9 of Sec. III B 2. The correct results are shown in the figures below. The correct probability distribution now shows the characteristic prominence of the “dineutron” over the “cigar” configuration. In addition, the most-probable distance between the two neutrons in the latter configuration is close to 4 fm (rather than the erroneously reported 5 fm). The other results and conclusion of the original paper remain unaffected.

  18. UNCLASSIFIED TPBAR RELEASES, INCLUDING TRITIUM TTQP-1-091 Rev 14

    SciTech Connect

    Gruel, Robert L.; Love, Edward F.; Thornhill, Cheryl K.

    This document provides a listing of unclassified tritium release values that should be assumed for unclassified analysis. Much of the information is brought forth from the related documents listed in Section 5.0 to provide a single-source listing of unclassified release values. This information has been updated based on current design analysis and available experimental data.

  19. Super Strypi HWIL 6DOF (Hardware-In-Loop six-degree-of-freedom) Rev. 2175

    SciTech Connect

    Gilkey, Jeff C.; Harl, Nathan R.; Kowalchuk, Scott A.

    2016-02-23

    The Super Strypi HWIL is a six degree-of-freedom (6DOF) simulation for the Super Strypi Launch Vehicle. The simulation is used to test the NGC flight software including the navigation software. Aerodynamic and propulsive forces, mass properties, ACS (attitude control system) parameters are defined in input files. Output parameters are saved to a Matlab mat file.

  20. Helicopter noise data : letter report DTS-75-FA053-LR8 (rev. 1)

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1990-07-17

    One-third octave spectral noise data are provided for 15 helicopters from the TSC Helicopter Noise Data Library. The original data were measured by TSC in 1978 through 1983 and published in reports as listed below. The data have been adjusted to refe...

  1. Seventh International Workshop on Microgravity Combustion and Chemically Reacting Systems. Rev. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacksteder, Kurt (Compiler)

    2003-01-01

    The Seventh International Workshop on Microgravity Combustion and Chemically Reacting Systems was planned for June 3-6, 2003, in Cleveland, Ohio, near the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The new name for the workshop is based on the decision to broaden our scope to encompass support for future space exploration through basic and applied research in reacting systems that in some cases may not look like combustion. The workshop has been lengthened to 4 days with focus sessions on spacecraft fire safety and exploration-related research. We believe that the microgravity combustion science community is almost uniquely positioned to make substantial contributions to this new effort.

  2. Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP) DOE EE0005985 Final Technical Report Rev 1a

    SciTech Connect

    Pietryk, Steven

    The primary purpose of the VOWTAP was to advance the offshore wind industry in the United States (U.S.) by demonstrating innovative technologies and process solutions that would establish offshore wind as a cost-effective renewable energy resource. The VOWTAP Team proposed to design, construct, and operate a 12 megawatt (MW) offshore wind facility located approximately 27 statute miles (mi) (24 nautical miles [nm], 43 kilometers [km]) off the coast of Virginia. The proposed Project would consist of two Alstom Haliade™ 150-6 MW turbines mounted on inward battered guide structures (IBGS), a 34.5-kilovolt (kV) alternating current (AC) submarine cable interconnecting the WTGsmore » (inter-array cable), a 34.5-kV AC submarine transmission cable (export cable), and a 34.5 kV underground cable (onshore interconnection cable) that would connect the Project with existing Dominion infrastructure located in Virginia Beach, Virginia (Figure 1). Interconnection with the existing Dominion infrastructure would also require an onshore switch cabinet, a fiber optic cable, and new interconnection station to be located entirely within the boundaries of the Camp Pendleton State Military Reservation (Camp Pendleton). The VOWTAP balanced technology innovation with commercial readiness such that turbine operations were anticipated to commence by 2018. Dominion, as the leaseholder of the Virginia Wind Energy Area (WEA), anticipated leveraging lessons learned through the VOWTAP, and applying them to future commercial-scale offshore wind development.« less

  3. Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS) Rev 11.0 Acceptance Test Review

    SciTech Connect

    HOLM, M.J.

    The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 11 of the TMACS Monitor and Control System (TMACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. This document is intended to test the software portion of TMACS. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be talking to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab.

  4. Redox Control For Hanford HLW Feeds VSL-12R2530-1, REV 0

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A. A.; Matlack, Keith S.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2012-12-13

    The principal objectives of this work were to investigate the effects of processing simulated Hanford HLW at the estimated maximum concentrations of nitrates and oxalates and to identify strategies to mitigate any processing issues resulting from high concentrations of nitrates and oxalates. This report provides results for a series of tests that were performed on the DM10 melter system with simulated C-106/AY-102 HLW. The tests employed simulated HLW feeds containing variable amounts of nitrates and waste organic compounds corresponding to maximum concentrations proj ected for Hanford HLW streams in order to determine their effects on glass production rate, processing characteristics,more » glass redox conditions, melt pool foaming, and the tendency to form secondary phases. Such melter tests provide information on key process factors such as feed processing behavior, dynamic effects during processing, processing rates, off-gas amounts and compositions, foaming control, etc., that cannot be reliably obtained from crucible melts.« less

  5. Evaluation of Performance and Costs Associated with Anaerobic Dechlorination Techniques. Phase 1 Site Survey, Rev 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    OF ORGANIC SUBSTRATES USED FOR ANAEROBIC DECHLORINATION Substrate Bulk Price per Pound (dollars) Advantages Disadvantages Sugar ( Corn Syrup ...that have been added to stimulate dechlorination reactions in the subsurface include: lactate, butyrate, acetate, molasses, refined sugars ( fructose ...1 11 3 Butyrate 3 3 1 3 2 3 3 0 Molasses 19 15 7 9 5 0 9 9 Fructose 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 Lactose 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 Acetate 3 3 1 2 1 0 3 0 Methanol/Acetate

  6. TA-60-1 Heavy Equipment Shop Areas SWPPP Rev 2 Jan 2017-Final

    SciTech Connect

    Burgin, Jillian Elizabeth

    The primary activities and equipment areas at the facility that are potential stormwater pollution sources include; The storage of vehicles and heavy equipment awaiting repair; or repaired vehicles waiting to be picked up; The storage and handling of oils, anti-freeze, solvents, degreasers, batteries and other chemicals for the maintenance of vehicles and heavy equipment; and Equipment cleaning operations including exterior vehicle wash-down. Steam cleaning is only done on the steam cleaning pad area located at the north east end of Building 60-0001.

  7. TA-60 Warehouse and Salvage SWPPP Rev 2 Jan 2017-Final

    SciTech Connect

    Burgin, Jillian Elizabeth

    The Stormwater Pollution Prevention Team (PPT) for the TA-60-0002 Salvage and Warehouse Area consists of operations and management personnel from the facility, Multi-Sector General Permitting (MSGP) stormwater personnel from Environmental Compliance Programs (EPC-CP) organization, and Deployed Environmental Professionals. The EPC-CP representative is responsible for Laboratory compliance under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit regulations. The team members are selected on the basis of their familiarity with the activities at the facility and the potential impacts of those activities on stormwater runoff. The Warehouse and Salvage Yard are a single shift operation; therefore, a member of the PPT ismore » always present during operations.« less

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: IRAS Point Source Identifications (MacConnell, 1993; rev. 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacConnell, D. J.

    2010-08-01

    Most of the sources are south of the celestial equator and have been classified in increasing galactic longitude over the period Sept. 1985 to May 1992. They have been classified on Kodak I-N objective-prism plates taken primarily with the Curtis Schmidt telescope at Cerro Tololo, but some northern plates taken with the Burrell Schmidt at Kitt Peak were also used for classification. The spectra cover the range 680-880nm at a dispersion of 340nm/mm at the A-band, and the plate scale is 96.6"/mm. They are ideal for classifying M stars of type M3 and cooler (increasing strength of TiO and VO bands) and carbon stars (CN bands), but stars warmer than M2 and most S stars cannot be classified or identified as such. The M stars M3 and cooler can be separated into about five groups. The limiting mag of the deepest plates is I about 13.5. The IRAS PS were identified on transparent overlays made to the plate scale for each plate center, and the association of a spectrum with a given PS is usually unambiguous. In cases of doubt or offset, a comment is made. Note that there are some cases where the PSC gives an incorrect association on the basis of position, and the correct association is with a faint, uncatalogued M star. (3 data files).

  9. Integrated Hydrogeological Model of the General Separations Area, Vol. 2, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    FLACH, GREGORYK.

    1999-04-01

    The 15 mi2 General Separations Area (GSA) contains more than 35 RCRA and CERCLA waste units, and is the focus of numerous ongoing and anticipated contaminant migration and remedial alternatives studies. To meet the analysis needs of GSA remediation programs, a groundwater flow model of the area based on the FACT code was developed. The model is consistent with detailed characterization and monitoring data through 1996. Model preprocessing has been automated so that future updates and modifications can be performed quickly and efficiently. Most remedial action scenarios can be explicitly simulated, including vertical recirculation wells, vertical barriers, surface caps, pumpingmore » wells at arbitrary locations, specified drawdown within well casings (instead of flowrate), and wetland impacts of remedial actions. The model has a fine scale vertical mesh and heterogeneous conductivity field, and includes the vadose zone. Therefore, the model is well suited to support subsequent contaminant transport simulations. the model can provide a common framework for analyzing groundwater flow, contaminant migration, and remedial alternatives across Environmental Restoration programs within the GSA.« less

  10. How Methodology Decisions Affect the Variability of Schools Identified as Beating the Odds. REL 2015-071.rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abe, Yasuyo; Weinstock, Phyllis; Chan, Vincent; Meyers, Coby; Gerdeman, R. Dean; Brandt, W. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A number of states and school districts have identified schools that perform better than expected, given the populations they serve, in order to recognize school performance or to learn from local school practices and policies. These schools have been labeled "beating the odds," "high-performing/high-poverty,"…

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Evenson

    2006-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139 is located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 139 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-35-01, Burn Pit; (2) 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; (3) 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; (4) 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; (5) 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; (6) 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and (7) 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluatemore » and recommend corrective action alternatives with the exception of CASs 09-23-01 and 09-34-01. Regarding these two CASs, CAS 09-23-01 is a gravel gertie where a zero-yield test was conducted with all contamination confined to below ground within the area of the structure, and CAS 09-34-01 is an underground detection station where no contaminants are present. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the other five CASs where information is insufficient. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 4, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 139.« less

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 555: Septic Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with Errata

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor, Laura

    2005-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 555: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 555 is located in Areas 1, 3 and 6 of the NTS, which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada,more » and is comprised of the five corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-59-01, Area 1 Camp Septic System; (2) CAS 03-59-03, Core Handling Building Septic System; (3) CAS 06-20-05, Birdwell Dry Well; (4) CAS 06-59-01, Birdwell Septic System; and (5) CAS 06-59-02, National Cementers Septic System. An FFACO modification was approved on December 14, 2005, to include CAS 06-20-05, Birdwell Dry Well, as part of the scope of CAU 555. The work scope was expanded in this document to include the investigation of CAS 06-20-05. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 555 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before the evaluation and selection of corrective action alternatives.« less

  13. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Antihistamines for the Common Cold. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;11:CD009345].

    PubMed

    Sterrantino, Carmel; Duarte, Gonçalo; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2016-03-01

    The common cold is an acute, self-limiting inflammation of the mucosa of the upper airways, which may involve one or all the sinuses, nasopharynx, oropharynx and larynx. It is common to have at least one episode per year. Common cold symptoms, which may include sore throat, sneezing, nasal congestion, runny nose, headache, malaise and mild fever usually disappear within a few days without treatment. The causative agent of most colds is rhinovirus. Although not associated with mortality, common cold is associated with significant morbidity. There is no vaccine or cure for common cold and, therefore, their treatment is centered on relieving the symptoms. This Cochrane review aimed to synthesize the existing evidence about the clinical benefit of antihistamines, used as monotherapy, compared with placebo or no treatment in children and adult patients with common cold. A total of 18 randomized clinical trials with 4342 participants were included. Main results were: 1) Antihistamines have a small (days one and two) beneficial effect in the short term on the severity of overall symptoms in adult patients, although this effect is not present in the medium to long term; 2) antihistamines were not associated with a clinically significant beneficial effect on the individual symptoms (nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, and sneezing); 3) Antihistamines are not associated with an increased risk of adverse effects; 4) No conclusion can be made about the effectiveness of antihistamines in pediatric populations. Our interpretation of the results is that the available evidence is insufficient to support the prescription or buying OTC antihistamines to relieve the symptoms of common cold without allergic component.

  14. Acoustic Response and Detection of Marine Mammals Using an Advanced Digital Acoustic Recording Tag(Rev 3)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-13

    Victor Gonzalez, University of La Laguna. Fieldwork was supported by University of La Laguna and Governments of El Hierro and the Canary Islands...team in El Hierro and the Field team in Liguria. Fieldwork support was provided by Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), BluWest, NATO Undersea Research...Center (NURC), and Governments of El Hierro and the Canary Islands. Some of Peter Madsen’s work was supported by a Steno Fellowship from the

  15. History and Organization. U.S. Bureau of the Census--Factfinder for the Nation. CFF No. 4 (Rev.).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of the Census (DOC), Suitland, MD.

    This document chronicles the history and organization of census taking in the United States. The first census (1790) counted only free white males, free white females, all other free persons, and the number of slaves. Since that time the need for information has grown and the census has changed to meet new demands. The expansion of the census, the…

  16. 2002 Airborne Geophysical Survey at Pueblo of Isleta Bombing Targets, New Mexico, April 10 May 6, 2002 (Rev 1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    helicopter geophysical survey performed by US Army Engineering Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory ( ORNL ) over areas...Array Detection System NAD North American Datum ORAGS Oak Ridge Airborne Geophysical System ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory RMS Root...used by ORNL in 1999 for.....................5 Figure 2.4 ORAGS-Hammerhead airborne magnetometer system used at Badlands Bombing Range in FY2000

  17. Final Report. LAW Glass Formulation to Support AP-101 Actual Waste Testing, VSL-03R3470-2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, I. S.; Pegg, I. L.; Rielley, Elizabeth

    2015-06-22

    The main objective of the work was to develop and select a glass formulation for vitrification testing of the actual waste sample of LAW AP-101 at Battelle - Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD). Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses to demonstrate compliance with contract and processing requirements, evaluation of the ability to achieve waste loading requirements, testing to demonstrate compatibility of the glass melts with melter materials of construction, comparison of the properties of simulant and actual waste glasses, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  18. Final Report - Enhanced LAW Glass Formulation Testing, VSL-07R1130-1, Rev. 0, dated 10/05/07

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Matlack, K. S.

    2013-11-13

    The principal objective of this work was to extend the glass formulation methodology developed in the earlier work [2, 5, 6] for Envelope A, B and C waste compositions for development of compliant glass compositions targeting five high sodium-sulfur waste loading regions. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale tests, and tests on the DM10 melter system. The DM10 was used for several previous tests on LAW compositions to determine the maximum feed sulfur concentrations that can be processed without forming secondary sulfate phases on the surface of the melt pool. This melter is the most efficient melter platformmore » for screening glass compositions over a wide range of sulfate concentrations and therefore was selected for the present tests. The tests were conducted to provide information on melter processing characteristics and off-gas data, including sulfur incorporation and partitioning. As described above, the main objective was to identify the limits of waste loading in compliant glass formulations spanning the range of expected Na{sub 2}O and SO{sub 3} concentrations in the LAW glasses.« less

  19. Reclassification of "Dactylosporangium variesporum" as Saccharothrix variisporea corrig. (ex Tomita et al. 1977) sp. nov., nom. rev.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the course of a polyphasic study it was observed that “Dactylosporangium variesporum” NRRL B-16296 is misclassified as a member of the genus Dactylosporangium becasuse it exhibits properties consistent with its assignment to the genus Saccharothrix. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene se...

  20. Comparative Study on Migration, Urbanization and Development in the ESCAP Region (RAS/P13/79). Rev. version.

    PubMed

    1982-01-01

    Development of a study project by the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) on migration, urbanization, and development in the following countries is described: Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. The project's immediate goal is to assist decision makers in formulating population redistribution policies. It was recommended that ESCAP develop and test a migration questionnaire to assist member countries in undertaking surveys to study the interrelationships of migration and development. Upon completion of survey manuals to assist in the survey implementation, it was suggested that ESCAP run a series of in-country workshops to discuss the applications of survey results for policy formulation. A national migration survey will be taken in each country in the early 1980s in order to discern pattern and type of population mobility, factors that cause people to move or not to move, and the consequences of migration on places of origin and destination. A sample of 14,000 households in each country will be selected and 1 person of age 15-64 will be chosen as the respondent for each household. the following are some items which will be studied: 1) volume of migration streams within and between metropolitan areas and urban-rural areas; 2) decision making factors; 3) interactions between population movement and family structure, chages in fertility levels, employment, and education; 4) impact of agricultural systems on seasonal movements; 5) contributions of migrants to the cities; and 6) implications of international migration to and from the country. Leading family planning agencies will use these results to develop policy relating to population distribution, industry location, migration laws, regional economic planning, modern technology, and rural education. The management framework of the project is presented. After these results are published, government agencies can utilize them by incorporating direct questions on population movement into the national census, conducting demonstration projects to assess the impact of population movement programs, and training personnel.

  1. Radioactive emission data from Canadian nuclear generating stations, 1988 to 1997. Report number INFO-0210/Rev.8

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This edition incorporates histograms for each nuclear generating station (NGS) displaying the annual gaseous emissions containing tritium, in the form of tritium oxide, noble gases, iodine-131, and radioactive particulates, as well as the annual liquid emissions containing tritium, in the form of tritiated water, and gross beta-gamma activity. For Pickering NGS A and Gentilly 2, annual emissions of carbon-14 are depicted; and for Darlington NGS A, airborne emissions of elemental tritium since 1988 are shown. In each case, the emission data are compared to the derived emission limits.

  2. Publisher's Note: Branching ratio of the electromagnetic decay of the Σ+(1385) Phys. Rev. D 85, 052004 (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, D.; Hicks, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Boiarinov, S.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nasseripour, R.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tkachenko, S.; Vernarsky, B.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2012-03-01

    The CLAS detector was used to obtain the first ever measurement of the electromagnetic decay of the $\\Sigma^{*+}(1385)$ from the reaction $\\gamma p \\to K^0 \\Sigma^{*+}(1385)$. A real photon beam with a maximum energy of 3.8 GeV was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target, resulting in the photoproduction of the kaon and $\\Sigma^*$ hyperon. Kinematic fitting was used to separate the reaction channel from the background processes. The fitting algorithm exploited a new method to kinematically fit neutrons in the CLAS detector, leading to the partial width measurement of $250.0\\pm56.9(stat)^{+34.3}_{-41.2}(sys)$ keV. A U-spin symmetry test using the SU(3) flavor-multiplet representation yields predictions for the $\\Sigma^{*+}(1385)\\to\\Sigma^{+}\\gamma$ and $\\Sigma^{*0}(1385)\\to\\Lambda\\gamma$ partial widths that agree with the experimental measurements.

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 528, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination (PCBs), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in the southwestern portion of Area 25 on the NTS in Jackass Flats (adjacent to Test Cell C [TCC]), CAU 528 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-27-03, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Surface Contamination. Test Cell C was built to support the Nuclear Rocket Development Stationmore » (operational between 1959 and 1973) activities including conducting ground tests and static firings of nuclear engine reactors. Although CAU 528 was not considered as a direct potential source of PCBs and petroleum contamination, two potential sources of contamination have nevertheless been identified from an unknown source in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. This CAU's close proximity to TCC prompted Shaw to collect surface soil samples, which have indicated the presence of PCBs extending throughout the area to the north, east, south, and even to the edge of the western boundary. Based on this information, more extensive field investigation activities are being planned, the results of which are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.« less

  4. Upper Bound Radiation Dose Assessment for Military Personnel at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, between 1962 and 1979 (2REV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-30

    veterans, their dependents , the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and the Naval Dosimetry Center regarding the VA radiogenic disease claims process. 15...nonexistent (HPS, 2010). Finally, to assist McMurdo Station veterans, their dependents , the VA, and the Naval Dosimetry Center, this report includes...24 h d−1 for 180 d Reasonable assumption 47 Parameter Value Rationale/Reference/Comment Dose coefficients Depends on organ 5-micrometer (µm

  5. Technical Report of the NAEP Mathematics Assessment in Puerto Rico: Focus on Statistical Issues (NCES 2007-462rev)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, G. P.; Ahmed, S.; Sikali, E.; Waits, T.; Sloan, M.; Salvucci, S.

    2007-01-01

    The Nation's Report Card[TM] informs the public about the academic achievement of elementary and secondary students in the United States and its jurisdictions, including Puerto Rico. In 2003, a trial NAEP mathematics assessment was administered in Spanish to public school students at grades 4 and 8 in Puerto Rico. Based on preliminary analyses of…

  6. Consultant selection guidebook : procedures for selecting consultants for FHWA federal-aid projects and state funded projects. [Rev. 2002

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-01-01

    This Guidebook provides an overview of procedures for consultant selection. The local agencies that intend to request federal and state funds for reimbursement of consultant services should follow specific selection and contracting procedures. These ...

  7. 75 FR 32493 - NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... has been proposed by these two agencies to address emergency planning and preparedness for Nuclear..., to measure the adequacy of emergency preparedness plans of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) owners and... changes proposed in FEMA's draft Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program Manual and Supplement 4 to...

  8. PLAN-TA9-2443(U), Rev. B Remediated Nitrate Salt (RNS) Surrogate Formulation and Testing Standard Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey Wayne

    2016-03-16

    This document identifies scope and some general procedural steps for performing Remediated Nitrate Salt (RNS) Surrogate Formulation and Testing. This Test Plan describes the requirements, responsibilities, and process for preparing and testing a range of chemical surrogates intended to mimic the energetic response of waste created during processing of legacy nitrate salts. The surrogates developed are expected to bound1 the thermal and mechanical sensitivity of such waste, allowing for the development of process parameters required to minimize the risk to worker and public when processing this waste. Such parameters will be based on the worst-case kinetic parameters as derived frommore » APTAC measurements as well as the development of controls to mitigate sensitivities that may exist due to friction, impact, and spark. This Test Plan will define the scope and technical approach for activities that implement Quality Assurance requirements relevant to formulation and testing.« less

  9. Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading of Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge: A Preliminary Techno-Economic Analysis, Rev.1

    SciTech Connect

    Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Zhu, Yunhua; Jones, Susanne B.

    A preliminary process model and techno-economic analysis (TEA) was completed for fuel produced from hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of sludge waste from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and subsequent biocrude upgrading. The model is adapted from previous work by Jones et al. (2014) for algae HTL, using experimental data generated in fiscal year 2015 (FY15) bench-scale HTL testing of sludge waste streams. Testing was performed on sludge samples received from Metro Vancouver’s Annacis Island WWTP (Vancouver, B.C.) as part of a collaborative project with the Water Environment and Reuse Foundation (WERF). The full set of sludge HTL testing data frommore » this effort will be documented in a separate report to be issued by WERF. This analysis is based on limited testing data and therefore should be considered preliminary. In addition, the testing was conducted with the goal of successful operation, and therefore does not represent an optimized process. Future refinements are necessary to improve the robustness of the model, including a cross-check of modeled biocrude components with the experimental GCMS data and investigation of equipment costs most appropriate at the relatively small scales used here. Environmental sustainability metrics analysis is also needed to understand the broader impact of this technology pathway. The base case scenario for the analysis consists of 10 HTL plants, each processing 100 dry U.S. ton/day (92.4 ton/day on a dry, ash-free basis) of sludge waste and producing 234 barrel per stream day (BPSD) biocrude, feeding into a centralized biocrude upgrading facility that produces 2,020 barrel per standard day of final fuel. This scale was chosen based upon initial wastewater treatment plant data collected by PNNL’s resource assessment team from the EPA’s Clean Watersheds Needs Survey database (EPA 2015a) and a rough estimate of what the potential sludge availability might be within a 100-mile radius. In addition, we received valuable feedback from the wastewater treatment industry as part of the WERF collaboration that helped form the basis for the selected HTL and upgrading plant scales and feedstock credit (current cost of disposal). It is assumed that the sludge is currently disposed of at $16.20/wet ton ($46/dry ton at 35% solids; $50/ton dry, ash-free basis) and this is included as a feedstock credit in the operating costs. The base case assumptions result in a minimum biocrude selling price of $3.8/gge and a minimum final upgraded fuel selling price of $4.9/gge. Several areas of process improvement and refinements to the analysis have the potential to significantly improve economics relative to the base case: •Optimization of HTL sludge feed solids content •Optimization of HTL biocrude yield •Optimization of HTL reactor liquid hourly space velocity (LHSV) •Optimization of fuel yield from hydrotreating •Combined large and small HTL scales specific to regions (e.g., metropolitan and suburban plants) Combined improvements believed to be achievable in these areas can potentially reduce the minimum selling price of biocrude and final upgraded fuel by about 50%. Further improvements may be possible through recovery of higher value components from the HTL aqueous phase, as being investigated under separate PNNL projects. Upgrading the biocrude at an existing petroleum refinery could also reduce the MFSP, although this option requires further testing to ensure compatibility and mitigation of risks to a refinery. And finally, recycling the HTL aqueous phase product stream back to the headworks of the WWTP (with no catalytic hydrothermal gasification treatment) can significantly reduce cost. This option is uniquely appropriate for application at a water treatment facility but also requires further investigation to determine any technical and economic challenges related to the extra chemical oxygen demand (COD) associated with the recycled water.« less

  10. The Same, Yet Different: United States and Gulf State Interests in the Post-Arab Spring Maghreb (1Rev)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-01

    but also to deepen Gulf involvement in tourism , real estate, and other non-oil sectors such as industry and defense. There is particular interest...will continue to develop Moroccan industries, especially tourism .43 Aid 38 Sara Hamdan, “Gulf...From 2009 to 2014, Qatar invested approximately $600 million in Algeria, into sectors such as tourism , banking, trade, and real estate. In November

  11. Effects of Problem Based Economics on High School Economics Instruction. Final Report. NCEE 2010-4022rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Neal; Hanson, Thomas; Huang, Chun-Wei; Hirschman, Becca; Huang, Min

    2011-01-01

    This study examines whether the Problem Based Economics curriculum developed by the Buck Institute for Education improves grade 12 students' content knowledge as measured by the Test of Economic Literacy, a test refined by the National Council on Economic Education (NCEE) over decades. Students' problem-solving skills in economics were also…

  12. Field Demonstration Report Applied Innovative Technologies for Characterization of Nitrocellulose- and Nitroglycerine Contaminated Buildings and Soils, Rev 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-05

    positive / false negatives. The quantitative on-site methods were evaluated using linear regression analysis and relative percent difference (RPD) comparison...Conclusion ...............................................................................................3-9 3.2 Quantitative Analysis Using CRREL...3-37 3.3 Quantitative Analysis for NG by GC/TID.........................................................3-38 3.3.1 Introduction

  13. Developing Performance Cost Index Targets for ASHRAE Standard 90.1 Appendix G – Performance Rating Method - Rev.1

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.

    2016-03-01

    Appendix G, the Performance Rating Method in ASHRAE Standard 90.1 has been updated to make two significant changes for the 2016 edition, to be published in October of 2016. First, it allows Appendix G to be used as a third path for compliance with the standard in addition to rating beyond code building performance. This prevents modelers from having to develop separate building models for code compliance and beyond code programs. Using this new version of Appendix G to show compliance with the 2016 edition of the standard, the proposed building design needs to have a performance cost index (PCI)more » less than targets shown in a new table based on building type and climate zone. The second change is that the baseline design is now fixed at a stable level of performance set approximately equal to the 2004 code. Rather than changing the stringency of the baseline with each subsequent edition of the standard, compliance with new editions will simply require a reduced PCI (a PCI of zero is a net-zero building). Using this approach, buildings of any era can be rated using the same method. The intent is that any building energy code or beyond code program can use this methodology and merely set the appropriate PCI target for their needs. This report discusses the process used to set performance criteria for compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2016 and suggests a method for demonstrating compliance with other codes and beyond code programs.« less

  14. Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits: a selected, annotated bibliography. Vol. 2, Rev. 1. [490 references

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.M.; Brock, M.L.; Garland, P.A.

    1979-07-01

    This bibliography, a compilation of 490 references, is the second in a series compiled from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Bibliographic Data Base. This data base is one of six data bases created by the Ecological Sciences Information Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy. Major emphasis for this volume has been placed on uranium geology, encompassing deposition, genesis of ore deposits, and ore controls; and prospecting techniques, including geochemistry and aerial reconnaissance. The following indexes are provided to aid the user in locating references of interest: author, geographic location, quadranglemore » name, geoformational feature, taxonomic name, and keyword.« less

  15. Rathayibacter agropyri sp. nov., nom. rev., (syn. Aplanobacter agropyri, ex. O’Gara, 1916) isolated from western wheatgrass (Agropyron smithii)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rathayibacter toxicus is a select agent plant pathogen largely due to the fact that it generates a toxin (tunicamycin) in forage grasses that causes death in livestock, a disease called annual ryegrass toxicity (ARGT). The majority of previous literature suggested that toxin production and ARGT was ...

  16. An Overview of Classes Taken and Credits Earned by Beginning Postsecondary Students. WEB Tables. NCES 2013-151rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, Alexandria Walton; Horn, Laura

    2012-01-01

    These Web Tables provide an overview of classes taken and credits earned by a nationwide sample of first-time beginning postsecondary students based on data from the Postsecondary Education Transcript Study (PETS) of the 2004/09 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study. PETS collected transcripts from all the postsecondary institutions…

  17. Hypermutation signature reveals a slippage and realignment model of translesion synthesis by Rev3 polymerase in cisplatin-treated yeast.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Romulo; Shen, Yaoqing; Lujan, Scott A; Jones, Steven J M; Stirling, Peter C

    2017-03-07

    Gene-gene or gene-drug interactions are typically quantified using fitness as a readout because the data are continuous and easily measured in high throughput. However, to what extent fitness captures the range of other phenotypes that show synergistic effects is usually unknown. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and focusing on a matrix of DNA repair mutants and genotoxic drugs, we quantify 76 gene-drug interactions based on both mutation rate and fitness and find that these parameters are not connected. Independent of fitness defects, we identified six cases of synthetic hypermutation, where the combined effect of the drug and mutant on mutation rate was greater than predicted. One example occurred when yeast lacking RA D1 were exposed to cisplatin, and we characterized this interaction using whole-genome sequencing. Our sequencing results indicate mutagenesis by cisplatin in rad1 Δ cells appeared to depend almost entirely on interstrand cross-links at GpCpN motifs. Interestingly, our data suggest that the following base on the template strand dictates the addition of the mutated base. This result differs from cisplatin mutation signatures in XPF-deficient Caenorhabditis elegans and supports a model in which translesion synthesis polymerases perform a slippage and realignment extension across from the damaged base. Accordingly, DNA polymerase ζ activity was essential for mutagenesis in cisplatin-treated rad1 Δ cells. Together these data reveal the potential to gain new mechanistic insights from nonfitness measures of gene-drug interactions and extend the use of mutation accumulation and whole-genome sequencing analysis to define DNA repair mechanisms.

  18. The Rev. John Bracken v. the Visitors of William and Mary College: A Post-Revolutionary Problem in Visitatorial Jurisdiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Reforms in 1779 at the College of William and Mary caused a professor to be dismissed, after which he took legal action against the institution. It is concluded that English corporate law was abused in defending against the professor's action. (Journal availability: College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185, $3.00.) (MSE)

  19. Erratum: "Low vibration laboratory with a single-stage vibration isolation for microscopy applications" [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 88, 023703 (2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtländer, Bert; Coenen, Peter; Cherepanov, Vasily; Borgens, Peter; Duden, Thomas; Tautz, F. Stefan

    2018-01-01

    The construction and the vibrational performance of a low vibration laboratory for microscopy applications comprising a 100 ton floating foundation supported by passive pneumatic isolators (air springs), which rest themselves on a 200 ton solid base plate is discussed. The optimization of the air spring system lead to a vibration level on the floating floor below that induced by an acceleration of 10 ng for most frequencies. Additional acoustic and electromagnetic isolation is accomplished by a room-in-room concept.

  20. Concept Area Three Objectives and Test Items (Rev.). Part One and Part Two. Economic Analysis Course. Segments 50 - 84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling Inst., Washington, DC. Educational Technology Center.

    A multimedia course in economic analysis was developed and used in conjunction with the United States Naval Academy. (See ED 043 790 and ED 043 791 for final reports of the project evaluation and development model.) This report deals with concept area three of the course, which focuses on microeconomics. The behavioral objectives, hierarchy…

  1. Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) Version 5.0, Rev. 2.0 (User’s Guide)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-03

    output (I/O) system. The framework provides tools for common modeling functions, as well as regridding, data decomposition, and communication on...Within this script, the user must specify both the site (DSRC or local) and the platform ( DAVINCI , EINSTEIN, or local machine) on which COAMPS is...being run. For example: site=navy_dsrc (for DSRC usage) site=nrlssc (for local NRL-SSC usage) platform= davinci or einstein (for DSRC usage

  2. Final Report - Management of High Sulfur HLW, VSL-13R2920-1, Rev. 0, dated 10/31/2013

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.

    2013-11-13

    The present report describes results from a series of small-scale crucible tests to determine the extent of corrosion associated with sulfur containing HLW glasses and to develop a glass composition for a sulfur-rich HLW waste stream, which was then subjected to small-scale melter testing to determine the maximum acceptable sulfate loadings. In the present work, a new glass formulation was developed and tested for a projected Hanford HLW composition with sulfate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading. Testing was then performed on the DM10 melter system at successively higher waste loadings to determine the maximum waste loading without themore » formation of a separate sulfate salt phase. Small scale corrosion testing was also conducted using the glass developed in the present work, the glass developed in the initial phase of this work [26], and a high iron composition, all at maximum sulfur concentrations determined from melter testing, in order to assess the extent of Inconel 690 and MA758 corrosion at elevated sulfate contents.« less

  3. Early Childhood Program Participation, from the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2012. First Look. NCES 2013-029.Rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamedova, Saida; Redford, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This report presents data on the early care and education arrangements and selected family activities of children in the United States from birth through the age of 5 who were not yet enrolled in kindergarten in the spring of 2012. The report also presents data on parents' satisfaction with various aspects of these care arrangements and on their…

  4. OECD 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test plan, Rev. 0 January 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1)more » resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. The first of these two tests, CCI-1, was conducted on December 19, 2003. This test investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The second of these two planned tests, CCI-2, will be conducted with a nearly identical test facility and experiment boundary conditions, but with a Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete test section to investigate the effect of concrete type on the two-dimensional core-concrete interaction and debris cooling behavior. The objective of this report is to provide the overall test plan for CCI-2 to enable pretest calculations to be carried out. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus, followed by a description of the planned test operating procedure. Overall specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1.« less

  5. Erratum: Creation of X-Ray Transparency of Matter by Stimulated Elastic Forward Scattering [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 , 107402 (2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Stöhr, J.; Scherz, A.

    X-ray absorption by matter has long been described by the famous Beer-Lambert law. Here we show how this fundamental law needs to be modified for high-intensity coherent x-ray pulses, now available at x-ray free electron lasers, due to the onset of stimulated elastic forward scattering. We present an analytical expression for the modified polarization-dependent Beer-Lambert law for the case of resonant core-to-valence electronic transitions and incident transform limited x-ray pulses. Upon transmission through a solid, the absorption and dichroic contrasts are found to vanish with increasing x-ray intensity, with the stimulation threshold lowered by orders of magnitude through a super-radiativemore » coherent effect. Our results have broad implications for the study of matter with x-ray lasers.« less

  6. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Boehlecke

    2004-04-01

    The six bunkers included in CAU 204 were primarily used to monitor atmospheric testing or store munitions. The ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'' (NNSA/NV, 2002a) provides information relating to the history, planning, and scope of the investigation; therefore, it will not be repeated in this CADD. This CADD identifies potential corrective action alternatives and provides a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204. The evaluation of corrective action alternatives is based on process knowledge and the results of investigative activitiesmore » conducted in accordance with the CAIP (NNSA/NV, 2002a) that was approved prior to the start of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI). Record of Technical Change (ROTC) No. 1 to the CAIP (approval pending) documents changes to the preliminary action levels (PALs) agreed to by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This ROTC specifically discusses the radiological PALs and their application to the findings of the CAU 204 corrective action investigation. The scope of this CADD consists of the following: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204.« less

  7. An Algorithm for the Vertical Structure of Aerosol Extinction in the Lowest Kilometer of the Atmosphere: Rev. 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-11-01

    inversion layer, or the well-mixed boundary layer. In such cases a low cloud ceiling is not present. In all instances the atmospheric extinction profiles...height, radiation fog depth, or the inversion layer height. The visibility regions and several representative vertical profiles of extinction are...the coefficient B can be found by B = ln(D/A) . (2) The coefficient B is sometimes a function of the cloud ceiling height, the inversion layer height

  8. Publisher's Note: System of classical nonlinear oscillators as a coarse-grained quantum system [Phys. Rev. A 84, 022103 (2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Radonjic, Milan; Prvanovic, Slobodan; Buric, Nikola

    2011-08-15

    This paper was published online on 2 August 2011 with a typographical error in an author name in the author list. The first author's name should be 'Milan Radonji Acute-Accent c'. The name has been corrected as of 16 August 2011. The name is correct in the printed version of the journal.

  9. 77 FR 30546 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Form HUD-40221(rev) “LOCCS/VRS Self...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ...: Ginger Macomber, SHOP Program Manager, Office of Affordable Housing Programs, U.S. Department of Housing...-4605 (this is not a toll-free number) or by email at ginger[email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY...

  10. Highlights From the 2003 International Adult Literacy and Lifeskills Survey (ALL). Issue Brief NCES 2005-117rev.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemke, Mariann; Miller, David; Johnston, Jamie; Krenzke, Tom; Alvarez-Rojas, Laura; Kastberg, David; Jocelyn, Leslie

    2005-01-01

    The Adult Literacy and Lifeskills Survey (ALL) is an international comparative study conducted in 2003 to provide participating countries with information about the skills of their adult populations. ALL builds upon earlier national and international studies of adult literacy. Information from ALL addresses questions such as: (1) What is the…

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Strand

    2004-06-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental corrective action alternatives. Corrective Action Unit 151 is located in Areas 2, 12, 18, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 151 is comprised of the nine Corrective Action Sites (CAS) listed below: (1) 02-05-01, UE-2ce Pond; (2)more » 12-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (6); (3) 12-04-01, Septic Tanks; (4) 12-04-02, Septic Tanks; (5) 12-04-03, Septic Tank; (6) 12-47-01, Wastewater Pond; (7) 18-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; (8) 18-99-09, Sewer Line (Exposed); and (9) 20-19-02, Photochemical Drain. The CASs within CAU 151 are discharge and collection systems. Corrective Action Site 02-05-01 is located in Area 2 and is a well-water collection pond used as a part of the Nash test. Corrective Action Sites 12-03-01, 12-04-01, 12-04-02, 12-04-03, and 12-47-01 are located in Area 12 and are comprised of sewage lagoons, septic tanks, associated piping, and two sumps. The features are a part of the Area 12 Camp housing and administrative septic systems. Corrective Action Sites 18-03-01 and 18-99-09 are located in the Area 17 Camp in Area 18. These sites are sewage lagoons and associated piping. The origin and terminus of CAS 18-99-09 are unknown; however, the type and configuration of the pipe indicates that it may be a part of the septic systems in Area 18. Corrective Action Site 20-19-02 is located in the Area 20 Camp. This site is comprised of a surface discharge of photoprocessing chemicals.« less

  12. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action 405: Area 3 Septic Systems, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada Rev. No.: 0, April 2002

    SciTech Connect

    IT Coroporation, Las Vegas, NV

    2002-04-17

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 405, Area 3 Septic Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) approximately 235 miles north of Las Vegas, Nevada, CAU 405 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-05-002-SW03, Septic Waste System (aka: Septic Waste System [SWS] 3); 03-05-002-SW04, Septic Waste System (aka: SWS 4); 03-05-002-SW07, Septic Waste System (aka: SWS 7). The CADD and CR have been combined into one report because no further action is recommended for this CAU, and this reportmore » provides specific information necessary to support this recommendation. The CAU consists of three leachfields and associated collection systems that were installed in or near Area 3 for wastewater disposal. These systems were used until a consolidated sewer system was installed in 1990. Historically, operations within various buildin gs in and near Area 3 of the TTR generated sanitary and industrial wastewaters. There is a potential that contaminants of concern (COCs) were present in the wastewaters and were disposed of in septic tanks and leachfields. The justification for closure of this CAU without further action is based on process knowledge and the results of the investigative activities. Closure activities were performed at these CASs between January 14 and February 2, 2002, and included the removal and proper disposal of media containing regulated constituents and proper closure of septic tanks. No further action is appropriate because all necessary activities have been completed. No use restrictions are required to be imposed for these sites since the investigation showed no evidence of COCs identified in the soil for CAU 405.« less

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    David Strand

    2006-05-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report ismore » to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 219 with no further corrective action beyond the application of a use restriction at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 20 through October 12, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 219 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. A best management practice was implemented at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03, and corrective action was performed at CAS 23-20-01 between January and April 2006. In addition, a use restriction will be applied to CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03 to provide additional protection to Nevada Test Site personnel. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 219 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A Tier 2 evaluation was conducted, and a FAL of 185,000 micrograms per kilogram was calculated for chlordane at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03 based on an occasional use area exposure scenario. This evaluation of chlordane based on the Tier 2 FAL determined that no FALs were exceeded. Therefore, the DQO data needs were met, and it was determined that no corrective action (based on risk to human receptors) is necessary for the site. The following contaminants were determined to be present at concentrations exceeding their corresponding FALs: (1) The surface soil surrounding the main concrete pad at CAS 23-20-01 contained Aroclor-1254, Aroclor-1260, and chlordane above the FALs. This soil, along with the COCs, was subsequently removed at CAS 23-20-01. (2) The sludge in the concrete box of the catch basin at the large concrete pad at CAS 23-20-01 contained lead and benzo(a)pyrene above the FALs. This contamination was limited to the sludge in the concrete box of the catch basin and did not migrate to the subsurface features beneath it. The contaminated and the concrete box of the catch basin were subsequently recovered at CAS 23-20-01.« less

  14. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Strand

    2005-05-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 224, Decon Pad and Septic Systems, in Areas 2, 3, 5, 6, 11, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 224 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 02-04-01, Septic Tank (Buried); (2) 03-05-01, Leachfield; (3) 05-04-01, Septic Tanks (4)/Discharge Area; (4) 06-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (3); (5) 06-05-01, Leachfield; (6) 06-17-04, Decon Pad and Wastewater Catch; (7) 06-23-01, Decon Pad Discharge Piping; (8) 11-04-01, Sewage Lagoon; and (9) 23-05-02,more » Leachfield. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for the nine CASs within CAU 224. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from August 10, 2004, through January 18, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 224 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.« less

  15. 76 FR 2402 - Maritime Security Directive 104-6 (Rev 5); Guidelines for U.S. Vessels Operating in High Risk Waters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... Vessel Activities, Coast Guard, telephone 202-372-1038, e-mail [email protected] . If you have... partners to prevent piracy. On February 10, 2006, the Coast Guard announced the release of MARSEC Directive...

  16. 77 FR 4573 - Maritime Security Directive 104-6 (Rev 6); Guidelines for U.S. Vessels Operating in High Risk Waters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ...-1038, email [email protected] . If you have questions on viewing material in the docket, call... February 10, 2006, the Coast Guard announced the release of MARSEC Directive 104-6 (71 FR 7054) for those...

  17. Final Report - Glass Formulation Testing to Increase Sulfate Volatilization from Melter, VSL-04R4970-1, Rev. 0, dated 2/24/05

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Matlack, K. A.; Pegg, I. L.

    2013-11-13

    The principal objectives of the DM100 and DM10 tests were to determine the impact of four different organics and one inorganic feed additive on sulfate volatilization and to determine the sulfur partitioning between the glass and the off-gas system. The tests provided information on melter processing characteristics and off-gas data including sulfur incorporation and partitioning. A series of DM10 and DM100 melter tests were conducted using a LAW Envelope A feed. The testing was divided into three parts. The first part involved a series of DM10 melter tests with four different organic feed additives: sugar, polyethylene glycol (PEG), starch, andmore » urea. The second part involved two confirmatory 50-hour melter tests on the DM100 using the best combination of reductants and conditions based on the DM10 results. The third part was performed on the DM100 with feeds containing vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) as an inorganic additive to increase sulfur partitioning to the off-gas. Although vanadium oxide is not a reductant, previous testing has shown that vanadium shows promise for partitioning sulfur to the melter exhaust, presumably through its known catalytic effect on the SO{sub 2}/SO{sub 3} reaction. Crucible-scale tests were conducted prior to the melter tests to confirm that the glasses and feeds would be processable in the melter and that the glasses would meet the waste form (ILAW) performance requirements. Thus, the major objectives of these tests were to: Perform screening tests on the DM10 followed by tests on the DM100-WV system using a LAW -Envelope A feed with four organic additives to assess their impact on sulfur volatilization. Perform tests on the DM100-WV system using a LAW -Envelope A feed containing vanadium oxide to assess its impact on sulfur volatilization. Determine feed processability and product quality with the above additives. Collect melter emissions data to determine the effect of additives on sulfur partitioning and melter emissions. Collect and analyze discharged glass to determine sulfur retention in the glass. Prepare and characterize feeds and glasses with the additives to confirm that the feeds and the glass melts are suitable for processing in the DM100 melter. Prepare and characterize glasses with the additives to confirm that the glasses meet the waste form (ILAW) performance requirements.« less

  18. Final Report - Testing of Optimized Bubbler Configuration for HLW Melter VSL-13R2950-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/12/2013

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Callow, R. A.

    2013-11-13

    The principal objective of this work was to determine the glass production rate increase and ancillary effects of adding more bubbler outlets to the current WTP HLW melter baseline. This was accomplished through testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) at VSL. The DM1200 unit was selected for these tests since it was used previously with several HLW waste streams including the four tank wastes proposed for initial processing at Hanford. This melter system was also used for the development and optimization of the present baseline WTP HLW bubbler configuration for the WTP HLW melter, as well as for MACTmore » testing for both HLW and LAW. Specific objectives of these tests were to: Conduct DM1200 melter testing with the baseline WTP bubbling configuration and as augmented with additional bubblers. Conduct DM1200 melter testing to differentiate the effects of total bubbler air flow and bubbler distribution on glass production rate and cold cap formation. Collect melter operating data including processing rate, temperatures at a variety of locations within the melter plenum space, melt pool temperature, glass melt density, and melter pressure with the baseline WTP bubbling configuration and as augmented with additional bubblers. Collect melter exhaust samples to compare particulate carryover for different bubbler configurations. Analyze all collected data to determine the effects of adding more bubblers to the WTP HLW melter to inform decisions regarding future lid re-designs. The work used a high aluminum HLW stream composition defined by ORP, for which an appropriate simulant and high waste loading glass formulation were developed and have been previously processed on the DM1200.« less

  19. The SAT® Essay and College Performance: Understanding What Essay Scores Add to HSGPA and SAT. Research Report 2012-9 (REV: 4-2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Emily J.; Kobrin, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between students' SAT essay scores and college outcomes, including first-year grade point average (FYGPA) and first-year English course grade average (FY EngGPA), overall and by various demographic and academic performance subgroups. Results showed that the SAT essay score has a positive relationship with both…

  20. [Nutrition and child development I; nutritional status of school children in a peripheral district of Madrid (Rev Clin Esp 1944; XII:87-94)].

    PubMed

    Grande Covián, F; Rof Carballo, J; Jiménez García, F; Morata Cernuda, A

    2014-09-01

    El estudio clínico del estado nutritivo de un grupo de niños en edad escolar, habitantes de un suburbio madrileño revela la existencia, relativamente rara, de signos carenciales específicos, que contrasta vivamente con el considerable retraso que se observa en su desarrollo somático. Los hechos parecen demostrar que el problema nutritivo de estos niños es sobre todo un problema cuantitativo. El retraso de la evolución está en relación con la insuficiencia global de la dieta y con el déficit de calcio que es probablemente el elemento individual con mayor grado de carencia en las dietas. La anemia que presenta el 98% de los niños no parece deberse únicamente a una deficiencia de hierro porque la dieta parece tener una cantidad adecuada; probablemente esté más en relación con el exiguo contenido de proteínas animales de la ración.

  1. Publisher's Note: Proton elastic form factor ratios to Q2=3.5GeV2 by polarization transfer [Phys. Rev. C 71, 055202 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punjabi, V.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Aniol, K. A.; Baker, F. T.; Berthot, J.; Bertin, P. Y.; Bertozzi, W.; Besson, A.; Bimbot, L.; Boeglin, W. U.; Brash, E. J.; Brown, D.; Calarco, J. R.; Cardman, L. S.; Chai, Z.; Chang, C.-C.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Churchwell, S.; Cisbani, E.; Dale, D. S.; Leo, R. De; Deur, A.; Diederich, B.; Domingo, J. J.; Epstein, M. B.; Ewell, L. A.; Fissum, K. G.; Fleck, A.; Fonvieille, H.; Frullani, S.; Gao, J.; Garibaldi, F.; Gasparian, A.; Gerstner, G.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, A.; Glashausser, C.; Gomez, J.; Gorbenko, V.; Green, A.; Hansen, J.-O.; Howell, C. R.; Huber, G. M.; Iodice, M.; Jager, C. W.; Jaminion, S.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M. K.; Kahl, W.; Kelly, J. J.; Khayat, M.; Kramer, L. H.; Kumbartzki, G.; Kuss, M.; Lakuriki, E.; Laveissière, G.; Lerose, J. J.; Liang, M.; Lindgren, R. A.; Liyanage, N.; Lolos, G. J.; Macri, R.; Madey, R.; Malov, S.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; McCormick, K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Meer, R. L.; Michaels, R.; Milbrath, B. D.; Mougey, J. Y.; Nanda, S. K.; Offermann, E. A.; Papandreou, Z.; Pentchev, L.; Petratos, G. G.; Piskunov, N. M.; Pomatsalyuk, R. I.; Prout, D. L.; Quéméner, G.; Ransome, R. D.; Raue, B. A.; Roblin, Y.; Roche, R.; Rutledge, G.; Rutt, P. M.; Saha, A.; Saito, T.; Sarty, A. J.; Smith, T. P.; Sorokin, P.; Strauch, S.; Suleiman, R.; Takahashi, K.; Templon, J. A.; Todor, L.; Ulmer, P. E.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vernin, P.; Vlahovic, B.; Voskanyan, H.; Wijesooriya, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B. B.; Woo, R. J.; Xiong, F.; Zainea, G. D.; Zhou, Z.-L.

    2005-06-01

    This paper was published online on 20 May 2005 without several of the authors’ corrections incorporated. Equation (13) has been replaced. The captions of Figs. 16 18 have also been replaced. Typographical errors on pages 4, 6, 14, 15, 18, 19, 22, and 24 have all been corrected. The paper has been corrected as of 8 June 2005. The text is correct in the printed version of the journal.

  2. Managing aging effects on dry cask storage systems for extended long-term storage and transportation of used fuel - rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Diercks, D.; Fabian, R.

    The cancellation of the Yucca Mountain repository program in the United States raises the prospect of extended long-term storage (i.e., >120 years) and deferred transportation of used fuel at operating and decommissioned nuclear power plant sites. Under U.S. federal regulations contained in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 72.42, the initial license term for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) must not exceed 40 years from the date of issuance. Licenses may be renewed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the expiration of the license term upon application by the licensee for a periodmore » not to exceed 40 years. Application for ISFSI license renewals must include the following: (1) Time-limited aging analyses (TLAAs) that demonstrate that structures, systems, and components (SSCs) important to safety will continue to perform their intended function for the requested period of extended operation; and (2) a description of the aging management program (AMP) for management of issues associated with aging that could adversely affect SSCs important to safety. In addition, the application must also include design bases information as documented in the most recent updated final safety analysis report as required by 10 CFR 72.70. Information contained in previous applications, statements, or reports filed with the Commission under the license may be incorporated by reference provided that those references are clear and specific. The NRC has recently issued the Standard Review Plan (SRP) for renewal of used-fuel dry cask storage system (DCSS) licenses and Certificates of Compliance (CoCs), NUREG-1927, under which NRC may renew a specific license or a CoC for a term not to exceed 40 years. Both the license and the CoC renewal applications must contain revised technical requirements and operating conditions (fuel storage, surveillance and maintenance, and other requirements) for the ISFSI and DCSS that address aging effects that could affect the safe storage of the used fuel. The information contained in the license and CoC renewal applications will require NRC review to verify that the aging effects on the SSCs in DCSSs/ ISFSIs are adequately managed for the period of extended operation. To date, all of the ISFSIs located across the United States with more than 1,500 dry casks loaded with used fuel have initial license terms of 20 years; three ISFSIs (Surry, H.B. Robinson and Oconee) have received their renewed licenses for 20 years, and two other ISFSIs (Calvert Cliffs and Prairie Island) have applied for license renewal for 40 years. This report examines issues related to managing aging effects on the SSCs in DCSSs/ISFSIs for extended long-term storage and transportation of used fuels, following an approach similar to that of the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) report, NUREG-1801, for the aging management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. The report contains five chapters and an appendix on quality assurance for aging management programs for used-fuel dry storage systems. Chapter I of the report provides an overview of the ISFSI license renewal process based on 10 CFR 72 and the guidance provided in NUREG-1927. Chapter II contains definitions and terms for structures and components in DCSSs, materials, environments, aging effects, and aging mechanisms. Chapter III and Chapter IV contain generic TLAAs and AMPs, respectively, that have been developed for managing aging effects on the SSCs important to safety in the dry cask storage system designs described in Chapter V. The summary descriptions and tabulations of evaluations of AMPs and TLAAs for the SSCs that are important to safety in Chapter V include DCSS designs (i.e., NUHOMS{reg_sign}, HI-STORM 100, Transnuclear (TN) metal cask, NAC International S/T storage cask, ventilated storage cask (VSC-24), and the Westinghouse MC-10 metal dry storage cask) that have been and continue to be used by utilities across the country for dry storage of used fuel to date. The goal of this report is to help establish the technical basis for extended long-term storage and transportation of used fuel.« less

  3. 75 FR 75486 - Maritime Security Directive 104-6 (Rev. 4); Guidelines for U.S. Vessels Operating in High Risk...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... Directive 104-6 (series), we have developed piracy-related Port Security Advisories (PSAs) to provide... compliance with this directive. The PSAs can be found at http://homeport.uscg.mil/piracy , including a non...

  4. 75 FR 29358 - Maritime Security Directive 104-6 (Rev 2 and 3); Guidelines for U.S. Vessels Operating in High...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ... developed piracy-related Port Security Advisories (PSAs)to provide further guidance and direction to U.S. flagged vessels operating in high risk waters to help facilitate compliance with this directive. The PSAs...

  5. 78 FR 11907 - Notice of Forthcoming Workshop To Discuss Revisions to NUREG/BR-0204, Rev. 2 “Instructions for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... would like the NRC to update NUREG/BR-0204 to address the manifesting of Technecium-99 (Tc-99), Carbon-14 (C-14), Tritium (H-3), and Iodine-129 (I-129) to minimize over-estimation of activity. These... uniform manifest for the waste shipment, ``[t]he activity of each of the radionuclides H-3, C-14, Tc-99...

  6. Publisher's Note: Search for ultrahigh energy neutrinos in highly inclined events at the Pierre Auger Observatory [Phys. Rev. D 84, 122005 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anticic, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badescu, A. M.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Bohácová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos Diaz, J.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M., Jr.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Del Peral, L.; Del Río, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; di Giulio, C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tascau, O.; Tavera Ruiz, C. G.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to neutrinos of all flavours above 0.1 EeV. These interact through charged and neutral currents in the atmosphere giving rise to extensive air showers. When interacting deeply in the atmosphere at nearly horizontal incidence, neutrinos can be distinguished from regular hadronic cosmic rays by the broad time structure of their shower signals in the water-Cherenkov detectors. In this paper we present for the first time an analysis based on down-going neutrinos. We describe the search procedure, the possible sources of background, the method to compute the exposure and the associated systematic uncertainties. No candidate neutrinos have been found in data collected from 1 January 2004 to 31 May 2010. Assuming an E^-2 differential energy spectrum the limit on the single flavour neutrino is (E^2 * dN/dE) < 1.74x10^-7 GeV cm^-2 s^-1 sr^-1 at 90% C.L. in the energy range 1x10^17 eV < E < 1x10^20 eV.

  7. Corrected Article: Simulation and observation of line-slip structures in columnar structures of soft spheres [Phys. Rev. E 96, 012610 (2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.; Haffner, B.; Weaire, D.; Mughal, A.; Hutzler, S.

    2017-07-01

    We present the computed phase diagram of columnar structures of soft spheres under pressure, of which the main feature is the appearance and disappearance of line slips, the shearing of adjacent spirals, as pressure is increased. A comparable experimental observation is made on a column of bubbles under forced drainage, clearly exhibiting the expected line slip.

  8. Evaluation of radioisotopic and non-radioisotopic versions of local lymph node assays for subcategorization of skin sensitizers compliant to UN GHS rev 4.

    PubMed

    Ha, Soojin; Ahn, Il Young; Kim, Da-Eun; Lee, Jong Kwon; Sohn, Soojung; Jung, Mi-Sook; Heo, Yong; Omori, Takashi; Bae, SeungJin; Lim, Kyung-Min

    2017-04-01

    Recently UN GHS has introduced the sub-categorization of skin sensitizers for which ECt (concentration estimated to induce stimulation index above threshold) of the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) is used as criteria. Non-radioisotopic variants of LLNA, LLNA: DA, LLNA: BrdU-ELISA, LNCC and LLNA: BrdU-FCM were developed yet their utilities for potency sub-categorization are not established. Here we assessed the agreement of LLNA variants with LLNA or human data in potency sub-categorization for 22 reference substances of OECD TG429. Concordance of sub-categorization with LLNA was highest for LLNA: BrdU-FCM(91%, κ = 0.833, weighted kappa) followed by LLNA: BrdU-ELISA (82%, κ = 0.744) and LLNA: DA (73%, κ = 0.656) whereas LNCC only showed a modest association (64%, κ = 0.441). With human data, LLNA agreed best (77%) followed by LLNA: DA and LLNA: BrdU-FCM(73%), LLNA: BrdU-ELISA (68%) and LNCC(55%). Bland-Altman plot revealed that ECt's of LLNA variants largely agreed with LLNA where most values fell within 95% limit of agreement. Correlation between ECt's of LLNA and LLNA variants were high except for LNCC(pair-wise with LLNA, LLNA: DA, r = 0.848, LLNA: BrdU-ELISA, r = 0.744, LLNA: BrdU-FCM, r=0.786, and LNCC, r = 0.561 by Pearson). Collectively, these results demonstrated that LLNA variants exhibit performance comparable to LLNA in the potency sub-categorization although additional substances shall be analyzed in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle

    DOE PAGES

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-02-27

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV’s reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNAmore » transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.« less

  10. The Commander’s Handbook on the Law of Naval Operations NWP 9 (REV.A)/ FMFM 1-10. Annotated Supplement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    respecting the Rights and Duties of Neutral Powers and Persons in Case of War on Land, 18 October 1907 Hague VII Hague Convention No. VII relating to the...their internal waters, archipelagic waters, territorial seas and exclusive economic zones, and on their continental shelves. In the case of artificial... Studies , v.61, 1980). For the ambiguous Soviet views, see Franckx, The U.S.S.R. Position on the Innocent Passage of Warships Through Foreign Territorial

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, July 2002, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect

    NNSA /NV

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 140 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 140 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-08-01, Detonation Pits; 05-08-02, Debris Pits; 05-17-01, Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site (Buried); 05-19-01, Waste Disposal Site; 05-23-01, Gravel Gertie; 05-35-01, Burn Pit; 05-99-04, Burn Pit; 22-99-04, Radioactive Waste Dump; 23-17-01, Hazardous Waste Storage Area. All nine of these CASs are located withinmore » Areas 5, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. This CAU is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The NTS has been used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. The CASs in CAU 140 were used for testing, material storage, waste storage, and waste disposal. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution criteria and resolve the decision statements. Phase I will determine if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels. This data will be evaluated at all CASs. Phase II will determine the extent of the contaminant(s) of concern (COCs). This data will only be evaluated for CASs with a COC identified during Phase I. Based on process knowledge, the COPCs for CAU 140 include volatile organics, semivolatile organics, petroleum hydrocarbons, explosive residues, herbicides, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.« less

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0 / June 2003), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    None

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 536 consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS): 03-44-02, Steam Jenny Discharge. The CAU 536 site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of possible contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives formore » CAS 03-44-02. The additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of this field investigation are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3-2004.« less

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 127: Areas 25 and 26 Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, August 2002)

    SciTech Connect

    NNSA /NV

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Offices's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 127 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 127 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of 12 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located at Test Cell C; the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) Facility; the X-Tunnel in Area 25; the Pluto Disassembly Facility; themore » Pluto Check Station; and the Port Gaston Training Facility in Area 26. These CASs include: CAS 25-01-05, Aboveground Storage Tank (AST); CAS 25-02-02, Underground Storage Tank (UST); CAS 25-23-11, Contaminated Materials; CAS 25-12-01, Boiler; CAS 25-01-06, AST; CAS 25-01-07, AST; CAS 25-02-13, UST; CAS 26- 01-01, Filter Tank (Rad) and Piping; CAS 26-01-02, Filter Tank (Rad); CAS 26-99-01, Radioactively Contaminated Filters; CAS 26-02-01, UST; CAS 26-23-01, Contaminated Liquids Spreader. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for CAU 127 include radionuclides, metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, asbestos, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Additionally, beryllium may be present at some locations. The sources of potential releases are varied, but releases of contaminated liquids may have occurred and may have migrated into and impacted soil below and surrounding storage vessels at some of the CASs. Also, at several CASs, asbestos-containing materials may be present on the aboveground structures and may be friable. Exposure pathways are limited to ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact (adsorption) of soils/sediments or liquids, or inhalation of contaminants by site workers due to disturbance of contaminated materials. Future land-use scenarios limit subsequent uses of the CASs to various nonresidential (i.e., industrial) activities. Field activities will consist of radiological walkover and screening surveys, and field-screening and collecting of both tank content and soil samples, and further sample testing as appropriate. A two-step data quality objective strategy will be followed: (1) Phase I will be to collect environmental samples for laboratory analysis to confirm the presence or absence of contaminants at concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels; and (2) Phase II will be to collect additional environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the extent of contamination identified in Phase I. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.« less

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with ROTC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Strand

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 224 is comprised of themore » nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: 02-04-01, Septic Tank (Buried); 03-05-01, Leachfield; 05-04-01, Septic Tanks (4)/Discharge Area; 06-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (3); 06-05-01, Leachfield; 06-17-04, Decon Pad and Wastewater Catch; 06-23-01, Decon Pad Discharge Piping; 11-04-01, Sewage Lagoon; and 23-05-02, Leachfield. Corrective Action Sites 06-05-01, 06-23-01, and 23-05-02 were identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECo) inventory (1991). The remaining sites were identified during review of various historical documents. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating and selecting a corrective action alternative for each CAS. The CAI will include field inspections, radiological and geological surveys, and sample collection. Data will also be obtained to support investigation-derived waste (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.« less

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    None

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office's (NNSA/NSO's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516, Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 516 consists of six Corrective Action Sites: 03-59-01, Building 3C-36 Septic System; 03-59-02, Building 3C-45 Septic System; 06-51-01, Sump Piping, 06-51-02, Clay Pipe and Debris; 06-51-03, Clean Out Box and Piping; and 22-19-04, Vehicle Decontamination Area. Located in Areasmore » 3, 6, and 22 of the NTS, CAU 516 is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls, and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information and process knowledge on the expected nature and extent of contamination of CAU 516 are insufficient to select preferred corrective action alternatives; therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.« less

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Strand

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 219 is located in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest ofmore » Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.« less

  17. OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1)more » resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The sand and aggregate constituents for this particular siliceous concrete were provided by CEA as an in-kind contribution to the program. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-3 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.« less

  18. OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1)more » resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-1 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. The posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.« less

  19. OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1)more » resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional LCS concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.« less

  20. Fluid Management Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1 with ROTC 1 and Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Echelard

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Offsites Project to characterize the risk posed to human health and the environment as a result of testing at formerly used nuclear sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The scope of this Fluid Management Plan (FMP) is to support the subsurface investigation at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Shoal-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Spring Range, south of Highwaymore » 50, about 39 miles southeast of Fallon, Nevada. (Figure 1-1). This FMP will be used at the PSA in lieu of an individual discharge permit for each well or a general water pollution control permit for management of all fluids produced during the drilling, construction, development, testing, experimentation, and/or sampling of wells conducted by the Offsites Project. The FMP provides guidance for the management of fluids generated during investigation activities and provides the standards by which fluids may be discharged on site. Although the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), Bureau of Federal Facilities (BoFF) is not a signatory to this FMP, it is involved in the negotiation of the contents of this plan and approves the conditions contained within. The major elements of this FMP include: (1) establishment of a well-site operations strategy; (2) site design/layout; (3) monitoring of contamination indicators (monitoring program); (4) sump characterization (sump sampling program); (5) fluid management decision criteria and fluid disposition; and (6) reporting requirements.« less

  1. L3.PHI.CTF.P10.02-rev2 Coupling of Subchannel T/H (CTF) and CRUD Chemistry (MAMBA1D)

    SciTech Connect

    Salko, Robert K.; Palmtag, Scott; Collins, Benjamin S.

    2015-05-15

    The purpose of this milestone is to create a preliminary capability for modeling light water reactor (LWR) thermal-hydraulic (T/H) and CRUD growth using the CTF subchannel code and the subgrid version of the MAMBA CRUD chemistry code, MAMBA1D. In part, this is a follow-on to Milestone L3.PHI.VCS.P9.01, which is documented in Report CASL-U-2014-0188-000, titled "Development of CTF Capability for Modeling Reactor Operating Cycles with Crud Growth". As the title suggests, the previous milestone set up a framework for modeling reactor operation cycles with CTF. The framework also facilitated coupling to a CRUD chemistry capability for modeling CRUD growth throughout themore » reactor operating cycle. To demonstrate the capability, a simple CRUD \\surrogate" tool was developed and coupled to CTF; however, it was noted that CRUD growth predictions by the surrogate were not considered realistic. This milestone builds on L3.PHI.VCS.P9.01 by replacing this simple surrogate tool with the more advanced MAMBA1D CRUD chemistry code. Completing this task involves addressing unresolved tasks from Milestone L3.PHI.VCS.P9.01, setting up an interface to MAMBA1D, and extracting new T/H information from CTF that was not previously required in the simple surrogate tool. Speci c challenges encountered during this milestone include (1) treatment of the CRUD erosion model, which requires local turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) (a value that CTF does not calculate) and (2) treatment of the MAMBA1D CRUD chimney boiling model in the CTF rod heat transfer solution. To demonstrate this new T/H, CRUD modeling capability, two sets of simulations were performed: (1) an 18 month cycle simulation of a quarter symmetry model of Watts Bar and (2) a simulation of Assemblies G69 and G70 from Seabrook Cycle 5. The Watts Bar simulation is merely a demonstration of the capability. The simulation of the Seabrook cycle, which had experienced CRUD-related fuel rod failures, had actual CRUD-scrape data to compare with results. As results show, the initial CTF/MAMBA1D-predicted CRUD thicknesses were about half of their expected values, so further investigation will be required for this simulation.« less

  2. FINAL REPORT SUMMARY OF DM 1200 OPERATION AT VSL VSL-06R6710-2 REV 0 9/7/06

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; DIENER G

    2011-12-29

    The principal objective of this report was to summarize the testing experience on the DuraMelter 1200 (DMI200), which is the High Level Waste (HLW) Pilot Melter located at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL). Further objectives were to provide descriptions of the history of all modifications and maintenance, methods of operation, problems and unit failures, and melter emissions and performance while processing a variety of simulated HL W and low activity waste (LAW) feeds for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and employing a variety of operating methods. All of these objectives were met. The River Protection Project -more » Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) Project has undertaken a 'tiered' approach to vitrification development testing involving computer-based glass formulation, glass property-composition models, crucible melts, and continuous melter tests of increasing, more realistic scales. Melter systems ranging from 0.02 to 1.2 m{sup 2} installed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) have been used for this purpose, which, in combination with the 3.3 m{sup 2} low activity waste (LAW) Pilot Melter at Duratek, Inc., span more than two orders of magnitude in melt surface area. In this way, less-costly small-scale tests can be used to define the most appropriate tests to be conducted at the larger scales in order to extract maximum benefit from the large-scale tests. For high level waste (HLW) vitrification development, a key component in this approach is the one-third scale DuraMelter 1200 (DM 1200), which is the HLW Pilot Melter that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. In particular, the DM1200 provides for testing on a vitrification system with the specific train of unit operations that has been selected for both HLW and LAW RPP-WTP off-gas treatment.« less

  3. Parent and Family Involvement in Education, from the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2012. First Look. NCES 2013-028.Rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel, Amber; Stark, Patrick; Redford, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This report presents data on students in the United States attending kindergarten through grade 12. The main focus of the report is on parent and family involvement in the students' education during the 2011-12 school year as reported by the students' parents. It also includes the percentage of students who participated in selected family…

  4. Documentation to the NCES Common Core of Data Local Education Agency Universe Survey: School Year 2009-10, Version Provisional 2a. NCES 2011-349rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keaton, Patrick; Sable, Jennifer; Liu, Fei

    2012-01-01

    This revised data file includes corrections that were provided to NCES as a result of a special collection effort designed to address data quality issues found in the 1a release of this file. In May 2012, NCES became aware of data errors for key data items for several schools on the published version of the SY 2009-10 school file; in some cases…

  5. Recommended practice for accepting new concrete pavement surfaces for tire/pavement noise : designation CPSCP PP 1-11 (rev 3/1/2011).

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-03-01

    This practice provides guidance and example specification language intended for use by Owner- : Agencies in development of specific contract language when requiring the evaluation of : tire/pavement noise for new concrete pavement surfaces. The overa...

  6. INTEGRATED DM 1200 MELTER TESTING OF HLW C-106/AY-102 COMPOSITION USING BUBBLERS VSL-03R3800-1 REV 0 9/15/03

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W

    2011-12-29

    This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post test inspections of system components.

  7. FINAL REPORT DM1200 TESTS WITH AZ 101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-03R3800-4 REV 0 2/17/04

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; BARDAKCI T

    2011-12-29

    This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM 1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW AZ-101 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW AZ-101 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate and feed solids content on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post-test inspections of system components. The test objectives (including test successmore » criteria), along with how they were met, are outlined in a table.« less

  8. Final Report - Melt Rate Enhancement for High Aluminum HLW Glass Formulation, VSL-08R1360-1, Rev. 0, dated 12/19/08

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.

    2013-11-13

    The principal objective of the work reported here was to develop and identify HLW glass compositions that maximize waste processing rates for the aluminum limted waste composition specified by ORP while maintaining high waste loadings and acceptable glass properties. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale tests, confirmation tests on the DM100 melter system, and demonstration at pilot scale (DM1200). The DM100-BL unit was selected for these tests since it was used previously with the HLW waste streams evaluated in this study, was used for tests on HLW glass compositions to support subsequent tests on the HLW Pilot Melter,more » conduct tests to determine the effect of various glass properties (viscosity and conductivity) and oxide concentrations on glass production rates with HLW feed streams, and to assess the volatility of cesium and technetium during the vitrification of an HLW AZ-102 composition. The same melter was selected for the present tests in order to maintain comparisons between the previously collected data. These tests provide information on melter processing characteristics and off-gas data, including formation of secondary phases and partitioning. Once DM100 tests were completed, one of the compositions was selected for further testing on the DM1200; the DM1200 system has been used for processing a variety of simulated Hanford waste streams. Tests on the larger melter provide processing data at one third of the scale of the actual WTP HLW melter and, therefore, provide a more accurate and reliable assessment of production rates and potential processing issues. The work focused on maximizing waste processing rates for high aluminum HLW compositions. In view of the diversity of forms of aluminum in the Hanford tanks, tests were also conducted on the DM100 to determine the effect of changes in the form of aluminum on feed properties and production rate. In addition, the work evaluated the effect on production rate of modest increases in melter operating temperature. Glass composition development was based on one of the HLW waste compositions specified by ORP that has a high concentration of aluminum. Small-scale tests were used to provide an initial screening of various glass formulations with respect to melt rates; more definitive screening was provided by the subsequent DM100 tests. Glass properties evaluated included: viscosity, electrical conductivity, crystallinity, gross glass phase separation and the 7- day Product Consistency Test (ASTM-1285). Glass property limits were based upon the reference properties for the WTP HLW melter. However, the WTP crystallinity limit (< 1 vol% at 950oC) was relaxed slightly as a waste loading constraint for the crucible melts.« less

  9. FINAL REPORT INTEGRATED DM1200 MELTER TESTING OF BUBBLER CONFIGURATIONS USING HLW AZ-101 SIMULANTS VSL-04R4800-4 REV 0 10/5/04

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W

    2011-12-29

    This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of AZ-101 HLW simulants. The tests reported herein are a subset of six tests from a larger series of tests described in the Test Plan for the work; results from the other tests have been reported separately. The solids contents of the melter feeds were based on the WTP baseline value for the solids content of the feeds from pretreatment which changed during these tests from 20% to 15% undissolved solids resulting in tests conducted at two feed solids contents. Based on themore » results of earlier tests with single outlet 'J' bubblers, initial tests were performed with a total bubbling rate of 651 pm. The first set of tests (Tests 1A-1E) addressed the effects of skewing this total air flow rate back and forth between the two installed bubblers in comparison to a fixed equal division of flow between them. The second set of tests (2A-2D) addressed the effects of bubbler depth. Subsequently, as the location, type and number of bubbling outlets were varied, the optimum bubbling rate for each was determined. A third (3A-3C) and fourth (8A-8C) set of tests evaluated the effects of alternative bubbler designs with two gas outlets per bubbler instead of one by placing four bubblers in positions simulating multiple-outlet bubblers. Data from the simulated multiple outlet bubblers were used to design bubblers with two outlets for an additional set of tests (9A-9C). Test 9 was also used to determine the effect of small sugar additions to the feed on ruthenium volatility. Another set of tests (10A-10D) evaluated the effects on production rate of spiking the feed with chloride and sulfate. Variables held constant to the extent possible included melt temperature, plenum temperature, cold cap coverage, the waste simulant composition, and the target glass composition. The feed rate was increased to the point that a constant, essentially complete, cold cap was achieved, which was used as an indicator of a maximized feed rate for each test. The first day of each test was used to build the cold cap and decrease the plenum temperature. The remainder of each test was split into two- to six-day segments, each with a different bubbling rate, bubbler orientation, or feed concentration of chloride and sulfur.« less

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata and ROTC 1, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect

    McCord, John; Marutzky, Sam

    2004-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) was developed for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain. The CAIP is a requirement of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) (FFACO, 1996). The FFACO addresses environmental restoration activities at U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) facilities and sites including the underground testing area(s) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This CAIP describes the investigation activities currently planned for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU.more » These activities are consistent with the current Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project strategy described in Section 3.0 of Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the FFACO (1996) and summarized in Section 2.1.2 of this plan. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU extends over several areas of the NTS (Figure 1-1) and includes former underground nuclear testing locations in Areas 12 and 16. The area referred to as ''Rainier Mesa'' includes the geographical area of Rainier Mesa proper and the contiguous Aqueduct Mesa. Figure 1-2 shows the locations of the tests (within tunnel complexes) conducted at Rainier Mesa. Shoshone Mountain is located approximately 20 kilometers (km) south of Rainier Mesa, but is included within the same CAU due to similarities in their geologic setting and in the nature and types of nuclear tests conducted. Figure 1-3 shows the locations of the tests conducted at Shoshone Mountain. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU falls within the larger-scale Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Investigation Area, which also includes the northwest section of the Yucca Flat CAU as shown in Figure 1-1. Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain lie adjacent to the Timber Mountain Caldera Complex and are composed of volcanic rocks that erupted from the caldera as well as from more distant sources. This has resulted in a layered volcanic stratigraphy composed of thick deposits of welded and nonwelded ash-flow tuff and lava flows. These deposits are proximal to the source caldera and are interstratified with the more distal facies of fallout tephra and bedded reworked tuff from more distant sources. In each area, a similar volcanic sequence was deposited upon Paleozoic carbonate and siliciclastic rocks that are disrupted by various thrust faults, normal faults, and strike-slip faults. In both Rainier Mesa (km) to the southwest, and Tippipah Spring, 4 km to the north, and the tunnel complex is dry. Particle-tracking simulations performed during the value of information analysis (VOIA) (SNJV, 2004b) indicate that most of the regional groundwater that underlies the test locations at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain eventually follows similar and parallel paths and ultimately discharges in Death Valley and the Amargosa Desert. Particle-tracking simulations conducted for the regional groundwater flow and risk assessment indicated that contamination from Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain were unlikely to leave the NTS during the 1,000-year period of interest (DOE/NV, 1997a). It is anticipated that CAU-scale modeling will modify these results somewhat, but it is not expected to radically alter the outcome of these previous particle-tracking simulations within the 1,000-year period of interest. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAIP describes the corrective action investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The CAI will be conducted by the UGTA Project, which is part of the NNSA/NSO Environmental Restoration Project (ERP). The purpose and scope of the CAI are presented in this section, followed by a summary of the entire document.« less

  11. Method 415.3, Rev. 1.2: Determination of Total Organic Carbon and Specific UV Absorbance at 254 nm in Source Water and Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method provides procedures for the determination of total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and UV absorption at 254 nm (UVA) in source waters and drinking waters. The DOC and UVA determinations are used in the calculation of the Specific UV Absorbance (S...

  12. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Evenson

    2006-05-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151, Septic Systems and Discharge Area, at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, according to the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 151 is comprised of eight corrective action sites (CASs): (1) CAS 02-05-01, UE-2ce Pond; (2) CAS 12-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (6); (3) CAS 12-04-01, Septic Tanks; (4) CAS 12-04-02, Septic Tanks; (5) CAS 12-04-03, Septic Tank; (6) CAS 12-47-01, Wastewater Pond; (7) CAS 18-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; and (8) CAS 18-99-09, Sewer Line (Exposed). The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document ismore » to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of corrective action alternatives (CAAs) for each of the eight CASs within CAU 151. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from September 12 through November 18, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 151 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. Additional confirmation sampling was performed on December 9, 2005; January 10, 2006; and February 13, 2006. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the contaminants of concern for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified contaminants of concern at two of the eight CASs in CAU 151 and required the evaluation of CAAs. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 151 revealed the following: (1) Soils at CASs 02-05-01, 12-04-01, 12-04-02, 12-04-03, 12-47-01, 18-03-01, 18-99-09, and Lagoons B through G of CAS 12-03-01 do not contain contamination at concentrations exceeding the FALs. (2) Lagoon A of CAS 12-03-01 has arsenic above FALs in shallow subsurface soils. (3) One of the two tanks of CAS 12-04-01, System No.1, has polychlorinated biphenyls (aroclor-1254), trichloroethane, and cesium-137 above FALs in the sludge. Both CAS 12-04-01, System No.1 tanks contain trichloroethane and 1,4-dichlorobenzene above ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' toxicity characteristic limits. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the eight CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 151. No Further Action is the recommended corrective action for soils at CASs 02-05-01, 12-04-01, 12-04-02, 12-04-03, 18-03-01, and 18-99-09; and Lagoons C, D, F, and G of CAS 12-03-01. No Further Action with implementation of a best management practice (BMP) is recommended for soils at CAS 12-47-01 and Lagoons B and E of CAS 12-03-01. To be protective of future workers should the present scenario used to calculate FALs change, an administrative use restriction will be recorded per the FFACO agreement as a BMP. Close in Place with Administrative Controls is the recommended corrective action for Lagoon A of CAS 12-03-01. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI; review of future and current operations at CASs 12-04-01, 12-04-02, and 12-04-03; and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following corrective actions are recommended for the septic tanks at these CASs. No Further Action with implementation of BMPs is the recommended corrective action for septic tanks that do not contain potential source material from CAS 12-04-01, System No.4 (four tanks); CAS 12-04-02, System No.5 (six tanks); and CAS 12-04-03, System No.3 (four tanks). Clean Closure with implementation of BMPs is the recommended corrective action for the septic tanks from CAS 12-04-01, System No.1 (two tanks). The preferred CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternatives meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential exposure pathways to the contaminated media to an acceptable level at CAU 151.« less

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 274: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Evenson

    2006-09-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 274, Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 274 is comprised of five corrective action sites (CASs): (1) CAS 03-02-01, WX-6 ETS Building Septic System; (2) CAS 06-02-01, Cesspool; (3) CAS 09-01-01, Spill Site; (4) CAS 09-05-01, Leaching Pit; and (5) CAS 20-05-01, Septic System. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the closure of CAU 274 with no further corrective action. Tomore » achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from November 14 through December 17, 2005 as set forth in the CAU 274 Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If contaminants of concern are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 274 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. No analytes were detected at concentrations exceeding the FALs. No COCs have been released to the soil at CAU 274, and corrective action is not required. Therefore, the DQO data needs were met, and it was determined that no corrective action based on risk to human receptors is necessary for the site. All FALs were calculated using the industrial site worker scenario except for benzo(a)pyrene, which was calculated based on the occasional use scenario. Benzo(a)pyrene was detected above the preliminary action level at CAS 20-05-01; however, it was not identified as a COC because the concentration was below the FAL. As a best management practice and to ensure that future site workers are not exposed to this site contaminant for more than this decision-basis exposure duration, an administrative use restriction was established around the leachfield at CAS 20-05-01. In addition, the removal of the septic tanks and septic tank contents at CASs 03-02-01, 06-02-01, and 20-05-01 was performed.« less

  14. DATA SUMMARY REPORT SMALL SCALE MELTER TESTING OF HLW ALGORITHM GLASSES MATRIX1 TESTS VSL-07S1220-1 REV 0 7/25/07

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    Eight tests using different HLW feeds were conducted on the DM100-BL to determine the effect of variations in glass properties and feed composition on processing rates and melter conditions (off-gas characteristics, glass processing, foaming, cold cap, etc.) at constant bubbling rate. In over seven hundred hours of testing, the property extremes of glass viscosity, electrical conductivity, and T{sub 1%}, as well as minimum and maximum concentrations of several major and minor glass components were evaluated using glass compositions that have been tested previously at the crucible scale. Other parameters evaluated with respect to glass processing properties were +/-15% batching errorsmore » in the addition of glass forming chemicals (GFCs) to the feed, and variation in the sources of boron and sodium used in the GFCs. Tests evaluating batching errors and GFC source employed variations on the HLW98-86 formulation (a glass composition formulated for HLW C-106/AY-102 waste and processed in several previous melter tests) in order to best isolate the effect of each test variable. These tests are outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to the Test Specification for this work. The present report provides summary level data for all of the tests in the first test matrix (Matrix 1) in the Test Plan. Summary results from the remaining tests, investigating minimum and maximum concentrations of major and minor glass components employing variations on the HLW98-86 formulation and glasses generated by the HLW glass formulation algorithm, will be reported separately after those tests are completed. The test data summarized herein include glass production rates, the type and amount of feed used, a variety of measured melter parameters including temperatures and electrode power, feed sample analysis, measured glass properties, and gaseous emissions rates. More detailed information and analysis from the melter tests with complete emission chemistry, glass durability, and melter operating details will be provided in the final report. A summary of the tests that were conducted is provided in Table 1. Each of the seven tests was of nominally one hundred hours in duration. Test B was conducted in two equal segments: the first with nominal additives, and the second with the replacement of borax with a mixture of boric acid and soda ash to determine the effect of alternative OPC sources on production rates and processing characteristics. Interestingly, sugar additions were required near mid points of Tests W and Z to reduce excessive foaming that severely limited feed processing rates. The sugar additions were very effective in recovering manageable processing conditions, albeit over the relatively short remainder of the test duration. Tests W and Z employed the highest melt viscosities but not by a particularly wide margin. Other tests, which did not exhibit such foaming Issues, employed higher concentrations of manganese or iron or both. These results highlight the need for the development of protocols for the a priori determination of which HLW feeds will require sugar additions and the appropriate amounts of sugar to be added in order to control foaming (and maintain throughput) without over-reduction of the melt (which could lead to molten metal formation). In total, over 8,800 kg of feed was processed to produce over 3200 kg of glass. Steady-state processing rates were achieved, and no secondary sulfate phases were observed during any of the tests. Analysis was performed on samples of the glass product taken throughout the tests to verify composition and properties. Sampling and analysis was also performed on melter exhaust to determine the effect of the feed and glass changes on melter emissions.« less

  15. Corrigendum to "Early dispersals of maize and other food plants into the Southern Caribbean and Northeastern South America" [Quat. Sci. Rev. 123 (2015) 231-246

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagán-Jiménez, Jaime R.; Rodríguez-Ramos, Reniel; Reid, Basil A.; van den Bel, Martijn; Hofman, Corinne L.

    2016-09-01

    When this paper was first published online, the authors mistyped the species name Capsicum chinense (a chili pepper species) in two of the four instances where it was mentioned in the above article. This typographic error does not change the results of the reported study. However, due to the potential implications of the findings on Capsicum spp., the correct paragraphs are printed below:

  16. Texturing concrete pavement for reduced tire/pavement noise using artificial turf drag : designation CPSCP GS 2-11 (rev 3/1/2011).

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-02-01

    This document provides language that can be used by an Owner-Agency to develop materials and : construction specifications with the objective of reducing tire/pavement noise. While the practices : described herein are largely prescriptive, they have ...

  17. Does Independent Schools Funding Make a Mockery of the Public Schools Funding Formula? BCTF Research Report. RR2015-01 rev2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Margaret; Kuehn, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the methodology used by the Ministry of Education to calculate per Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) student funding for independent schools and discusses the underlying inequities when the public school funding formula is applied to funding for private schools. Vancouver school district is provided as a case example to work through…

  18. Public School Graduates and Dropouts from the Common Core of Data: School Year 2009-10. First Look (Provisional Data). NCES 2013-309rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stillwell, Robert; Sable, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the number of high school completers, the Averaged Freshman Graduation Rate (AFGR), and the dropout data for grades 9-12 for public schools in school year 2009-10. State Education Agencies (SEAs) report annual counts of completers, dropouts, and enrollments to the National Center for Education Statistics' (NCES) Common Core of…

  19. X-33 Rev-F Turbulent Aeroheating Results From Test 6817 in NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel and Comparisons With Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Berry, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements and predictions of the X-33 turbulent aeroheating environment have been performed at Mach 6, perfect-gas air conditions. The purpose of this investigation was to compare measured turbulent aeroheating levels on smooth models, models with discrete trips, and models with arrays of bowed panels (which simulate bowed thermal protections system tiles) with each other and with predictions from two Navier-Stokes codes, LAURA and GASP. The wind tunnel testing was conducted at free stream Reynolds numbers based on length of 1.8 x 10(exp 6) to 6.1 x 10(exp 6) on 0.0132 scale X-33 models at a = 40-deg. Turbulent flow was produced by the discrete trips and by the bowed panels at ill but the lowest Reynolds number, but turbulent flow on the smooth model was produced only at the highest Reynolds number. Turbulent aeroheating levels on each of the three model types were measured using global phosphor thermography and were found to agree to within .he estimated uncertainty (plus or minus 15%) of the experiment. Computations were performed at the wind tunnel free stream conditions using both codes. Turbulent aeroheating levels predicted using the LAURA code were generally 5%-10% lower than those from GASP, although both sets of predictions fell within the experimental accuracy of the wind tunnel data.

  20. Enrollment in Postsecondary Institutions, Fall 2011; Financial Statistics, Fiscal Year 2011; and Graduation Rates, Selected Cohorts, 2003-2008: First Look (Provisional Data). NCES 2012-174rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Laura G.; Kelly-Reid, Janice E.; Ginder, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) collects institution-level data from postsecondary institutions in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia) and other U.S. jurisdictions (see appendix A for a list of other U.S. jurisdictions). This "First Look" presents findings from the provisional data of the…

  1. Erratum: Evidence of b -jet quenching in PbPb collisions at s N N = 2.76 TeV [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 , 132301 (2014)

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-07-10

    In our Letter, there was a component of the statistical uncertainty from the simulated PbPb Monte Carlo samples. This uncertainty was not propagated to all of the results. Figures 3 and 4 have been updated to reflect this source of uncertainty. In this case, the statistical uncertainties remain smaller than the systematic uncertainties in all cases such that the conclusions of the Letter are unaltered.

  2. Safety analysis report for packaging, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, model DC-1 package with HEU oxide contents. Change pages for Rev.1

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for the Model DC-1 package with highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide contents has been prepared in accordance with governing regulations form the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation and orders from the Department of energy. The fundamental safety requirements addressed by these regulations and orders pertain to the containment of radioactive material, radiation shielding, and nuclear subcriticality. This report demonstrates how these requirements are met.

  3. RISK COMMUNICATION FOR ES&H PROFESSIONALS AND LINE SUPERVISORS PARTICIPANT MANUAL COURSE NUMBER 004111 REV 0.1 JULY 2011

    SciTech Connect

    ALDRIDGE PK; ROCKS S

    This course will help you successfully apply risk communication principles when interacting with workers regarding work hazards. What Is the Difference Between a Risk and a Hazard? In many cases, the terms 'risk' and 'hazard' are incorrectly used interchangeably. A hazard is a physical condition or practice with the potential for causing harm/adverse effects. A risk is the probability of harm/adverse effects occurring from an exposure to a hazard. It is modified by the severity of harm (the consequence). Once a hazard is identified, a risk assessment is conducted to determine the severity of the risk. It uses scientific methodsmore » and rigorous tests to determine the effects of the risk on people and the environment. Risk Management takes data from the risk assessment and writes policies to help protect people and the environment against the risk. Risk communication is an ongoing process that starts soon after a hazard is identified and continues through the writing of policies. In the past, governing agencies did not do a good job of communicating risk; they would only communicate about risk after studies had been conducted and policies written.« less

  4. TECHNETIUM RETENTION IN WTP LAW GLASS WITH RECYCLE FLOW-SHEET DM10 MELTER TESTING VSL-12R2640-1 REV 0

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowitz, Howard; Brandys, Marek; Cecil, Richard

    2012-12-11

    Melter tests were conducted to determine the retention of technetium and other volatiles in glass while processing simulated Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams through a DM10 melter equipped with a prototypical off-gas system that concentrates and recycles fluid effiuents back to the melter feed. To support these tests, an existing DM10 system installed at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was modified to add the required recycle loop. Based on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) LAW off-gas system design, suitably scaled versions of the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS), Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP), and TLP vacuum evaporator were designed,more » built, and installed into the DM10 system. Process modeling was used to support this design effort and to ensure that issues associated with the short half life of the {sup 99m}Tc radioisotope that was used in this work were properly addressed and that the system would be capable of meeting the test objectives. In particular, this required that the overall time constant for the system was sufficiently short that a reasonable approach to steady state could be achieved before the {sup 99m}Tc activity dropped below the analytical limits of detection. The conceptual design, detailed design, flow sheet development, process model development, Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (P&ID) development, control system design, software design and development, system fabrication, installation, procedure development, operator training, and Test Plan development for the new system were all conducted during this project. The new system was commissioned and subjected to a series of shake-down tests before embarking on the planned test program. Various system performance issues that arose during testing were addressed through a series of modifications in order to improve the performance and reliability of the system. The resulting system provided a robust and reliable platform to address the test objectives.« less

  5. Erratum: I-Love-Q relations for gravastars and the approach to the black-hole limit [Phys. Rev. D 92, 124030 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    We point out two mistakes which affect the computation of the moment of inertia and of the tidal Love number in the original paper. Both mistakes have been corrected in Ref. [1] and the correct tidal Love number agrees with the recent computation of Ref. [2].

  6. Adult Training and Education: Results from the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016. First Look. NCES 2017-103rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronen, Stephanie; McQuiggan, Meghan; Isenberg, Emily

    2018-01-01

    This First Look report provides selected key findings on adults' attainment of nondegree credentials (licenses, certifications, and postsecondary certificates), and their completion of work experience programs such as apprenticeships and internships. This version of the report corrects an error in three tables in the originally released version…

  7. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Interventions for Improving Upper Limb Function after Stroke. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014,11:CD010820].

    PubMed

    Sousa Nanji, Liliana; Torres Cardoso, André; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of the upper limbs is quite frequent after stroke, making rehabilitation an essential step towards clinical recovery and patient empowerment. This review aimed to synthetize existing evidence regarding interventions for upper limb function improvement after Stroke and to assess which would bring some benefit. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Reviews of Effects and PROSPERO databases were searched until June 2013 and 40 reviews have been included, covering 503 studies, 18 078 participants and 18 interventions, as well as different doses and settings of interventions. The main results were: 1- Information currently available is insufficient to assess effectiveness of each intervention and to enable comparison of interventions; 2- Transcranial direct current stimulation brings no benefit for outcomes of activities of daily living; 3- Moderate-quality evidence showed a beneficial effect of constraint-induced movement therapy, mental practice, mirror therapy, interventions for sensory impairment, virtual reality and repetitive task practice; 4- Unilateral arm training may be more effective than bilateral arm training; 5- Moderate-quality evidence showed a beneficial effect of robotics on measures of impairment and ADLs; 6- There is no evidence of benefit or harm for technics such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, music therapy, pharmacological interventions, electrical stimulation and other therapies. Currently available evidence is insufficient and of low quality, not supporting clear clinical decisions. High-quality studies are still needed.

  8. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV’s reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNAmore » transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.« less

  9. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Vitamin D supplementation for prevention of cancer in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014, 6:CD007469].

    PubMed

    Cardoso, André Torres; Nanji, Liliana; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D has been mentioned in the literature has a potentially important agent for preventing the development of tumors, namely breast, colon, prostate and ovary tumors. However, the currently available evidence on the subject is contradictory and inconclusive. In this Cochrane systematic review, patients taking supplemental vitamin D on its various forms (cholecalciferol, ergocalciferol, alfacalcidol or calcitriol), regardless the dose, duration and route of administration, were compared with placebo, healthy adults without any intervention or adults with a disease in a stable phase, non-related with vitamin D metabolism. The results showed that currently, there is no firm evidence that vitamin D supplementation increases or decreases the risk of cancer occurrence, mainly in elderly community-dwelling women. Though at risk of type I errors due to small samples and substantial dropout of participants during the trials, the administration of supplemental cholecalciferol led to a 12% (CI 95%: 2 a 22%) decreased in cancer mortality, while the administration of supplemental vitamin D decreased all-cause mortality by 7% (CI 95%: 2 a 12%). The combined administration of supplements of cholecalciferol and calcium induced an increased incidence of nephrolithiasis.

  10. Abstracts of Innovative/Exemplary Activities in Industrial Teacher Education in the State of Michigan (MCITE Report-G Rev. 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nee, Johm G., Comp.; Matson, Johm H., Comp.

    This report is composed of a series of abstracts describing innovative/exemplary activities in industrial education in Michigan. The activities included (1) projects which invent a creative solution to a problem; (2) projects which demonstrate an exemplary program suitable for widespread use or a model to emulate; and (3) adoption of an exemplary…

  11. Texturing concrete pavement for reduced tire/pavement noise using longitudinal tining : designation CPSCP GS 3-11 (rev 3/1/2011).

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-03-01

    This document provides language that can be used by an Owner-Agency to develop materials and : construction specifications with the objective of reducing tire/pavement noise. While the practices : described herein are largely prescriptive, they have ...

  12. Texturing concrete pavement for reduced tire/pavement noise using transverse tining : designation CPSCP GS 4-11 (rev 3/1/2011).

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-03-01

    This document provides language that can be used by an Owner-Agency to develop materials and : construction specifications with the objective of reducing tire/pavement noise. While the practices : described herein are largely prescriptive, they have ...

  13. Final Report - Enhanced LAW Glass Property - Composition Models - Phase 1 VSL-13R2940-1, Rev. 0, dated 9/27/2013

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Muller, I.; Gilbo, K.

    2013-11-13

    The objectives of this work are aimed at the development of enhanced LAW propertycomposition models that expand the composition region covered by the models. The models of interest include PCT, VHT, viscosity and electrical conductivity. This is planned as a multi-year effort that will be performed in phases with the objectives listed below for the current phase.  Incorporate property- composition data from the new glasses into the database.  Assess the database and identify composition spaces in the database that need augmentation.  Develop statistically-designed composition matrices to cover the composition regions identified in the above analysis.  Preparemore » crucible melts of glass compositions from the statistically-designed composition matrix and measure the properties of interest.  Incorporate the above property-composition data into the database.  Assess existing models against the complete dataset and, as necessary, start development of new models.« less

  14. CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 383: AREA 12 E-TUNNEL SITES, NEVADA TEST SITE, REV. NO. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Mark McLane

    2005-03-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The recommendations and corrective actions described within this document apply to the future closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 383, Area 12 E-Tunnel Sites, which is a joint DTRA and NNSA/NSO site. The CAU consists of three (3) Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 12-06-06 (Muckpile); CAS 12-25-02 (Oil Spill); and CAS 12-28-02 (Radioactive Material). In addition to these CASs, E-Tunnel Ponds One, Two, and Three, and the Drainage Area above themore » ponds were included since closure of the Muckpile will impact these areas. This CADD is consistent with the requirements of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The DTRA point of contact is the Nevada Operations Office, Environmental Project Manager; currently Ms. Tiffany A. Lantow. The NNSA/NSO point of contact is the Environmental Restoration, Industrial Sites Project Manager; currently Ms. Janet Appenzeller-Wing. The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for CAU 383. This document presents the recommended corrective action for CAU 383 (E-Tunnel Sites); however, implementation may be affected by the corrective action (to be determined) for CAU 551 (Area 12 Muckpiles) due to the close proximity of B, C, D, and F-Tunnels. The scope of this CADD consists of the following tasks: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for CAU 383.« less

  15. Final Report - Crystal Settling, Redox, and High Temperature Properties of ORP HLW and LAW Glasses, VSL-09R1510-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/18/09

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Wang, C.; Gan, H.

    2013-11-13

    The radioactive tank waste treatment programs at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) have featured joule heated ceramic melter technology for the vitrification of high level waste (HLW). The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) employs this same basic technology not only for the vitrification of HLW streams but also for the vitrification of Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams. Because of the much greater throughput rates required of the WTP as compared to the vitrification facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) or the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the WTP employs advanced joule heated meltersmore » with forced mixing of the glass pool (bubblers) to improve heat and mass transport and increase melting rates. However, for both HLW and LAW treatment, the ability to increase waste loadings offers the potential to significantly reduce the amount of glass that must be produced and disposed and, therefore, the overall project costs. This report presents the results from a study to investigate several glass property issues related to WTP HLW and LAW vitrification: crystal formation and settling in selected HLW glasses; redox behavior of vanadium and chromium in selected LAW glasses; and key high temperature thermal properties of representative HLW and LAW glasses. The work was conducted according to Test Plans that were prepared for the HLW and LAW scope, respectively. One part of this work thus addresses some of the possible detrimental effects due to considerably higher crystal content in waste glass melts and, in particular, the impact of high crystal contents on the flow property of the glass melt and the settling rate of representative crystalline phases in an environment similar to that of an idling glass melter. Characterization of vanadium redox shifts in representative WTP LAW glasses is the second focal point of this work. The third part of this work focused on key high temperature thermal properties of representative WTP HLW and LAW glasses over a wide range of temperatures, from the melter operating temperature to the glass transition.« less

  16. Documentation to the NCES Common Core of Data Local Education Agency Universe Survey: School Year 2010-11. Version Provisional 2a. NCES 2012-337rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keaton, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The Common Core of Data (CCD) nonfiscal surveys consist of data submitted annually to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) by state education agencies (SEAs) in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the four U.S. Island Areas (American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin…

  17. Texturing concrete pavement for reduced tire/pavement noise using diamond grinding : designation CPSCP GS 1-11 (rev 3/1/2011).

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-03-01

    This document provides language that can be used by an Owner-Agency to develop materials and : construction specifications with the objective of reducing tire/pavement noise. While the practices : described herein are largely prescriptive, they have ...

  18. Evidence appraisal of Arrowsmith VA, Taylor R. Removal of nail polish and finger rings to prevent surgical infection (Review). Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014;8:CD003325.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    This systematic review revealed that there remains no evidence to indicate whether removing nail polish and finger rings affects the rate of SSIs after surgery. Given that there are no new studies on this topic, there is insufficient evidence to determine whether wearing finger rings or nail polish affects the number of bacteria on the skin after surgical hand scrubbing.

  19. Normalizing the Future Years Defense Program for Funding Policy Changes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    IDA INSTITUTE FOR DEFENSE ANALYSES - Normalizing the Future Years Defense Program for Funding Policy Changes f James L. Wilson, Project... Policy Changes James L.Wilson, Project Leader Timothy J. Graves John A. Lobi Ronald E. Porten PREFACE This paper was prepared by the Institute for...to match the funding policies now in effect for the current and future years. This work was reviewed within IDA by Waynard C. Devers and Stanley A

  20. Comprehensive Aeroelastic Analysis of Helicopter Rotor with Trailing-Edge Flap for Primary Control and Vibration Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    183 3.34 5/rev fixed system hub normal force with 4/rev open loop trailing-edge flap input...184 3.35 5/rev fixed system hub normal force with 5/rev open loop trailing-edge flap input...185 3.36 5/rev fixed system hub normal force with 6/rev open loop trailing-edge flap

  1. FINAL REPORT INTEGRATED DM1200 MELTER TESTING USING AZ 102 AND C 106/AY-102 HLW SIMULANTS: HLW SIMULANT VERIFICATION VSL-05R5800-1 REV 0 6/27/05

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W

    2011-12-29

    The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter tests were to determine the effects of feed rheology, feed solid content, and bubbler configuration on glass production rate and off-gas system performance while processing the HLW AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102 feed compositions; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components, as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and perform pre- and post test inspections of system components. The specific objectives (including test success criteria) of this testing, along with how each objective was met, are outlined in a table. The datamore » provided in this Final Report address the impacts of HLW melter feed rheology on melter throughput and validation of the simulated HLW melter feeds. The primary purpose of this testing is to further validate/verify the HLW melter simulants that have been used for previous melter testing and to support their continued use in developing melter and off-gas related processing information for the Project. The primary simulant property in question is rheology. Simulants and melter feeds used in all previous melter tests were produced by direct addition of chemicals; these feed tend to be less viscous than rheological the upper-bound feeds made from actual wastes. Data provided here compare melter processing for the melter feed used in all previous DM100 and DM1200 tests (nominal melter feed) with feed adjusted by the feed vendor (NOAH Technologies) to be more viscous, thereby simulating more closely the upperbounding feed produced from actual waste. This report provides results of tests that are described in the Test Plan for this work. The Test Plan is responsive to one of several test objectives covered in the WTP Test Specification for this work; consequently, only part of the scope described in the Test Specification was addressed in this particular Test Plan. For the purpose of comparison, the tests reported here were performed with AZ-102 and C-106/AY-102 HLW simulants and glass compositions that are essentially the same as those used for recent DM1200 tests. One exception was the use of an alternate, higher-waste-loading C-106/AY-102 glass composition that was used in previous DM100 tests to further evaluate the performance of the optimized bubbler configuration.« less

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 405: Area 3 Septic Systems, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada(April 2001, Rev. 0) with Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    2001-04-26

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 405, Area 3 Septic Systems, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 405 consists of Corrective Action Sites 03-05-002-SW03, 03-05-002-SW04, and 03-05-002-SW07 (also collectively known as: Septic Waste Systems [SWSs] 3, 4, and 7). Located in Area 3 in the northwest section of the TTR, approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, this location was historically (betweenmore » 1960 and 1990) used as a research facility with the mission to perform defense-related projects, and whose operations generated sanitary and industrial wastewaters potentially contaminated with COPCs and disposed of in septic tanks and leachfields. Though Septic Waste Systems 3, 4, and 7 were origin ally constructed to receive sanitary sewage, they may have inadvertently received effluent containing potentially hazardous and radiological constituents containing acetone, benzene, ethylbenzene, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, toluene, xylenes, volatile organic compound constituents, phenols, arsenic, barium, lead, mercury, hydrocarbons of oil and grease, and uranium-234, -235, and -238. The Area 3 septic systems were documented in a DOE/NV 1996 report as being included in the septic tank abandonment program conducted by Sandia National Laboratories in 1993; however, this program was not completed and the possibility exists that some of the Area 3 septic tanks may not have been abandoned. Even though all of the SWSs addressed in this CAIP are inactive, geophysical surveys conducted in 1993 were generally inconclusive and did not provide useful data for the purposes of this investigation. The scope of this current investigation, therefore, will be to determine the existence of the identified CO PCs and excavation will be the primary investigation method employed for these leachfield systems, but this effort may be limited by existing facilities and utilities. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the subsequent corrective action decision document.« less

  3. FINAL REPORT REGULATORY OFF GAS EMISSIONS TESTING ON THE DM1200 MELTER SYSTEM USING HLW AND LAW SIMULANTS VSL-05R5830-1 REV 0 10/31/05

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W

    2011-12-29

    The operational requirements for the River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) and High Level Waste (HLW) melter systems, together with the feed constituents, impose a number of challenges to the off-gas treatment system. The system must be robust from the standpoints of operational reliability and minimization of maintenance. The system must effectively control and remove a wide range of solid particulate matter, acid mists and gases, and organic constituents (including those arising from products of incomplete combustion of sugar and organics in the feed) to concentration levels below those imposed by regulatory requirements. Themore » baseline design for the RPP-WTP LAW primary off-gas system includes a submerged bed scrubber (SBS), a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP), and a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The secondary off-gas system includes a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed (AC-S), a thermal catalytic oxidizer (TCO), a single-stage selective catalytic reduction NOx treatment system (SCR), and a packed-bed caustic scrubber (PBS). The baseline design for the RPP-WTP HLW primary off-gas system includes an SBS, a WESP, a high efficiency mist eliminator (HEME), and a HEPA filter. The HLW secondary off-gas system includes a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed, a silver mordenite bed, a TCO, and a single-stage SCR. The one-third scale HLW DM1200 Pilot Melter installed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was equipped with a prototypical off-gas train to meet the needs for testing and confirmation of the performance of the baseline off-gas system design. Various modifications have been made to the DM1200 system as the details of the WTP design have evolved, including the installation of a silver mordenite column and an AC-S column for testing on a slipstream of the off-gas flow; the installation of a full-flow AC-S bed for the present tests was completed prior to initiation of testing. The DM1200 system was reconfigured to enable testing of the baseline HLW or LAW off-gas trains to perform off-gas emissions testing with both LAW and HLW simulants in the present work. During 2002 and 2003, many of these off-gas components were tested individually and in an integrated manner with the DM1200 Pilot Melter. Data from these tests are being used to support engineering design confirmation and to provide data to support air permitting activities. In fiscal year 2004, the WTP Project was directed by the Office of River Protection (ORP) to comply with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements for organics. This requires that the combined melter and off-gas system have destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of >99.99% for principal organic dangerous constituents (PODCs). In order to provide confidence that the melter and off-gas system are able to achieve the required DRE, testing has been directed with both LAW and HLW feeds. The tests included both 'normal' and 'challenge' WTP melter conditions in order to obtain data for the potential range of operating conditions for the WTP melters and off-gas components. The WTP Project, Washington State Department of Ecology, and ORP have agreed that naphthalene will be used for testing to represent semi-volatile organics and allyl alcohol will be used to represent volatile organics. Testing was also performed to determine emissions of halides, metals, products of incomplete combustion (PICs), dioxins, furans, coplanar PCBs, total hydrocarbons, and COX and NOX, as well as the particle size distribution (PSD) of particulate matter discharged at the end of the off-gas train. A description of the melter test requirements and analytical methods used is provided in the Test Plan for this work. Test Exceptions were subsequently issued which changed the TCO catalyst, added total organic emissions (TOE) to exhaust sampling schedule, and allowing modification of the test conditions in response to attainable plenum temperatures as well as temperature increases in the sulfur impregnated activated carbon (AC-S) column. Data are provided in this final report for all the required emission samples as well as melter and off-gas conditions during all the sampling periods. Appended to this report are previously issued VSL Letter Reports on method development for monitoring allyl alcohol in melter exhaust streams, on the results of characterization of the selected AC-S carbon media (Donnau BAT37), and on DM1200 off-line tests on the AC-S bed; also appended are reports from Air Tech on emissions sampling, and reports from Keika Ventures on validation of analytical data provided by Severn Trent Laboratories of Knoxville, Tennessee.« less

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 5: Landfills, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0) includes Record of Technical Change No. 1 (dated 9/17/2002)

    SciTech Connect

    IT Corporation, Las Vegas, NV

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 5 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 5 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-15-01, Sanitary Landfill; 05-16-01, Landfill; 06-08-01, Landfill; 06-15-02, Sanitary Landfill; 06-15-03, Sanitary Landfill; 12-15-01, Sanitary Landfill; 20-15-01, Landfill; 23-15-03, Disposal Site. Located between Areas 5, 6, 12, 20, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), CAU 5 consists of unlined landfillsmore » used in support of disposal operations between 1952 and 1992. Large volumes of solid waste were produced from the projects which used the CAU 5 landfills. Waste disposed in these landfills may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment. During the 1992 to 1995 time frame, the NTS was used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. Instead of managing solid waste at one or two disposal sites, the practice on the NTS was to dispose of solid waste in the vicinity of the project. A review of historical documentation, process knowledge, personal interviews, and inferred activities associated with this CAU identified the following as potential contaminants of concern: volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel- and gasoline-range organics), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Metals, plus nickel and zinc. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution criteria and resolve the decision statements. Phase I will concentrate on geophysical surveys to confirm the presence or absence of disposed waste within a CAS and verify the boundaries of disposal areas; penetrate disposal feature covers via excavation and/or drilling; perform geodetic surveys; and be used to collect both soil and environmental samples for laboratory analyses. Phase II will deal only with those CASs where a contaminant of concern has been identified. This phase will involve the collection of additional soil and/or environmental samples for laboratory analyses. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.« less

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 165: Areas 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, and 3) (January 2002, Rev. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 165 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; CAS 25-51-02, Dry Well; CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; CAS 26-59-01, Septic System; CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain. All eight CASsmore » are located in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Six of these CASs are located in Area 25 facilities and two CASs are located in Area 26 facilities. The eight CASs at CAU 165 consist of dry wells, septic systems, decontamination pads, and a reservoir. The six CASs in Area 25 are associated with the Nuclear Rocket Development Station that operated from 1958 to 1973. The two CASs in Area 26 are associated with facilities constructed for Project Pluto, a series of nuclear reactor tests conducted between 1961 to 1964 to develop a nuclear-powered ramjet engine. Based on site history, the scope of this plan will be a two-phased approach to investigate the possible presence of hazardous and/or radioactive constituents at concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The Phase I analytical program for most CASs will include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and radionuclides. If laboratory data obtained from the Phase I investigation indicates the presence of contaminants of concern, the process will continue with a Phase II investigation to define the extent of contamination. Based on the results of Phase I sampling, the analytical program for Phase II investigation may be reduced. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.« less

  6. Publisher's Note: High-temperature superconductivity stabilized by electron-hole interband coupling in collapsed tetragonal phase of KFe 2 As 2 under high pressure [Phys. Rev. B 91 , 060508(R) (2015)

    DOE PAGES

    Nakajima, Yasuyuki; Wang, Renxiong; Metz, Tristin; ...

    2015-03-09

    Here, we report a high-pressure study of simultaneous low-temperature electrical resistivity and Hall effect measurements on high quality single-crystalline KFe 2As 2 using designer diamond anvil cell techniques with applied pressures up to 33 GPa. In the low pressure regime, we show that the superconducting transition temperature T c finds a maximum onset value of 7 K near 2 GPa, in contrast to previous reports that find a minimum T c and reversal of pressure dependence at this pressure. Upon applying higher pressures, this T c is diminished until a sudden drastic enhancement occurs coincident with a first-order structural phasemore » transition into a collapsed tetragonal phase. The appearance of a distinct superconducting phase above 13 GPa is also accompanied by a sudden reversal of dominant charge carrier sign, from hole- to electron-like, which agrees with our band calculations predicting the emergence of an electron pocket and diminishment of hole pockets upon Fermi surface reconstruction. Our results suggest the high-temperature superconducting phase in KFe 2As 2 is substantially enhanced by the presence of nested electron and hole pockets, providing the key ingredient of high-T c superconductivity in iron pnictide superconductors.« less

  7. Skills of U.S. Unemployed, Young, and Older Adults in Sharper Focus: Results from the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) 2012/2014. First Look. NCES 2016-039rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rampey, Bobby D.; Finnegan, Robert; Mohadjer, Leyla; Krenzke, Tom; Hogan, Jacquie; Provasnik, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) is a cyclical, large-scale study of adult skills and life experiences focusing on education and employment. Nationally representative samples of adults between the ages of 16 and 65 are administered an assessment of literacy, numeracy, and problem solving in technology rich…

  8. Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    John McCord

    2006-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project to assess and evaluate the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater beneath the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity. The framework for this evaluation is provided in Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Section 3.0 of Appendix VI ''Corrective Action Strategy'' of the FFACO describes the process that will be used to complete corrective actions specifically for the UGTA Project. The objective of themore » UGTA corrective action strategy is to define contaminant boundaries for each UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) where groundwater may have become contaminated from the underground nuclear weapons tests. The contaminant boundaries are determined based on modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. A summary of the FFACO corrective action process and the UGTA corrective action strategy is provided in Section 1.5. The FFACO (1996) corrective action process for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU 97 was initiated with the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE/NV, 2000a). The CAIP included a review of existing data on the CAU and proposed a set of data collection activities to collect additional characterization data. These recommendations were based on a value of information analysis (VOIA) (IT, 1999), which evaluated the value of different possible data collection activities, with respect to reduction in uncertainty of the contaminant boundary, through simplified transport modeling. The Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAIP identifies a three-step model development process to evaluate the impact of underground nuclear testing on groundwater to determine a contaminant boundary (DOE/NV, 2000a). The three steps are as follows: (1) Data compilation and analysis that provides the necessary modeling data that is completed in two parts: the first addressing the groundwater flow model, and the second the transport model. (2) Development of a groundwater flow model. (3) Development of a groundwater transport model. This report presents the results of the first part of the first step, documenting the data compilation, evaluation, and analysis for the groundwater flow model. The second part, documentation of transport model data will be the subject of a separate report. The purpose of this document is to present the compilation and evaluation of the available hydrologic data and information relevant to the development of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU groundwater flow model, which is a fundamental tool in the prediction of the extent of contaminant migration. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are summarized with reference to the complete documentation. The specific task objectives for hydrologic data documentation are as follows: (1) Identify and compile available hydrologic data and supporting information required to develop and validate the groundwater flow model for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU. (2) Assess the quality of the data and associated documentation, and assign qualifiers to denote levels of quality. (3) Analyze the data to derive expected values or spatial distributions and estimates of the associated uncertainty and variability.« less

  9. Documentation to the NCES Common Core of Data Public Elementary/Secondary School Universe Survey: School Year 2010-11. Version Provisional 2a. NCES 2012-338rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keaton, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The Public Elementary/Secondary School Universe file includes data for the following variables: NCES school ID number, state school ID number, name of the school, name of the agency that operates the school, mailing address, physical location address, phone number, school type, operational status, locale code, latitude, longitude, county number,…

  10. Documentation for the NCES Common Core of Data National Public Education Financial Survey (NPEFS), School Year 2008-09 (Fiscal Year 2009). Revised File Version 1b. NCES 2011-330rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornman, Stephen Q.; Zhou, Lei; Nakamoto, Nanae

    2012-01-01

    This documentation is for the revised file (Version 1b) of the National Center for Education Statistics' (NCES) Common Core of Data (CCD) National Public Education Financial Survey (NPEFS) for school year 2008-2009, fiscal year 2009 (FY 09). It contains a brief description of the data collection along with information required to understand and…

  11. Erratum: Evolution of precipitate morphology during heat treatment and its implications for the superconductivity in K x F e 1.6 + y S e 2 single crystals [Phys. Rev. B 86 , 144507 (2012)

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Y.; Xing, Q.; Dennis, K. W.; ...

    2015-08-14

    In this article, we study the relationship between precipitate morphology and superconductivity in K xFe 1.6+ySe 2 single crystals grown by self-flux method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements revealed that the superconducting phase forms a network in the samples quenched above iron vacancy order-disorder transition temperature T s, whereas it aggregates into micrometer-sized rectangular bars and aligns as disconnected chains in the furnace-cooled samples.

  12. Graduation Rates for Selected Cohorts, 2008-13; Outcome Measures for Cohort Year 2008; Student Financial Aid, Academic Year 2015-16; and Admissions in Postsecondary Institutions, Fall 2016: First Look (Provisional Data). NCES 2017-150rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginder, Scott A.; Kelly-Reid, Janice E.; Mann, Farrah B.

    2017-01-01

    The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) collects institution-level data from postsecondary institutions in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia) and other U.S. jurisdictions. This "First Look" presents findings from the provisional data of the IPEDS winter 2016-17 data collection, which included…

  13. High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09). 2013 Update and High School Transcript Study: A First Look at Fall 2009 Ninth-Graders in 2013. NCES 2015-037rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Ben; Ingels, Steven J.; Fritch, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a first look at selected findings from 1) the 2013 Update and 2) the High School Transcript Study of the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09). HSLS:09 is a nationally representative study of a cohort of students who were ninth-graders in fall 2009. The study focuses on understanding students' trajectories from the…

  14. Publisher's Note: Proton elastic form factor ratios to Q{sup 2}=3.5 GeV{sup 2} by polarization transfer [Phys. Rev. C 71, 055202 (2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Punjabi, V.; Perdrisat, C.F.; Aniol, K.A.

    2005-06-01

    This paper was published online on 20 May 2005 without several of the authors' corrections incorporated. Equation (13) has been replaced. The captions of Figs. 16-18 have also been replaced. Typographical errors on pages 4, 6, 14, 15, 18, 19, 22, and 24 have all been corrected. The paper has been corrected as of 8 June 2005. The text is correct in the printed version of the journal.

  15. Postsecondary Institutions and Cost of Attendance in 2016-17; Degrees and Other Awards Conferred, 2015-16; and 12-Month Enrollment, 2015-16: First Look (Provisional Data). NCES 2017-075rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginder, Scott A.; Kelly-Reid, Janice E.; Mann, Farrah B.

    2018-01-01

    The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) collects institution-level data from postsecondary institutions in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia) and other U.S. jurisdictions. This "First Look" is a revised version of the preliminary report released on July 18, 2017. It includes fully edited and…

  16. Postsecondary Institutions and Price of Attendance in 2011-12, Degrees and Other Awards Conferred: 2010-11, and 12-Month Enrollment: 2010-11. First Look (Provisional Data). NCES 2012-289rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Laura G.; Kelly-Reid, Janice E.; Ginder, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) collects institution-level data from postsecondary institutions in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia) and other U.S. jurisdictions (see appendix A for a list of other U.S. jurisdictions). This "First Look" presents findings from the provisional data of the…

  17. Postsecondary Institutions and Cost of Attendance in 2013-14; Degrees and Other Awards Conferred, 2012-13; and 12-Month Enrollment, 2012-13 First Look (Provisional Data). NCES 2014-066rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginder, Scott A.; Kelly-Reid, Janice E.; Mann, Farrah B.

    2014-01-01

    The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) collects institution-level data from postsecondary institutions in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia) and other U.S. jurisdictions (see appendix A for a list of other U.S. jurisdictions). This "First Look" presents findings from the provisional data of the…

  18. Erratum: Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries in inclusive production of hadron pairs in e⁺e⁻ annihilation at √s=10.58 GeV [Phys. Rev. D 78, 032011 (2008)

    DOE PAGES

    Seidl, R.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Ogawa, A.; ...

    2012-08-09

    In the original article, it was found in Monte Carlo simulations that the reconstructed A₀ results are roughly consistent with the generated asymmetries, while the A₁₂ results systematically underestimate the generated asymmetries. This underestimation can be attributed to the difference between the reconstructed thrust axis and the original quark-antiquark axis. The corresponding correction factors are 1.6 ± 0.04 for the A₁₂ results and 1.11 ± 0.05 for the A₀ results. Because of a flaw in the original analysis program, these correction factors were not applied to the A UC-type asymmetries in Table V as well as in some figures. Inmore » addition, a small mistake in the error propagation in the charm correction resulted in slightly underestimated statistical uncertainties. These omissions affect all but the charm asymmetry results. The correct central values are therefore given in Tables IV and V of this Erratum. The systematic uncertainties of the original publication remain unchanged.« less

  19. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F

    2007-09-19

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoingmore » corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.« less

  20. Corrigendum to "Three climatic cycles recorded in a loess-palaeosol sequence at Semlac (Romania)-Implications for dust accumulation in south-eastern Europe" [Quat. Sci. Rev. 154C (2016) 130-142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeden, C.; Kels, H.; Hambach, U.; Schulte, P.; Protze, J.; Eckmeier, E.; Marković, S. B.; Klasen, N.; Lehmkuhl, F.

    2018-05-01

    In the article 'Three climatic cycles recorded in a loess-palaeosol sequence at Semlac (Romania)-Implications for dust accumulation in south-eastern Europe' (Zeeden et al., 2016) we employed rock magnetic and grain size proxy data in combination with OSL- and correlative age models. The data and dating is combined to discuss glacial-interglacial paleoclimate variability in an Eurasian context. This dataset was also interpreted regarding the dust source in the eastern Carpathian (Middle Danube) Basin.

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 486: Double Tracks RADSAFE Ares, Nellis Air Force Range, Nevada, Rev. 0; DOE/NV--523 UPDATED WITH ROTC No.1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    ITLV

    This CAIP presents a plan to investigate the DTRSA where unregulated disposal of radioactive and possibly hazardous waste occurred during decontamination activities for the Double Tracks test. The purpose of the corrective action investigation described in this CAIP is to: Identify and verify the locations of the decontamination facility and animal burial pit within the DTRSA; Identify the presence and nature of COPCs; Determine the vertical and lateral extent of COPCs; and Provide sufficient information and data to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for the CAS. This CAIP was developed using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Data Qualitymore » Objectives (DQOs) (EPA, 1994d) process to clearly define the goals for collecting environmental data, to determine data uses, and to design a data collection program that will satisfy these uses. A DQO scoping meeting was held prior to preparation of this plan; a brief summary of the DQOs is presented in Section 3.4. A more detailed summary of the DQO process and results is included in Appendix A.« less

  2. Documentation to the NCES Common Core of Data Public Elementary/Secondary School Universe Survey: School Year 2009-10. Version Provisional 2a. NCES 2011-348rev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chen-Su; Sable, Jennifer; Mitchell, Lindsey; Liu, Fei

    2012-01-01

    The Common Core of Data (CCD) nonfiscal surveys consist of data submitted annually to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) by state education agencies (SEAs) in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the four U.S. Island Areas (American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin…

  3. Dose and release pattern of anabolic implants affects growth of finishing beef steers across days on feed.

    PubMed

    Parr, S L; Chung, K Y; Hutcheson, J P; Nichols, W T; Yates, D A; Streeter, M N; Swingle, R S; Galyean, M L; Johnson, B J

    2011-03-01

    Four experiments evaluated the effect of implant dose and release pattern on performance and carcass traits of crossbred beef steers. In Exp. 1, steers (4 to 7 pens/treatment; initial BW = 315 kg) were fed an average of 174 d. Treatments were 1) no implant (NI); 2) Revalor-S [120 mg of trenbolone acetate (TBA) and 24 mg of estradiol 17β (E(2)); REV-S]; 3) Revalor-IS followed by REV-S (cumulatively 200 mg of TBA and 40 mg of E(2); reimplanted at 68 to 74 d; REV-IS/S); and 4) Revalor-XS (200 mg of TBA and 40 mg of E(2); REV-X). Carcass-adjusted final BW was greater (P < 0.05) for REV-X and REV-IS/S than for REV-S (610, 609, and 598 kg, respectively). Daily DMI did not differ (P > 0.10) among the 3 implants, but carcass-adjusted G:F was greater (P < 0.05) for REV-X and REV-IS/S than for REV-S (0.197 and 0.195 vs. 0.188). Both HCW and LM area were greater (P < 0.05) for REV-X and REV-IS/S than for REV-S. Marbling scores were greatest (P < 0.05) for REV-S and least (P < 0.05) for REV-IS/S; REV-X was intermediate to NI and REV-IS/S. In Exp. 2, steers (10 pens/treatment; initial BW = 391 kg) were fed 131 d, with treatments of REV-S, REV-IS/S (reimplanted at 44 to 47 d), and REV-X. Carcass-adjusted final BW (598 kg), ADG (1.6 kg), DMI (9.4 kg), G:F (0.17), and HCW did not differ (P > 0.10) among treatments. The percentage of Choice was less (P < 0.05) and percentage of Select greater (P < 0.05) for REV-IS/S than for REV-S and REV-X. In Exp. 3, steers (10 pens/treatment; initial BW = 277 kg) were fed 197 d and received either REV-IS/S (reimplanted at 90 to 103 d) or REV-X. Carcass-adjusted final BW (625 vs. 633 kg) and ADG (1.81 vs. 1.76 kg) were greater (P < 0.05) for REV-X-implanted steers. Daily DMI did not differ, but G:F tended (P < 0.10) to be increased and HCW was greater (P < 0.05) for REV-X than for REV-IS/S. In Exp. 4, steers (8 pens/treatment; initial BW = 238 kg) were fed 243 d and received either REV-IS/S (reimplanted at 68 to 71 d) or REV-X. Carcass

  4. Defects, Tunneling, and EPR Spectra of Single-Molecule Magnets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Caranin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 187203 (2001); Phys. Rev. B 65, 094423 (2002). 19. A. Cornia, R. Sessoli, L. Sorace, D. Gatteschi , A. L. Barra, and C...Phys. Rev. B 64, 184426 (2001). 25. A. Mukhin, B. Gorshunov, M. Dressel, C. Sangregorio. and D. Gatteschi , Phys. Rev. B 63, 214411 (2001). 26. W

  5. [A social diagnosis of HIV/AIDS infection and endogenous prevention strategies in Gaoua, Burkina Faso].

    PubMed

    Somé, Donmozoun Télesphore

    2008-04-01

    Despite sensitising and prevention messages, women still remain concerned about AIDS in developing countries. How do they perceive the illness and methods of prevention? The objective of this study was to assess the social diagnosis of HIV/AIDS, and endogenous strategies developed by women from Gaoua. A qualitative approach was adopted, involving four focus group discussions with women from the Lobi, Birifor, Dioula and Dagara ethnic groups. An interview guide was developed for the discussions, which were carried out in local languages, tape recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed in detail. Specific descriptions of HIV/AIDS related to signs/symptoms were given. These were: _Kpéré tchi_ (lose weight and die) _gbè yirè_ (twig feet) _sii dan_ (end of life) _gbè milè_ (thin feet), respectively for Lobi, Birifor, Dioula and Dagara. The major signs of AIDS mentioned were weight loss, appetite for meat, good meals, curly hair, large spots on the body, high fever, diarrhoea, and redness of lips. In relation to these signs, some endogenous strategies were developed by women to protect themselves against the illness, including "observation" and hot spiced meals for a few days for a partner who was absent for a long time, as well as early marriage for young girls. The social diagnosis of HIV/AIDS by a specific group like women demonstrates the gap between perceptions of the illness and prevention messages. This could help to understand that it is important to take account of communities' perceptions of illness in elaboration of prevention messages.

  6. Allicin Alleviates Reticuloendotheliosis Virus-Induced Immunosuppression via ERK/Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in Specific Pathogen-Free Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liyuan; Jiao, Hongchao; Zhao, Jingpeng; Wang, Xiaojuan; Sun, Shuhong; Lin, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), a gammaretrovirus in the Retroviridae family, causes an immunosuppressive, oncogenic, and runting–stunting syndrome in multiple avian hosts. Allicin, the main effective component of garlic, has a broad spectrum of pharmacological properties. The hypothesis that allicin could relieve REV-induced immune dysfunction was investigated in vivo and in vitro in the present study. The results showed that dietary allicin supplementation ameliorated REV-induced dysplasia and immune dysfunction in REV-infected chickens. Compared with the control groups, REV infection promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, interferon (IFN)-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), whereas, allicin reversed these changes induced by REV infection. The decreased levels of IFN-α, IFN-β, and IL-2 were observed in REV-infected chickens, which were significantly improved by allicin. Allicin suppressed the REV-induced high expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) as well as melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the nuclear factor kappa B p65. REV stimulated the phosphorylation of JNK, ERK, and p38, the downstream key signaling molecules of MAPK pathway, while allicin retarded the augmented phosphorylation level induced by REV infection. The decreased phosphorylation level of ERK was associated with REV replication, suggesting that ERK signaling is involved in REV replication, and allicin can alleviate the REV-induced immune dysfunction by inhibiting the activation of ERK. In addition, REV infection induced oxidative damage in thymus and spleen, whereas allicin treatment significantly decreased the oxidative stress induced by REV infection, suggesting that the antioxidant effect of allicin should be at least partially responsible for the harmful effect of REV infection. In conclusion, the findings suggest that allicin alleviates the

  7. Interactions of Ultracold Impurity Particles with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-23

    Lukin et al ., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 037901 (2001). [2] D. Jaksch et al ., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2208 (2000). [3] L. Isenhower et al ., Phys. Rev. Lett...104, 010503 (2010). [4] T. Wilk et al ., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 010502 (2010). [5] I. Mourachko et al ., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 253 (1998). [6] W. R...Phys. 12, 103044 (2010). [12] R. M. W. van Bijnen et al ., J. Phys. B 44, 184008 (2011). [13] I. Lesanovsky, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 025301 (2011). [14] E

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF STANDARDS FOR EVALUATING THE IMPORTANCE OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT: FIERY DISCUSSIONS, COMMON PURPOSE, A PROVEN WIN-WIN PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY AND ASTM COMMITTEE E47 (NON-PEER REV'D. JOURNAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of standards through the consensus based process is often a long and arduous process even in the best of circumstances. The impetus to develop standards is a need to obtain high quality data for the evaluation of questions that often pertain to the development of...

  9. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 168: Areas 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0) includes Record of Technical Change No. 1 (dated 8/28/2002), Record of Technical Change No. 2 (dated 9/23/2002), and Record of Technical Change No. 3 (dated 6/2/2004)

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 168 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 168 consists of a group of twelve relatively diverse Corrective Action Sites (CASs 25-16-01, Construction Waste Pile; 25-16-03, MX Construction Landfill; 25-19-02, Waste Disposal Site; 25-23-02, Radioactive Storage RR Cars; 25-23-18, Radioactive Material Storage; 25-34-01, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; 25-34-02, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-23-13, ETL - Lab Radioactive Contamination; 25-99-16, USW G3;more » 26-08-01, Waste Dump/Burn Pit; 26-17-01, Pluto Waste Holding Area; 26-19-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2). These CASs vary in terms of the sources and nature of potential contamination. The CASs are located and/or associated wit h the following Nevada Test Site (NTS) facilities within three areas. The first eight CASs were in operation between 1958 to 1984 in Area 25 include the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility; the Missile Experiment Salvage Yard; the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility; the Radioactive Materials Storage Facility; and the Treatment Test Facility Building at Test Cell A. Secondly, the three CASs located in Area 26 include the Project Pluto testing area that operated from 1961 to 1964. Lastly, the Underground Southern Nevada Well (USW) G3 (CAS 25-99-16), a groundwater monitoring well located west of the NTS on the ridgeline of Yucca Mountain, was in operation during the 1980s. Based on site history and existing characterization data obtained to support the data quality objectives process, contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) for CAU 168 are primarily radionuclide; however, the COPCs for several CASs were not defined. To address COPC uncertainty, the analytical program for most CASs will include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and radionuclides. Upon reviewing historical data and current site conditions, it has been determined that no further characterization is required at USW G3 (CAS 25-99-16) to select the appropriate corrective action. A cesium-137 source was encased in cement within the vadous zone during the drilling of the well (CAS 25-99-16). A corrective action of closure in place with a land-use restriction for drilling near USW G3 is appropriate. This corrective action will be documented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for CAU 168. The results of the remaining field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives for the other CASs within CAU 168 in this CADD.« less

  10. Validation of General Electric Aviation DAPS2015 Digital Recording and 1/3 Octave Analysis System for Use in Support of Aircraft Noise Certification Efforts in Compliance with 14 CFR Part 36; Letter Report: V324-FA5JBQ-LR4 Rev. 1

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-10-31

    NOTE: This is a revision of Letter Report V324-FA5JBQ-LR4. The purpose of the revision is to correctly identify the system designation for which the validation applies. The applicant originally identified the materials provided in support of this val...

  11. Integrated system for production of neutronics and photonics calculational constants. Volume 17, Part B, Rev. 1. Program SIGMA 1 (Version 78-1): Doppler broadened evaluated cross sections in the evaluated nuclear data file/Version B (ENDF/B) format. [For CDC-7600

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1978-07-04

    The code SIGMA1 Doppler broadens evaluated cross sections in the ENDF/B format. The code can be applied only to data that vary as a linear function of energy and cross section between tabulated points. This report describes the methods used in the code and serves as a user's guide to the code. 6 figures, 2 tables.

  12. New mutations affecting induced mutagenesis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, C W; Krauss, B R; Christensen, R B

    1985-01-01

    Previously isolated mutations in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that impair induced mutagenesis were all identified with the aid of tests that either exclusively or predominantly detect base-pair substitutions. To avoid this bias, we have screened 11 366 potentially mutant clones for UV-induced reversion of the frameshift allele, his4-38, and have identified 10 mutants that give much reduced yields of revertants. Complementation and recombination tests show that 6 of these carry mutations at the previously known REV1, REV1 and REV3 loci, while the remaining 4 define 3 new genes, REV4 (2 mutations), REV5 and REV6. The rev4 mutations are readily suppressed in many genetic backgrounds and, like the rev5 mutation, impart only a limited deficiency for induced mutagenesis: it is likely, therefore that the REV4+ and REV5+ gene functions are only remotely concerned with this process. The rev6 mutants have a more general deficiency, however, as well as marked sensitivity to UV and an increased spontaneous mutation rate, properties that suggest the REV6 gene is directly involved in mutation induction. The REV5 gene is located about 1 cM proximal to CYC1 on chromosome X.

  13. 75 FR 54390 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses Involving No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... with the implementation of Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) 04-10, ``Risk-Informed Technical... approved NEI 04-10, Rev. 1 in accordance with the TS SFCP. NEI [Nuclear Energy Institute] 04-10, Rev. 1...

  14. Reply to "Comment on `Particle path through a nested Mach-Zehnder interferometer' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2018-02-01

    While much of the technical analysis in the preceding Comment is correct, in the end it confirms the conclusion reached in my previous work [Phys. Rev. A 94, 032115 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.94.032115]: A consistent histories analysis provides no support for the claim of counterfactual quantum communication put forward by Salih et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 170502 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.170502].

  15. Reply to "Comment on `Protecting bipartite entanglement by quantum interferences' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sumanta; Agarwal, G. S.

    2018-03-01

    In a recent Comment Nair and Arun, Phys. Rev. A 97, 036301 (2018), 10.1103/PhysRevA.97.036301, it was concluded that the two-qubit entanglement protection reported in our work [Das and Agarwal, Phys. Rev. A 81, 052341 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevA.81.052341] is erroneous. While we acknowledge the error in analytical results on concurrence when dipole matrix elements were unequal, the essential conclusions on entanglement protection are not affected.

  16. Bibliography of Leishmania and Leishmanial Diseases. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    Sea 7 Rev. Med.- Yucatan Paulo, REVISTA MEDICA DE YUCATAN . Merida. Rev, Paliclin, Caracas Rev. Menn. Med. , Brazil REVISTA DE LA POLICLINICA, CARACAc...Parasit., 41(2):126-136. 799 pp. CHAKG, P. Y.; TENG, L. T.; SUNG, Y. (1957A) Interactions T. & LIU, Y. C. (1958A) Kala-azar between nutrition and...of nutrition in experimental Infectivan. Bact. Rev. , 13:99-134. CLINTON, B. A.; STAUBER, L. A.& CLRT .(1959A) Comparative PALCZUK, N. C. (1969A

  17. Reply to "Comment on `Troublesome aspects of the Renyi-MaxEnt treatment' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plastino, A.; Rocca, M. C.; Pennini, F.

    2017-11-01

    This Reply is intended as a refutation of the preceding Comment [Oikonomou and Bagci, Phys. Rev. E 96, 056101 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevE.96.056101] on our paper [Plastino et al., Phys. Rev. E 94, 012145 (2016)., 10.1103/PhysRevE.94.012145]. We show that the Tsallis probability distribution of our paper does not coincide with the Tsallis distribution studied by Oikonomou and Bagci. Consequently, their findings do not apply to our paper.

  18. Annual Gaseous Electronics Conference (44TH) Held in Albuquerque, New Mexico on 22-25 October 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    Phys. Rev. A 38, 2471 (1988); J. E. Lawler et al., Phys. Rev. A 43, 4427 1991). T. J. Sommerer et al., Phys. Rev. A39, 6356 (1989). EA-2 Diagnostics and...Charged Ions with a Metal Surface.* F.W. MEYER, S.H. OVERBURY, CC. HAVENER, PA. ZEULMANS VAN EMMICHOVEN, and D.M. ZEHNER, ORNL -- Projectile K-Auger

  19. Far Infrared, Magnetic and Electronic Studies of High Tc Superconducting Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-30

    Phys. Rev. Left. 63, 2421(1989). 8. K. H. Fischer and T. Nattermann, Phys. Rev. .43, 10372(1991). 9. R. E. Walstedt, R. F. Bell, and D. B. Mitzi , Phys...Duran, J. Yazyi, F. dela Cruz, D. J. Bishop, D. B. Mitzi , and A. Kapitulnik, Phys. Rev. B 44, 17737(1991). 14. Y. Yeshurun and A. P. Malozemoff, Phys

  20. Equilibrium Structure and Vibrational Spectra of Sila-Adamantane

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-27

    42, 3276 (1990); M. R. Pederson, K. A. Jackson, Phys. Rev. B. 43, 7312 ( 1991 ); M. R. Pederson, D. V. Porezag, J. Kortus, and D. C. Patton, Phys... Pankratov , Phys. Rev. B 68, 085310 (2003); P. H. Han, W. G. Schmidt, and F. Becstedt, Phys. Rev. B 72, 245425 (2005). [13] T. Yamada, T. Inoue, K. Yamada, N

  1. 46 CFR 160.047-1 - Incorporation by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., Models AK-1, and AF-1. Sheet 2, Rev. 2—Cutting Pattern and General Arrangement, Models CKM-1 and CFM-1. Sheet 3, Rev. 2—Cutting Pattern and General Arrangement, Models CKS-1 and CFS-1. Sheet 4, Rev. 1—Pad... Business Service Center, General Services Administration, Washington, DC 20407; (3) The military...

  2. Experimental Test of Nonlocal Realism Using a Fiber-Based Source of Polarization-Entangled Photon Paris

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-25

    J. F. Clauser and M. A. Horne, Phys. Rev. D 10, 526 1974. 6 A. Zeilinger , Rev. Mod. Phys. 71, S288 1999; A. Aspect, Nature London 398, 189...Jennewein, M. Zukowski, M. Aspelmeyer, and A. Zeilinger , Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 210406 2007; C. Branciard, A. Ling, N. Gisin, C. Kurt- siefer, A. Lamas

  3. The Role of Stat3 Activation in Androgen Receptor Signaling and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    S. C. & Xiao, G. (2003) Cancer Metastasis Rev. 22, 405–422. 10. Karin, M. & Greten , F. R. (2005) Nat. Rev. Immunol. 5, 749–759. 11. Karin, M., Cao, Y... Greten , F. R. & Li, Z. W. (2002) Nat. Rev. Cancer 2, 301–310. 12. Fan, C. M. & Maniatis, T. (1991) Nature 354, 395–398. 13. Betts, J. C. & Nabel, G

  4. Chaotic and Bifurcating Nonlinear Systems Driven by Noise with Applications to Laser Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-30

    W. o. leich and M. 0. Scully, Phys. Rev. A . 37, 3010 (1988) and ibid, 1261 (1988), and references therein. 14. A . K. Dhara and S. V . G. Menon, J...Fronzoni, F. Moss, R. Mannella and P. V . E. McClintock. Phys. Rev. A 36. 834 (1987) 35. L. Fronzoni, F. Moss and P. V . E. McClintock, Phys. Rev. A . 36...1492 (1987). 36. V . Altares and G. Nicolis, Phys. Rev. A 37. 3630 (1988) 37. R. Lefever and JI Win. Turner. Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 1631 (1986) 38. K

  5. Series of (2+1)-dimensional stable self-dual interacting conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Meng; Xu, Cenke

    2016-12-01

    Using the duality between seemingly different (2+1)-dimensional [(2 +1 )d ] conformal field theories (CFT) proposed recently [D. T. Son, Phys. Rev. X 5, 031027 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.031027; M. A. Metlitski and A. Vishwanath, Phys. Rev. B 93, 245151 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.245151; C. Wang and T. Senthil, Phys. Rev. X 6, 011034 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.6.011034; C. Wang and T. Senthil, Phys. Rev. X 5, 041031 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.041031; C. Wang and T. Senthil, Phys. Rev. B 93, 085110 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.085110; C. Xu and Y.-Z. You, Phys. Rev. B 92, 220416 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.220416; D. F. Mross et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 016802 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.016802; A. Karch and D. Tong, arXiv:1606.01893; N. Seiberg et al., arXiv:1606.01989; P.-S. Hsin and N. Seiberg, arXiv:1607.07457], we study a series of (2 +1 )d stable self-dual interacting CFTs. These CFTs can be realized (for instance) on the boundary of the 3 d bosonic topological insulator protected by U(1) and time-reversal symmetry (T ), and they remain stable as long as these symmetries are preserved. When realized as a boundary system, these CFTs can be driven into anomalous fractional quantum Hall states once T is broken. We demonstrate that the newly proposed dualities allow us to study these CFTs quantitatively through a controlled calculation, without relying on a large flavor number of matter fields. We also propose a numerical test for our results, which would provide strong evidence for the originally proposed duality between Dirac fermion and QED.

  6. Specificity in the immunosuppression induced by avian reticuloendotheliosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M H; Rup, B J; Rubin, A S; Bose, H R

    1983-01-01

    Several parameters of the cellular and humoral immune responses of chickens infected with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV-T), an avian defective acute leukemia virus, or with its helper virus, reticuloendotheliosis-associated virus (REV-A), were evaluated. Spleen cells from chickens infected with REV-T (REV-A) or REV-A exhibited depressed mixed lymphocyte and mitogen responses in vitro. Allograft rejection was delayed by 6 to 14 days in birds infected with REV-A. The specific antitumor cell immune response was also studied by a 51Cr-release cytotoxicity assay. Lymphocytes from chickens infected with low numbers of the REV-T-transformed cells exhibited significant levels of cytolytic reactivity against the 51Cr-labeled REV-T tumor cells in vitro. The mitogen response of lymphocytes from these injected birds was similar to that of uninjected chickens. In contrast, lymphocytes from chickens injected with higher numbers of REV-T-transformed cells exhibited suppressed mitogen reactivity and failed to develop detectable levels of cytotoxic activity directed against the REV-T tumor cells. These results suggest that the general depression of cellular immune competence which occurs during REV-T (REV-A) infection could contribute to the development of this acute leukemia by inhibiting the proliferation of cytotoxic cells directed against the tumor cell antigens. The cytotoxic effect observed after the injection of chickens with non-immunosuppressive levels of REV-T-transformed cells appears to be specific for the REV-T tumor cell antigens since cells transformed by Marek's disease virus or avian erythroblastosis virus were not lysed. In marked contrast, birds whose cellular immune responses were suppressed by infection with REV-A were capable of producing a humoral immune response to viral antigens. Detectable levels of viral antibody, however, did not appear until 12 to 15 days after REV-A infection. Since REV-T (REV-A) induced an acute leukemia resulting in death within 7

  7. Basic Emotions in the Nencki Affective Word List (NAWL BE): New Method of Classifying Emotional Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wierzba, Małgorzata; Riegel, Monika; Wypych, Marek; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Turnau, Paweł; Grabowska, Anna; Marchewka, Artur

    2015-01-01

    The Nencki Affective Word List (NAWL) has recently been introduced as a standardized database of Polish words suitable for studying various aspects of language and emotions. Though the NAWL was originally based on the most commonly used dimensional approach, it is not the only way of studying emotions. Another framework is based on discrete emotional categories. Since the two perspectives are recognized as complementary, the aim of the present study was to supplement the NAWL database by the addition of categories corresponding to basic emotions. Thus, 2902 Polish words from the NAWL were presented to 265 subjects, who were instructed to rate them according to the intensity of each of the five basic emotions: happiness, anger, sadness, fear and disgust. The general characteristics of the present word database, as well as the relationships between the studied variables are shown to be consistent with typical patterns found in previous studies using similar databases for different languages. Here we present the Basic Emotions in the Nencki Affective Word List (NAWL BE) as a database of verbal material suitable for highly controlled experimental research. To make the NAWL more convenient to use, we introduce a comprehensive method of classifying stimuli to basic emotion categories. We discuss the advantages of our method in comparison to other methods of classification. Additionally, we provide an interactive online tool (http://exp.lobi.nencki.gov.pl/nawl-analysis) to help researchers browse and interactively generate classes of stimuli to meet their specific requirements.

  8. Basic Emotions in the Nencki Affective Word List (NAWL BE): New Method of Classifying Emotional Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Wierzba, Małgorzata; Riegel, Monika; Wypych, Marek; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Turnau, Paweł; Grabowska, Anna; Marchewka, Artur

    2015-01-01

    The Nencki Affective Word List (NAWL) has recently been introduced as a standardized database of Polish words suitable for studying various aspects of language and emotions. Though the NAWL was originally based on the most commonly used dimensional approach, it is not the only way of studying emotions. Another framework is based on discrete emotional categories. Since the two perspectives are recognized as complementary, the aim of the present study was to supplement the NAWL database by the addition of categories corresponding to basic emotions. Thus, 2902 Polish words from the NAWL were presented to 265 subjects, who were instructed to rate them according to the intensity of each of the five basic emotions: happiness, anger, sadness, fear and disgust. The general characteristics of the present word database, as well as the relationships between the studied variables are shown to be consistent with typical patterns found in previous studies using similar databases for different languages. Here we present the Basic Emotions in the Nencki Affective Word List (NAWL BE) as a database of verbal material suitable for highly controlled experimental research. To make the NAWL more convenient to use, we introduce a comprehensive method of classifying stimuli to basic emotion categories. We discuss the advantages of our method in comparison to other methods of classification. Additionally, we provide an interactive online tool (http://exp.lobi.nencki.gov.pl/nawl-analysis) to help researchers browse and interactively generate classes of stimuli to meet their specific requirements. PMID:26148193

  9. Vanishing Hall conductance in the phase-glass Bose metal at zero temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May-Mann, Julian; Phillips, Philip W.

    2018-01-01

    Motivated in part by numerical simulations [H. G. Katzgraber and A. P. Young, Phys. Rev. B 66, 224507 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevB.66.224507; J. M. Kosterlitz and N. Akino, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4672 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.81.4672; Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4672 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.81.4672] that reveal that the energy to create a defect in a gauge or phase glass scales as Lθ with θ <0 for two dimensions, thereby implying a vanishing stiffness, we reexamine the relevance of these kinds of models to the Bose metal in light of the new experiments [N. P. Breznay and Kapitulnik (unpublished); Y. Wang, I. Tamir, D. Shahar, and N. P. Armitage, arXiv:1708.01908 [cond-mat.supr-con

  10. Link-Prediction Enhanced Consensus Clustering for Complex Networks (Open Access)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-20

    92:022816. Available from: http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevE.92.022816. doi: 10. 1103 /PhysRevE.92.022816 16. Aldecoa R, Marín I. Exploring the...from: http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevE.80.056117. doi: 10. 1103 /PhysRevE.80.056117 18. Dahlin J, Svenson P. Ensemble approaches for improving...046110. Available from: http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevE.81.046110. doi: 10. 1103 /PhysRevE.81.046110 28. Gfeller D, Chappelier JC, De Los Rios P

  11. STS-1 low-speed ground navigation console procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, J.

    1980-01-01

    The space Transportation System 1 Flight onorbit mission phase is broken into three distinct subphases; those subphases being the rev 1 through rev 6 contigency reentry opportunities, the general onorbit time period, and the rev 34 to the postdeorbit Guam pass inclusive. The necessary information to ensure that sufficient data tables are accummulated in real time to support the postmission off line ancillary data analysis studies designed to support postmission ancillary data generation and investigation of mission related anomalies is given.

  12. Naval Sea Systems Command > Home > Warfare Centers > NSWC Corona

    Science.gov Websites

    Modernization Inactive Ships International Fleet Support Surface Ship Readiness and Sustainment SURFMEPP Surface ; Schemas MIL-DTL-24784C IM/IP DTD Suite IWS6 Common Schema NAVSEA Class 2 ETM DTD Changes from the ETM Class 2 Revision E History Early Revisions Early Revisions Rev E Changes Rev D Changes Rev C 1.2 Changes

  13. Proposed Experiment in Two-Qubit Linear Optical Photonic Gates for Maximal Success Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Phys. Rev. A 72 032307 [10] Kwiat P G, Waks E White A G, Applebaum I and Eberhaard P E 1999 Phys. Rev. A 60 R773–6 [11] Barz S, Cronenberg G, Zeilinger ...17] Reck M, Zeilinger A, Bernstein H J and Bertani P 1994 Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 58 [18] Thompson M G, Politi A, Matthews J C F and O’Brien J L 2011 IET

  14. PSA-Based Screening Outcomes, Dietary Heterocyclic Amine Exposure, and Prostate Cancer Risk in African-Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    associated micronutrients , and risk of prostate cancer. Epidemiol. Rev. 2001a: 23: 82-86. Chan J., and Giovannucci E. Dairy products, calcium, and...118. Chan J., and Giovannucci E. Vegetables, fruits, associated micronutrients , and risk of prostate cancer. Epidemiol. Rev. 2001a: 23: 82-86...Chan J., and Giovannucci E. Dairy products, calcium, and vitamin D, and risk of prostate cancer. Epidemiol. Rev. 2001b: 23: 87-92. Cohen J.H., Kristal

  15. Aging and Rejuvenation with Fractional Derivatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-10

    Chechkin , J. Klafter, V . Yu . Gonchar , R. Metzler, and L. V . Tanatarov, Phys. Rev. E 67, 010102(R) (2003). [12] I. M. Sokolov and R. Metzler, Phys. Rev. E 67...051106 (2001). [7] A . V . Chechkin , R. Gorenflo, and I. M. Sokolov, Phys. Rev. E 66, 046129 (2002). [8] J. Bisquert, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 010602 (2003...9] R. Metzler and J. Klafter, J. Phys. Chem. B 104 3851 (2000). [10] E. Barkai and R. J. Silbey, J. Phys. Chem. B 104 3866 (2000).

  16. Multiplicity-dependent and nonbinomial efficiency corrections for particle number cumulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzdak, Adam; Holzmann, Romain; Koch, Volker

    2016-12-01

    In this article we extend previous work on efficiency corrections for cumulant measurements [Bzdak and Koch, Phys. Rev. C 86, 044904 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.044904; Phys. Rev. C 91, 027901 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevC.91.027901]. We will discuss the limitations of the methods presented in these papers. Specifically we will consider multiplicity dependent efficiencies as well as nonbinomial efficiency distributions. We will discuss the most simple and straightforward methods to implement those corrections.

  17. Reply to "Comment on 'Troublesome aspects of the Renyi-MaxEnt treatment' ".

    PubMed

    Plastino, A; Rocca, M C; Pennini, F

    2017-11-01

    This Reply is intended as a refutation of the preceding Comment [Oikonomou and Bagci, Phys. Rev. E 96, 056101 (2017)10.1103/PhysRevE.96.056101] on our paper [Plastino et al., Phys. Rev. E 94, 012145 (2016).1539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.94.012145]. We show that the Tsallis probability distribution of our paper does not coincide with the Tsallis distribution studied by Oikonomou and Bagci. Consequently, their findings do not apply to our paper.

  18. Multiplicity-dependent and nonbinomial efficiency corrections for particle number cumulants

    DOE PAGES

    Bzdak, Adam; Holzmann, Romain; Koch, Volker

    2016-12-19

    Here, we extend previous work on efficiency corrections for cumulant measurements [Bzdak and Koch, Phys. Rev. C 86, 044904 (2012)PRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.86.044904; Phys. Rev. C 91, 027901 (2015)PRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.91.027901]. We will then discuss the limitations of the methods presented in these papers. Specifically we will consider multiplicity dependent efficiencies as well as nonbinomial efficiency distributions. We will discuss the most simple and straightforward methods to implement those corrections.

  19. Upper bound on three-tangles of reduced states of four-qubit pure states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. Shelly; Sharma, N. K.

    2017-06-01

    Closed formulas for upper bounds on three-tangles of three-qubit reduced states in terms of three-qubit-invariant polynomials of pure four-qubit states are obtained. Our results offer tighter constraints on total three-way entanglement of a given qubit with the rest of the system than those used by Regula et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 110501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.110501 and Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 049902(E) (2016)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.049902 to verify monogamy of four-qubit quantum entanglement.

  20. Investigation of UH-60A Rotor Structural Loads from Flight and Wind Tunnel Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-19

    and main rotor blades. A bifilar pendulum -type vibration absorber system was mounted on top of the hub to reduce 3/rev rotating in-plane loads. Main... pendulum weights were not attached (no 3/rev in-plane load absorption). The rotor assembly was mounted on a large test stand with its own fixed system

  1. 75 FR 47646 - Idaho State University; Notice of Issuance of Director's Decision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... detector from the reactor core. In the petition Dr. Crawford states that this was cited as an Apparent... detector. The personnel roof access hatch was also addressed in Rev. 3 and Rev. 4 of the Physical Security... procedures to wear protective clothing to routinely remove the activated startup channel detector from the...

  2. The Quebec Liberation Front (FLQ) as an Insurgency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-08

    Histoire d’un mouvement clandestin, rev. ed. (Outremont, QC: Lanctôt Éditeur, 1998), 11. 4 targeted union workers and students. They also represented...Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 2006. Fournier, Louis. FLQ: Histoire d’un mouvement clandestin. Rev. ed. Outremont, QC: Lanctôt Éditeur

  3. In Situ Studies of the Decomposition of Simulated Chemical Warfare Agents on Nanoparticle Catalysts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-04

    University of South Carolina NUMBER Office of Sponsored Programs & Research James F. Byrnes International Center Columbia, SC 29208 - 9...P.; Barrat , J. L. Phys. Rev. B 1997, 56, 2248. (28) Ercolessi, F.; Andreoni, W.; Tosatti, E. Phys. Rev. Lett. 1991, 66, 911. (29) Marks, L. D

  4. Optical Spin Initialization and Nondestructive Measurement in a Quantum Dot Molecule

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-02

    in fre- quency domain [7], and coherent spin rotations in time domain [8,9]). We thank M. F. Doty and V. L. Korenev for illuminating discussions...035409 (2007). [29] V. L. Korenev , Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 256405 (2007). [30] A. I. Tartakovskii et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 026806 (2007). [31] A

  5. Electron Spin Polarization and Detection in InAs Quantum Dots Through p-Shell Trions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-08

    Bracker, D. Gershoni, V. L. Korenev , S. C. Badescu, Y. Lyanda- Geller, and T. L. Reinecke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 177403 2005. 16A. Babinski, M...V. L. Korenev , and I. A. Merkulov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 047402 2005. 28Excitation of trion superposition states has also been considered but it has

  6. 49 CFR 572.130 - Incorporation by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... in § 572.132. (3) SAE Recommended Practice J211/1, Rev. Mar 95 “Instrumentation for Impact Tests—Part 1—Electronic Instrumentation”, incorporated by reference in § 572.137; (4) SAE Recommended Practice J211/2, Rev. Mar 95 “Instrumentation for Impact Tests—Part 2—Photographic Instrumentation” incorporated...

  7. 49 CFR 572.130 - Incorporation by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... in § 572.132. (3) SAE Recommended Practice J211/1, Rev. Mar 95 “Instrumentation for Impact Tests—Part 1—Electronic Instrumentation”, incorporated by reference in § 572.137; (4) SAE Recommended Practice J211/2, Rev. Mar 95 “Instrumentation for Impact Tests—Part 2—Photographic Instrumentation” incorporated...

  8. 49 CFR 572.130 - Incorporation by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... in § 572.132. (3) SAE Recommended Practice J211/1, Rev. Mar 95 “Instrumentation for Impact Tests—Part 1—Electronic Instrumentation”, incorporated by reference in § 572.137; (4) SAE Recommended Practice J211/2, Rev. Mar 95 “Instrumentation for Impact Tests—Part 2—Photographic Instrumentation” incorporated...

  9. Departures from Axisymmetric Balance Dynamics during Secondary Eyewall Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    tensification of Hurricane Opal as diagnosed from a GFDL model forecast. Mon. Wea. Rev., 130, 1866–1881, doi:10.1175/ 1520-0493(2002)130,1866:BCTTIO...2002: Environ- mental interactions in the GFDL hurricane model for Hurri- cane Opal . Mon. Wea. Rev., 130, 298–317, doi:10.1175/ 1520-0493(2002

  10. 40 CFR 86.1319-90 - CVS calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with such a device.) The CVS calibration procedures are designed for use of a “metering venturi” type... series with the pump. (ii) The calculated flow rate, ft 3/min, (at pump inlet absolute pressure and... during test period N Revs ±1 Rev. Elapsed time for test period t sec. ±0.5 sec. (5) After the system has...

  11. 40 CFR 86.1319-90 - CVS calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... with such a device.) The CVS calibration procedures are designed for use of a “metering venturi” type... series with the pump. (ii) The calculated flow rate, ft 3/min, (at pump inlet absolute pressure and... test period N Revs ±1 Rev. Elapsed time for test period t sec. ±0.5 sec. (5) After the system has been...

  12. 40 CFR 86.1319-90 - CVS calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with such a device.) The CVS calibration procedures are designed for use of a “metering venturi” type... series with the pump. (ii) The calculated flow rate, ft 3/min, (at pump inlet absolute pressure and... during test period N Revs ±1 Rev. Elapsed time for test period t sec. ±0.5 sec. (5) After the system has...

  13. 40 CFR 86.1319-90 - CVS calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... with such a device.) The CVS calibration procedures are designed for use of a “metering venturi” type... series with the pump. (ii) The calculated flow rate, ft 3/min, (at pump inlet absolute pressure and... test period N Revs ±1 Rev. Elapsed time for test period t sec. ±0.5 sec. (5) After the system has been...

  14. Human Pol ζ purified with accessory subunits is active in translesion DNA synthesis and complements Pol η in cisplatin bypass

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sam; Gregory, Mark T.; Yang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerase ζ (Pol ζ) is a eukaryotic B-family DNA polymerase that specializes in translesion synthesis and is essential for normal embryogenesis. At a minimum, Pol ζ consists of a catalytic subunit Rev3 and an accessory subunit Rev7. Mammalian Rev3 contains >3,000 residues and is twice as large as the yeast homolog. To date, no vertebrate Pol ζ has been purified for biochemical characterization. Here we report purification of a series of human Rev3 deletion constructs expressed in HEK293 cells and identification of a minimally catalytically active human Pol ζ variant. With a tagged form of an active Pol ζ variant, we isolated two additional accessory subunits of human Pol ζ, PolD2 and PolD3. The purified four-subunit Pol ζ4 (Rev3–Rev7–PolD2–PolD3) is much more efficient and more processive at bypassing a 1,2-intrastrand d(GpG)-cisplatin cross-link than the two-subunit Pol ζ2 (Rev3–Rev7). We show that complete bypass of cisplatin lesions requires Pol η to insert dCTP opposite the 3′ guanine and Pol ζ4 to extend the primers. PMID:24449906

  15. Optical Properties of Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-15

    9. T. Holstein, Phys. Rev. 88, 1427 (1952); Phys. Rev. 96, 535 (1954). 10. A.B. Pippard, Proc. Roy. Soc. A191 , 370 (1947). 11. H.E. Bennett, J.M...process in a dust-free environment. Any dust, particulate matter, residual stains , or water marks will replicate .ust as well as the surface

  16. The Concentrations but Not the Components of Particulate Material and Secondary Transformation Products May Account for Much of the Variation in Air Mutagenicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mutagenic potency of ambient air PM in the Salmonella mutagenicity assay (rev/mg PM) varies only ~1 order of magnitude worldwide; however, the mutagenic potency of the air itself (rev/m3 of air) varies ~5 orders of magnitude (IARC Monograph Vol 109, 2016). Thus, the componen...

  17. Network Dynamics: Modeling And Generation Of Very Large Heterogeneous Social Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-23

    P11035 (2014). [19] P. L. Krapivsky and S. Redner, Phys. Rev. E. 71, 036118 (2005). [20] M. O. Jackson and B. W. Rogers, Amer. Econ . Rev. 97, 890...P06004 (2010). [24] M. E. J. Newman, Networks: An Introduction (Oxford Univ. Press, Oxford, 2010). [25] P. J. Flory, Principles of Polymer Chemistry

  18. Human Pol ζ purified with accessory subunits is active in translesion DNA synthesis and complements Pol η in cisplatin bypass.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Sam; Gregory, Mark T; Yang, Wei

    2014-02-25

    DNA polymerase ζ (Pol ζ) is a eukaryotic B-family DNA polymerase that specializes in translesion synthesis and is essential for normal embryogenesis. At a minimum, Pol ζ consists of a catalytic subunit Rev3 and an accessory subunit Rev7. Mammalian Rev3 contains >3,000 residues and is twice as large as the yeast homolog. To date, no vertebrate Pol ζ has been purified for biochemical characterization. Here we report purification of a series of human Rev3 deletion constructs expressed in HEK293 cells and identification of a minimally catalytically active human Pol ζ variant. With a tagged form of an active Pol ζ variant, we isolated two additional accessory subunits of human Pol ζ, PolD2 and PolD3. The purified four-subunit Pol ζ4 (Rev3-Rev7-PolD2-PolD3) is much more efficient and more processive at bypassing a 1,2-intrastrand d(GpG)-cisplatin cross-link than the two-subunit Pol ζ2 (Rev3-Rev7). We show that complete bypass of cisplatin lesions requires Pol η to insert dCTP opposite the 3' guanine and Pol ζ4 to extend the primers.

  19. Reply to ``Comment on `Suppression of chaos by resonant parametric perturbations' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Ricardo; Pettini, Marco

    1993-06-01

    The preceding Comment [Cuadros and Chacón, Phys. Rev. E 47, 4628 (1993)] on the paper by Lima and Pettini [Phys. Rev. A 41, 726 (1990)] contains a correct premise; however, erroneous consequences are drawn from it. In this Reply we explain why.

  20. Theoretical Study of the Saturated Stage of a Relativistic Magnetron

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-30

    mentioned that an earlier method to estimate the validity of a variational approximation had been given in Ref. [28], where Dexais, Anderson and Lasik ...Zemlyanaya. Phys. Rev. Lett. 80 (1998)5117. [28] M. Dexais. D. Anderson. M. Lasik . Phys. Rev. A 40 (1989) 2441. This research was supported in part by

  1. Novel Approaches to Quantum Computation Using Solid State Qubits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-31

    hysteretic DC-SQUIDs, Phys. Rev. B 71, 220509(R) (2005). 18. C.-P. Yang and S. Han, Generation of Greenberger-Horne- Zeilinger entangled states with three SQUID...Horne- Zeilinger entangled states with multiple superconducting quantum interference device qubits/atoms in cavity QED, Phys. Rev. A 70, 062323 (2004

  2. Needs Assessment of Volunteers in a Non-Profit Organization in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yin-Che; Lin, Chen-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    The idea of helping people by the medium of telephone was inspired by Rev. Alan Walker, Superintendent of the Central Methodist Mission in Sydney since 1958. Having made several radio and TV appearances, Rev. Walker found himself being called by people facing difficulties and personal crises. He did not have the time or the energy to give them the…

  3. 46 CFR 160.047-1 - Incorporation by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reference to the following documents: (1) Federal Specification: L-P-375C—Plastic Film, Flexible, Vinyl... part of this subpart: Dwg. No. 160.047-1: Sheet 1, Rev. 2—Cutting Pattern and General Arrangement, Models AK-1, and AF-1. Sheet 2, Rev. 2—Cutting Pattern and General Arrangement, Models CKM-1 and CFM-1...

  4. 46 CFR 160.047-1 - Incorporation by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reference to the following documents: (1) Federal Specification: L-P-375C—Plastic Film, Flexible, Vinyl... part of this subpart: Dwg. No. 160.047-1: Sheet 1, Rev. 2—Cutting Pattern and General Arrangement, Models AK-1, and AF-1. Sheet 2, Rev. 2—Cutting Pattern and General Arrangement, Models CKM-1 and CFM-1...

  5. 46 CFR 160.047-1 - Incorporation by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... reference to the following documents: (1) Federal Specification: L-P-375C—Plastic Film, Flexible, Vinyl... part of this subpart: Dwg. No. 160.047-1: Sheet 1, Rev. 2—Cutting Pattern and General Arrangement, Models AK-1, and AF-1. Sheet 2, Rev. 2—Cutting Pattern and General Arrangement, Models CKM-1 and CFM-1...

  6. 46 CFR 160.047-1 - Incorporation by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... reference to the following documents: (1) Federal Specification: L-P-375C—Plastic Film, Flexible, Vinyl... part of this subpart: Dwg. No. 160.047-1: Sheet 1, Rev. 2—Cutting Pattern and General Arrangement, Models AK-1, and AF-1. Sheet 2, Rev. 2—Cutting Pattern and General Arrangement, Models CKM-1 and CFM-1...

  7. Insertion of reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into CVI988 strain of Marek’s disease virus results in enhanced growth and protection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It has been reported that co-cultivation of a JM/102W strain, a virulent strain of Marek’s disease virus (MDV), with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) resulted in the integration of REV long terminal repeat (LTR) into the MDV repeat region. The resulting virus, RM1, was unable to transform T-cells ...

  8. Taxonomy and Biology of Phlebotomine Vectors of Human Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-31

    Sobre o encontro de Lutzomyiu longipalpis (Lutz & Neiva, 1912) no Estado de Sao Paulo, Brasil, Rev. Saude Publ. Sac Paulo 4:99-100. 3 Forattini, 0. P...Almeida. /1964. Flebotomos do nordeste. I. Encontro de "Plboou cht, " "P. gmgxi e ’T. 1QnstispinJ. em Pernambuco (Diptera, Psychodidae). Rev. Brasil. Biol

  9. Comment on ``Fano Line Shapes Reconsidered: Symmetric Photoionization Peaks from Pure Continuum Excitation''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, John W.; Greene, Chris H.; Langhoff, Peter W.; Starace, Anthony F.; Winstead, Carl

    2005-06-01

    A Comment on the Letter by U. Eichmann. T. F. Gallagher, and R. M. Konik, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 233004 (2003)., PRLTAO, 0031-9007, 10.1103/PhysRevLett.90.233004 The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  10. First-principles Calculations of Twin-boundary and Stacking-fault Energies in Magnesium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Vasu KI. Scripta Mater 1969;3:927. [7] Couret A, Caillard D. Acta Metall 1985;33:1455. [8] Fleischer RL . Scripta Mater 1986;20:223. [9] Liu ZK. J...Jackson KA, Pederson MR, Singh DJ, Fiolhais C. Phys Rev B 1992;46:6671. [17] Kresse G, Furthmuller J. Phys Rev B 1996;54:11169. [18] Kresse G, Joubert

  11. An avian, oncogenic retrovirus replicates in vivo in more than 50% of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes from an endangered grouse

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reoccurring infection of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), an avian oncogenic retrovirus, has been a major obstacle in attempts to breed and release an endangered grouse, the Attwater's prairie chicken (Tympanicus cupido attwateri). REV infection of these birds in breeding facilities was found to r...

  12. 26 CFR 601.201 - Rulings and determinations letters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... entire group. See, for example, Rev. Proc. 78-15, 1978-2 C.B. 488, and Rev. Proc. 78-16, 1978-2 C.B. 489... rulings to business, trade, or industrial associations or to other similar groups relating to the application of the tax laws to members of the group. However, rulings may be issued to such groups or...

  13. 26 CFR 601.201 - Rulings and determinations letters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... entire group. See, for example, Rev. Proc. 78-15, 1978-2 C.B. 488, and Rev. Proc. 78-16, 1978-2 C.B. 489... rulings to business, trade, or industrial associations or to other similar groups relating to the application of the tax laws to members of the group. However, rulings may be issued to such groups or...

  14. 26 CFR 601.201 - Rulings and determinations letters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... entire group. See, for example, Rev. Proc. 78-15, 1978-2 C.B. 488, and Rev. Proc. 78-16, 1978-2 C.B. 489... rulings to business, trade, or industrial associations or to other similar groups relating to the application of the tax laws to members of the group. However, rulings may be issued to such groups or...

  15. 26 CFR 601.201 - Rulings and determinations letters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... entire group. See, for example, Rev. Proc. 78-15, 1978-2 C.B. 488, and Rev. Proc. 78-16, 1978-2 C.B. 489... rulings to business, trade, or industrial associations or to other similar groups relating to the application of the tax laws to members of the group. However, rulings may be issued to such groups or...

  16. 26 CFR 601.201 - Rulings and determinations letters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... entire group. See, for example, Rev. Proc. 78-15, 1978-2 C.B. 488, and Rev. Proc. 78-16, 1978-2 C.B. 489... rulings to business, trade, or industrial associations or to other similar groups relating to the application of the tax laws to members of the group. However, rulings may be issued to such groups or...

  17. 76 FR 34763 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses Involving No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... approved [Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI)] 04-10, Rev. 1 in accordance with the TS SFCP. NEI 04-10, Rev. 1... environmental impact statement or environmental assessment need be prepared for these amendments. If the... by the proposed amendment. The proposed amendment adopts the NRC-accepted guidelines of NEI [Nuclear...

  18. Walsh, Da Silva, and Wei Reply

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, A.; Da Silva, J. L. F.; Wei, S. H.

    2009-04-17

    This is a reply to Stefano Sanvito and Chaitanya Das Pemmaraju's, Comment on Theoretical Description of Carrier Mediated Magnetism in Cobalt Doped ZnO, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 159701 (2009); and the original article is Theoretical Description of Carrier Mediated Magnetism in Cobalt Doped ZnO, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 256401 (2008).

  19. Comment on ``Microscopic Theory of Network Glasses''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micoulaut, M.; Boolchand, P.

    2003-10-01

    A Comment on the Letter by

    Randall W. Hall and Peter G. Wolynes, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 90, 085505 (2003)10.1103/PhysRevLett.90.085505
    . The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  20. Quantum Search and Beyond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-02

    an N-atom system. II. Calculation of the eigenstates Terry Rudolph, Itay Yavin and Helen Freedhoff, quant-ph/0206067 Phys. Rev. A. 69, 013815 (2004...Calculation of the eigenstates Terry Rudolph, Itay Yavin and Helen Freedhoff, quant-ph/0206067 Phys. Rev. A. 69, 013815 (2004). 13. Quantum searching a

  1. Three-electron spin qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, Maximilian; Burkard, Guido

    2017-10-01

    The goal of this article is to review the progress of three-electron spin qubits from their inception to the state of the art. We direct the main focus towards the exchange-only qubit (Bacon et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 1758-61, DiVincenzo et al 2000 Nature 408 339) and its derived versions, e.g. the resonant exchange (RX) qubit, but we also discuss other qubit implementations using three electron spins. For each three-spin qubit we describe the qubit model, the envisioned physical realization, the implementations of single-qubit operations, as well as the read-out and initialization schemes. Two-qubit gates and decoherence properties are discussed for the RX qubit and the exchange-only qubit, thereby completing the list of requirements for quantum computation for a viable candidate qubit implementation. We start by describing the full system of three electrons in a triple quantum dot, then discuss the charge-stability diagram, restricting ourselves to the relevant subsystem, introduce the qubit states, and discuss important transitions to other charge states (Russ et al 2016 Phys. Rev. B 94 165411). Introducing the various qubit implementations, we begin with the exchange-only qubit (DiVincenzo et al 2000 Nature 408 339, Laird et al 2010 Phys. Rev. B 82 075403), followed by the RX qubit (Medford et al 2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 050501, Taylor et al 2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 050502), the spin-charge qubit (Kyriakidis and Burkard 2007 Phys. Rev. B 75 115324), and the hybrid qubit (Shi et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 140503, Koh et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 250503, Cao et al 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 086801, Thorgrimsson et al 2016 arXiv:1611.04945). The main focus will be on the exchange-only qubit and its modification, the RX qubit, whose single-qubit operations are realized by driving the qubit at its resonant frequency in the microwave range similar to electron spin resonance. Two different types of two-qubit operations are presented for the exchange

  2. Greens Function-Based Defect Identification in InAs-InA1-xSbx Strained Layer Superlattices (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-15

    the GaSb valance band edge, in agreement with values deduced recently from lifetime measurements and analysis [Aytac et al . Phys. Rev. Appl., 5...meV below the GaSb valance band edge, in agreement with values deduced recently from lifetime mea- surements and analysis [Aytac et al . Phys. Rev

  3. Impact of source-production revision on the dose-rate constant of {sup 131}Cs interstitial brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhe; Bongiorni, Paul; Nath, Ravinder

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Since its introduction in 2004, the model CS-1 Rev.1 {sup 131}Cs source has been used in many radiation therapy clinics for prostate brachytherapy. In 2006, this source model underwent a Rev.2 production revision. The aim of this work was to investigate the dosimetric influences of the Rev.2 production revision using high-resolution photon spectrometry. Methods: Three CS-1 Rev.1 and three CS-1 Rev.2 {sup 131}Cs sources were used in this study. The relative photon energy spectrum emitted by each source in the transverse bisector of the source was measured using a high-resolution germanium detector designed for low-energy photon spectrometry. Based onmore » the measured photon energy spectrum and the radioactivity distribution in the source, the dose-rate constant ({Lambda}) of each source was determined. The effects of the Rev.2 production revision were quantified by comparing the emitted photon energy spectra and the {Lambda} values determined for the sources manufactured before and after the production revision. Results: The relative photon energy spectrum originating from the principal emissions of {sup 131}Cs was found to be nearly identical before and after the Rev.2 revision. However, the portion of the spectrum originating from the production of fluorescent x rays in niobium, a trace element present in the source construction materials, was found to differ significantly between the Rev.1 and Rev.2 sources. The peak intensity of the Nb K{sub {alpha}} and Nb K{sub {beta}} fluorescent x rays from the Rev.2 source was approximately 35% of that from the Rev.1 source. Consequently, the nominal {Lambda} value of the Rev.2 source was found to be greater than that determined for the Rev.1 source by approximately 0.7%{+-}0.5%. Conclusions: A significant reduction (65%) in relative niobium fluorescent x-ray yield was observed in the Rev.2 {sup 131}Cs sources. The impact of this reduction on the dose-rate constant was found to be small, with a relative

  4. [The efficacy of autocatalytic casapse-3 driven by human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter on human ovarian carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Song, Yue; Shen, Keng; Yu, Jing-rong

    2007-11-06

    To construct recombinant adenoviral vector expressing autocatalysis caspase-3 driven by human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter (hTERTp), and investigate its antitumor effect on ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. Recombinant adenovirus expressing autocatalytic caspase-3 (rev-csapase-3) driven by hTERTp, AdHT-rev-casp3, was constructed. Ad-rev-casp3 expressing rev-caspase-3 driven by cytomegalovirus promoter (CMVp) was used as a positive control. hTERT positive human ovarian cancer cells of the line AO and hTERT-negative human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured and transfected with AdHT-rev-casp3, Ad-rev-casp3, or Ad-EGFG expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein as control group. Western blotting, Cell Counting Kit (CCK-8), flow cytometry, and TUNEL were used to detect the expression of p17, active subunit of caspase-3, and p85, a poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage fragment, and they were also used to measure the cell survival rate and apoptotic rate. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of active caspase-3 and its substrate PARP in the AO cells and HUVECs. Twenty nude BALB/c mice were inoculated subcutaneously with AO cells to establish subcutaneous tumor models, when the tumor grew to the volume of 150 mm3 the rats were divided into 4 equal groups to undergo intra-tumor injection of AdHT-rev-casp3, Ad-rev-casp3, Ad-EGFG, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) respectively, the survival rate tumor inhibition rate was observed, 72 days later the mice were killed with their livers and tumors taken out, and Western blotting was used to detect the expression of active caspase-3. Another 40 mice underwent intraperitoneal injection of AO cells to establish intraperitoneal transplanted tumor models, 21 days later the rats were divided into 4 equal groups to be injected intraperitoneally with AdHT-rev-casp3, Ad-rev-casp3, Ad-EGFG, or PBS, the survival rate was observed, and the blood levels of alanine transaminase

  5. Thermodynamics of quantum spacetime histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolin, Lee

    2017-11-01

    We show that the simplicity constraints, which define the dynamics of spin foam models, imply, and are implied by, the first law of thermodynamics, when the latter is applied to causal diamonds in the quantum spacetime. This result reveals an intimate connection between the holographic nature of gravity, as reflected by the Bekenstein entropy, and the fact that general relativity and other gravitational theories can be understood as constrained topological field theories. To state and derive this correspondence we describe causal diamonds in the causal structure of spin foam histories and generalize arguments given for the near horizon region of black holes by Frodden, Gosh and Perez [Phys. Rev. D 87, 121503 (2013); , 10.1103/PhysRevD.87.121503Phys. Rev. D 89, 084069 (2014); , 10.1103/PhysRevD.89.084069Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 241301 (2011); , 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.241301Phys. Rev. Lett.108, 169901(E) (2012)., 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.169901] and Bianchi [arXiv:1204.5122.]. This allows us to apply a recent argument of Jacobson [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 201101 (2016).10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.201101] to show that if a spin foam history has a semiclassical limit described in terms of a smooth metric geometry, that geometry satisfies the Einstein equations. These results suggest also a proposal for a quantum equivalence principle.

  6. [Construction of autocatalytic caspase-3 driven by amplified human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter and its enhanced efficacy of inducing apoptosis in human ovarian carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Song, Yue; Shen, Keng; He, Chun-Xia

    2007-09-01

    To construct recombinant adenoviral vector expressing autocatalysis caspase-3 driven by human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter amplified by two-step transcription amplification (hTERTp-TSTA), and investigate its antitumor effect in ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. Recombinant adenoviruses expressing autocatalytic caspase-3 (rev-caspase-3) driven by hTERTp-TSTA were prepared, which were named as AdHTVP2G5-rev-casp3. AdHT-rev-casp3, Ad-rev-casp3 and AdHTVP2G5-EGEP, which express rev-caspase-3 driven by hTERTp, cytomegalovirus promoter (CMVp) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), respectively, were used as controls. Western blot, cell counting kit (CCK-8), flow cytometry (FCM) and TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) were used to detect the expression of p17, active subunit of caspase-3, and p85, and to measure cell survival rates, apoptotic rates and cell cycle distribution in ovarian cell line AO and normal human umbilical vein endothelial cell line HUVEC, following treatments of AdHTVP2G5-rev-casp3. subcutaneous tumor models and abdominally spread tumor models of human ovarian carcinoma using AO cells in BALB/c nude mice were established. Following treatments of AdHTVP2G5-rev-casp3, western blot was used to detect the expression of active caspase-3 in abdominally spread tumors and liver tissues, respectively, and the mouse survival rates and the volume of tumor nodules were measured, and the serum level of alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) were analyzed to monitor liver damages and HE staining was used to detect the histopathological changes of various organs. The levels of p17 expression in AdHTVP2G5-rev-casp3-treated AO cells were significantly higher than that in Ad-rev-casp3 or AdHT-rev-casp3 treated AO cells, while no expression was observed in AdHTVP2G5-rev-casp3-treated HUVEC. There was strong cell killing of AdHTVP2G5-rev-casp3 of hTERT positive AO cells, but not of the hTERT-negative HUVEC cells

  7. Methodology, status and plans for development and assessment of the code ATHLET

    SciTech Connect

    Teschendorff, V.; Austregesilo, H.; Lerchl, G.

    1997-07-01

    The thermal-hydraulic computer code ATHLET (Analysis of THermal-hydraulics of LEaks and Transients) is being developed by the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) for the analysis of anticipated and abnormal plant transients, small and intermediate leaks as well as large breaks in light water reactors. The aim of the code development is to cover the whole spectrum of design basis and beyond design basis accidents (without core degradation) for PWRs and BWRs with only one code. The main code features are: advanced thermal-hydraulics; modular code architecture; separation between physical models and numerical methods; pre- and post-processing tools; portability. The codemore » has features that are of special interest for applications to small leaks and transients with accident management, e.g. initialization by a steady-state calculation, full-range drift-flux model, dynamic mixture level tracking. The General Control Simulation Module of ATHLET is a flexible tool for the simulation of the balance-of-plant and control systems including the various operator actions in the course of accident sequences with AM measures. The code development is accompained by a systematic and comprehensive validation program. A large number of integral experiments and separate effect tests, including the major International Standard Problems, have been calculated by GRS and by independent organizations. The ATHLET validation matrix is a well balanced set of integral and separate effects tests derived from the CSNI proposal emphasizing, however, the German combined ECC injection system which was investigated in the UPTF, PKL and LOBI test facilities.« less

  8. HLA-E coding and 3' untranslated region variability determined by next-generation sequencing in two West-African population samples.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Erick C; Mendes-Junior, Celso T; Sabbagh, Audrey; Porto, Iane O P; Garcia, André; Ramalho, Jaqueline; Lima, Thálitta H A; Massaro, Juliana D; Dias, Fabrício C; Collares, Cristhianna V A; Jamonneau, Vincent; Bucheton, Bruno; Camara, Mamadou; Donadi, Eduardo A

    2015-12-01

    HLA-E is a non-classical Human Leucocyte Antigen class I gene with immunomodulatory properties. Whereas HLA-E expression usually occurs at low levels, it is widely distributed amongst human tissues, has the ability to bind self and non-self antigens and to interact with NK cells and T lymphocytes, being important for immunosurveillance and also for fighting against infections. HLA-E is usually the most conserved locus among all class I genes. However, most of the previous studies evaluating HLA-E variability sequenced only a few exons or genotyped known polymorphisms. Here we report a strategy to evaluate HLA-E variability by next-generation sequencing (NGS) that might be used to other HLA loci and present the HLA-E haplotype diversity considering the segment encoding the entire HLA-E mRNA (including 5'UTR, introns and the 3'UTR) in two African population samples, Susu from Guinea-Conakry and Lobi from Burkina Faso. Our results indicate that (a) the HLA-E gene is indeed conserved, encoding mainly two different protein molecules; (b) Africans do present several unknown HLA-E alleles presenting synonymous mutations; (c) the HLA-E 3'UTR is quite polymorphic and (d) haplotypes in the HLA-E 3'UTR are in close association with HLA-E coding alleles. NGS has proved to be an important tool on data generation for future studies evaluating variability in non-classical MHC genes. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Three-dimensional vasculature of the bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Shirai, W; Sato, T; Shibuya, H; Naito, K; Tsukise, A

    2005-12-01

    To clarify anatomical distribution of Fasciola infection, the vascular and ductal architectures of the liver were studied by means of corrosion cast technique using synthetic resin. The arteria hepatica propria (AP) passes as the arteria gastroduodenalis (AG); AP becomes the left trunk after the porta hepatis; AP passes on the right side of vena porta communis (VPC) and projects AG while curving in a U-shape below the portal vein. Hepatic veins located between the vena hepatica media (HM) and vena hepatica dextra (HD) varied widely among specimens and were irregular, including the vena hepatica dorso-lateralis sinistra (Hds), vena hepatica dorso-lateralis dextra (Hdd), vena hepatica lobi caudati (Hlc), venae hepaticae processus caudati (Hpc), venae hepaticae processus papillaris (Hpp), and the hepatic vein to the dorsal intermediate part, which directly or indirectly drained into the vena cava caudalis. The courses of the bovine hepatic veins were markedly diverse, and anastomoses between vena hepatica sinistra (HS) and Hds were observed in about a half of the livers. The portal vein entered the liver as VPC slightly above the centre of the right lobe on the visceral surface. The intermediate or transverse part [pars transversa trunci sinistri (PTS)] of truncus sinister (TS), which extends from the entry of the portal vein into the left lobe of the liver, was slightly arched downward [pars umbilicalis trunci sinistri (PUS)]. The portal vein further arched from the distal end of TS to the umbilical vein and ran towards the inter-lobar incision between the left lobe and quadrate lobe. Based on these branches, hepatic segments were determined as 13 or 14 areas. A total of 15 bile ducts were derived from various lobes. The hepatic duct was about 2.6-6 cm long from the confluence of the right and left hepatic ducts to the division of the cystic duct and the common hepatic duct.

  10. RDS - A systematic approach towards system thermal hydraulics input code development for a comprehensive deterministic safety analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Mohd Faiz; Roslan, Ridha; Ibrahim, Mohd Rizal Mamat @

    2014-02-01

    Deterministic Safety Analysis (DSA) is one of the mandatory requirements conducted for Nuclear Power Plant licensing process, with the aim of ensuring safety compliance with relevant regulatory acceptance criteria. DSA is a technique whereby a set of conservative deterministic rules and requirements are applied for the design and operation of facilities or activities. Computer codes are normally used to assist in performing all required analysis under DSA. To ensure a comprehensive analysis, the conduct of DSA should follow a systematic approach. One of the methodologies proposed is the Standardized and Consolidated Reference Experimental (and Calculated) Database (SCRED) developed by University of Pisa. Based on this methodology, the use of Reference Data Set (RDS) as a pre-requisite reference document for developing input nodalization was proposed. This paper shall describe the application of RDS with the purpose of assessing its effectiveness. Two RDS documents were developed for an Integral Test Facility of LOBI-MOD2 and associated Test A1-83. Data and information from various reports and drawings were referred in preparing the RDS. The results showed that by developing RDS, it has made possible to consolidate all relevant information in one single document. This is beneficial as it enables preservation of information, promotes quality assurance, allows traceability, facilitates continuous improvement, promotes solving of contradictions and finally assisting in developing thermal hydraulic input regardless of whichever code selected. However, some disadvantages were also recognized such as the need for experience in making engineering judgments, language barrier in accessing foreign information and limitation of resources. Some possible improvements are suggested to overcome these challenges.

  11. Simulation of DNAPL migration in heterogeneous translucent porous media based on estimation of representative elementary volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming; Wu, Jianfeng; Wu, Jichun

    2017-10-01

    When the dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) comes into the subsurface environment, its migration behavior is crucially affected by the permeability and entry pressure of subsurface porous media. A prerequisite for accurately simulating DNAPL migration in aquifers is then the determination of the permeability, entry pressure and corresponding representative elementary volumes (REV) of porous media. However, the permeability, entry pressure and corresponding representative elementary volumes (REV) are hard to determine clearly. This study utilizes the light transmission micro-tomography (LTM) method to determine the permeability and entry pressure of two dimensional (2D) translucent porous media and integrates the LTM with a criterion of relative gradient error to quantify the corresponding REV of porous media. As a result, the DNAPL migration in porous media might be accurately simulated by discretizing the model at the REV dimension. To validate the quantification methods, an experiment of perchloroethylene (PCE) migration is conducted in a two-dimensional heterogeneous bench-scale aquifer cell. Based on the quantifications of permeability, entry pressure and REV scales of 2D porous media determined by the LTM and relative gradient error, different models with different sizes of discretization grid are used to simulate the PCE migration. It is shown that the model based on REV size agrees well with the experimental results over the entire migration period including calibration, verification and validation processes. This helps to better understand the microstructures of porous media and achieve accurately simulating DNAPL migration in aquifers based on the REV estimation.

  12. Magnetic and structural X-ray dichroïsms of metallic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzini, Stefania; Fontaine, A.; Baudelet, F.; Minr, S.; Giorgetti, C.; Dartyge, E.; Bobo, J. F.; Piecuch, M.

    1995-05-01

    Fe/Cu and Co/Cu multilayers are intensively studied because of their exceptional magnetic properties, i.e., their giant magnetoresistance and the oscillations of the magnetic coupling between magnetic layers as a function of the thickness of the copper spacer [S.S. Parkin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 66 (1991) 2152; F. Petroff et al., Phys. Rev. B 44 (1991) 5355]. Spectroscopic approaches to the understanding of the coupling of ferromagnetic layers through a noble metal layer have been recently introduced, in particular spin-resolved photoemission [N.B. Brookes et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 67 (1991) 354; C. Carbone et al., PRL 71 (1993) 2805] inverse photoemission [J.E. Ortega et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 69 (1992) 844; Phys. Rev. B 47 (1993) 1540] and magnetic circular dichroism [S. Pizzini et al., MRS Symp. Proc., vol. 313 (1993); M.G. Samant et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 72 (1994) 2152; S. Pizzini et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74 (1995) 1470]. X-ray absorption spectroscopy appears to be effective both for determination of the local structure, specific to the bidimensionality of the system but also for the electron symmetry-dependent evaluation of the spin polarisation of the noble metal as well as the magnetic element.

  13. Quantum-Critical Dynamics of the Skyrmion Lattice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Andrew G.

    2002-03-01

    Slightly away from exact filling of the lowest Landau level, the quantum Hall ferromagnet contains a finite density of magnetic vortices or Skyrmions[1,2]. These Skyrmions are expected to form a square lattice[3], the low energy excitations of which (translation/phonon modes and rotation/breathing modes) lead to dramatically enhanced nuclear relaxation[4,5]. Upon changing the filling fraction, the rotational modes undergo a quantum phase transition where zero-point fluctuations destroy the orientational order of the Skyrmions[4,6]. I will discuss the effect of this quantum critical point upon nuclear spin relaxation[7]. [1]S. L. Sondhi et al., Phys. Rev. B47, 16419 (1993). [2]S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 5112 (1995), A. Schmeller et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 4290 (1995). [3]L. Brey et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2562 (1995). [4]R. Côté et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 4825 (1997). [5]R. Tycko et al., Science 268, 1460 (1995). [6]Yu V. Nazarov and A. V. Khaetskii, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 576 (1998). [7]A. G. Green, Phys. Rev. B61, R16 299 (2000).

  14. The sensitivity of predicted financial and genetic gains in Holsteins to changes in the economic value of traits.

    PubMed

    Cottle, D J; Coffey, M P

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of using different relative economic values (REVs) in selection indices on predicted financial and trait gains from selection of sires of cows and on the choice of leading Holstein bulls available in the UK dairy industry. Breeding objective traits were milk yield, fat yield, protein yield, lifespan, mastitis, non-return rate, calving interval and lameness. Relative importance of a trait, as estimated by a.h(2), was only moderately related to the rate of financial loss or total economic merit (ΔTEM) per percentage under- or overestimation of REV (r = 0.38 and 0.29, respectively) as a result of the variance-covariance structure of traits. The effects on TEM of under- or overestimating trait REVs were non-symmetrical. TEM was most sensitive to incorrect REVs for protein, fat, milk and lifespan and least sensitive to incorrect calving interval, lameness, non-return and mastitis REVs. A guide to deciding which dairy traits require the most rigorous analysis in the calculation of their REVs is given. Varying the REVs within a fairly wide range resulted in different bulls being selected by index and their differing predicted transmitting abilities would result in the herds moving in different directions in the long term (20 years). It is suggested that customized indices, where the farmer creates rankings of bulls tailored to their specific farm circumstances, can be worthwhile. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Trans-Lesion DNA Polymerases May Be Involved in Yeast Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Arbel-Eden, Ayelet; Joseph-Strauss, Daphna; Masika, Hagit; Printzental, Oxana; Rachi, Eléanor; Simchen, Giora

    2013-01-01

    Trans-lesion DNA polymerases (TLSPs) enable bypass of DNA lesions during replication and are also induced under stress conditions. Being only weakly dependent on their template during replication, TLSPs introduce mutations into DNA. The low processivity of these enzymes ensures that they fall off their template after a few bases are synthesized and are then replaced by the more accurate replicative polymerase. We find that the three TLSPs of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rev1, PolZeta (Rev3 and Rev7), and Rad30 are induced during meiosis at a time when DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are formed and homologous chromosomes recombine. Strains deleted for one or any combination of the three TLSPs undergo normal meiosis. However, in the triple-deletion mutant, there is a reduction in both allelic and ectopic recombination. We suggest that trans-lesion polymerases are involved in the processing of meiotic double-strand breaks that lead to mutations. In support of this notion, we report significant yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) associations in meiosis-arrested cells between the TLSPs and DSB proteins Rev1-Spo11, Rev1-Mei4, and Rev7-Rec114, as well as between Rev1 and Rad30. We suggest that the involvement of TLSPs in processing of meiotic DSBs could be responsible for the considerably higher frequency of mutations reported during meiosis compared with that found in mitotically dividing cells, and therefore may contribute to faster evolutionary divergence than previously assumed. PMID:23550131

  16. Detection of reticuloendotheliosis virus as a contaminant of fowl pox vaccines.

    PubMed

    Awad, A M; Abd El-Hamid, H S; Abou Rawash, A A; Ibrahim, H H

    2010-11-01

    This study was designed to detect reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) as a contaminant in fowl pox vaccines. A total of 30 fowl pox vaccine samples were examined for the presence of REV using both in vitro and in vivo methods. In in vitro testing, the fowl pox vaccine samples were inoculated into chicken embryo fibroblast cultures prepared from specific-pathogen-free embryonated chicken eggs, and the cultures were examined using PCR to detect REV. In in vivo testing, each fowl pox vaccine sample was inoculated into 5-d-old specific-pathogen-free chicks, which were kept under observation for up to 12 wk postinoculation; serum samples were collected at 15, 30, and 45 d postinoculation for the detection of REV-specific antibodies using ELISA. Tissue samples were collected at 8 and 12 wk postinoculation for histopathological examination. Of the tested vaccines, only one imported vaccine sample tested positive for REV using PCR. Serum samples collected from chicks infected with the PCR-positive vaccine batch also tested positive for REV-specific antibodies using ELISA. Histopathological examination of the liver, spleen, and bursa of Fabricius demonstrated the presence of tumor cells in these organs, confirming the results obtained using PCR and ELISA, and indicating that the sample was contaminated with REV. These data clearly indicate that the screening of all commercial poultry vaccines for viruses is an important factor in assuring the biosafety of animal vaccines.

  17. Elastic fields, dipole tensors, and interaction between self-interstitial atom defects in bcc transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, S. L.; Ma, Pui-Wai

    2018-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that self-interstitial atom (SIA) defects in nonmagnetic body-centered-cubic (bcc) metals adopt strongly anisotropic configurations, elongated in the <111 > direction [S. Han et al., Phys. Rev. B 66, 220101 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevB.66.220101; D. Nguyen-Manh et al., Phys. Rev. B 73, 020101 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevB.73.020101; P. M. Derlet et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 054107 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevB.76.054107; S. L. Dudarev, Annu. Rev. Mater. Res. 43, 35 (2013), 10.1146/annurev-matsci-071312-121626]. Elastic distortions, associated with such anisotropic atomic structures, appear similar to distortions around small prismatic dislocation loops, although the extent of this similarity has never been quantified. We derive analytical formulas for the dipole tensors of SIA defects, which show that, in addition to the prismatic dislocation looplike character, the elastic field of a SIA defect also has a significant isotropic dilatation component. Using empirical potentials and DFT calculations, we parametrize dipole tensors of <111 > defects for all the nonmagnetic bcc transition metals. This enables a quantitative evaluation of the energy of elastic interaction between the defects, which also shows that in a periodic three-dimensional simple cubic arrangement of crowdions, long-range elastic interactions between a defect and all its images favor a <111 > orientation of the defect.

  18. Adaptive clustering procedure for continuous gravitational wave searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Avneet; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Eggenstein, Heinz-Bernd; Walsh, Sinéad

    2017-10-01

    In hierarchical searches for continuous gravitational waves, clustering of candidates is an important post-processing step because it reduces the number of noise candidates that are followed up at successive stages [J. Aasi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 102002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevD.88.102002; B. Behnke, M. A. Papa, and R. Prix, Phys. Rev. D 91, 064007 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevD.91.064007; M. A. Papa et al., Phys. Rev. D 94, 122006 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevD.94.122006]. Previous clustering procedures bundled together nearby candidates ascribing them to the same root cause (be it a signal or a disturbance), based on a predefined cluster volume. In this paper, we present a procedure that adapts the cluster volume to the data itself and checks for consistency of such volume with what is expected from a signal. This significantly improves the noise rejection capabilities at fixed detection threshold, and at fixed computing resources for the follow-up stages, this results in an overall more sensitive search. This new procedure was employed in the first Einstein@Home search on data from the first science run of the advanced LIGO detectors (O1) [LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration, arXiv:1707.02669 [Phys. Rev. D (to be published)

  19. Treatment with the Fusion Inhibitor Enfuvirtide Influences the Appearance of Mutations in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Regulatory Protein Rev▿

    PubMed Central

    Svicher, Valentina; Alteri, Claudia; D'Arrigo, Roberta; Laganà, Alessandro; Trignetti, Maria; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Callegaro, Anna Paola; Maggiolo, Franco; Mazzotta, Francesco; Ferro, Alfredo; Dimonte, Salvatore; Aquaro, Stefano; di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano; Tommasi, Chiara; Trotta, Maria Paola; Narciso, Pasquale; Antinori, Andrea; Perno, Carlo Federico; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    The gp41-encoding sequence of the env gene contains in two separate regions the Rev-responsive elements (RRE) and the alternative open reading frame of the second exon of the regulatory protein Rev. The binding of Rev to the RRE allows the transport of unspliced/singly spliced viral mRNAs out of the nucleus, an essential step in the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In this study, we have investigated whether the fusion-inhibitor enfuvirtide (ENF) can induce mutations in Rev and if these mutations correlate with the classical ENF resistance gp41 mutations and with viremia and CD4 cell count. Specific Rev mutations were positively associated with ENF treatment and significantly correlated with classical ENF resistance gp41 mutations. In particular, a cluster was observed for the Rev mutations E57A (E57Arev) and N86Srev with the ENF resistance gp41 mutations Q40H (Q40Hgp41) and L45Mgp41. In addition, the presence at week 48 of the E57Arev correlates with a significant viremia increase from baseline to week 48 and with a CD4 cell count loss from baseline to week 48. By modeling the RRE structure, we found that the Q40gp41 and L45gp41 codons form complementary base pairs in a region of the RRE involved in Rev binding. The conformation of this Rev-binding site is disrupted when Q40Hgp41 and L45Mgp41 occur alone while it is restored when both mutations are present. In conclusion, our study shows that ENF pressure may also affect both Rev and RRE structures and can provide an excellent example of compensatory evolution. This highlights the multiple roles of ENF (and perhaps other entry inhibitors) in modulating the correct interplay between the different HIV-1 genes and proteins during the HIV-1 life cycle. PMID:19124665

  20. Background field removal technique using regularization enabled sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data with varying kernel sizes.

    PubMed

    Kan, Hirohito; Kasai, Harumasa; Arai, Nobuyuki; Kunitomo, Hiroshi; Hirose, Yasujiro; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-09-01

    An effective background field removal technique is desired for more accurate quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) prior to dipole inversion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of regularization enabled sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data with varying spherical kernel sizes (REV-SHARP) method using a three-dimensional head phantom and human brain data. The proposed REV-SHARP method used the spherical mean value operation and Tikhonov regularization in the deconvolution process, with varying 2-14mm kernel sizes. The kernel sizes were gradually reduced, similar to the SHARP with varying spherical kernel (VSHARP) method. We determined the relative errors and relationships between the true local field and estimated local field in REV-SHARP, VSHARP, projection onto dipole fields (PDF), and regularization enabled SHARP (RESHARP). Human experiment was also conducted using REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP. The relative errors in the numerical phantom study were 0.386, 0.448, 0.838, and 0.452 for REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP. REV-SHARP result exhibited the highest correlation between the true local field and estimated local field. The linear regression slopes were 1.005, 1.124, 0.988, and 0.536 for REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP in regions of interest on the three-dimensional head phantom. In human experiments, no obvious errors due to artifacts were present in REV-SHARP. The proposed REV-SHARP is a new method combined with variable spherical kernel size and Tikhonov regularization. This technique might make it possible to be more accurate backgroud field removal and help to achive better accuracy of QSM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of production strategies and animal performance on economic values of dairy sheep traits.

    PubMed

    Krupová, Z; Wolfová, M; Krupa, E; Oravcová, M; Daňo, J; Huba, J; Polák, P

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to carry out a sensitivity analysis on the impact of various production strategies and performance levels on the relative economic values (REVs) of traits in dairy sheep. A bio-economic model implemented in the program package ECOWEIGHT was used to simulate the profit function for a semi-extensive production system with the Slovak multi-purpose breed Improved Valachian and to calculate the REV of 14 production and functional traits. The following production strategies were analysed: differing proportions of milk processed to cheese, customary weaning and early weaning of lambs with immediate sale or sale after artificial rearing, seasonal lambing in winter and aseasonal lambing in autumn. Results of the sensitivity analysis are presented in detail for the four economically most important traits: 150 days milk yield, conception rate of ewes, litter size and ewe productive lifetime. Impacts of the differences in the mean value of each of these four traits on REVs of all other traits were also examined. Simulated changes in the production circumstances had a higher impact on the REV for milk yield than on REVs of the other traits investigated. The proportion of milk processed to cheese, weaning management strategy for lambs and level of milk yield were the main factors influencing the REV of milk yield. The REVs for conception rate of ewes were highly sensitive to the current mean level of the trait. The REV of ewe productive lifetime was most sensitive to variation in ewe conception rate, and the REV of litter size was most affected by weaning strategy for lambs. On the basis of the results of sensitivity analyses, it is recommended that economic values of traits for the overall breeding objective for dairy sheep be calculated as the weighted average of the economic values obtained for the most common production strategies of Slovak dairy sheep farms and that economic values be adjusted after substantial changes in performance levels

  2. Relativistically induced transparency acceleration of light ions by an ultrashort laser pulse interacting with a heavy-ion-plasma density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Aakash A.; Tsung, Frank S.; Tableman, Adam R.; Mori, Warren B.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.

    2013-10-01

    The relativistically induced transparency acceleration (RITA) scheme of proton and ion acceleration using laser-plasma interactions is introduced, modeled, and compared to the existing schemes. Protons are accelerated with femtosecond relativistic pulses to produce quasimonoenergetic bunches with controllable peak energy. The RITA scheme works by a relativistic laser inducing transparency [Akhiezer and Polovin, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz 30, 915 (1956); Kaw and Dawson, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1692942 13, 472 (1970); Max and Perkins, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.27.1342 27, 1342 (1971)] to densities higher than the cold-electron critical density, while the background heavy ions are stationary. The rising laser pulse creates a traveling acceleration structure at the relativistic critical density by ponderomotively [Lindl and Kaw, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1693437 14, 371 (1971); Silva , Phys. Rev. E1063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.59.2273 59, 2273 (1999)] driving a local electron density inflation, creating an electron snowplow and a co-propagating electrostatic potential. The snowplow advances with a velocity determined by the rate of the rise of the laser's intensity envelope and the heavy-ion-plasma density gradient scale length. The rising laser is incrementally rendered transparent to higher densities such that the relativistic-electron plasma frequency is resonant with the laser frequency. In the snowplow frame, trace density protons reflect off the electrostatic potential and get snowplowed, while the heavier background ions are relatively unperturbed. Quasimonoenergetic bunches of velocity equal to twice the snowplow velocity can be obtained and tuned by controlling the snowplow velocity using laser-plasma parameters. An analytical model for the proton energy as a function of laser intensity, rise time, and plasma density gradient is developed and compared to 1D and 2D PIC OSIRIS [Fonseca , Lect. Note Comput. Sci.9783

  3. Universal formulation of excitonic linear absorption spectra in all semiconductor microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Pierre; Christol, Philippe; Mathieu, Henry

    1995-01-01

    We present a generalization of the well-known exciton absorption calculations of Elliott [Phys. Rev. 108, 1384 (1957)], in the 3-dimensional case, and of Shinada and Sugano [J. Phys. Soc. Japan 21, 1936 (1966)], for 2-dimensional media: We calculate the optical absorption spectra of bound and unbound exciton states, by using a metric space with a noninteger dimension α (1 < α), obtaining almost exactly the same theoretical lineshapes as those resulting from accurate but costly numerical approaches [Chuang et al. Phys. Rev. B, 43, 1500 (1991); Benner and Haug, Phys. Rev. B 47, 15750 (1993)].

  4. Cooperative Effects and Intrinsic Optical Bistability in Collections of Atoms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    Wang, M. Scalora and G.M. Bowden, Phys. Rev. A38, 4043 (1988). 8. Y. Ben-Aryeli and G.M. B~owden, "Mirrorless Optical Bistability in a Spacially... Scalora andiC.M. Blowden, i’h~s. age Ii re-Rev. A38 (1988) 4043.ag pssage timie Fkw the parameters chiosen. it re- 121 Y. Ben-Arych. C.M. Bowvden and J.C...685 (1984). 10. M. Dagenais and W.F. Sharfin, Appi. Phys. Lett. 45, 210 (1984). 21 11. J.W. Haus, L. Wang, M. Scalora and C.M. Bowden, Phys. Rev. A38

  5. Optical Measurement and Modeling of Interactions between Two Hole Spins or Two Electron Spins in Coupled InAs Quantum Dots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-12

    Loss, Phys. Rev. B 62, 2581 (2000). [10] R. I. Dzhioev, K.V. Kavokin, V. L. Korenev , M.V. Lazarev, B.Y. Meltser, M.N. Stepanova, B. P. Zakharchenya... Korenev , T. L. Reinecke, and D. Gammon, Phys. Rev. B 75, 245318 (2007). [12] D. Kim, S. G. Carter, A. Greilich, A. S. Bracker, and D. Gammon, Nat. Phys. 7...I. V. Ponomarev, E. A. Stinaff, A. S. Bracker, V. L. Korenev , T. L. Reinecke, and D. Gammon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 197202 (2006). [30] W. Liu, S

  6. Magnetotransport in Two Dimensional Electron Systems Under Microwave Excitation and in Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2147 (1999). [89] Y. Zhang, Y. Tan, H. L. Stormer and P. Kim, Nature 438, 10 (2005). [90] J. W. McClure, Phys. Rev. 108, 612 (1957...Phys. 2, 595 (2006). [97] H. L. Stormer , J. P. Eisenstein, A. C. Gossard, W. Wiegmann, and K. Baldwin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 85 (1985). [98] B. A...Sadowski, J. M. Schneider, and M. Potemski, J. Phys.: Cond. Matter 20, 454223 (2008). [108] W. Pan, J. S. Xia, H. L. Stormer , D. C. Tsui, C. L

  7. Rational Design of Regulators of Programmed Cell Death in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    1992). 2. R. E. Ellis, J . Y. Yuan, H. R. Horvitz, Annu Rev Cell Biol 7, 663-98 (1991). 3. A. Strasser, D. C. Huang, D. L. Vaux, Biochim Biophys Acta...1333, F151-78 (1997). 4. C. B. Thompson, Science 267, 1456-62 (1995). DAMD17-99-1-9362 17 5. D. T. Chao, S. J . Korsmeyer, Annu Rev Immunol 16, 395...419 (1998). 6. J . C. Reed, Adv Pharmacol 41, 501-32 (1997). 7. S. Cory, Annu Rev Immunol 13, 513-43 (1995). 8. E. Yang, S. J . Korsmeyer, Blood 88

  8. Theoretical Study of Hydrogen Adsorption on the GaN(0001) Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    423 (1999) 70. [39] J.E. Northrup, J. Neugebauer, R.M. Feenstra, A.R. Smith, Phys. Rev. B 61 (2000) 9932. [40] K. Nakamura, T. Hayashi , A. Tachibana, K...Hasegawa, I.S.T. Tsong, T. Sakurai, T. Ohno , Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 3074. [45] K. Raghavachari, Q. Fu, G. Chen, L. Li, C.H. Li, D.C. Law, R.F. Hicks, J...Xue, S. Kuwano, J.T. Sadowski, K.F. Kelly, T. Sakurai, T. Ohno , Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (2000) 4015. [78] S. Vézian, F. Semond, J. Massies, D.W. Bullock, Z

  9. Basic Research in Electronics (JSEP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    Single Crystal Growth Single crystals of Bi2Sr 2 CaCu2 O8 (BSCCO) have been prepared following the method of Mitzi , et al. [241. A mixture of oxides...P.C. van Son, H. van Kempen and P. Wyder, Phys. Rev. Lett., 50 2226 (1987). [24] D.B. Mitzi , L.W. Lombardo, A. Kapitulnik,/S.S. Laderman and R.D...Phys. Rev., 165 837 (1908). P.C. van Son, H. van Kempen and P. Wyder, Phys. Rev. Lett., 59 2228 (1987). D.B. Mitzi , L.W. Lombardo, A. Kapitulnik

  10. Selective suppression of autocatalytic caspase-3 driven by two-step transcriptional amplified human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter on ovarian carcinoma growth in vitro and in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Yue; Xin, Xing; Xia, Zhijun; Zhai, Xingyue; Shen, Keng

    2014-07-01

    The objective of our study was to construct recombinant adenovirus (rAd) AdHTVP2G5-rev-casp3, which expresses autocatalytic caspase-3 driven by human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter (hTERTp) with a two-step transcription amplification (TSTA) system and investigate its antitumor effects on ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescent detection was used to detect EGFP expression in various cells. Cell viabilities were determined using the Cell Counting Kit-8 and flow cytometry. RT-PCR and immunoblotting assays were used to detect cellular apoptotic activities. Tumor growth and survival of tumor-bearing mice were studied. The hTERTp-TSTA system showed the strongest activity in hTERT-positive cancer cells when compared with hTERTp and cytomeglovirus promoter (CMVp). In contrast, it showed no activity in hTERT‑negative HUVECs. AdHTVP2G5‑rev-casp3 markedly suppressed the survival of AO cells in a dose-dependent modality with a viability rate of 17.8 ± 3.5% at an MOI of 70, which was significantly lower than that by AdHT-rev-casp3 and Ad-rev-casp3 (rAds which express rev-caspase-3 driven by hTERTp and CMVp, respectively). In contrast, AdHTVP2G5‑rev-casp3 induced little HUVEC death with a viability rate of 92.7 ± 5.2% at the same MOI. Additionally, AdHTVP2G5-rev-casp3 (MOI=70) caused significant apoptosis in AO cells with an apoptotic rate of 42%. The tumor growth suppression rate of AdHTVP2G5-rev-casp3 was 81.52%, significantly higher than that of AdHT-rev-casp3 (54.94%) or Ad-rev-casp3 (21.35%). AdHTVP2G5-rev-casp3 significantly improved the survival of tumor-bearing mice with little liver damage, with a mean survival of 258 ± 28 days. These results showed that AdHTVP2G5-rev-casp3 caused effective apoptosis with significant tumor selectivity, strongly suppressed tumor growth and improved mouse survival with little liver toxicity. It can be a potent therapeutic agent for tumor targeted treatment of ovarian cancer.

  11. Autocatalytic caspase-3 driven by human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter suppresses human ovarian carcinoma growth in vitro and in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Yue; Xia, Zhijun; Shen, Keng; Zhai, Xingyue

    2013-05-01

    To construct recombinant adenoviruses AdHT-rev-casp3 and Ad-rev-casp3, which express autocatalysis caspase-3 driven by human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter and cytomegalovirus promoter, respectively; and to investigate their antitumor effects on ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. Cell viabilities were determined using the cell counting kit 8 and flow cytometry. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting assays were used to detect cellular apoptotic activities after treatments. Tumor growth and survival of mice bearing AO cells were studied. AdHT-rev-casp3 significantly suppressed the survival of AO cells in a dose-dependent modality with a viability rate of 60.45% ± 7.8% at an multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 70 and 42.18 ± 5.3% at an MOI of 100, which was somewhat lower than that of the AO cells treated with Ad-rev-casp3 (32.28% ± 5.3% and 21.84% ± 3.4%, respectively). In contrast, AdHT-rev-casp3 induced little human umbilical vein epithelial cell (HUVEC) death with a viability rate of 98.52% ± 6.9% at an MOI of 70, whereas Ad-rev-casp3 induced significant cell death in HUVEC with a viability rate of 27.14% ± 5.4%. Additionally, AdHT-rev-casp3 (MOI = 70) caused significant apoptosis in AO cells with an apoptotic rate of 25.97%, whereas it caused undetectable apoptosis in HUVECs with the rate of only 1.75%. Ad-rev-casp3 (MOI = 70) caused strong apoptosis in both AO and HUVECs, with the rate of 35.82% and 38.12%, respectively. AdHT-rev-casp3 caused markedly higher levels of active caspase-3, causing no detectable active caspase-3 expression in HUVECs. The tumor growth suppression rate of AdHT-rev-casp3 was 54.94%, significantly higher than that of phosphate-buffered saline at the end point of the study. AdHT-rev-casp3 significantly improved the survival of mice receiving intraperitoneal inoculation of AO cells with little liver damage, with the mean survival of 177 ± 12 days. AdHT-rev-casp3 causes effective apoptosis

  12. Upper-Bounds on Qubit Coherence Set by Master Clock Instabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-10

    PhysRevLett.95.060502 [3] Olmschenk S, Younge K C, Moehring D L, Matsukevich D N , Maunz P and Monroe C 2007 Phys. Rev. A 76 052314 [4] Soare A, Ball H...Sekiguchi T, Itoh K M, Jamieson D N , McCallum J C, Dzurak A S and Morello A 2014 Nature Nanotechnology 9 986–991 [9] Brown K R, Wilson A C, Colombe Y...Cleland A and Martinis J M 2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112(24) 240504 [11] Harty T P, Allcock D, Ballance C J, Guidoni L, Janacek H A, Linke N M, Stacey D N

  13. Quantum Phases of Matter in Optical Lattices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-30

    doi: 10.1103/PhysRevA.89.013625 Hyungwon Kim, David A. Huse. Ballistic Spreading of Entanglement in a Diffusive Nonintegrable System, Physical...Review B, (07 2013): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.014206 Lin Dong, Lei Jiang, Han Pu. Fulde–Ferrell pairing instability in spin–orbit coupled Fermi...PhysRevA.87.051603 Kuei Sun, C. J. Bolech. Pair tunneling, phase separation, and dimensional crossover in imbalanced fermionic superfluids in a coupled

  14. The Annual Meeting (16th) and the 20th Day of Scientific Lectures of the National Society of Black Physicists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-24

    Johnson, J. Kiraly, E. Moshey, G. Renda , S. Sesnic, N. R. Sauthoff, F. Tenney and K. M. Young, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 56, 840 (1985). (4) J. Schivell, G... Renda , J. Lawrence, and H. Hsuan, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 53, 1527 (1982); J. Schivell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 56, 972 (1985) (5) L. A. Vainshtemi and U. I...was confused in at least two major ways. First, the descriptions of both were in our lab books allowing us extra timE to prepare for the second

  15. 25MM Plastic Telescoped Cartridge Case Development Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    Mat’ I____ Projectile: 0wq. No. 30033;7,Rev, A, Platic "Band, 3000 Grain. Primer: Type .SmL. , Lot No.,, , Ne. . Flash Tubet.l3TSpe 1ell Project l...8217 _ ’_"__ Projectile: Dwg. No. 300347, Ray. A, Platic Biand, 3000 Graln. Primer: Type P-SIT.ML , Lot No. . No, Flash Tube:c<# 7’Tr-pecla1, Projectile Rot ntlo...Case: N ,o Rev. ___, Mati:.l, ILt Dwg. No,._____ Rev. M Nt l______Projectile: Dwg, No. 300347, ev • A, Platic ’ t -and, 3000 Grain, Primers Type , Lot

  16. Computational Study of Chalcopyrite Semiconductors and Their Non-Linear Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-12

    34 Xiaoshu Jiang, M. S. Miao , and Walter R. Lambrecht, Phys. Rev. B 71, 205212 (2005). 4. "Structure and phonons of ZnGeN 2 ," Walter R. Lambrecht, Erik All...dredge, and Kwiseon Kim Phys. Rev. B 72, 155202 (2005) 5. "Theoretical study of the phosphorus vacancy in ZnGeP 2 ," Xiaoshu Jiang, M. S. Miao , and...Rocksalt Phase Transitions," M. S. Miao and Walter R. Lambrecht, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 225501 (2005) 1 20070925383 b. Manuscripts submitted to peer

  17. Reticuloendotheliosis virus: detection of immunological relationship to mammalian type C retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Charman, H P; Gilden, R V; Oroszlan, S

    1979-01-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) p30 shares cross-reactive determinants and a common NH2-terminal tripeptide with mammalian type C viral p30's. An interspecies competition radioimmunoassay was developed, using iodinated REV p30 and a broadly reactive antiserum to mammalian virus p30's. The avian leukosis-sarcoma viruses and mammalian non-type C retroviruses did not compete in this assay. Previous data indicating that the REV group is not represented completely in normal avian cell DNA lead us to speculate that this may be the first example of interclass transmission, albeit in the remote past, among the Retroviridae. PMID:87519

  18. HHC study in the DNW to reduce BVI noise - An analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Boyd, D. D., Jr.; Splettstoesser, Wolf R.; Schultz, Klaus -J.; Kube, Roland; Niesl, Georg H.; Streby, Olivier

    1991-01-01

    The noise of an aeroelastically scaled helicopter rotor has been studied in the German-Dutch wind tunnel in order to assess the utility of higher-harmonic control (HHC) in reducing blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. Acoustic data are presented for 3/rev, 4/rev, and 5/rev HHC, as applied to a typical landing approach rotor operating condition; noise reduction of up to 6 dB were found for advancing-blade BVI noise radiating upstream of the rotor, as well as for retreating blade BVI noise radiating below and downstream of the rotor.

  19. A Novel Tumor Antigen and Foxp3 Dual Targeting Tumor Cell Vaccine Enhances the Immunotherapy in a Murine Model of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    GTA TCC GAT GTC CAC AAT-30; CD206_fw 50-GCA AAT GGA GCC GTC TGT GC-30, CD206_rev 50-CTC GTG GAT CTC CGT GAC AC-30; Arg-1_fw 50- GTG AAG AAC CCA CGG TCT...GT-30, Arg-1_rev 50-CTG GTT GTC AGG GGA GTG TT-30; iNOS_fw 50-TGG TGG TGA CAA GCA CAT TT-30, iNOS_rev 50- AAG GCC AAA CAC AGC ATA CC-30; Cxcl9_fw 50

  20. Orbital Debris: Technical and Legal Issues and Solutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    States will seek to minimize the creation of space debris. NASA, the intelligence community, and DoD, in cooperation with the private sector, will...205 and accompanying text. 388 Raymond T. Swenson, “Pollution of the Extraterrestrial Environment” (1985) 25 A.F. L. Rev. 70 at 79. “Article IX is...Hastings Int’l & Comp. L. Rev. 125. Swenson, Raymond T. “Pollution of the Extraterrestrial Environment” (1985) 25 A.F. L. Rev. 70. Tan, David

  1. Devil's staircases and continued fractions in Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Medvedeva, S. Yu.; Botha, A. E.; Kolahchi, M. R.; Irie, A.

    2013-12-01

    Detailed numerical simulations of the IV characteristics of a Josephson junction under external electromagnetic radiation show the devil's staircase within different bias current intervals. We have found that the observed steps form very precisely continued fractions. Increase of the amplitude of the radiation shifts the devil's staircase to higher Shapiro steps. An algorithm for the appearance and detection of subharmonics with increasing radiation amplitude is proposed. We demonstrate that the subharmonic steps registered in the well-known experiments by Dayem and Wiegand [Phys. Rev. 155, 419 (1967), 10.1103/PhysRev.155.419] and Clarke [Phys. Rev. B 4, 2963 (1971), 10.1103/PhysRevB.4.2963] also form continued fractions.

  2. Respiratory Plasticity Following Spinal Injury: Role of Chloride-Dependent Inhibitory Neurotransmission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    respiratory pathways following spinal cord injury. J Appl Physiol. 94(2):795-810. Raineteau O and Schwab ME (2001). Plasticity of motor systems after incomplete spinal cord injury. Nat Rev Neurosci. 2(4):262-73. APPENDICES : None

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Williams syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Berman KF. Neural correlates of genetically abnormal social cognition in Williams syndrome. Nat Neurosci. 2005 Aug;8( ... syndrome: a unique window to genetic influences on cognition and behaviour. Nat Rev Neurosci. 2006 May;7( ...

  4. Comment on "Modified quantum-speed-limit bounds for open quantum dynamics in quantum channels"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkin, Nicolás; Toscano, Fabricio; Wisniacki, Diego A.

    2018-04-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. A 95, 052118 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevA.95.052118], the authors claim that our criticism, in Phys. Rev. A 94, 052125 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.94.052125, to some quantum speed limit bounds for open quantum dynamics that appeared recently in literature are invalid. According to the authors, the problem with our analysis would be generated by an artifact of the finite-precision numerical calculations. We analytically show here that it is not possible to have any inconsistency associated with the numerical precision of calculations. Therefore, our criticism of the quantum speed limit bounds continues to be valid.

  5. Comment on "Generalization of the Kohn-Sham system that can represent arbitrary one-electron density matrices"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piris, Mario; Pernal, Katarzyna

    2017-10-01

    van Dam [Phys. Rev. A 93, 052512 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.052512] claims that the one-particle reduced density matrix (1RDM) of an interacting system can be represented by means of a single-determinant wave function of fictitious noninteracting particles. van Dam [Phys. Rev. A 93, 052512 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.052512] introduced orbitals within a mean-field framework that produce energy levels similar to Hartree-Fock orbital energies, therefore he also claims that conventional analyses based on Koopmans' theorem are possible in 1RDM functional theory. In this Comment, we demonstrate that both claims are unfounded.

  6. N-body simulations for f(R) gravity using a self-adaptive particle-mesh code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Li, Baojiu; Koyama, Kazuya

    2011-02-01

    We perform high-resolution N-body simulations for f(R) gravity based on a self-adaptive particle-mesh code MLAPM. The chameleon mechanism that recovers general relativity on small scales is fully taken into account by self-consistently solving the nonlinear equation for the scalar field. We independently confirm the previous simulation results, including the matter power spectrum, halo mass function, and density profiles, obtained by Oyaizu [Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 78, 123524 (2008)10.1103/PhysRevD.78.123524] and Schmidt [Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 79, 083518 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevD.79.083518], and extend the resolution up to k˜20h/Mpc for the measurement of the matter power spectrum. Based on our simulation results, we discuss how the chameleon mechanism affects the clustering of dark matter and halos on full nonlinear scales.

  7. Key findings from the intelligent transportation systems (ITS) program, what have we learned?

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-06-01

    A study has been conducted to evaluate the quality and variability of the International Roughness Index (IRI) data in the Long Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) database. All LTPP profiles collected between June 1989 and October 1997 were visually rev...

  8. GUIDED TOUR OF A WEB-BASED ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION TOOLKIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Decision-making regarding the targeting of vulnerable resources and prioritization of actions requires synthesis of data on condition, vulnerability, and feasibility of risk management alternatives. EP A's Regional Vulnerability Assessment (ReV A) Program has evaluated existing a...

  9. Brownian motion and entropic torque driven motion of domain walls in antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhengren; Chen, Zhiyuan; Qin, Minghui; Lu, Xubing; Gao, Xingsen; Liu, Junming

    2018-02-01

    We study the spin dynamics in antiferromagnetic nanowire under an applied temperature gradient using micromagnetic simulations on a classical spin model with a uniaxial anisotropy. The entropic torque driven domain-wall motion and the Brownian motion are discussed in detail, and their competition determines the antiferromagnetic wall motion towards the hotter or colder region. Furthermore, the spin dynamics in an antiferromagnet can be well tuned by the anisotropy and the temperature gradient. Thus, this paper not only strengthens the main conclusions obtained in earlier works [Kim et al., Phys. Rev. B 92, 020402(R) (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.020402; Selzer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 107201 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.107201], but more importantly gives the concrete conditions under which these conclusions apply, respectively. Our results may provide useful information on the antiferromagnetic spintronics for future experiments and storage device design.

  10. Summary of Previous Chamber or Controlled Anthrax Studies and Recommendations for Possible Additional Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2010-12-29

    This report and an associated Excel file(a) summarizes the investigations and results of previous chamber and controlled studies(b) to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing and/or transporting, extracting, and analyzing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis (BA) or related simulants. This report and the Excel are the joint work of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for the Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate. The report was originally released as PNNL-SA-69338, Rev. 0 in November 2009 with limited distribution, but was subsequently cleared for release withmore » unlimited distribution in this Rev. 1. Only minor changes were made to Rev. 0 to yield Rev. 1. A more substantial update (including summarizing data from other studies and more condensed summary tables of data) is underway« less

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary folate malabsorption

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCFT is important for normal functioning of intestinal epithelial cells, which are cells that line the walls of the intestine. ... intestinal absorption and transport into systemic compartments and tissues. Expert Rev Mol Med. 2009 Jan 28;11: ...

  12. Reply to "Comment on 'Defocusing complex short-pulse equation and its multi-dark-soliton solution' ".

    PubMed

    Feng, Bao-Feng; Ling, Liming; Zhu, Zuonong

    2017-08-01

    Our paper [Phys. Rev. E 93, 052227 (2016)PREHBM2470-004510.1103/PhysRevE.93.052227], proposing an integrable model for the propagation of ultrashort pulses, has recently received a Comment by Youssoufa et al. [Phys. Rev. E 96, 026201 (2017)10.1103/PhysRevE.96.026201] about a possible flaw in its derivation. We point out that their claim is incorrect since we have stated explicitly that a term is neglected to derive our model equation in our paper. Furthermore, the integrable model is validated by comparing with the normalized Maxwell equation and other known integrable models. Moreover, we show that a similar approximation has to be performed in deriving the same integrable equation as explained in the Comment.

  13. Thermal solitons as revealed by the static structure factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawryluk, Krzysztof; Brewczyk, Mirosław; Rzążewski, Kazimierz

    2017-04-01

    We study, within a framework of the classical fields approximation, the static structure factor of a weakly interacting Bose gas at thermal equilibrium. As in a recent experiment [R. Schley et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 055301 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.055301], we find that the thermal distribution of phonons in a three-dimensional Bose gas follows the Planck distribution. On the other hand we find a disagreement between the Planck and phonon (calculated just as for the bulk gas) distributions in the case of elongated quasi-one-dimensional systems. We attribute this discrepancy to the existence of spontaneous dark solitons [i.e., thermal solitons as reported in T. Karpiuk et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 205302 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.205302] in an elongated Bose gas at thermal equilibrium.

  14. State of the cart.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, C; Weiss, S; Lorenzini, B

    1994-03-15

    Food on wheels: it's here, there and everywhere. But while some operations rev up cart expansion plans, others have shifted into low gear. Here's an update on that '90s phenomenon: mobile merchandising.

  15. Drag reduction by polymer additives from turbulent spectra.

    PubMed

    Calzetta, Esteban

    2010-12-01

    We extend the analysis of the friction factor for turbulent pipe flow reported by G. Gioia and P. Chakraborty [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 044502 (2006)] to the case where drag is reduced by polymer additives.

  16. Critical infrastructure protection : significant challenges in developing analysis, warning, and response capabilities testimony

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-05-22

    This is the statement of Robert F. Dacey, Director, Information Security Issues before the Subcommittee on Technology, Terrorism and Government Information, Committee on the Judiciary, U.S. Senate regarding the General Accounting Office's (GAO's) rev...

  17. Guidelines for Enhancement of Visual Conspicuity of Trains at Grade Crossings

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-05-01

    This report summarizes a comprehensive study of potential means of reducing the probability of train-motor vehicle collisions at railroad-highway grade crossings through enhancement of the visual conspicuity of locomotives. Passive techniques are rev...

  18. Final Report - ILAW PCT, VHT, Viscosity, and Electrical Conductivity Model Development, VSL-07R1230-1

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Cooley, S. K.; Joseph, I.

    This report describes the results of work and testing specified by the Test Specifications (24590-LAW-TSP-RT-01-013 Rev.1 and 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-02-001 Rev.0), Test Plans (VSL-02T4800-1 Rev.1 & TP-RPP-WTP-179 Rev.1), and Text Exception (24590-WTP-TEF-RT-03-040). The work and any associated testing followed established quality assurance requirements and conducted as authorized. The descriptions provided in this test report are an accurate account of both the conduct of the work and the data collected. Results required by the Test Plans are reported. Also reported are any unusual or anomalous occurrences that are different from the starting hypotheses. The test results and this report have been reviewed andmore » verified.« less

  19. Comment on ``Deterministic Single-Photon Source for Distributed Quantum Networking''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, H. J.

    2003-06-01

    A Comment on the Letter by

    Axel Kuhn, Markus Hennrich, and Gerhard Rempe, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 89, 067901 (2002). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  20. Inclusive breakup calculations in angular momentum basis: Application to 7Li+58Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jin

    2018-03-01

    The angular momentum basis method is introduced to solve the inclusive breakup problem within the model proposed by Ichimura, Austern, and Vincent [Phys. Rev. C 32, 431 (1985), 10.1103/PhysRevC.32.431]. This method is based on the geometric transformation between different Jacobi coordinates, in which the particle spins can be included in a natural and efficient way. To test the validity of this partial wave expansion method, a benchmark calculation is done comparing with the one given by Lei and Moro [Phys. Rev. C 92, 044616 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevC.92.044616]. In addition, using the distorted-wave Born approximation version of the IAV model, applications to 7Li+58Ni reactions at energies around Coulomb barrier are presented and compared with available data.