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Sample records for zarya control module

  1. Lindsey and Kavandi in FGB/Zarya module

    2001-07-14

    S104-E-5058 (14 July 2001) --- STS-104 crewmembers Steven W. Lindsey, mission commander, and Janet L. Kavandi, mission specialist, travel through the Zarya module during their visit to the International Space Station (ISS).

  2. Stowage bags in FGB/Zarya module

    2005-07-31

    S114-E-5945 (31 July 2005) --- This scene in Zarya, the functional cargo block for the International Space Station, serves witness to the primary current emphasis onboard the orbital outpost. Transfers of additional water and supplies to the International Space Station continues on this Sunday as the crew aboard Space Shuttle Discovery begins Flight Day 6. Cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev of Russia's Federal Space Agency can be seen at the far end of the cluttered hallway.

  3. STS-88 Onboard Photograph - The Unity Module and the Zarya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This photograph taken during the STS-88 mission, shows the cornected Zarya (top with solar wings) and the Unity Module after having been released from the Orbiter Endeavour's cargo bay. The Unity (also called Node 1), the first U.S. Module for the International Space Station (ISS), is a six-sided connector to which all future U.S. Station modules will attach and was manufactured by the Boeing Company at the Marshall Space Flight Center from 1994 to 1997. The U.S. built Unity module was launched aboard the orbiter Endeavour (STS-88 mission) on December 4, 1998 and connected to the Zarya, the Russian built Functional Energy Block (FGB). The Zarya was launched on a Russian proton rocket prior to the launch of the Unity. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.

  4. STS-88 Onboard Photograph - Unity and Zarya Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This photograph, taken during the STS-88 mission, shows the cornected Unity Module or Node 1 and Zarya or the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) after having been released from the Orbiter Endeavour's cargo bay. The Unity (also called Node 1), the first U.S. Module for the International Space Station (ISS), is a six-sided connector to which all future U.S. Station modules will attach. It was manufactured by the Boeing Company at the Marshall Space Flight Center from 1994 to 1997. The U.S. built Unity Module was launched aboard the orbiter Endeavour (STS-88 mission) on December 4, 1998 and connected to the Zarya, the Russian built Functional Energy Block (FGB). The Zarya was launched on a Russian proton rocket prior to the launch of the Unity. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.

  5. Julie Payette and Tamara Jernigan in FGB/Zarya module

    2017-04-20

    S96-E-5161 (2 June 1999) --- Astronauts Jule Payette (left) and Tamara E. Jernigan, mission specialists, participate in the final hours of tasks designed to prepare the International Space Station (ISS) for business. Here, on the Russian-built Zarya module, the two are seen with a small part of the supplies brought up by the Space Shuttle Discovery. The photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 05:58:37 GMT, June 2, 1999.

  6. View of the FGB/Zarya and Node 1/Unity modules in the payload bay

    1998-12-07

    STS088-719-071 (6 Dec. 1998) --- Just a few feet away from a 70mm camera onboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, the Russian-built control module and the U.S.-built Unity connecting module are mated in the shuttle's cargo bay. Using Endeavour's 50-ft. long Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robot arm, astronaut Nancy J. Currie working from the aft flight deck, plucked Zarya out of orbit at 5:47 p.m. (CST), December 6. The craft had been orbiting Earth for a little over 16 days prior to grapple and subsequent docking to Unity.

  7. View of the STS-88 crew at work in the FGB/Zarya module

    1998-12-11

    STS088-357-011 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- Astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), work in the FGB or Zarya Module of the International Space Station (ISS). The two are using battery powered tools to extract bolts.

  8. View of the docked Node 1/Unity and FGB/Zarya modules

    1998-12-12

    STS088-344-016 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- This scene photographed from the top of Node 1 shows the nose of the Space Shuttle Endeavour, during one of three Extravehicular Activities (EVA) by astronaut Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman (both out of frame). The EVA was part of the overall effort to ready for release the recently-joined Russian-built Zarya Module (FGB) and the United States-built Unity (Node 1) Module.

  9. Currie and Krikalev remove launch restraint bolts in FGB/Zarya module

    1998-12-11

    S88-E-5085 (12-11-98) --- Nancy J. Currie and Sergei Krikalev use rechargeable power tools to tighten and loosen nuts onboard the Russian-built Zarya module which they entered on Flight Day 8. The two are mission specialists, with Krikalev representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA). The photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 05:28:53 GMT, Dec. 11.

  10. Currie and Krikalev pull launch restraint bolts in the FGB/Zarya module

    2013-11-19

    STS088-359-037 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- Astronaut Nancy J. Currie and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, both mission specialists, use rechargeable power tools to manipulate nuts and bolts on the Russian-built Zarya module. Astronaut Robert D. Cabana, mission commander, translates along the rail network in the background. The six STS-88 crew members had earlier entered the module through the U.S.-built Unity connecting module. Rails, straps and tools indicate the crewmembers had been working awhile when this photo was taken. Krikalev, representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), has been assigned as a member of the three-man initial International Space Station (ISS) crew.

  11. Valeri Tokarev and Julie Payette replace battery chargers in the FGB/Zarya module

    2017-04-20

    S96-E-5086 (31 May 1999) --- Astronaut Julie Payette and cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, mission specialists, are in the process of replacing all 18 of the battery charge/discharge units that support Zarya's six nickel-cadmium batteries. Known by the Russian acronym, "MIRTs," the batteries are thought to have been responsible for voltage problems first detected in January of this year, as Zarya, docked to Unity, orbited Earth. The photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 03:15:38 GMT, May 31, 1999.

  12. Krikalev and Currie perform an IFM on a battery recharger in the FGB/Zarya

    2013-11-19

    STS088-334-029 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- Astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), perform an in-flight maintenance on a battery charging unit on the Russian-built FGB Module (Zarya). One of Zarya's six batteries had experienced a problem discharging stored energy in its automatic configuration. Krikalev had swapped out an identical component during two previous flights on the Russia?s Mir Space Station.

  13. Helms in FGB/Zarya with cameras

    2001-06-08

    ISS002-E-6526 (8 June 2001) --- Astronaut Susan J. Helms, Expedition Two flight engineer, mounts a video camera onto a bracket in the Zarya or Functional Cargo Block (FGB) of the International Space Station (ISS). The image was recorded with a digital still camera.

  14. Node 1 / Unity and FGB / Zarya Nadir (+ZA) view during docked operations

    2013-11-19

    STS088-363-023 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- Wires and cables on the Unity module (foreground) are telltale clues that the space walking astronauts of STS-88 had performed their first extravehicular activity (EVA) when this 35mm frame was exposed from the aft windows of Endeavour. The Zarya module can be seen mated to the top end of Unity.

  15. EVA view of the Nadir (+ZA, plane I) side of FGB / Zarya

    1998-12-09

    STS088-355-015 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, STS-88 mission specialist, is pictured during one of three space walks which were conducted on the eleven-day mission. Perched on the end of Endeavour's remote manipulator system (RMS) arm, astronaut James H. Newman, mission specialist, recorded this image. Newman can be seen reflected in Ross' helmet visor. The solar array panel for the Russian-built Zarya module can be seen along right edge.

  16. Astronaut Susan J. Helms Mounts a Videao Camera in Zarya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Astronaut Susan J. Helms, Expedition Two flight engineer, mounts a video camera onto a bracket in the Russian Zarya or Functional Cargo Block (FGB) of the International Space Station (ISS). Launched by a Russian Proton rocket from the Baikonu Cosmodrome on November 20, 1998, the Unites States-funded and Russian-built Zarya was the first element of the ISS, followed by the U.S. Unity Node.

  17. Starboard-Zenith (+YA, -ZA) side of Node 1/Unity and FGB/Zarya

    1998-12-13

    STS088-703-019 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- The U.S.-built Unity connecting module (bottom) and the Russian-built Zarya module are backdropped against the blackness of space in this 70mm photograph taken from the Space Shuttle Endeavour. After devoting the major portion of its mission time to various tasks to ready the two docked modules for their International Space Station (ISS) roles, the six-member STS-88 crew released the tandem and performed a fly-around survey of the hardware.

  18. External view of Zarya and Zvezda taken during the STS-106 mission

    2000-09-11

    S106-E-5116 (11 September 2000) --- This view of the International Space Station (ISS) was taken while it was docked with the Space Shuttle Atlantis and shows parts of all but one of the current components. From the top are the Progress supply vehicle, the Zvezda service module, and the Zarya functional cargo block (FGB). The Unity, now linked to the docking system of the Atlantis in the cargo bay, is out of view at bottom. A multicolored layer signals a sunset or sunrise on Earth at bottom left.

  19. Water heater control module

    DOEpatents

    Hammerstrom, Donald J

    2013-11-26

    An advanced electric water heater control system that interfaces with a high temperature cut-off thermostat and an upper regulating thermostat. The system includes a control module that is electrically connected to the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module includes a switch to open or close the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module further includes circuitry configured to control said switch in response to a signal selected from the group of an autonomous signal, a communicated signal, and combinations thereof.

  20. Decoupled Modulation Control

    SciT

    Wang, Shaobu; Huang, Renke; Huang, Zhenyu

    The objective of this research work is to develop decoupled modulation control methods for damping inter-area oscillations with low frequencies, so the damping control can be more effective and easier to design with less interference among different oscillation modes in the power system. A signal-decoupling algorithm was developed that can enable separation of multiple oscillation frequency contents and extraction of a “pure” oscillation frequency mode that are fed into Power System Stabilizers (PSSs) as the modulation input signals. As a result, instead of introducing interferences between different oscillation modes from the traditional approaches, the output of the new PSS modulationmore » control signal mainly affects only one oscillation mode of interest. The new decoupled modulation damping control algorithm has been successfully developed and tested on the standard IEEE 4-machine 2-area test system and a minniWECC system. The results are compared against traditional modulation controls, which demonstrates the validity and effectiveness of the newly-developed decoupled modulation damping control algorithm.« less

  1. Zenith (-ZA/Plane III) side of the FGB/Zarya

    1998-12-06

    STS088-719-059 (6 Dec. 1998) --- Backdropped against the darkness of space, the Russian-built FGB, also called Zarya, approaches the out-of-frame Space Shuttle Endeavour and the U.S.-built Node 1, also called Unity. Inside Endeavour's cabin, the STS-88 crew readied the remote manipulator system (RMS) for Zarya capture as they awaited the rendezvous.

  2. Unity connecting module in the Space Station Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, awaits processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). On the end at the right can be seen the Pressurized Mating Adapter 2, which provides entry into the module. The Unity, scheduled to be launched on STS-88 in December 1998, will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will already be in orbit. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for the International Space Station.

  3. Zarya Energy Balance Analysis: The Effect of Spacecraft Shadowing on Solar Array Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.; Kolosov, Vladimir

    1999-01-01

    The first element of the International Space Station (ISS). Zarya, was funded by NASA and built by the Russian aerospace company Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center (KhSC). NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and KhSC collaborated in performing analytical predictions of the on-orbit electrical performance of Zarya's solar arrays. GRC assessed the pointing characteristics of and shadow patterns on Zarya's solar arrays to determine the average solar energy incident on the arrays. KHSC used the incident energy results to determine Zarya's electrical power generation capability and orbit-average power balance. The power balance analysis was performed over a range of solar beta angles and vehicle operational conditions. This analysis enabled identification of problems that could impact the power balance for specific flights during ISS assembly and was also used as the primary means of verifying that Zarya complied with electrical power requirements. Analytical results are presented for select stages in the ISS assembly sequence along with a discussion of the impact of shadowing on the electrical performance of Zarya's solar arrays.

  4. MS Lonchakov and MS Phillips work with an IMAX film magazine bag in Zarya

    2001-04-23

    S100-E-5345 (23 April 2001) --- Cosmonaut Yuri V. Lonchakov, STS-100 mission specialist representing Rosaviakosmos, changes out a film magazine on an IMAX camera in the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) or Zarya aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Astronaut John L. Phillips, mission specialist, is in the background. The scene was recorded with a digital still camera.

  5. Unity connecting module viewed from above in the Space Station Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Unity connecting module is viewed from above while it awaits processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). On the side can be seen the connecting hatch. The Unity, scheduled to be launched on STS-88 in December 1998, will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will already be in orbit. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for the International Space Station.

  6. Phase-Controlled Polarization Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Wollack, E. J.; Novak, G.; Moseley, S. H.; Pisano, G.; Krejny, M.; U-Yen, K.

    2012-01-01

    We report technology development of millimeter/submillimeter polarization modulators that operate by introducing a a variable, controlled phase delay between two orthogonal polarization states. The variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) operates via the introduction of a variable phase delay between two linear orthogonal polarization states, resulting in a variable mapping of a single linear polarization into a combination of that Stokes parameter and circular (Stokes V) polarization. Characterization of a prototype VPM is presented at 350 and 3000 microns. We also describe a modulator in which a variable phase delay is introduced between right- and left- circular polarization states. In this architecture, linear polarization is fully modulated. Each of these devices consists of a polarization diplexer parallel to and in front of a movable mirror. Modulation involves sub-wavelength translations of the mirror that change the magnitude of the phase delay.

  7. Managing Complexity - Developing the Node Control Software For The International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Donald B.

    2000-01-01

    On December 4th, 1998 at 3:36 AM STS-88 (the space shuttle Endeavor) was launched with the "Node 1 Unity Module" in its payload bay. After working on the Space Station program for a very long time, that launch was one of the most beautiful sights I had ever seen! As the Shuttle proceeded to rendezvous with the Russian American module know as Zarya, I returned to Houston quickly to start monitoring the activation of the software I had spent the last 3 years working on. The FGB module (also known as "Zarya"), was grappled by the shuttle robotic arm, and connected to the Unity module. Crewmembers then hooked up the power and data connections between Zarya and Unity. On December 7th, 1998 at 9:49 PM CST the Node Control Software was activated. On December 15th, 1998, the Node-l/Zarya "cornerstone" of the International Space Station was left on-orbit. The Node Control Software (NCS) is the first software flown by NASA for the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS Program is considered the most complex international engineering effort ever undertaken. At last count some 18 countries are active partners in this global venture. NCS has performed all of its intended functions on orbit, over 200 miles above us. I'll be describing how we built the NCS software.

  8. Intersection-Controller Software Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Aaron; Foster, Conrad

    2005-01-01

    An important part of the emergency-vehicle traffic-light-preemption system summarized in the preceding article is a software module executed by a microcontroller in each intersection controller. This module monitors the broadcasts from all nearby participating emergency vehicles and intersections. It gathers the broadcast data pertaining to the positions and velocities of the vehicles and the timing of traffic and pedestrian lights and processes the data into predictions of the future positions of the vehicles. Analyzing the predictions by a combination of proximity tests, map-matching techniques, and statistical calculations designed to minimize the adverse effects of uncertainties in vehicle positions and headings, the module decides whether to preempt and issues the appropriate commands to the traffic lights, pedestrian lights, and electronic warning signs at the intersection. The module also broadcasts its state to all nearby vehicles and intersections. The module is designed to mitigate the effects of missing data and of unpredictable delays in the system. It has been intensively tested and refined so that it fails to warn in very few cases and issues very few false warnings.

  9. The Unity connecting module is moved to payload canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers attach the overhead crane that will lift the Unity connecting module from its workstand to move the module to the payload canister. Part of the International Space Station (ISS), Unity is scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  10. The Unity connecting module moves into payload bay of Endeavour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Looking like a painting, this wide-angle view shows the Unity connecting module being moved toward the payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. Part of the International Space Station (ISS), Unity is scheduled for launch Dec. 3, 1998, on Mission STS-88. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach it to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  11. The Unity connecting module is moved to payload canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane moves the Unity connecting module to the payload canister for transfer to the launch pad. Part of the International Space Station (ISS), Unity is scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  12. The Unity connecting module is moved to payload canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers at the side and on the floor of the payload canister guide the Unity connecting module into position for transfer to the launch pad. Part of the International Space Station (ISS), Unity is scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  13. The Unity connecting module moves into payload bay of Endeavour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Viewed from below, the Unity connecting module is moved into the payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. Part of the International Space Station (ISS), Unity is scheduled for launch Dec. 3, 1998, on Mission STS-88. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach it to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  14. The Unity connecting module is moved to payload canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, a closeup view shows the overhead crane holding the Unity connecting module as it moves it to the payload canister for transfer to the launch pad. Part of the International Space Station (ISS), Unity is scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  15. The Unity connecting module moves into payload bay of Endeavour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Unity connecting module is moved toward the payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. Part of the International Space Station (ISS), Unity is scheduled for launch Dec. 3, 1998, on Mission STS-88 . The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach it to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  16. Integrating Software Modules For Robot Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volpe, Richard A.; Khosla, Pradeep; Stewart, David B.

    1993-01-01

    Reconfigurable, sensor-based control system uses state variables in systematic integration of reusable control modules. Designed for open-architecture hardware including many general-purpose microprocessors, each having own local memory plus access to global shared memory. Implemented in software as extension of Chimera II real-time operating system. Provides transparent computing mechanism for intertask communication between control modules and generic process-module architecture for multiprocessor realtime computation. Used to control robot arm. Proves useful in variety of other control and robotic applications.

  17. Monetary rewards modulate inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Paula M.; Speranza, Mario; Hampshire, Adam; Bekinschtein, Tristán A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to override a dominant response, often referred to as behavioral inhibition, is considered a key element of executive cognition. Poor behavioral inhibition is a defining characteristic of several neurological and psychiatric populations. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the motivational dimension of behavioral inhibition, with some experiments incorporating emotional contingencies in classical inhibitory paradigms such as the Go/NoGo and Stop Signal Tasks (SSTs). Several studies have reported a positive modulatory effect of reward on performance in pathological conditions such as substance abuse, pathological gambling, and Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). However, experiments that directly investigate the modulatory effects of reward magnitudes on the performance of inhibitory tasks are scarce and little is known about the finer grained relationship between motivation and inhibitory control. Here we probed the effect of reward magnitude and context on behavioral inhibition with three modified versions of the widely used SST. The pilot study compared inhibition performance during six blocks alternating neutral feedback, low, medium, and high monetary rewards. Study One compared increasing vs. decreasing rewards, with low, high rewards, and neutral feedback; whilst Study Two compared low and high reward magnitudes alone also in an increasing and decreasing reward design. The reward magnitude effect was not demonstrated in the pilot study, probably due to a learning effect induced by practice in this lengthy task. The reward effect per se was weak but the context (order of reward) was clearly suggested in Study One, and was particularly strongly confirmed in study two. In addition, these findings revealed a “kick start effect” over global performance measures. Specifically, there was a long lasting improvement in performance throughout the task when participants received the highest reward magnitudes at the beginning of the

  18. Unity connecting module in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, is shown with Pressurized Mating Adapters 1 (left) and 2 (right) attached. Unity is scheduled to undergo testing of the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is the primary payload on mission STS-88, targeted to launch Dec. 3, 1998. Other testing includes the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27. The Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time.

  19. Command module/service module reaction control subsystem assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weary, D. P.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed review of component failure histories, qualification adequacy, manufacturing flow, checkout requirements and flow, ground support equipment interfaces, subsystem interface verification, protective devices, and component design did not reveal major weaknesses in the command service module (CSM) reaction control system (RCS). No changes to the CSM RCS were recommended. The assessment reaffirmed the adequacy of the CSM RCS for future Apollo missions.

  20. Power module control moment gyro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The directed design modifications to the Skylab/ATM CMG for application to the Power Module include new rotors of a different material with high resistance to stress corrosion cracking. The spin bearing retainer fix which was determined during the post Skylab mission was incorporated, and the speed pickoff was improved through the use of pickoff thermal cycling screening tests. The unlimited gimbal freedom on box axes was incorporated using slip ring assemblies. The on-orbit replacement capability was also incorporated for the CMG assembly and the inverter assembly.

  1. View of the docked Node 1 and FGB modules with umbilical cables attached

    1998-12-08

    S88-E-5061 (12-08-98) --- Cables and wires in place on the Unity module signify the end of the first of three spacewalks scheduled for the STS-88 mission. Astronauts Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman, both mission specialists, were succesful in mating 40 cables and connectors running 76 feet from the Zarya control module (seen at top in this photo) to Unity, with the 35-ton complex towering over Endeavour's cargo bay. This photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 03:37:35 GMT, Dec. 8.

  2. Unity nameplate examined before being attached to module for ISS and Mission STS-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, holding the nameplate for the Unity connecting module are (left) Joan Higginbotham, with the Astronaut Office Computer Support Branch, and (right) Nancy Tolliver, with Boeing-Huntsville. Part of the International Space Station, Unity was expected to be transported to Launch Pad 39A on Oct. 26 for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  3. Unity nameplate is attached to module for ISS and Mission STS-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    - In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker checks placement of the nameplate to be attached to the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station. Unity was expected to be transported to Launch Pad 39A on Oct. 26 for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  4. Unity nameplate gets final check before being attached to module for ISS and Mission STS-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    - In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers make a final check of the nameplate to be attached to the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station. Unity was expected to be transported to Launch Pad 39A on Oct. 26 for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  5. Unity nameplate added to module for ISS and Mission STS-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers look over the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, after attaching the nameplate. Unity was expected to be transported to Launch Pad 39A on Oct. 26 for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  6. Unity nameplate examined after being attached to module for ISS and Mission STS-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker checks placement of the nameplate for the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station. Unity was expected to be transported to Launch Pad 39A on Oct. 26 for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  7. The Unity connecting module rests inside the payload bay of Endeavour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Unity connecting module rests inside the payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. The first U.S. element of the International Space Station (ISS), Unity is scheduled for launch Dec. 3, 1998, on Mission STS-88. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach it to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time. The mission is expected to last nearly 12 days, landing back at the Kennedy Space Center on Dec. 14.

  8. Unity nameplate examined after being attached to module for ISS and Mission STS-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, Joan Higgenbotham, with KSC's Astronaut Office Computer Support, checks placement of the nameplate for the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station. Unity was expected to be transported to Launch Pad 39A on Oct. 26 for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  9. Unity nameplate is attached to module for ISS and Mission STS-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    - In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker places the nameplate on the side of the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station. Unity was expected to be transported to Launch Pad 39A on Oct. 26 for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  10. Strategic modulation of cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Lungu, Ovidiu V; Liu, Tao; Waechter, Tobias; Willingham, Daniel T; Ashe, James

    2007-08-01

    The neural substrate of cognitive control is thought to comprise an evaluative component located in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and an executive component in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The control mechanism itself is mainly local, triggered by response conflict (monitored by the ACC) and involving the allocation of executive resources (recruited by the PFC) in a trial-to-trial fashion. However, another way to achieve control would be to use a strategic mechanism based on long-term prediction of upcoming events and on a chronic response strategy that ignores local features of the task. In the current study, we showed that such a strategic control mechanism was based on a functional dissociation or complementary relationship between the ACC and the PFC. When information in the environment was available to make predictions about upcoming stimuli, local task features (e.g., response conflict) were no longer used as a control signal. We suggest that having separate control mechanisms based on local or global task features allows humans to be persistent in pursuing their goals, yet flexible enough to adapt to changes in the environment.

  11. Josephson junction microwave modulators for qubit control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaman, O.; Strong, J. A.; Ferguson, D. G.; Egan, J.; Bailey, N.; Hinkey, R. T.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate Josephson junction based double-balanced mixer and phase shifter circuits operating at 6-10 GHz and integrate these components to implement both a monolithic amplitude/phase vector modulator and an I/Q quadrature mixer. The devices are actuated by flux signals, dissipate no power on chip, exhibit input saturation powers in excess of 1 nW, and provide cryogenic microwave modulation solutions for integrated control of superconducting qubits.

  12. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Hsi, Wen C; Moyers, Michael F; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E; Farr, Jonathan B; Mascia, Anthony E; Schreuder, Andries N

    2009-06-01

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to +/-21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than +/-3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies.

  13. Microeconomics of 300-mm process module control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, Kevin M.; Chatterjee, Arun K.; Falessi, Georges; Levy, Ady; Stoller, Meryl D.

    2001-08-01

    Simple microeconomic models that directly link metrology, yield, and profitability are rare or non-existent. In this work, we validate and apply such a model. Using a small number of input parameters, we explain current yield management practices in 200 mm factories. The model is then used to extrapolate requirements for 300 mm factories, including the impact of simultaneous technology transitions to 130nm lithography and integrated metrology. To support our conclusions, we use examples relevant to factory-wide photo module control.

  14. Unity connecting module lowered to new site in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, is lowered to its new location in the SSPF. In the background, visitors watch through a viewing window, part of the visitors tour at the Center. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the Shuttle's payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27.

  15. Unity connecting module placed in new site in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, is placed in a work station in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the Shuttle's payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27.

  16. Unity connecting module moving to new site in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers guide the suspended Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, as they move it to another location in the SSPF. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27.

  17. Unity connecting module moving to new site in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, hangs suspended during its move to another location in the SSPF. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the Shuttle's payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27.

  18. Stressor controllability modulates fear extinction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Catherine A.; Gorun, Alyson; Reddan, Marianne C.; Ramirez, Franchesca; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic events are proposed to play a role in the development of anxiety disorders, however not all individuals exposed to extreme stress experience a pathological increase in fear. Recent studies in animal models suggest that the degree to which one is able to control an aversive experience is a critical factor determining its behavioral consequences. In this study, we examined whether stressor controllability modulates subsequent conditioned fear expression in humans. Participants were randomly assigned to an escapable stressor condition, a yoked inescapable stressor condition, or a control condition involving no stress exposure. One week later, all participants underwent fear conditioning, fear extinction, and a test of extinction retrieval the following day. Participants exposed to inescapable stress showed impaired fear extinction learning and increased fear expression the following day. In contrast, escapable stress improved fear extinction and prevented the spontaneous recovery of fear. Consistent with the bidirectional controllability effects previously reported in animal models, these results suggest that one's degree of control over aversive experiences may be an important factor influencing the development of psychological resilience or vulnerability in humans. PMID:24333646

  19. Electromechanical Devices and Controllers. Electronics Module 10. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ed

    This module is the tenth of 10 modules in the competency-based electronics series. Introductory materials include a listing of competencies addressed in the module, a parts/equipment list, and a cross-reference table of instructional materials. Six instructional units cover: electromechanical control devices; programmable logic controllers (PLC);…

  20. Astronaut Vance Brand at controls of Apollo Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Astronaut Vance D. Brand, command module pilot of the American ASTP crew, is seen at the controls of the Apollo Command Module during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) docking in Earth orbit mission.

  1. Emergency Control Aircraft System Using Thrust Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J. (Inventor); Burcham, Frank W., Jr. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A digital longitudinal Aircraft Propulsion Control (APC system of a multiengine aircraft is provided by engine thrust modulation in response to comparing an input flightpath angle signal (gamma)c from a pilot thumbwheel. or an ILS system with a sensed flightpath angle y to produce an error signal (gamma)e that is then integrated (with reasonable limits) to generate a drift correction signal to be added to the error signal (gamma)e after first subtracting a lowpass filtered velocity signal Vel(sub f) for phugoid damping. The output error signal is multiplied by a constant to produce an aircraft thrust control signal ATC of suitable amplitude to drive a throttle servo for all engines. each of which includes its own full-authority digital engine control (FADEC) computer. An alternative APC system omits sensed flightpath angle feedback and instead controls the flightpath angle by feedback of the lowpass filtered velocity signal Vel(sub f) which also inherently provides phugoid damping. The feature of drift compensation is retained.

  2. Cosmonaut Dezhurov Talks With Flight Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), Cosmonaut and Expedition Three flight engineer Vladimir N. Dezhurov, representing Rosaviakosmos, talks with flight controllers from the Zvezda Service Module. Russian-built Zvezda is linked to the Functional Cargo Block (FGB), or Zarya, the first component of the ISS. Zarya was launched on a Russian Proton rocket prior to the launch of Unity. The third component of the ISS, Zvezda (Russian word for star), the primary Russian contribution to the ISS, was launched by a three-stage Proton rocket on July 12, 2000. Zvezda serves as the cornerstone for early human habitation of the Station, providing living quarters, a life support system, electrical power distribution, a data processing system, flight control system, and propulsion system. It also provides a communications system that includes remote command capabilities from ground flight controllers. The 42,000-pound module measures 43 feet in length and has a wing span of 98 feet. Similar in layout to the core module of Russia's Mir space station, it contains 3 pressurized compartments and 13 windows that allow ultimate viewing of Earth and space.

  3. Indoor Unmanned Airship System Airborne Control Module Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YongXia, Gao; YiBo, Li

    By adopting STC12C5A60S2 SCM as a system control unit, assisted by appropriate software and hardware resources, we complete the airborne control module's design of unmanned airship system. This paper introduces hardware control module's structure, airship-driven composition and software realization. Verified by the China Science and Technology Museum special-shaped airship,this control module can work well.

  4. An auto-bias control scheme for IQ-modulator with various modulation formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenqi; Yuan, Xueguang; Zhang, Yang'an

    2016-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate an auto-bias control scheme for the IQ-modulator of a flexible optical PSK or QAM or other modulation formats transmitter in this paper. Due to IQ-modulators usually producing higher-order modulation format, these modulation formats involve phase mostly. It is based on that the bias drift will change the operating point and result in varying the output optical phase. This technology has no restrictions on modulation formats, so it has good flexibility. The experimental result show the three biases can be stabilized when the proposed scheme is implemented.

  5. Wakata haircut in the Service Module (SM)

    2009-04-04

    ISS018-E-044596 (4 April 2009) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 18/19 flight engineer, trims his hair in the Zarya module of the International Space Station, using hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  6. Wakata haircut in the Service Module (SM)

    2009-04-04

    ISS018-E-044602 (4 April 2009) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 18/19 flight engineer, trims his hair in the Zarya module of the International Space Station, using scissors and a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  7. Wakata haircut in the Service Module (SM)

    2009-04-04

    ISS018-E-044607 (4 April 2009) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 18/19 flight engineer, returns scissors and hair clippers to their storage bag after trimming his hair in the Zarya module of the International Space Station.

  8. Unity connecting module moving to new site in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) Unity is suspended in air as it is moved to a now location in the SSPF. At right, visitors watch through a viewing window, part of the visitors tour at the Center. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27.

  9. System control module diagnostic Expert Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Luis M.; Hansen, Roger F.

    1990-01-01

    The Orbiter EXperiments (OEX) Program was established by NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) to accomplish the precise data collection necessary to support a complete and accurate assessment of Space Transportation System (STS) Orbiter performance during all phases of a mission. During a mission, data generated by the various experiments are conveyed to the OEX System Control Module (SCM) which arranges for and monitors storage of the data on the OEX tape recorder. The SCM Diagnostic Expert Assistant (DEA) is an expert system which provides on demand advice to technicians performing repairs of a malfunctioning SCM. The DEA is a self-contained, data-driven knowledge-based system written in the 'C' Language Production System (CLIPS) for a portable micro-computer of the IBM PC/XT class. The DEA reasons about SCM hardware faults at multiple levels; the most detailed layer of encoded knowledge of the SCM is a representation of individual components and layouts of the custom-designed component boards.

  10. Programming Programmable Logic Controller. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsky, Kevin

    This training module on programming programmable logic controllers (PLC) is part of the memory structure and programming unit used in a packaging systems equipment control course. In the course, students assemble, install, maintain, and repair industrial machinery used in industry. The module contains description, objectives, content outline,…

  11. Vibration and Noise Control. Module SH-33. Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on vibration and noise control is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. Following the introduction, nine objectives (each keyed to a page in the text) the student is expected to accomplish are listed (e.g., Compare four strategies for vibration control). Then each objective is taught in detail, sometimes…

  12. A panoramic view of the Space Station Processing Facility with Unity connecting module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In this panoramic view of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) can be seen (left to right) Unity connecting module, the Rack Insertion Device and the first Multi-Purpose Launch Module, the Leonardo. Windows at the right above Leonardo allow visitors on tour to watch the activities in the SSPF. The Unity, scheduled to be launched on STS-88 in December 1998, will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will already be in orbit. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for the International Space Station. The Italian-built MPLM, scheduled to be launched on STS-100 on Dec. 2, 1999, will be carried in the payload bay of the Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the International Space Station.

  13. Unity connecting module lifted from workstand before move to new site in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) oversee the lifting of the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, for its move to another location in the SSPF. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the Shuttle's payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27.

  14. Unity connecting module prepared for move to new site in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) attach a frame to lift the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, for its move to another location in the SSPF. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the Shuttle's payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27.

  15. Unity connecting module before being moved to new site in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, sits on a workstand before its move to a new location in the SSPF. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the Shuttle's payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27.

  16. Positive Affect Modulates Flexibility and Evaluative Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wouwe, Nelleke C.; Band, Guido P. H.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2011-01-01

    The ability to interact with a constantly changing environment requires a balance between maintaining the currently relevant working memory content and being sensitive to potentially relevant new information that should be given priority access to working memory. Mesocortical dopamine projections to frontal brain areas modulate working memory…

  17. Astronauts Stafford and Brand at controls of Apollo Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Two American ASTP crewmen, Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford (foreground) and Vance D. Brand are seen at the controls of the Apollo Command Module during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) docking in Earth orbit mission.

  18. Phillips removes Failed RPCM (Remote Power Controller Module)

    2005-09-20

    ISS011-E-13361 (20 September 2005) --- Astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA science officer and flight engineer, performs a Remote Power Control Module (RPCM) remove and replacement in the Unity node of the international space station.

  19. View of the STS-88 crew in the Node 1/Unity module

    2013-11-19

    STS088-334-012 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- Astronaut Frederick W. Sturckow, pilot, works with furnishings on the U.S.-built Unity module as he and five crew mates teamed up to prepare Unity and the connected Russian-built Zarya module for their International Space Station (ISS) roles.

  20. View of the STS-88 crew in the Node 1/Unity module

    1998-12-11

    STS088-332-017 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- From the left, astronauts Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist; Robert D. Cabana, commander, and Jerry L. Ross, mission specialist, go about various chores designed to put the United States-built Unity Connecting Module (Node 1) in readiness for its impending release in Earth-orbit. Currie talks with ground controllers while Cabana logs a note and Ross checks a supply bag. After devoting the major portion of its mission time to various tasks to ready the Russian-built FGB Module (Zarya) and the docked United States-built node, the six-member crew released the tandem from the Space Shuttle Endeavour’s cargo bay toward mission’s end.

  1. The Unity connecting module rests inside the payload bay of Endeavour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Unity connecting module rests inside the open payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. At the top of bay is the docking mechanism first used with launches to Mir, the Russian space station. Unity is the first U.S. element of the International Space Station (ISS) and is scheduled for launch Dec. 3, 1998, on Mission STS-88. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach it to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time. The mission is expected to last nearly 12 days, landing back at the Kennedy Space Center on Dec. 14.

  2. The Unity connecting module rests inside the payload bay of Endeavour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This fish-eye view of the Unity connecting module reveals its immense size relative to the workers (below right). Unity rests inside the open payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour on Launch Pad 39A. At the top of bay is the docking mechanism first used with launches to Mir, the Russian space station. Unity is the first U.S. element of the International Space Station (ISS) and is scheduled for launch Dec. 3, 1998, on Mission STS-88. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach it to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time. The mission is expected to last nearly 12 days, landing back at the Kennedy Space Center on Dec. 14.

  3. Unity nameplate examined before being attached to module for ISS and Mission STS-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Examining the nameplate for the Unity connecting module, in the Space Station Processing Facility, are (left to right) Joe Schweiger and Tommy Annis, of Boeing-KSC, and Nancy Tolliver, of Boeing-Huntsville. An unidentified worker behind them looks on. Part of the International Space Station, Unity was expected to be transported to Launch Pad 39A on Oct. 26 for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  4. Demonstration of pulse controlled all-optical switch/modulator.

    PubMed

    Akin, Osman; Dinleyici, M S

    2014-03-15

    An all-optical pulse controlled switch/modulator based on evanescent coupling between a polymer slab waveguide and a single mode fiber is demonstrated. Very fast all-optical modulation/switching is achieved via Kerr effect of the nonlinear polymer placed in the evanescent region of the optical fiber. Local refractive index perturbation (Δn=-1.45612×10(-5)) on the thin film leads to 0.374 nW power modulation at the fiber output, which results in a switching efficiency of ≈1.5%.

  5. Bilingual Contexts Modulate the Inhibitory Control Network

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Ye, Jianqiao; Wang, Ruiming; Zhou, Ke; Wu, Yan Jing

    2018-01-01

    The present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated influences of language contexts on inhibitory control and the underlying neural processes. Thirty Cantonese–Mandarin–English trilingual speakers, who were highly proficient in Cantonese (L1) and Mandarin (L2), and moderately proficient in English (L3), performed a picture-naming task in three dual-language contexts (L1-L2, L2-L3, and L1-L3). After each of the three naming tasks, participants performed a flanker task, measuring contextual effects on the inhibitory control system. Behavioral results showed a typical flanker effect in the L2-L3 and L1-L3 condition, but not in the L1-L2 condition, which indicates contextual facilitation on inhibitory control performance by the L1-L2 context. Whole brain analysis of the fMRI data acquired during the flanker tasks showed more neural activations in the right prefrontal cortex and subcortical areas in the L2-L3 and L1-L3 condition on one hand as compared to the L1-L2 condition on the other hand, suggesting greater involvement of the cognitive control areas when participants were performing the flanker task in L2-L3 and L1-L3 contexts. Effective connectivity analyses displayed a cortical-subcortical-cerebellar circuitry for inhibitory control in the trilinguals. However, contrary to the right-lateralized network in the L1-L2 condition, functional networks for inhibitory control in the L2-L3 and L1-L3 condition are less integrated and more left-lateralized. These findings provide a novel perspective for investigating the interaction between bilingualism (multilingualism) and inhibitory control by demonstrating instant behavioral effects and neural plasticity as a function of changes in global language contexts. PMID:29636713

  6. Bilingual Contexts Modulate the Inhibitory Control Network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Ye, Jianqiao; Wang, Ruiming; Zhou, Ke; Wu, Yan Jing

    2018-01-01

    The present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated influences of language contexts on inhibitory control and the underlying neural processes. Thirty Cantonese-Mandarin-English trilingual speakers, who were highly proficient in Cantonese (L1) and Mandarin (L2), and moderately proficient in English (L3), performed a picture-naming task in three dual-language contexts (L1-L2, L2-L3, and L1-L3). After each of the three naming tasks, participants performed a flanker task, measuring contextual effects on the inhibitory control system. Behavioral results showed a typical flanker effect in the L2-L3 and L1-L3 condition, but not in the L1-L2 condition, which indicates contextual facilitation on inhibitory control performance by the L1-L2 context. Whole brain analysis of the fMRI data acquired during the flanker tasks showed more neural activations in the right prefrontal cortex and subcortical areas in the L2-L3 and L1-L3 condition on one hand as compared to the L1-L2 condition on the other hand, suggesting greater involvement of the cognitive control areas when participants were performing the flanker task in L2-L3 and L1-L3 contexts. Effective connectivity analyses displayed a cortical-subcortical-cerebellar circuitry for inhibitory control in the trilinguals. However, contrary to the right-lateralized network in the L1-L2 condition, functional networks for inhibitory control in the L2-L3 and L1-L3 condition are less integrated and more left-lateralized. These findings provide a novel perspective for investigating the interaction between bilingualism (multilingualism) and inhibitory control by demonstrating instant behavioral effects and neural plasticity as a function of changes in global language contexts.

  7. Pressure tracking control of vehicle ABS using piezo valve modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a wheel slip control for the ABS(anti-lock brake system) of a passenger vehicle using a controllable piezo valve modulator. The ABS is designed to optimize for braking effectiveness and good steerability. As a first step, the principal design parameters of the piezo valve and pressure modulator are appropriately determined by considering the braking pressure variation during the ABS operation. The proposed piezo valve consists of a flapper, pneumatic circuit and a piezostack actuator. In order to get wide control range of the pressure, the pressure modulator is desired. The modulator consists of a dual-type cylinder filled with different substances (fluid and gas) and a piston rod moving vertical axis to transmit the force. Subsequently, a quarter car wheel slip model is formulated and integrated with the governing equation of the piezo valve modulator. A sliding mode controller to achieve the desired slip rate is then designed and implemented. Braking control performances such as brake pressure and slip rate are evaluated via computer simulations.

  8. Caffeine Does Not Modulate Inhibitory Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tieges, Zoe; Snel, Jan; Kok, Albert; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2009-01-01

    The effects of a 3 mg/kg body weight (BW) dose of caffeine were assessed on behavioral indices of response inhibition. To meet these aims, we selected a modified AX version of the Continuous Performance Test (CPT), the stop task, and the flanker task. In three double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects experiments, these tasks were…

  9. Regulatory modules controlling maize inflorescence architecture

    Genetic control of branching is a primary determinant of yield, regulating seed number and harvesting ability, yet little is known about the molecular networks that shape grain-bearing inflorescences of cereal crops. Here, we used the maize (Zea mays) inflorescence to investigate gene networks that...

  10. Modulation linearization of a frequency-modulated voltage controlled oscillator, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis is presented for the voltage versus frequency characteristics of a varactor modulated VHF voltage controlled oscillator in which the frequency deviation is linearized by using the nonlinear characteristics of a field effect transistor as a signal amplifier. The equations developed are used to calculate the oscillator output frequency in terms of pertinent circuit parameters. It is shown that the nonlinearity exponent of the FET has a pronounced influence on frequency deviation linearity, whereas the junction exponent of the varactor controls total frequency deviation for a given input signal. A design example for a 250 MHz frequency modulated oscillator is presented.

  11. Modular microfluidic systems using reversibly attached PDMS fluid control modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Sip, Christopher G.; Folch, Albert; Dufva, Martin

    2013-05-01

    The use of soft lithography-based poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) valve systems is the dominating approach for high-density microscale fluidic control. Integrated systems enable complex flow control and large-scale integration, but lack modularity. In contrast, modular systems are attractive alternatives to integration because they can be tailored for different applications piecewise and without redesigning every element of the system. We present a method for reversibly coupling hard materials to soft lithography defined systems through self-aligning O-ring features thereby enabling easy interfacing of complex-valve-based systems with simpler detachable units. Using this scheme, we demonstrate the seamless interfacing of a PDMS-based fluid control module with hard polymer chips. In our system, 32 self-aligning O-ring features protruding from the PDMS fluid control module form chip-to-control module interconnections which are sealed by tightening four screws. The interconnection method is robust and supports complex fluidic operations in the reversibly attached passive chip. In addition, we developed a double-sided molding method for fabricating PDMS devices with integrated through-holes. The versatile system facilitates a wide range of applications due to the modular approach, where application specific passive chips can be readily attached to the flow control module.

  12. Current limiting remote power control module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Douglas C.

    1990-01-01

    The power source for the Space Station Freedom will be fully utilized nearly all of the time. As such, any loads on the system will need to operate within expected limits. Should any load draw an inordinate amount of power, the bus voltage for the system may sag and disrupt the operation of other loads. To protect the bus and loads some type of power interface between the bus and each load must be provided. This interface is most crucial when load faults occur. A possible system configuration is presented. The proposed interface is the Current Limiting Remote Power Controller (CL-RPC). Such an interface should provide the following power functions: limit overloading and resulting undervoltage; prevent catastrophic failure and still provide for redundancy management within the load; minimize cable heating; and provide accurate current measurement. A functional block diagram of the power processing stage of a CL-RPC is included. There are four functions that drive the circuit design: rate control of current; current sensing; the variable conductance switch (VCS) technology; and the algorithm used for current limiting. Each function is discussed separately.

  13. Electron tunneling infrared sensor module with integrated control circuitry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyadzhyan-Sevak, Vardkes V. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    In an integrated electron tunneling sensor, an automatic tunneling control circuit varies a high voltage bias applied to the sensor deflection electrode in response to changes in sensor output to maintain the proper gap between the sensor tip and membrane. The control circuit ensures stable tunneling activity in the presence of large signals and other disturbances to the sensor. Output signals from the module may be derived from the amplified sensor output. The integrated sensor module is particularly well adapted for use in blood glucose measurement and monitoring system.

  14. Singing modulates parvalbumin interneurons throughout songbird forebrain vocal control circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Zengin-Toktas, Yildiz

    2017-01-01

    Across species, the performance of vocal signals can be modulated by the social environment. Zebra finches, for example, adjust their song performance when singing to females (‘female-directed’ or FD song) compared to when singing in isolation (‘undirected’ or UD song). These changes are salient, as females prefer the FD song over the UD song. Despite the importance of these performance changes, the neural mechanisms underlying this social modulation remain poorly understood. Previous work in finches has established that expression of the immediate early gene EGR1 is increased during singing and modulated by social context within the vocal control circuitry. Here, we examined whether particular neural subpopulations within those vocal control regions exhibit similar modulations of EGR1 expression. We compared EGR1 expression in neurons expressing parvalbumin (PV), a calcium buffer that modulates network plasticity and homeostasis, among males that performed FD song, males that produced UD song, or males that did not sing. We found that, overall, singing but not social context significantly affected EGR1 expression in PV neurons throughout the vocal control nuclei. We observed differences in EGR1 expression between two classes of PV interneurons in the basal ganglia nucleus Area X. Additionally, we found that singing altered the amount of PV expression in neurons in HVC and Area X and that distinct PV interneuron types in Area X exhibited different patterns of modulation by singing. These data indicate that throughout the vocal control circuitry the singing-related regulation of EGR1 expression in PV neurons may be less influenced by social context than in other neuron types and raise the possibility of cell-type specific differences in plasticity and calcium buffering. PMID:28235074

  15. 60. View of radome hydraulic module control center in mezzanine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. View of radome hydraulic module control center in mezzanine level in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  16. Apollo Experience Report: Command and Service Module Reaction Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taeuber, Ralph J.; Weary, Dwayne P.

    1973-01-01

    The reaction control systems of the Apollo command and service module were developed and modified between July 1961 and July 1969. The successful development of these systems, as part of the Apollo Program, was the result of extensive testing, retesting, and modifications of the hardware to ensure system capability and intrasystem compatibility.

  17. Broadband and high modulation-depth THz modulator using low bias controlled VO2-integrated metasurface.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gaochao; Dai, Penghui; Wu, Jingbo; Jin, Biaobing; Wen, Qiye; Zhu, Guanghao; Shen, Ze; Zhang, Caihong; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2017-07-24

    An active vanadium dioxide integrated metasurface offering broadband transmitted terahertz wave modulation with large modulation-depth under electrical control is demonstrated. The device consists of metal bias-lines arranged with grid-structure patterned vanadium dioxide (VO 2 ) film on sapphire substrate. Amplitude transmission is continuously tuned from more than 78% to 28% or lower in the frequency range from 0.3 THz to 1.0 THz, by means of electrical bias at temperature of 68 °C. The physical mechanism underlying the device's electrical tunability is investigated and found to be attributed to the ohmic heating. The developed device possessing over 87% modulation depth with 0.7 THz frequency band is expected to have many potential applications in THz regime such as tunable THz attenuator.

  18. Control Systems with Pulse Width Modulation in Matrix Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarev, A. V.; Fedorov, S. V.; Muravyova, E. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this article, the matrix frequency converter for the system of the frequency control of the electric drive is considered. Algorithms of formation of an output signal on the basis of pulse width modulation were developed for the quantitative analysis of quality of an output signal on the basis of mathematical models. On the basis of simulation models of an output signal, assessment of quality of this signal was carried out. The analysis of harmonic composition of the voltage output received on the basis of pulse width modulation was made for the purpose of determination of opportunities of the control system for improving harmonic composition. The result of such analysis led to the fact that the device formation of switching functions of the control system on the basis of PWM does not lead to a distortion reduction of a harmonic of the control signal, and leads to offset of harmonic in the field of frequencies, the multiple relatively carrier frequency.

  19. Thermal control system for Space Station Freedom photovoltaic power module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacha, Thomas H.; Howard, Laura

    1994-01-01

    The electric power for Space Station Freedom (SSF) is generated by the solar arrays of the photovoltaic power modules (PVM's) and conditioned, controlled, and distributed by a power management and distribution system. The PVM's are located outboard of the alpha gimbals of SSF. A single-phase thermal control system is being developed to provide thermal control of PVM electrical equipment and energy storage batteries. This system uses ammonia as the coolant and a direct-flow deployable radiator. The description and development status of the PVM thermal control system is presented.

  20. Thermal control system for Space Station Freedom photovoltaic power module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacha, Thomas H.; Howard, Laura S.

    1992-01-01

    The electric power for Space Station Freedom (SSF) is generated by the solar arrays of the photovoltaic power modules (PVM's) and conditioned, controlled, and distributed by a power management and distribution system. The PVM's are located outboard of the alpha gimbals of SSF. A single-phase thermal control system is being developed to provide thermal control of PVM electrical equipment and energy storage batteries. This system uses ammonia as the coolant and a direct-flow deployable radiator. This paper presents the description and development status of the PVM thermal control system.

  1. A Venturi microregulator array module for distributed pressure control

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Dustin S.; Langelier, Sean M.; Zeitoun, Ramsey I.

    2010-01-01

    Pressure-driven flow control systems are a critical component in many microfluidic devices. Compartmentalization of this functionality into a stand-alone module possessing a simple interface would allow reduction of the number of pneumatic interconnects required for fluidic control. Ideally, such a module would also be sufficiently compact for implementation in portable platforms. In our current work, we show the feasibility of using a modular array of Venturi pressure microregulators for coordinated droplet manipulation. The arrayed microregulators share a single pressure input and are capable of outputting electronically controlled pressures that can be independently set between ±1.3 kPa. Because the Venturi microregulator operates by thermal perturbation of a choked gas flow, this output range corresponds to a temperature variation between 20 and 95°C. Using the array, we demonstrate loading, splitting, merging, and independent movement of multiple droplets in a valveless microchannel network. PMID:20938490

  2. Matlab Stability and Control Toolbox: Trim and Static Stability Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the technical background of the Trim and Static module of the Matlab Stability and Control Toolbox. This module performs a low-fidelity stability and control assessment of an aircraft model for a set of flight critical conditions. This is attained by determining if the control authority available for trim is sufficient and if the static stability characteristics are adequate. These conditions can be selected from a prescribed set or can be specified to meet particular requirements. The prescribed set of conditions includes horizontal flight, take-off rotation, landing flare, steady roll, steady turn and pull-up/ push-over flight, for which several operating conditions can be specified. A mathematical model was developed allowing for six-dimensional trim, adjustable inertial properties, asymmetric vehicle layouts, arbitrary number of engines, multi-axial thrust vectoring, engine(s)-out conditions, crosswind and gyroscopic effects.

  3. Newman and Cabana in the Node 1/Unity module

    1998-12-11

    STS088-357-016 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- Astronauts James H. Newman (left), mission specialist, and Robert D. Cabana, mission commander, look over checklists as they prepare to continue work in the U.S.-built Unity connecting module in Earth orbit. The STS-88 crew went on to spend eleven days in space preparing Unity and the attached Russian-built Zarya module for their International Space Station (ISS) roles.

  4. Currie and Ross in the Node 1/Unity module

    1998-12-11

    STS088-357-020 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- Astronauts Jerry L. Ross and Nancy J. Currie, both mission specialists, check procedures list prior to performing a variety of tasks in the United States-built Node 1 or Unity Module. The hatchway in upper left corner accesses the Russian-built FGB or Zarya Module, which had earlier been retrieved with the aid of the Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS) and linked with Unity.

  5. Electro-Optical Modulator Bias Control Using Bipolar Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, William; Kovalik, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    An improved method has been devised for controlling the DC bias applied to an electro-optical crystal that is part of a Mach-Zehnder modulator that generates low-duty-cycle optical pulses for a pulse-position modulation (PPM) optical data-communication system. In such a system, it is desirable to minimize the transmission of light during the intervals between pulses, and for this purpose, it is necessary to maximize the extinction ratio of the modulator (the ratio between the power transmitted during an "on" period and the power transmitted during an "off" period). The present method is related to prior dither error feedback methods, but unlike in those methods, there is no need for an auxiliary modulation subsystem to generate a dithering signal. Instead, as described below, dither is effected through alternation of the polarity of the modulation signal. The upper part of Figure 1 schematically depicts a Mach-Zehnder modulator. The signal applied to the electro-optical crystal consists of a radio-frequency modulating pulse signal, VRF, superimposed on a DC bias Vbias. Maximum extinction occurs during the off (VRF = 0) period if Vbias is set at a value that makes the two optical paths differ by an odd integer multiple of a half wavelength so that the beams traveling along the two paths interfere destructively at the output beam splitter. Assuming that the modulating pulse signal VRF has a rectangular waveform, maximum transmission occurs during the "on" period if the amplitude of VRF is set to a value, V , that shifts the length of the affected optical path by a half wavelength so that now the two beams interfere constructively at the output beam splitter. The modulating pulse signal is AC-coupled from an amplifier to the electro-optical crystal. Sometimes, two successive pulses occur so close in time that the operating point of the amplifier drifts, one result being that there is not enough time for the signal level to return to ground between pulses. Also, the

  6. Light Controlled Modulation of Gene Expression by Chemical Optoepigenetic Probes

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Surya A.; Ghosh, Balaram; Hendricks, J. Adam; Szantai-Kis, D. Miklos; Törk, Lisa; Ross, Kenneth N.; Lamb, Justin; Read-Button, Willis; Zheng, Baixue; Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation is a dynamic process orchestrated by chromatin-modifying enzymes. Many of these master regulators exert their function through covalent modification of DNA and histone proteins. Aberrant epigenetic processes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple human diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors have been essential to advancing our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of epigenetic processes. However, the resolution offered by small molecules is often insufficient to manipulate epigenetic processes with high spatio-temporal control. Here, we present a novel and generalizable approach, referred to as ‘Chemo-Optical Modulation of Epigenetically-regulated Transcription’ (COMET), enabling high-resolution, optical control of epigenetic mechanisms based on photochromic inhibitors of human histone deacetylases using visible light. COMET probes may translate into novel therapeutic strategies for diseases where conditional and selective epigenome modulation is required. PMID:26974814

  7. Lawrence and Kelly at SSRMS controls in Destiny laboratory module

    2005-08-05

    S114-E-7490 (5 August 2005) --- Astronauts Wendy B. Lawrence (foreground), STS-114 mission specialist, and James M. Kelly, pilot, work with the Mobile Service System (MSS) and Canadarm2 controls in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked to the Station. The two were re-stowing the Italian-built Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) in the cargo bay.

  8. Single event effects in pulse width modulation controllers

    SciT

    Penzin, S.H.; Crain, W.R.; Crawford, K.B.

    1996-12-01

    SEE testing was performed on pulse width modulation (PWM) controllers which are commonly used in switching mode power supply systems. The devices are designed using both Set-Reset (SR) flip-flops and Toggle (T) flip-flops which are vulnerable to single event upset (SEU) in a radiation environment. Depending on the implementation of the different devices the effect can be significant in spaceflight hardware.

  9. Biometrically modulated collaborative control for an assistive wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Urdiales, Cristina; Fernandez-Espejo, Blanca; Annicchiaricco, Roberta; Sandoval, Francisco; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2010-08-01

    To operate a wheelchair, people with severe physical disabilities may require assistance, which can be provided by robotization. However, medical experts report that an excess of assistance may lead to loss of residual skills, so that it is important to provide just the right amount of assistance. This work proposes a collaborative control system based on weighting the robot's and the user's commands by their respective efficiency to reactively obtain an emergent controller. Thus, the better the person operates, the more control he/she gains. Tests with volunteers have proven, though, that some users may require extra assistance when they become stressed. Hence, we propose a controller that can change the amount of support taking into account supplementary biometric data. In this work, we use an off-the-shelf wearable pulse oximeter. Experiments have demonstrated that volunteers could use our wheelchair in a more efficient way due to the proposed biometric modulated collaborative control.

  10. ODS and RMS arm in position to grapple Node 1/Unity module

    1998-12-05

    STS088-361-021 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- The Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm is about to grapple the Node 1 or Unity Module for mating to the Space Shuttle Endeavour. The move marked the first of many steps that allowed the United States-built Unity Module to be docked with the Russian-built FGB or Zarya Module later in the mission.

  11. Lunar Module Environmental Control System Design Considerations and Failure Modes. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation seeks to describe the Lunar Module Environmental Control System (ECS) subsystem testing and redesign and seeks to summarize the in-flight failures of the Lunar Module (LM) Environmental Control System (ECS).

  12. Color control through FRET efficiency modulation using CDI (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolowelsky, Karni; Guyes, Eric; Rubin, Shimon; Suss, Matthew; Bercovici, Moran; Rotschild, Carmel

    2017-02-01

    Although much progress was made in light emitting devices, the ability to electrically control their spectral emission remains limited. We will present a novel approach and experimental results for dynamic color control, by electrically modulating the non-radiative Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency between donor and acceptor dyes in a solution. FRET efficiency depends on the 6th power of the distance between donor and acceptor dye molecules, and thus, it is sensitive to variations in acceptor's concentration. Controlled acceptor concentrations could be achieved by attracting or repelling ionic dyes from the electrodes using a capacitive deionization (CDI) cell, with high surface area porous electrodes. This approach to dynamic color control may open new directions in 100% fill-factor displays, and can be expanded to energy saving applications such as controlling building's external wall emissivity. We studied the modulation of a single dye emission using a CDI cell with negatively charged Fluorescein Sodium Salt in aquatic solution. Photoluminescence was measured along few charging-discharging CDI cycles and showed the ability to control extensive optical response through CDI. We experimented with two types of FRET-pair dyes: a) anion-cation, where the acceptor and the donor ions are oppositely charged, and b) zwitterion and ion, where the donor is neutral. We found that electrical control on FRET in aquatic solution is weak, due to hydrophobic attractive interaction between the acceptor and the donor. In order to avoid this effect, we are experimenting FRET control in organic solvents. These results will be presented in the talk.

  13. Thermal equilibrium control by frequent bang-bang modulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Xi; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the non-Markovian heat transfer between a weakly damped harmonic oscillator (system) and a thermal bath. When the system is initially in a thermal state and not correlated with the environment, the mean energy of the system always first increases, then oscillates, and finally reaches equilibrium with the bath, no matter what the initial temperature of the system is. Moreover, the heat transfer between the system and the bath can be controlled by fast bang-bang modulation. This modulation does work on the system, and temporarily inverts the direction of heat flow. In this case, the common sense that heat always transfers from hot to cold does not hold any more. At the long time scale, a new dynamic equilibrium is established between the system and the bath. At this equilibrium, the energy of the system can be either higher or lower than its normal equilibrium value. A comprehensive analysis of the relationship between the dynamic equilibrium and the parameters of the modulation as well as the environment is presented.

  14. Frequency response control of semiconductor laser by using hybrid modulation scheme.

    PubMed

    Mieda, Shigeru; Yokota, Nobuhide; Isshiki, Ryuto; Kobayashi, Wataru; Yasaka, Hiroshi

    2016-10-31

    A hybrid modulation scheme that simultaneously applies the direct current modulation and intra-cavity loss modulation to a semiconductor laser is proposed. Both numerical calculations using rate equations and experiments using a fabricated laser show that the hybrid modulation scheme can control the frequency response of the laser by changing a modulation ratio and time delay between the two modulations. The modulation ratio and time delay provide the degree of signal mixing of the two modulations and an optimum condition is found when a non-flat frequency response for the intra-cavity loss modulation is compensated by that for the direct current modulation. We experimentally confirm a 8.64-dB improvement of the modulation sensitivity at 20 GHz compared with the pure direct current modulation with a 0.7-dB relaxation oscillation peak.

  15. Strekalov performing maintenance on Core module control panel

    1995-07-01

    NM18-302-025 (March-July 1995) --- Onboard Mir's base block module cosmonaut Gennadiy M. Strekalov, flight engineer, prepares to check the air quality control and the propulsion system of the station. Strekalov told reporters at a July 18 press conference in Houston that even though he tried not to awaken astronaut Norman E. Thagard, who was asleep nearby, he was unable to keep from disturbing the cosmonaut researcher. He went on to point out that Thagard was always very cooperative and tolerant of such interruptions.

  16. Modulation and control of matrix converter for aerospace application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobravi, Keyhan

    In the context of modern aircraft systems, a major challenge is power conversion to supply the aircraft's electrical instruments. These instruments are energized through a fixed-frequency internal power grid. In an aircraft, the available sources of energy are a set of variable-speed generators which provide variable-frequency ac voltages. Therefore, to energize the internal power grid of an aircraft, the variable-frequency ac voltages should be converted to a fixed-frequency ac voltage. As a result, an ac to ac power conversion is required within an aircraft's power system. This thesis develops a Matrix Converter to energize the aircraft's internal power grid. The Matrix Converter provides a direct ac to ac power conversion. A major challenge of designing Matrix Converters for aerospace applications is to minimize the volume and weight of the converter. These parameters are minimized by increasing the switching frequency of the converter. To design a Matrix Converter operating at a high switching frequency, this thesis (i) develops a scheme to integrate fast semiconductor switches within the current available Matrix Converter topologies, i.e., MOSFET-based Matrix Converter, and (ii) develops a new modulation strategy for the Matrix Converter. This Matrix Converter and the new modulation strategy enables the operation of the converter at a switching-frequency of 40kHz. To provide a reliable source of energy, this thesis also develops a new methodology for robust control of Matrix Converter. To verify the performance of the proposed MOSFET-based Matrix Converter, modulation strategy, and control design methodology, various simulation and experimental results are presented. The experimental results are obtained under operating condition present in an aircraft. The experimental results verify the proposed Matrix Converter provides a reliable power conversion in an aircraft under extreme operating conditions. The results prove the superiority of the proposed Matrix

  17. Neural signature of reward-modulated unconscious inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Diao, Liuting; Qi, Senqing; Xu, Mengsi; Li, Zhiai; Ding, Cody; Chen, Antao; Zheng, Yan; Yang, Dong

    2016-09-01

    Consciously initiated cognitive control is generally determined by motivational incentives (e.g., monetary reward). Recent studies have revealed that human cognitive control processes can nevertheless operate without awareness. However, whether monetary reward can impinge on unconscious cognitive control remains unclear. To clarify this issue, a task consisting of several runs was designed to combine a modified version of the reward-priming paradigm with an unconscious version of the Go/No-Go task. At the beginning of each run, participants were exposed to a high- or low-value coin, followed by the modified Go/No-Go task. Participants could earn the coin only if they responded correctly to each trial of the run. Event-related potential (ERP) results indicated that high-value rewards (vs. low-value rewards) induced a greater centro-parietal P3 component associated with conscious and unconscious inhibitory control. Moreover, the P3 amplitude correlated positively with the magnitude of reaction time slowing reflecting the intensity of activation of unconscious inhibitory control in the brain. These findings suggest that high-value reward may facilitate human higher-order inhibitory processes that are independent of conscious awareness, which provides insights into the brain processes that underpin motivational modulation of cognitive control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Unity connecting module moving to new site in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), Unity (top) is suspended in air as it is moved to a new location (bottom left)in the SSPF. To its left is Leonardo, the Italian-built Multi- Purpose Logistics Module to be launched on STS-100. Above Leonardo, visitors watch through a viewing window, part of the visitors tour at the Center. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27.

  19. Validation of Storm Water Management Model Storm Control Measures Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M. A.; Platz, M. C.

    2017-12-01

    EPA's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) is a computational code heavily relied upon by industry for the simulation of wastewater and stormwater infrastructure performance. Many municipalities are relying on SWMM results to design multi-billion-dollar, multi-decade infrastructure upgrades. Since the 1970's, EPA and others have developed five major releases, the most recent ones containing storm control measures modules for green infrastructure. The main objective of this study was to quantify the accuracy with which SWMM v5.1.10 simulates the hydrologic activity of previously monitored low impact developments. Model performance was evaluated with a mathematical comparison of outflow hydrographs and total outflow volumes, using empirical data and a multi-event, multi-objective calibration method. The calibration methodology utilized PEST++ Version 3, a parameter estimation tool, which aided in the selection of unmeasured hydrologic parameters. From the validation study and sensitivity analysis, several model improvements were identified to advance SWMM LID Module performance for permeable pavements, infiltration units and green roofs, and these were performed and reported herein. Overall, it was determined that SWMM can successfully simulate low impact development controls given accurate model confirmation, parameter measurement, and model calibration.

  20. Pointing and tracking control for freedom's Solar Dynamic modules and vibration control of freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Roger D.; Chen, Jiunn-Liang

    1992-01-01

    A control strategy is presented for pointing particular modules of flexible multibody space structures while simultaneously attenuating structural vibrations. The application that is addressed is the planned Space Station Freedom in a growth configuration with Solar Dynamic (SD) module. A NASTRAN model of Freedom is used to demonstrate the control strategy. Two cases of SD concentrator fine-pointing controller bandwidths are studied with examples. The effect of limiting the controller motor torques to realistic baseline values is examined. SD pointing and station vibration control is accomplished during realistic disturbances due to aerodynamic drag, Shuttle docking, and Shuttle reaction control system plume impingement on SD. Gravity gradient induced torques on SD are relatively small and pseudo-steady.

  1. Engine Performance (Section C: Emission Control Systems). Auto Mechanics Curriculum Guide. Module 3. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rains, Larry

    This engine performance (emission control systems) module is one of a series of competency-based modules in the Missouri Auto Mechanics Curriculum Guide. Topics of this module's five units are: positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) and evaporative emission control systems; exhaust gas recirculation (EGR); air injection and catalytic converters;…

  2. View in the Node 1/Unity module after docking

    1998-12-10

    S88-E-5112 (12-10-98)) --- Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, mission specialist, packs a bag of tools and equipment in the hatchway of the Unity connecting module. Ross and his crewmates were installing hand rails and other equipment and performing various tasks to ready the Unity and Zarya for their ISS roles. The photo was taken with an electronic still camera at 20:26:02 GMT, Dec. 10.

  3. Controlled Aggregation of Ferritin to Modulate MRI Relaxivity

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kevin M.; Shapiro, Erik M.; Sotak, Christopher H.; Koretsky, Alan P.

    2008-01-01

    Ferritin is an iron storage protein expressed in varying concentrations in mammalian cells. The deposition of ferric iron in the core of ferritin makes it a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent, and ferritin has recently been proposed as a gene expression reporter protein for magnetic resonance imaging. To date, ferritin has been overexpressed in vivo and has been coexpressed with transferrin receptor to increase iron loading in cells. However, ferritin has a relatively low T2 relaxivity (R2 ≈ 1 mM−1s−1) at typical magnetic field strengths and so requires high levels of expression to be detected. One way to modulate the transverse relaxivity of a superparamagnetic agent is to cause it to aggregate, thereby manipulating the magnetic field gradients through which water diffuses. In this work, it is demonstrated by computer simulation and in vitro that aggregation of ferritin can alter relaxivity. The effects of aggregate size and intraaggregate perturber spacing on R2 are studied. Computer modeling indicates that the optimal spacing of the ferritin molecules in aggregate for increasing R2 is 100–200 nm for a typical range of water diffusion rates. Chemical cross-linking of ferritin at 12 Å spacing led to a 70% increase in R2 compared to uncross-linked ferritin controls. To modulate ferritin aggregation in a potentially biologically relevant manner, ferritin was attached to actin and polymerized in vitro. The polymerization of ferritin-F-actin caused a 20% increase in R2 compared to unpolymerized ferritin-G-actin. The R2-value was increased by another 10% by spacing the ferritin farther apart on the actin filaments. The modulation of ferritin aggregation by binding to cytoskeletal elements may be a useful strategy to make a functional reporter gene for magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:18326661

  4. Glucocorticoids as modulators in the control of feeding.

    PubMed

    Castonguay, T W

    1991-01-01

    Three sets of experiments have been conducted that suggest that adrenal glucocorticoids play a role in the long-term control of intake and in dietary preferences. First, obesity is dependent upon glucocorticoid-modulated metabolic pathways. Surgical or pharmacological manipulations in obese animals that eliminate or diminish corticosterone activity result in levels of intake, meal patterns, macronutrient self-selection and weight gain that revert to levels seen in lean controls. Glucocorticoid replacement of adrenalectomized genetically obese Zucker rats restores the phenotypic expression of the obese rat's genetic heritage: increased weight gain, increased fat and total daily caloric intake and adiposity are restored in a dose-dependent fashion. Second, the increased fat intake observed subsequent to fasting in Sprague-Dawley rats is correlated with an increase in circulating corticosterone. Adrenalectomy blocks the fat specific refeeding response, and corticosterone treatment of adrenalectomized rats restores the increase in fat, carbohydrate and protein observed during refeeding. Third, humans suffering from Cushing's Disease have an increased preference for dietary fat. Weight-matched but disease-free obese controls show only slight increases in fat preference when compared to normal weight controls.

  5. Programmable logic controller optical fibre sensor interface module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allwood, Gary; Wild, Graham; Hinckley, Steven

    2011-12-01

    Most automated industrial processes use Distributed Control Systems (DCSs) or Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) for automated control. PLCs tend to be more common as they have much of the functionality of DCSs, although they are generally cheaper to install and maintain. PLCs in conjunction with a human machine interface form the basis of Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, combined with communication infrastructure and Remote Terminal Units (RTUs). RTU's basically convert different sensor measurands in to digital data that is sent back to the PLC or supervisory system. Optical fibre sensors are becoming more common in industrial processes because of their many advantageous properties. Being small, lightweight, highly sensitive, and immune to electromagnetic interference, means they are an ideal solution for a variety of diverse sensing applications. Here, we have developed a PLC Optical Fibre Sensor Interface Module (OFSIM), in which an optical fibre is connected directly to the OFSIM located next to the PLC. The embedded fibre Bragg grating sensors, are highly sensitive and can detect a number of different measurands such as temperature, pressure and strain without the need for a power supply.

  6. The Waukesha Turbocharger Control Module: A tool for improved engine efficiency and response

    SciT

    Zurlo, J.R.; Reinbold, E.O.; Mueller, J.

    1996-12-31

    The Waukesha Turbocharger Control Module allows optimum control of turbochargers on lean burn gaseous fueled engines. The Turbocharger Control Module is user programmed to provide either maximum engine efficiency or best engine response to load changes. In addition, the Turbocharger Control Module prevents undesirable turbocharger surge. The Turbocharger Control Module consists of an electronic control box, engine speed, intake manifold pressure, ambient temperature sensors, and electric actuators driving compressor bypass and wastegate valves. The Turbocharger Control Module expands the steady state operational environment of the Waukesha AT27GL natural gas engine from sea level to 1,525 m altitude with one turbochargermore » match and improves the engine speed turn down by 80 RPM. Finally, the Turbocharger Control Module improves engine response to load changes.« less

  7. Remotely Controlled Mixers for Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Colloid Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurk, Michael A. (Andy)

    2015-01-01

    Developed by NASA Glenn Research Center, the LMM aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is enabling multiple biomedical science experiments. Techshot, Inc., has developed a series of colloid specialty cell systems (C-SPECS) for use in the colloid science experiment module on the LMM. These low-volume mixing devices will enable uniform particle density and remotely controlled repetition of LMM colloid experiments. By automating the experiment process, C-SPECS allow colloid samples to be processed more quickly. In addition, C-SPECS will minimize the time the crew will need to spend on colloid experiments as well as eliminate the need for multiple and costly colloid samples, which are expended after a single examination. This high-throughput capability will lead to more efficient and productive use of the LMM. As commercial launch vehicles begin routine visits to the ISS, C-SPECS could become a significant means to process larger quantities of high-value materials for commercial customers.

  8. Apollo experience report. Guidance and control systems: Command and service module stabilization and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littleton, O. P.

    1974-01-01

    The concepts, design, development, testing, and flight results of the command and service module stabilization and control system are discussed. The period of time covered was from November 1961 to December 1972. Also included are a functional description of the system, a discussion of the major problems, and recommendations for future programs.

  9. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciT

    Miyagi, Atsushi, E-mail: atsushi.miyagi@inserm.fr, E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr; Scheuring, Simon, E-mail: atsushi.miyagi@inserm.fr, E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollablemore » drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed.« less

  10. High speed turning of compacted graphite iron using controlled modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalbaum, Tyler Paul

    Compacted graphite iron (CGI) is a material which emerged as a candidate material to replace cast iron (CI) in the automotive industry for engine block castings. Its thermal and mechanical properties allow the CGI-based engines to operate at higher cylinder pressures and temperatures than CI-based engines, allowing for lower fuel emissions and increased fuel economy. However, these same properties together with the thermomechanical wear mode in the CGI-CBN system result in poor machinability and inhibit CGI from seeing wide spread use in the automotive industry. In industry, machining of CGI is done only at low speeds, less than V = 200 m/min, to avoid encountering rapid wear of the cutting tools during cutting. Studies have suggested intermittent cutting operations such as milling suffer less severe tool wear than continuous cutting. Furthermore, evidence that a hard sulfide layer which forms over the cutting edge in machining CI at high speeds is absent during machining CGI is a major factor in the difference in machinability of these material systems. The present study addresses both of these issues by modification to the conventional machining process to allow intermittent continuous cutting. The application of controlled modulation superimposed onto the cutting process -- modulation-assisted machining (MAM) -- is shown to be quite effective in reducing the wear of cubic boron nitride (CBN) tools when machining CGI at high machining speeds (> 500 m/min). The tool life is at least 20 times greater than found in conventional machining of CGI. This significant reduction in wear is a consequence of reduction in the severity of the tool-work contact conditions with MAM. The propensity for thermochemical wear of CBN is thus reduced. It is found that higher cutting speed (> 700 m/min) leads to lower tool wear with MAM. The MAM configuration employing feed-direction modulation appears feasible for implementation at high speeds and offers a solution to this challenging

  11. Precision Control Module For UV Laser 3D Micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-Hong; Hung, Min-Wei; Chang, Chun-Li

    2011-01-01

    UV laser has been widely used in various micromachining such as micro-scribing or patterning processing. At present, most of the semiconductors, LEDs, photovoltaic solar panels and touch panels industries need the UV laser processing system. However, most of the UV laser processing applications in the industries utilize two dimensional (2D) plane processing. And there are tremendous business opportunities that can be developed, such as three dimensional (3D) structures of micro-electromechanical (MEMS) sensor or the precision depth control of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films edge insulation in touch panels. This research aims to develop a UV laser 3D micromachining module that can create the novel applications for industries. By special designed beam expender in optical system, the focal point of UV laser can be adjusted quickly and accurately through the optical path control lens of laser beam expender optical system. Furthermore, the integrated software for galvanometric scanner and focal point adjustment mechanism is developed as well, so as to carry out the precise 3D microstructure machining.

  12. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-9, Weld Repair Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This ninth in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection describes the purposes, essential elements, and application of a weld control program. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  13. Pump and Flow Control Subassembly of Thermal Control Subsystem for Photovoltaic Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian; Santen, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    The pump and flow control subassembly (PFCS) is an orbital replacement unit (ORU) on the Space Station Freedom photovoltaic power module (PVM). The PFCS pumps liquid ammonia at a constant rate of approximately 1170 kg/hr while providing temperature control by flow regulation between the radiator and the bypass loop. Also, housed within the ORU is an accumulator to compensate for fluid volumetric changes as well as the electronics and firmware for monitoring and control of the photovoltaic thermal control system (PVTCS). Major electronic functions include signal conditioning, data interfacing and motor control. This paper will provide a description of each major component within the PFCS along with performance test data. In addition, this paper will discuss the flow control algorithm and describe how the nickel hydrogen batteries and associated power electronics will be thermally controlled through regulation of coolant flow to the radiator.

  14. The Node 1 (or Unity) Module for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph, taken by the Boeing Company,shows Boeing technicians preparing to install one of six hatches or doors to the Node 1 (also called Unity), the first U.S. Module for the International Space Station (ISS). The Node 1, or Unity, serves as a cornecting passageway to Space Station modules and was manufactured by the Boeing Company at the Marshall Space Flight Center from 1994 to 1997. The U.S. built Unity module was launched aboard the orbiter Endeavour (STS-88 mission) on December 4, 1998 and connected to the Zarya, the Russian-built Functional Energy Block (FGB). The Zarya was launched on a Russian proton rocket prior to the launch of the Unity. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.

  15. The Node 1 (or Unity) Module for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph, taken by the Boeing Company, shows Node 1 (also called Unity), the first U.S. Module for the International Space Station (ISS), with its hatch door installed. The Node 1, or Unity, serves as a cornecting passageway to Space Station modules and was manufactured by the Boeing Company at the Marshall Space Flight Center from 1994 to 1997. The U.S. built Unity module was launched aboard the orbiter Endeavour (STS-88 mission) on December 4, 1998 and connected to the Zarya, the Russian-built Functional Energy Block (FGB). The Zarya was launched on a Russian proton rocket prior to the launch of the Unity. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.

  16. The Node 1 (or Unity) Module for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph, taken by the Boeing Company, shows Boeing technicians preparing to install one of six hatches or doors to the Node 1 (also called Unity), the first U.S. Module for the International Space Station (ISS). The Node 1, or Unity, serves as a cornecting passageway to Space Station modules and was manufactured by the Boeing Company at the Marshall Space Flight Center from 1994 to 1997. The U.S. built Unity module was launched aboard the orbiter Endeavour (STS-88 mission) on December 4, 1998 and connected to the Zarya, the Russian-built Functional Energy Block (FGB). The Zarya was launched on a Russian proton rocket prior to the launch of the Unity. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.

  17. Amylin Modulates the Mesolimbic Dopamine System to Control Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    Mietlicki-Baase, Elizabeth G; Reiner, David J; Cone, Jackson J; Olivos, Diana R; McGrath, Lauren E; Zimmer, Derek J; Roitman, Mitchell F; Hayes, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    Amylin acts in the CNS to reduce feeding and body weight. Recently, the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a mesolimbic nucleus important for food intake and reward, was identified as a site-of-action mediating the anorectic effects of amylin. However, the long-term physiological relevance and mechanisms mediating the intake-suppressive effects of VTA amylin receptor (AmyR) activation are unknown. Data show that the core component of the AmyR, the calcitonin receptor (CTR), is expressed on VTA dopamine (DA) neurons and that activation of VTA AmyRs reduces phasic DA in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC). Suppression in NAcC DA mediates VTA amylin-induced hypophagia, as combined NAcC D1/D2 receptor agonists block the intake-suppressive effects of VTA AmyR activation. Knockdown of VTA CTR via adeno-associated virus short hairpin RNA resulted in hyperphagia and exacerbated body weight gain in rats maintained on high-fat diet. Collectively, these findings show that VTA AmyR signaling controls energy balance by modulating mesolimbic DA signaling. PMID:25035079

  18. Apollo experience report: Guidance and control systems. Lunar module stabilization and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    A brief functional description of the Apollo lunar module stabilization and control subsystem is presented. Subsystem requirements definition, design, development, test results, and flight experiences are discussed. Detailed discussions are presented of problems encountered and the resulting corrective actions taken during the course of assembly-level testing, integrated vehicle checkout and test, and mission operations. Although the main experiences described are problem oriented, the subsystem has performed satisfactorily in flight.

  19. New Modulation Method and Control Strategies for Power Electronics Inverters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleenejad, Mohsen

    The DC to AC power Converters (so-called Inverters) are widely used in industrial applications. The MLIs are becoming increasingly popular in industrial apparatus aimed at medium to high power conversion applications. In comparison to the conventional inverters, they feature superior characteristics such as lower total harmonic distortion (THD), higher efficiency, and lower switching voltage stress. Nevertheless, the superior characteristics come at the price of a more complex topology with an increased number of power electronic switches. The increased number of power electronics switches results in more complicated control strategies for the inverter. Moreover, as the number of power electronic switches increases, the chances of fault occurrence of the switches increases, and thus the inverter's reliability decreases. Due to the extreme monetary ramifications of the interruption of operation in commercial and industrial applications, high reliability for power inverters utilized in these sectors is critical. As a result, developing simple control strategies for normal and fault-tolerant operation of MLIs has always been an interesting topic for researchers in related areas. The purpose of this dissertation is to develop new control and fault-tolerant strategies for the multilevel power inverter. For the normal operation of the inverter, a new high switching frequency technique is developed. The proposed method extends the utilization of the dc link voltage while minimizing the dv/dt of the switches. In the event of a fault, the line voltages of the faulty inverters are unbalanced and cannot be applied to the 3-phase loads. For the faulty condition of the inverter, three novel fault-tolerant techniques are developed. The proposed fault-tolerant strategies generate balanced line voltages without bypassing any healthy and operative inverter element, makes better use of the inverter capacity and generates higher output voltage. These strategies exploit the advantages

  20. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-8, Filler Metal Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This eighth in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection describes controls necessary to place the proper electrode or rod at each welding station. More specifically, the module describes use of the American Welding Society specifications, control of weld filler material after receipt from the supplier, and methods of ensuring…

  1. Navy Occupational Health Information Management System (NOHIMS). Hazardous Materials Control Module. Users’ Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-16

    Occupational Health Information Management System (NOHIMS) 6 Hazardous Materials Control Module (HMC) User’s Manual 7. Author(s) 8. Performing Organization...Materials Control (HMC) module of the Naval Medical Command’s (NAVMED) Navy Occupational Health Information Management System (NOHIMS). After presenting

  2. Cognitive control modulates attention to food cues: Support for the control readiness model of self-control.

    PubMed

    Kleiman, Tali; Trope, Yaacov; Amodio, David M

    2016-12-01

    Self-control in one's food choices often depends on the regulation of attention toward healthy choices and away from temptations. We tested whether selective attention to food cues can be modulated by a newly developed proactive self-control mechanism-control readiness-whereby control activated in one domain can facilitate control in another domain. In two studies, we elicited the activation of control using a color-naming Stroop task and tested its effect on attention to food cues in a subsequent, unrelated task. We found that control readiness modulates both overt attention, which involves shifts in eye gaze (Study 1), and covert attention, which involves shift in mental attention without shifting in eye gaze (Study 2). We further demonstrated that individuals for whom tempting food cues signal a self-control problem (operationalized by relatively higher BMI) were especially likely to benefit from control readiness. We discuss the theoretical contributions of the control readiness model and the implications of our findings for enhancing proactive self-control to overcome temptation in food choices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Active control of sound transmission through partitions composed of discretely controlled modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leishman, Timothy W.

    This thesis provides a detailed theoretical and experimental investigation of active segmented partitions (ASPs) for the control of sound transmission. ASPs are physically segmented arrays of interconnected acoustically and structurally small modules that are discretely controlled using electronic controllers. Theoretical analyses of the thesis first address physical principles fundamental to ASP modeling and experimental measurement techniques. Next, they explore specific module configurations, primarily using equivalent circuits. Measured normal-incidence transmission losses and related properties of experimental ASPs are determined using plane wave tubes and the two-microphone transfer function technique. A scanning laser vibrometer is also used to evaluate distributed transmitting surface vibrations. ASPs have the inherent potential to provide excellent active sound transmission control (ASTC) through lightweight structures, using very practical control strategies. The thesis analyzes several unique ASP configurations and evaluates their abilities to produce high transmission losses via global minimization of normal transmitting surface vibrations. A novel dual diaphragm configuration is shown to employ this strategy particularly well. It uses an important combination of acoustical actuation and mechano-acoustical segmentation to produce exceptionally high transmission loss (e.g., 50 to 80 dB) over a broad frequency range-including lower audible frequencies. Such performance is shown to be comparable to that produced by much more massive partitions composed of thick layers of steel or concrete and sand. The configuration uses only simple localized error sensors and actuators, permitting effective use of independent single-channel controllers in a decentralized format. This work counteracts the commonly accepted notion that active vibration control of partitions is an ineffective means of controlling sound transmission. With appropriate construction, actuation

  4. United States Control Module Guidance, Navigation, and Control Subsystem Design Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, M. E.; Bartlow, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Should the Russian Space Agency (RSA) not participate in the International Space Station (ISS) program, then the United States (U.S.) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) may choose to execute the ISS mission. However, in order to do this, NASA must build two new space vehicles, which must perform the functions that the Russian vehicles and hardware were to perform. These functions include periodic ISS orbit reboost, initial ISS attitude control, and U.S. On-Orbit Segment (USOS) control Moment gyroscope (CMG) momentum desaturation. The two new NASA vehicles that must perform these functions are called the U.S. control module (USCM) and the U.S. resupply module. This paper presents a design concept for the USCM GN&C subsystem, which must play a major role in ISS orbit reboost and initial attitude control, plus USOS CMG momentum desaturation. The proposed concept is structured similar to the USOS GN&C subsystem, by design. It is very robust, in that it allows the USCM to assume a variety of vehicle attitudes and stay power-positive. It has a storage/safe mode that places the USCM in a gravity-gradient orientation and keeps it there for extended periods of time without consuming a great deal of propellant. Simulation results are presented and discussed that show the soundness of the design approach. An equipment list is included that gives detailed information on the baselined GN&C components.

  5. Intrinsic Sensing and Evolving Internal Model Control of Compact Elastic Module for a Lower Extremity Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Wang, Likun; Du, Zhijiang; Dong, Wei; Shen, Yi; Zhao, Guangyu

    2018-03-19

    To achieve strength augmentation, endurance enhancement, and human assistance in a functional autonomous exoskeleton, control precision, back drivability, low output impedance, and mechanical compactness are desired. In our previous work, two elastic modules were designed for human-robot interaction sensing and compliant control, respectively. According to the intrinsic sensing properties of the elastic module, in this paper, only one compact elastic module is applied to realize both purposes. Thus, the corresponding control strategy is required and evolving internal model control is proposed to address this issue. Moreover, the input signal to the controller is derived from the deflection of the compact elastic module. The human-robot interaction is considered as the disturbance which is approximated by the output error between the exoskeleton control plant and evolving forward learning model. Finally, to verify our proposed control scheme, several experiments are conducted with our robotic exoskeleton system. The experiment shows a satisfying result and promising application feasibility.

  6. Intrinsic Sensing and Evolving Internal Model Control of Compact Elastic Module for a Lower Extremity Exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Likun; Du, Zhijiang; Dong, Wei; Shen, Yi; Zhao, Guangyu

    2018-01-01

    To achieve strength augmentation, endurance enhancement, and human assistance in a functional autonomous exoskeleton, control precision, back drivability, low output impedance, and mechanical compactness are desired. In our previous work, two elastic modules were designed for human–robot interaction sensing and compliant control, respectively. According to the intrinsic sensing properties of the elastic module, in this paper, only one compact elastic module is applied to realize both purposes. Thus, the corresponding control strategy is required and evolving internal model control is proposed to address this issue. Moreover, the input signal to the controller is derived from the deflection of the compact elastic module. The human–robot interaction is considered as the disturbance which is approximated by the output error between the exoskeleton control plant and evolving forward learning model. Finally, to verify our proposed control scheme, several experiments are conducted with our robotic exoskeleton system. The experiment shows a satisfying result and promising application feasibility. PMID:29562684

  7. Controller and interface module for the High-Speed Data Acquisition System correlator/accumulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brokl, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    One complex channel of the High-Speed Data Acquisition System (a subsystem used in the Goldstone solar system radar), consisting of two correlator modules and one accumulator module, is operated by the controller and interface module interfaces are provided to the VAX UNIBUS for computer control, monitor, and test of the controller and correlator/accumulator. The correlator and accumulator modules controlled by this module are the key digital signal processing elements of the Goldstone High-Speed Data Acquisition System. This fully programmable unit provides for a wide variety of correlation and filtering functions operating on a three megaword/second data flow. Data flow is to the VAX by way of the I/O port of a FPS 5210 array processor.

  8. Miniature Surface Plasmon Polariton Amplitude Modulator by Beat Frequency and Polarization Control

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Chu-En; Yu, Chih-Jen; Yeh, Ting-Tso; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization of modulators keeps pace for the compact devices in optical applications. Here, we present a miniature surface plasmon polariton amplitude modulator (SPPAM) by directing and interfering surface plasmon polaritons on a nanofabricated chip. Our results show that this SPPAM enables two kinds of modulations. The first kind of modulation is controlled by encoding angular-frequency difference from a Zeeman laser, with a beat frequency of 1.66 MHz; the second of modulation is validated by periodically varying the polarization states from a polarization generator, with rotation frequencies of 0.5–10 k Hz. In addition, the normalized extinction ratio of our plasmonic structure reaches 100. Such miniaturized beat-frequency and polarization-controlled amplitude modulators open an avenue for the exploration of ultrasensitive nanosensors, nanocircuits, and other integrated nanophotonic devices. PMID:27558516

  9. View of the STS-88 crew in the Node 1/Unity module

    1998-12-10

    STS088-322-035 (4 - 15 DECEMBER 1998) --- Three STS-88 crew members are pictured in one of two Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMA) connected to the Unity and Zarya modules. Taking pictures in the foreground is astronaut Jerry L. Ross, mission specialist. Others are astronaut Robert D. Cabana (left), mission commander, and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA).

  10. Amplitude Control of Solid-State Modulators for Precision Fast Kicker Applications

    SciT

    Watson, J A; Anaya, R M; Caporaso, G C

    2002-11-15

    A solid-state modulator with very fast rise and fall times, pulse width agility, and multi-pulse burst and intra-pulse amplitude adjustment capability for use with high speed electron beam kickers has been designed and tested at LLNL. The modulator uses multiple solid-state modules stacked in an inductive-adder configuration. Amplitude adjustment is provided by controlling individual modules in the adder, and is used to compensate for transverse e-beam motion as well as the dynamic response and beam-induced steering effects associated with the kicker structure. A control algorithm calculates a voltage based on measured e-beam displacement and adjusts the modulator to regulate beammore » centroid position. This paper presents design details of amplitude control along with measured performance data from kicker operation on the ETA-II accelerator at LLNL.« less

  11. Getting Down to Business: Pest Control Service, Module 28. [Student Guide]. Entrepreneurship Training Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colby, Pamela G.

    This module on owning and operating a pest control service is one of 36 in a series on entrepreneurship. The introduction tells the student what topics will be covered and suggests other modules to read in related occupations. Each unit includes student goals, a case study, and a discussion of the unit subject matter. Learning activities are…

  12. Project T.E.A.M. (Technical Education Advancement Modules). Introduction to Statistical Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billings, Paul H.

    This instructional guide, one of a series developed by the Technical Education Advancement Modules (TEAM) project, is a 6-hour introductory module on statistical process control (SPC), designed to develop competencies in the following skill areas: (1) identification of the three classes of SPC use; (2) understanding a process and how it works; (3)…

  13. A double-panel active segmented partition module using decoupled analog feedback controllers: numerical model.

    PubMed

    Sagers, Jason D; Leishman, Timothy W; Blotter, Jonathan D

    2009-06-01

    Low-frequency sound transmission has long plagued the sound isolation performance of lightweight partitions. Over the past 2 decades, researchers have investigated actively controlled structures to prevent sound transmission from a source space into a receiving space. An approach using active segmented partitions (ASPs) seeks to improve low-frequency sound isolation capabilities. An ASP is a partition which has been mechanically and acoustically segmented into a number of small individually controlled modules. This paper provides a theoretical and numerical development of a single ASP module configuration, wherein each panel of the double-panel structure is independently actuated and controlled by an analog feedback controller. A numerical model is developed to estimate frequency response functions for the purpose of controller design, to understand the effects of acoustic coupling between the panels, to predict the transmission loss of the module in both passive and active states, and to demonstrate that the proposed ASP module will produce bidirectional sound isolation.

  14. Fuzzy Logic Controlled Solar Module for Driving Three- Phase Induction Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afiqah Zainal, Nurul; Sooi Tat, Chan; Ajisman

    2016-02-01

    Renewable energy produced by solar module gives advantages for generated three- phase induction motor in remote area. But, solar module's ou tput is uncertain and complex. Fuzzy logic controller is one of controllers that can handle non-linear system and maximum power of solar module. Fuzzy logic controller used for Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique to control Pulse-Width Modulation (PWM) for switching power electronics circuit. DC-DC boost converter used to boost up photovoltaic voltage to desired output and supply voltage source inverter which controlled by three-phase PWM generated by microcontroller. IGBT switched Voltage source inverter (VSI) produced alternating current (AC) voltage from direct current (DC) source to control speed of three-phase induction motor from boost converter output. Results showed that, the output power of solar module is optimized and controlled by using fuzzy logic controller. Besides that, the three-phase induction motor can be drive and control using VSI switching by the PWM signal generated by the fuzzy logic controller. This concluded that the non-linear system can be controlled and used in driving three-phase induction motor.

  15. [Statistical process control applied to intensity modulated radiotherapy pretreatment controls with portal dosimetry].

    PubMed

    Villani, N; Gérard, K; Marchesi, V; Huger, S; François, P; Noël, A

    2010-06-01

    The first purpose of this study was to illustrate the contribution of statistical process control for a better security in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments. This improvement is possible by controlling the dose delivery process, characterized by pretreatment quality control results. So, it is necessary to put under control portal dosimetry measurements (currently, the ionisation chamber measurements were already monitored by statistical process control thanks to statistical process control tools). The second objective was to state whether it is possible to substitute ionisation chamber with portal dosimetry in order to optimize time devoted to pretreatment quality control. At Alexis-Vautrin center, pretreatment quality controls in IMRT for prostate and head and neck treatments were performed for each beam of each patient. These controls were made with an ionisation chamber, which is the reference detector for the absolute dose measurement, and with portal dosimetry for the verification of dose distribution. Statistical process control is a statistical analysis method, coming from industry, used to control and improve the studied process quality. It uses graphic tools as control maps to follow-up process, warning the operator in case of failure, and quantitative tools to evaluate the process toward its ability to respect guidelines: this is the capability study. The study was performed on 450 head and neck beams and on 100 prostate beams. Control charts, showing drifts, both slow and weak, and also both strong and fast, of mean and standard deviation have been established and have shown special cause introduced (manual shift of the leaf gap of the multileaf collimator). Correlation between dose measured at one point, given with the EPID and the ionisation chamber has been evaluated at more than 97% and disagreement cases between the two measurements were identified. The study allowed to demonstrate the feasibility to reduce the time devoted to

  16. Kelly at SSRMS controls in Destiny laboratory module

    2005-08-05

    S114-E-7484 (5 August 2005) --- Astronaut James M. Kelly, STS-114 pilot, works in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked to the Station. Astronauts Kelly and Wendy B. Lawrence (out of frame), mission specialist, joined forces to re-stow the Italian-built Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) in the cargo bay.

  17. On the (Frequency) Modulation of Coupled Oscillator Arrays in Phased Array Beam Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, R.; Acorn, J.; Zawadzki, M.

    2000-01-01

    It has been shown that arrays of voltage controlled oscillators coupled to nearest neighbors can be used to produce useful aperture phase distributions for phased array antennas. However, placing information of the transmitted signal requires that the oscillations be modulated.

  18. High density, multi-range analog output Versa Module Europa board for control system applications

    SciT

    Singh, Kundan, E-mail: kundan@iuac.res.in; Das, Ajit Lal

    2014-01-15

    A new VMEDAC64, 12-bit 64 channel digital-to-analog converter, a Versa Module Europa (VME) module, features 64 analog voltage outputs with user selectable multiple ranges, has been developed for control system applications at Inter University Accelerator Centre. The FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) is the module's core, i.e., it implements the DAC control logic and complexity of VMEbus slave interface logic. The VMEbus slave interface and DAC control logic are completely designed and implemented on a single FPGA chip to achieve high density of 64 channels in a single width VME module and will reduce the module count in the controlmore » system applications, and hence will reduce the power consumption and cost of overall system. One of our early design goals was to develop the VME interface such that it can be easily integrated with the peripheral devices and satisfy the timing specifications of VME standard. The modular design of this module reduces the amount of time required to develop other custom modules for control system. The VME slave interface is written as a single component inside FPGA which will be used as a basic building block for any VMEbus interface project. The module offers multiple output voltage ranges depending upon the requirement. The output voltage range can be reduced or expanded by writing range selection bits in the control register. The module has programmable refresh rate and by default hold capacitors in the sample and hold circuit for each channel are charged periodically every 7.040 ms (i.e., update frequency 284 Hz). Each channel has software controlled output switch which disconnects analog output from the field. The modularity in the firmware design on FPGA makes the debugging very easy. On-board DC/DC converters are incorporated for isolated power supply for the analog section of the board.« less

  19. Machine Shop. Module 8: CNC (Computerized Numerical Control). Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosswhite, Dwight

    This document consists of materials for a five-unit course on the following topics: (1) safety guidelines; (2) coordinates and dimensions; (3) numerical control math; (4) programming for numerical control machines; and (5) setting and operating the numerical control machine. The instructor's guide begins with a list of competencies covered in the…

  20. Does Language Proficiency Modulate Oculomotor Control? Evidence from Hindi-English Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Niharika; Mishra, Ramesh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Though many previous studies have reported enhanced cognitive control in bilinguals, few have investigated if such control is modulated by language proficiency. Here, we examined the inhibitory control of high and low proficient Hindi-English bilinguals on an oculomotor Stroop task. Subjects were asked to make a saccade as fast as possible towards…

  1. Modulation of head movement control in humans during treadmill walking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Verstraete, Mary C.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the coordination of the head relative to the trunk within a gait cycle during gaze fixation. Nine normal subjects walked on a motorized treadmill driven at 1.79 m/s (20 s trials) while fixing their gaze on a centrally located earth-fixed target positioned at a distance of 2 m from their eyes. The net and relative angular motions of the head about the three axes of rotations, as well as the corresponding values for the moments acting on it relative to the trunk during the gait cycle were quantified and used as measures of coordination. The average net moment, as well as the average moments about the different axes were significantly different (P<0.01) between the high impact and low/no impact phases of the gait cycle. However, the average net angular displacement as well as the average angular displacement about the axial rotation axis of the head relative to the trunk was maintained uniform (P>0.01) throughout the gait cycle. The average angular displacement about the lateral bending axis was significantly increased (P<0.01) during the high impact phase while that about the flexion-extension axis was significantly decreased (P<0.01) throughout the gait cycle. Thus, the coordination of the motion of the head relative to the trunk during walking is dynamically modulated depending on the behavioral events occurring in the gait cycle. This modulation may serve to aid stabilization of the head by counteracting the force variations acting on the upper body that may aid in the visual fixation of targets during walking.

  2. Electrically optical phase controlling for millimeter wave orbital angular momentum multi-modulation communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haotian; Tang, Jin; Yu, Zhenliang; Yi, Jun; Chen, Shuqing; Xiao, Jiangnan; Zhao, Chujun; Li, Ying; Chen, Lin; Wen, Shuangchun

    2017-06-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM), an emerging and fascinating degree of freedom, has highlighted an innovation in communication and optical manipulation field. The beams with different OAM state, which manifest as the phase front ;twisting; of electromagnetic waves, are mutually orthogonal, which is exactly what a new freedom applied to practical communication eagers for. Herein, we proposed a novel millimeter-wave OAM modulation technique by electrically optical phase controlling. By modulating OAM and phase of optical-millimeter-wave synchronously, the multi-modulation: quadrature orbital angular momentum modulation (QOM) communication system at W band is structured and simulated, allowing a 50 Gbit/s signal transmitting with bit-error rates less than 10-4. Our work might suggest that OAM could be compounded to more complex multi-modulation signal, and revealed a new insight into OAM based high capacity wireless and radio-over-fiber communication.

  3. Feasibility of controlling speed-dependent low-frequency brake vibration amplification by modulating actuation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Osman Taha; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-12-01

    In this article, a feasibility study of controlling the low frequency torque response of a disc brake system with modulated actuation pressure (in the open loop mode) is conducted. First, a quasi-linear model of the torsional system is introduced, and analytical solutions are proposed to incorporate the modulation effect. Tractable expressions for three different modulation schemes are obtained, and conditions that would lead to a reduction in the oscillatory amplitudes are identified. Second, these conditions are evaluated with a numerical model of the torsional system with clearance nonlinearity, and analytical solutions are verified in terms of the trends observed. Finally, a laboratory experiment with a solenoid valve is built to modulate actuation pressure with a constant duty cycle, and time-frequency domain data are acquired. Measurements are utilized to assess analytical observations, and all methods show that the speed-dependent brake torque amplitudes can be altered with an appropriate modulation of actuation pressure.

  4. Social exclusion modulates priorities of attention allocation in cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mengsi; Li, Zhiai; Diao, Liuting; Zhang, Lijie; Yuan, Jiajin; Ding, Cody; Yang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have investigated how exclusion affects cognitive control and have reported inconsistent results. However, these studies usually treated cognitive control as a unitary concept, whereas it actually involved two main sub-processes: conflict detection and response implementation. Furthermore, existing studies have focused primarily on exclusion’s effects on conscious cognitive control, while recent studies have shown the existence of unconscious cognitive control. Therefore, the present study investigated whether and how exclusion affects the sub-processes underlying conscious and unconscious cognitive control differently. The Cyberball game was used to manipulate social exclusion and participants subsequently performed a masked Go/No-Go task during which event-related potentials were measured. For conscious cognitive control, excluded participants showed a larger N2 but smaller P3 effects than included participants, suggesting that excluded people invest more attention in conscious conflict detection, but less in conscious inhibition of impulsive responses. However, for unconscious cognitive control, excluded participants showed a smaller N2 but larger P3 effects than included participants, suggesting that excluded people invest less attention in unconscious conflict detection, but more in unconscious inhibition of impulsive responses. Together, these results suggest that exclusion causes people to rebalance attention allocation priorities for cognitive control according to a more flexible and adaptive strategy. PMID:27511746

  5. Methodology Series Module 2: Case-control Studies.

    PubMed

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Case-Control study design is a type of observational study. In this design, participants are selected for the study based on their outcome status. Thus, some participants have the outcome of interest (referred to as cases), whereas others do not have the outcome of interest (referred to as controls). The investigator then assesses the exposure in both these groups. The investigator should define the cases as specifically as possible. Sometimes, definition of a disease may be based on multiple criteria; thus, all these points should be explicitly stated in case definition. An important aspect of selecting a control is that they should be from the same 'study base' as that of the cases. We can select controls from a variety of groups. Some of them are: General population; relatives or friends; and hospital patients. Matching is often used in case-control control studies to ensure that the cases and controls are similar in certain characteristics, and it is a useful technique to increase the efficiency of the study. Case-Control studies can usually be conducted relatively faster and are inexpensive - particularly when compared with cohort studies (prospective). It is useful to study rare outcomes and outcomes with long latent periods. This design is not very useful to study rare exposures. Furthermore, they may also be prone to certain biases - selection bias and recall bias.

  6. Methodology Series Module 2: Case-control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Case-Control study design is a type of observational study. In this design, participants are selected for the study based on their outcome status. Thus, some participants have the outcome of interest (referred to as cases), whereas others do not have the outcome of interest (referred to as controls). The investigator then assesses the exposure in both these groups. The investigator should define the cases as specifically as possible. Sometimes, definition of a disease may be based on multiple criteria; thus, all these points should be explicitly stated in case definition. An important aspect of selecting a control is that they should be from the same ‘study base’ as that of the cases. We can select controls from a variety of groups. Some of them are: General population; relatives or friends; and hospital patients. Matching is often used in case-control control studies to ensure that the cases and controls are similar in certain characteristics, and it is a useful technique to increase the efficiency of the study. Case-Control studies can usually be conducted relatively faster and are inexpensive – particularly when compared with cohort studies (prospective). It is useful to study rare outcomes and outcomes with long latent periods. This design is not very useful to study rare exposures. Furthermore, they may also be prone to certain biases – selection bias and recall bias. PMID:27057012

  7. Social exclusion modulates priorities of attention allocation in cognitive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mengsi; Li, Zhiai; Diao, Liuting; Zhang, Lijie; Yuan, Jiajin; Ding, Cody; Yang, Dong

    2016-08-01

    Many studies have investigated how exclusion affects cognitive control and have reported inconsistent results. However, these studies usually treated cognitive control as a unitary concept, whereas it actually involved two main sub-processes: conflict detection and response implementation. Furthermore, existing studies have focused primarily on exclusion’s effects on conscious cognitive control, while recent studies have shown the existence of unconscious cognitive control. Therefore, the present study investigated whether and how exclusion affects the sub-processes underlying conscious and unconscious cognitive control differently. The Cyberball game was used to manipulate social exclusion and participants subsequently performed a masked Go/No-Go task during which event-related potentials were measured. For conscious cognitive control, excluded participants showed a larger N2 but smaller P3 effects than included participants, suggesting that excluded people invest more attention in conscious conflict detection, but less in conscious inhibition of impulsive responses. However, for unconscious cognitive control, excluded participants showed a smaller N2 but larger P3 effects than included participants, suggesting that excluded people invest less attention in unconscious conflict detection, but more in unconscious inhibition of impulsive responses. Together, these results suggest that exclusion causes people to rebalance attention allocation priorities for cognitive control according to a more flexible and adaptive strategy.

  8. Social exclusion modulates priorities of attention allocation in cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mengsi; Li, Zhiai; Diao, Liuting; Zhang, Lijie; Yuan, Jiajin; Ding, Cody; Yang, Dong

    2016-08-11

    Many studies have investigated how exclusion affects cognitive control and have reported inconsistent results. However, these studies usually treated cognitive control as a unitary concept, whereas it actually involved two main sub-processes: conflict detection and response implementation. Furthermore, existing studies have focused primarily on exclusion's effects on conscious cognitive control, while recent studies have shown the existence of unconscious cognitive control. Therefore, the present study investigated whether and how exclusion affects the sub-processes underlying conscious and unconscious cognitive control differently. The Cyberball game was used to manipulate social exclusion and participants subsequently performed a masked Go/No-Go task during which event-related potentials were measured. For conscious cognitive control, excluded participants showed a larger N2 but smaller P3 effects than included participants, suggesting that excluded people invest more attention in conscious conflict detection, but less in conscious inhibition of impulsive responses. However, for unconscious cognitive control, excluded participants showed a smaller N2 but larger P3 effects than included participants, suggesting that excluded people invest less attention in unconscious conflict detection, but more in unconscious inhibition of impulsive responses. Together, these results suggest that exclusion causes people to rebalance attention allocation priorities for cognitive control according to a more flexible and adaptive strategy.

  9. Temperature control system for a J-module heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Basdekas, Demetrios L.; Macrae, George; Walsh, Joseph M.

    1978-01-01

    The level of primary fluid is controlled to change the effective heat transfer area of a heat exchanger utilized in a liquid metal nuclear power plant to eliminate the need for liquid metal control valves to regulate the flow of primary fluid and the temperature of the effluent secondary fluid.

  10. Modulation-format-free and automatic bias control for optical IQ modulators based on dither-correlation detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolei; Deng, Lei; Chen, Xiaoman; Cheng, Mengfan; Fu, Songnian; Tang, Ming; Liu, Deming

    2017-04-17

    A novel automatic bias control (ABC) method for optical in-phase and quadrature (IQ) modulator is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed method, two different low frequency sine wave dither signals are generated and added on to the I/Q bias signal respectively. Instead of power monitoring of the harmonics of the dither signal, dither-correlation detection is proposed and used to adjust the bias voltages of the optical IQ modulator. By this way, not only frequency spectral analysis isn't required but also the directional bias adjustment could be realized, resulting in the decrease of algorithm complexity and the growth of convergence rate of ABC algorithm. The results show that the sensitivity of the proposed ABC method outperforms that of the traditional dither frequency monitoring method. Moreover, the proposed ABC method is proved to be modulation-format-free, and the transmission penalty caused by this method for both 10 Gb/s optical QPSK and 17.9 Gb/s optical 16QAM-OFDM signal transmission are negligible in our experiment.

  11. Periodic equivalence ratio modulation method and apparatus for controlling combustion instability

    DOEpatents

    Richards, George A.; Janus, Michael C.; Griffith, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The periodic equivalence ratio modulation (PERM) method and apparatus significantly reduces and/or eliminates unstable conditions within a combustion chamber. The method involves modulating the equivalence ratio for the combustion device, such that the combustion device periodically operates outside of an identified unstable oscillation region. The equivalence ratio is modulated between preselected reference points, according to the shape of the oscillation region and operating parameters of the system. Preferably, the equivalence ratio is modulated from a first stable condition to a second stable condition, and, alternatively, the equivalence ratio is modulated from a stable condition to an unstable condition. The method is further applicable to multi-nozzle combustor designs, whereby individual nozzles are alternately modulated from stable to unstable conditions. Periodic equivalence ratio modulation (PERM) is accomplished by active control involving periodic, low frequency fuel modulation, whereby low frequency fuel pulses are injected into the main fuel delivery. Importantly, the fuel pulses are injected at a rate so as not to affect the desired time-average equivalence ratio for the combustion device.

  12. Electrically and spatially controllable PDLC phase gratings for diffraction and modulation of laser beams

    SciT

    Hadjichristov, Georgi B., E-mail: georgibh@issp.bas.bg; Marinov, Yordan G.; Petrov, Alexander G.

    2016-03-25

    We present a study on electrically- and spatially-controllable laser beam diffraction, electrooptic (EO) phase modulation, as well as amplitude-frequency EO modulation by single-layer microscale polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) phase gratings (PDLC SLPGs) of interest for device applications. PDLC SLPGs were produced from nematic liquid crystal (LC) E7 in photo-curable NOA65 polymer. The wedge-formed PDLC SLPGs have a continuously variable thickness (2–25 µm). They contain LC droplets of diameters twice as the layer thickness, with a linear-gradient size distribution along the wedge. By applying alternating-current (AC) electric field, the PDLC SLPGs produce efficient: (i) diffraction splitting of transmitted laser beams; (ii)more » spatial redistribution of diffracted light intensity; (iii) optical phase modulation; (iv) amplitude-frequency modulation, all controllable by the driven AC field and the droplet size gradient.« less

  13. Multi Infrastructure Control and Optimization Toolkit, Resilient Design Module (MICOT-RDT), version 2.X

    SciT

    Bent, Russell; Nagarajan, Harsha; Yamangil, Emre

    2016-06-24

    MICOT is a tool for optimizing and controlling infrastructure systems. In includes modules for optimizing the operations of an infrastructure structure (for example optimal dispatch), designing infrastructure systems, restoring infrastructures systems, resiliency, preparing for natural disasters, interdicting networks, state estimation, sensor placement, and simulation of infrastructure systems. It implements algorithms developed at LANL that have been published in the academic community. This is a release of the of resilient design module of the MICOT.

  14. Troubleshooting of an Electromechanical System (Westinghouse PLC Controlling a Pneumatic Robot). High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, James D.

    This training module on the troubleshooting of an electromechanical system, The Westinghouse Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) controlling a pneumatic robot, is used for a troubleshooting unit in an electromechanical systems/robotics and automation systems course. In this unit, students locate and repair a defect in a PLC-operated machine. The…

  15. Apollo experience report: Lunar module environmental control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillen, R. J.; Brady, J. C.; Collier, F.

    1972-01-01

    A functional description of the environmental control subsystem is presented. Development, tests, checkout, and flight experiences of the subsystem are discussed; and the design fabrication, and operational difficulties associated with the various components and subassemblies are recorded. Detailed information is related concerning design changes made to, and problems encountered with, the various elements of the subsystem, such as the thermal control water sublimator, the carbon dioxide sensing and control units, and the water section. The problems associated with water sterilization, water/glycol formulation, and materials compatibility are discussed. The corrective actions taken are described with the expection that this information may be of value for future subsystems. Although the main experiences described are problem oriented, the subsystem has generally performed satisfactorily in flight.

  16. Nonrandom extinction patterns can modulate pest control service decline.

    PubMed

    Karp, Daniel S; Moeller, Holly V; Frishkoff, Luke O

    2013-06-01

    Changes in biodiversity will mediate the consequences of agricultural intensification and expansion for ecosystem services. Regulating services, like pollination and pest control, generally decline with species loss. In nature, however, relationships between service provision and species richness are not always strong, partially because anthropogenic disturbances purge species from communities in nonrandom orders. The same traits that make for effective service providers may also confer resistance or sensitivity to anthropogenic disturbances, which may either temper or accelerate declines in service provision with species loss. We modeled a community of predators interacting with insect pest prey, and identified the contexts in which pest control provision was most sensitive to species loss. We found pest populations increased rapidly when functionally unique and dietary-generalist predators were lost first, with up to 20% lower pest control provision than random loss. In general, pest abundance increased most in the scenarios that freed more pest species from predation. Species loss also decreased the likelihood that the most effective service providers were present. In communities composed of species with identical traits, predators were equally effective service providers and, when competing predators went extinct, remaining community members assumed their functional roles. In more realistic trait-diverse communities, predators differed in pest control efficacy, and remaining predators could not fully compensate for the loss of their competitors, causing steeper declines in pest control provision with predator species loss. These results highlight diet breadth in particular as a key predictor of service provision, as it affects both the way species respond to and alter their environments. More generally, our model provides testable hypotheses for predicting how nonrandom species loss alters relationships between biodiversity and pest control provision.

  17. Calcium channel modulation as a target in chronic pain control

    PubMed Central

    Montagut‐Bordas, Carlota; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains poorly treated for large numbers of patients, and little progress has been made in developing novel classes of analgesics. To redress this issue, ziconotide (Prialt™) was developed and approved as a first‐in‐class synthetic version of ω‐conotoxin MVIIA, a peptide blocker of Cav2.2 channels. Unfortunately, the impracticalities of intrathecal delivery, low therapeutic index and severe neurological side effects associated with ziconotide have restricted its use to exceptional circumstances. Ziconotide exhibits no state or use‐dependent block of Cav2.2 channels; activation state‐dependent blockers were hypothesized to circumvent the side effects of state‐independent blockers by selectively targeting high‐frequency firing of nociceptive neurones in chronic pain states, thus alleviating aberrant pain but not affecting normal sensory transduction. Unfortunately, numerous drugs, including state‐dependent calcium channel blockers, have displayed efficacy in preclinical models but have subsequently been disappointing in clinical trials. In recent years, it has become more widely acknowledged that trans‐aetiological sensory profiles exist amongst chronic pain patients and may indicate similar underlying mechanisms and drug sensitivities. Heterogeneity amongst patients, a reliance on stimulus‐evoked endpoints in preclinical studies and a failure to utilize translatable endpoints, all are likely to have contributed to negative clinical trial results. We provide an overview of how electrophysiological and operant‐based assays provide insight into sensory and affective aspects of pain in animal models and how these may relate to chronic pain patients in order to improve the bench‐to‐bedside translation of calcium channel modulators. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Recent Advances in Targeting Ion Channels to Treat Chronic Pain. To view the other articles in this section visit http

  18. Calcium channel modulation as a target in chronic pain control.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ryan; Montagut-Bordas, Carlota; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2018-06-01

    Neuropathic pain remains poorly treated for large numbers of patients, and little progress has been made in developing novel classes of analgesics. To redress this issue, ziconotide (Prialt™) was developed and approved as a first-in-class synthetic version of ω-conotoxin MVIIA, a peptide blocker of Ca v 2.2 channels. Unfortunately, the impracticalities of intrathecal delivery, low therapeutic index and severe neurological side effects associated with ziconotide have restricted its use to exceptional circumstances. Ziconotide exhibits no state or use-dependent block of Ca v 2.2 channels; activation state-dependent blockers were hypothesized to circumvent the side effects of state-independent blockers by selectively targeting high-frequency firing of nociceptive neurones in chronic pain states, thus alleviating aberrant pain but not affecting normal sensory transduction. Unfortunately, numerous drugs, including state-dependent calcium channel blockers, have displayed efficacy in preclinical models but have subsequently been disappointing in clinical trials. In recent years, it has become more widely acknowledged that trans-aetiological sensory profiles exist amongst chronic pain patients and may indicate similar underlying mechanisms and drug sensitivities. Heterogeneity amongst patients, a reliance on stimulus-evoked endpoints in preclinical studies and a failure to utilize translatable endpoints, all are likely to have contributed to negative clinical trial results. We provide an overview of how electrophysiological and operant-based assays provide insight into sensory and affective aspects of pain in animal models and how these may relate to chronic pain patients in order to improve the bench-to-bedside translation of calcium channel modulators. This article is part of a themed section on Recent Advances in Targeting Ion Channels to Treat Chronic Pain. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v175

  19. Apollo experience report: Command and service module environmental control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samonski, F. H., Jr.; Tucker, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive review is presented of the design philosophy of the Apollo environmental control system together with the development history of the total system and of selected components within the system. In particular, discussions are presented relative to the development history and to the problems associated with the equipment cooling coldplates, the evaporator and its electronic control system, and the space radiator system used for rejection of the spacecraft thermal loads. Apollo flight experience and operational difficulties associated with the spacecraft water system and the waste management system are discussed in detail to provide definition of the problem and the corrective action taken when applicable.

  20. Unconscious Modulation of the Conscious Experience of Voluntary Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linser, Katrin; Goschke, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    How does the brain generate our experience of being in control over our actions and their effects? Here, we argue that the perception of events as self-caused emerges from a comparison between anticipated and actual action-effects: if the representation of an event that follows an action is activated before the action, the event is experienced as…

  1. Protein-protein recognition control by modulating electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Han, Song; Yin, Shijin; Yi, Hong; Mouhat, Stéphanie; Qiu, Su; Cao, Zhijian; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin

    2010-06-04

    Protein-protein control recognition remains a huge challenge, and its development depends on understanding the chemical and biological mechanisms by which these interactions occur. Here we describe a protein-protein control recognition technique based on the dominant electrostatic interactions occurring between the proteins. We designed a potassium channel inhibitor, BmP05-T, that was 90.32% identical to wild-type BmP05. Negatively charged residues were translocated from the nonbinding interface to the binding interface of BmP05 inhibitor, such that BmP05-T now used BmP05 nonbinding interface as the binding interface. This switch demonstrated that nonbinding interfaces were able to control the orientation of protein binding interfaces in the process of protein-protein recognition. The novel function findings of BmP05-T peptide suggested that the control recognition technique described here had the potential for use in designing and utilizing functional proteins in many biological scenarios.

  2. Cable tensioned membrane solar collector module with variable tension control

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar collector comprising a membrane for concentrating sunlight, a plurality of elongated structural members for suspending the membrane member thereon, and a plurality of control members for adjustably tensioning the membrane member, as well as for controlling a focus produced by the membrane members. Each control member is disposed at a different corresponding one of the plurality of structural members. The collector also comprises an elongated flexible tensioning member, which serves to stretch the membrane member and to thereafter hold it in tension, and a plurality of sleeve members, which serve to provide the membrane member with a desired surface contour during tensioning of the membrane member. The tensioning member is coupled to the structural members such that the tensioning member is adjustably tensioned through the structural members. The tensioning member is also coupled to the membrane member through the sleeve members such that the sleeve members uniformly and symmetrically stretch the membrane member upon applying tension to the tensioning member with the control members.

  3. Cable tensioned membrane solar collector module with variable tension control

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-09

    Disclosed is a solar collector comprising a membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a plurality of elongated structural members for suspending the membrane member thereon, and a plurality of control members for adjustably tensioning the membrane member, as well as for controlling a focus produced by the membrane members. Each control member is disposed at a different corresponding one of the plurality of structural members. The collector also comprises an elongated flexible tensioning member, which serves to stretch the membrane member and to thereafter hold it in tension, and a plurality of sleeve members which serve to provide the membrane member with a desired surface contour during tensioning of the membrane member. The tensioning member is coupled to the structural members such that the tensioning member is adjustably tensioned through the structural members. The tensioning member is also coupled to the membrane member through the sleeve members such that the sleeve members uniformly and symmetrically stretch the membrane member upon applying tension to the tensioning member with the control members.

  4. Voss and Helms at SSRMS controls in Destiny laboratory module

    2001-04-22

    ISS002-E-7043 (22 April 2001) --- Expedition Two flight engineers James S. Voss and Susan J. Helms work at the Canadarm2 / Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) control station in the Destiny Laboratory. The image was recorded with a digital still camera.

  5. Kavandi at controls of Canadarm2 in Destiny module

    2001-07-16

    S104-E-5114 (16 July 2001) --- Janet L. Kavandi, STS-104 mission specialist, looks over the Canadarm2, Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), control station in the Destiny laboratory during STS-104's visit to the International Space Station (ISS).

  6. Hadfield works robotic controls in the Cupola Module

    2013-01-10

    ISS034-E-027317 (10 Jan. 2013) --- In the Cupola aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield, Expedition 34 flight engineer, works the controls at the Robotic workstation to maneuver the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) or CanadArm2 from its parked position to grapple the Mobile Remote Servicer (MRS) Base System (MBS) Power and Data Grapple Fixture 4 (PDGF-4).

  7. Focus control system for stretched-membrane mirror module

    DOEpatents

    Butler, B.L.; Beninga, K.J.

    1991-05-21

    A focus control system dynamically sets and controls the focal length of a reflective membrane supported between a perimeter frame. A rear membrane is also supported between the perimeter frame rearward and spaced apart from a back side of the reflective membrane. The space between the membranes defines a plenum space into which a mass of gas at a first pressure is inserted. The pressure differential between the first pressure and an external pressure, such as the atmospheric pressure, causes the reflective membrane to assume a first curvature relative to a reference plane associated with the perimeter frame. This curvature defines the focal length of the reflective membrane. The focal length is dynamically controlled by changing the volume of the plenum space, thereby changing the first pressure. The system can be used to change or maintain the pressure differential and hence the front membrane curvature. The plenum volume is changed by pushing or pulling on a central section of the rear membrane using a suitable actuator. Sensing means continuously sense the location of the reflective membrane relative to the reference plane. This sensed position is compared to a reference position, and a resulting error signal, comprising the difference between the sensed position and reference position, drives the actuator in a direction to minimize the difference. A vent value compensates for temperature changes or leaks in the closed volume by allowing the pressure differential to be adjusted as required to center the working range of the actuator about the desired focal length. 13 figures.

  8. Focus control system for stretched-membrane mirror module

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Barry L.; Beninga, Kelly J.

    1991-01-01

    A focus control system dynamically sets and controls the focal length of a reflective membrane supported between a perimeter frame. A rear membrane is also supported between the perimeter frame rearward and spaced apart from a back side of the reflective membrane. The space between the membranes defines a plenum space into which a mass of gas at a first pressure is inserted. The pressure differential between the first pressure and an external pressure, such as the atmospheric pressure, causes the reflective membrane to assume a first curvature relative to a reference plane associated with the perimeter frame. This curvature defines the focal length of the reflective membrane. The focal length is dynamically controlled by changing the volume of the plenum space, thereby changing the first pressure. The system can be used to change or maintain the pressure differential and hence the front membrane curvature. The plenum volume is changed by pushing or pulling on a central section of the rear membrane using a suitable actuator. Sensing means continuously sense the location of the reflective membrane relative to the reference plane. This sensed position is compared to a reference position, and a resulting error signal, comprising the difference between the sensed position and reference position, drives the actuator in a direction to minimize the difference. A vent value compensates for temperature changes or leaks in the closed volume by allowing the pressure differential to be adjusted as required to center the working range of the actuator about the desired focal length.

  9. MATLAB Stability and Control Toolbox Trim and Static Stability Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Sean P.; Crespo, Luis

    2012-01-01

    MATLAB Stability and Control Toolbox (MASCOT) utilizes geometric, aerodynamic, and inertial inputs to calculate air vehicle stability in a variety of critical flight conditions. The code is based on fundamental, non-linear equations of motion and is able to translate results into a qualitative, graphical scale useful to the non-expert. MASCOT was created to provide the conceptual aircraft designer accurate predictions of air vehicle stability and control characteristics. The code takes as input mass property data in the form of an inertia tensor, aerodynamic loading data, and propulsion (i.e. thrust) loading data. Using fundamental nonlinear equations of motion, MASCOT then calculates vehicle trim and static stability data for the desired flight condition(s). Available flight conditions include six horizontal and six landing rotation conditions with varying options for engine out, crosswind, and sideslip, plus three take-off rotation conditions. Results are displayed through a unique graphical interface developed to provide the non-stability and control expert conceptual design engineer a qualitative scale indicating whether the vehicle has acceptable, marginal, or unacceptable static stability characteristics. If desired, the user can also examine the detailed, quantitative results.

  10. Mathematical analysis and coordinated current allocation control in battery power module systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Weiji; Zhang, Liang

    2017-12-01

    As the major energy storage device and power supply source in numerous energy applications, such as solar panels, wind plants, and electric vehicles, battery systems often face the issue of charge imbalance among battery cells/modules, which can accelerate battery degradation, cause more energy loss, and even incur fire hazard. To tackle this issue, various circuit designs have been developed to enable charge equalization among battery cells/modules. Recently, the battery power module (BPM) design has emerged to be one of the promising solutions for its capability of independent control of individual battery cells/modules. In this paper, we propose a new current allocation method based on charging/discharging space (CDS) for performance control in BPM systems. Based on the proposed method, the properties of CDS-based current allocation with constant parameters are analyzed. Then, real-time external total power requirement is taken into account and an algorithm is developed for coordinated system performance control. By choosing appropriate control parameters, the desired system performance can be achieved by coordinating the module charge balance and total power efficiency. Besides, the proposed algorithm has complete analytical solutions, and thus is very computationally efficient. Finally, the efficacy of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated using simulations.

  11. Intracavity optically controlled crystal modulators for a CO/sub 2/ laser

    SciT

    Chizhevskii, V.N.; Churakov, V.V.

    1986-06-01

    This paper presents the results of studies of intracavity amplitude modulation of CW CO/sub 2/ laser radiation by its optically controlled absorption on nonequilibrium charge carriers (NCC) in KRS-5, KRS-6, and ZnSe crystals. The fundamental variables which determine the efficiency of such a modulation method are discussed. The radiation from a ruby laser with a 35-nsec pulse width was used to produce the nonequilibrium charge carriers. The variation of the modulation percentage of the intensity vs. excitation level at lambda = 0.6943 ..mu..m is shown for different powers of the CO/sub 2/ laser. The studies attest to the relatively highmore » efficiency of intracavity modulation based on IR radiation absorption by NCC in crystals, where the NCC are generated under the influence of external excitation.« less

  12. Optical modulation in silicon waveguides via charge state control of deep levels.

    PubMed

    Logan, D F; Jessop, P E; Knights, A P; Wojcik, G; Goebel, A

    2009-10-12

    The control of defect mediated optical absorption at a wavelength of 1550 nm via charge state manipulation is demonstrated using optical absorption measurements of indium doped Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) rib waveguides. These measurements introduce the potential for modulation of waveguide transmission by using the local depletion and injection of free-carriers to change deep-level occupancy. The extinction ratio and modulating speed are simulated for a proposed device structure. A 'normally-off' depletion modulator is described with an extinction coefficient limited to 5 dB/cm and switching speeds in excess of 1 GHz. For a carrier injection modulator a fourfold enhancement in extinction ratio is provided relative to free carrier absorption alone. This significant improvement in performance is achieved with negligible increase in driving power but slightly degraded switching speed.

  13. Dynamic modulation of visual and electrosensory gains for locomotor control

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Erin E.; Demir, Alican; Stamper, Sarah A.; Fortune, Eric S.; Cowan, Noah J.

    2016-01-01

    Animal nervous systems resolve sensory conflict for the control of movement. For example, the glass knifefish, Eigenmannia virescens, relies on visual and electrosensory feedback as it swims to maintain position within a moving refuge. To study how signals from these two parallel sensory streams are used in refuge tracking, we constructed a novel augmented reality apparatus that enables the independent manipulation of visual and electrosensory cues to freely swimming fish (n = 5). We evaluated the linearity of multisensory integration, the change to the relative perceptual weights given to vision and electrosense in relation to sensory salience, and the effect of the magnitude of sensory conflict on sensorimotor gain. First, we found that tracking behaviour obeys superposition of the sensory inputs, suggesting linear sensorimotor integration. In addition, fish rely more on vision when electrosensory salience is reduced, suggesting that fish dynamically alter sensorimotor gains in a manner consistent with Bayesian integration. However, the magnitude of sensory conflict did not significantly affect sensorimotor gain. These studies lay the theoretical and experimental groundwork for future work investigating multisensory control of locomotion. PMID:27170650

  14. Fibromodulin modulates myoblast differentiation by controlling calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Ju; Nam, Joo Hyun; Choi, Inho

    2018-06-16

    Fibromodulin (FMOD) is a proteoglycan present in extracellular matrix (ECM). Based on our previous findings that FMOD controls myoblast differentiation by regulating the gene expressions of collagen type I alpha 1 (COL1α1) and integral membrane protein 2 A (Itm2a), we undertook this study to investigate relationships between FMOD and calcium channels and to understand further the mechanism by which they control myoblast differentiation. Gene expression studies and luciferase reporter assays showed FMOD affected calcium channel gene expressions by regulating calcium channel gene promoter, and patch-clamp experiments showed both L- and T-type calcium channel currents were almost undetectable in FMOD knocked down cells. In addition, gene knock-down studies demonstrated the COL1α1 and Itm2a genes both regulate the expressions of calcium channel genes. Studies using a cardiotoxin-induced mouse muscle injury model demonstrated calcium channels play important roles in the regeneration of muscle tissue, possibly by promoting the differentiation of muscle stem cells (MSCs). Summarizing, the study demonstrates ECM components secreted by myoblasts during differentiation provide an essential environment for muscle differentiation and regeneration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Shape control of slack space reflectors using modulated solar pressure

    PubMed Central

    Borggräfe, Andreas; Heiligers, Jeannette; Ceriotti, Matteo; McInnes, Colin R.

    2015-01-01

    The static deflection profile of a large spin-stabilized space reflector because of solar radiation pressure acting on its surface is investigated. Such a spacecraft consists of a thin reflective circular film, which is deployed from a supporting hoop structure in an untensioned, slack manner. This paper investigates the use of a variable reflectivity distribution across the surface to control the solar pressure force and hence the deflected shape. In this first analysis, the film material is modelled as one-dimensional slack radial strings with no resistance to bending or transverse shear, which enables a semi-analytic derivation of the nominal deflection profile. An inverse method is then used to find the reflectivity distribution that generates a specific, for example, parabolic deflection shape of the strings. Applying these results to a parabolic reflector, short focal distances can be obtained when large slack lengths of the film are employed. The development of such optically controlled reflector films enables future key mission applications such as solar power collection, radio-frequency antennae and optical telescopes. PMID:26345083

  16. Shape control of slack space reflectors using modulated solar pressure.

    PubMed

    Borggräfe, Andreas; Heiligers, Jeannette; Ceriotti, Matteo; McInnes, Colin R

    2015-07-08

    The static deflection profile of a large spin-stabilized space reflector because of solar radiation pressure acting on its surface is investigated. Such a spacecraft consists of a thin reflective circular film, which is deployed from a supporting hoop structure in an untensioned, slack manner. This paper investigates the use of a variable reflectivity distribution across the surface to control the solar pressure force and hence the deflected shape. In this first analysis, the film material is modelled as one-dimensional slack radial strings with no resistance to bending or transverse shear, which enables a semi-analytic derivation of the nominal deflection profile. An inverse method is then used to find the reflectivity distribution that generates a specific, for example, parabolic deflection shape of the strings. Applying these results to a parabolic reflector, short focal distances can be obtained when large slack lengths of the film are employed. The development of such optically controlled reflector films enables future key mission applications such as solar power collection, radio-frequency antennae and optical telescopes.

  17. Chalcogenide nanocrystal assembly: Controlling heterogeneity and modulating heterointerfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jessica

    chalcogenide NC gels with different NC components with control over the degree of mixing. In order to control the degree of mixing, the factors that underscore sol-gel oxidative assembly were elucidated and the aggregation and gelation kinetics of metal chalcogenide QDs were monitored through time-resolved dynamic light scattering (TR-DLS), and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Through these kinetic studies of the surface speciation of metal chalcogenides, control over heterogeneity in dual component CdSe-ZnS system, was achieved through adjustment of the capping ligand, the native crystal structure and the chalcogenide, thereby changing the relative rates of assembly for each component independently.

  18. Compact vehicle drive module having improved thermal control

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Andreas A.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2006-01-03

    An electric vehicle drive includes a thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support, which may be controlled in a closed-loop manner. Interfacing between circuits, circuit mounting structure, and the support provide for greatly enhanced cooling. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  19. Porous Carriers for Controlled/Modulated Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, G.; Pathak, K.

    2009-01-01

    Considerable research efforts have been directed in recent years towards the development of porous carriers as controlled drug delivery matrices because of possessing several features such as stable uniform porous structure, high surface area, tunable pore size and well-defined surface properties. Owing to wide range of useful properties porous carriers have been used in pharmaceuticals for many purposes including development of floating drug delivery systems, sustained drug delivery systems. Various types of pores like open, closed, transport and blind pores in the porous solid allow them to adsorb drugs and release them in a more reproducible and predictable manner. Pharmaceutically exploited porous adsorbents includes, silica (mesoporous), ethylene vinyl acetate (macroporous), polypropylene foam powder (microporous), titanium dioxide (nanoporous). When porous polymeric drug delivery system is placed in contact with appropriate dissolution medium, release of drug to medium must be preceded by the drug dissolution in the water filled pores or from surface and by diffusion through the water filled channels. The porous carriers are used to improve the oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs, to increase the dissolution of relatively insoluble powders and conversion of crystalline state to amorphous state. PMID:20376211

  20. Spectrum-modulating fiber-optic sensors for aircraft control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, Glenn; Fritsch, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    A family of fiber-optic sensors for aircraft engine control systems is described. Each of these sensors uses a spectrum-modulation method to obtain an output which is largely independent of the fiber link transmissivity. A position encoder is described which uses a code plate to digitally modulate the sensor output spectrum. Also described are pressure and temperature sensors, each of which uses a Fabry-Perot cavity to modulate the sensor output spectrum as a continuous function of the measurand. A technique is described whereby a collection of these sensors may be effectively combined to perform a number of the measurements which are required by an aircraft-engine control system.

  1. The effects of control field detuning on the modulation instability in a three-level quantum well system

    SciT

    Borgohain, Nitu, E-mail: nituborgohain.ism@gmail.com; Konar, S.

    The paper presents a theoretical study of the modulation instability of a continuous or quasi-continuous optical probe in a three level quantum well system under electromagnetically induced transparency. The modulation instability is affected by the control field detuning, as well as even-order dispersion and by the strength of Kerr (third-order) and quintic (fifth-order) nonlinearities. The fourth-order dispersion reduces the bandwidth over which modulation instability occurs, whereas the quintic nonlinearity saturates the growth of the modulation instability. Detuning the control field from resonance can significantly reduce the growth of the modulation instability at both low and high power levels. At lowmore » powers, the system becomes stable against modulation instability for small detuning of the control field and at high powers modulation instability disappears for larger detuning.« less

  2. Optimal feedback control successfully explains changes in neural modulations during experiments with brain-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Benyamini, Miri; Zacksenhouse, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments with brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs) indicate that the extent of neural modulations increased abruptly upon starting to operate the interface, and especially after the monkey stopped moving its hand. In contrast, neural modulations that are correlated with the kinematics of the movement remained relatively unchanged. Here we demonstrate that similar changes are produced by simulated neurons that encode the relevant signals generated by an optimal feedback controller during simulated BMI experiments. The optimal feedback controller relies on state estimation that integrates both visual and proprioceptive feedback with prior estimations from an internal model. The processing required for optimal state estimation and control were conducted in the state-space, and neural recording was simulated by modeling two populations of neurons that encode either only the estimated state or also the control signal. Spike counts were generated as realizations of doubly stochastic Poisson processes with linear tuning curves. The model successfully reconstructs the main features of the kinematics and neural activity during regular reaching movements. Most importantly, the activity of the simulated neurons successfully reproduces the observed changes in neural modulations upon switching to brain control. Further theoretical analysis and simulations indicate that increasing the process noise during normal reaching movement results in similar changes in neural modulations. Thus, we conclude that the observed changes in neural modulations during BMI experiments can be attributed to increasing process noise associated with the imperfect BMI filter, and, more directly, to the resulting increase in the variance of the encoded signals associated with state estimation and the required control signal.

  3. Optimal feedback control successfully explains changes in neural modulations during experiments with brain-machine interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Benyamini, Miri; Zacksenhouse, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments with brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs) indicate that the extent of neural modulations increased abruptly upon starting to operate the interface, and especially after the monkey stopped moving its hand. In contrast, neural modulations that are correlated with the kinematics of the movement remained relatively unchanged. Here we demonstrate that similar changes are produced by simulated neurons that encode the relevant signals generated by an optimal feedback controller during simulated BMI experiments. The optimal feedback controller relies on state estimation that integrates both visual and proprioceptive feedback with prior estimations from an internal model. The processing required for optimal state estimation and control were conducted in the state-space, and neural recording was simulated by modeling two populations of neurons that encode either only the estimated state or also the control signal. Spike counts were generated as realizations of doubly stochastic Poisson processes with linear tuning curves. The model successfully reconstructs the main features of the kinematics and neural activity during regular reaching movements. Most importantly, the activity of the simulated neurons successfully reproduces the observed changes in neural modulations upon switching to brain control. Further theoretical analysis and simulations indicate that increasing the process noise during normal reaching movement results in similar changes in neural modulations. Thus, we conclude that the observed changes in neural modulations during BMI experiments can be attributed to increasing process noise associated with the imperfect BMI filter, and, more directly, to the resulting increase in the variance of the encoded signals associated with state estimation and the required control signal. PMID:26042002

  4. Examining Sensory Modulation in Individuals with Autism as Compared to Community Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Janet K.; Garver, Carolyn R.; Carmody, Thomas; Andrews, Alonzo A.; Mehta, Jyutika A.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine sensory modulation items on the Sensory Profile in individuals with autism as compared to community controls. The data for this study were collected as part of a cross-sectional study that examined sensory processing, using the Sensory Profile, in 103 individuals with autism and/or pervasive developmental…

  5. Project T.E.A.M. (Technical Education Advancement Modules). Advanced Statistical Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Dale

    This instructional guide, one of a series developed by the Technical Education Advancement Modules (TEAM) project, is a 20-hour advanced statistical process control (SPC) and quality improvement course designed to develop the following competencies: (1) understanding quality systems; (2) knowing the process; (3) solving quality problems; and (4)…

  6. Cardiorespiratory Fitness and the Flexible Modulation of Cognitive Control in Preadolescent Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontifex, Matthew B.; Raine, Lauren B.; Johnson, Christopher R.; Chaddock, Laura; Voss, Michelle W.; Cohen, Neal J.; Kramer, Arthur F.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of cardiorespiratory fitness on the modulation of cognitive control was assessed in preadolescent children separated into higher- and lower-fit groups. Participants completed compatible and incompatible stimulus-response conditions of a modified flanker task, consisting of congruent and incongruent arrays, while ERPs and task…

  7. Apollo experience report: Command and service module sequential events control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo command and service module sequential events control subsystem is described, with particular emphasis on the major systems and component problems and solutions. The subsystem requirements, design, and development and the test and flight history of the hardware are discussed. Recommendations to avoid similar problems on future programs are outlined.

  8. Electrical Procedures and Environmental Control Systems. Building Maintenance. Module IV. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Garry

    This curriculum guide, one of six modules keyed to the building maintenance competency profile developed by industry and education professionals, provides materials for two units on electrical procedures and environmental control systems. Unit 1, on electrical procedures, includes the following lessons: electrical safety; troubleshooting and…

  9. 76 FR 78 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard; Engine Control Module Speed Limiter Device

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... be equipped with an electronic control module (ECM) that is capable of limiting the maximum speed of the vehicle. 2. The ECM shall be set at no more than 68 mph by the manufacturer. 3. The ECM should be... ECM to be adjusted to let the vehicle exceed 68 mph. 4. Immediately upon the rule taking effect...

  10. Apollo experience report: Guidance and control systems: Command and service module entry monitor subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reina, B., Jr.; Patterson, H. G.

    1975-01-01

    The conceptual aspects of the command and service module entry monitor subsystem, together with an interpretation of the displays and their associated relationship to entry trajectory control, are presented. The entry monitor subsystem is described, and the problems encountered during the developmental phase and the first five manned Apollo flights are discussed in conjunction with the design improvements implemented.

  11. View of the STS-88 crew in the Node 1/Unity module

    1998-12-10

    STS088-322-021 (4-15 DECEMBER 1998) --- Astronaut Robert D. Cabana (left), mission commander, and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), plan their approach to tasks in the U.S.-built Unity module. All six STS-88 crew members were involved in tasks to ready Unity and the now-connected Russian-built FGB module, also called Zarya, for their International Space Station (ISS) roles. Krikalev has been named as a member of the first ISS crew.

  12. Impact on learning of an e-learning module on leukaemia: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background e-learning resources may be beneficial for complex or conceptually difficult topics. Leukaemia is one such topic, yet there are no reports on the efficacy of e-learning for leukaemia. This study compared the learning impact on senior medical students of a purpose-built e-learning module on leukaemia, compared with existing online resources. Methods A randomised controlled trial was performed utilising volunteer senior medical students. Participants were randomly allocated to Study and Control groups. Following a pre-test on leukaemia administered to both groups, the Study group was provided with access to the new e-learning module, while the Control group was directed to existing online resources. A post-test and an evaluation questionnaire were administered to both groups at the end of the trial period. Results Study and Control groups were equivalent in gender distribution, mean academic ability, pre-test performance and time studying leukaemia during the trial. The Study group performed significantly better than the Control group in the post-test, in which the group to which the students had been allocated was the only significant predictor of performance. The Study group’s evaluation of the module was overwhelmingly positive. Conclusions A targeted e-learning module on leukaemia had a significant effect on learning in this cohort, compared with existing online resources. We believe that the interactivity, dialogic feedback and integration with the curriculum offered by the e-learning module contributed to its impact. This has implications for e-learning design in medicine and other disciplines. PMID:22640463

  13. Impact on learning of an e-learning module on leukaemia: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Morgulis, Yuri; Kumar, Rakesh K; Lindeman, Robert; Velan, Gary M

    2012-05-28

    e-learning resources may be beneficial for complex or conceptually difficult topics. Leukaemia is one such topic, yet there are no reports on the efficacy of e-learning for leukaemia. This study compared the learning impact on senior medical students of a purpose-built e-learning module on leukaemia, compared with existing online resources. A randomised controlled trial was performed utilising volunteer senior medical students. Participants were randomly allocated to Study and Control groups. Following a pre-test on leukaemia administered to both groups, the Study group was provided with access to the new e-learning module, while the Control group was directed to existing online resources. A post-test and an evaluation questionnaire were administered to both groups at the end of the trial period. Study and Control groups were equivalent in gender distribution, mean academic ability, pre-test performance and time studying leukaemia during the trial. The Study group performed significantly better than the Control group in the post-test, in which the group to which the students had been allocated was the only significant predictor of performance. The Study group's evaluation of the module was overwhelmingly positive. A targeted e-learning module on leukaemia had a significant effect on learning in this cohort, compared with existing online resources. We believe that the interactivity, dialogic feedback and integration with the curriculum offered by the e-learning module contributed to its impact. This has implications for e-learning design in medicine and other disciplines.

  14. Coal gasification system with a modulated on/off control system

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1984-01-01

    A modulated control system is provided for improving regulation of the bed level in a fixed-bed coal gasifier into which coal is fed from a rotary coal feeder. A nuclear bed level gauge using a cobalt source and an ion chamber detector is used to detect the coal bed level in the gasifier. The detector signal is compared to a bed level set point signal in a primary controller which operates in proportional/integral modes to produce an error signal. The error signal is modulated by the injection of a triangular wave signal of a frequency of about 0.0004 Hz and an amplitude of about 80% of the primary deadband. The modulated error signal is fed to a triple-deadband secondary controller which jogs the coal feeder speed up or down by on/off control of a feeder speed change driver such that the gasifier bed level is driven toward the set point while preventing excessive cycling (oscillation) common in on/off mode automatic controllers of this type. Regulation of the bed level is achieved without excessive feeder speed control jogging.

  15. Design development of the Apollo command and service module thrust vector attitude control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Development of the Apollo thrust vector control digital autopilot (TVC DAP) was summarized. This is the control system that provided pitch and yaw attitude control during velocity change maneuvers using the main rocket engine on the Apollo service module. A list of ten primary functional requirements for this control system are presented, each being subordinate to a more general requirement appearing earlier on the list. Development process functions were then identified and the essential information flow paths were explored. This provided some visibility into the particular NASA/contractor interface, as well as relationships between the many individual activities.

  16. Randomized controlled trial of a computer-based module to improve contraceptive method choice.

    PubMed

    Garbers, Samantha; Meserve, Allison; Kottke, Melissa; Hatcher, Robert; Ventura, Alicia; Chiasson, Mary Ann

    2012-10-01

    Unintended pregnancy is common in the United States, and interventions are needed to improve contraceptive use among women at higher risk of unintended pregnancy, including Latinas and women with low educational attainment. A three-arm randomized controlled trial was conducted at two family planning sites serving low-income, predominantly Latina populations. The trial tested the efficacy of a computer-based contraceptive assessment module in increasing the proportion of patients choosing an effective method of contraception (<10 pregnancies/100 women per year, typical use). Participants were randomized to complete the module and receive tailored health materials, to complete the module and receive generic health materials, or to a control condition. In intent-to-treat analyses adjusted for recruitment site (n=2231), family planning patients who used the module were significantly more likely to choose an effective contraceptive method: 75% among those who received tailored materials [odds ratio (OR)=1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.23-1.98] and 78% among those who received generic materials (OR=1.74; 95% CI: 1.35-2.25), compared to 65% among control arm participants. The findings support prior research suggesting that patient-centered interventions can positively influence contraceptive method choice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Conceptual design of a thermal control system for an inflatable lunar habitat module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadkari, Ketan; Goyal, Sanjay K.; Vanniasinkam, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    NASA is considering the establishment of a manned lunar base within the next few decades. To house and protect the crew from the harsh lunar environment, a habitat is required. A proposed habitat is an spherical, inflatable module. Heat generated in the module must be rejected to maintain a temperature suitable for human habitation. This report presents a conceptual design of a thermal control system for an inflatable lunar module. The design solution includes heat acquisition, heat transport, and heat rejection subsystems. The report discusses alternative designs and design solutions for each of the three subsystems mentioned above. Alternative subsystems for heat acquisition include a single water-loop, a single air-loop, and a double water-loop. The vapor compression cycle, vapor absorption cycle, and metal hydride absorption cycle are the three alternative transport subsystems. Alternative rejection subsystems include flat plate radiators, the liquid droplet radiator, and reflux boiler radiators. Feasibility studies on alternatives of each subsystem showed that the single water-loop, the vapor compression cycle, and the reflux boiler radiator were the most feasible alternatives. The design team combined the three subsystems to come up with an overall system design. Methods of controlling the system to adapt it for varying conditions within the module and in the environment are presented. Finally, the report gives conclusions and recommendations for further study of thermal control systems for lunar applications.

  18. Method and apparatus for pulse width modulation control of an AC induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Geppert, Steven; Slicker, James M.

    1984-01-01

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a micro-processor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .THETA., where .THETA. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands of electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a "flyback" DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  19. Method and apparatus for pulse width modulation control of an AC induction motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geppert, Steven (Inventor); Slicker, James M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a micro-processor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .THETA., where .THETA. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands of electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a flyback DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  20. A compact, smart Langmuir Probe control module for MAST-Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, J.; Stephen, R.; Bray, S.; Naylor, G.; Elmore, S.; Willett, H.; Peterka, M.; Dimitrova, M.; Havranek, A.; Hron, M.; Sharples, R.

    2017-11-01

    A new control module for the MAST-Upgrade Langmuir Probe system has been developed. It is based on a Xilinx Zynq FPGA, which allows for excellent configurability and ease of retrieving data. The module is capable of arbitrary bias voltage waveform generation, and digitises current and voltage readings from 16 probes. The probes are biased and measured one at a time in a time multiplexed fashion, with the multiplexing sequence completely configurable. In addition, simultaneous digitisation of the floating potential of all unbiased probes is possible. A suite of these modules, each coupled with a high voltage amplifier, enables biasing and digitisation of 640 Langmuir Probes in the MAST-Upgrade Super-X divertor. The system has been successfully tested on the York Linear Plasma Device and on the COMPASS tokamak. It will be installed on MAST-Upgrade ready for operations in 2018.

  1. Frontal Eye Fields Control Attentional Modulation of Alpha and Gamma Oscillations in Contralateral Occipitoparietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    O'Shea, Jacinta; Jensen, Ole; Bergmann, Til O.

    2015-01-01

    Covertly directing visuospatial attention produces a frequency-specific modulation of neuronal oscillations in occipital and parietal cortices: anticipatory alpha (8–12 Hz) power decreases contralateral and increases ipsilateral to attention, whereas stimulus-induced gamma (>40 Hz) power is boosted contralaterally and attenuated ipsilaterally. These modulations must be under top-down control; however, the control mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Here we investigated the causal contribution of the human frontal eye field (FEF) by combining repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with subsequent magnetoencephalography. Following inhibitory theta burst stimulation to the left FEF, right FEF, or vertex, participants performed a visual discrimination task requiring covert attention to either visual hemifield. Both left and right FEF TMS caused marked attenuation of alpha modulation in the occipitoparietal cortex. Notably, alpha modulation was consistently reduced in the hemisphere contralateral to stimulation, leaving the ipsilateral hemisphere relatively unaffected. Additionally, right FEF TMS enhanced gamma modulation in left visual cortex. Behaviorally, TMS caused a relative slowing of response times to targets contralateral to stimulation during the early task period. Our results suggest that left and right FEF are causally involved in the attentional top-down control of anticipatory alpha power in the contralateral visual system, whereas a right-hemispheric dominance seems to exist for control of stimulus-induced gamma power. These findings contrast the assumption of primarily intrahemispheric connectivity between FEF and parietal cortex, emphasizing the relevance of interhemispheric interactions. The contralaterality of effects may result from a transient functional reorganization of the dorsal attention network after inhibition of either FEF. PMID:25632139

  2. Frontal eye fields control attentional modulation of alpha and gamma oscillations in contralateral occipitoparietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Tom R; O'Shea, Jacinta; Jensen, Ole; Bergmann, Til O

    2015-01-28

    Covertly directing visuospatial attention produces a frequency-specific modulation of neuronal oscillations in occipital and parietal cortices: anticipatory alpha (8-12 Hz) power decreases contralateral and increases ipsilateral to attention, whereas stimulus-induced gamma (>40 Hz) power is boosted contralaterally and attenuated ipsilaterally. These modulations must be under top-down control; however, the control mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Here we investigated the causal contribution of the human frontal eye field (FEF) by combining repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with subsequent magnetoencephalography. Following inhibitory theta burst stimulation to the left FEF, right FEF, or vertex, participants performed a visual discrimination task requiring covert attention to either visual hemifield. Both left and right FEF TMS caused marked attenuation of alpha modulation in the occipitoparietal cortex. Notably, alpha modulation was consistently reduced in the hemisphere contralateral to stimulation, leaving the ipsilateral hemisphere relatively unaffected. Additionally, right FEF TMS enhanced gamma modulation in left visual cortex. Behaviorally, TMS caused a relative slowing of response times to targets contralateral to stimulation during the early task period. Our results suggest that left and right FEF are causally involved in the attentional top-down control of anticipatory alpha power in the contralateral visual system, whereas a right-hemispheric dominance seems to exist for control of stimulus-induced gamma power. These findings contrast the assumption of primarily intrahemispheric connectivity between FEF and parietal cortex, emphasizing the relevance of interhemispheric interactions. The contralaterality of effects may result from a transient functional reorganization of the dorsal attention network after inhibition of either FEF. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351638-10$15.00/0.

  3. Wavefront control with a spatial light modulator containing dual-frequency liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Dong-Feng; Winker, Bruce; Wen, Bing; Taber, Don; Brackley, Andrew; Wirth, Allan; Albanese, Marc; Landers, Frank

    2004-10-01

    A versatile, scalable wavefront control approach based upon proven liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology was extended for potential use in high-energy near-infrared laser applications. The reflective LC SLM module demonstrated has a two-inch diameter active aperture with 812 pixels. Using an ultra-low absorption transparent conductor in the LC SLM, a high laser damage threshold was demonstrated. Novel dual frequency liquid crystal materials and addressing schemes were implemented to achieve fast switching speed (<1ms at 1.31 microns). Combining this LCSLM with a novel wavefront sensing method, a closed loop wavefront controller is being demonstrated. Compared to conventional deformable mirrors, this non-mechanical wavefront control approach offers substantial improvements in speed (bandwidth), resolution, power consumption and system weight/volume.

  4. A computer module used to calculate the horizontal control surface size of a conceptual aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Swanson, Stephen Mark

    1990-01-01

    The creation of a computer module used to calculate the size of the horizontal control surfaces of a conceptual aircraft design is discussed. The control surface size is determined by first calculating the size needed to rotate the aircraft during takeoff, and, second, by determining if the calculated size is large enough to maintain stability of the aircraft throughout any specified mission. The tail size needed to rotate during takeoff is calculated from a summation of forces about the main landing gear of the aircraft. The stability of the aircraft is determined from a summation of forces about the center of gravity during different phases of the aircraft's flight. Included in the horizontal control surface analysis are: downwash effects on an aft tail, upwash effects on a forward canard, and effects due to flight in close proximity to the ground. Comparisons of production aircraft with numerical models show good accuracy for control surface sizing. A modified canard design verified the accuracy of the module for canard configurations. Added to this stability and control module is a subroutine that determines one of the three design variables, for a stable vectored thrust aircraft. These include forward thrust nozzle position, aft thrust nozzle angle, and forward thrust split.

  5. Controlled generation of high-intensity optical rogue waves by induced modulation instability

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Saili; Yang, Hua; Chen, Nengsong; Zhao, Chujun

    2017-01-01

    Optical rogue waves are featured as the generation of high amplitude events at low probability in optical systems. Moreover, the formation of optical rogue waves is unpredictable and transient in photonic crystal fibers. In this paper, we put forward a method to generate high-intensity optical rogue waves in a more controlled way based on induced modulation instability, which can suppress the noise effect and hence play a leading role in the process of pulse evolution. Our numerical simulations indicate that the generation of rogue wave can be controlled when seeding at the optimal modulation frequency and the intensity of rogue wave can be enhanced with appropriate modulation depth. Further, high-intensity rogue wave can also be ejected in the fiber with a shorter propagation length by regulating the modulation depth. These results all provide a better understanding of optical rogue wave, which can contribute to the generation of tunable long-wavelength spectral components and selective excitation of mid-infrared supercontinuum. PMID:28051149

  6. Controlled generation of high-intensity optical rogue waves by induced modulation instability.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Saili; Yang, Hua; Chen, Nengsong; Zhao, Chujun

    2017-01-04

    Optical rogue waves are featured as the generation of high amplitude events at low probability in optical systems. Moreover, the formation of optical rogue waves is unpredictable and transient in photonic crystal fibers. In this paper, we put forward a method to generate high-intensity optical rogue waves in a more controlled way based on induced modulation instability, which can suppress the noise effect and hence play a leading role in the process of pulse evolution. Our numerical simulations indicate that the generation of rogue wave can be controlled when seeding at the optimal modulation frequency and the intensity of rogue wave can be enhanced with appropriate modulation depth. Further, high-intensity rogue wave can also be ejected in the fiber with a shorter propagation length by regulating the modulation depth. These results all provide a better understanding of optical rogue wave, which can contribute to the generation of tunable long-wavelength spectral components and selective excitation of mid-infrared supercontinuum.

  7. High Voltage, Fast-Switching Module for Active Control of Magnetic Fields and Edge Plasma Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Prager, James; Slobodov, Ilia

    2016-10-01

    Fast, reliable, real-time control of plasma is critical to the success of magnetic fusion science. High voltage and current supplies are needed to mitigate instabilities in all experiments as well as disruption events in large scale tokamaks for steady-state operation. Silicon carbide (SiC) MOSFETs offer many advantages over IGBTs including lower drive energy requirements, lower conduction and switching losses, and higher switching frequency capabilities; however, these devices are limited to 1.2-1.7 kV devices. As fusion enters the long-pulse and burning plasma eras, efficiency of power switching will be important. Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. developing a high voltage SiC MOSFET module that operates at 10 kV. This switch module utilizes EHT gate drive technology, which has demonstrated the ability to increase SiC MOSFET switching efficiency. The module will allow more rapid development of high voltage switching power supplies at lower cost necessary for the next generation of fast plasma feedback and control. EHT is partnering with the High Beta Tokamak group at Columbia to develop detailed high voltage module specifications, to ensure that the final product meets the needs of the fusion science community.

  8. Speed And Power Control Of An Engine By Modulation Of The Load Torque

    DOEpatents

    Ziph, Benjamin; Strodtman, Scott; Rose, Thomas K

    1999-01-26

    A system and method of speed and power control for an engine in which speed and power of the engine is controlled by modulation of the load torque. The load torque is manipulated in order to cause engine speed, and hence power to be changed. To accomplish such control, the load torque undergoes a temporary excursion in the opposite direction of the desired speed and power change. The engine and the driven equipment will accelerate or decelerate accordingly as the load torque is decreased or increased, relative to the essentially fixed or constant engine torque. As the engine accelerates or decelerates, its power increases or decreases in proportion.

  9. Q-controlled amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy in liquids: An analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, H.; Schwarz, U. D.

    2006-08-01

    An analysis of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy in liquids is presented with respect to the application of the Q-Control technique. The equation of motion is solved by numerical and analytic methods with and without Q-Control in the presence of a simple model interaction force adequate for many liquid environments. In addition, the authors give an explicit analytical formula for the tip-sample indentation showing that higher Q factors reduce the tip-sample force. It is found that Q-Control suppresses unwanted deformations of the sample surface, leading to the enhanced image quality reported in several experimental studies.

  10. A compact roller-gear pitch-yaw joint module: Design and control issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dohring, Mark E.; Anderson, William J.; Newman, Wyatt S.; Rohn, Douglas A.

    1993-01-01

    Robotic systems have been proposed as a means of accomplishing assembly and maintenance tasks in space. The desirable characteristics of these systems include compact size, low mass, high load capacity, and programmable compliance to improve assembly performance. In addition, the mechanical system must transmit power in such a way as to allow high performance control of the system. Efficiency, linearity, low backlash, low torque ripple, and low friction are all desirable characteristics. This work presents a pitch-yaw joint module designed and built to address these issues. Its effectiveness as a two degree-of-freedom manipulator using natural admittance control, a method of force control, is demonstrated.

  11. Temporally Dissociable Mechanisms of Self-Control: Early Attentional Filtering Versus Late Value Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Todd; Rangel, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Optimal decision-making often requires exercising self-control. A growing fMRI literature has implicated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) in successful self-control, but due to the limitations inherent in BOLD measures of brain activity, the neurocomputational role of this region has not been resolved. Here we exploit the high temporal resolution and whole-brain coverage of event-related potentials (ERPs) to test the hypothesis that dlPFC affects dietary self-control through two different mechanisms: attentional filtering and value modulation. Whereas attentional filtering of sensory input should occur early in the decision process, value modulation should occur later on, after the computation of stimulus values begins. Hungry human subjects were asked to make food choices while we measured neural activity using ERP in a natural condition, in which they responded freely and did not exhibit a tendency to regulate their diet, and in a self-control condition, in which they were given a financial incentive to lose weight. We then measured various neural markers associated with the attentional filtering and value modulation mechanisms across the decision period to test for changes in neural activity during the exercise of self-control. Consistent with the hypothesis, we found evidence for top-down attentional filtering early on in the decision period (150–200 ms poststimulus onset) as well as evidence for value modulation later in the process (450–650 ms poststimulus onset). We also found evidence that dlPFC plays a role in the deployment of both mechanisms. PMID:24285897

  12. Does an attention bias to appetitive and aversive words modulate interference control in youth with ADHD?

    PubMed

    Ma, Ili; Mies, Gabry W; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda N J; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cillessen, Antonius H N; Scheres, Anouk

    2018-05-01

    Interference control refers to the ability to selectively attend to certain information while ignoring distracting information. This ability can vary as a function of distractor relevance. Distractors that are particularly relevant to an individual may attract more attention than less relevant distractors. This is referred to as attention bias. Weak interference control and altered reward sensitivity are both important features of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, interference control is typically studied in isolation. This study integrates both. Youths (aged 9 to 17 years) with ADHD (n = 37, 25 boys) and typically-developing controls (n = 38, 20 boys) completed a Stroop task using appetitive words and matched neutral words to assess whether appetitive distractors diminished interference control more in youths with ADHD than controls. In order to test for specificity, aversive words were also included. As expected, appetitive words disrupted interference control but this effect was not stronger for youths with ADHD than the controls. Aversive words, on the other hand, facilitated interference control. Dimensional analyses revealed that this facilitation effect increased substantially as a function of ADHD symptom severity. Possible mechanisms for this effect include up-regulation of interference control as a function of induced negative mood, or as a function of increased effort. In conclusion, appetitive words do not lead to worse interference control in youths with ADHD compared with controls. Interference control was modulated in a valence-specific manner, concurrent with mood-induced effects on cognitive control.

  13. Control-structure interaction study for the Space Station solar dynamic power module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, J.; Ianculescu, G.; Ly, J.; Kim, M.

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigate the feasibility of using a conventional PID (proportional plus integral plus derivative) controller design to perform the pointing and tracking functions for the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic power module. Using this simple controller design, the control/structure interaction effects were also studied without assuming frequency bandwidth separation. From the results, the feasibility of a simple solar dynamic control solution with a reduced-order model, which satisfies the basic system pointing and stability requirements, is suggested. However, the conventional control design approach is shown to be very much influenced by the order of reduction of the plant model, i.e., the number of the retained elastic modes from the full-order model. This suggests that, for complex large space structures, such as the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic, the conventional control system design methods may not be adequate.

  14. Pulse-modulated dual-gas control subsystem for space cabin atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    An atmosphere control subsystem (ACS) was developed for use in a closed manned cabin, such as the Space Shuttle Orbiter. This subsystem uses the Perkin Elmer mass spectrometer for continuous measurement of major atmospheric constituents (H2, H2O, N2, O2, and CO2). The O2 and N2 analog signals are used as inputs to the controller, which produces a pulse-frequency-modulated output to operate the N2 gas admission solenoid valve and an on-off signal to operate the O2 valve. The proportional controller characteristic results in improved control accuracy as compared with previously used on-off controllers having significant dead-band. A 60-day evaluation test was performed on the ACS during which operation was measured at various values of control setpoint and simulated cabin leakage.

  15. Performance Evaluation of a High Bandwidth Liquid Fuel Modulation Valve for Active Combustion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saus, Joseph R.; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, a characterization rig was designed and constructed for the purpose of evaluating high bandwidth liquid fuel modulation devices to determine their suitability for active combustion control research. Incorporated into the rig s design are features that approximate conditions similar to those that would be encountered by a candidate device if it were installed on an actual combustion research rig. The characterized dynamic performance measures obtained through testing in the rig are planned to be accurate indicators of expected performance in an actual combustion testing environment. To evaluate how well the characterization rig predicts fuel modulator dynamic performance, characterization rig data was compared with performance data for a fuel modulator candidate when the candidate was in operation during combustion testing. Specifically, the nominal and off-nominal performance data for a magnetostrictive-actuated proportional fuel modulation valve is described. Valve performance data were collected with the characterization rig configured to emulate two different combustion rig fuel feed systems. Fuel mass flows and pressures, fuel feed line lengths, and fuel injector orifice size was approximated in the characterization rig. Valve performance data were also collected with the valve modulating the fuel into the two combustor rigs. Comparison of the predicted and actual valve performance data show that when the valve is operated near its design condition the characterization rig can appropriately predict the installed performance of the valve. Improvements to the characterization rig and accompanying modeling activities are underway to more accurately predict performance, especially for the devices under development to modulate fuel into the much smaller fuel injectors anticipated in future lean-burning low-emissions aircraft engine combustors.

  16. Engineering aspects of a thermal control subsystem for the 25 kW power module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents the key trade study results, analysis results, and the recommended thermal control approach for the 25 kW power module defined by NASA. Power conversion inefficiencies and component heat dissipation results in a minimum heat rejection requirement of 9 kW to maintain the power module equipment at desired temperature levels. Additionally, some cooling capacity should be provided for user payloads in the sortie and free-flying modes. The baseline thermal control subsystem includes a dual-loop-pumped Freon-21 coolant with the heat rejected from deployable existing orbiter radiators. Thermal analysis included an assessment of spacecraft orientations, radiator shapes and locations, and comparison of hybrid heat pipe and all liquid panels.

  17. Lawrence and Kelly's hands on controls in the Destiny laboratory module

    2005-08-05

    S114-E-7493 (5 August 2005) --- This image features a close-up view the hands of astronauts Wendy B. Lawrence, STS-114 mission specialist, and James M. Kelly, pilot, at the Mobile Service System (MSS) and Canadarm2 controls in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked to the Station. The two were re-stowing the Italian-built Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) in the cargo bay.

  18. Lunar Module ECS (Environmental Control System) - Design Considerations and Failure Modes. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Design considerations and failure modes for the Lunar Module (LM) Environmental Control System (ECS) are described. An overview of the the oxygen supply and cabin pressurization, atmosphere revitalization, water management and heat transport systems are provided. Design considerations including reliability, flight instrumentation, modularization and the change to the use of batteries instead of fuel cells are discussed. A summary is provided for the LM ECS general testing regime.

  19. Investigation of laser dynamics, modulation and control by means of intra-cavity time varying perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Siegman, A. E.; Kuizenga, D. J.; Kung, A. H.; Young, J. F.; Bekkers, G. W.; Bloom, D. M.; Newton, J. H.; Phillion, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    The generation of tunable visible, infrared, and ultraviolet light is examined, along with the control of this light by means of novel mode-locking and modulation techniques. Transient mode-locking of the Nd:YAG laser and generation of short tunable pulses in the visible and the alkali metal inert gas excimer laser systems were investigated. Techniques for frequency conversion of high power and high energy laser radiation are discussed, along with high average power blue and UV laser light sources.

  20. Control scheme for power modulation of a free piston Stirling engine

    DOEpatents

    Dhar, Manmohan

    1989-01-01

    The present invention relates to a control scheme for power modulation of a free-piston Stirling engine-linear alternator power generator system. The present invention includes connecting an autotransformer in series with a tuning capacitance between a linear alternator and a utility grid to maintain a constant displacement to piston stroke ratio and their relative phase angle over a wide range of operating conditions.

  1. Incentive-related modulation of cognitive control in healthy, anxious, and depressed adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Michael G.; Schroth, Elizabeth; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2009-01-01

    Background Developmental changes in cognitive and affective processes contribute to adolescent risk-taking behavior, emotional intensification, and psychopathology. The current study examined adolescent development of cognitive control processes and their modulation by incentive, in health and psychopathology. Predictions include 1) better cognitive control in adults than adolescents, and in healthy adolescents than anxious and depressed adolescents, and 2) a stronger influence of incentives in adolescents than adults, and in healthy adolescents than their depressed and anxious counterparts. Methods Antisaccadic eye movement parameters, which provide a measure of cognitive control, were collected during a reward antisaccade task that included parameterized incentive levels. Participants were 20 healthy adults, 30 healthy adolescents, 16 adolescents with an anxiety disorder, and 11 adolescents with major depression. Performance accuracy and saccade latency were analyzed to test both developmental and psychopathology hypotheses. Results Development and psychopathology group differences in cognitive control were found. Specifically, adults performed better than healthy adolescents, and healthy adolescents than anxious and depressed adolescents. Incentive improved accuracy for all groups; however, incremental increases were not sufficiently large to further modulate performance. Incentives also affected saccade latencies, pushing healthy adolescent latencies to adult levels, while being less effective in adolescents with depression or anxiety. This latter effect was partially mediated by anxiety symptom severity. Conclusions Current findings evidence the modulation of cognitive control processes by incentives. While seen in both healthy adults and healthy adolescents, this modulatory effect was stronger in youth. While anxious and depressed adolescents exhibited improved cognitive control under incentives, this effect was smaller than that in healthy adolescents. These

  2. Scaling behavior of the thermal conductivity of width-modulated nanowires and nanofilms for heat transfer control at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Zianni, Xanthippi; Jean, Valentin; Termentzidis, Konstantinos; Lacroix, David

    2014-11-21

    We report on scaling behavior of the thermal conductivity of width-modulated nanowires and nanofilms that have been studied with the phonon Monte Carlo technique. It has been found that the reduction of the thermal conductivity scales with the nanostructure transmissivity, a property entirely determined by the modulation geometry, irrespectively of the material choice. Tuning of the thermal conductivity is possible by the nanostructure width-modulation without strict limitations for the modulation profile. In addition, a very significant constriction thermal resistance due to width-discontinuity has been identified, in analogy to the contact thermal resistance between two dissimilar materials. The constriction thermal resistance also scales with the modulated nanostructure transmissivity. Our conclusions are generic indicating that a wide range of materials can be used for the modulated nanostructures. Direct heat flow control can be provided by designing the nanostructure width-modulation.

  3. Design of resolution/power controllable Asynchronous Sigma-Delta Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Anita Arvind; Deshmukh, Raghvendra B.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the design of a Programmable Asynchronous Modulator (PAM) with field control of resolution and power. A novel variable hysteresis Schmitt Trigger (ST) is used for external programmability. Asynchronous Sigma-Delta Modulator (ASDM) implementation with external control voltages is proposed to supervise the resolution and power. This architecture with reduced circuit complexity considerably improves the earlier realizations by eliminating multiple current sources as well switched capacitor circuits and results in power saving up to 87 %. Proposed PAM design demonstrates an improved SNDR of 115 dB, DR of 96 dB, and power consumption below 280 μW. It illustrates Effective Number of Bits (ENOB) to 18.81 and Figure of Merit (FoM) to 0.15 fJ/conversion step. Modulator is implemented in Cadence UMC Hspice 0.18 μm CMOS analog technology. Off-chip PAM control for resolution/power performance has potential applications in battery operated ultra low power applications like IoT; where ADC is one of the major power consuming components. It offers the promise for an efficient performance with power saving.

  4. Real-Time Performance of Mechatronic PZT Module Using Active Vibration Feedback Control.

    PubMed

    Aggogeri, Francesco; Borboni, Alberto; Merlo, Angelo; Pellegrini, Nicola; Ricatto, Raffaele

    2016-09-25

    This paper proposes an innovative mechatronic piezo-actuated module to control vibrations in modern machine tools. Vibrations represent one of the main issues that seriously compromise the quality of the workpiece. The active vibration control (AVC) device is composed of a host part integrated with sensors and actuators synchronized by a regulator; it is able to make a self-assessment and adjust to alterations in the environment. In particular, an innovative smart actuator has been designed and developed to satisfy machining requirements during active vibration control. This study presents the mechatronic model based on the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the AVC device. To ensure a real time performance, a H2-LQG controller has been developed and validated by simulations involving a machine tool, PZT actuator and controller models. The Hardware in the Loop (HIL) architecture is adopted to control and attenuate the vibrations. A set of experimental tests has been performed to validate the AVC module on a commercial machine tool. The feasibility of the real time vibration damping is demonstrated and the simulation accuracy is evaluated.

  5. Design and development of the Waukesha Custom Engine Control Air/Fuel Module

    SciT

    Moss, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    The Waukesha Custom Engine Control Air/Fuel Module (AFM) is designed to control the air-fuel ratio for all Waukesha carbureted, gaseous fueled, industrial engine. The AFM is programmed with a personal computer to run in one of four control modes: catalyst, best power, best economy, or lean-burn. One system can control naturally aspirated, turbocharged, in-line or vee engines. The basic system consists of an oxygen sensing system, intake manifold pressure transducer, electronic control module, actuator and exhaust thermocouple. The system permits correct operation of Waukesha engines in spite of changes in fuel pressure or temperature, engine load or speed, and fuelmore » composition. The system utilizes closed loop control and is centered about oxygen sensing technology. An innovative approach to applying oxygen sensors to industrial engines provides very good performance, greatly prolongs sensor life, and maintains sensor accuracy. Design considerations and operating results are given for application of the system to stationary, industrial engines operating on fuel gases of greatly varying composition.« less

  6. New controller for high voltage converter modulator at spallation neutron source

    SciT

    Wezensky, Mark W; Brown, David L; Lee, Sung-Woo

    2017-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has developed a new control system for the High Voltage Convertor Modulator (HVCM) at the SNS to replace the original control system which is approaching obsolescence. The original system was based on controllers for similar high voltage systems that were already in use [1]. The new controller, based on National Instruments PXI/FlexRIO Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform, offers enhancements such as modular construction, flexibility and non-proprietary software. The new controller also provides new capabilities like various methods for modulator pulse flattening, waveform capture, and first fault detection. This paper will discuss the design ofmore » the system, including the human machine interface, based on lessons learned at the SNS and other projects. It will also discuss performance and other issues related to its operation in an accelerator facility which requires high availability. To date, 73% of the operational HVCMs have been upgraded to with the new controller, and the remainder are scheduled for completion by mid-2017.« less

  7. Real-Time Performance of Mechatronic PZT Module Using Active Vibration Feedback Control

    PubMed Central

    Aggogeri, Francesco; Borboni, Alberto; Merlo, Angelo; Pellegrini, Nicola; Ricatto, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an innovative mechatronic piezo-actuated module to control vibrations in modern machine tools. Vibrations represent one of the main issues that seriously compromise the quality of the workpiece. The active vibration control (AVC) device is composed of a host part integrated with sensors and actuators synchronized by a regulator; it is able to make a self-assessment and adjust to alterations in the environment. In particular, an innovative smart actuator has been designed and developed to satisfy machining requirements during active vibration control. This study presents the mechatronic model based on the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the AVC device. To ensure a real time performance, a H2-LQG controller has been developed and validated by simulations involving a machine tool, PZT actuator and controller models. The Hardware in the Loop (HIL) architecture is adopted to control and attenuate the vibrations. A set of experimental tests has been performed to validate the AVC module on a commercial machine tool. The feasibility of the real time vibration damping is demonstrated and the simulation accuracy is evaluated. PMID:27681732

  8. An electromagnetic modulator based on electrically controllable metamaterial analogue to electromagnetically induced transparency.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuancheng; Qiao, Tong; Zhang, Fuli; Fu, Quanhong; Dong, Jiajia; Kong, Botao; Li, Hongqiang

    2017-01-16

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is a promising technology for the enhancement of light-matter interactions, and recent demonstrations of the EIT analogue realized in artificial micro-structured medium have remarkably reduced the extreme requirement for experimental observation of EIT spectrum. In this paper, we propose to electrically control the EIT-like spectrum in a metamaterial as an electromagnetic modulator. A diode acting as a tunable resistor is loaded in the gap of paired wires to inductively tune the magnetic resonance, which induces remarkable modulation on the EIT-like spectrum through the metamaterial sample. The experimental measurements confirmed that the prediction of electromagnetic modulation in three narrow bands on the EIT-like spectrum, and a modulation contrast of up to 31 dB was achieved on the transmission through the metamaterial. Our results may facilitate the study on active/dynamical technology in translational metamaterials, which connect extraordinary manipulations on the flow of light in metamaterials, e.g., the exotic EIT, and practical applications in industry.

  9. Fully interferometric controllable anomalous refraction efficiency using cross modulation with plasmonic metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaocheng; Chen, Shuqi; Li, Jianxiong; Cheng, Hua; Li, Zhancheng; Liu, Wenwei; Yu, Ping; Xia, Ji; Tian, Jianguo

    2014-12-01

    We present a method of fully interferometric, controllable anomalous refraction efficiency by introducing cross-modulated incident light based on plasmonic metasurfaces. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations indicate that the anomalous and ordinary refracted beams generated from two opposite-helicity incident beams and following the generalized Snell's law will have a superposition for certain incident angles, and the anomalous refraction efficiency can be dynamically controlled by changing the relative phase of the incident sources. As the incident wavelength nears the resonant wavelength of the plasmonic metasurfaces, two equal-amplitude incident beams with opposite helicity can be used to control the anomalous refraction efficiency. Otherwise, two unequal-amplitude incident beams with opposite helicity can be used to fully control the anomalous refraction efficiency. This Letter may offer a further step in the development of controllable anomalous refraction.

  10. Development of a standardized control module for dc-to-dc converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Y.; Iwens, R. I.; Lee, F. C.; Inouye, L. Y.

    1977-01-01

    The electrical performance of a power processor depends on the quality of its control system. Most of the existing control circuits suffer one or more of the following imperfections that tend to restrict their respective utility: (1) inability to perform different modes of duty cycle control; (2) lack of immunity to output filter parameter changes, and (3) lack of capability to provide power component stress limiting on an instantaneous basis. The three lagging aspects of existing control circuits have been used to define the major objectives of the current Standardized Control Module (SCM) Program. Detailed information on the SCM functional block diagram, its universality, and performance features, circuit description, test results, and modeling and analysis efforts are presented.

  11. The use of precession modulation for nutation control in spin-stabilized spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. M.; Donner, R. J.; Tasar, V.

    1974-01-01

    The relations which determine the nutation effects induced in a spinning spacecraft by periodic precession thrust pulses are derived analytically. By utilizing the idea that nutation need only be observed just before each precession thrust pulse, a difficult continuous-time derivation is replaced by a simple discrete-time derivation using z-transforms. The analytic results obtained are used to develop two types of modulated precession control laws which use the precession maneuver to concurrently control nutation. Results are illustrated by digital simulation of an actual spacecraft configuration.

  12. Testosterone Modulates Altered Prefrontal Control of Emotional Actions in Psychopathic Offenders(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Volman, Inge; von Borries, Anna Katinka Louise; Bulten, Berend Hendrik; Verkes, Robbert Jan; Toni, Ivan; Roelofs, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Psychopathic individuals are notorious for their controlled goal-directed aggressive behavior. Yet, during social challenges, they often show uncontrolled emotional behavior. Healthy individuals can control their social emotional behavior through anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC) downregulation of neural activity in the amygdala, with testosterone modulating aPFC-amygdala coupling. This study tests whether individual differences in this neuroendocrine system relate to the paradoxical lack of emotional control observed in human psychopathic offenders. Emotional control was operationalized with an fMRI-adapted approach-avoidance task requiring rule-driven control over rapid emotional responses. Fifteen psychopathic offenders and 19 matched healthy control subjects made approaching and avoiding movements in response to emotional faces. Control of social emotional behavior was required during affect-incongruent trials, when participants had to override affect-congruent, automatic action tendencies and select the opposite response. Psychopathic offenders showed less control-related aPFC activity and aPFC-amygdala coupling during trials requiring control of emotional actions, when compared with healthy control subjects. This pattern was particularly pronounced in psychopathic individuals with high endogenous testosterone levels. These findings suggest that reduced prefrontal coordination underlies reduced behavioral control in psychopathic offenders during emotionally provoking situations. Even though the modest sample size warrants replication, the modulatory role of endogenous testosterone on the aPFC-amygdala circuit suggests a neurobiological substrate of individual differences that is relevant for the advancement of treatment and the reduction of recidivism.

  13. Positive emotion modulates cognitive control: an event-related potentials study.

    PubMed

    Xue, Song; Cui, Jingjing; Wang, Kangcheng; Zhang, Songyan; Qiu, Jiang; Luo, Yuejia

    2013-04-01

    There is substantial evidence to indicate that negative emotion can modulate cognitive control processing. However, only a few studies have investigated this effect with positive emotion. Therefore, the present study explored the electrophysiological correlates of the impact of positive emotional stimuli on cognitive control, using event-related potentials (ERPs). Sixteen healthy young adults completed a modified Simon task (Simon, 1969). Behavioral data indicated that reaction times were faster for positive emotional stimuli than for neutral emotional stimuli in the incongruent condition, but not in the congruent condition, which suggested that positive emotion expedited conflict resolution. The ERP data showed that two negative ERP components (N300-400 and N450-550) were associated with the positive emotional stimuli in the incongruent minus congruent condition. It is suggested that these components may respectively be related to the conflict monitoring (N300-400) and response selection (N450-550) stages of cognitive control processing. Overall, our results indicated that positive emotion could facilitate cognitive control processing. These results are in line with the neuropsychological theory, according to which, positive emotion could modulate cognitive control mediated by increased dopamine levels in frontal brain areas. © 2013 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2013 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  14. An Enhancer Composed of Interlocking Sub-modules Controls Transcriptional Autoregulation of Suppressor of Hairless

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Posakony, James W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Positive autoregulation is an effective mechanism for the long-term maintenance of a transcription factor’s expression. This strategy is widely deployed in cell lineages, where the autoregulatory factor controls the activity of a battery of genes that constitute the differentiation program of a post-mitotic cell type. In Drosophila, the Notch pathway transcription factor Suppressor of Hairless activates its own expression specifically in the socket cell of external sensory organs, via an autoregulatory enhancer called the ASE. Here we show that the ASE is composed of several enhancer sub-modules, each of which can independently initiate weak Su(H) autoregulation. Cross-activation by these sub-modules is critical to ensuring that Su(H) rises above a threshold level necessary to activate a maintenance sub-module, which then sustains long-term Su(H) autoregulation. Our study reveals the use of interlinked positive feedback loops to control autoregulation dynamically, and provides mechanistic insight into initiation, establishment, and maintenance of the autoregulatory state. PMID:24735880

  15. Orion Service Module Reaction Control System Plume Impingement Analysis Using PLIMP/RAMP2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Lumpkin, Forrest E., III; Gati, Frank; Yuko, James R.; Motil, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Service Module Reaction Control System engine plume impingement was computed using the plume impingement program (PLIMP). PLIMP uses the plume solution from RAMP2, which is the refined version of the reacting and multiphase program (RAMP) code. The heating rate and pressure (force and moment) on surfaces or components of the Service Module were computed. The RAMP2 solution of the flow field inside the engine and the plume was compared with those computed using GASP, a computational fluid dynamics code, showing reasonable agreement. The computed heating rate and pressure using PLIMP were compared with the Reaction Control System plume model (RPM) solution and the plume impingement dynamics (PIDYN) solution. RPM uses the GASP-based plume solution, whereas PIDYN uses the SCARF plume solution. Three sets of the heating rate and pressure solutions agree well. Further thermal analysis on the avionic ring of the Service Module was performed using MSC Patran/Pthermal. The obtained temperature results showed that thermal protection is necessary because of significant heating from the plume.

  16. Orion Service Module Reaction Control System Plume Impingement Analysis Using PLIMP/RAMP2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen J.; Gati, Frank; Yuko, James R.; Motil, Brian J.; Lumpkin, Forrest E.

    2009-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Service Module Reaction Control System engine plume impingement was computed using the plume impingement program (PLIMP). PLIMP uses the plume solution from RAMP2, which is the refined version of the reacting and multiphase program (RAMP) code. The heating rate and pressure (force and moment) on surfaces or components of the Service Module were computed. The RAMP2 solution of the flow field inside the engine and the plume was compared with those computed using GASP, a computational fluid dynamics code, showing reasonable agreement. The computed heating rate and pressure using PLIMP were compared with the Reaction Control System plume model (RPM) solution and the plume impingement dynamics (PIDYN) solution. RPM uses the GASP-based plume solution, whereas PIDYN uses the SCARF plume solution. Three sets of the heating rate and pressure solutions agree well. Further thermal analysis on the avionic ring of the Service Module showed that thermal protection is necessary because of significant heating from the plume.

  17. Input-dependent modulation of MEG gamma oscillations reflects gain control in the visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Orekhova, Elena V; Sysoeva, Olga V; Schneiderman, Justin F; Lundström, Sebastian; Galuta, Ilia A; Goiaeva, Dzerasa E; Prokofyev, Andrey O; Riaz, Bushra; Keeler, Courtney; Hadjikhani, Nouchine; Gillberg, Christopher; Stroganova, Tatiana A

    2018-05-31

    Gamma-band oscillations arise from the interplay between neural excitation (E) and inhibition (I) and may provide a non-invasive window into the state of cortical circuitry. A bell-shaped modulation of gamma response power by increasing the intensity of sensory input was observed in animals and is thought to reflect neural gain control. Here we sought to find a similar input-output relationship in humans with MEG via modulating the intensity of a visual stimulation by changing the velocity/temporal-frequency of visual motion. In the first experiment, adult participants observed static and moving gratings. The frequency of the MEG gamma response monotonically increased with motion velocity whereas power followed a bell-shape. In the second experiment, on a large group of children and adults, we found that despite drastic developmental changes in frequency and power of gamma oscillations, the relative suppression at high motion velocities was scaled to the same range of values across the life-span. In light of animal and modeling studies, the modulation of gamma power and frequency at high stimulation intensities characterizes the capacity of inhibitory neurons to counterbalance increasing excitation in visual networks. Gamma suppression may thus provide a non-invasive measure of inhibitory-based gain control in the healthy and diseased brain.

  18. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 6. Bleeding Control, Wounds and Bandaging, Shock. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the sixth in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains three sections covering the following course content: control of bleeding, caring for wounds and bandaging various body parts, and caring for shock victims. Each section contains objectives, an introduction,…

  19. Implementation of the Orbital Maneuvering Systems Engine and Thrust Vector Control for the European Service Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has entered into a partnership with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to develop and provide the Service Module (SM) for the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program. The European Service Module (ESM) will provide main engine thrust by utilizing the Space Shuttle Program Orbital Maneuvering System Engine (OMS-E). Thrust Vector Control (TVC) of the OMS-E will be provided by the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) TVC, also used during the Space Shuttle Program. NASA will be providing the OMS-E and OMS TVC to ESA as Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) to integrate into the ESM. This presentation will describe the OMS-E and OMS TVC and discuss the implementation of the hardware for the ESM.

  20. A Flexible VHDL Floating Point Module for Control Algorithm Implementation in Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padierna, A.; Nicoleau, C.; Sanchez, J.; Hidalgo, I.; Elvira, S.

    2012-08-01

    The implementation of control loops for space applications is an area with great potential. However, the characteristics of this kind of systems, such as its wide dynamic range of numeric values, make inadequate the use of fixed-point algorithms.However, because the generic chips available for the treatment of floating point data are, in general, not qualified to operate in space environments and the possibility of using an IP module in a FPGA/ASIC qualified for space is not viable due to the low amount of logic cells available for these type of devices, it is necessary to find a viable alternative.For these reasons, in this paper a VHDL Floating Point Module is presented. This proposal allows the design and execution of floating point algorithms with acceptable occupancy to be implemented in FPGAs/ASICs qualified for space environments.

  1. Effects of Solar Array Shadowing on the Power Capability of the Interim Control Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fincannon, James; Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Garner, James Christopher

    1999-01-01

    The Interim Control Module (ICM) is being built by the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for NASA as a propulsion module for the International Space Station (ISS). Originally developed as a spinning spacecraft used to move payloads to their final orbit, for ISS, the ICM will be in a fixed orientation and location for long periods resulting in substantial solar panel shadowing. This paper describes the methods used to determine the incident energy incident energy on the ICM solar panels and the power capability of the electric power system (EPS). Applying this methodology has resulted in analyses and assessments used to identify ICM early design changes/options, placement and orientations that enable successful operation of the EPS under a wide variety of anticipated conditions.

  2. Application handbook for a Standardized Control Module (SCM) for DC-DC converters, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, F. C.; Mahmoud, M. F.; Yu, Y.

    1980-04-01

    The standardized control module (SCM) was developed for application in the buck, boost and buck/boost DC-DC converters. The SCM used multiple feedback loops to provide improved input line and output load regulation, stable feedback control system, good dynamic transient response and adaptive compensation of the control loop for changes in open loop gain and output filter time constraints. The necessary modeling and analysis tools to aid the design engineer in the application of the SCM to DC-DC Converters were developed. The SCM functional block diagram and the different analysis techniques were examined. The average time domain analysis technique was chosen as the basic analytical tool. The power stage transfer functions were developed for the buck, boost and buck/boost converters. The analog signal and digital signal processor transfer functions were developed for the three DC-DC Converter types using the constant on time, constant off time and constant frequency control laws.

  3. Application handbook for a Standardized Control Module (SCM) for DC-DC converters, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.; Mahmoud, M. F.; Yu, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The standardized control module (SCM) was developed for application in the buck, boost and buck/boost DC-DC converters. The SCM used multiple feedback loops to provide improved input line and output load regulation, stable feedback control system, good dynamic transient response and adaptive compensation of the control loop for changes in open loop gain and output filter time constraints. The necessary modeling and analysis tools to aid the design engineer in the application of the SCM to DC-DC Converters were developed. The SCM functional block diagram and the different analysis techniques were examined. The average time domain analysis technique was chosen as the basic analytical tool. The power stage transfer functions were developed for the buck, boost and buck/boost converters. The analog signal and digital signal processor transfer functions were developed for the three DC-DC Converter types using the constant on time, constant off time and constant frequency control laws.

  4. Automation of testing modules of controller ELSY-ТМК

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolotov, A. E.; Dolotova, R. G.; Petuhov, D. V.; Potapova, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    In modern life, there are means for automation of various processes which allow one to provide high quality standards of released products and to raise labour efficiency. In the given paper, the data on the automation of the test process of the ELSY-TMK controller [1] is presented. The ELSY-TMK programmed logic controller is an effective modular platform for construction of automation systems for small and average branches of industrial production. The modern and functional standard of communication and open environment of the logic controller give a powerful tool of wide spectrum applications for industrial automation. The algorithm allows one to test controller modules by operating the switching system and external devices faster and at a higher level of quality than a human without such means does.

  5. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-08-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW.

  6. Graphene Based Surface Plasmon Polariton Modulator Controlled by Ferroelectric Domains in Lithium Niobate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Zhao, Hua; Hu, Guangwei; Li, Siren; Su, Hang; Zhang, Jingwen

    2015-01-01

    We proposed a ferroelectric domain controlled graphene based surface plasmon polariton modulator. Ferroelectricity-induced electronic and optical property tuning of graphene by domain in lithium niobate was theoretically investigated considering both interband and intraband contributions of surface conductivity. With the corrected Sellmeier equation of lithium niobate, the propagation of transverse magnetic mode surface plasmon polaritons in an air/graphene/lithium niobate structure was studied when monolayer graphene was tuned by down polarization direction ferroelectric domain with different polarization levels. The length of the ferroelectric domain was optimized to be 90 nm for a wavelength of 5.0 μm with signal extinction per unit 14.7 dB/μm, modulation depth 474.1 dB/μm and figure of merit 32.5. This work may promote the study of highly efficient modulators and other ultra-compact nonvolatile electronic and photonic devices in which two-dimensional materials and ferroelectric materials are combined. PMID:26657622

  7. Analysis and design of a standardized control module for switching regulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, F. C.; Mahmoud, M. F.; Yu, Y.; Kolecki, J. C.

    1982-07-01

    Three basic switching regulators: buck, boost, and buck/boost, employing a multiloop standardized control module (SCM) were characterized by a common small signal block diagram. Employing the unified model, regulator performances such as stability, audiosusceptibility, output impedance, and step load transient are analyzed and key performance indexes are expressed in simple analytical forms. More importantly, the performance characteristics of all three regulators are shown to enjoy common properties due to the unique SCM control scheme which nullifies the positive zero and provides adaptive compensation to the moving poles of the boost and buck/boost converters. This allows a simple unified design procedure to be devised for selecting the key SCM control parameters for an arbitrarily given power stage configuration and parameter values, such that all regulator performance specifications can be met and optimized concurrently in a single design attempt.

  8. Proton mediated control of biochemical reactions with bioelectronic pH modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yingxin; Miyake, Takeo; Keene, Scott; Josberger, Erik E.; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    In Nature, protons (H+) can mediate metabolic process through enzymatic reactions. Examples include glucose oxidation with glucose dehydrogenase to regulate blood glucose level, alcohol dissolution into carboxylic acid through alcohol dehydrogenase, and voltage-regulated H+ channels activating bioluminescence in firefly and jellyfish. Artificial devices that control H+ currents and H+ concentration (pH) are able to actively influence biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate a biotransducer that monitors and actively regulates pH-responsive enzymatic reactions by monitoring and controlling the flow of H+ between PdHx contacts and solution. The present transducer records bistable pH modulation from an “enzymatic flip-flop” circuit that comprises glucose dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase. The transducer also controls bioluminescence from firefly luciferase by affecting solution pH.

  9. Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation Modulates Risky Decision Making in a Frequency-Controlled Experiment.

    PubMed

    Yaple, Zachary; Martinez-Saito, Mario; Feurra, Matteo; Shestakova, Anna; Klucharev, Vasily

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on voluntary risky decision making and executive control in humans. Stimulation was delivered online at 5 Hz (θ), 10 Hz (α), 20 Hz (β), and 40 Hz (γ) on the left and right frontal area while participants performed a modified risky decision-making task. This task allowed participants to voluntarily select between risky and certain decisions associated with potential gains or losses, while simultaneously measuring the cognitive control component (voluntary switching) of decision making. The purpose of this experimental design was to test whether voluntary risky decision making and executive control can be modulated with tACS in a frequency-specific manner. Our results revealed a robust effect of a 20-Hz stimulation over the left prefrontal area that significantly increased voluntary risky decision making, which may suggest a possible link between risky decision making and reward processing, underlined by β-oscillatory activity.

  10. Proton mediated control of biochemical reactions with bioelectronic pH modulation

    SciT

    Deng, Yingxin; Miyake, Takeo; Keene, Scott

    In Nature, protons (H +) can mediate metabolic process through enzymatic reactions. Examples include glucose oxidation with glucose dehydrogenase to regulate blood glucose level, alcohol dissolution into carboxylic acid through alcohol dehydrogenase, and voltage-regulated H + channels activating bioluminescence in firefly and jellyfish. Artificial devices that control H + currents and H + concentration (pH) are able to actively influence biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate a biotransducer that monitors and actively regulates pH-responsive enzymatic reactions by monitoring and controlling the flow of H + between PdH x contacts and solution. The present transducer records bistable pH modulation from an “enzymaticmore » flip-flop” circuit that comprises glucose dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase. Furthermore, the transducer also controls bioluminescence from firefly luciferase by affecting solution pH.« less

  11. Evaluation and application of a fast module in a PLC based interlock and control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaera-Sanz, M.

    2009-08-01

    The LHC Beam Interlock system requires a controller performing a simple matrix function to collect the different beam dump requests. To satisfy the expected safety level of the Interlock, the system should be robust and reliable. The PLC is a promising candidate to fulfil both aspects but too slow to meet the expected response time which is of the order of μseconds. Siemens has introduced a ``so called'' fast module (FM352-5 Boolean Processor). It provides independent and extremely fast control of a process within a larger control system using an onboard processor, a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), to execute code in parallel which results in extremely fast scan times. It is interesting to investigate its features and to evaluate it as a possible candidate for the beam interlock system. This paper publishes the results of this study. As well, this paper could be useful for other applications requiring fast processing using a PLC.

  12. Proton mediated control of biochemical reactions with bioelectronic pH modulation

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Yingxin; Miyake, Takeo; Keene, Scott; ...

    2016-04-07

    In Nature, protons (H +) can mediate metabolic process through enzymatic reactions. Examples include glucose oxidation with glucose dehydrogenase to regulate blood glucose level, alcohol dissolution into carboxylic acid through alcohol dehydrogenase, and voltage-regulated H + channels activating bioluminescence in firefly and jellyfish. Artificial devices that control H + currents and H + concentration (pH) are able to actively influence biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate a biotransducer that monitors and actively regulates pH-responsive enzymatic reactions by monitoring and controlling the flow of H + between PdH x contacts and solution. The present transducer records bistable pH modulation from an “enzymaticmore » flip-flop” circuit that comprises glucose dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase. Furthermore, the transducer also controls bioluminescence from firefly luciferase by affecting solution pH.« less

  13. Optical techniques to feed and control GaAs MMIC modules for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Anzic, G.; Kunath, R. R.; Connolly, D. J.

    A complex signal distribution system is required to feed and control GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) for phased array antenna applications above 20 GHz. Each MMIC module will require one or more RF lines, one or more bias voltage lines, and digital lines to provide a minimum of 10 bits of combined phase and gain control information. In a closely spaced array, the routing of these multiple lines presents difficult topology problems as well as a high probability of signal interference. To overcome GaAs MMIC phased array signal distribution problems optical fibers interconnected to monolithically integrated optical components with GaAs MMIC array elements are proposed as a solution. System architecture considerations using optical fibers are described. The analog and digital optical links to respectively feed and control MMIC elements are analyzed. It is concluded that a fiber optic network will reduce weight and complexity, and increase reliability and performance, but higher power will be required.

  14. Optical techniques to feed and control GaAs MMIC modules for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Anzic, G.; Kunath, R. R.; Connolly, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A complex signal distribution system is required to feed and control GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) for phased array antenna applications above 20 GHz. Each MMIC module will require one or more RF lines, one or more bias voltage lines, and digital lines to provide a minimum of 10 bits of combined phase and gain control information. In a closely spaced array, the routing of these multiple lines presents difficult topology problems as well as a high probability of signal interference. To overcome GaAs MMIC phased array signal distribution problems optical fibers interconnected to monolithically integrated optical components with GaAs MMIC array elements are proposed as a solution. System architecture considerations using optical fibers are described. The analog and digital optical links to respectively feed and control MMIC elements are analyzed. It is concluded that a fiber optic network will reduce weight and complexity, and increase reliability and performance, but higher power will be required.

  15. Instruction manual, optical effects module electronic controller and processor, model OEMCP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The OEM-1 electronic module is discussed; it is comprised of four subsystems: the signal processing and display; the stepper motor controls; the chopper controls; and the dc-dc invertor. The OEM-1 module controls the sample wheel so that the relative transmittance of the samples can be compared to the clear aperture position. The 3-1/2 digit digital voltmeter displays the clear aperture signal level as well as the ratio of the remaining sample positions relative to the clear aperture position. The sample wheel position is decoded so that the signals and ratios can be correlated to the data. The OEM is automatically reset to the I sub o on initial turn-on and can be reset to the '0' position by actuating a front panel switch. The sample wheel can be interrupted to change samples or induce a longer integration time if desired by a front panel command. Integration times from 1 - 50 seconds are provided at the front panel, and BCD data for external interfacing is provided.

  16. International Space Station Internal Thermal Control System Lab Module Simulator Build-Up and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Paul; Miller, Lee; Ibarra, Tom

    2003-01-01

    As part of the Sustaining Engineering program for the International Space Station (ISS), a ground simulator of the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) in the Lab Module was designed and built at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). To support prediction and troubleshooting, this facility is operationally and functionally similar to the flight system and flight-like components were used when available. Flight software algorithms, implemented using the LabVIEW(Registered Trademark) programming language, were used for monitoring performance and controlling operation. Validation testing of the low temperature loop was completed prior to activation of the Lab module in 2001. Assembly of the moderate temperature loop was completed in 2002 and validated in 2003. The facility has been used to address flight issues with the ITCS, successfully demonstrating the ability to add silver biocide and to adjust the pH of the coolant. Upon validation of the entire facility, it will be capable not only of checking procedures, but also of evaluating payload timelining, operational modifications, physical modifications, and other aspects affecting the thermal control system.

  17. Sequential modulation of cardiac autonomic control induced by cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreflex mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlan, R.; Jacob, G.; Palazzolo, L.; Rimoldi, A.; Diedrich, A.; Harris, P. A.; Porta, A.; Malliani, A.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonhypotensive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) induces a reflex increase in forearm vascular resistance and muscle sympathetic neural discharge without affecting mean heart rate. We tested the hypothesis that a reflex change of the autonomic modulation of heartbeat might arise during low intensity LBNP without changes of mean heart rate. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ten healthy volunteers underwent plasma catecholamine evaluation and a continuous recording of ECG, finger blood pressure, respiratory activity, and central venous pressure (CVP) during increasing levels of LBNP up to -40 mm Hg. Spectrum and cross-spectrum analyses assessed the changes in the spontaneous variability of R-R interval, respiration, systolic arterial pressure (SAP), and CVP and in the gain (alpha(LF)) of arterial baroreflex control of heart rate. Baroreceptor sensitivity was also evaluated by the SAP/R-R spontaneous sequences technique. LBNP began decreasing significantly: CVP at -10, R-R interval at -20, SAP at -40, and the indexes alpha(LF) and baroreceptor sensitivity at -30 and -20 mm Hg, compared with baseline conditions. Plasma norepinephrine increased significantly at -20 mm Hg. The normalized low-frequency component of R-R variability (LF(R-R)) progressively increased and was significantly higher than in the control condition at -15 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: Nonhypotensive LBNP elicits a reflex increase of cardiac sympathetic modulation, as evaluated by LF(R-R), which precedes the changes in the hemodynamics and in the indexes of arterial baroreflex control.

  18. Design and fabrication of reflective spatial light modulator for high-dynamic-range wavefront control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hao; Bierden, Paul; Cornelissen, Steven; Bifano, Thomas; Kim, Jin-Hong

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes design and fabrication of a microelectromechanical metal spatial light modulator (SLM) integrated with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics, for high-dynamic-range wavefront control. The metal SLM consists of a large array of piston-motion MEMS mirror segments (pixels) which can deflect up to 0.78 µm each. Both 32x32 and 150x150 arrays of the actuators (1024 and 22500 elements respectively) were fabricated onto the CMOS driver electronics and individual pixels were addressed. A new process has been developed to reduce the topography during the metal MEMS processing to fabricate mirror pixels with improved optical quality.

  19. Controlled ecological life support systems: Development of a plant growth module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averner, Mel M.; Macelroy, Robert D.; Smernoff, David T.

    1987-01-01

    An effort was made to begin defining the scientific and technical requirements for the design and construction of a ground-based plant growth facility. In particular, science design criteria for the Plant Growth Module (PGM) of the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) were determined in the following areas: (1) irradiation parameters and associated equipment affecting plant growth; (2) air flow; (3) planting, culture, and harvest techniques; (4) carbon dioxide; (5) temperature and relative humidity; (6) oxygen; (7) construction materials and access; (8) volatile compounds; (9) bacteria, sterilization, and filtration; (10) nutrient application systems; (11) nutrient monitoring; and (12) nutrient pH and conductivity.

  20. Glial Control of Endocannabinoid Heterosynaptic Modulation in Hypothalamic Magnocellular Neuroendocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Ion R.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors are functionally operant at both glutamate and GABA synapses on hypothalamic magnocellular neuroendocrine cells; however, retrograde endocannabinoid actions are evoked at only glutamate synapses. We tested whether the functional targeting of evoked retrograde endocannabinoid actions to glutamate, and not GABA, synapses on magnocellular neurons is the result of the spatial restriction of extracellular endocannabinoids by astrocytes. Whole-cell GABA synaptic currents were recorded in magnocellular neurons in rat hypothalamic slices following manipulations to reduce glial buffering of extracellular signals. Depolarization- and glucocorticoid-evoked retrograde endocannabinoid suppression of synaptic GABA release was not detected under normal conditions, but occurred in both oxytocin and vasopressin neurons under conditions of attenuated glial coverage and depressed glial metabolic function, suggesting an emergent endocannabinoid modulation of GABA synapses with the loss of astrocyte function. Tonic endocannabinoid suppression of GABA release was insensitive to glial manipulation. Blocking cannabinoid transport mimicked, and increasing the extracellular viscosity reversed, the effect of suppressed glial buffering on the endocannabinoid modulation of GABA release. Evoked, but not tonic, endocannabinoid modulation of GABA synapses was mediated by 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Therefore, depolarization- and glucocorticoid-evoked 2-arachidonoylglycerol release from magnocellular neurons is spatially restricted to glutamate synapses by astrocytes, but spills over onto GABA synapses under conditions of reduced astrocyte buffering; tonic endocannabinoid modulation of GABA release, in contrast, is likely mediated by anandamide and is insensitive to astrocytic buffering. Astrocytes, therefore, provide dynamic control of stimulus-evoked 2-arachidonoylglycerol, but not tonic anandamide, regulation of GABA synaptic inputs to magnocellular neuroendocrine cells under

  1. Pulse width modulation-based temperature tracking for feedback control of a shape memory alloy actuator.

    PubMed

    Ayvali, Elif; Desai, Jaydev P

    2014-04-01

    This work presents a temperature-feedback approach to control the radius of curvature of an arc-shaped shape memory alloy (SMA) wire. The nonlinear properties of the SMA such as phase transformation and its dependence on temperature and stress make SMA actuators difficult to control. Tracking a desired trajectory is more challenging than controlling just the position of the SMA actuator since the desired path is continuously changing. Consequently, tracking the desired strain directly or tracking the parameters such as temperature and electrical resistance that are related to strain with a model is a challenging task. Temperature-feedback is an attractive approach when direct measurement of strain is not practical. Pulse width modulation (PWM) is an effective method for SMA actuation and it can be used along with a compensator to control the temperature of the SMA. Using the constitutive model of the SMA, the desired temperature profile can be obtained for a given strain trajectory. A PWM-based nonlinear PID controller with a feed-forward heat transfer model is proposed to use temperature-feedback for tracking a desired temperature trajectory. The proposed controller is used during the heating phase of the SMA actuator. The controller proves to be effective in tracking step-wise and continuous trajectories.

  2. Plug-in module acceleration feedback control for fast steering mirror-based beam stabilization systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chao; Ren, Wei; Mao, Yao; Ren, Ge

    2017-08-01

    A plug-in module acceleration feedback control (Plug-In AFC) strategy based on the disturbance observer (DOB) principle is proposed for charge-coupled device (CCD)-based fast steering mirror (FSM) stabilization systems. In classical FSM tracking systems, dual-loop control (DLC), including velocity feedback and position feedback, is usually utilized to enhance the closed-loop performance. Due to the mechanical resonance of the system and CCD time delay, the closed-loop bandwidth is severely restricted. To solve this problem, cascade acceleration feedback control (AFC), which is a kind of high-precision robust control method, is introduced to strengthen the disturbance rejection property. However, in practical applications, it is difficult to realize an integral algorithm in an acceleration controller to compensate for the quadratic differential contained in the FSM acceleration model, resulting in a challenging controller design and a limited improvement. To optimize the acceleration feedback framework in the FSM system, different from the cascade AFC, the accelerometers are used to construct DOB to compensate for the platform vibrations directly. The acceleration nested loop can be plugged into the velocity loop without changing the system stability, and the controller design is quite simple. A series of comparative experimental results demonstrate that the disturbance rejection property of the CCD-based FSM can be effectively improved by the proposed approach.

  3. Contamination control in hybrid microelectronic modules. Part 3: Specifications for coating material and process controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himmel, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    Resin systems for coating hybrids prior to hermetic sealing are described. The resin systems are a flexible silicone junction resin system and a flexible cycloaliphatic epoxy resin system. The coatings are intended for application to the hybrid after all the chips have been assembled and wire bonded, but prior to hermetic sealing of the package. The purpose of the coating is to control particulate contamination by immobilizing particles and by passivating the hybrid. Recommended process controls for the purpose of minimizing contamination in hybrid microcircuit packages are given. Emphasis is placed on those critical hybrid processing steps in which contamination is most likely to occur.

  4. An Active Heater Control Concept to Meet IXO Type Mirror Module Thermal-Structural Distortion Requirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Flight mirror assemblies (FMAs) of large telescopes, such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO), have very stringent thermal-structural distortion requirements. The spatial temperature gradient requirement within a FMA could be as small as 0.05 C. Con ventionally, heaters and thermistors are attached to the stray light baffle (SLB), and centralized heater controllers (i.e., heater controller boards located in a large electronics box) are used. Due to the large number of heater harnesses, accommodating and routing them is extremely difficult. The total harness length/mass is very large. This innovation uses a thermally conductive pre-collimator to accommodate heaters and a distributed heater controller approach. It minimizes the harness length and mass, and reduces the problem of routing and accommodating them. Heaters and thermistors are attached to a short (4.67 cm) aluminum portion of the pre-collimator, which is thermally coupled to the SLB. Heaters, which have a very small heater power density, and thermistors are attached to the exterior of all the mirror module walls. The major portion (23.4 cm) of the pre-collimator for the middle and outer modules is made of thin, non-conductive material. It minimizes the view factors from the FMA and heated portion of the precollimator to space. It also minimizes heat conduction from one end of the FMA to the other. Small and multi-channel heater controllers, which have adjustable set points and internal redundancy, are used. They are mounted to the mechanical support structure members adjacent to each module. The IXO FMA, which is 3.3 m in diameter, is an example of a large telescope. If the heater controller boards are centralized, routing and accommodating heater harnesses is extremely difficult. This innovation has the following advantages. It minimizes the length/mass of the heater harness between the heater controllers and heater circuits. It reduces the problem of routing and accommodating the harness on the

  5. Kinetic Control of Aqueous Hydrolysis: Modulating Structure/Property Relationships in Inorganic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, James R.

    2011-12-01

    A grand challenge in materials science and chemistry revolves around the preparation of materials with desired properties by controlling structure on multiple length scales. Biology approaches this challenge by evolving tactics to transform soluble precursors into materials and composites with macro-scale and atomic precision. Studies of biomineralization in siliceous sponges led to the discovery of slow, catalytic hydrolysis of molecular precursors in the biogenesis of silica skeletal elements with well defined micro- and nano-scale architectures. However, the role of aqueous hydrolysis in the limit of kinetic control is not well understood; this allows us to form a central hypothesis: that the kinetics of hydrolysis modulate the structures of materials and their properties. As a model system, the diffusion of a simple hydrolytic catalyst (such as ammonia) across an air-water interface into a metal salt solution reproduces some aspects of the chemistry found in biomineralization, namely kinetic and vectorial control. Variation of the catalyst concentration modulates the hydrolysis rate, and thus alters the resulting structure of the inorganic crystals. Using aqueous solutions of cobalt(II) chloride, each product (cobalt hydroxide chloride) forms with a unique composition, despite being prepared from identical mother liquors. Synchrotron X-ray total scattering methods are needed to locate the atomic positions in the material, which are not aptly described by a traditional crystallographic unit cell due to structural disorder. Detailed definition of the structure confirms that the hydrolysis conditions systematically modulate the arrangement of atoms in the lattice. This tightly coupled control of crystal formation and knowledge of local and average structures of these materials provides insight into the unusual magnetic properties of these cobalt hydroxides. The compounds studied show significant and open magnetization loops with little variation with composition

  6. Analysis and Control of Pulse-Width Modulated AC to DC Voltage Source Converters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rusong

    The pulse width modulated AC to DC voltage source converter is comprehensively analyzed in the thesis. A general mathematical model of the converter is first established, which is discontinuous, time-variant and non-linear. The following three techniques are used to obtain closed form solutions: Fourier analysis, transformation of reference frame and small signal linearization. Three models, namely, a steady-state DC model, a low frequency small signal AC model and a high frequency model, are consequently developed. Finally, three solution sets, namely, the steady-state solution, various dynamic transfer functions and the high frequency harmonic components, are obtained from the three models. Two control strategies, the Phase and Amplitude Control (PAC) and a new proposed strategy, Predicted Current Control with a Fixed Switching Frequency (PCFF), are investigated. Based on the transfer functions derived from the above mentioned analysis, regulators for a closed-loop control are designed. A prototype circuit is built to experimentally verify the theoretical predictions. The analysis and experimental results show that both strategies produce nearly sinusoidal line current with unity power factor on the utility side in both rectifying and regenerating operations and concurrently provide a regulated DC output voltage on the load side. However the proposed PCFF control has a faster and improved dynamic response over the PAC control. Moreover it is also easier to be implemented. Therefore, the PCFF control is preferable to the PAC control. As an example of application, a configuration of variable DC supply under PCFF control is proposed. The quasi-optimal dynamic response obtained shows that the PWM AC to DC converter lays the foundation for building a four-quadrant, fast-dynamic system, and the PCFF control is an effective strategy for improving dynamic performances not only as applied to the AC to DC converter, but also as applied to the DC to DC chopper or other

  7. Getting Down to Business: Pest Control Service, Module 28. Teacher Guide. Entrepreneurship Training Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colby, Pamela G.

    This is the twenty-eighth in a set of 36 teacher guides to the Entrepreneurship Training modules and accompanies CE 031 084. Following an overview are general notes on use of the module. Suggested steps for module use contain suggestions on introducing the module, a brief discussion of the nine units, responses to learning activities, suggestions…

  8. Magnetic force microscopy with frequency-modulated capacitive tip-sample distance control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Schwenk, J.; Mandru, A. O.; Penedo, M.; Baćani, M.; Marioni, M. A.; Hug, H. J.

    2018-01-01

    In a step towards routinely achieving 10 nm spatial resolution with magnetic force microscopy, we have developed a robust method for active tip-sample distance control based on frequency modulation of the cantilever oscillation. It allows us to keep a well-defined tip-sample distance of the order of 10 nm within better than +/- 0.4 nm precision throughout the measurement even in the presence of energy dissipative processes, and is adequate for single-passage non-contact operation in vacuum. The cantilever is excited mechanically in a phase-locked loop to oscillate at constant amplitude on its first flexural resonance mode. This frequency is modulated by an electrostatic force gradient generated by tip-sample bias oscillating from a few hundred Hz up to a few kHz. The sum of the side bands’ amplitudes is a proxy for the tip-sample distance and can be used for tip-sample distance control. This method can also be extended to other scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  9. A novel solubility-modulated granules through porosity osmotic pump for controlled carvedilol delivery.

    PubMed

    Song, Qun-Li; Li, Ping; Li, Yu-Min

    2012-01-01

    A method for the preparation of porosity osmotic pump granules was obtained by modulating carvedilol solubility with tartaric acid. Controlled porosity of the membrane was accomplished by the use of pore-forming agent in the coating. In this study, carvedilol was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop a zero-order release system; tartaric acid was used as the solubility promoter; NaCl was used as the osmotic agent; cellulose acetate (CA) was used as the materials of semipermeable membrane; and PEG-400 was used as the pore-forming agent in the semipermeable membrane. The influence of different factors or levels on the in vitro release was studied. In order to simulate the gastrointestinal tract environments, two kinds of pH media (pH 1.5 and 6.8) on drug release were studied in this research, respectively. This porosity osmotic pump was optimized by single factor design experiments, and it was found to deliver carvedilol at a zero-order rate within 12 h and controlled release for 24 h. We drew a conclusion that the solubility-modulated porosity osmotic pump system is simple to prepare and might be used for the preparation of osmotic pump system of other poorly water-soluble drugs with alkaline or acid groups.

  10. Factors modulating expression of Renilla luciferase from control plasmids used in luciferase reporter gene assays1

    PubMed Central

    Shifera, Amde Selassie; Hardin, John A.

    2009-01-01

    The Renilla luciferase gene is commonly used as an internal control in luciferase-based reporter gene assays to normalize the values of the experimental reporter gene for variations that could be caused by transfection efficiency and sample handling. Various plasmids encoding Renilla luciferase under different promoter constructs are commercially available. The validity of the use of Renilla luciferase as an internal control is based on the assumption that it is constitutively expressed in transfected cells and that its constitutive expression is not modulated by experimental factors that could result in either the upregulation or the downregulation of the amounts of the enzyme produced. During the past ten years, a number of reports have appeared that identified a variety of conditions that could alter the basal constitutive expression of Renilla luciferase. The use of Renilla luciferase in those circumstances would not be valid and an alternative way of normalization would be necessary. This review covers the factors that have been reported thus far as modulating the expression of Renilla luciferase from plasmid constructs. PMID:19788887

  11. Controlling Fringe Sensitivity of Electro-Optic Holography Systems Using Laser Diode Current Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bybee, Shannon J.

    2001-01-01

    Electro-Optic Holography (EOH) is a non-intrusive, laser-based, displacement measurement technique capable of static and dynamic displacement measurements. EOH is an optical interference technique in which fringe patterns that represent displacement contour maps are generated. At excessively large displacements the fringe density may be so great that individual fringes are not resolvable using typical EOH techniques. This thesis focuses on the development and implementation of a method for controlling the sensitivity of the EOH system. This method is known as Frequency Translated Electro-Optic Holography (FTEOH). It was determined that by modulating the current source of the laser diode at integer multiples of the object vibration, the fringe pattern is governed by higher order Bessel function of the first kind and the number of fringes that represent a given displacement can be controlled. The reduction of fringes is theoretically unlimited but physically limited by the frequency bandwidth of the signal generator, providing modulation to the laser diode. Although this research technique has been verified theoretically and experimentally in this thesis, due to the current laser diode capabilities it is a tedious and time consuming process to acquire data using the FTEOH technique.

  12. Concurrent information affects response inhibition processes via the modulation of theta oscillations in cognitive control networks.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Witold X; Mückschel, Moritz; Dippel, Gabriel; Beste, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Inhibiting responses is a challenge, where the outcome (partly) depends on the situational context. In everyday situations, response inhibition performance might be altered when irrelevant input is presented simultaneously with the information relevant for response inhibition. More specifically, irrelevant concurrent information may either brace or interfere with response-relevant information, depending on whether these inputs are redundant or conflicting. The aim of this study is to investigate neurophysiological mechanisms and the network underlying such modulations using EEG beamforming as method. The results show that in comparison to a baseline condition without concurrent information, response inhibition performance can be aggravated or facilitated by manipulating the extent of conflict via concurrent input. This depends on whether the requirement for cognitive control is high, as in conflicting trials, or whether it is low, as in redundant trials. In line with this, the total theta frequency power decreases in a right hemispheric orbitofrontal response inhibition network including the SFG, MFG, and SMA, when concurrent redundant information facilitates response inhibition processes. Vice versa, theta activity in a left-hemispheric response inhibition network (i.e., SFG, MFG, and IFG) increases, when conflicting concurrent information compromises response inhibition processes. We conclude that concurrent information bi-directionally shifts response inhibition performance and modulates the network architecture underlying theta oscillations which are signaling different levels of the need for cognitive control.

  13. Neural control and modulation of swimming speed in the larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Marques, João C.; O'Malley, Donald M.; Orger, Michael B.; Engert, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vertebrate locomotion at different speeds is driven by descending excitatory connections to central pattern generators in the spinal cord. To investigate how these inputs determine locomotor kinematics, we used whole-field visual motion to drive zebrafish to swim at different speeds. Larvae match the stimulus speed by utilizing more locomotor events, or modifying kinematic parameters such as the duration and speed of swimming bouts, the tail-beat frequency, and choice of gait. We used laser ablations, electrical stimulation, and activity recordings in descending neurons of the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (nMLF) to dissect their contribution to controlling forward movement. We found that the activity of single identified neurons within the nMLF is correlated with locomotor kinematics, and modulates both the duration and oscillation frequency of tail movements. By identifying the contribution of individual supraspinal circuit elements to locomotion kinematics we build a better understanding of how the brain controls movement. PMID:25066084

  14. Design of multi-modal obstruction to control tonal fan noise using modulation principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Anthony; Moreau, Stéphane; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2015-11-01

    The approach presented in this paper uses a combination of obstructions in the upstream flow of subsonic axial fans with B blades to destructively interfere with the primary tonal noise at the blade passage frequency. The first step of the proposed experimental method consists in identifying the independent radiation of B - 1 and B lobed obstructions at the control microphones. During this identification step, rotating obstructions allow for the frequencies of primary and secondary tonal noise to be slightly shifted in the spectrum due to modulation principles. The magnitude of the secondary tonal noise generated by each obstruction can be adjusted by varying the size of the lobes of the obstruction, and the phase of the secondary tonal noise is related to the angular position of the obstruction. The control obstructions are then optimized by combining the B - 1 and B lobed obstructions to significantly reduce the acoustic power at blade passage frequency.

  15. A novel oscillation control for MEMS vibratory gyroscopes using a modified electromechanical amplitude modulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wei; Lin, Yiyu; Liu, Siqi; Zheng, Xudong; Jin, Zhonghe

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports a novel oscillation control algorithm for MEMS vibratory gyroscopes using a modified electromechanical amplitude modulation (MEAM) technique, which enhances the robustness against the frequency variation of the driving mode, compared to the conventional EAM (CEAM) scheme. In this approach, the carrier voltage exerted on the proof mass is frequency-modulated by the drive resonant frequency. Accordingly, the pick-up signal from the interface circuit involves a constant-frequency component that contains the amplitude and phase information of the vibration displacement. In other words, this informational detection signal is independent of the mechanical resonant frequency, which varies due to different batches, imprecise micro-fabrication and changing environmental temperature. In this paper, the automatic gain control loop together with the phase-locked loop are simultaneously analyzed using the averaging method and Routh-Hurwitz criterion, deriving the stability condition and the parameter optimization rules of the transient response. Then, a simulation model based on the real system is set up to evaluate the control algorithm. Further, the proposed MEAM method is tested using a field-programmable-gate-array based digital platform on a capacitive vibratory gyroscope. By optimizing the control parameters, the transient response of the drive amplitude reveals a settling time of 45.2 ms without overshoot, according well with the theoretical prediction and simulation results. The first measurement results show that the amplitude variance of the drive displacement is 12 ppm in an hour while the phase standard deviation is as low as 0.0004°. The mode-split gyroscope operating under atmospheric pressure demonstrates an outstanding performance. By virtue of the proposed MEAM method, the bias instability and angle random walk are measured to be 0.9° h-1 (improved by 2.4 times compared to the CEAM method) and 0.068° (√h)-1 (improved by 1.4 times

  16. Cerebral blood flow modulations during cognitive control in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Alexandra; Montoro, Casandra I; Reyes Del Paso, Gustavo A; Duschek, Stefan

    2018-09-01

    This study investigated cerebral blood flow modulations during proactive and reactive cognitive control in major depressive disorder (MDD). Proactive control refers to preparatory processes during anticipation of a behaviorally relevant event; reactive control is activated after such an event to ensure goal attainment. Using functional transcranial Doppler sonography, blood flow velocities in the middle cerebral arteries of both hemispheres were recorded in 40 MDD patients and 40 healthy controls during a precued Stroop task. The font color of color words, which appeared 5 s after an acoustic warning signal, had to be indicated while ignoring word meaning. Patients, as compared to controls, exhibited smaller bilateral blood flow increases during task preparation and larger increases after color word presentation. Response time was longer in patients irrespective of the match or mismatch between font color and word meaning. The blood flow increase after word presentation correlated positively with response time. Potential effects of psychotropic medication on cognition and cerebral blood flow could not be controlled. The study revealed evidence of reduced cortical activity during proactive and elevated activity that occurs during reactive control in MDD. Deficient implementation of proactive control in MDD may lead to increased reliance on reactive control. The association between the blood flow increase after color word presentation and poorer performance indicates that deficient response preparation cannot be compensated for by reactive strategies. The findings are clinically relevant, as they may contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms relevant to cognitive impairments in MDD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. State dependent model predictive control for orbital rendezvous using pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhu, Zheng H.; Meguid, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation based trajectory planning for orbital rendezvous and proximity maneuvering near a non-cooperative spacecraft in an elliptical orbit. The problem is formulated by converting the continuous control input, output from the state dependent model predictive control, into a sequence of pulses of constant magnitude by controlling firing frequency and duration of constant-magnitude thrusters. The state dependent model predictive control is derived by minimizing the control error of states and control roughness of control input for a safe, smooth and fuel efficient approaching trajectory. The resulting nonlinear programming problem is converted into a series of quadratic programming problem and solved by numerical iteration using the receding horizon strategy. The numerical results show that the proposed state dependent model predictive control with the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation is able to effectively generate optimized trajectories using equivalent control pulses for the proximity maneuvering with less energy consumption.

  18. Reward-Modulated Hebbian Plasticity as Leverage for Partially Embodied Control in Compliant Robotics

    PubMed Central

    Burms, Jeroen; Caluwaerts, Ken; Dambre, Joni

    2015-01-01

    In embodied computation (or morphological computation), part of the complexity of motor control is offloaded to the body dynamics. We demonstrate that a simple Hebbian-like learning rule can be used to train systems with (partial) embodiment, and can be extended outside of the scope of traditional neural networks. To this end, we apply the learning rule to optimize the connection weights of recurrent neural networks with different topologies and for various tasks. We then apply this learning rule to a simulated compliant tensegrity robot by optimizing static feedback controllers that directly exploit the dynamics of the robot body. This leads to partially embodied controllers, i.e., hybrid controllers that naturally integrate the computations that are performed by the robot body into a neural network architecture. Our results demonstrate the universal applicability of reward-modulated Hebbian learning. Furthermore, they demonstrate the robustness of systems trained with the learning rule. This study strengthens our belief that compliant robots should or can be seen as computational units, instead of dumb hardware that needs a complex controller. This link between compliant robotics and neural networks is also the main reason for our search for simple universal learning rules for both neural networks and robotics. PMID:26347645

  19. Designing Diameter-Modulated Heterostructure Nanowires of PbTe/Te by Controlled Dewetting.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abinash; Kundu, Subhajit; Samantaray, Debadarshini; Kundu, Paromita; Zanaga, Daniele; Bals, Sara; Ravishankar, N

    2017-12-13

    Heterostructures consisting of semiconductors with controlled morphology and interfaces find applications in many fields. A range of axial, radial, and diameter-modulated nanostructures have been synthesized primarily using vapor phase methods. Here, we present a simple wet chemical routine to synthesize heterostructures of PbTe/Te using Te nanowires as templates. A morphology evolution study for the formation of these heterostructures has been performed. On the basis of these control experiments, a pathway for the formation of these nanostructures is proposed. Reduction of a Pb precursor to Pb on Te nanowire templates followed by interdiffusion of Pb/Te leads to the formation of a thin shell of PbTe on the Te wires. Controlled dewetting of the thin shell leads to the formation of cube-shaped PbTe that is periodically arranged on the Te wires. Using control experiments, we show that different reactions parameters like rate of addition of the reducing agent, concentration of Pb precursor and thickness of initial Te nanowire play a critical role in controlling the spacing between the PbTe cubes on the Te wires. Using simple surface energy arguments, we propose a mechanism for the formation of the hybrid. The principles presented are general and can be exploited for the synthesis of other nanoscale heterostructures.

  20. Flyback CCM inverter for AC module applications: iterative learning control and convergence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Ho; Kim, Minsung

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents an iterative learning controller (ILC) for an interleaved flyback inverter operating in continuous conduction mode (CCM). The flyback CCM inverter features small output ripple current, high efficiency, and low cost, and hence it is well suited for photovoltaic power applications. However, it exhibits the non-minimum phase behaviour, because its transfer function from control duty to output current has the right-half-plane (RHP) zero. Moreover, the flyback CCM inverter suffers from the time-varying grid voltage disturbance. Thus, conventional control scheme results in inaccurate output tracking. To overcome these problems, the ILC is first developed and applied to the flyback inverter operating in CCM. The ILC makes use of both predictive and current learning terms which help the system output to converge to the reference trajectory. We take into account the nonlinear averaged model and use it to construct the proposed controller. It is proven that the system output globally converges to the reference trajectory in the absence of state disturbances, output noises, or initial state errors. Numerical simulations are performed to validate the proposed control scheme, and experiments using 400-W AC module prototype are carried out to demonstrate its practical feasibility.

  1. Permanent magnet DC motor control by using arduino and motor drive module BTS7960

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syukriyadin, S.; Syahrizal, S.; Mansur, G.; Ramadhan, H. P.

    2018-05-01

    This study proposes a control system for permanent magnet DC (PMDC) motor. PMDC drive control system has two critical parameters: control and monitoring. Control system includes rotation speed control and direction of rotation of motor using motor drive module BTS7960. The PWM signal has a fixed frequency of waves with varying duty cycles (between 0% and 100%), so the motor rotation can be regulated gradually using a potentiometer already programmed on the Arduino Uno board. The motor rotation direction setting uses the H-bridge circuit method using a 3-way switch to set the direction of forward-reverse rotation of the motor. The monitoring system includes measurements of rotational speed, current, and voltage. Motor rotation speed can be adjusted from the armature voltage settings through the duty cycle PWM setting so that the motor speed can be increased or decreased by the desired duty cycle. From the unload PMDC motor test results it has also been shown that the torque of the motor is relatively constant when there is a change in speed from low rpm to high rpm or vice versa.

  2. High-frequency autonomic modulation: a new model for analysis of autonomic cardiac control.

    PubMed

    Champéroux, Pascal; Fesler, Pierre; Judé, Sebastien; Richard, Serge; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves; Thireau, Jérôme

    2018-05-03

    Increase in high-frequency beat-to-beat heart rate oscillations by torsadogenic hERG blockers appears to be associated with signs of parasympathetic and sympathetic co-activation which cannot be assessed directly using classic methods of heart rate variability analysis. The present work aimed to find a translational model that would allow this particular state of the autonomic control of heart rate to be assessed. High-frequency heart rate and heart period oscillations were analysed within discrete 10 s intervals in a cohort of 200 healthy human subjects. Results were compared to data collected in non-human primates and beagle dogs during pharmacological challenges and torsadogenic hERG blockers exposure, in 127 genotyped LQT1 patients on/off β-blocker treatment and in subgroups of smoking and non-smoking subjects. Three states of autonomic modulation, S1 (parasympathetic predominance) to S3 (reciprocal parasympathetic withdrawal/sympathetic activation), were differentiated to build a new model of heart rate variability referred to as high-frequency autonomic modulation. The S2 state corresponded to a specific state during which both parasympathetic and sympathetic systems were coexisting or co-activated. S2 oscillations were proportionally increased by torsadogenic hERG-blocking drugs, whereas smoking caused an increase in S3 oscillations. The combined analysis of the magnitude of high-frequency heart rate and high-frequency heart period oscillations allows a refined assessment of heart rate autonomic modulation applicable to long-term ECG recordings and offers new approaches to assessment of the risk of sudden death both in terms of underlying mechanisms and sensitivity. © 2018 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Pharmacological Society.

  3. Inferior Frontal Cortex Modulation with an Acute Dose of Heroin During Cognitive Control

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, André; Walter, Marc; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Smieskova, Renata; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Lang, Undine E; Rubia, Katya; McGuire, Philip; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Impairments in inhibitory control and in stimulus-driven attention are hallmarks of drug addiction and are associated with decreased activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Although previous studies indicate that the response inhibition function is impaired in abstinent heroin dependents, and that this is mediated by reduced IFG activity, it remains completely unknown whether and how an acute dose of heroin modulates IFG activity during cognitive control in heroin-dependent patients. This study investigates the acute effects of heroin administration on IFG activity during response inhibition and stimulus-driven attention in heroin-dependent patients. Using a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, saline and heroin were administered to 26 heroin-dependent patients from stable heroin-assisted treatment, while performing a Go/No–Go event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging task to assess right IFG activity during motor response inhibition, as well as during oddball-driven attention allocation. Relative to saline, heroin significantly reduced right IFG activity during both successful response inhibition and oddball-driven attention allocation, whereas it did not change right IFG activity during response inhibition after correction for the effect of attention allocation. These heroin-induced effects were not related to changes in drug craving, state anxiety, behavioral performance, or co-consumption of psychostimulant drugs. This study demonstrates that heroin administration acutely impairs stimulus-driven attention allocation, as indicated by reduced IFG activity in response to infrequently presented stimuli, and does not specifically modulate IFG activity during response inhibition. PMID:23673865

  4. Serotonin receptor 1A–modulated phosphorylation of glycine receptor α3 controls breathing in mice

    PubMed Central

    Manzke, Till; Niebert, Marcus; Koch, Uwe R.; Caley, Alex; Vogelgesang, Steffen; Hülsmann, Swen; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Müller, Ulrike; Smart, Trevor G.; Harvey, Robert J.; Richter, Diethelm W.

    2010-01-01

    Rhythmic breathing movements originate from a dispersed neuronal network in the medulla and pons. Here, we demonstrate that rhythmic activity of this respiratory network is affected by the phosphorylation status of the inhibitory glycine receptor α3 subtype (GlyRα3), which controls glutamatergic and glycinergic neuronal discharges, subject to serotonergic modulation. Serotonin receptor type 1A–specific (5-HTR1A–specific) modulation directly induced dephosphorylation of GlyRα3 receptors, which augmented inhibitory glycine-activated chloride currents in HEK293 cells coexpressing 5-HTR1A and GlyRα3. The 5-HTR1A–GlyRα3 signaling pathway was distinct from opioid receptor signaling and efficiently counteracted opioid-induced depression of breathing and consequential apnea in mice. Paradoxically, this rescue of breathing originated from enhanced glycinergic synaptic inhibition of glutamatergic and glycinergic neurons and caused disinhibition of their target neurons. Together, these effects changed respiratory phase alternations and ensured rhythmic breathing in vivo. GlyRα3-deficient mice had an irregular respiratory rhythm under baseline conditions, and systemic 5-HTR1A activation failed to remedy opioid-induced respiratory depression in these mice. Delineation of this 5-HTR1A–GlyRα3 signaling pathway offers a mechanistic basis for pharmacological treatment of opioid-induced apnea and other breathing disturbances caused by disorders of inhibitory synaptic transmission, such as hyperekplexia, hypoxia/ischemia, and brainstem infarction. PMID:20978350

  5. Ghrelin potentiates cardiac reactivity to stress by modulating sympathetic control and beta-adrenergic response.

    PubMed

    Camargo-Silva, Gabriel; Turones, Larissa Córdova; da Cruz, Kellen Rosa; Gomes, Karina Pereira; Mendonça, Michelle Mendanha; Nunes, Allancer; de Jesus, Itamar Guedes; Colugnati, Diego Basile; Pansani, Aline Priscila; Pobbe, Roger Luis Henschel; Santos, Robson; Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky; Guatimosim, Silvia; de Castro, Carlos Henrique; Ianzer, Danielle; Ferreira, Reginaldo Nassar; Xavier, Carlos Henrique

    2018-03-01

    Prior evidence indicates that ghrelin is involved in the integration of cardiovascular functions and behavioral responses. Ghrelin actions are mediated by the growth hormone secretagogue receptor subtype 1a (GHS-R1a), which is expressed in peripheral tissues and central areas involved in the control of cardiovascular responses to stress. In the present study, we assessed the role of ghrelin - GHS-R1a axis in the cardiovascular reactivity to acute emotional stress in rats. Ghrelin potentiated the tachycardia evoked by restraint and air jet stresses, which was reverted by GHS-R1a blockade. Evaluation of the autonomic balance revealed that the sympathetic branch modulates the ghrelin-evoked positive chronotropy. In isolated hearts, the perfusion with ghrelin potentiated the contractile responses caused by stimulation of the beta-adrenergic receptor, without altering the amplitude of the responses evoked by acetylcholine. Experiments in isolated cardiomyocytes revealed that ghrelin amplified the increases in calcium transient changes evoked by isoproterenol. Taken together, our results indicate that the Ghrelin-GHS-R1a axis potentiates the magnitude of stress-evoked tachycardia by modulating the autonomic nervous system and peripheral mechanisms, strongly relying on the activation of cardiac calcium transient and beta-adrenergic receptors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Antioxidant and signal modulation properties of plant polyphenols in controlling vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kostyuk, Vladimir A; Potapovich, Alla I; Suhan, Tatyana O; de Luca, Chiara; Korkina, Liudmila G

    2011-05-11

    Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) play a critical role in the initiation of atherosclerosis through activation of inflammatory signaling. In the present work we investigated the role of antioxidant and signal modulation properties of plant polyphenols in controlling vascular inflammation. Significant decrease in intracellular NO level and superoxide overproduction was found in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) treated with oxLDL, but not with LDL. The redox imbalance was prevented by the addition of quercetin or resveratrol. Expression analysis of 14 genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammation revealed oxLDL-mediated up-regulation of genes specifically involved in leukocyte recruitment and adhesion. This up-regulation could be partially avoided by the addition of verbascoside or resveratrol, while treatment with quercetin resulted in a further increase in the expression of these genes. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated HUVEC were also used for the evaluation of anti-inflammatory potency of plant polyphenols. Significant differences between HUVEC treaded with oxLDL and LPS were found in both the expression pattern of inflammation-related genes and the effects of plant polyphenols on cellular responses. The present data indicate that plant polyphenols may affect vascular inflammation not only as antioxidants but also as modulators of inflammatory redox signaling pathways. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The tongue and its control by sleep state-dependent modulators.

    PubMed

    Horner, R L

    2011-12-01

    The neural networks controlling vital functions such as breathing are embedded in the brain, the neural and chemical environment of which changes with state, i.e., wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and REM sleep, and with commonly administered drugs such as anaesthetics, sedatives and ethanol. One particular output from the state-dependent chemical brain is the focus of attention in this paper; the motor output to the muscles of the tongue, specifically the actions of state-dependent modulators acting at the hypoglossal motor pool. Determining the mechanisms underlying the modulation of the hypoglossal motor output during sleep is relevant to understanding the spectrum of increased upper airway resistance, airflow limitation, hypoventilation and airway obstructions that occur during natural and drug-influenced sleep in humans. Understanding the mechanisms underlying upper airway dysfunction in sleep-disordered breathing is also important given the large and growing prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome which constitutes a major public health problem with serious clinical, social and economic consequences.

  8. Global Model of Time-Modulated Electronegative Discharges for Neutral Radical and Electron Temperature Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungjin; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.

    2003-10-01

    Control and reduction of neutral radical flux/ion flux ratio and electron temperature Te is required for next generation etching in the microelectronics industry. We investigate time-modulated power for these purposes using a volume-averaged (global) oxygen discharge model, We consider pressures of 10-50 mTorr and plasma densities of 10^10-10^11 cm-3. In this regime, the discharge is found to be weakly electronegative. The modulation period and the duty ratio (on-time/period) are varied to determine the optimum conditions for reduction of FR= O-atom flux/ion flux and T_e. Two chambers with different height/diameter ratios (<< 1, and unity) are examined to determine the influence of the surface-area/volume ratio. At a fixed duty ratio, both FR and Te are found to have minimum values as the pulse period is varied, with the minimum value decreasing as the duty ratio decreases. Significant reductions in FR and Te are found. Support provided by Lam Research, NSF Grant ECS-0139956, California industries, and UC-SMART Contract SM99-10051.

  9. Stroop proactive control and task conflict are modulated by concurrent working memory load.

    PubMed

    Kalanthroff, Eyal; Avnit, Amir; Henik, Avishai; Davelaar, Eddy J; Usher, Marius

    2015-06-01

    Performance on the Stroop task reflects two types of conflict-informational (between the incongruent word and font color) and task (between the contextually relevant color-naming task and the irrelevant, but automatic, word-reading task). According to the dual mechanisms of control theory (DMC; Braver, 2012), variability in Stroop performance can result from variability in the deployment of a proactive task-demand control mechanism. Previous research has shown that when proactive control (PC) is diminished, both increased Stroop interference and a reversed Stroop facilitation (RF) are observed. Although the current DMC model accounts for the former effect, it does not predict the observed RF, which is considered to be behavioral evidence for task conflict in the Stroop task. Here we expanded the DMC model to account for Stroop RF. Assuming that a concurrent working memory (WM) task reduces PC, we predicted both increased interference and an RF. Nineteen participants performed a standard Stroop task combined with a concurrent n-back task, which was aimed at reducing available WM resources, and thus overloading PC. Although the results indicated common Stroop interference and facilitation in the low-load condition (zero-back), in the high-load condition (two-back), both increased Stroop interference and RF were observed, consistent with the model's prediction. These findings indicate that PC is modulated by concurrent WM load and serves as a common control mechanism for both informational and task Stroop conflicts.

  10. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) polymorphisms modulate working memory in individuals with schizophrenia and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaka, Camila T; Christofolini, Denise; Ota, Vanessa K; Gadelha, Ary; Berberian, Arthur A; Noto, Cristiano; Mazzotti, Diego R; Spindola, Leticia M; Moretti, Patricia N; Smith, Marilia A C; Melaragno, Maria I; Belangero, Sintia I; Bressan, Rodrigo A

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a core feature of schizophrenia, related to dopaminergic dysfunction in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). It is hypothesized that functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4680 of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene could mediate the relationship between cognition and dopamine activity in the PFC. Other COMT SNPs could also play a role. We evaluated the role of three COMT SNPs (rs737865, rs165599, and rs4680) in schizophrenia and their impact on three working memory tasks. For genetic association analyses, 212 individuals with schizophrenia and 257 healthy controls (HCs) were selected. The Visual Working Memory (VWM) Task, Keep Track Task, and Letter Memory Task were administered to 133 schizophrenics and 93 HCs. We found a significant association of rs737865, with the GG genotype exerting a protective effect and the GA haplotype (rs4680/rs165599) exerting a risk effect for schizophrenia. COMT rs4680 AA carriers and rs737865 AA carriers scored lowest on the Keep Track Task. When the genotype*group interaction effect was evaluated, rs165599 exerted opposite effects for VWM and Keep Track task performance in patients and controls, with AA carriers scoring lowest on both tests among controls, but highest among patients. These data support the hypothesis that COMT polymorphisms may be associated with schizophrenia and modulate cognition in patients and controls.

  11. Alcohol effects on performance monitoring and adjustment: affect modulation and impairment of evaluative cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Bartholow, Bruce D; Henry, Erika A; Lust, Sarah A; Saults, J Scott; Wood, Phillip K

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol is known to impair self-regulatory control of behavior, though mechanisms for this effect remain unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that alcohol's reduction of negative affect (NA) is a key mechanism for such impairment. This hypothesis was tested by measuring the amplitude of the error-related negativity (ERN), a component of the event-related brain potential (ERP) posited to reflect the extent to which behavioral control failures are experienced as distressing, while participants completed a laboratory task requiring self-regulatory control. Alcohol reduced both the ERN and error positivity (Pe) components of the ERP following errors and impaired typical posterror behavioral adjustment. Structural equation modeling indicated that effects of alcohol on both the ERN and posterror adjustment were significantly mediated by reductions in NA. Effects of alcohol on Pe amplitude were unrelated to posterror adjustment, however. These findings indicate a role for affect modulation in understanding alcohol's effects on self-regulatory impairment and more generally support theories linking the ERN with a distress-related response to control failures. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Interface Control Document for the EMPACT Module that Estimates Electric Power Transmission System Response to EMP-Caused Damage

    SciT

    Werley, Kenneth Alan; Mccown, Andrew William

    The EPREP code is designed to evaluate the effects of an Electro-Magnetic Pulse (EMP) on the electric power transmission system. The EPREP code embodies an umbrella framework that allows a user to set up analysis conditions and to examine analysis results. The code links to three major physics/engineering modules. The first module describes the EM wave in space and time. The second module evaluates the damage caused by the wave on specific electric power (EP) transmission system components. The third module evaluates the consequence of the damaged network on its (reduced) ability to provide electric power to meet demand. Thismore » third module is the focus of the present paper. The EMPACT code serves as the third module. The EMPACT name denotes EMP effects on Alternating Current Transmission systems. The EMPACT algorithms compute electric power transmission network flow solutions under severely damaged network conditions. Initial solutions are often characterized by unacceptible network conditions including line overloads and bad voltages. The EMPACT code contains algorithms to adjust optimally network parameters to eliminate network problems while minimizing outages. System adjustments include automatically adjusting control equipment (generator V control, variable transformers, and variable shunts), as well as non-automatic control of generator power settings and minimal load shedding. The goal is to evaluate the minimal loss of customer load under equilibrium (steady-state) conditions during peak demand.« less

  13. The NCS code of practice for the quality assurance and control for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mans, Anton; Schuring, Danny; Arends, Mark P.; Vugts, Cornelia A. J. M.; Wolthaus, Jochem W. H.; Lotz, Heidi T.; Admiraal, Marjan; Louwe, Rob J. W.; Öllers, Michel C.; van de Kamer, Jeroen B.

    2016-10-01

    In 2010, the NCS (Netherlands Commission on Radiation Dosimetry) installed a subcommittee to develop guidelines for quality assurance and control for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments. The report (published in 2015) has been written by Dutch medical physicists and has therefore, inevitably, a Dutch focus. This paper is a condensed version of these guidelines, the full report in English is freely available from the NCS website www.radiationdosimetry.org. After describing the transition from IMRT to VMAT, the paper addresses machine quality assurance (QA) and treatment planning system (TPS) commissioning for VMAT. The final section discusses patient specific QA issues such as the use of class solutions, measurement devices and dose evaluation methods.

  14. Presynaptic ionotropic receptors controlling and modulating the rules for spike timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Verhoog, Matthijs B; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2011-01-01

    Throughout life, activity-dependent changes in neuronal connection strength enable the brain to refine neural circuits and learn based on experience. In line with predictions made by Hebb, synapse strength can be modified depending on the millisecond timing of action potential firing (STDP). The sign of synaptic plasticity depends on the spike order of presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons. Ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors, such as NMDA receptors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, are intimately involved in setting the rules for synaptic strengthening and weakening. In addition, timing rules for STDP within synapses are not fixed. They can be altered by activation of ionotropic receptors located at, or close to, synapses. Here, we will highlight studies that uncovered how network actions control and modulate timing rules for STDP by activating presynaptic ionotropic receptors. Furthermore, we will discuss how interaction between different types of ionotropic receptors may create "timing" windows during which particular timing rules lead to synaptic changes.

  15. Quasi-periodic dynamics in system with multilevel pulse modulated control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gol'tsov, Yu A.; Kizhuk, A. S.; Rubanov, V. G.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the authors describe the transitions from the regular periodic mode to quasiperiodicity that can be observed in a multilevel pulse-width modulated control system for a high-power heating unit. The behavior of such system can be described by a set of two coupled non-autonomous differential equations with discontinuous right-hand sides. The authors reduce the investigation of this system to the studying of a two-dimensional piecewise-smooth map. The authors demonstrate how a closed invariant curve associated with quasiperiodic dynamics can arise from a stable periodic motion through a border-collision bifurcation. The paper also considers a variety of interesting nonlinear phenomena, including phase-locking modes, the coexistence of several stable closed invariant curves, embedded one into the other and with their basins of attraction separated by intervening repelling closed curves.

  16. Investigation of laser dynamics, modulation and control by means of intra-cavity time varying perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.

    1974-01-01

    Projects aimed at the generation of tunable visible, infrared, and ultraviolet light, and on the control of this light by means of novel mode-locking and modulation techniques are discussed. During this period the following projects have been active: (1) studies of transient mode-locking of the Nd:YAG laser and the application of short optical pulses; (2) experimental investigations of the Na-Xe excimer laser system; (3) further development of techniques for vacuum ultraviolet holography; and (4) theoretical and initial experimental studies of a new device which should prove very useful for both infrared up-conversion and generation of tunable UV radiation - a two-photon resonantly pumped frequency converter.

  17. Cell intrinsic modulation of Wnt signaling controls neuroblast migration in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Mentink, Remco A; Middelkoop, Teije C; Rella, Lorenzo; Ji, Ni; Tang, Chung Yin; Betist, Marco C; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Korswagen, Hendrik C

    2014-10-27

    Members of the Wnt family of secreted signaling proteins are key regulators of cell migration and axon guidance. In the nematode C. elegans, the migration of the QR neuroblast descendants requires multiple Wnt ligands and receptors. We found that the migration of the QR descendants is divided into three sequential phases that are each mediated by a distinct Wnt signaling mechanism. Importantly, the transition from the first to the second phase, which is the main determinant of the final position of the QR descendants along the anteroposterior body axis, is mediated through a cell-autonomous process in which the time-dependent expression of a Wnt receptor turns on the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling response that is required to terminate long-range anterior migration. Our results show that, in addition to direct guidance of cell migration by Wnt morphogenic gradients, cell migration can also be controlled indirectly through cell-intrinsic modulation of Wnt signaling responses.

  18. Presynaptic Ionotropic Receptors Controlling and Modulating the Rules for Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Verhoog, Matthijs B.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout life, activity-dependent changes in neuronal connection strength enable the brain to refine neural circuits and learn based on experience. In line with predictions made by Hebb, synapse strength can be modified depending on the millisecond timing of action potential firing (STDP). The sign of synaptic plasticity depends on the spike order of presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons. Ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors, such as NMDA receptors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, are intimately involved in setting the rules for synaptic strengthening and weakening. In addition, timing rules for STDP within synapses are not fixed. They can be altered by activation of ionotropic receptors located at, or close to, synapses. Here, we will highlight studies that uncovered how network actions control and modulate timing rules for STDP by activating presynaptic ionotropic receptors. Furthermore, we will discuss how interaction between different types of ionotropic receptors may create “timing” windows during which particular timing rules lead to synaptic changes. PMID:21941664

  19. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-6, Process Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This sixth in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection describes procedures review, process monitoring, and weld defect analysis. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject matter, (6)…

  20. Direct modulation of T-box riboswitch-controlled transcription by protein synthesis inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Stamatopoulou, Vassiliki; Apostolidi, Maria; Li, Shuang; Lamprinou, Katerina; Papakyriakou, Athanasios

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Recently, it was discovered that exposure to mainstream antibiotics activate numerous bacterial riboregulators that control antibiotic resistance genes including metabolite-binding riboswitches and other transcription attenuators. However, the effects of commonly used antibiotics, many of which exhibit RNA-binding properties, on the widespread T-box riboswitches, remain unknown. In Staphylococcus aureus, a species-specific glyS T-box controls the supply of glycine for both ribosomal translation and cell wall synthesis, making it a promising target for next-generation antimicrobials. Here, we report that specific protein synthesis inhibitors could either significantly increase T-box-mediated transcription antitermination, while other compounds could suppress it, both in vitro and in vivo. In-line probing of the full-length T-box combined with molecular modelling and docking analyses suggest that the antibiotics that promote transcription antitermination stabilize the T-box:tRNA complex through binding specific positions on stem I and the Staphylococcal-specific stem Sa. By contrast, the antibiotics that attenuate T-box transcription bind to other positions on stem I and do not interact with stem Sa. Taken together, our results reveal that the transcription of essential genes controlled by T-box riboswitches can be directly modulated by commonly used protein synthesis inhibitors. These findings accentuate the regulatory complexities of bacterial response to antimicrobials that involve multiple riboregulators. PMID:28973457

  1. Thermal Control System Development to Support the Crew Exploration Vehicle and Lunar Surface Access Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Molly; Westheimer, David

    2006-01-01

    All space vehicles or habitats require thermal management to maintain a safe and operational environment for both crew and hardware. Active Thermal Control Systems (ATCS) perform the functions of acquiring heat from both crew and hardware within a vehicle, transporting that heat throughout the vehicle, and finally rejecting that energy into space. Almost all of the energy used in a space vehicle eventually turns into heat, which must be rejected in order to maintain an energy balance and temperature control of the vehicle. For crewed vehicles, Active Thermal Control Systems are pumped fluid loops that are made up of components designed to perform these functions. NASA has recently evaluated all of the agency s technology development work and identified key areas that must be addressed to aid in the successful development of a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The technologies that have been selected and are currently under development include: fluids that enable single loop ATCS architectures, a gravity insensitive vapor compression cycle heat pump, a sublimator with reduced sensitivity to feedwater contamination, an evaporative heat sink that can operate in multiple ambient pressure environments, a compact spray evaporator, and lightweight radiators that take advantage of carbon composites and advanced optical coatings.

  2. Shuttle Payload Ground Command and Control: An Experiment Implementation Combustion Module-2 Software Development, STS-107

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carek, David Andrew

    2003-01-01

    This presentation covers the design of a command and control architecture developed by the author for the Combustion Module-2 microgravity experiment, which flew aboard the STS-107 Shuttle mission, The design was implemented to satisfy a hybrid network that utilized TCP/IP for both the onboard segment and ground segment, with an intermediary unreliable transport for the space to ground segment. With the infusion of Internet networking technologies into Space Shuttle, Space Station, and spacecraft avionics systems, comes the need for robust methodologies for ground command and control. Considerations of high bit error links, and unreliable transport over intermittent links must be considered in such systems. Internet protocols applied to these systems, coupled with the appropriate application layer protections, can provide adequate communication architectures for command and control. However, there are inherent limitations and additional complexities added by the use of Internet protocols that must be considered during the design. This presentation will discuss the rationale for the: framework and protocol algorithms developed by the author. A summary of design considerations, implantation issues, and learned lessons will be will be presented. A summary of mission results using this communications architecture will be presented. Additionally, areas of further needed investigation will be identified.

  3. Classical Optimal Control for Energy Minimization Based On Diffeomorphic Modulation under Observable-Response-Preserving Homotopy.

    PubMed

    Soley, Micheline B; Markmann, Andreas; Batista, Victor S

    2018-06-12

    We introduce the so-called "Classical Optimal Control Optimization" (COCO) method for global energy minimization based on the implementation of the diffeomorphic modulation under observable-response-preserving homotopy (DMORPH) gradient algorithm. A probe particle with time-dependent mass m( t;β) and dipole μ( r, t;β) is evolved classically on the potential energy surface V( r) coupled to an electric field E( t;β), as described by the time-dependent density of states represented on a grid, or otherwise as a linear combination of Gaussians generated by the k-means clustering algorithm. Control parameters β defining m( t;β), μ( r, t;β), and E( t;β) are optimized by following the gradients of the energy with respect to β, adapting them to steer the particle toward the global minimum energy configuration. We find that the resulting COCO algorithm is capable of resolving near-degenerate states separated by large energy barriers and successfully locates the global minima of golf potentials on flat and rugged surfaces, previously explored for testing quantum annealing methodologies and the quantum optimal control optimization (QuOCO) method. Preliminary results show successful energy minimization of multidimensional Lennard-Jones clusters. Beyond the analysis of energy minimization in the specific model systems investigated, we anticipate COCO should be valuable for solving minimization problems in general, including optimization of parameters in applications to machine learning and molecular structure determination.

  4. A pulse-width modulated, high reliability charge controller for small photovoltaic systems

    SciT

    Gerken, K.; Welsh, D.

    1997-02-01

    This report presents the results of a development effort to design, test and begin production of a new class of small photovoltaic (PV) charge controllers. Sandia National Laboratories provided technical support, test data and financial support through a Balance-of-System Development contract. One of the objectives of the development was to increase user confidence in small PV systems by improving the reliability and operating life of the system controllers. Another equally important objective was to improve the economics of small PV systems by extending the battery lifetimes. Using new technology and advanced manufacturing techniques, these objectives were accomplished. Because small stand-alonemore » PV systems account for over one third of all PV modules shipped, the positive impact of improving the reliability and economics of PV systems in this market segment will be felt throughout the industry. The results of verification testing of the new product are also included in this report. The initial design goals and specifications were very aggressive, but the extensive testing demonstrates that all the goals were achieved. Production of the product started in May at a rate of 2,000 units per month. Over 40 Morningstar distributors (5 US and 35 overseas) have taken delivery in the first 2 months of shipments. Initial customer reactions to the new controller have been very favorable.« less

  5. Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation Modulates Risky Decision Making in a Frequency-Controlled Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Bhuvanesh

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we investigated the effect of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on voluntary risky decision making and executive control in humans. Stimulation was delivered online at 5 Hz (θ), 10 Hz (α), 20 Hz (β), and 40 Hz (γ) on the left and right frontal area while participants performed a modified risky decision-making task. This task allowed participants to voluntarily select between risky and certain decisions associated with potential gains or losses, while simultaneously measuring the cognitive control component (voluntary switching) of decision making. The purpose of this experimental design was to test whether voluntary risky decision making and executive control can be modulated with tACS in a frequency-specific manner. Our results revealed a robust effect of a 20-Hz stimulation over the left prefrontal area that significantly increased voluntary risky decision making, which may suggest a possible link between risky decision making and reward processing, underlined by β-oscillatory activity. PMID:29379865

  6. Direct modulation of T-box riboswitch-controlled transcription by protein synthesis inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stamatopoulou, Vassiliki; Apostolidi, Maria; Li, Shuang; Lamprinou, Katerina; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Zhang, Jinwei; Stathopoulos, Constantinos

    2017-09-29

    Recently, it was discovered that exposure to mainstream antibiotics activate numerous bacterial riboregulators that control antibiotic resistance genes including metabolite-binding riboswitches and other transcription attenuators. However, the effects of commonly used antibiotics, many of which exhibit RNA-binding properties, on the widespread T-box riboswitches, remain unknown. In Staphylococcus aureus, a species-specific glyS T-box controls the supply of glycine for both ribosomal translation and cell wall synthesis, making it a promising target for next-generation antimicrobials. Here, we report that specific protein synthesis inhibitors could either significantly increase T-box-mediated transcription antitermination, while other compounds could suppress it, both in vitro and in vivo. In-line probing of the full-length T-box combined with molecular modelling and docking analyses suggest that the antibiotics that promote transcription antitermination stabilize the T-box:tRNA complex through binding specific positions on stem I and the Staphylococcal-specific stem Sa. By contrast, the antibiotics that attenuate T-box transcription bind to other positions on stem I and do not interact with stem Sa. Taken together, our results reveal that the transcription of essential genes controlled by T-box riboswitches can be directly modulated by commonly used protein synthesis inhibitors. These findings accentuate the regulatory complexities of bacterial response to antimicrobials that involve multiple riboregulators. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Guanfacine modulates the emotional biasing of amygdala-prefrontal connectivity for cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Kurt P; Clerkin, Suzanne M; Newcorn, Jeffrey H; Halperin, Jeffrey M; Fan, Jin

    2014-09-01

    Functional interactions between amygdala and prefrontal cortex provide a cortical entry point for emotional cues to bias cognitive control. Stimulation of α2 adrenoceptors enhances the prefrontal control functions and blocks the amygdala-dependent encoding of emotional cues. However, the impact of this stimulation on amygdala-prefrontal interactions and the emotional biasing of cognitive control have not been established. We tested the effect of the α2 adrenoceptor agonist guanfacine on psychophysiological interactions of amygdala with prefrontal cortex for the emotional biasing of response execution and inhibition. Fifteen healthy adults were scanned twice with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing an emotional go/no-go task following administration of oral guanfacine (1mg) and placebo in a double-blind, counterbalanced design. Happy, sad, and neutral faces served as trial cues. Guanfacine moderated the effect of face emotion on the task-related functional connectivity of left and right amygdala with left inferior frontal gyrus compared to placebo, by selectively reversing the functional co-activation of the two regions for response execution cued by sad faces. This shift from positively to negatively correlated activation for guanfacine was associated with selective improvements in the relatively low accuracy of responses to sad faces seen for placebo. These results demonstrate the importance of functional interactions between amygdala and inferior frontal gyrus to both bottom-up biasing of cognitive control and top-down control of emotional processing, as well as for the α2 adrenoceptor-mediated modulation of these processes. These mechanisms offer a possibile method to address the emotional reactivity that is common to several psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  8. Pain facilitation and pain inhibition during conditioned pain modulation in fibromyalgia and in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Stéphane; Marchand, Serge

    2016-08-01

    Although fibromyalgia (FM) is associated with a deficit in inhibitory conditioned pain modulation (CPM), the discriminative power of CPM procedures is unknown. Moreover, the high intersubject heterogeneity in CPM responses in FM raises the possibility that a sizeable subgroup of these patients may experience pain facilitation during CPM, but the phenomenon has not been explicitly studied. To address these issues, 96 patients with FM and 71 healthy controls were recruited. Thermal stimuli were used to measure pain thresholds. Pain inhibition was elicited using a tonic thermal test (Peltier thermode) administered before and after activation of CPM mechanisms using a cold pressor test. Thermal pain thresholds were lower in patients with FM than in healthy controls. Pain ratings during the cold pressor test were higher in patients with FM, relative to controls. The CPM inhibitory efficacy was lower in patients with FM than in controls. The CPM procedure had good specificity (78.9%) but low sensitivity (45.7%), whereas a composite pain index had good sensitivity (75.0%) and specificity (78.9%). Finally, the rate of patients with FM who reported pain facilitation during the CPM procedure was found to be significantly increased compared with that of controls (41.7% vs 21.2%). The good discriminative power of the composite pain index highlights the need for further validation studies using mechanistically relevant psychophysical procedures in FM. The low sensitivity of the CPM procedure, combined with the large proportion of patients with FM experiencing pain facilitation during CPM, strongly suggests that endogenous pain inhibition mechanisms are deeply impaired in patients with FM, but only in a subgroup of them.

  9. Motor planning modulates sensory-motor control of collision avoidance behavior in the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Hideki; Nishida, Yuuya

    2012-01-01

    Summary In this study, we examined the collision avoidance behavior of the frog, Rana catesbeiana to an approaching object in the upper visual field. The angular velocity of the frog's escape turn showed a significant positive correlation with the turn angle (r2 = 0.5741, P<0.05). A similar mechanism of velocity control has been known in head movements of the owl and in human saccades. By analogy, this suggests that the frog planned its escape velocity in advance of executing the turn, to make the duration of the escape behavior relatively constant. For escape turns less than 60°, the positive correlation was very strong (r2 = 0.7097, P<0.05). Thus, the frog controlled the angular velocity of small escape turns very accurately and completed the behavior within a constant time. On the other hand, for escape turns greater than 60°, the same correlation was not significant (r2 = 0.065, P>0.05). Thus, the frog was not able to control the velocity of the large escape turns accurately and did not complete the behavior within a constant time. In the latter case, there was a small but significant positive correlation between the threshold angular size and the angular velocity (r2 = 0.1459, P<0.05). This suggests that the threshold is controlled to compensate for the insufficient escape velocity achieved during large turn angles, and could explain a significant negative correlation between the turn angle and the threshold angular size (r2 = 0.1145, P<0.05). Thus, it is likely that the threshold angular size is also controlled by the turn angle and is modulated by motor planning. PMID:23213389

  10. Guanfacine Modulates the Emotional Biasing of Amygdala-Prefrontal Connectivity for Cognitive Control

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Kurt P.; Clerkin, Suzanne M.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Halperin, Jeffrey M.; Fan, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Functional interactions between amygdala and prefrontal cortex provide a cortical entry point for emotional cues to bias cognitive control. Stimulation of α2 adrenoceptors enhances the prefrontal control functions and blocks the amygdala-dependent encoding of emotional cues. However, the impact of this stimulation on amygdala-prefrontal interactions and the emotional biasing of cognitive control have not been established. We tested the effect of the α2 adrenoceptor agonist guanfacine on psychophysiological interactions of amygdala with prefrontal cortex for the emotional biasing of response execution and inhibition. Fifteen healthy adults were scanned twice with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing an emotional go/no-go task following administration of oral guanfacine (1 mg) and placebo in a double-blind, counterbalanced design. Happy, sad, and neutral faces served as trial cues. Guanfacine moderated the effect of face emotion on the task-related functional connectivity of left and right amygdala with left inferior frontal gyrus compared to placebo, by selectively reversing the functional co-activation of the two regions for response execution cued by sad faces. This shift from positively to negatively correlated activation for guanfacine was associated with selective improvements in the relatively low accuracy of responses to sad faces seen for placebo. These results demonstrate the importance of functional interactions between amygdala and inferior frontal gyrus to both bottom-up biasing of cognitive control and top-down control of emotional processing, as well as for the α2 adrenoceptor-mediated modulation of these processes. These mechanisms offer a possibile method to address the emotional reactivity that is common to several psychiatric disorders. PMID:25059532

  11. Magnetically controlled terahertz modulator based on Fe3O4 nanoparticle ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Xiong, Luyao; Yu, Xiang; He, Shuli; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Jingling

    2018-03-01

    A multifunctional terahertz (THz) wave modulator fabricated from Fe3O4 nanoparticle ferrofluids and metamaterials was characterized in externally applied magnetic fields. Specifically, modulation depths and frequency shifts by the wave modulators were examined. A 34% THz amplitude modulation depth was demonstrated and the absorption peak of the metamaterial induced a frequency shift of 33 GHz at low magnetic field intensities. It is anticipated that this device structure and its tunable properties will have many potential applications in THz filtering, modulation, and sensing.

  12. High-frequency combustion instability control through acoustic modulation at the inlet boundary for liquid rocket engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennewitz, John William

    This research investigation encompasses experimental tests demonstrating the control of a high-frequency combustion instability by acoustically modulating the propellant flow. A model rocket combustor burned gaseous oxygen and methane using a single-element, pentad-style injector. Flow conditions were established that spontaneously excited a 2430 Hz first longitudinal combustion oscillation at an amplitude up to p'/pc ≈ 6%. An acoustic speaker was placed at the base of the oxidizer supply to modulate the flow and alter the oscillatory behavior of the combustor. Two speaker modulation approaches were investigated: (1) Bands of white noise and (2) Pure sinusoidal tones. The first approach adjusted 500 Hz bands of white noise ranging from 0-500 Hz to 2000-2500 Hz, while the second implemented single-frequency signals with arbitrary phase swept from 500-2500 Hz. The results showed that above a modulation signal amplitude threshold, both approaches suppressed 95+% of the spontaneous combustion oscillation. By increasing the applied signal amplitude, a wider frequency range of instability suppression became present for these two acoustic modulation approaches. Complimentary to these experiments, a linear modal analysis was undertaken to investigate the effects of acoustic modulation at the inlet boundary on the longitudinal instability modes of a dump combustor. The modal analysis employed acoustically consistent matching conditions with a specific impedance boundary condition at the inlet to represent the acoustic modulation. From the modal analysis, a naturally unstable first longitudinal mode was predicted in the absence of acoustic modulation, consistent with the spontaneously excited 2430 Hz instability observed experimentally. Subsequently, a detailed investigation involving variation of the modulation signal from 0-2500 Hz and mean combustor temperature from 1248-1685 K demonstrated the unstable to stable transition of a 2300-2500 Hz first longitudinal mode. The

  13. Toward Modular Soft Robotics: Proprioceptive Curvature Sensing and Sliding-Mode Control of Soft Bidirectional Bending Modules.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming; Skorina, Erik H; Tao, Weijia; Chen, Fuchen; Ozel, Selim; Sun, Yinan; Onal, Cagdas D

    2017-06-01

    Real-world environments are complex, unstructured, and often fragile. Soft robotics offers a solution for robots to safely interact with the environment and human coworkers, but suffers from a host of challenges in sensing and control of continuously deformable bodies. To overcome these challenges, this article considers a modular soft robotic architecture that offers proprioceptive sensing of pressure-operated bending actuation modules. We present integrated custom magnetic curvature sensors embedded in the neutral axis of bidirectional bending actuators. We describe our recent advances in the design and fabrication of these modules to improve the reliability of proprioceptive curvature feedback over our prior work. In particular, we study the effect of dimensional parameters on improving the linearity of curvature measurements. In addition, we present a sliding-mode controller formulation that drives the binary solenoid valve states directly, giving the control system the ability to hold the actuator steady without continuous pressurization and depressurization. In comparison to other methods, this control approach does not rely on pulse width modulation and hence offers superior dynamic performance (i.e., faster response rates). Our experimental results indicate that the proposed soft robotic modules offer a large range of bending angles with monotonic and more linear embedded curvature measurements, and that the direct sliding-mode control system exhibits improved bandwidth and a notable reduction in binary valve actuation operations compared to our earlier iterative sliding-mode controller.

  14. Frequency-modulated laser ranging sensor with closed-loop control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Fabian M.; Böttger, Gunnar; Janeczka, Christian; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Schröder, Henning; Schneider-Ramelow, Martin

    2018-02-01

    Advances in autonomous driving and robotics are creating high demand for inexpensive and mass-producible distance sensors. A laser ranging system (Lidar), based on the frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) method is built in this work. The benefits of an FMCW Lidar system are the low-cost components and the performance in comparison to conventional time-of-flight Lidar systems. The basic system consists of a DFB laser diode (λ= 1308 nm) and an asymmetric fiber-coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fixed delay line in one arm. Linear tuning of the laser optical frequency via injection current modulation creates a beat signal at the interferometer output. The frequency of the beat signal is proportional to the optical path difference in the interferometer. Since the laser frequency-to-current response is non-linear, a closed-loop feed-back system is designed to improve the tuning linearity, and consequently the measurement resolution. For fast active control, an embedded system with FPGA is used, resulting in a nearly linear frequency tuning, realizing a narrow peak in the Fourier spectrum of the beat signal. For free-space measurements, a setup with two distinct interferometers is built. The fully fiber-coupled Mach-Zehnder reference interferometer is part of the feed-back loop system, while the other - a Michelson interferometer - has a free-space arm with collimator lens and reflective target. A resolution of 2:0 mm for a 560 mm distance is achieved. The results for varying target distances show high consistency and a linear relation to the measured beat-frequency.

  15. Modulations of the executive control network by stimulus onset asynchrony in a Stroop task

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Manipulating task difficulty is a useful way of elucidating the functional recruitment of the brain’s executive control network. In a Stroop task, pre-exposing the irrelevant word using varying stimulus onset asynchronies (‘negative’ SOAs) modulates the amount of behavioural interference and facilitation, suggesting disparate mechanisms of cognitive processing in each SOA. The current study employed a Stroop task with three SOAs (−400, -200, 0 ms), using functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate for the first time the neural effects of SOA manipulation. Of specific interest were 1) how SOA affects the neural representation of interference and facilitation; 2) response priming effects in negative SOAs; and 3) attentional effects of blocked SOA presentation. Results The results revealed three regions of the executive control network that were sensitive to SOA during Stroop interference; the 0 ms SOA elicited the greatest activation of these areas but experienced relatively smaller behavioural interference, suggesting that the enhanced recruitment led to more efficient conflict processing. Response priming effects were localized to the right inferior frontal gyrus, which is consistent with the idea that this region performed response inhibition in incongruent conditions to overcome the incorrectly-primed response, as well as more general action updating and response preparation. Finally, the right superior parietal lobe was sensitive to blocked SOA presentation and was most active for the 0 ms SOA, suggesting that this region is involved in attentional control. Conclusions SOA exerted both trial-specific and block-wide effects on executive processing, providing a unique paradigm for functional investigations of the cognitive control network. PMID:23902451

  16. Card9 mediates susceptibility to intestinal pathogens through microbiota modulation and control of bacterial virulence.

    PubMed

    Lamas, Bruno; Michel, Marie-Laure; Waldschmitt, Nadine; Pham, Hang-Phuong; Zacharioudaki, Vassiliki; Dupraz, Louise; Delacre, Myriam; Natividad, Jane M; Costa, Gregory Da; Planchais, Julien; Sovran, Bruno; Bridonneau, Chantal; Six, Adrien; Langella, Philippe; Richard, Mathias L; Chamaillard, Mathias; Sokol, Harry

    2017-08-08

    In association with innate and adaptive immunity, the microbiota controls the colonisation resistance against intestinal pathogens. Caspase recruitment domain 9 ( CARD9 ), a key innate immunity gene, is required to shape a normal gut microbiota. Card9 -/- mice are more susceptible to the enteric mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium that mimics human infections with enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli . Here, we examined how CARD9 controls C. rodentium infection susceptibility through microbiota-dependent and microbiota-independent mechanisms. C. rodentium infection was assessed in conventional and germ-free (GF) wild-type (WT) and Card9 -/- mice. To explore the impact of Card9 -/- microbiota in infection susceptibility, GF WT mice were colonised with WT (WT→GF) or Card9 -/- ( Card9 -/- →GF) microbiota before C. rodentium infection. Microbiota composition was determined by 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Inflammation severity was determined by histology score and lipocalin level. Microbiota-host immune system interactions were assessed by quantitative PCR analysis. CARD9 controls pathogen virulence in a microbiota-independent manner by supporting a specific humoral response. Higher susceptibility to C. rodentium -induced colitis was observed in Card9 -/- →GF mice. The microbiota of Card9 -/- mice failed to outcompete the monosaccharide-consuming C. rodentium , worsening the infection severity. A polysaccharide-enriched diet counteracted the ecological advantage of C. rodentium and the defective pathogen-specific antibody response in Card9 -/- mice. CARD9 modulates the susceptibility to intestinal infection by controlling the pathogen virulence in a microbiota-dependent and microbiota-independent manner. Genetic susceptibility to intestinal pathogens can be overridden by diet intervention that restores humoural immunity and a competing microbiota. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017

  17. Efficacy of Adolescent Suicide Prevention E-Learning Modules for Gatekeepers: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Ghoncheh, Rezvan; Gould, Madelyn S; Twisk, Jos Wr; Kerkhof, Ad Jfm; Koot, Hans M

    2016-01-29

    Face-to-face gatekeeper training can be an effective strategy in the enhancement of gatekeepers' knowledge and self-efficacy in adolescent suicide prevention. However, barriers related to access (eg, time, resources) may hamper participation in face-to-face training sessions. The transition to a Web-based setting could address obstacles associated with face-to-face gatekeeper training. Although Web-based suicide prevention training targeting adolescents exists, so far no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been conducted to investigate their efficacy. This RCT study investigated the efficacy of a Web-based adolescent suicide prevention program entitled Mental Health Online, which aimed to improve the knowledge and self-confidence of gatekeepers working with adolescents (12-20 years old). The program consisted of 8 short e-learning modules each capturing an important aspect of the process of early recognition, guidance, and referral of suicidal adolescents, alongside additional information on the topic of (adolescent) suicide prevention. A total of 190 gatekeepers (ages 21 to 62 years) participated in this study and were randomized to either the experimental group or waitlist control group. The intervention was not masked. Participants from both groups completed 3 Web-based assessments (pretest, posttest, and 3-month follow-up). The outcome measures of this study were actual knowledge, and participants' ratings of perceived knowledge and perceived self-confidence using questionnaires developed specifically for this study. The actual knowledge, perceived knowledge, and perceived self-confidence of gatekeepers in the experimental group improved significantly compared to those in the waitlist control group at posttest, and the effects remained significant at 3-month follow-up. The overall effect sizes were 0.76, 1.20, and 1.02, respectively, across assessments. The findings of this study indicate that Web-based suicide prevention e-learning modules can be an

  18. Efficacy of Adolescent Suicide Prevention E-Learning Modules for Gatekeepers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Madelyn S; Twisk, Jos WR; Kerkhof, Ad JFM; Koot, Hans M

    2016-01-01

    Background Face-to-face gatekeeper training can be an effective strategy in the enhancement of gatekeepers’ knowledge and self-efficacy in adolescent suicide prevention. However, barriers related to access (eg, time, resources) may hamper participation in face-to-face training sessions. The transition to a Web-based setting could address obstacles associated with face-to-face gatekeeper training. Although Web-based suicide prevention training targeting adolescents exists, so far no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been conducted to investigate their efficacy. Objective This RCT study investigated the efficacy of a Web-based adolescent suicide prevention program entitled Mental Health Online, which aimed to improve the knowledge and self-confidence of gatekeepers working with adolescents (12-20 years old). The program consisted of 8 short e-learning modules each capturing an important aspect of the process of early recognition, guidance, and referral of suicidal adolescents, alongside additional information on the topic of (adolescent) suicide prevention. Methods A total of 190 gatekeepers (ages 21 to 62 years) participated in this study and were randomized to either the experimental group or waitlist control group. The intervention was not masked. Participants from both groups completed 3 Web-based assessments (pretest, posttest, and 3-month follow-up). The outcome measures of this study were actual knowledge, and participants’ ratings of perceived knowledge and perceived self-confidence using questionnaires developed specifically for this study. Results The actual knowledge, perceived knowledge, and perceived self-confidence of gatekeepers in the experimental group improved significantly compared to those in the waitlist control group at posttest, and the effects remained significant at 3-month follow-up. The overall effect sizes were 0.76, 1.20, and 1.02, respectively, across assessments. Conclusions The findings of this study indicate that Web

  19. In-situ calibration: migrating control system IP module calibration from the bench to the storage ring

    SciT

    Weber, Jonah M.; Chin, Michael

    2002-04-30

    The Control System for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) uses in-house designed IndustryPack(registered trademark) (IP) modules contained in compact PCI (cPCI) crates with 16-bit analog I/O to control instrumentation. To make the IP modules interchangeable, each module is calibrated for gain and offset compensation. We initially developed a method of verifying and calibrating the IP modules in a lab bench test environment using a PC with LabVIEW. The subsequent discovery that the ADCs have significant drift characteristics over periods of days of installed operation prompted development of an ''in-situ'' calibration process--one in which themore » IP modules can be calibrated without removing them from the cPCI crates in the storage ring. This paper discusses the original LabVIEW PC calibration and the migration to the proposed in-situ EPICS control system calibration.« less

  20. Abdicating power for control: a precision timing strategy to modulate function of flight power muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sponberg, S.; Daniel, T. L.

    2012-01-01

    Muscles driving rhythmic locomotion typically show strong dependence of power on the timing or phase of activation. This is particularly true in insects' main flight muscles, canonical examples of muscles thought to have a dedicated power function. However, in the moth (Manduca sexta), these muscles normally activate at a phase where the instantaneous slope of the power–phase curve is steep and well below maximum power. We provide four lines of evidence demonstrating that, contrary to the current paradigm, the moth's nervous system establishes significant control authority in these muscles through precise timing modulation: (i) left–right pairs of flight muscles normally fire precisely, within 0.5–0.6 ms of each other; (ii) during a yawing optomotor response, left—right muscle timing differences shift throughout a wider 8 ms timing window, enabling at least a 50 per cent left–right power differential; (iii) timing differences correlate with turning torque; and (iv) the downstroke power muscles alone causally account for 47 per cent of turning torque. To establish (iv), we altered muscle activation during intact behaviour by stimulating individual muscle potentials to impose left—right timing differences. Because many organisms also have muscles operating with high power–phase gains (Δpower/Δphase), this motor control strategy may be ubiquitous in locomotor systems. PMID:22833272

  1. Organic cation transporter 3 modulates murine basophil functions by controlling intracellular histamine levels

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Elke; Machavoine, François; Pléau, Jean-Marie; Bertron, Anne-France; Thurmond, Robin L.; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takehiko; Schinkel, Alfred H.; Dy, Michel

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we identify the bidirectional organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3/Slc22a3) as the molecule responsible for histamine uptake by murine basophils. We demonstrate that OCT3 participates in the control of basophil functions because exogenous histamine can inhibit its own synthesis—and that of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, and IL-13—through this means of transport. Furthermore, ligands of H3/H4 histamine receptors or OCT3 inhibit histamine uptake, and outward transport of newly synthesized histamine. By doing so, they increase the histamine content of basophils, which explains why they mimic the effect of exogenous histamine. These drugs were no longer effective in histamine-free histidine decarboxylase (HDC)-deficient mice, in contrast with histamine itself. Histamine was not taken up and lost its inhibitory effect in mice deficient for OCT3, which proved its specific involvement. Intracellular histamine levels were increased strongly in IL-3–induced OCT3 −/− bone marrow basophils, and explained why they generated fewer cytokines than their wild-type counterpart. Their production was enhanced when histamine synthesis was blocked by the specific HDC inhibitor α-fluoro-methyl histidine, and underscored the determinant role of histamine in the inhibitory effect. We postulate that pharmacologic modulation of histamine transport might become instrumental in the control of basophil functions during allergic diseases. PMID:16061728

  2. Local control after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Amarinthia E; Okcu, M Fatih; Chintagumpala, Murali; Teh, Bin S; Paulino, Arnold C

    2009-01-01

    To examine the patterns of failure in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Between 1998 and 2005, 19 patients with a diagnosis of head-and-neck RMS received IMRT at The Methodist Hospital. There were 11 male and 8 female patients, with a median age of 6 years at time of irradiation. Tumor location was parameningeal in 7, orbital in 6, and other head-and-neck RMS in 6. Chemotherapy was given to all patients, with vincristine, actinomycin D, and cyclophosphamide being the most common regimen (n = 18). The median prescribed dose was 5040 cGy. The clinical target volume included the gross tumor volume with a 1.5-cm margin. The median duration of follow-up for surviving patients was 56 months. The 4-year overall survival and local control rates were 76% and 92.9%, respectively. One patient developed a local failure in the high-dose region of the radiation field; there were no marginal failures. Distant metastasis was seen in 4 patients. Overall survival was 42.9% for parameningeal sites and 100% for other sites (p < 0.01). Late toxicities were seen in 7 patients. Two secondary malignancies occurred in 1 child with embryonal RMS of the face and a p53 mutation. Local control was excellent in patients receiving IMRT for head-and-neck RMS. Patterns of local failure reveal no marginal failures in this group of patients.

  3. An HDAC3-PROX1 corepressor module acts on HNF4α to control hepatic triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Armour, Sean M; Remsberg, Jarrett R; Damle, Manashree; Sidoli, Simone; Ho, Wesley Y; Li, Zhenghui; Garcia, Benjamin A; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2017-09-15

    The histone deacetylase HDAC3 is a critical mediator of hepatic lipid metabolism, and liver-specific deletion of HDAC3 leads to fatty liver. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, here we report a method of cross-linking followed by mass spectrometry to define a high-confidence HDAC3 interactome in vivo that includes the canonical NCoR-HDAC3 complex as well as Prospero-related homeobox 1 protein (PROX1). HDAC3 and PROX1 co-localize extensively on the mouse liver genome, and are co-recruited by hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). The HDAC3-PROX1 module controls the expression of a gene program regulating lipid homeostasis, and hepatic-specific ablation of either component increases triglyceride content in liver. These findings underscore the importance of specific combinations of transcription factors and coregulators in the fine tuning of organismal metabolism.HDAC3 is a critical mediator of hepatic lipid metabolism and its loss leads to fatty liver. Here, the authors characterize the liver HDAC3 interactome in vivo, provide evidence that HDAC3 interacts with PROX1, and show that HDAC3 and PROX1 control expression of genes regulating lipid homeostasis.

  4. Abdicating power for control: a precision timing strategy to modulate function of flight power muscles.

    PubMed

    Sponberg, S; Daniel, T L

    2012-10-07

    Muscles driving rhythmic locomotion typically show strong dependence of power on the timing or phase of activation. This is particularly true in insects' main flight muscles, canonical examples of muscles thought to have a dedicated power function. However, in the moth (Manduca sexta), these muscles normally activate at a phase where the instantaneous slope of the power-phase curve is steep and well below maximum power. We provide four lines of evidence demonstrating that, contrary to the current paradigm, the moth's nervous system establishes significant control authority in these muscles through precise timing modulation: (i) left-right pairs of flight muscles normally fire precisely, within 0.5-0.6 ms of each other; (ii) during a yawing optomotor response, left-right muscle timing differences shift throughout a wider 8 ms timing window, enabling at least a 50 per cent left-right power differential; (iii) timing differences correlate with turning torque; and (iv) the downstroke power muscles alone causally account for 47 per cent of turning torque. To establish (iv), we altered muscle activation during intact behaviour by stimulating individual muscle potentials to impose left-right timing differences. Because many organisms also have muscles operating with high power-phase gains (Δ(power)/Δ(phase)), this motor control strategy may be ubiquitous in locomotor systems.

  5. An improved immune algorithm for optimizing the pulse width modulation control sequence of inverters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, L.; Qian, S. Q.; Ye, Y. Q.; Wu, Y. H.

    2017-09-01

    In this article, an improved immune algorithm (IIA), based on the fundamental principles of the biological immune system, is proposed for optimizing the pulse width modulation (PWM) control sequence of a single-phase full-bridge inverter. The IIA takes advantage of the receptor editing and adaptive mutation mechanisms of the immune system to develop two operations that enhance the population diversity and convergence of the proposed algorithm. To verify the effectiveness and examine the performance of the IIA, 17 cases are considered, including fixed and disturbed resistances. Simulation results show that the IIA is able to obtain an effective PWM control sequence. Furthermore, when compared with existing immune algorithms (IAs), genetic algorithms (GAs), a non-traditional GA, simplified simulated annealing, and a generalized Hopfield neural network method, the IIA can achieve small total harmonic distortion (THD) and large magnitude. Meanwhile, a non-parametric test indicates that the IIA is significantly better than most comparison algorithms. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0305215X.2016.1250894.

  6. Multivalent Protein Polymer MRI Contrast Agents: Controlling Relaxivity via Modulation of Amino Acid Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Karfeld-Sulzer, Lindsay S.; Waters, Emily A.; Davis, Nicolynn E.; Meade, Thomas J.; Barron, Annelise E.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive imaging modality with high spatial and temporal resolution. Contrast agents (CAs) are frequently used to increase the contrast between tissues of interest. To increase the effectiveness of MR agents, small molecule CAs have been attached to macromolecules. We have created a family of biodegradable, macromolecular CAs based on protein polymers, allowing control over the CA properties. The protein polymers are monodisperse, random coil, and contain evenly spaced lysines that serve as reactive sites for Gd(III) chelates. The exact sequence and length of the protein can be specified, enabling controlled variation in lysine spacing and molecular weight. Relaxivity could be modulated by changing protein polymer length and lysine spacing. Relaxivities of up to ∼14 mM-1s-1 per Gd(III) and ∼461 mM-1s-1 per conjugate were observed. These CAs are biodegradable by incubation with plasmin, such that they can be easily excreted after use. They do not reduce cell viability, a prerequisite for future in vivo studies. The protein polymer CAs can be customized for different clinical diagnostic applications, including biomaterial tracking, as a balanced agent with high relaxivity and appropriate molar mass. PMID:20420441

  7. Trait susceptibility to worry modulates the effects of cognitive load on cognitive control: An ERP study.

    PubMed

    Owens, Max; Derakshan, Nazanin; Richards, Anne

    2015-10-01

    According to the predictions of attentional control theory (ACT) of anxiety (Eysenck, Derakshan, Santos, & Calvo, 2007), worry is a central feature of anxiety that interferes with the ability to inhibit distracting information necessary for successful task performance. However, it is unclear how such cognitive control deficits are modulated by task demands and by the emotionality of the distractors. A sample of 31 participants (25 female) completed a novel flanker task with emotional and neutral distractors under low- and high-cognitive-load conditions. The negative-going N2 event-related potential was measured to index participants' level of top-down resource allocation in the inhibition of distractors under high- and low-load conditions. Results showed N2 amplitudes were larger under high- compared with low-load conditions. In addition, under high but not low load, trait worry was associated with greater N2 amplitudes. Our findings support ACT predictions that trait worry adversely affects goal-directed behavior, and is associated with greater recruitment of cognitive resources to inhibit the impact of distracting information under conditions in which cognitive resources are taxed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. MPK-1 ERK controls membrane organization in C. elegans oogenesis via a sex-determination module.

    PubMed

    Arur, Swathi; Ohmachi, Mitsue; Berkseth, Matt; Nayak, Sudhir; Hansen, David; Zarkower, David; Schedl, Tim

    2011-05-17

    Tissues that generate specialized cell types in a production line must coordinate developmental mechanisms with physiological demand, although how this occurs is largely unknown. In the Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite, the developmental sex-determination cascade specifies gamete sex in the distal germline, while physiological sperm signaling activates MPK-1/ERK in the proximal germline to control plasma membrane biogenesis and organization during oogenesis. We discovered repeated utilization of a self-contained negative regulatory module, consisting of NOS-3 translational repressor, FEM-CUL-2 (E3 ubiquitin ligase), and TRA-1 (Gli transcriptional repressor), which acts both in sex determination and in physiological demand control of oogenesis, coordinating these processes. In the distal germline, where MPK-1 is not activated, TRA-1 represses the male fate as NOS-3 functions in translational repression leading to inactivation of the FEM-CUL-2 ubiquitin ligase. In the proximal germline, sperm-dependent physiological MPK-1 activation results in phosphorylation-based inactivation of NOS-3, FEM-CUL-2-mediated degradation of TRA-1 and the promotion of membrane organization during oogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Neural control and modulation of swimming speed in the larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Severi, Kristen E; Portugues, Ruben; Marques, João C; O'Malley, Donald M; Orger, Michael B; Engert, Florian

    2014-08-06

    Vertebrate locomotion at different speeds is driven by descending excitatory connections to central pattern generators in the spinal cord. To investigate how these inputs determine locomotor kinematics, we used whole-field visual motion to drive zebrafish to swim at different speeds. Larvae match the stimulus speed by utilizing more locomotor events, or modifying kinematic parameters such as the duration and speed of swimming bouts, the tail-beat frequency, and the choice of gait. We used laser ablations, electrical stimulation, and activity recordings in descending neurons of the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (nMLF) to dissect their contribution to controlling forward movement. We found that the activity of single identified neurons within the nMLF is correlated with locomotor kinematics, and modulates both the duration and oscillation frequency of tail movements. By identifying the contribution of individual supraspinal circuit elements to locomotion kinematics, we build a better understanding of how the brain controls movement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Structural Basis for Modulation of Quality Control Fate in a Marginally Stable Protein.

    PubMed

    Brock, Kelly P; Abraham, Ayelet-chen; Amen, Triana; Kaganovich, Daniel; England, Jeremy L

    2015-07-07

    The human von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor is a marginally stable protein previously used as a model substrate of eukaryotic refolding and degradation pathways. When expressed in the absence of its cofactors, VHL cannot fold and is quickly degraded by the quality control machinery of the cell. We combined computational methods with in vivo experiments to examine the basis of the misfolding propensity of VHL. By expressing a set of randomly mutated VHL sequences in yeast, we discovered a more stable mutant form. Subsequent modeling suggested the mutation had caused a conformational change affecting cofactor and chaperone interaction, and this hypothesis was then confirmed by additional knockout and overexpression experiments targeting a yeast cofactor homolog. These findings offer a detailed structural basis for the modulation of quality control fate in a model misfolded protein and highlight burial mode modeling as a rapid means to detect functionally important conformational changes in marginally stable globular domains. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Dynamically controlled electromagnetically induced transparency in terahertz graphene metamaterial for modulation and slow light applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xunjun; Yao, Yuan; Yang, Xingyu; Lu, Guangjun; Yang, Wenlong; Yang, Yuqiang; Wu, Fengmin; Yu, Zhigang; Jiang, Jiuxing

    2018-03-01

    By patterning two graphene resonators on a SiO2/Si substrate, a dynamically controlled electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the terahertz graphene metamaterial was numerically studied through tuning the structural parameter and Fermi energy of graphene. The calculated surface current distributions demonstrate that the distinct EIT window in the graphene metamaterial results from the near-field coupling of two graphene resonators. Moreover, the EIT window can be actively controlled by tuning Fermi energy combined states of two resonators. When the Fermi energy combined state of two resonators changes from (0.21 and 0.16 eV) to (0.4 and 0.11 eV), the amplitude modulation depth of the EIT peak is 97.8% at 0.45 THz, and the corresponding enhanced factor of group delay with 6 times is obtained. This study offers an alternative tuning method to existing optical, thermal, and relative distance tuning, delivering a promising potential for designing active and miniaturized THz devices.

  12. CLONING AND EXPRESSING TRYPSIN MODULATING OOSTATIC FACTOR IN Chlorella desiccata TO CONTROL MOSQUITO LARVAE.

    PubMed

    Borovsky, Dov; Sterner, Andeas; Powell, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    The insect peptide hormone trypsin modulating oostatic factor (TMOF), a decapeptide that is synthesized by the mosquito ovary and controls the translation of the gut's trypsin mRNA was cloned and expressed in the marine alga Chlorella desiccata. To express Aedes aegypti TMOF gene (tmfA) in C. desiccata cells, two plasmids (pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA) were engineered with pKYLX71 DNA (5 Kb) carrying the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter 35S(2) and the kanamycin resistant gene (neo), as well as, a 8 Kb nitrate reductase gene (nit) from Chlorella vulgaris. Transforming C. desiccata with pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA show that the engineered algal cells express TMOF (20 ± 4 μg ± SEM and 17 ± 3 μg ± SEM, respectively in 3 × 10(8) cells) and feeding the cells to mosquito larvae kill 75 and 60% of Ae. aegypti larvae in 4 days, respectively. Southern and Northern blots analyses show that tmfA integrated into the genome of C. desiccata by homologous recombination using the yeast 2 μ circle of replication and the nit in pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA, respectively, and the transformed algal cells express tmfA transcript. Using these algal cells it will be possible in the future to control mosquito larvae in the marsh. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Optically controlled reflection modulator using GaAs-AlGaAs n-i-p-i/multiple-quantum-well structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, K.-K.; Simes, R. J.; Coldren, L. A.; Gossard, A. C.; Maserjian, J.

    1989-01-01

    An optically controlled reflection modulator has been demonstrated that consists of a combination of a GaAs-AlGaAs n-i-p-i doping structure with a multiple-quantum-well structures on top of a distributed Bragg reflector, all grown by MBE. A modulation of approximately 60 percent is obtained on the test structure, corresponding to a differential change of absorption coefficient in the quantum wells of approximately 7500/cm. Changes in reflectance can be observed with a control beam power as low as 1.5 microW. This device structure has the potential of being developed as an optically addressed spatial light modulator for optical information processing.

  14. Method and apparatus for active control of combustion rate through modulation of heat transfer from the combustion chamber wall

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Jr., Charles E.; Chadwell, Christopher J.

    2004-09-21

    The flame propagation rate resulting from a combustion event in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is controlled by modulation of the heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls. In one embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is mechanically modulated by a movable member that is inserted into, or withdrawn from, the combustion chamber thereby changing the shape of the combustion chamber and the combustion chamber wall surface area. In another embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is modulated by cooling the surface of a portion of the combustion chamber wall that is in close proximity to the area of the combustion chamber where flame speed control is desired.

  15. Affective Modulation of Cognitive Control is Determined by Performance-Contingency and Mediated by Ventromedial Prefrontal and Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    King, Joseph A.; Korb, Franziska M.; Krebs, Ruth M.; Notebaert, Wim; Egner, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control requires a fine balance between stability, the protection of an on-going task-set, and flexibility, the ability to update a task-set in line with changing contingencies. It is thought that emotional processing modulates this balance, but results have been equivocal regarding the direction of this modulation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a crucial determinant of this modulation is whether affective stimuli represent performance-contingent or task-irrelevant signals. Combining functional magnetic resonance imaging with a conflict task-switching paradigm, we contrasted the effects of presenting negative- and positive-valence pictures on the stability/flexibility trade-off in humans, depending on whether picture presentation was contingent on behavioral performance. Both the behavioral and neural expressions of cognitive control were modulated by stimulus valence and performance contingency: in the performance-contingent condition, cognitive flexibility was enhanced following positive pictures, whereas in the nonperformance-contingent condition, positive stimuli promoted cognitive stability. The imaging data showed that, as anticipated, the stability/flexibility trade-off per se was reflected in differential recruitment of dorsolateral frontoparietal and striatal regions. In contrast, the affective modulation of stability/flexibility shifts was mirrored, unexpectedly, by neural responses in ventromedial prefrontal and posterior cingulate cortices, core nodes of the “default mode” network. Our results demonstrate that the affective modulation of cognitive control depends on the performance contingency of the affect-inducing stimuli, and they document medial default mode regions to mediate the flexibility-promoting effects of performance-contingent positive affect, thus extending recent work that recasts these regions as serving a key role in on-task control processes. PMID:24155301

  16. Post-error action control is neurobehaviorally modulated under conditions of constant speeded response.

    PubMed

    Soshi, Takahiro; Ando, Kumiko; Noda, Takamasa; Nakazawa, Kanako; Tsumura, Hideki; Okada, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Post-error slowing (PES) is an error recovery strategy that contributes to action control, and occurs after errors in order to prevent future behavioral flaws. Error recovery often malfunctions in clinical populations, but the relationship between behavioral traits and recovery from error is unclear in healthy populations. The present study investigated the relationship between impulsivity and error recovery by simulating a speeded response situation using a Go/No-go paradigm that forced the participants to constantly make accelerated responses prior to stimuli disappearance (stimulus duration: 250 ms). Neural correlates of post-error processing were examined using event-related potentials (ERPs). Impulsivity traits were measured with self-report questionnaires (BIS-11, BIS/BAS). Behavioral results demonstrated that the commission error for No-go trials was 15%, but PES did not take place immediately. Delayed PES was negatively correlated with error rates and impulsivity traits, showing that response slowing was associated with reduced error rates and changed with impulsivity. Response-locked error ERPs were clearly observed for the error trials. Contrary to previous studies, error ERPs were not significantly related to PES. Stimulus-locked N2 was negatively correlated with PES and positively correlated with impulsivity traits at the second post-error Go trial: larger N2 activity was associated with greater PES and less impulsivity. In summary, under constant speeded conditions, error monitoring was dissociated from post-error action control, and PES did not occur quickly. Furthermore, PES and its neural correlate (N2) were modulated by impulsivity traits. These findings suggest that there may be clinical and practical efficacy of maintaining cognitive control of actions during error recovery under common daily environments that frequently evoke impulsive behaviors.

  17. Cortisol Modulation by Ayahuasca in Patients With Treatment Resistant Depression and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Ana C. de Menezes; de Almeida, Raíssa N.; Silva, Erick A. dos Santos; Freire, Fúlvio A. M.; Palhano-Fontes, Fernanda; Onias, Heloisa; Arcoverde, Emerson; Maia-de-Oliveira, João P.; de Araújo, Dráulio B.; Lobão-Soares, Bruno; Galvão-Coelho, Nicole L.

    2018-01-01

    Major depression is a highly prevalent mood disorder, affecting about 350 million people, and around 30% of the patients are resistant to currently available antidepressant medications. Recent evidence from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) supports the rapid antidepressant effects of the psychedelic ayahuasca in treatment-resistant depression. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of ayahuasca on plasma cortisol and awakening salivary cortisol response, in the same group of treatment-resistant patients (MD) and in healthy volunteers (C). Subjects received a single dose of ayahuasca or placebo (dosing session), and both plasma and awakening salivary cortisol response were measured at baseline (before dosing session) and 48 h after the dosing session. Baseline assessment (D0) showed blunted awakening salivary cortisol response and hypocortisolemia in patients, with respect to healthy controls. Salivary cortisol was also measured during dosing session, and we observed higher increases for both C and MD that ingested ayahuasca than placebo. After 48 h from the dosing session with ayahuasca, patients' awakening salivary cortisol response is similar to the ones detected in controls. No significant changes in plasma cortisol levels were observed 48 h after the sessions. Therefore, these findings point to new evidence on the modulation of salivary cortisol levels as a result of an ayahuasca session, both in healthy and depressive volunteers. Considering that cortisol acts in regulation of distinct physiological pathways, emotional and cognitive processes, it is assumed to be critically involved to the etiology of depression and its regulation seems to be important for the treatment and remission of major depression, ayahuasca use as antidepressant should be further investigated. Moreover, this study highlights the importance of psychedelics in the treatment of human mental disorders. PMID:29867608

  18. Post-error action control is neurobehaviorally modulated under conditions of constant speeded response

    PubMed Central

    Soshi, Takahiro; Ando, Kumiko; Noda, Takamasa; Nakazawa, Kanako; Tsumura, Hideki; Okada, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Post-error slowing (PES) is an error recovery strategy that contributes to action control, and occurs after errors in order to prevent future behavioral flaws. Error recovery often malfunctions in clinical populations, but the relationship between behavioral traits and recovery from error is unclear in healthy populations. The present study investigated the relationship between impulsivity and error recovery by simulating a speeded response situation using a Go/No-go paradigm that forced the participants to constantly make accelerated responses prior to stimuli disappearance (stimulus duration: 250 ms). Neural correlates of post-error processing were examined using event-related potentials (ERPs). Impulsivity traits were measured with self-report questionnaires (BIS-11, BIS/BAS). Behavioral results demonstrated that the commission error for No-go trials was 15%, but PES did not take place immediately. Delayed PES was negatively correlated with error rates and impulsivity traits, showing that response slowing was associated with reduced error rates and changed with impulsivity. Response-locked error ERPs were clearly observed for the error trials. Contrary to previous studies, error ERPs were not significantly related to PES. Stimulus-locked N2 was negatively correlated with PES and positively correlated with impulsivity traits at the second post-error Go trial: larger N2 activity was associated with greater PES and less impulsivity. In summary, under constant speeded conditions, error monitoring was dissociated from post-error action control, and PES did not occur quickly. Furthermore, PES and its neural correlate (N2) were modulated by impulsivity traits. These findings suggest that there may be clinical and practical efficacy of maintaining cognitive control of actions during error recovery under common daily environments that frequently evoke impulsive behaviors. PMID:25674058

  19. Effect of modulated-frequency and modulated-intensity transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation after abdominal surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Mitsunori; Tabira, Kazuyuki; Masuda, Takashi; Nishiwada, Takashi; Shomoto, Koji

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for treatment of postoperative pain and pulmonary functions (vital capacity [VC]; cough peak flow, [CPF]) in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. Forty-eight patients were randomly allocated to receive TENS, placebo TENS, or no TENS (control) 1 hour a day for 3 days postoperatively. A 0-100 visual analog scale was used to assess pain at preintervention, mid-intervention, and postintervention on the third postoperative day. Pulmonary functions (VC, CPF) were evaluated by spirometer at preoperation (baseline) and at preintervention, mid-intervention, and postintervention on the third postoperative day. One-way analysis of variance was used to assess differences between groups at baseline. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the control group with the placebo-TENS and TENS group, at each assessment timepoint. Two-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni post hoc test assessed the difference between the 2 (placebo-TENS×TENS) groups. A value of P<0.01 was considered statistically significant. The baselines were not significantly different between any groups. The TENS group had significant reductions in postoperative pain compared with the placebo group (P<0.01) and control group (P<0.01). There was also improvement in pulmonary functions (VC, CPF) at mid-TENS and post-TENS, but not in the placebo-TENS (P<0.01) or control groups (P<0.01). TENS is a valuable treatment to alleviate postoperative pain and improve pulmonary functions (ie, VC, CPF) in patients following abdominal surgery.

  20. Impingement effect of service module reaction control system engine plumes. Results of service module reaction control system plume model force field application to an inflight Skylab mission proximity operation situation with the inflight Skylab response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobb, J. D., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Plume impingement effects of the service module reaction control system thruster firings were studied to determine if previous flight experience would support the current plume impingement model for the orbiter reaction control system engines. The orbiter reaction control system is used for rotational and translational maneuvers such as those required during rendezvous, braking, docking, and station keeping. Therefore, an understanding of the characteristics and effects of the plume force fields generated by the reaction control system thruster firings were examined to develop the procedures for orbiter/payload proximity operations.

  1. Incentive-Related Modulation of Cognitive Control in Healthy, Anxious, and Depressed Adolescents: Development and Psychopathology Related Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Michael G.; Schroth, Elizabeth; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2007-01-01

    Background: Developmental changes in cognitive and affective processes contribute to adolescent risk-taking behavior, emotional intensification, and psychopathology. The current study examined adolescent development of cognitive control processes and their modulation by incentive, in health and psychopathology. Predictions include 1) better…

  2. Expedition One crew in Russian with Service Module

    2000-07-14

    Photographic documentation of Expedition One crew in Russia with Service Module. Views include: The three crew members for ISS Expedition One train with computers on the trainer / mockup for the Zvezda Service Module. From the left are cosmonauts Yuri Gidzenko, Soyuz commander; and Sergei Krikalev, flight engineer; and astronaut William Shepherd, mission commander. The session took place at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Russia (18628). View looking toward the hatch inside the Zvezda Service Module trainer / mockup at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Russia (18629). A wide shot of the Zvezda Service Module trainer / mockup, with the transfer compartment in the foreground (18630). Side view of the Zvezda Service Module (18631). An interior shot of the Zarya / Functional Cargo Bay (FGB) trainer / mockup (18632). Astronaut Scott Kelly, director of operations - Russia, walks through a full scale trainer / mockup for the Zvezda Service Module at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Russia (18633). Astronaut William Shepherd (right) mission commander for ISS Expedition One, and Sergei Krikalev, flight engineer, participate in a training session in a trainer / mockup of the Zvezda Service Module (18634).

  3. NaCl osmotic perturbation can modulate hydration control in rabbit cornea.

    PubMed

    Ruberti, Jeffrey W; Klyce, Stephen D

    2003-03-01

    larger (+/-45 mOsm) perturbations did not elicit a similar response consistently. Our data suggest that trans-endothelial fluid transport can be rapidly modulated to control stromal hydration in response to small NaCl osmotic stresses in a way that cushions the shock and reduces the change in corneal thickness. Moreover, this behavior is not reversible in the short term, and may assist the regulation of corneal hydration homeostatically.

  4. Controlling specific locomotor behaviors through multidimensional monoaminergic modulation of spinal circuitries

    PubMed Central

    Musienko, Pavel; van den Brand, Rubia; Märzendorfer, Olivia; Roy, Roland R.; Gerasimenko, Yury; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Courtine, Grégoire

    2012-01-01

    Descending monoaminergic inputs markedly influence spinal locomotor circuits, but the functional relationships between specific receptors and the control of walking behavior remain poorly understood. To identify these interactions, we manipulated serotonergic, dopaminergic, and noradrenergic neural pathways pharmacologically during locomotion enabled by electrical spinal cord stimulation in adult spinal rats in vivo. Using advanced neurobiomechanical recordings and multidimensional statistical procedures, we reveal that each monoaminergic receptor modulates a broad but distinct spectrum of kinematic, kinetic and EMG characteristics, which we expressed into receptor–specific functional maps. We then exploited this catalogue of monoaminergic tuning functions to devise optimal pharmacological combinations to encourage locomotion in paralyzed rats. We found that, in most cases, receptor-specific modulatory influences summed near algebraically when stimulating multiple pathways concurrently. Capitalizing on these predictive interactions, we elaborated a multidimensional monoaminergic intervention that restored coordinated hindlimb locomotion with normal levels of weight bearing and partial equilibrium maintenance in spinal rats. These findings provide new perspectives on the functions of and interactions between spinal monoaminergic receptor systems in producing stepping, and define a framework to tailor pharmacotherapies for improving neurological functions after CNS disorders. PMID:21697376

  5. Glucose-ABL1-TOR Signaling Modulates Cell Cycle Tuning to Control Terminal Appressorial Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway integrates growth and development with available nutrients, but how cellular glucose controls TOR function and signaling is poorly understood. Here, we provide functional evidence from the devastating rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae that glucose can mediate TOR activity via the product of a novel carbon-responsive gene, ABL1, in order to tune cell cycle progression during infection-related development. Under nutrient-free conditions, wild type (WT) M. oryzae strains form terminal plant-infecting cells (appressoria) at the tips of germ tubes emerging from three-celled spores (conidia). WT appressorial development is accompanied by one round of mitosis followed by autophagic cell death of the conidium. In contrast, Δabl1 mutant strains undergo multiple rounds of accelerated mitosis in elongated germ tubes, produce few appressoria, and are abolished for autophagy. Treating WT spores with glucose or 2-deoxyglucose phenocopied Δabl1. Inactivating TOR in Δabl1 mutants or glucose-treated WT strains restored appressorium formation by promoting mitotic arrest at G1/G0 via an appressorium- and autophagy-inducing cell cycle delay at G2/M. Collectively, this work uncovers a novel glucose-ABL1-TOR signaling axis and shows it engages two metabolic checkpoints in order to modulate cell cycle tuning and mediate terminal appressorial cell differentiation. We thus provide new molecular insights into TOR regulation and cell development in response to glucose. PMID:28072818

  6. Geranylgeranyl Diphosphate Synthase Modulates Fetal Lung Branching Morphogenesis Possibly through Controlling K-Ras Prenylation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wen-Jun; Jiang, Shan; Tang, Qiao-Li; Shen, Di; Xue, Bin; Ning, Wen; Li, Chao-Jun

    2016-06-01

    G proteins play essential roles in regulating fetal lung development, and any defects in their expression or function (eg, activation or posttranslational modification) can lead to lung developmental malformation. Geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS) can modulate protein prenylation that is required for protein membrane-anchoring and activation. Here, we report that GGPPS regulates fetal lung branching morphogenesis possibly through controlling K-Ras prenylation during fetal lung development. GGPPS was continuously expressed in lung epithelium throughout whole fetal lung development. Specific deletion of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase 1 (Ggps1) in lung epithelium during fetal lung development resulted in neonatal respiratory distress syndrome-like disease. The knockout mice died at postnatal day 1 of respiratory failure, and the lungs showed compensatory pneumonectasis, pulmonary atelectasis, and hyaline membranes. Subsequently, we proved that lung malformations in Ggps1-deficient mice resulted from the failure of fetal lung branching morphogenesis. Further investigation revealed Ggps1 deletion blocked K-Ras geranylgeranylation and extracellular signal-related kinase 1 or 2/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, which in turn disturbed fibroblast growth factor 10 regulation on fetal lung branching morphogenesis. Collectively, our data suggest that GGPPS is essential for maintaining fetal lung branching morphogenesis, which is possibly through regulating K-Ras prenylation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An Evolutionarily Conserved DOF-CONSTANS Module Controls Plant Photoperiodic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Reina, Eva; Romero-Campero, Francisco J; Romero, José M; Valverde, Federico

    2015-06-01

    The response to daylength is a crucial process that evolved very early in plant evolution, entitling the early green eukaryote to predict seasonal variability and attune its physiological responses to the environment. The photoperiod responses evolved into the complex signaling pathways that govern the angiosperm floral transition today. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii DNA-Binding with One Finger (CrDOF) gene controls transcription in a photoperiod-dependent manner, and its misexpression influences algal growth and viability. In short days, CrDOF enhances CrCO expression, a homolog of plant CONSTANS (CO), by direct binding to its promoter, while it reduces the expression of cell division genes in long days independently of CrCO. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), transgenic plants overexpressing CrDOF show floral delay and reduced expression of the photoperiodic genes CO and FLOWERING LOCUS T. The conservation of the DOF-CO module during plant evolution could be an important clue to understanding diversification by the inheritance of conserved gene toolkits in key developmental programs. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. An Evolutionarily Conserved DOF-CONSTANS Module Controls Plant Photoperiodic Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The response to daylength is a crucial process that evolved very early in plant evolution, entitling the early green eukaryote to predict seasonal variability and attune its physiological responses to the environment. The photoperiod responses evolved into the complex signaling pathways that govern the angiosperm floral transition today. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii DNA-Binding with One Finger (CrDOF) gene controls transcription in a photoperiod-dependent manner, and its misexpression influences algal growth and viability. In short days, CrDOF enhances CrCO expression, a homolog of plant CONSTANS (CO), by direct binding to its promoter, while it reduces the expression of cell division genes in long days independently of CrCO. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), transgenic plants overexpressing CrDOF show floral delay and reduced expression of the photoperiodic genes CO and FLOWERING LOCUS T. The conservation of the DOF-CO module during plant evolution could be an important clue to understanding diversification by the inheritance of conserved gene toolkits in key developmental programs. PMID:25897001

  9. Analysis of Plume Impingement Effects from Orion Crew Service Module Dual Reaction Control System Engine Firings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisbell, Andrew; Marichalar, J.; Lumpkin, F.; LeBeau, G.

    2010-01-01

    Plume impingement effects on the Orion Crew Service Module (CSM) were analyzed for various dual Reaction Control System (RCS) engine firings and various configurations of the solar arrays. The study was performed using a decoupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) approach. This approach included a single jet plume solution for the R1E RCS engine computed with the General Aerodynamic Simulation Program (GASP) CFD code. The CFD solution was used to create an inflow surface for the DSMC solution based on the Bird continuum breakdown parameter. The DSMC solution was then used to model the dual RCS plume impingement effects on the entire CSM geometry with deployed solar arrays. However, because the continuum breakdown parameter of 0.5 could not be achieved due to geometrical constraints and because high resolution in the plume shock interaction region is desired, a focused DSMC simulation modeling only the plumes and the shock interaction region was performed. This high resolution intermediate solution was then used as the inflow to the larger DSMC solution to obtain plume impingement heating, forces, and moments on the CSM and the solar arrays for a total of 21 cases that were analyzed. The results of these simulations were used to populate the Orion CSM Aerothermal Database.

  10. Modulating capacitive response of MoS2 flake by controlled nanostructuring through focused laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Rani, Renu; Kundu, Anirban; Balal, Mohammad; Sheet, Goutam; Hazra, Kiran Shankar

    2018-08-24

    Unlike graphene nanostructures, various physical properties of nanostructured MoS 2 have remained unexplored due to the lack of established fabrication routes. Herein, we have reported unique electrostatic properties of MoS 2 nanostructures, fabricated in a controlled manner of different geometries on 2D flake by using focused laser irradiation technique. Electrostatic force microscopy has been carried out on MoS 2 nanostructures by varying tip bias voltage and lift height. The analysis depicts no contrast flip in phase image of the patterned nanostructure due to the absence of free surface charges. However, prominent change in phase shift at the patterned area is observed. Such contrast changes signify the capacitive interaction between tip and nanostructures at varying tip bias voltage and lift height, irrespective of their shape and size. Such unperturbed capacitive behavior of the MoS 2 nanostructures offer modulation of capacitance in periodic array on 2D MoS 2 flake for potential application in capacitive devices.

  11. Modulation of spin dynamics via voltage control of spin-lattice coupling in multiferroics

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Mingmin; Zhou, Ziyao; Peng, Bin; ...

    2017-02-03

    Our work aims at magnonics manipulation by the magnetoelectric coupling effect and is motivated by the most recent progresses in both magnonics (spin dynamics) and multiferroics fields. Here, voltage control of magnonics, particularly the surface spin waves, is achieved in La 0.7Sr 0.3MnO 3/0.7Pb(Mg 1/3Nb 2/3)O 3-0.3PbTiO 3 multiferroic heterostructures. With the electron spin resonance method, a large 135 Oe shift of surface spin wave resonance (≈7 times greater than conventional voltage-induced ferromagnetic resonance shift of 20 Oe) is determined. A model of the spin-lattice coupling effect, i.e., varying exchange stiffness due to voltage-induced anisotropic lattice changes, has been establishedmore » to explain experiment results with good agreement. In addition, an “on” and “off” spin wave state switch near the critical angle upon applying a voltage is created. The modulation of spin dynamics by spin-lattice coupling effect provides a platform for realizing energy-efficient, tunable magnonics devices.« less

  12. Dynamic and Progressive Control of DNA Origami Conformation by Modulating DNA Helicity with Chemical Adducts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haorong; Zhang, Hanyu; Pan, Jing; Cha, Tae-Gon; Li, Shiming; Andréasson, Joakim; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2016-05-24

    DNA origami has received enormous attention for its ability to program complex nanostructures with a few nanometer precision. Dynamic origami structures that change conformation in response to environmental cues or external signals hold great promises in sensing and actuation at the nanoscale. The reconfiguration mechanism of existing dynamic origami structures is mostly limited to single-stranded hinges and relies almost exclusively on DNA hybridization or strand displacement. Here, we show an alternative approach by demonstrating on-demand conformation changes with DNA-binding molecules, which intercalate between base pairs and unwind DNA double helices. The unwinding effect modulates the helicity mismatch in DNA origami, which significantly influences the internal stress and the global conformation of the origami structure. We demonstrate the switching of a polymerized origami nanoribbon between different twisting states and a well-constrained torsional deformation in a monomeric origami shaft. The structural transformation is shown to be reversible, and binding isotherms confirm the reconfiguration mechanism. This approach provides a rapid and reversible means to change DNA origami conformation, which can be used for dynamic and progressive control at the nanoscale.

  13. Gener: a minimal programming module for chemical controllers based on DNA strand displacement

    PubMed Central

    Kahramanoğulları, Ozan; Cardelli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Gener is a development module for programming chemical controllers based on DNA strand displacement. Gener is developed with the aim of providing a simple interface that minimizes the opportunities for programming errors: Gener allows the user to test the computations of the DNA programs based on a simple two-domain strand displacement algebra, the minimal available so far. The tool allows the user to perform stepwise computations with respect to the rules of the algebra as well as exhaustive search of the computation space with different options for exploration and visualization. Gener can be used in combination with existing tools, and in particular, its programs can be exported to Microsoft Research’s DSD tool as well as to LaTeX. Availability and implementation: Gener is available for download at the Cosbi website at http://www.cosbi.eu/research/prototypes/gener as a windows executable that can be run on Mac OS X and Linux by using Mono. Contact: ozan@cosbi.eu PMID:25957353

  14. Compact, Intelligent, Digitally Controlled IGBT Gate Drivers for a PEBB-Based ILC Marx Modulator

    SciT

    Nguyen, M.N.; Burkhart, C.; Olsen, J.J.

    2010-06-07

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has built and is currently operating a first generation prototype Marx klystron modulator to meet ILC specifications. Under development is a second generation prototype, aimed at improving overall performance, serviceability, and manufacturability as compared to its predecessor. It is designed around 32 cells, each operating at 3.75 kV and correcting for its own capacitor droop. Due to the uniqueness of this application, high voltage gate drivers needed to be developed for the main 6.5 kV and droop correction 1.7 kV IGBTs. The gate driver provides vital functions such as protection of the IGBT from over-voltage andmore » over-current, detection of gate-emitter open and short circuit conditions, and monitoring of IGBT degradation (based on collector-emitter saturation voltage). Gate drive control, diagnostic processing capabilities, and communication are digitally implemented using an FPGA. This paper details the design of the gate driver circuitry, component selection, and construction layout. In addition, experimental results are included to illustrate the effectiveness of the protection circuit.« less

  15. Gener: a minimal programming module for chemical controllers based on DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Kahramanoğulları, Ozan; Cardelli, Luca

    2015-09-01

    : Gener is a development module for programming chemical controllers based on DNA strand displacement. Gener is developed with the aim of providing a simple interface that minimizes the opportunities for programming errors: Gener allows the user to test the computations of the DNA programs based on a simple two-domain strand displacement algebra, the minimal available so far. The tool allows the user to perform stepwise computations with respect to the rules of the algebra as well as exhaustive search of the computation space with different options for exploration and visualization. Gener can be used in combination with existing tools, and in particular, its programs can be exported to Microsoft Research's DSD tool as well as to LaTeX. Gener is available for download at the Cosbi website at http://www.cosbi.eu/research/prototypes/gener as a windows executable that can be run on Mac OS X and Linux by using Mono. ozan@cosbi.eu. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Glucose-ABL1-TOR Signaling Modulates Cell Cycle Tuning to Control Terminal Appressorial Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Marroquin-Guzman, Margarita; Sun, Guangchao; Wilson, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway integrates growth and development with available nutrients, but how cellular glucose controls TOR function and signaling is poorly understood. Here, we provide functional evidence from the devastating rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae that glucose can mediate TOR activity via the product of a novel carbon-responsive gene, ABL1, in order to tune cell cycle progression during infection-related development. Under nutrient-free conditions, wild type (WT) M. oryzae strains form terminal plant-infecting cells (appressoria) at the tips of germ tubes emerging from three-celled spores (conidia). WT appressorial development is accompanied by one round of mitosis followed by autophagic cell death of the conidium. In contrast, Δabl1 mutant strains undergo multiple rounds of accelerated mitosis in elongated germ tubes, produce few appressoria, and are abolished for autophagy. Treating WT spores with glucose or 2-deoxyglucose phenocopied Δabl1. Inactivating TOR in Δabl1 mutants or glucose-treated WT strains restored appressorium formation by promoting mitotic arrest at G1/G0 via an appressorium- and autophagy-inducing cell cycle delay at G2/M. Collectively, this work uncovers a novel glucose-ABL1-TOR signaling axis and shows it engages two metabolic checkpoints in order to modulate cell cycle tuning and mediate terminal appressorial cell differentiation. We thus provide new molecular insights into TOR regulation and cell development in response to glucose.

  17. Statistical process control analysis for patient quality assurance of intensity modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Rena; Kim, Kyubo; Cho, Samju; Lim, Sangwook; Lee, Suk; Shim, Jang Bo; Huh, Hyun Do; Lee, Sang Hoon; Ahn, Sohyun

    2017-11-01

    This study applied statistical process control to set and verify the quality assurances (QA) tolerance standard for our hospital's characteristics with the criteria standards that are applied to all the treatment sites with this analysis. Gamma test factor of delivery quality assurances (DQA) was based on 3%/3 mm. Head and neck, breast, prostate cases of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric arc radiation therapy (VMAT) were selected for the analysis of the QA treatment sites. The numbers of data used in the analysis were 73 and 68 for head and neck patients. Prostate and breast were 49 and 152 by MapCHECK and ArcCHECK respectively. C p value of head and neck and prostate QA were above 1.0, C pml is 1.53 and 1.71 respectively, which is close to the target value of 100%. C pml value of breast (IMRT) was 1.67, data values are close to the target value of 95%. But value of was 0.90, which means that the data values are widely distributed. C p and C pml of breast VMAT QA were respectively 1.07 and 2.10. This suggests that the VMAT QA has better process capability than the IMRT QA. Consequently, we should pay more attention to planning and QA before treatment for breast Radiotherapy.

  18. Full quaternion based finite-time cascade attitude control approach via pulse modulation synthesis for a spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Mazinan, A H; Pasand, M; Soltani, B

    2015-09-01

    In the aspect of further development of investigations in the area of spacecraft modeling and analysis of the control scheme, a new hybrid finite-time robust three-axis cascade attitude control approach is proposed via pulse modulation synthesis. The full quaternion based control approach proposed here is organized in association with both the inner and the outer closed loops. It is shown that the inner closed loop, which consists of the sliding mode finite-time control approach, the pulse width pulse frequency modulator, the control allocation and finally the dynamics of the spacecraft is realized to track the three-axis referenced commands of the angular velocities. The pulse width pulse frequency modulators are in fact employed in the inner closed loop to accommodate the control signals to a number of on-off thrusters, while the control allocation algorithm provides the commanded firing times for the reaction control thrusters in the overactuated spacecraft. Hereinafter, the outer closed loop, which consists of the proportional linear control approach and the kinematics of the spacecraft is correspondingly designed to deal with the attitude angles that are presented by quaternion vector. It should be noted that the main motivation of the present research is to realize a hybrid control method by using linear and nonlinear terms and to provide a reliable and robust control structure, which is able to track time varying three-axis referenced commands. Subsequently, a stability analysis is presented to verify the performance of the overall proposed cascade attitude control approach. To prove the effectiveness of the presented approach, a thorough investigation is presented compared to a number of recent corresponding benchmarks. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Modulation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Controls CD4+ T-cell Activation and Antitumor Function.

    PubMed

    Thaxton, Jessica E; Wallace, Caroline; Riesenberg, Brian; Zhang, Yongliang; Paulos, Chrystal M; Beeson, Craig C; Liu, Bei; Li, Zihai

    2017-08-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an energy-sensing organelle with intimate ties to programming cell activation and metabolic fate. T-cell receptor (TCR) activation represents a form of acute cell stress and induces mobilization of ER Ca 2+ stores. The role of the ER in programming T-cell activation and metabolic fate remains largely undefined. Gp96 is an ER protein with functions as a molecular chaperone and Ca 2+ buffering protein. We hypothesized that the ER stress response may be important for CD4 + T-cell activation and that gp96 may be integral to this process. To test our hypothesis, we utilized genetic deletion of the gp96 gene Hsp90b1 in a CD4 + T cell-specific manner. We show that gp96-deficient CD4 + T cells cannot undergo activation-induced glycolysis due to defective Ca 2+ mobilization upon TCR engagement. We found that activating naïve CD4 + T cells while inhibiting ER Ca 2+ exchange, through pharmacological blockade of the ER Ca 2+ channel inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP 3 R), led to a reduction in cytosolic Ca 2+ content and generated a pool of CD62L high /CD44 low CD4 + T cells compared with wild-type (WT) matched controls. In vivo IP 3 R-inhibited CD4 + T cells exhibited elevated tumor control above WT T cells. Together, these data show that ER-modulated cytosolic Ca 2+ plays a role in defining CD4 + T-cell phenotype and function. Factors associated with the ER stress response are suitable targets for T cell-based immunotherapies. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(8); 666-75. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Stimulus onset predictability modulates proactive action control in a Go/No-go task

    PubMed Central

    Berchicci, Marika; Lucci, Giuliana; Spinelli, Donatella; Di Russo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether the presence/absence of visual cues specifying the onset of an upcoming, action-related stimulus modulates pre-stimulus brain activity, associated with the proactive control of goal-directed actions. To this aim we asked 12 subjects to perform an equal probability Go/No-go task with four stimulus configurations in two conditions: (1) uncued, i.e., without any external information about the timing of stimulus onset; and (2) cued, i.e., with external visual cues providing precise information about the timing of stimulus onset. During task both behavioral performance and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. Behavioral results showed faster response times in the cued than uncued condition, confirming existing literature. ERPs showed novel results in the proactive control stage, that started about 1 s before the motor response. We observed a slow rising prefrontal positive activity, more pronounced in the cued than the uncued condition. Further, also pre-stimulus activity of premotor areas was larger in cued than uncued condition. In the post-stimulus period, the P3 amplitude was enhanced when the time of stimulus onset was externally driven, confirming that external cueing enhances processing of stimulus evaluation and response monitoring. Our results suggest that different pre-stimulus processing come into play in the two conditions. We hypothesize that the large prefrontal and premotor activities recorded with external visual cues index the monitoring of the external stimuli in order to finely regulate the action. PMID:25964751

  1. Microgravity Emissions Laboratory Testing of the Light Microscopy Module Control Box Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Anne M.; Samorezov, Sergey; Haecker, Anthony H.

    2003-01-01

    The Microgravity Emissions Laboratory (MEL) was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center for the characterization, simulation, and verification of the International Space Station (ISS) microgravity environment. This Glenn lab was developed in support of the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF). The MEL is a six-degrees-of-freedom inertial measurement system that can characterize the inertial response forces (emissions) of components, subrack payloads, or rack-level payloads down to 10 7g. The inertial force output data generated from the steady-state or transient operations of the test article are used with finite element analysis, statistical energy analysis, and other analysis tools to predict the on-orbit environment at specific science or rack interface locations. Customers of the MEL have used benefits in isolation performance testing in defining available attenuation during the engineering hardware design phase of their experiment s development. The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Control Box (LCB) fan was tested in the MEL in June and July of 2002. The LMM is planned as a remotely controllable on-orbit microscope subrack facility that will be accommodated in an FCF Fluids Integrated Rack on the ISS. The disturbances measured in the MEL test resulted from operation of the air-circulation fan within the LCB. The objectives of the testing were (1) to identify an isolator to be added to the LCB fan assembly to reduce fan-speed harmonics and (2) to identify the fan-disturbance forcing functions for use in rack-response analysis of the LMM and Fluids Integrated Rack facility. This report describes the MEL, the testing process, and the results from ground-based MEL LCB fan testing.

  2. Simultaneous exposure of nematophagous fungi, entomopathogenic nematodes and entomopathogenic fungi can modulate belowground insect pest control.

    PubMed

    Bueno-Pallero, Francisco Ángel; Blanco-Pérez, Rubén; Dionísio, Lídia; Campos-Herrera, Raquel

    2018-05-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) and fungi (EPF) are well known biological control agents (BCAs) against insect pests. Similarly, the nematophagous fungi (NF) are considered good BCA candidates for controlling plant parasitic nematodes. Because NF can employ EPNs as food and interact with EPF, we speculate that the simultaneous application of EPNs and EPF might result in higher insect mortality, whereas the triple species combination with NF will reduce the EPN and EPF activity by predation or inhibition. Here we evaluated single, dual (EPN + EPF, EPF + NF, EPN + NF) and triple (EPN + EPF + NF) combinations of one EPN, Steinernema feltiae (Rhabditida: Steinernematidae), one EPF, Beauveria bassiana (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae), and two NF, Arthrobotrys musiformis (Orbiliales: Orbiliaceae) and Purpureocillium lilacinum (Hypocreales: Ophiocordycipitaceae) under laboratory conditions. First, we showed that EPF reduced the growth rate of NF and vice versa when combined in both rich and limiting media, suggesting a negative interaction when combining both fungi. Three different fungal applications (contact with mycelia-conidia, immersion in conidial suspension, and injection of conidial suspension) were tested in single, dual and triple species combinations, evaluating Galleria mellonella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larval mortality and time to kill. When mycelia was presented, the EPF appeared to be the dominant in combined treatments, whereas in immersion exposure was the EPN. In both types of exposure, NF alone did not produce any effect on larvae. However, when A. musiformis was injected, it produced larval mortalities >70% in the same time span as EPN. Overall, additive effects dominated the dual and triple combinations, with the exception of injection method, where synergisms occurred for both NF species combined with EPN + EPF. This study illustrates how differences in species combination and timing of fungal arrival can modulate the action

  3. Disease Control and Ototoxicity Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Tumor-Bed Boost for Medulloblastoma

    SciT

    Polkinghorn, William R.; Dunkel, Ira J.; Souweidane, Mark M.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We previously reported excellent local control for treating medulloblastoma with a limited boost to the tumor bed. In order to decrease ototoxicity, we subsequently implemented a tumor-bed boost using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the clinical results of which we report here. Patients and Methods: A total of 33 patients with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma, 25 with standard risk, and 8 with high risk, were treated on an IMRT tumor-bed boost following craniospinal irradiation (CSI). Six standard-risk patients were treated with an institutional protocol with 18 Gy CSI in conjunction with intrathecal iodine-131-labeled monoclonal antibody. The majority of patients received concurrentmore » vincristine and standard adjuvant chemotherapy. Pure-tone audiograms were graded according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Median age was 9 years old (range, 4-46 years old). Median follow-up was 63 months. Kaplan-Meier estimates of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates for standard-risk patients who received 23.4 or 36 Gy CSI (not including those who received 18 Gy CSI with radioimmunotherapy) were 81.4% and 88.4%, respectively, at 5 years; 5-year PFS and OS rates for high-risk patients were both 87.5%. There were no isolated posterior fossa failures outside of the boost volume. Posttreatment audiograms were available for 31 patients, of whom 6%, at a median follow-up of 19 months, had developed Grade 3 hearing loss. Conclusion: An IMRT tumor-bed boost results in excellent local control while delivering a low mean dose to the cochlea, resulting in a low rate of ototoxicity.« less

  4. Statistical quality control for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery by using the machine's log data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Me-Yeon; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Park, Soah; Hwang, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Han, Tae Jin; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to set up statistical quality control for monitoring the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery error by using the machine's log data. Eclipse and a Clinac iX linac with the RapidArc system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) are used for delivery of the VMAT plan. During the delivery of the RapidArc fields, the machine determines the delivered monitor units (MUs) and the gantry angle's position accuracy and the standard deviations of the MU ( σMU: dosimetric error) and the gantry angle ( σGA: geometric error) are displayed on the console monitor after completion of the RapidArc delivery. In the present study, first, the log data were analyzed to confirm its validity and usability; then, statistical process control (SPC) was applied to monitor the σMU and the σGA in a timely manner for all RapidArc fields: a total of 195 arc fields for 99 patients. The MU and the GA were determined twice for all fields, that is, first during the patient-specific plan QA and then again during the first treatment. The sMU and the σGA time series were quite stable irrespective of the treatment site; however, the sGA strongly depended on the gantry's rotation speed. The σGA of the RapidArc delivery for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was smaller than that for the typical VMAT. Therefore, SPC was applied for SBRT cases and general cases respectively. Moreover, the accuracy of the potential meter of the gantry rotation is important because the σGA can change dramatically due to its condition. By applying SPC to the σMU and σGA, we could monitor the delivery error efficiently. However, the upper and the lower limits of SPC need to be determined carefully with full knowledge of the machine and log data.

  5. Motivational intensity modulates the effects of positive emotions on set shifting after controlling physiological arousal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ya; Siu, Angela F Y

    2015-12-01

    Recent research on the construct of emotion suggests the integration of a motivational dimension into the traditional two-dimension (subjective valence and physiological arousal) model. The motivational intensity of an emotional state should be taken into account while investigating the emotion-cognition relationship. This study examined how positive emotional states varying in motivational intensity influenced set shifting, after controlling the potential confounding impacts of physiological arousal. In Experiment 1, 155 volunteers performed a set-shifting task after being randomly assigned to five states: high- vs. low-motivating positive affect (interest vs. serenity), high- vs. low-motivating negative affect (disgust vs. anxiety), and neutral state. Eighty-five volunteers participated in Experiment 2, which further examined the effects of higher vs. lower degree of interest. Both experiments measured and compared participants' physiological arousal (blood pressure and pulse rate) under the normal and experimental conditions as the covariate. Results showed no difference in switching performance between the neutral and serenity groups. As compared with the neutral state, the high-motivating positive affect significantly increased set-switching reaction time costs, but reduced error rate costs; the higher the motivational intensity, the greater the time-costs impairment. This indicates a role of the high-motivating positive affect in regulating the balance between the flexible and stable cognitive control. Motivational intensity also modulated the effects of negative emotional states, i.e., disgust caused a larger increase in time costs than anxiety. Further exploration into neurobiological mechanisms that may mediate the emotional effects on set shifting is warranted. © 2015 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Pulse-density modulation control of chemical oscillation far from equilibrium in a droplet open-reactor system

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Haruka; Ito, Manami; Okuaki, Tomoya; Mori, Yoshihito; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The design, construction and control of artificial self-organized systems modelled on dynamical behaviours of living systems are important issues in biologically inspired engineering. Such systems are usually based on complex reaction dynamics far from equilibrium; therefore, the control of non-equilibrium conditions is required. Here we report a droplet open-reactor system, based on droplet fusion and fission, that achieves dynamical control over chemical fluxes into/out of the reactor for chemical reactions far from equilibrium. We mathematically reveal that the control mechanism is formulated as pulse-density modulation control of the fusion–fission timing. We produce the droplet open-reactor system using microfluidic technologies and then perform external control and autonomous feedback control over autocatalytic chemical oscillation reactions far from equilibrium. We believe that this system will be valuable for the dynamical control over self-organized phenomena far from equilibrium in chemical and biomedical studies. PMID:26786848

  7. Pulse-density modulation control of chemical oscillation far from equilibrium in a droplet open-reactor system.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Haruka; Ito, Manami; Okuaki, Tomoya; Mori, Yoshihito; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-20

    The design, construction and control of artificial self-organized systems modelled on dynamical behaviours of living systems are important issues in biologically inspired engineering. Such systems are usually based on complex reaction dynamics far from equilibrium; therefore, the control of non-equilibrium conditions is required. Here we report a droplet open-reactor system, based on droplet fusion and fission, that achieves dynamical control over chemical fluxes into/out of the reactor for chemical reactions far from equilibrium. We mathematically reveal that the control mechanism is formulated as pulse-density modulation control of the fusion-fission timing. We produce the droplet open-reactor system using microfluidic technologies and then perform external control and autonomous feedback control over autocatalytic chemical oscillation reactions far from equilibrium. We believe that this system will be valuable for the dynamical control over self-organized phenomena far from equilibrium in chemical and biomedical studies.

  8. Emotional modulation of control dilemmas: the role of positive affect, reward, and dopamine in cognitive stability and flexibility.

    PubMed

    Goschke, Thomas; Bolte, Annette

    2014-09-01

    Goal-directed action in changing environments requires a dynamic balance between complementary control modes, which serve antagonistic adaptive functions (e.g., to shield goals from competing responses and distracting information vs. to flexibly switch between goals and behavioral dispositions in response to significant changes). Too rigid goal shielding promotes stability but incurs a cost in terms of perseveration and reduced flexibility, whereas too weak goal shielding promotes flexibility but incurs a cost in terms of increased distractibility. While research on cognitive control has long been conducted relatively independently from the study of emotion and motivation, it is becoming increasingly clear that positive affect and reward play a central role in modulating cognitive control. In particular, evidence from the past decade suggests that positive affect not only influences the contents of cognitive processes, but also modulates the balance between complementary modes of cognitive control. In this article we review studies from the past decade that examined effects of induced positive affect on the balance between cognitive stability and flexibility with a focus on set switching and working memory maintenance and updating. Moreover, we review recent evidence indicating that task-irrelevant positive affect and performance-contingent rewards exert different and sometimes opposite effects on cognitive control modes, suggesting dissociations between emotional and motivational effects of positive affect. Finally, we critically review evidence for the popular hypothesis that effects of positive affect may be mediated by dopaminergic modulations of neural processing in prefrontal and striatal brain circuits, and we refine this "dopamine hypothesis of positive affect" by specifying distinct mechanisms by which dopamine may mediate effects of positive affect and reward on cognitive control. We conclude with a discussion of limitations of current research, point to

  9. Phase control and fast start-up of a magnetron using modulation of an addressable faceted cathode

    SciT

    Browning, J., E-mail: JimBrowning@BoiseState.edu; Fernandez-Gutierrez, S.; Lin, M. C.

    The use of an addressable, faceted cathode has been proposed as a method of modulating current injection in a magnetron to improve performance and control phase. To implement the controllable electron emission, five-sided and ten-sided faceted planar cathodes employing gated field emitters are considered as these emitters could be fabricated on flat substrates. For demonstration, the conformal finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell simulation, as implemented in VORPAL, has been used to model a ten-cavity, rising sun magnetron using the modulated current sources and benchmarked against a typical continuous current source. For the modulated, ten-sided faceted cathode case, the electrons are injected frommore » three emitter elements on each of the ten facets. Each emitter is turned ON and OFF in sequence at the oscillating frequency with five emitters ON at one time to drive the five electron spokes of the π-mode. The emitter duty cycle is then 1/6th the Radio-Frequency (RF) period. Simulations show a fast start-up time as low as 35 ns for the modulated case compared to 100 ns for the continuous current cases. Analysis of the RF phase using the electron spoke locations and the RF magnetic field components shows that the phase is controlled for the modulated case while it is random, as typical, for the continuous current case. Active phase control during oscillation was demonstrated by shifting the phase of the electron injection 180° after oscillations started. The 180° phase shift time was approximately 25 RF cycles.« less

  10. Evaluation of an active learning module to teach hazard and risk in Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) classes.

    PubMed

    Oyarzabal, Omar A; Rowe, Ellen

    2017-04-01

    The terms hazard and risk are significant building blocks for the organization of risk-based food safety plans. Unfortunately, these terms are not clear for some personnel working in food manufacturing facilities. In addition, there are few examples of active learning modules for teaching adult participants the principles of hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP). In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of an active learning module to teach hazard and risk to participants of HACCP classes provided by the University of Vermont Extension in 2015 and 2016. This interactive module is comprised of a questionnaire; group playing of a dice game that we have previously introduced in the teaching of HACCP; the discussion of the terms hazard and risk; and a self-assessment questionnaire to evaluate the teaching of hazard and risk. From 71 adult participants that completed this module, 40 participants (56%) provided the most appropriate definition of hazard, 19 participants (27%) provided the most appropriate definition of risk, 14 participants (20%) provided the most appropriate definitions of both hazard and risk, and 23 participants (32%) did not provide an appropriate definition for hazard or risk. Self-assessment data showed an improvement in the understanding of these terms (P < 0.05). Thirty participants (42%) stated that the most valuable thing they learned with this interactive module was the difference between hazard and risk, and 40 participants (65%) responded that they did not attend similar presentations in the past. The fact that less than one third of the participants answered properly to the definitions of hazard and risk at baseline is not surprising. However, these results highlight the need for the incorporation of modules to discuss these important food safety terms and include more active learning modules to teach food safety classes. This study suggests that active learning helps food personnel better understand important food safety

  11. Validation of an auditory startle response system using chemicals or parametric modulation as positive controls.

    PubMed

    Marable, Brian R; Maurissen, Jacques P J

    2004-01-01

    Neurotoxicity regulatory guidelines mandate that automated test systems be validated using chemicals. However, in some cases, chemicals may not necessarily be needed to prove test system validity. To examine this issue, two independent experiments were conducted to validate an automated auditory startle response (ASR) system. In Experiment 1, we used adult (PND 63) and weanling (PND 22) Sprague-Dawley rats (10/sex/dose) to determine the effect of either d-amphetamine (4.0 or 8.0 mg/kg) or clonidine (0.4 or 0.8 mg/kg) on the ASR peak amplitude (ASR PA). The startle response of each rat to a short burst of white noise (120 dB SPL) was recorded over 50 consecutive trials. The ASR PA was significantly decreased (by clonidine) and increased (by d-amphetamine) compared to controls in PND 63 rats. In PND 22 rats, the response to clonidine was similar to adults, but d-amphetamine effects were not significant. Neither drug affected the rate of the decrease in ASR PA over time (habituation). In Experiment 2, PND 31 Sprague-Dawley rats (8/sex) were presented with 150 trials consisting of either white noise bursts of variable intensity (70-120 dB SPL in 10 dB increments, presented in random order) or null (0 dB SPL) trials. Statistically significant sex- and intensity-dependent differences were detected in the ASR PA. These results suggest that in some cases, parametric modulation may be an alternative to using chemicals for test system validation.

  12. Hydrophilic excipients modulate the time lag of time-controlled disintegrating press-coated tablets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Li, Mei-Jane; Lin, Kung-Hsu

    2004-08-16

    An oral press-coated tablet was developed by means of direct compression to achieve the time-controlled disintegrating or rupturing function with a distinct predetermined lag time. This press-coated tablet containing sodium diclofenac in the inner core was formulated with an outer shell by different weight ratios of hydrophobic polymer of micronized ethylcellulose (EC) powder and hydrophilic excipients such as spray-dried lactose (SDL) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC). The effect of the formulation of an outer shell comprising both hydrophobic polymer and hydrophilic excipients on the time lag of drug release was investigated. The release profile of the press-coated tablet exhibited a time period without drug release (time lag) followed by a rapid and complete release phase, in which the outer shell ruptured or broke into 2 halves. The lag phase was markedly dependent on the weight ratios of EC/SDL or EC/HPMC in the outer shell. Different time lags of the press-coated tablets from 1.0 to 16.3 hours could be modulated by changing the type and amount of the excipients. A semilogarithmic plot of the time lag of the tablet against the weight ratios of EC/SDL or EC/HPMC in the outer shell demonstrated a good linear relationship, with r = 0.976 and r = 0.982, respectively. The predetermined time lag prior to the drug release from a press-coated tablet prepared by using a micronized EC as a retarding coating shell can be adequately scheduled with the addition of hydrophilic excipients according to the time or site requirements.

  13. Phytoestrogens modulate hepcidin expression by Nrf2: Implications for dietary control of iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Bayele, Henry K; Balesaria, Sara; Srai, Surjit K S

    2015-12-01

    Hepcidin is a liver-derived antimicrobial peptide that regulates iron absorption and is also an integral part of the acute phase response. In a previous report, we found evidence that this peptide could also be induced by toxic heavy metals and xenobiotics, thus broadening its teleological role as a defensin. However it remained unclear how its sensing of disparate biotic and abiotic stressors might be integrated at the transcriptional level. We hypothesized that its function in cytoprotection may be regulated by NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the master transcriptional controller of cellular stress defenses. In this report, we show that hepcidin regulation is inextricably linked to the acute stress response through Nrf2 signaling. Nrf2 regulates hepcidin expression from a prototypical antioxidant response element in its promoter, and by synergizing with other basic leucine-zipper transcription factors. We also show that polyphenolic small molecules or phytoestrogens commonly found in fruits and vegetables including the red wine constituent resveratrol can induce hepcidin expression in vitro and post-prandially, with concomitant reductions in circulating iron levels and transferrin saturation by one such polyphenol quercetin. Furthermore, these molecules derepress hepcidin promoter activity when its transcription by Nrf2 is repressed by Keap1. Taken together, the data show that hepcidin is a prototypical antioxidant response or cytoprotective gene within the Nrf2 transcriptional circuitry. The ability of phytoestrogens to modulate hepcidin expression in vivo suggests a novel mechanism by which diet may impact iron homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Acquired self-control of insula cortex modulates emotion recognition and brain network connectivity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Sergio; Lee, Sangkyun; Soekadar, Surjo R; Caria, Andrea; Veit, Ralf; Kircher, Tilo; Birbaumer, Niels; Sitaram, Ranganatha

    2013-01-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rtfMRI) is a novel technique that has allowed subjects to achieve self-regulation of circumscribed brain regions. Despite its anticipated therapeutic benefits, there is no report on successful application of this technique in psychiatric populations. The objectives of the present study were to train schizophrenia patients to achieve volitional control of bilateral anterior insula cortex on multiple days, and to explore the effect of learned self-regulation on face emotion recognition (an extensively studied deficit in schizophrenia) and on brain network connectivity. Nine patients with schizophrenia were trained to regulate the hemodynamic response in bilateral anterior insula with contingent rtfMRI neurofeedback, through a 2-weeks training. At the end of the training stage, patients performed a face emotion recognition task to explore behavioral effects of learned self-regulation. A learning effect in self-regulation was found for bilateral anterior insula, which persisted through the training. Following successful self-regulation, patients recognized disgust faces more accurately and happy faces less accurately. Improvements in disgust recognition were correlated with levels of self-activation of right insula. RtfMRI training led to an increase in the number of the incoming and outgoing effective connections of the anterior insula. This study shows for the first time that patients with schizophrenia can learn volitional brain regulation by rtfMRI feedback training leading to changes in the perception of emotions and modulations of the brain network connectivity. These findings open the door for further studies of rtfMRI in severely ill psychiatric populations, and possible therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Experience-based quality control of clinical intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kevin L; Brame, R Scott; Low, Daniel A; Mutic, Sasa

    2011-10-01

    To incorporate a quality control tool, according to previous planning experience and patient-specific anatomic information, into the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan generation process and to determine whether the tool improved treatment plan quality. A retrospective study of 42 IMRT plans demonstrated a correlation between the fraction of organs at risk (OARs) overlapping the planning target volume and the mean dose. This yielded a model, predicted dose = prescription dose (0.2 + 0.8 [1 - exp(-3 overlapping planning target volume/volume of OAR)]), that predicted the achievable mean doses according to the planning target volume overlap/volume of OAR and the prescription dose. The model was incorporated into the planning process by way of a user-executable script that reported the predicted dose for any OAR. The script was introduced to clinicians engaged in IMRT planning and deployed thereafter. The script's effect was evaluated by tracking δ = (mean dose-predicted dose)/predicted dose, the fraction by which the mean dose exceeded the model. All OARs under investigation (rectum and bladder in prostate cancer; parotid glands, esophagus, and larynx in head-and-neck cancer) exhibited both smaller δ and reduced variability after script implementation. These effects were substantial for the parotid glands, for which the previous δ = 0.28 ± 0.24 was reduced to δ = 0.13 ± 0.10. The clinical relevance was most evident in the subset of cases in which the parotid glands were potentially salvageable (predicted dose <30 Gy). Before script implementation, an average of 30.1 Gy was delivered to the salvageable cases, with an average predicted dose of 20.3 Gy. After implementation, an average of 18.7 Gy was delivered to salvageable cases, with an average predicted dose of 17.2 Gy. In the prostate cases, the rectum model excess was reduced from δ = 0.28 ± 0.20 to δ = 0.07 ± 0.15. On surveying dosimetrists at the end of the study, most reported that the script

  16. Controlled Release of Dexamethasone from Peptide Nanofiber Gels to Modulate Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Matthew J.; Matson, John B.; Tamboli, Vibha K.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2012-01-01

    module for PA-based therapies. More broadly, these studies define a versatile strategy for facile synthesis of self-assembling peptide-based materials with the ability to control drug release. PMID:22748768

  17. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Cardiac Contractility Modulation.

    PubMed

    Abraham, William T; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Goldsmith, Rochelle L; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Reddy, Vivek Y; Carson, Peter E; Mann, Douglas L; Saville, Benjamin; Parise, Helen; Chan, Rodrigo; Wiegn, Phi; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Kaplan, Andrew J; Edelmann, Frank; Luthje, Lars; Kahwash, Rami; Tomassoni, Gery F; Gutterman, David D; Stagg, Angela; Burkhoff, Daniel; Hasenfuß, Gerd

    2018-05-05

    The authors sought to confirm a subgroup analysis of the prior FIX-HF-5 (Evaluate Safety and Efficacy of the OPTIMIZER System in Subjects With Moderate-to-Severe Heart Failure) study showing that cardiac contractility modulation (CCM) improved exercise tolerance (ET) and quality of life in patients with ejection fractions between 25% and 45%. CCM therapy for New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III and IV heart failure (HF) patients consists of nonexcitatory electrical signals delivered to the heart during the absolute refractory period. A total of 160 patients with NYHA functional class III or IV symptoms, QRS duration <130 ms, and ejection fraction ≥25% and ≤45% were randomized to continued medical therapy (control, n = 86) or CCM (treatment, n = 74, unblinded) for 24 weeks. Peak VO 2 (primary endpoint), Minnesota Living With Heart Failure questionnaire, NYHA functional class, and 6-min hall walk were measured at baseline and at 12 and 24 weeks. Bayesian repeated measures linear modeling was used for the primary endpoint analysis with 30% borrowing from the FIX-HF-5 subgroup. Safety was assessed by the percentage of patients free of device-related adverse events with a pre-specified lower bound of 70%. The difference in peak VO 2 between groups was 0.84 (95% Bayesian credible interval: 0.123 to 1.552) ml O 2 /kg/min, satisfying the primary endpoint. Minnesota Living With Heart Failure questionnaire (p < 0.001), NYHA functional class (p < 0.001), and 6-min hall walk (p = 0.02) were all better in the treatment versus control group. There were 7 device-related events, yielding a lower bound of 80% of patients free of events, satisfying the primary safety endpoint. The composite of cardiovascular death and HF hospitalizations was reduced from 10.8% to 2.9% (p = 0.048). CCM is safe, improves exercise tolerance and quality of life in the specified group of HF patients, and leads to fewer HF hospitalizations. (Evaluate Safety and Efficacy of

  18. Modulated cortical control of individual fingers in experienced musicians: an EEG study. Electroencephalographic study.

    PubMed

    Slobounov, S; Chiang, H; Johnston, J; Ray, W

    2002-12-01

    The present research was designed to address the nature of interdependency between fingers during force production tasks in subjects with varying experience in performing independent finger manipulation. Specifically, behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) measures associated with controllability of the most enslaved (ring) and the least enslaved (index) fingers was examined in musicians and non-musicians. Six piano players and 6 age-matched control subjects performed a series of isometric force production tasks with the index and ring fingers. Subjects produced 3 different force levels with either their index or ring fingers. We measured the isometric force output produced by all 4 fingers (index, ring, middle and little), including both ramp and static phases of force production. We applied time-domain averaging of EEG single trials in order to extract 4 components of the movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP) preceding and accompanying force responses. Three behavioral findings were observed. First, musicians were more accurate than non-musicians at reaching the desired force level. Second, musicians showed less enslaving as compared to non-musicians. And third, the amount of enslaving increased with the increment of nominal force levels regardless of whether the index or ring finger was used as the master finger. In terms of EEG measures, we found differences between tasks performed with the index and ring fingers in non-musicians. For musicians, we found larger MRCP amplitudes at most electrode sites for the ring finger. Our data extends previous enslaving research and suggest an important role for previous experience in terms of the independent use of the fingers. Given that a variety of previous work has shown finger independence to be reflected in cortical representation in the brain and our findings of MRCP amplitude associated with greater independence of fingers in musicians, this suggests that what has been considered to be stable constraints

  19. Dosimetric advantages of intensity-modulated proton therapy for oropharyngeal cancer compared with intensity-modulated radiation: A case-matched control analysis

    SciT

    Holliday, Emma B.; Kocak-Uzel, Esengul; Department of Radiation Therapy, Beykent University, Istanbul

    A potential advantage of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) over intensity-modulated (photon) radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) is lower radiation dose to several critical structures involved in the development of nausea and vomiting, mucositis, and dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to quantify doses to critical structures for patients with OPC treated with IMPT and compare those with doses on IMRT plans generated for the same patients and with a matched cohort of patients actually treated with IMRT. In this study, 25 patients newly diagnosed with OPC were treated with IMPT between 2011 and 2012.more » Comparison IMRT plans were generated for these patients and for additional IMRT-treated controls extracted from a database of patients with OPC treated between 2000 and 2009. Cases were matched based on the following criteria, in order: unilateral vs bilateral therapy, tonsil vs base of tongue primary, T-category, N-category, concurrent chemotherapy, induction chemotherapy, smoking status, sex, and age. Results showed that the mean doses to the anterior and posterior oral cavity, hard palate, larynx, mandible, and esophagus were significantly lower with IMPT than with IMRT comparison plans generated for the same cohort, as were doses to several central nervous system structures involved in the nausea and vomiting response. Similar differences were found when comparing dose to organs at risks (OARs) between the IMPT cohort and the case-matched IMRT cohort. In conclusion, these findings suggest that patients with OPC treated with IMPT may experience fewer and less severe side effects during therapy. This may be the result of decreased beam path toxicities with IMPT due to lower doses to several dysphagia, odynophagia, and nausea and vomiting–associated OARs. Further study is needed to evaluate differences in long-term disease control and chronic toxicity between patients with OPC treated with IMPT in comparison

  20. Ultra-high modulation depth exceeding 2,400% in optically controlled topological surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Sangwan; Jang, Houk; Koirala, Nikesh; Brahlek, Matthew; Moon, Jisoo; Sung, Ji Ho; Park, Jun; Cha, Soonyoung; Oh, Seongshik; Jo, Moon-Ho; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Choi, Hyunyong

    2015-01-01

    Modulating light via coherent charge oscillations in solids is the subject of intense research topics in opto-plasmonics. Although a variety of methods are proposed to increase such modulation efficiency, one central challenge is to achieve a high modulation depth (defined by a ratio of extinction with/without light) under small photon-flux injection, which becomes a fundamental trade-off issue both in metals and semiconductors. Here, by fabricating simple micro-ribbon arrays of topological insulator Bi2Se3, we report an unprecedentedly large modulation depth of 2,400% at 1.5 THz with very low optical fluence of 45 μJ cm−2. This was possible, first because the extinction spectrum is nearly zero due to the Fano-like plasmon–phonon-destructive interference, thereby contributing an extremely small denominator to the extinction ratio. Second, the numerator of the extinction ratio is markedly increased due to the photoinduced formation of massive two-dimensional electron gas below the topological surface states, which is another contributor to the ultra-high modulation depth. PMID:26514372

  1. Controlled Ecological Life Support System. Design, Development, and Use of a Ground-Based Plant Growth Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, Robert D.; Smernoff, David T.; Rummel, John D.

    1987-01-01

    Problems of food production by higher plants are addressed. Experimentation requirements and necessary equipment for designing an experimental Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Plant Growth Module are defined. A framework is provided for the design of laboratory sized plant growth chambers. The rationale for the development of an informal collaborative effort between investigators from universities and industry and those at Ames is evaluated. Specific research problems appropriate for collaborative efforts are identified.

  2. Incentive-related modulation of cognitive control in healthy, anxious, and depressed adolescents: development and psychopathology related differences.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Michael G; Schroth, Elizabeth; Pine, Daniel S; Ernst, Monique

    2007-05-01

    Developmental changes in cognitive and affective processes contribute to adolescent risk-taking behavior, emotional intensification, and psychopathology. The current study examined adolescent development of cognitive control processes and their modulation by incentive, in health and psychopathology. Predictions include 1) better cognitive control in adults than adolescents, and in healthy adolescents than anxious and depressed adolescents, and 2) a stronger influence of incentives in adolescents than adults, and in healthy adolescents than their depressed and anxious counterparts. Antisaccadic eye movement parameters, which provide a measure of cognitive control, were collected during a reward antisaccade task that included parameterized incentive levels. Participants were 20 healthy adults, 30 healthy adolescents, 16 adolescents with an anxiety disorder, and 11 adolescents with major depression. Performance accuracy and saccade latency were analyzed to test both developmental and psychopathology hypotheses. Development and psychopathology group differences in cognitive control were found. Specifically, adults performed better than healthy adolescents, and healthy adolescents than anxious and depressed adolescents. Incentive improved accuracy for all groups; however, incremental increases were not sufficiently large to further modulate performance. Incentives also affected saccade latencies, pushing healthy adolescent latencies to adult levels, while being less effective in adolescents with depression or anxiety. This latter effect was partially mediated by anxiety symptom severity. Current findings evidence the modulation of cognitive control processes by incentives. While seen in both healthy adults and healthy adolescents, this modulatory effect was stronger in youth. While anxious and depressed adolescents exhibited improved cognitive control under incentives, this effect was smaller than that in healthy adolescents. These findings suggest differential

  3. Distinct sets of locomotor modules control the speed and modes of human locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Hikaru; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Kawashima, Noritaka; Shinya, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    Although recent vertebrate studies have revealed that different spinal networks are recruited in locomotor mode- and speed-dependent manners, it is unknown whether humans share similar neural mechanisms. Here, we tested whether speed- and mode-dependence in the recruitment of human locomotor networks exists or not by statistically extracting locomotor networks. From electromyographic activity during walking and running over a wide speed range, locomotor modules generating basic patterns of muscle activities were extracted using non-negative matrix factorization. The results showed that the number of modules changed depending on the modes and speeds. Different combinations of modules were extracted during walking and running, and at different speeds even during the same locomotor mode. These results strongly suggest that, in humans, different spinal locomotor networks are recruited while walking and running, and even in the same locomotor mode different networks are probably recruited at different speeds. PMID:27805015

  4. Development of Low-Cost Remote-Control Generators Based on BiTe Thermoelectric Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanicó, Luis E.; Rinalde, Fabián; Taglialavore, Eduardo; Molina, Marcelo

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a new thermogenerator based on moderate-temperature (up to 175°C) BiTe modules available on the open market. Despite this handicap relative to commercial thermogenerators based on high-temperature proprietary-technology PbBi modules (up to 560°C), this new design may become economically competitive due to its innovative thermal sink. Our thermal sink is based on a free-convection water loop built with standard tubing and household hot-water radiators, leading to a more practical, modular design. So, the specific cost of about 55,000 USD/kW obtained for this 120-W prototype is improved to 33,000 USD/kW for a 1-kW unit, which represents about half the price of commercial thermogenerators. Moreover, considering recently launched BiTe modules (that withstand up to 320°C), our proposition could have an even more favorable outlook.

  5. Improved Learning Outcomes After Flipping a Therapeutics Module: Results of a Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Lockman, Kashelle; Haines, Stuart T; McPherson, Mary Lynn

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the impact on learning outcomes of flipping a pain management module in a doctor of pharmacy curriculum. In a required first-professional-year pharmacology and therapeutics course at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, the pain therapeutics content of the pain management module was flipped. This redesign transformed the module from a largely lecture-based, instructor-centered model to a learner-centered model that included a variety of preclass activities and in-class active learning exercises. In spring 2015, the module was taught using the traditional model; in spring 2016, it was taught using the flipped model. The same end-of-module objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) and multiple-choice exam were administered in 2015 to the traditional cohort (TC; n = 156) and in 2016 to the flipped cohort (FC; n = 162). Cohort performance was compared. Learning outcomes improved significantly in the FC: The mean OSCE score improved by 12.33/100 points (P < .0001; 95% CI 10.28-14.38; effect size 1.33), and performance on the multiple-choice exam's therapeutics content improved by 5.07 percentage points (P < .0001; 95% CI 2.56-7.59; effect size 0.45). Student performance on exam items assessing higher cognitive levels significantly improved under the flipped model. Grade distribution on both exams shifted, with significantly more FC students earning an A or B and significantly fewer earning a D or F compared with TC students. Student performance on knowledge- and skill-based assessments improved significantly after flipping the therapeutics content of a pain management module.

  6. Quality control and batch testing of MRPC modules for BESIII ETOF upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Li, X.; Sun, Y. J.; Li, C.; Heng, Y. K.; Chen, T. X.; Dai, H. L.; Shao, M.; Sun, S. S.; Tang, Z. B.; Yang, R. X.; Wu, Z.; Wang, X. Z.

    2017-12-01

    The end-cap time-of-flight (ETOF) system for the Beijing Spectrometer III (BESIII) has been upgraded using the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) technology (Williams et al., 1999; Li et al., 2001; Blanco et al., 2003; Fonte et al., 2013, [1-4]). A set of quality-assurance procedures has been developed to guarantee the performances of the 72 mass-produced MRPC modules installed. The cosmic ray batch testing show that the average detection efficiency of the MRPC modules is about 95%. Two different calibration methods indicate that MRPCs' time resolution can reach 60 ps in the cosmic ray test.

  7. Disease Control After Reduced Volume Conformal and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    SciT

    Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org; Kun, Larry E.; Hua, Chia-Ho

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the rate of disease control after conformal radiation therapy using reduced clinical target volume (CTV) margins and to determine factors that predict for tumor progression. Methods and Materials: Eighty-eight children (median age, 8.5 years; range, 3.2-17.6 years) received conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy between 1998 and 2009. The study group included those prospectively treated from 1998 to 2003, using a 10-mm CTV, defined as the margin surrounding the solid and cystic tumor targeted to receive the prescription dose of 54 Gy. The CTV margin was subsequently reduced after 2003, yielding 2 groups of patients: those treatedmore » with a CTV margin greater than 5 mm (n=26) and those treated with a CTV margin less than or equal to 5 mm (n=62). Disease progression was estimated on the basis of additional variables including sex, race, extent of resection, tumor interventions, target volume margins, and frequency of weekly surveillance magnetic resonance (MR) imaging during radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 5 years. Results: There was no difference between progression-free survival rates based on CTV margins (>5 mm vs ≤5 mm) at 5 years (88.1% ± 6.3% vs 96.2% ± 4.4% [P=.6386]). There were no differences based on planning target volume (PTV) margins (or combined CTV plus PTV margins). The PTV was systematically reduced from 5 to 3 mm during the time period of the study. Factors predictive of superior progression-free survival included Caucasian race (P=.0175), no requirement for cerebrospinal fluid shunting (P=.0066), and number of surveillance imaging studies during treatment (P=.0216). Patients whose treatment protocol included a higher number of weekly surveillance MR imaging evaluations had a lower rate of tumor progression. Conclusions: These results suggest that targeted volume reductions for radiation therapy using smaller margins are feasible and safe but require careful monitoring. We are currently

  8. Role of Modulators in Controlling the Colloidal Stability and Polydispersity of the UiO-66 Metal–Organic Framework

    SciT

    Morris, William; Wang, Shunzhi; Cho, David

    2017-04-07

    Nanoscale UiO-66 Zr6(OH)4O4(C8O4H4)6 has been synthesized with a series of carboxylic acid modulators, R-COOH (where R = H, CH3, CF3, and CHCl2). The phase purity and size of each MOF was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction, BET surface area analysis, and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Size control of UiO-66 crystals from 20 nm to over 1 μm was achieved, and confirmed by STEM. The colloidal stability of each MOF was evaluated by dynamic light scattering and was found to be highly dependent on the modulator conditions utilized in the synthesis, with both lower pKa and higher acid concentration resultingmore » in more stable structures. Furthermore, STEM was carried out on both colloidally stable samples and those that exhibited a large degree of aggregation, which allowed for visualization of the different degrees of dispersion of the samples. The use of modulators at higher concentrations and with lower pKas leads to the formation of more defects, as a consequence of terephthalic acid ligands being replaced by modulator molecules, thereby enhancing the colloidal stability of the UiO-66 nanoparticles. These findings could have a significant impact on nanoscale MOF material syntheses and applications, especially in the areas of catalysis and drug delivery.« less

  9. COMMAND MODULE - APOLLO - INTERIOR - SPACECRAFT (S/C) 101 - PANEL - CONTROL - NORTH AMERICAN AVIATION (NAA), CA

    1967-01-27

    S67-23078 (27 Jan. 1967) --- Three astronauts (later to be named the Apollo 9 prime crew) in Apollo spacecraft 101 Command module during Apollo crew compartment fit and function test. Left to right are astronauts James A. McDivitt, David R. Scott, and Russell L. Schweickart.

  10. A single dynamic observer-based module for design of simultaneous fault detection, isolation and tracking control scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, M.; Meskin, N.; Khorasani, K.

    2018-03-01

    The problem of simultaneous fault detection, isolation and tracking (SFDIT) control design for linear systems subject to both bounded energy and bounded peak disturbances is considered in this work. A dynamic observer is proposed and implemented by using the H∞/H-/L1 formulation of the SFDIT problem. A single dynamic observer module is designed that generates the residuals as well as the control signals. The objective of the SFDIT module is to ensure that simultaneously the effects of disturbances and control signals on the residual signals are minimised (in order to accomplish the fault detection goal) subject to the constraint that the transfer matrix from the faults to the residuals is equal to a pre-assigned diagonal transfer matrix (in order to accomplish the fault isolation goal), while the effects of disturbances, reference inputs and faults on the specified control outputs are minimised (in order to accomplish the fault-tolerant and tracking control goals). A set of linear matrix inequality (LMI) feasibility conditions are derived to ensure solvability of the problem. In order to illustrate and demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed design methodology, the developed and proposed schemes are applied to an autonomous unmanned underwater vehicle (AUV).

  11. A Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Genomic Modulators of Rate Control Therapy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kolek, Matthew J.; Edwards, Todd L.; Muhammad, Raafia; Balouch, Adnan; Shoemaker, M. Benjamin; Blair, Marcia A.; Kor, Kaylen C.; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Roden, Dan M.; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Darbar, Dawood

    2014-01-01

    For many patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), ventricular rate control with atrioventricular (AV) nodal blockers is considered first-line therapy, though response to treatment is highly variable. Using an extreme phenotype of failure of rate control necessitating AV nodal ablation and pacemaker implantation, we conducted a genome wide association study (GWAS) to identify genomic modulators of rate control therapy. Cases included 95 patients who failed rate control therapy. Controls (N=190) achieved adequate rate control therapy with ≤2 AV nodal blockers using a conventional clinical definition. Genotyping was performed on the Illumina 610-Quad platform, and results were imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference haplotypes. 554,041 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) met criteria for minor allele frequency (>0.01), call rate (>95%), and quality control, and 6,055,224 SNPs were available after imputation. No SNP reached the canonical threshold for significance for GWAS of P<5 × 10−8. Sixty-three SNPs with P<10−5 at 6 genomic loci were genotyped in a validation cohort of 130 cases and 157 controls. These included 6q24.3 (near SAMD5/SASH1, P=9.36 × 10−8), 4q12 (IGFBP7, P=1.75 × 10−7), 6q22.33 (C6orf174, P=4.86 × 10−7), 3p21.31 (CDCP1, P=1.18 × 10−6), 12p12.1 (SOX5, P=1.62 × 10−6), and 7p11 (LANCL2, P=6.51 × 10−6). However, none of these were significant in the replication cohort or in a meta-analysis of both cohorts. In conclusion, we identified several potentially important genomic modulators of rate control therapy in AF, particularly SOX5, which was previously associated with resting heart rate and PR interval. However these failed to reach genome-wide significance. PMID:25015694

  12. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 2. Equipment, Safe Driving Practices, Legal Aspects, Controlling the Situation, Action Evaluation Conference. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the second in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains five sections that cover the following course content: ambulance equipment, safe driving practices for emergency vehicle drivers, legal aspects of the EMT's job, how to maintain control at an accident scene…

  13. Using Arrays of Microelectrodes Implanted in Residual Peripheral Nerves to Provide Dextrous Control of, and Modulated Sensory Feedback from, a Hand Prosthesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Modulated Sensory Feedback from, a Hand Prosthesis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Bradley Greger, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Arizona State University...Residual Peripheral Nerves to Provide Dextrous Control of, and Modulated Sensory Feedback from, a Hand Prosthesis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Peripheral Nerve Interface, Prosthetic Hand, Neural Prosthesis , Sensory Feedback, Micro-stimulation, Electrophysiology, Action Potentials, Micro

  14. Modulation of active site electronic structure by the protein matrix to control [NiFe] hydrogenase reactivity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dayle M A; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C

    2014-11-21

    Control of the reactivity of the nickel center of the [NiFe] hydrogenase and other metalloproteins commonly involves outer coordination sphere ligands that act to modify the geometry and physical properties of the active site metal centers. We carried out a combined set of classical molecular dynamics and quantum/classical mechanics calculations to provide quantitative estimates of how dynamic fluctuations of the active site within the protein matrix modulate the electronic structure at the catalytic center. Specifically we focused on the dynamics of the inner and outer coordination spheres of the cysteinate-bound Ni-Fe cluster in the catalytically active Ni-C state. There are correlated movements of the cysteinate ligands and the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, which modulate the electron affinity at the active site and the proton affinity of a terminal cysteinate. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesize a coupling between protein dynamics and electron and proton transfer reactions critical to dihydrogen production.

  15. Effects of Stress and Relaxation on Central Pain Modulation in Chronic Whiplash and Fibromyalgia Patients Compared to Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Coppieters, Iris; Cagnie, Barbara; Nijs, Jo; van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Danneels, Lieven; De Pauw, Robby; Meeus, Mira

    2016-03-01

    Compelling evidence has demonstrated that impaired central pain modulation contributes to persistent pain in patients with chronic whiplash associated disorders (WAD) and fibromyalgia (FM). However, there is limited research concerning the influence of stress and relaxation on central pain modulation in patients with chronic WAD and FM. The present study aims to investigate the effects of acute cognitive stress and relaxation on central pain modulation in chronic WAD and FM patients compared to healthy individuals. A randomized crossover design was employed. The present study took place at the University of Brussels, the University Hospital Brussels, and the University of Antwerp. Fifty-nine participants (16 chronic WAD patients, 21 FM, 22 pain-free controls) were enrolled and subjected to various pain measurements. Temporal summation (TS) of pain and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) were evaluated. Subsequently, participants were randomly allocated to either a group that received progressive relaxation therapy or a group that performed a battery of cognitive tests (= cognitive stressor). Afterwards, all pain measurements were repeated. One week later participant groups were switched. A significant difference was found between the groups in the change in TS in response to relaxation (P = 0.008) and cognitive stress (P = 0.003). TS decreased in response to relaxation and cognitive stress in chronic WAD patients and controls. In contrast, TS increased after both interventions in FM patients. CPM efficacy decreased in all 3 groups in response to relaxation (P = 0.002) and cognitive stress (P = 0.001). The obtained results only apply for a single session of muscle relaxation therapy and cognitive stress, whereby no conclusions can be made for effects on pain perception and modulation of chronic cognitive stress and long-term relaxation therapies. A single relaxation session as well as cognitive stress may have negative acute effects on pain modulation in patients with

  16. Locoregional control after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma with an anatomy-based target definition.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ariji, Takaki; Kameoka, Satoru; Ueda, Takashi; Kohno, Ryosuke; Nishio, Teiji; Arahira, Satoko; Motegi, Atsushi; Zenda, Sadamoto; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Tahara, Makoto; Hayashi, Ryuichi

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate locoregional control after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer using a target definition along with anatomical boundaries. Forty patients with biopsy-proven squamous cell or non-keratinizing carcinoma of the nasopharynx who underwent intensity-modulated radiotherapy between April 2006 and November 2009 were reviewed. There were 10 females and 30 males with a median age of 48 years (range, 17-74 years). More than half of the patients had T3/4 (n = 21) and/or N2/3 (n = 24) disease. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was administered as 70 Gy/33 fractions with or without concomitant chemotherapy. The clinical target volume was contoured along with muscular fascia or periosteum, and the prescribed radiotherapy dose was determined for each anatomical compartment and lymph node level in the head and neck. One local recurrence was observed at Meckel's cave on the periphery of the high-risk clinical target volume receiving a total dose of <63 Gy. Otherwise, six locoregional failures were observed within irradiated volume receiving 70 Gy. Local and nodal control rates at 3 years were 91 and 89%, respectively. Adverse events were acceptable, and 25 (81%) of 31 patients who were alive without recurrence at 2 years had xerostomia of ≤Grade 1. The overall survival rate at 3 years was 87%. Target definition along with anatomically defined boundaries was feasible without compromise of the therapeutic ratio. It is worth testing this method further to minimize the unnecessary irradiated volume and to standardize the target definition in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer.

  17. FIBER AND INTEGRATED OPTICS. OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Investigation of an electrooptic multichannel-waveguide modulator as a controlled transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykovskiĭ, Yu A.; Zheregi, V. G.; Kulchin, Yurii N.; Poryadin, Yu D.; Smirnov, V. L.; Fomichev, N. N.

    1990-05-01

    An investigation was made of a multichannel LiNbO3 waveguide modulator of light in space and time, suitable for processing of analog and digital signals. This modulator had 26 channels and the half-wave control voltage was 4.5 V. A theoretical analysis and an experimental study were made of the functional performance of this modulator depending on the channel interconnections and on the nature of the signals applied to the modulator. The feasibility of processing analog and digital signals was studied.

  18. Modulation transfer function of partial gating detector by liquid crystal auto-controlling light intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xusan; Tang, Yuanhe; Liu, Kai; Liu, Hanchen; Gao, Haiyang; Li, Qing; Zhang, Ruixia; Ye, Na; Liang, Yuan; Zhao, Gaoxiang

    2008-12-01

    Based on the electro-optical properties of liquid crystal, we have designed a novel partial gating detector. Liquid crystal can be taken to change its own transmission according to the light intensity outside. Every single pixel of the image is real-time modulated by liquid crystal, thus the strong light is weakened and low light goes through the detector normally .The purpose of partial-gating strong light (>105lx) can be achieved by this detector. The modulation transfer function (MTF) equations of the main optical sub-systems are calculated in this paper, they are liquid crystal panels, linear fiber panel and CCD array detector. According to the relevant size, the MTF value of this system is fitted out. The result is MTF= 0.518 at Nyquist frequency.

  19. Controlling the light shift of the CPT resonance by modulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsygankov, E. A.; Petropavlovsky, S. V.; Vaskovskaya, M. I.; Zibrov, S. A.; Velichansky, V. L.; Yakovlev, V. P.

    2017-12-01

    Motivated by recent developments in atomic frequency standards employing the effect of coherent population trapping (CPT), we propose a theoretical framework for the frequency modulation spectroscopy of the CPT resonances. Under realistic assumptions we provide simple yet non-trivial analytical formulae for the major spectroscopic signals such as the CPT resonance line and the in-phase/quadrature responses. We discuss the influence of the light shift and, in particular, derive a simple expression for the displacement of the resonance as a function of modulation index. The performance of the model is checked against numerical simulations, the agreement is good to perfect. The obtained results can be used in more general models accounting for light absorption in the thick optical medium.

  20. Design and Simulation of Control Technique for Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Using Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mansoor; Yong, Wang; Mustafa, Ehtasham

    2017-07-01

    After the rapid advancement in the field of power electronics devices and drives for last few decades, there are different kinds of Pulse Width Modulation techniques which have been brought to the market. The applications ranging from industrial appliances to military equipment including the home appliances. The vey common application for the PWM is three phase voltage source inverter, which is used to convert DC to AC in the homes to supply the power to the house in case electricity failure, usually named as Un-interrupted Power Supply. In this paper Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation techniques is discussed and analysed under the control technique named as Field Oriented Control. The working and implementation of this technique has been studied by implementing on the three phase bridge inverter. The technique is used to control the Permanente Magnet Synchronous Motor. The drive system is successfully implemented in MATLAB/Simulink using the mathematical equation and algorithm to achieve the satisfactory results. PI type of controller is used to tuned ers of the motothe parametr i.e. torque and current.

  1. Substance P Differentially Modulates Firing Rate of Solitary Complex (SC) Neurons from Control and Chronic Hypoxia-Adapted Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Powell, Frank L.; Dean, Jay B.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    NK1 receptors, which bind substance P, are present in the majority of brainstem regions that contain CO2/H+-sensitive neurons that play a role in central chemosensitivity. However, the effect of substance P on the chemosensitive response of neurons from these regions has not been studied. Hypoxia increases substance P release from peripheral afferents that terminate in the caudal nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). Here we studied the effect of substance P on the chemosensitive responses of solitary complex (SC: NTS and dorsal motor nucleus) neurons from control and chronic hypoxia-adapted (CHx) adult rats. We simultaneously measured intracellular pH and electrical responses to hypercapnic acidosis in SC neurons from control and CHx adult rats using the blind whole cell patch clamp technique and fluorescence imaging microscopy. Substance P significantly increased the basal firing rate in SC neurons from control and CHx rats, although the increase was smaller in CHx rats. However, substance P did not affect the chemosensitive response of SC neurons from either group of rats. In conclusion, we found that substance P plays a role in modulating the basal firing rate of SC neurons but the magnitude of the effect is smaller for SC neurons from CHx adult rats, implying that NK1 receptors may be down regulated in CHx adult rats. Substance P does not appear to play a role in modulating the firing rate response to hypercapnic acidosis of SC neurons from either control or CHx adult rats. PMID:24516602

  2. Voluntary control of breathing does not alter vagal modulation of heart rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patwardhan, A. R.; Evans, J. M.; Bruce, E. N.; Eckberg, D. L.; Knapp, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    Variations in respiratory pattern influence the heart rate spectrum. It has been suggested, hence, that metronomic respiration should be used to correctly assess vagal modulation of heart rate by using spectral analysis. On the other hand, breathing to a metronome has been reported to increase heart rate spectral power in the high- or respiratory frequency region; this finding has led to the suggestion that metronomic respiration enhances vagal tone or alters vagal modulation of heart rate. To investigate whether metronomic breathing complicates the interpretation of heart rate spectra by altering vagal modulation, we recorded the electrocardiogram and respiration from eight volunteers during three breathing trials of 10 min each: 1) spontaneous breathing (mean rate of 14.4 breaths/min); 2) breathing to a metronome at the rate of 15, 18, and 21 breaths/min for 2, 6, and 2 min, respectively; and 3) breathing to a metronome at the rate of 18 breaths/min for 10 min. Data were also collected from eight volunteers who breathed spontaneously for 20 min and breathed metronomically at each subject's mean spontaneous breathing frequency for 20 min. Results from the three 10-min breathing trials showed that heart rate power in the respiratory frequency region was smaller during metronomic breathing than during spontaneous breathing. This decrease could be explained fully by the higher breathing frequencies used during trials 2 and 3 of metronomic breathing. When the subjects breathed metronomically at each subject's mean breathing frequency, the heart rate powers during metronomic breathing were similar to those during spontaneous breathing. Our results suggest that vagal modulation of heart rate is not altered and vagal tone is not enhanced during metronomic breathing.

  3. Controlled Enhancemnt of Long-Term Memory by Modulating Neuronal miRNA Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-20

    Faraday Ave. Carlsbad CA 92008 Prepare antisense oligonucleotides 8/1/2007 12:00:00AM 2/1/2009 12:00:00AM Sub Contractor Numbers (c): Patent Clause...with ampakines. However, ampakines that accomplish positive modulation have shown undesired clinical side effects . Another approach is to improve...of times that a mouse touches objects introduced into the cage in a fixed period of time. Objects are either “old” (prior exposure) or “new” (not

  4. Too Hard to Control: Compromised Pain Anticipation and Modulation in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-07

    modulation) will be able to answer these questions. In a related prior study, quantitative sensory testing was conducted in moderate to severe TBI and...found significant loss of thermal and touch sensibility compared with healthy con- trols.67 Although detailed quantitative sensory testing was not...IA. Pain and post traumatic stress disorder ‚Äì Review of clinical and experimental evidence. Neuropharmacology 2012; 62: 586–597. 36 First MB, Spitzer

  5. Wave-aberration control with a liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS) spatial phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Enrique J; Prieto, Pedro M; Artal, Pablo

    2009-06-22

    Liquid crystal on Silicon (LCOS) spatial phase modulators offer enhanced possibilities for adaptive optics applications in terms of response velocity and fidelity. Unlike deformable mirrors, they present a capability for reproducing discontinuous phase profiles. This ability also allows an increase in the effective stroke of the device by means of phase wrapping. The latter is only limited by the diffraction related effects that become noticeable as the number of phase cycles increase. In this work we estimated the ranges of generation of the Zernike polynomials as a means for characterizing the performance of the device. Sets of images systematically degraded with the different Zernike polynomials generated using a LCOS phase modulator have been recorded and compared with their theoretical digital counterparts. For each Zernike mode, we have found that image degradation reaches a limit for a certain coefficient value; further increase in the aberration amount has no additional effect in image quality. This behavior is attributed to the intensification of the 0-order diffraction. These results have allowed determining the usable limits of the phase modulator virtually free from diffraction artifacts. The results are particularly important for visual simulation and ophthalmic testing applications, although they are equally interesting for any adaptive optics application with liquid crystal based devices.

  6. Modulation control over ultrasound-mediated gene delivery: evaluating the importance of standing waves.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mariame A; Buldakov, Mikhail A; Ogawa, Ryohei; Zhao, Qing-Li; Furusawa, Yukihiro; Kudo, Nobuki; Kondo, Takashi; Riesz, Peter

    2010-01-04

    Low modulation frequencies from 0.5 to 100Hz were shown to alter the characteristics of the ultrasound field producing solution agitation (<5Hz; region of "ultrasound streaming" prevalence) or stagnancy (>5Hz; region of standing waves establishment) (Buldakov et al., Ultrason. Sonochem., 2009). In this study, the same conditions were used to depict the changes in exogenous DNA delivery in these regions. The luciferase expression data revealed that lower modulations were more capable of enhancing delivery at the expense of viability. On the contrary, the viability was conserved at higher modulations whereas delivery was found to be null. Cavitational activity and acoustic streaming were the effecters beyond the observed pattern and delivery enhancement was shown to be mediated mainly through sonopermeation. To promote transfection, the addition of calcium ions or an echo contrast agent (Levovist((R))) was proposed. Depending on the mechanism involved in each approach, differential enhancement was observed in both regions and at the interim zone (5Hz). In both cases, enhancement in standing waves field was significant reaching 16.0 and 3.3 folds increase, respectively. Therefore, it is concluded that although the establishment of standing waves is not the only prerequisite for high transfection rates, yet, it is a key element in optimization when other factors such as proximity and cavitation are considered.

  7. Subgenual anterior cingulate cortex controls sadness-induced modulations of cognitive and emotional network hubs.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Mahaluf, Juan P; Perramon, Joan; Otal, Begonya; Villoslada, Pablo; Compte, Albert

    2018-06-04

    The regulation of cognitive and emotional processes is critical for proper executive functions and social behavior, but its specific mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we addressed this issue by studying with functional magnetic resonance imaging the changes in network topology that underlie competitive interactions between emotional and cognitive networks in healthy participants. Our behavioral paradigm contrasted periods with high emotional and cognitive demands by including a sadness provocation task followed by a spatial working memory task. The sharp contrast between successive tasks was designed to enhance the separability of emotional and cognitive networks and reveal areas that regulate the flow of information between them (hubs). By applying graph analysis methods on functional connectivity between 20 regions of interest in 22 participants we identified two main brain network modules, one dorsal and one ventral, and their hub areas: the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and the left medial frontal pole (mFP). These hub areas did not modulate their mutual functional connectivity following sadness but they did so through an interposed area, the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sACC). Our results identify dlPFC and mFP as areas regulating interactions between emotional and cognitive networks, and suggest that their modulation by sadness experience is mediated by sACC.

  8. Control of nanoscale atomic arrangement in multicomponent thin films by temporally modulated vapour fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarakinos, Kostas

    2016-09-01

    Synthesis of multicomponent thin films using vapor fluxes with a modulated deposition pattern is a potential route for accessing a wide gamut of atomic arrangements and morphologies for property tuning. In the current study, we present a research concept that allows for understanding the combined effect of flux modulation, kinetics and thermodynamics on the growth of multinary thin films. This concept entails the combined use of thin film synthesis by means of multiatomic vapor fluxes modulated with sub-monolayer resolution, deterministic growth simulations and nanoscale microstructure probes. Using this research concept we study structure formation within the archetype immiscible Ag-Cu binary system showing that atomic arrangement and morphology at different length scales is governed by diffusion of near-surface Ag atoms to encapsulate 3D Cu islands growing on 2D Ag layers. Moreover, we explore the relevance of the mechanism outlined above for morphology evolution and structure formation within the miscible Ag-Au binary system. The knowledge generated and the methodology presented herein provides the scientific foundation for tailoring atomic arrangement and physical properties in a wide range of miscible and immiscible multinary systems.

  9. A water pumping control system with a programmable logic controller (PLC) and industrial wireless modules for industrial plants--an experimental setup.

    PubMed

    Bayindir, Ramazan; Cetinceviz, Yucel

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes a water pumping control system that is designed for production plants and implemented in an experimental setup in a laboratory. These plants contain harsh environments in which chemicals, vibrations or moving parts exist that could potentially damage the cabling or wires that are part of the control system. Furthermore, the data has to be transferred over paths that are accessible to the public. The control systems that it uses are a programmable logic controller (PLC) and industrial wireless local area network (IWLAN) technologies. It is implemented by a PLC, an communication processor (CP), two IWLAN modules, and a distributed input/output (I/O) module, as well as the water pump and sensors. Our system communication is based on an Industrial Ethernet and uses the standard Transport Control Protocol/Internet Protocol for parameterisation, configuration and diagnostics. The main function of the PLC is to send a digital signal to the water pump to turn it on or off, based on the tank level, using a pressure transmitter and inputs from limit switches that indicate the level of the water in the tank. This paper aims to provide a convenient solution in process plants where cabling is not possible. It also has lower installation and maintenance cost, provides reliable operation, and robust and flexible construction, suitable for industrial applications. Copyright © 2010 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrical system for pulse-width modulated control of a power inverter using phase-shifted carrier signals and related operating methods

    DOEpatents

    Welchko, Brian A [Torrance, CA

    2012-02-14

    Systems and methods are provided for pulse-width modulated control of power inverter using phase-shifted carrier signals. An electrical system comprises an energy source and a motor. The motor has a first set of windings and a second set of windings, which are electrically isolated from each other. An inverter module is coupled between the energy source and the motor and comprises a first set of phase legs coupled to the first set of windings and a second set of phase legs coupled to the second set of windings. A controller is coupled to the inverter module and is configured to achieve a desired power flow between the energy source and the motor by modulating the first set of phase legs using a first carrier signal and modulating the second set of phase legs using a second carrier signal. The second carrier signal is phase-shifted relative to the first carrier signal.

  11. A high-speed, tunable silicon photonic ring modulator integrated with ultra-efficient active wavelength control.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuezhe; Chang, Eric; Amberg, Philip; Shubin, Ivan; Lexau, Jon; Liu, Frankie; Thacker, Hiren; Djordjevic, Stevan S; Lin, Shiyun; Luo, Ying; Yao, Jin; Lee, Jin-Hyoung; Raj, Kannan; Ho, Ron; Cunningham, John E; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V

    2014-05-19

    We report the first complete 10G silicon photonic ring modulator with integrated ultra-efficient CMOS driver and closed-loop wavelength control. A selective substrate removal technique was used to improve the ring tuning efficiency. Limited by the thermal tuner driver output power, a maximum open-loop tuning range of about 4.5nm was measured with about 14mW of total tuning power including the heater driver circuit power consumption. Stable wavelength locking was achieved with a low-power mixed-signal closed-loop wavelength controller. An active wavelength tracking range of > 500GHz was demonstrated with controller energy cost of only 20fJ/bit.

  12. Counterfactual Reasoning for Regretted Situations Involving Controllable Versus Uncontrollable Events: The Modulating Role of Contingent Self-Esteem

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Meredith R.; Ball, Linden J.; Alford, David

    2015-01-01

    We report a study that examined the modulating impact of contingent self-esteem on regret intensity for regretted outcomes associated with controllable versus uncontrollable events. The Contingent Self-Esteem Scale (e.g., Kernis & Goldman, 2006) was used to assess the extent to which a person’s sense of self-worth is based on self and others’ expectations. We found that there was an influence of self-esteem contingency for controllable but not for uncontrollable regret types. For controllable regret types individuals with a high contingent (i.e., unstable) self-esteem reported greater regret intensity than those with a low contingent (i.e., stable) self-esteem. We interpret this finding as reflecting a functional and adaptive role of high contingent self-esteem in terms of mobilizing the application of counterfactual reasoning and planning mechanisms that can enable personal expectations to be achieved in the future. PMID:25883697

  13. Counterfactual reasoning for regretted situations involving controllable versus uncontrollable events: the modulating role of contingent self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Meredith R; Ball, Linden J; Alford, David

    2015-01-01

    We report a study that examined the modulating impact of contingent self-esteem on regret intensity for regretted outcomes associated with controllable versus uncontrollable events. The Contingent Self-Esteem Scale (e.g., Kernis & Goldman, 2006) was used to assess the extent to which a person's sense of self-worth is based on self and others' expectations. We found that there was an influence of self-esteem contingency for controllable but not for uncontrollable regret types. For controllable regret types individuals with a high contingent (i.e., unstable) self-esteem reported greater regret intensity than those with a low contingent (i.e., stable) self-esteem. We interpret this finding as reflecting a functional and adaptive role of high contingent self-esteem in terms of mobilizing the application of counterfactual reasoning and planning mechanisms that can enable personal expectations to be achieved in the future.

  14. Response control networks are selectively modulated by attention to rare events and memory load regardless of the need for inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wijeakumar, Sobanawartiny; Magnotta, Vincent A; Buss, Aaron T; Ambrose, Joseph P; Wifall, Timothy A; Hazeltine, Eliot; Spencer, John P

    2015-10-15

    Recent evidence has sparked debate about the neural bases of response selection and inhibition. In the current study, we employed two reactive inhibition tasks, the Go/Nogo (GnG) and Simon tasks, to examine questions central to these debates. First, we investigated whether a fronto-cortical-striatal system was sensitive to the need for inhibition per se or the presentation of infrequent stimuli, by manipulating the proportion of trials that do not require inhibition (Go/Compatible trials) relative to trials that require inhibition (Nogo/Incompatible trials). A cortico-subcortical network composed of insula, putamen, and thalamus showed greater activation on salient and infrequent events, regardless of the need for inhibition. Thus, consistent with recent findings, key parts of the fronto-cortical-striatal system are engaged by salient events and do not appear to play a selective role in response inhibition. Second, we examined how the fronto-cortical-striatal system is modulated by working memory demands by varying the number of stimulus-response (SR) mappings. Right inferior parietal lobule showed decreasing activation as the number of SR mappings increased, suggesting that a form of associative memory - rather than working memory - might underlie performance in these tasks. A broad motor planning and control network showed similar trends that were also modulated by the number of motor responses required in each task. Finally, bilateral lingual gyri were more robustly engaged in the Simon task, consistent with the role of this area in shifts of visuo-spatial attention. The current study sheds light on how the fronto-cortical-striatal network is selectively engaged in reactive control tasks and how control is modulated by manipulations of attention and memory load. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Improvement of time-delayed feedback control by periodic modulation: analytical theory of Floquet mode control scheme.

    PubMed

    Just, Wolfram; Popovich, Svitlana; Amann, Andreas; Baba, Nilüfer; Schöll, Eckehard

    2003-02-01

    We investigate time-delayed feedback control schemes which are based on the unstable modes of the target state, to stabilize unstable periodic orbits. The periodic time dependence of these modes introduces an external time scale in the control process. Phase shifts that develop between these modes and the controlled periodic orbit may lead to a huge increase of the control performance. We illustrate such a feature on a nonlinear reaction diffusion system with global coupling and give a detailed investigation for the Rössler model. In addition we provide the analytical explanation for the observed control features.

  16. A preliminary investigation of the Environmental Control and Life Support Subsystem (EC/LSS) for the space construction base manufacturing modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, H. B.

    1977-01-01

    The preliminary data of the environmental control and life support subsystem for a space construction base manufacturing module was reported. A space processing module, which is capable of performing production biological experiments, was chosen as a baseline configuration. The primary assemblies and components considered for use were humidity and temperature control, ventilation fan, cabin fan, water separator, condensate storage, overboard dumping, distribution system, contaminant monitoring, cabin sensors, and fire and smoke detection.

  17. Exact soliton solutions and their stability control in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with spatiotemporally modulated nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qing; Wu, Lei; Zhang, Jie-Fang; Malomed, Boris A; Mihalache, D; Liu, W M

    2011-01-01

    We put forward a generic transformation which helps to find exact soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a spatiotemporal modulation of the nonlinearity and external potentials. As an example, we construct exact solitons for the defocusing nonlinearity and harmonic potential. When the soliton's eigenvalue is fixed, the number of exact solutions is determined by energy levels of the linear harmonic oscillator. In addition to the stable fundamental solitons, stable higher-order modes, describing array of dark solitons nested in a finite-width background, are constructed too. We also show how to control the instability domain of the nonstationary solitons.

  18. Nitric oxide-dependent modulation of sympathetic neural control of oxygenation in exercising human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chavoshan, Bahman; Sander, Mikael; Sybert, Troy E; Hansen, Jim; Victor, Ronald G; Thomas, Gail D

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) attenuates α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting rodent skeletal muscle, but it is unclear if NO plays a similar role in human muscle. We therefore hypothesized that in humans, NO produced in exercising skeletal muscle blunts the vasoconstrictor response to sympathetic activation. We assessed vasoconstrictor responses in the microcirculation of human forearm muscle using near-infrared spectroscopy to measure decreases in muscle oxygenation during reflex sympathetic activation evoked by lower body negative pressure (LBNP). Experiments were performed before and after NO synthase inhibition produced by systemic infusion of NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). Before l-NAME, LBNP at −20 mmHg decreased muscle oxygenation by 20 ± 2 % in resting forearm and by 2 ± 3 % in exercising forearm (n = 20), demonstrating metabolic modulation of sympathetic vasoconstriction. As expected, l-NAME increased mean arterial pressure by 17 ± 3 mmHg, leading to baroreflex-mediated supression of baseline muscle sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). The increment in muscle SNA in response to LBNP at −20 mmHg also was attenuated after l-NAME (before, +14 ± 2; after, +8 ± 1 bursts min−1; n = 6), but this effect of l-NAME was counteracted by increasing LBNP to −40 mmHg (+19 ± 2 bursts min−1). After l-NAME, LBNP at −20 mmHg decreased muscle oxygenation similarly in resting (−11 ± 3 %) and exercising (−10 ± 2 %) forearm (n = 12). Likewise, LBNP at −40 mmHg decreased muscle oxygenation both in resting (−19 ± 4 %) and exercising (−21 ± 5 %) forearm (n = 8). These data advance the hypothesis that NO plays an important role in modulating sympathetic vasoconstriction in the microcirculation of exercising muscle, because such modulation is abrogated by NO synthase inhibition with l-NAME. PMID:11927694

  19. Angle-of-Attack-Modulated Terminal Point Control for Neptune Aerocapture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queen, Eric M.

    2004-01-01

    An aerocapture guidance algorithm based on a calculus of variations approach is developed, using angle of attack as the primary control variable. Bank angle is used as a secondary control to alleviate angle of attack extremes and to control inclination. The guidance equations are derived in detail. The controller has very small onboard computational requirements and is robust to atmospheric and aerodynamic dispersions. The algorithm is applied to aerocapture at Neptune. Three versions of the controller are considered with varying angle of attack authority. The three versions of the controller are evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations with expected dispersions.

  20. Hormones in pain modulation and their clinical implications for pain control: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueyin; Zhang, Jinyuan; Wang, Xiangrui

    2016-07-01

    Recently, more and more studies have found that pain generation, transmission and modulation are under hormonal regulation. Indeed, hormonal dysregulation is a common component of chronic pain syndromes. Studies have attempted to determine whether the relationship between the pain and its perception and hormones is a causative relationship and how these processes interrelate. This review summarizes and analyzes the current experimental data and provides an overview of the studies addressing these questions. The relationship between pain perception and endocrine effects suggests that hormones can be used as important biomarkers of chronic pain syndromes and/or be developed into therapeutic agents in the fight against pain.

  1. Requirements for implementing real-time control functional modules on a hierarchical parallel pipelined system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, Thomas E.; Michaloski, John L.; Lumia, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of a robot control system leads to a broad range of processing requirements. One fundamental requirement of a robot control system is the necessity of a microcomputer system in order to provide sufficient processing capability.The use of multiple processors in a parallel architecture is beneficial for a number of reasons, including better cost performance, modular growth, increased reliability through replication, and flexibility for testing alternate control strategies via different partitioning. A survey of the progression from low level control synchronizing primitives to higher level communication tools is presented. The system communication and control mechanisms of existing robot control systems are compared to the hierarchical control model. The impact of this design methodology on the current robot control systems is explored.

  2. Remote control radioactive-waste removal system uses modulated laser transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcher, E. E.; Kopia, L. P.; Rowland, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    Laser remote control system consists of transmitter, auto tracker, and receiver. Transmitter and tracker, packaged together and bore sighted, constitute control station, receiver is slave station. Model has five command channels and optical link operating range of 110 m.

  3. Matrix stiffness modulates formation and activity of neuronal networks of controlled architectures.

    PubMed

    Lantoine, Joséphine; Grevesse, Thomas; Villers, Agnès; Delhaye, Geoffrey; Mestdagh, Camille; Versaevel, Marie; Mohammed, Danahe; Bruyère, Céline; Alaimo, Laura; Lacour, Stéphanie P; Ris, Laurence; Gabriele, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    The ability to construct easily in vitro networks of primary neurons organized with imposed topologies is required for neural tissue engineering as well as for the development of neuronal interfaces with desirable characteristics. However, accumulating evidence suggests that the mechanical properties of the culture matrix can modulate important neuronal functions such as growth, extension, branching and activity. Here we designed robust and reproducible laminin-polylysine grid micropatterns on cell culture substrates that have similar biochemical properties but a 100-fold difference in Young's modulus to investigate the role of the matrix rigidity on the formation and activity of cortical neuronal networks. We found that cell bodies of primary cortical neurons gradually accumulate in circular islands, whereas axonal extensions spread on linear tracks to connect circular islands. Our findings indicate that migration of cortical neurons is enhanced on soft substrates, leading to a faster formation of neuronal networks. Furthermore, the pre-synaptic density was two times higher on stiff substrates and consistently the number of action potentials and miniature synaptic currents was enhanced on stiff substrates. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence to indicate that matrix stiffness is a key parameter to modulate the growth dynamics, synaptic density and electrophysiological activity of cortical neuronal networks, thus providing useful information on scaffold design for neural tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Electric-field-controlled interface dipole modulation for Si-based memory devices.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Noriyuki

    2018-05-31

    Various nonvolatile memory devices have been investigated to replace Si-based flash memories or emulate synaptic plasticity for next-generation neuromorphic computing. A crucial criterion to achieve low-cost high-density memory chips is material compatibility with conventional Si technologies. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a new memory concept, interface dipole modulation (IDM) memory. IDM can be integrated as a Si field-effect transistor (FET) based memory device. The first demonstration of this concept employed a HfO 2 /Si MOS capacitor where the interface monolayer (ML) TiO 2 functions as a dipole modulator. However, this configuration is unsuitable for Si-FET-based devices due to its large interface state density (D it ). Consequently, we propose, a multi-stacked amorphous HfO 2 /1-ML TiO 2 /SiO 2 IDM structure to realize a low D it and a wide memory window. Herein we describe the quasi-static and pulse response characteristics of multi-stacked IDM MOS capacitors and demonstrate flash-type and analog memory operations of an IDM FET device.

  5. BMP signaling controls buckling forces to modulate looping morphogenesis of the gut.

    PubMed

    Nerurkar, Nandan L; Mahadevan, L; Tabin, Clifford J

    2017-02-28

    Looping of the initially straight embryonic gut tube is an essential aspect of intestinal morphogenesis, permitting proper placement of the lengthy small intestine within the confines of the body cavity. The formation of intestinal loops is highly stereotyped within a given species and results from differential-growth-driven mechanical buckling of the gut tube as it elongates against the constraint of a thin, elastic membranous tissue, the dorsal mesentery. Although the physics of this process has been studied, the underlying biology has not. Here, we show that BMP signaling plays a critical role in looping morphogenesis of the avian small intestine. We first exploited differences between chicken and zebra finch gut morphology to identify the BMP pathway as a promising candidate to regulate differential growth in the gut. Next, focusing on the developing chick small intestine, we determined that Bmp2 expressed in the dorsal mesentery establishes differential elongation rates between the gut tube and mesentery, thereby regulating the compressive forces that buckle the gut tube into loops. Consequently, the number and tightness of loops in the chick small intestine can be increased or decreased directly by modulation of BMP activity in the small intestine. In addition to providing insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying intestinal development, our findings provide an example of how biochemical signals act on tissue-level mechanics to drive organogenesis, and suggest a possible mechanism by which they can be modulated to achieve distinct morphologies through evolution.

  6. BMP signaling controls buckling forces to modulate looping morphogenesis of the gut

    PubMed Central

    Nerurkar, Nandan L.; Mahadevan, L.; Tabin, Clifford J.

    2017-01-01

    Looping of the initially straight embryonic gut tube is an essential aspect of intestinal morphogenesis, permitting proper placement of the lengthy small intestine within the confines of the body cavity. The formation of intestinal loops is highly stereotyped within a given species and results from differential-growth–driven mechanical buckling of the gut tube as it elongates against the constraint of a thin, elastic membranous tissue, the dorsal mesentery. Although the physics of this process has been studied, the underlying biology has not. Here, we show that BMP signaling plays a critical role in looping morphogenesis of the avian small intestine. We first exploited differences between chicken and zebra finch gut morphology to identify the BMP pathway as a promising candidate to regulate differential growth in the gut. Next, focusing on the developing chick small intestine, we determined that Bmp2 expressed in the dorsal mesentery establishes differential elongation rates between the gut tube and mesentery, thereby regulating the compressive forces that buckle the gut tube into loops. Consequently, the number and tightness of loops in the chick small intestine can be increased or decreased directly by modulation of BMP activity in the small intestine. In addition to providing insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying intestinal development, our findings provide an example of how biochemical signals act on tissue-level mechanics to drive organogenesis, and suggest a possible mechanism by which they can be modulated to achieve distinct morphologies through evolution. PMID:28193855

  7. Modulation of brain glutamate dehydrogenase as a tool for controlling seizures.

    PubMed

    Rasgado, Lourdes A Vega; Reyes, Guillermo Ceballos; Díaz, Fernando Vega

    2015-12-01

    Glutamate (Glu) is a major excitatory neurotransmitter involved in epilepsy. Glu is synthesized by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, E.C. 1.4.1.3) and dysfunction of the enzymatic activity of GDH is associated with brain pathologies. The main goal of this work is to establish the role of GDH in the effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) such as valproate (VALP), diazepam (DIAZ) and diphenylhydantoin (DPH) and its repercussions on oxygen consumption. Oxidative deamination of Glu and reductive amination of αketoglutarate (αK) in mice brain were investigated. Our results show that AEDs decrease GDH activity and oxygen consumption in vitro. In ex vivo experiments, AEDs increased GDH activity but decreased oxygen consumption during Glu oxidative deamination. VALP and DPH reversed the increase in reductive amination of αK caused by the chemoconvulsant pentylenetetrazol. These results suggest that AEDs act by modulating brain GDH activity, which in turn decreased oxygen consumption. GDH represents an important regulation point of neuronal excitability, and modulation of its activity represents a potential target for metabolic treatment of epilepsy and for the development of new AEDs.

  8. Food Modulation Controls Astaxanthin Accumulation in Eggs of the Sea Urchin Arbacia lixula.

    PubMed

    Galasso, Christian; Orefice, Ida; Toscano, Alfonso; Vega Fernández, Tomás; Musco, Luigi; Brunet, Christophe; Sansone, Clementina; Cirino, Paola

    2018-05-28

    The carotenoid astaxanthin has strong antioxidant properties with beneficial effects for various degenerative diseases. This carotenoid is produced by some microalgae species when cultivated in particular conditions, and, interestingly, it is a predominant carotenoid in aquatic animals throughout a broad range of taxa. Recently, astaxanthin was detected in the eggs of the sea urchin Arbacia lixula in relevant concentrations when this organism was maintained in culture. These results have paved the way for deeper research into astaxanthin production by this species, particularly in regards to how astaxanthin production can be modulated by diet. Results showed that the highest content of astaxanthin in eggs was observed in sea urchins fed on a diet enriched with Spirulina platensis . This result was confirmed by the high antioxidant activity recorded in the egg extracts of these animals. Our results suggest that (i) the sea urchin A. lixula is able to synthesize astaxanthin from precursors obtained from food, and (ii) it is possible to modulate the astaxanthin accumulation in sea urchin eggs by modifying the proportions of different food ingredients provided in their diet. This study demonstrates the large potential of sea urchin cultivation for the eco-sustainable production of healthy supplements for nutraceutical applications.

  9. Can microRNAs control vascular smooth muscle phenotypic modulation and the response to injury?

    PubMed Central

    Albinsson, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation are critical events in vascular proliferative diseases. Recent studies have established microRNAs (miRNAs) as important mediators for the modulation of VSMC phenotype by targeting transcription factors and the cytoskeleton, which act as molecular switches for VSMC differentiation. The importance of miRNAs for VSMC development, differentiation, and function is evident by the fact that loss of the miRNA processing enzyme Dicer in VSMCs results in embryonic lethality due to severe vascular abnormalities. Similar abnormalities are observed in adult miR-143/145 knockout mice, indicating that these miRNAs are important for VSMC differentiation and function. However, since miR-143/145 knockout is not embryonically lethal, additional miRNA must be required during embryonic development of VSMCs. In addition, specific miRNAs such as miR-145, miR-21, and miR-221 have been found to regulate neointimal hyperplasia following vascular injury, which provides interesting possibilities for future therapeutical targets against vascular disease. Herein, we summarize recent advances regarding the role of miRNAs in VSMC phenotype modulation and response to injury. PMID:20841497

  10. Roles of stimulus control and reinforcement frequency in modulating the behavioral effects of d-amphetamine in the rat

    SciT

    Rees, D.C.; Wood, R.W.; Laties, V.G.

    1984-03-01

    The behavioral effects of d-amphetamine have been shown to be modulated by stimulus control, with less impairment of performance occurring when control is great. When the fixed-consecutive-number schedule is used (on which at least a specified consecutive number of responses must be made on one operandum before a single response on another will produce a reinforcer), response rate tends to invariant but reinforcement frequency is not. This study asks whether the differences in reinforcement frequency that usually accompany changes in stimulus control could themselves be responsible for the performance differences. Two versions of the fixed-consecutive-number schedule of reinforcement were combinedmore » into a multiple schedule within which stimulus control was varied but differences in reinforcement frequency were minimized by omitting some reinforcer deliveries during the component that usually had the higher reinforcement frequency. In one component, a compound discriminative stimulus was added with the eighth consecutive response on the first lever, a single response on the second lever was then reinforced. In the other component, no such stimulus was presented. With no added stimulus, large decreases occurred in the number of runs satisfying the minimum requirement for reinforcement at doses of drug that produced only minimal changes when an added stimulus controlled behavior. Thus, increased stimulus control diminishes the behavioral changes produced by d-amphetamine even when the possible contribution by baseline reinforcement rate is minimized. 17 references, 6 figures, 4 tables.« less

  11. Design and control of a variable geometry turbofan with an independently modulated third stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Ronald J.

    Emerging 21st century military missions task engines to deliver the fuel efficiency of a high bypass turbofan while retaining the ability to produce the high specific thrust of a low bypass turbofan. This study explores the possibility of satisfying such competing demands by adding a second independently modulated bypass stream to the basic turbofan architecture. This third stream can be used for a variety of purposes including: providing a cool heat sink for dissipating aircraft heat loads, cooling turbine cooling air, and providing a readily available stream of constant pressure ratio air for lift augmentation. Furthermore, by modulating airflow to the second and third streams, it is possible to continuously match the engine's airflow demand to the inlet's airflow supply thereby reducing spillage and increasing propulsive efficiency. This research begins with a historical perspective of variable cycle engines and shows a logical progression to proposed architectures. Then a novel method for investigating optimal performance is presented which determines most favorable on design variable geometry settings, most beneficial moment to terminate flow holding, and an optimal scheduling of variable features for fuel efficient off design operation. Mission analysis conducted across the three candidate missions verifies that these three stream variable cycles can deliver fuel savings in excess of 30% relative to a year 2000 reference turbofan. This research concludes by evaluating the relative impact of each variable technology on the performance of adaptive engine architectures. The most promising technologies include modulated turbine cooling air, variable high pressure turbine inlet area and variable third stream nozzle throat area. With just these few features it is possible to obtain nearly optimal performance, including 90% or more of the potential fuel savings, with far fewer variable features than are available in the study engine. It is abundantly clear that

  12. Optical control of pain in vivo with a photoactive mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator.

    PubMed

    Font, Joan; López-Cano, Marc; Notartomaso, Serena; Scarselli, Pamela; Di Pietro, Paola; Bresolí-Obach, Roger; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Malhaire, Fanny; Rovira, Xavier; Catena, Juanlo; Giraldo, Jesús; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Goudet, Cyril; Nonell, Santi; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Llebaria, Amadeu; Ciruela, Francisco

    2017-04-11

    Light-operated drugs constitute a major target in drug discovery, since they may provide spatiotemporal resolution for the treatment of complex diseases (i.e. chronic pain). JF-NP-26 is an inactive photocaged derivative of the metabotropic glutamate type 5 (mGlu 5 ) receptor negative allosteric modulator raseglurant. Violet light illumination of JF-NP-26 induces a photochemical reaction prompting the active-drug's release, which effectively controls mGlu 5 receptor activity both in ectopic expressing systems and in striatal primary neurons. Systemic administration in mice followed by local light-emitting diode (LED)-based illumination, either of the thalamus or the peripheral tissues, induced JF-NP-26-mediated light-dependent analgesia both in neuropathic and in acute/tonic inflammatory pain models. These data offer the first example of optical control of analgesia in vivo using a photocaged mGlu 5 receptor negative allosteric modulator. This approach shows potential for precisely targeting, in time and space, endogenous receptors, which may allow a better management of difficult-to-treat disorders.

  13. Effects of arousal on cognitive control: empirical tests of the conflict-modulated Hebbian-learning hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen B R E; van Steenbergen, Henk; Kedar, Tomer; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of empirical phenomena that were previously interpreted as a result of cognitive control, turn out to reflect (in part) simple associative-learning effects. A prime example is the proportion congruency effect, the finding that interference effects (such as the Stroop effect) decrease as the proportion of incongruent stimuli increases. While this was previously regarded as strong evidence for a global conflict monitoring-cognitive control loop, recent evidence has shown that the proportion congruency effect is largely item-specific and hence must be due to associative learning. The goal of our research was to test a recent hypothesis about the mechanism underlying such associative-learning effects, the conflict-modulated Hebbian-learning hypothesis, which proposes that the effect of conflict on associative learning is mediated by phasic arousal responses. In Experiment 1, we examined in detail the relationship between the item-specific proportion congruency effect and an autonomic measure of phasic arousal: task-evoked pupillary responses. In Experiment 2, we used a task-irrelevant phasic arousal manipulation and examined the effect on item-specific learning of incongruent stimulus-response associations. The results provide little evidence for the conflict-modulated Hebbian-learning hypothesis, which requires additional empirical support to remain tenable.

  14. Modulation of Posterior Alpha Activity by Spatial Attention Allows for Controlling A Continuous Brain-Computer Interface.

    PubMed

    Horschig, Jörn M; Oosterheert, Wouter; Oostenveld, Robert; Jensen, Ole

    2015-11-01

    Here we report that the modulation of alpha activity by covert attention can be used as a control signal in an online brain-computer interface, that it is reliable, and that it is robust. Subjects were instructed to orient covert visual attention to the left or right hemifield. We decoded the direction of attention from the magnetoencephalogram by a template matching classifier and provided the classification outcome to the subject in real-time using a novel graphical user interface. Training data for the templates were obtained from a Posner-cueing task conducted just before the BCI task. Eleven subjects participated in four sessions each. Eight of the subjects achieved classification rates significantly above chance level. Subjects were able to significantly increase their performance from the first to the second session. Individual patterns of posterior alpha power remained stable throughout the four sessions and did not change with increased performance. We conclude that posterior alpha power can successfully be used as a control signal in brain-computer interfaces. We also discuss several ideas for further improving the setup and propose future research based on solid hypotheses about behavioral consequences of modulating neuronal oscillations by brain computer interfacing.

  15. Simulating the control of molecular reactions via modulated light fields: from gas phase to solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Keefer, Daniel; Rott, Florian; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2017-04-01

    Over the past few years quantum control has proven to be very successful in steering molecular processes. By combining theory with experiment, even highly complex control aims were realized in the gas phase. In this topical review, we illustrate the past achievements on several examples in the molecular context. The next step for the quantum control of chemical processes is to translate the fruitful interplay between theory and experiment to the condensed phase and thus to the regime where chemical synthesis can be supported. On the theory side, increased efforts to include solvent effects in quantum control simulations were made recently. We discuss two major concepts, namely an implicit description of the environment via the density matrix algorithm and an explicit inclusion of solvent molecules. By application to chemical reactions, both concepts conclude that despite environmental perturbations leading to more complex control tasks, efficient quantum control in the condensed phase is still feasible.

  16. A genome-wide association study to identify genomic modulators of rate control therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kolek, Matthew J; Edwards, Todd L; Muhammad, Raafia; Balouch, Adnan; Shoemaker, M Benjamin; Blair, Marcia A; Kor, Kaylen C; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Roden, Dan M; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Darbar, Dawood

    2014-08-15

    For many patients with atrial fibrillation, ventricular rate control with atrioventricular (AV) nodal blockers is considered first-line therapy, although response to treatment is highly variable. Using an extreme phenotype of failure of rate control necessitating AV nodal ablation and pacemaker implantation, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genomic modulators of rate control therapy. Cases included 95 patients who failed rate control therapy. Controls (n = 190) achieved adequate rate control therapy with ≤2 AV nodal blockers using a conventional clinical definition. Genotyping was performed on the Illumina 610-Quad platform, and results were imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference haplotypes. A total of 554,041 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) met criteria for minor allele frequency (>0.01), call rate (>95%), and quality control, and 6,055,224 SNPs were available after imputation. No SNP reached the canonical threshold for significance for GWAS of p <5 × 10(-8). Sixty-three SNPs with p <10(-5) at 6 genomic loci were genotyped in a validation cohort of 130 cases and 157 controls. These included 6q24.3 (near SAMD5/SASH1, p = 9.36 × 10(-8)), 4q12 (IGFBP7, p = 1.75 × 10(-7)), 6q22.33 (C6orf174, p = 4.86 × 10(-7)), 3p21.31 (CDCP1, p = 1.18 × 10(-6)), 12p12.1 (SOX5, p = 1.62 × 10(-6)), and 7p11 (LANCL2, p = 6.51 × 10(-6)). However, none of these were significant in the replication cohort or in a meta-analysis of both cohorts. In conclusion, we identified several potentially important genomic modulators of rate control therapy in atrial fibrillation, particularly SOX5, which was previously associated with heart rate at rest and PR interval. However, these failed to reach genome-wide significance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Transcriptional Control by PARP-1: Chromatin Modulation, Enhancer-binding, Coregulation, and Insulation

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, W. Lee

    2008-01-01

    Summary The regulation of gene expression requires a wide array of protein factors that can modulate chromatin structure, act at enhancers, function as transcriptional coregulators, or regulate insulator function. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), an abundant and ubiquitous nuclear enzyme that catalyzes the NAD+-dependent addition of ADP-ribose polymers on a variety of nuclear proteins, has been implicated in all of these functions. Recent biochemical, genomic, proteomic, and cell-based studies have highlighted the role of PARP-1 in each of these processes and provided new insights about the molecular mechanisms governing PARP-1-dependent regulation of gene expression. In addition, these studies have demonstrated how PARP-1 functions as an integral part of cellular signaling pathways that culminate in gene regulatory outcomes. PMID:18450439

  18. Optical temperature compensation schemes of spectral modulation sensors for aircraft engine control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkcan, Ertugrul

    1993-02-01

    Optical temperature compensation schemes for the ratiometric interrogation of spectral modulation sensors for source temperature robustness are presented. We have obtained better than 50 - 100X decrease of the temperature coefficient of the sensitivity using these types of compensation. We have also developed a spectrographic interrogation scheme that provides increased source temperature robustness; this affords a significantly improved accuracy over FADEC temperature ranges as well as temperature coefficient of the sensitivity that is substantially and further reduced. This latter compensation scheme can be integrated in a small E/O package including the detection, analog and digital signal processing. We find that these interrogation schemes can be used within a detector spatially multiplexed architecture.

  19. Emotional modulation of cognitive control: approach-withdrawal states double-dissociate spatial from verbal two-back task performance.

    PubMed

    Gray, J R

    2001-09-01

    Emotional states might selectively modulate components of cognitive control. To test this hypothesis, the author randomly assigned 152 undergraduates (equal numbers of men and women) to watch short videos intended to induce emotional states (approach, neutral, or withdrawal). Each video was followed by a computerized 2-back working memory task (spatial or verbal, equated for difficulty and appearance). Spatial 2-back performance was enhanced by a withdrawal state and impaired by an approach state; the opposite pattern held for verbal performance. The double dissociation held more strongly for participants who made more errors than average across conditions. The results suggest that approach-withdrawal states can have selective influences on components of cognitive control, possibly on a hemispheric basis. They support and extend several frameworks for conceptualizing emotion-cognition interactions.

  20. Imaging contrast and tip-sample interaction of non-contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy with Q-control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shuai; Guo, Dan; Luo, Jianbin

    2017-10-01

    Active quality factor (Q) exhibits many promising properties in dynamic atomic force microscopy. Energy dissipation and image contrasts are investigated in the non-contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) with an active Q-control circuit in the ambient air environment. Dissipated power and virial were calculated to compare the highly nonlinear interaction of tip-sample and image contrasts with different Q gain values. Greater free amplitudes and lower effective Q values show better contrasts for the same setpoint ratio. Active quality factor also can be employed to change tip-sample interaction force in non-contact regime. It is meaningful that non-destructive and better contrast images can be realized in non-contact AM-AFM by applying an active Q-control to the dynamic system.

  1. Kinetic control over pathway complexity in supramolecular polymerization through modulating the energy landscape by rational molecular design.

    PubMed

    Ogi, Soichiro; Fukui, Tomoya; Jue, Melinda L; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Sugiyasu, Kazunori

    2014-12-22

    Far-from-equilibrium thermodynamic systems that are established as a consequence of coupled equilibria are the origin of the complex behavior of biological systems. Therefore, research in supramolecular chemistry has recently been shifting emphasis from a thermodynamic standpoint to a kinetic one; however, control over the complex kinetic processes is still in its infancy. Herein, we report our attempt to control the time evolution of supramolecular assembly in a process in which the supramolecular assembly transforms from a J-aggregate to an H-aggregate over time. The transformation proceeds through a delicate interplay of these two aggregation pathways. We have succeeded in modulating the energy landscape of the respective aggregates by a rational molecular design. On the basis of this understanding of the energy landscape, programming of the time evolution was achieved through adjusting the balance between the coupled equilibria. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Dimerization Controls Marburg Virus VP24-dependent Modulation of Host Antioxidative Stress Responses

    SciT

    Johnson, Britney; Li, Jing; Adhikari, Jagat

    Marburg virus (MARV), a member of the Filoviridae family that also includes Ebola virus (EBOV), causes lethal hemorrhagic fever with case fatality rates that have exceeded 50% in some outbreaks. Within an infected cell, there are numerous host-viral interactions that contribute to the outcome of infection. Recent studies identified MARV protein 24 (mVP24) as a modulator of the host antioxidative responses, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Using a combination of biochemical and mass spectrometry studies, we show that mVP24 is a dimer in solution that directly binds to the Kelch domain of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) to regulatemore » nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). This interaction between Keap1 and mVP24 occurs through the Kelch interaction loop (K-Loop) of mVP24 leading to upregulation of antioxidant response element transcription, which is distinct from other Kelch binders that regulate Nrf2 activity. N-terminal truncations disrupt mVP24 dimerization, allowing monomeric mVP24 to bind Kelch with higher affinity and stimulate higher antioxidative stress response element (ARE) reporter activity. Mass spectrometry-based mapping of the interface revealed overlapping binding sites on Kelch for mVP24 and the Nrf2 proteins. Substitution of conserved cysteines, C209 and C210, to alanine in the mVP24 K-Loop abrogates Kelch binding and ARE activation. Our studies identify a shift in the monomer-dimer equilibrium of MARV VP24, driven by its interaction with Keap1 Kelch domain, as a critical determinant that modulates host responses to pathogenic Marburg viral infections.« less

  3. Dimerization Controls Marburg Virus VP24-dependent Modulation of Host Antioxidative Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Britney; Li, Jing; Adhikari, Jagat; Edwards, Megan R; Zhang, Hao; Schwarz, Toni; Leung, Daisy W; Basler, Christopher F; Gross, Michael L; Amarasinghe, Gaya K

    2016-08-28

    Marburg virus (MARV), a member of the Filoviridae family that also includes Ebola virus (EBOV), causes lethal hemorrhagic fever with case fatality rates that have exceeded 50% in some outbreaks. Within an infected cell, there are numerous host-viral interactions that contribute to the outcome of infection. Recent studies identified MARV protein 24 (mVP24) as a modulator of the host antioxidative responses, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Using a combination of biochemical and mass spectrometry studies, we show that mVP24 is a dimer in solution that directly binds to the Kelch domain of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) to regulate nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). This interaction between Keap1 and mVP24 occurs through the Kelch interaction loop (K-Loop) of mVP24 leading to upregulation of antioxidant response element transcription, which is distinct from other Kelch binders that regulate Nrf2 activity. N-terminal truncations disrupt mVP24 dimerization, allowing monomeric mVP24 to bind Kelch with higher affinity and stimulate higher antioxidative stress response element (ARE) reporter activity. Mass spectrometry-based mapping of the interface revealed overlapping binding sites on Kelch for mVP24 and the Nrf2 proteins. Substitution of conserved cysteines, C209 and C210, to alanine in the mVP24 K-Loop abrogates Kelch binding and ARE activation. Our studies identify a shift in the monomer-dimer equilibrium of MARV VP24, driven by its interaction with Keap1 Kelch domain, as a critical determinant that modulates host responses to pathogenic Marburg viral infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Observers' cognitive states modulate how visual inputs relate to gaze control.

    PubMed

    Kardan, Omid; Henderson, John M; Yourganov, Grigori; Berman, Marc G

    2016-09-01

    Previous research has shown that eye-movements change depending on both the visual features of our environment, and the viewer's top-down knowledge. One important question that is unclear is the degree to which the visual goals of the viewer modulate how visual features of scenes guide eye-movements. Here, we propose a systematic framework to investigate this question. In our study, participants performed 3 different visual tasks on 135 scenes: search, memorization, and aesthetic judgment, while their eye-movements were tracked. Canonical correlation analyses showed that eye-movements were reliably more related to low-level visual features at fixations during the visual search task compared to the aesthetic judgment and scene memorization tasks. Different visual features also had different relevance to eye-movements between tasks. This modulation of the relationship between visual features and eye-movements by task was also demonstrated with classification analyses, where classifiers were trained to predict the viewing task based on eye movements and visual features at fixations. Feature loadings showed that the visual features at fixations could signal task differences independent of temporal and spatial properties of eye-movements. When classifying across participants, edge density and saliency at fixations were as important as eye-movements in the successful prediction of task, with entropy and hue also being significant, but with smaller effect sizes. When classifying within participants, brightness and saturation were also significant contributors. Canonical correlation and classification results, together with a test of moderation versus mediation, suggest that the cognitive state of the observer moderates the relationship between stimulus-driven visual features and eye-movements. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. [The Heidelberg CI database module : Quality control in hearing restoration with cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Herisanu, I T; Hoth, S; Praetorius, M

    2016-12-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) have been established as the therapy of choice for functional deafness. The number of CI-rehabilitated patients is continuously growing. The resulting data can provide important information for physicians, health insurance companies, and scientists. Assessment and structuring of data becomes more feasible with the application of modern database systems. In collaboration with Innoforce Est., Liechtenstein, the authors developed a database module for the specific needs of CI patients. Data of 100 patients were included and evaluated. The main features of the module and an example data analysis are presented. Analysis of data from these 100 patients reveals 50 men and 50 women aged between 1 and 87 years, with a maximum value in the 51-60-years age group. More than 50% of the patients were also severely hearing impaired in the contralateral ear and fitted the CI indication criteria. Functional deafness in the ear subsequently fitted with CI in most of the patients had arisen more than 20 years previously. Preoperative diagnostic electrical stimulation of the cochlear nerve was positive in 67 patients. All 100 patients perceived auditory sensations with the CI. The presented patient cohort is representative of patients at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Heidelberg Medical Center, Germany, and the demographic distribution is in accordance with the literature. The state of the contralateral ear, often also fitting the CI indication, is not surprising, as cochlear implantation is a comparatively new procedure. Preoperative electrical stimulation turned out not to be significant by itself. The hearing results and overview of complications were easy to calculate in comparison to a pure data storage system such as i.s.h.med.

  6. Cross-Phase Modulation: A New Technique for Controlling the Spectral, Temporal, and Spatial Properties of Ultrashort Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldeck, P. L.; Ho, P. P.; Alfano, Robert R.

    Self-phase modulation (SPM) is the principal mechanism responsible for the generation of picosecond and femtosecond white-light supercontinua. When an intense ultrashort pulse progagates through a medium, it distorts the atomic configuration of the material, which changes the refractive index. The pulse phase is time modulated, which causes the generation of new frequencies. This phase modulation originates from the pulse itself (self-phase modulation). It can also be generated by a copropagating pulse (cross-phase modulation).

  7. Executive Control Modulates Cross-Language Lexical Activation during L2 Reading: Evidence from Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pivneva, Irina; Mercier, Julie; Titone, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Models of bilingual reading such as Bilingual Interactive Activation Plus (Dijkstra & van Heuven, 2002) do not predict a central role for domain-general executive control during bilingual reading, in contrast with bilingual models from other domains, such as production (e.g., the Inhibitory Control Model; Green, 1998). We thus investigated…

  8. Modulating inhibitory control with direct current stimulation of the superior medial frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Yu; Tseng, Lin-Yuan; Yu, Jia-Xin; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Hung, Daisy L; Tzeng, Ovid J L; Walsh, Vincent; Muggleton, Neil G; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2011-06-15

    The executive control of voluntary action involves not only choosing from a range of possible actions but also the inhibition of responses as circumstances demand. Recent studies have demonstrated that many clinical populations, such as people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, exhibit difficulties in inhibitory control. One prefrontal area that has been particularly associated with inhibitory control is the pre-supplementary motor area (Pre-SMA). Here we applied non-invasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over Pre-SMA to test its role in this behavior. tDCS allows for current to be applied in two directions to selectively excite or suppress the neural activity of Pre-SMA. Our results showed that anodal tDCS improved efficiency of inhibitory control. Conversely, cathodal tDCS showed a tendency towards impaired inhibitory control. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of non-invasive intervention tDCS altering subjects' inhibitory control. These results further our understanding of the neural bases of inhibitory control and suggest a possible therapeutic intervention method for clinical populations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. PRRT2 controls neuronal excitability by negatively modulating Na+ channel 1.2/1.6 activity

    PubMed Central

    Fruscione, Floriana; Valente, Pierluigi; Sterlini, Bruno; Romei, Alessandra; Baldassari, Simona; Fadda, Manuela; Prestigio, Cosimo; Giansante, Giorgia; Sartorelli, Jacopo; Rossi, Pia; Rubio, Alicia; Gambardella, Antonio; Nieus, Thierry; Broccoli, Vania; Fassio, Anna; Baldelli, Pietro; Corradi, Anna; Zara, Federico

    2018-01-01

    voltage-dependent Na+ channels in homozygous PRRT2 knockout human and mouse neurons and that, in addition to the reported synaptic functions, PRRT2 is an important negative modulator of Nav1.2 and Nav1.6 channels. Given the predominant paroxysmal character of PRRT2-linked diseases, the disturbance in cellular excitability by lack of negative modulation of Na+ channels appears as the key pathogenetic mechanism. PMID:29554219

  10. Adaptive Instrument Module: Space Instrument Controller "Brain" through Programmable Logic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrin, Ann Garrison; Conde, Richard; Chern, Bobbie; Luers, Phil; Jurczyk, Steve; Mills, Carl; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Adaptive Instrument Module (AIM) will be the first true demonstration of reconfigurable computing with field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) in space, enabling the 'brain' of the system to evolve or adapt to changing requirements. In partnership with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Satellite Systems (CRC-SS), APL has built the flight version to be flown on the Australian university-class satellite FEDSAT. The AIM provides satellites the flexibility to adapt to changing mission requirements by reconfiguring standardized processing hardware rather than incurring the large costs associated with new builds. This ability to reconfigure the processing in response to changing mission needs leads to true evolveable computing, wherein the instrument 'brain' can learn from new science data in order to perform state-of-the-art data processing. The development of the AIM is significant in its enormous potential to reduce total life-cycle costs for future space exploration missions. The advent of RAM-based FPGAs whose configuration can be changed at any time has enabled the development of the AIM for processing tasks that could not be performed in software. The use of the AIM enables reconfiguration of the FPGA circuitry while the spacecraft is in flight, with many accompanying advantages. The AIM demonstrates the practicalities of using reconfigurable computing hardware devices by conducting a series of designed experiments. These include the demonstration of implementing data compression, data filtering, and communication message processing and inter-experiment data computation. The second generation is the Adaptive Processing Template (ADAPT) which is further described in this paper. The next step forward is to make the hardware itself adaptable and the ADAPT pursues this challenge by developing a reconfigurable module that will be capable of functioning efficiently in various applications. ADAPT will take advantage of

  11. PRRT2 controls neuronal excitability by negatively modulating Na+ channel 1.2/1.6 activity.

    PubMed

    Fruscione, Floriana; Valente, Pierluigi; Sterlini, Bruno; Romei, Alessandra; Baldassari, Simona; Fadda, Manuela; Prestigio, Cosimo; Giansante, Giorgia; Sartorelli, Jacopo; Rossi, Pia; Rubio, Alicia; Gambardella, Antonio; Nieus, Thierry; Broccoli, Vania; Fassio, Anna; Baldelli, Pietro; Corradi, Anna; Zara, Federico; Benfenati, Fabio

    2018-04-01

    -dependent Na+ channels in homozygous PRRT2 knockout human and mouse neurons and that, in addition to the reported synaptic functions, PRRT2 is an important negative modulator of Nav1.2 and Nav1.6 channels. Given the predominant paroxysmal character of PRRT2-linked diseases, the disturbance in cellular excitability by lack of negative modulation of Na+ channels appears as the key pathogenetic mechanism.

  12. Flexible traffic control of the synfire-mode transmission by inhibitory modulation: Nonlinear noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Takashi; Okada, Masato; Reyes, Alex D.; Câteau, Hideyuki

    2010-01-01

    Intermingled neural connections apparent in the brain make us wonder what controls the traffic of propagating activity in the brain to secure signal transmission without harmful crosstalk. Here, we reveal that inhibitory input but not excitatory input works as a particularly useful traffic controller because it controls the degree of synchrony of population firing of neurons as well as controlling the size of the population firing bidirectionally. Our dynamical system analysis reveals that the synchrony enhancement depends crucially on the nonlinear membrane potential dynamics and a hidden slow dynamical variable. Our electrophysiological study with rodent slice preparations show that the phenomenon happens in real neurons. Furthermore, our analysis with the Fokker-Planck equations demonstrates the phenomenon in a semianalytical manner.

  13. Contamination Control in Hybrid Microelectronic Modules. Part 1: Identification of Critical Process and Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himmel, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    Various hybrid processing steps, handling procedures, and materials are examined in an attempt to identify sources of contamination and to propose methods for the control of these contaminants. It is found that package sealing, assembly, and rework are especially susceptible to contamination. Moisture and loose particles are identified as the worst contaminants. The points at which contaminants are most likely to enter the hybrid package are also identified, and both general and specific methods for their detection and control are developed. In general, the most effective controls for contaminants are: clean working areas, visual inspection at each step of the process, and effective cleaning at critical process steps. Specific methods suggested include the detection of loose particles by a precap visual inspection, by preseal and post-seal electrical testing, and by a particle impact noise test. Moisture is best controlled by sealing all packages in a clean, dry, inert atmosphere after a thorough bake-out of all parts.

  14. Symptom-specific amygdala hyperactivity modulates motor control network in conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Hassa, Thomas; Sebastian, Alexandra; Liepert, Joachim; Weiller, Cornelius; Schmidt, Roger; Tüscher, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Initial historical accounts as well as recent data suggest that emotion processing is dysfunctional in conversion disorder patients and that this alteration may be the pathomechanistic neurocognitive basis for symptoms in conversion disorder. However, to date evidence of direct interaction of altered negative emotion processing with motor control networks in conversion disorder is still lacking. To specifically study the neural correlates of emotion processing interacting with motor networks we used a task combining emotional and sensorimotor stimuli both separately as well as simultaneously during functional magnetic resonance imaging in a well characterized group of 13 conversion disorder patients with functional hemiparesis and 19 demographically matched healthy controls. We performed voxelwise statistical parametrical mapping for a priori regions of interest within emotion processing and motor control networks. Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) was used to test altered functional connectivity of emotion and motor control networks. Only during simultaneous emotional stimulation and passive movement of the affected hand patients displayed left amygdala hyperactivity. PPI revealed increased functional connectivity in patients between the left amygdala and the (pre-)supplemental motor area and the subthalamic nucleus, key regions within the motor control network. These findings suggest a novel mechanistic direct link between dysregulated emotion processing and motor control circuitry in conversion disorder.

  15. Feedforward and feedback control of locked mode phase and rotation in DIII-D with application to modulated ECCD experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, W.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, M. J.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Strait, E. J.; Sweeney, R.; Volpe, F. A.; The DIII-D Team

    2018-03-01

    The toroidal phase and rotation of otherwise locked magnetic islands of toroidal mode number n  =  1 are controlled in the DIII-D tokamak by means of applied magnetic perturbations of n  =  1. Pre-emptive perturbations were applied in feedforward to ‘catch’ the mode as it slowed down and entrain it to the rotating field before complete locking, thus avoiding the associated major confinement degradation. Additionally, for the first time, the phase of the perturbation was optimized in real-time, in feedback with magnetic measurements, in order for the mode’s phase to closely match a prescribed phase, as a function of time. Experimental results confirm the capability to hold the mode in a given fixed-phase or to rotate it at up to 20 Hz with good uniformity. The control-coil currents utilized in the experiments agree with the requirements estimated by an electromechanical model. Moreover, controlled rotation at 20 Hz was combined with electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) modulated at the same frequency. This is simpler than regulating the ECCD modulation in feedback with spontaneous mode rotation, and enables repetitive, reproducible ECCD deposition at or near the island O-point, X-point and locations in between, for careful studies of how this affects the island stability. Current drive was found to be radially misaligned relative to the island, and resulting growth and shrinkage of islands matched expectations of the modified Rutherford equation for some discharges presented here. Finally, simulations predict the as designed ITER 3D coils can entrain a small island at sub-10 Hz frequencies.

  16. Modulating laser intensity profile ellipticity for microstructural control during metal additive manufacturing

    SciT

    Roehling, Tien T.; Wu, Sheldon S. Q.; Khairallah, Saad A.

    Additively manufactured (AM) metals are often highly textured, containing large columnar grains that initiate epitaxially under steep temperature gradients and rapid solidification conditions. These unique microstructures partially account for the massive property disparity existing between AM and conventionally processed alloys. Although equiaxed grains are desirable for isotropic mechanical behavior, the columnar-to-equiaxed transition remains difficult to predict for conventional solidification processes, and much more so for AM. In this study, the effects of laser intensity profile ellipticity on melt track macrostructures and microstructures were studied in 316L stainless steel. Experimental results were supported by temperature gradients and melt velocities simulated usingmore » the ALE3D multi-physics code. As a general trend, columnar grains preferentially formed with increasing laser power and scan speed for all beam profiles. However, when conduction mode laser heating occurs, scan parameters that result in coarse columnar microstructures using Gaussian profiles produce equiaxed or mixed equiaxed-columnar microstructures using elliptical profiles. Furthermore, by modulating spatial laser intensity profiles on the fly, site-specific microstructures and properties can be directly engineered into additively manufactured parts.« less

  17. Independence of motor unit recruitment and rate modulation during precision force control.

    PubMed

    Kamen, G; Du, D C

    1999-01-01

    The vertebrate motor system chiefly employs motor unit recruitment and rate coding to modulate muscle force output. In this paper, we studied how the recruitment of new motor units altered the firing rate of already-active motor units during precision force production in the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Six healthy adults performed linearly increasing isometric voluntary contractions while motor unit activity and force output were recorded. After motor unit discharges were identified, motor unit firing rates were calculated before and after the instances of new motor unit recruitment. Three procedures were applied to compute motor unit firing rate, including the mean of a fixed number of inter-spike intervals and the constant width weighted Hanning window filter method, as well as a modified boxcar technique. In contrast to previous reports, the analysis of the firing rates of over 200 motor units revealed that reduction of the active firing rates was not a common mechanism used to accommodate the twitch force produced by the recruitment of a new motor unit. Similarly, during de-recruitment there was no tendency for motor unit firing rates to increase immediately following the cessation of activity in other motor units. Considerable consistency in recruitment behavior was observed during repeated contractions. However, firing rates during repeated contractions demonstrated considerably more fluctuation. It is concluded that the neuromuscular system does not use short-term preferential motor unit disfacilitation to effect precise regulation of muscular force output.

  18. Control of seizures by ketogenic diet-induced modulation of metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Clanton, Ryan M; Wu, Guoyao; Akabani, Gamal; Aramayo, Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is too complex to be considered as a disease; it is more of a syndrome, characterized by seizures, which can be caused by a diverse array of afflictions. As such, drug interventions that target a single biological pathway will only help the specific individuals where that drug's mechanism of action is relevant to their disorder. Most likely, this will not alleviate all forms of epilepsy nor the potential biological pathways causing the seizures, such as glucose/amino acid transport, mitochondrial dysfunction, or neuronal myelination. Considering our current inability to test every individual effectively for the true causes of their epilepsy and the alarming number of misdiagnoses observed, we propose the use of the ketogenic diet (KD) as an effective and efficient preliminary/long-term treatment. The KD mimics fasting by altering substrate metabolism from carbohydrates to fatty acids and ketone bodies (KBs). Here, we underscore the need to understand the underlying cellular mechanisms governing the KD's modulation of various forms of epilepsy and how a diverse array of metabolites including soluble fibers, specific fatty acids, and functional amino acids (e.g., leucine, D-serine, glycine, arginine metabolites, and N-acetyl-cysteine) may potentially enhance the KD's ability to treat and reverse, not mask, these neurological disorders that lead to epilepsy.

  19. Modulating laser intensity profile ellipticity for microstructural control during metal additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Roehling, Tien T.; Wu, Sheldon S. Q.; Khairallah, Saad A.; ...

    2017-02-12

    Additively manufactured (AM) metals are often highly textured, containing large columnar grains that initiate epitaxially under steep temperature gradients and rapid solidification conditions. These unique microstructures partially account for the massive property disparity existing between AM and conventionally processed alloys. Although equiaxed grains are desirable for isotropic mechanical behavior, the columnar-to-equiaxed transition remains difficult to predict for conventional solidification processes, and much more so for AM. In this study, the effects of laser intensity profile ellipticity on melt track macrostructures and microstructures were studied in 316L stainless steel. Experimental results were supported by temperature gradients and melt velocities simulated usingmore » the ALE3D multi-physics code. As a general trend, columnar grains preferentially formed with increasing laser power and scan speed for all beam profiles. However, when conduction mode laser heating occurs, scan parameters that result in coarse columnar microstructures using Gaussian profiles produce equiaxed or mixed equiaxed-columnar microstructures using elliptical profiles. Furthermore, by modulating spatial laser intensity profiles on the fly, site-specific microstructures and properties can be directly engineered into additively manufactured parts.« less

  20. Neuronal Control of Metabolism through Nutrient-Dependent Modulation of Tracheal Branching

    PubMed Central

    Linneweber, Gerit A.; Jacobson, Jake; Busch, Karl Emanuel; Hudry, Bruno; Christov, Christo P.; Dormann, Dirk; Yuan, Michaela; Otani, Tomoki; Knust, Elisabeth; de Bono, Mario; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Summary During adaptive angiogenesis, a key process in the etiology and treatment of cancer and obesity, the vasculature changes to meet the metabolic needs of its target tissues. Although the cues governing vascular remodeling are not fully understood, target-derived signals are generally believed to underlie this process. Here, we identify an alternative mechanism by characterizing the previously unrecognized nutrient-dependent plasticity of the Drosophila tracheal system: a network of oxygen-delivering tubules developmentally akin to mammalian blood vessels. We find that this plasticity, particularly prominent in the intestine, drives—rather than responds to—metabolic change. Mechanistically, it is regulated by distinct populations of nutrient- and oxygen-responsive neurons that, through delivery of both local and systemic insulin- and VIP-like neuropeptides, sculpt the growth of specific tracheal subsets. Thus, we describe a novel mechanism by which nutritional cues modulate neuronal activity to give rise to organ-specific, long-lasting changes in vascular architecture. PMID:24439370

  1. Performance Enhancement by Threshold Level Control of a Receiver in WDM-PON System with Manchester Coded Downstream and NRZ Upstream Re-Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bong Kyu; Chung, Hwan Seok; Chang, Sun Hyok; Park, Sangjo

    We propose and demonstrate a scheme enhancing the performance of optical access networks with Manchester coded downstream and re-modulated NRZ coded upstream. It is achieved by threshold level control of a limiting amplifier at a receiver, and the minimum sensitivity of upstream is significantly improved for the re-modulation scheme with 5Gb/s Manchester coded downstream and 2.488Gb/s NRZ upstream data rates.

  2. Non Digestible Oligosaccharides Modulate the Gut Microbiota to Control the Development of Leukemia and Associated Cachexia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bindels, Laure B; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Salazar, Nuria; Taminiau, Bernard; Druart, Céline; Muccioli, Giulio G; François, Emmanuelle; Blecker, Christophe; Richel, Aurore; Daube, Georges; Mahillon, Jacques; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Cani, Patrice D; Delzenne, Nathalie M

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that changing the gut microbiota using pectic oligosaccharides (POS) or inulin (INU) differently modulates the progression of leukemia and related metabolic disorders. Mice were transplanted with Bcr-Abl-transfected proB lymphocytes mimicking leukemia and received either POS or INU in their diet (5%) for 2 weeks. Combination of pyrosequencing, PCR-DGGE and qPCR analyses of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that POS decreased microbial diversity and richness of caecal microbiota whereas it increased Bifidobacterium spp., Roseburia spp. and Bacteroides spp. (affecting specifically B. dorei) to a higher extent than INU. INU supplementation increased the portal SCFA propionate and butyrate, and decreased cancer cell invasion in the liver. POS treatment did not affect hepatic cancer cell invasion, but was more efficient than INU to decrease the metabolic alterations. Indeed, POS better than INU delayed anorexia linked to cancer progression. In addition, POS treatment increased acetate in the caecal content, changed the fatty acid profile inside adipose tissue and counteracted the induction of markers controlling β-oxidation, thereby hampering fat mass loss. Non digestible carbohydrates with prebiotic properties may constitute a new nutritional strategy to modulate gut microbiota with positive consequences on cancer progression and associated cachexia.

  3. Modulation of Active Site Electronic Structure by the Protein Matrix to Control [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reactivity

    SciT

    Smith, Dayle MA; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-30

    Control of the reactivity of the nickel center of the [NiFe] hydrogenase and other metalloproteins commonly involves outer coordination sphere ligands that act to modify the geometry and physical properties of the active site metal centers. We carried out a combined set of classical molecular dynamics and quantum/classical mechanics calculations to provide quantitative estimates of how dynamic fluctuations of the active site within the protein matrix modulate the electronic structure at the catalytic center. Specifically we focused on the dynamics of the inner and outer coordination spheres of the cysteinate-bound Ni–Fe cluster in the catalytically active Ni-C state. There aremore » correlated movements of the cysteinate ligands and the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, which modulate the electron affinity at the active site and the proton affinity of a terminal cysteinate. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesize a coupling between protein dynamics and electron and proton transfer reactions critical to dihydrogen production.« less

  4. Coherent control of flexural vibrations in dual-nanoweb fibers using phase-modulated two-frequency light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, J. R.; Noskov, R. E.; Sukhorukov, A. A.; Novoa, D.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2017-12-01

    Coherent control of the resonant response in spatially extended optomechanical structures is complicated by the fact that the optical drive is affected by the backaction from the generated phonons. Here we report an approach to coherent control based on stimulated Raman-like scattering, in which the optical pressure can remain unaffected by the induced vibrations even in the regime of strong optomechanical interactions. We demonstrate experimentally coherent control of flexural vibrations simultaneously along the whole length of a dual-nanoweb fiber, by imprinting steps in the relative phase between the components of a two-frequency pump signal, the beat frequency being chosen to match a flexural resonance. Furthermore, sequential switching of the relative phase at time intervals shorter than the lifetime of the vibrations reduces their amplitude to a constant value that is fully adjustable by tuning the phase modulation depth and switching rate. The results may trigger new developments in silicon photonics, since such coherent control uniquely decouples the amplitude of optomechanical oscillations from power-dependent thermal effects and nonlinear optical loss.

  5. Applying sensory modulation to mental health inpatient care to reduce seclusion and restraint: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Charlotte; Kolmos, Anne; Andersen, Kjeld; Sippel, Volkmar; Stenager, Elsebeth

    2017-10-01

    Clinical training in managing conflicts and preventing violence seldom contains sensory modulation (SM) as a method to de-escalate and prevent restraint and seclusion. Sensory-based interventions promote adaptive regulation of arousal and emotion. SM is a complementary approach that is associated with reduced rates of seclusion and restraint in mental healthcare, but there is need for more research in this area. Using SM to reduce restraint and seclusion in inpatient mental health care. The study included two similar psychiatric units where one unit implemented SM and one unit served as the control group. In the very beginning of the study, a staff-training program in the use of SM including assessment tools and intervention strategies was established. Data on restraint and forced medicine were sampled post the course of the year of implementation and compared with the control group. The use of belts decreased with 38% compared to the control group. The use of forced medication decreased with 46% compared to the control group. Altogether the use of physical restraint and forced medication decreased significantly with 42% (p < .05). Implementing a SM approach in mental healthcare facilities has a significant effect on the reduction of restraint and seclusion. As a part of the implementation, staff training and education in SM are crucial.

  6. Individual differences in cognitive control over emotional material modulate cognitive biases linked to depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Everaert, Jonas; Grahek, Ivan; Koster, Ernst H W

    2017-06-01

    Deficient cognitive control over emotional material and cognitive biases are important mechanisms underlying depression, but the interplay between these emotionally distorted cognitive processes in relation to depressive symptoms is not well understood. This study investigated the relations among deficient cognitive control of emotional information (i.e. inhibition, shifting, and updating difficulties), cognitive biases (i.e. negative attention and interpretation biases), and depressive symptoms. Theory-driven indirect effect models were constructed, hypothesising that deficient cognitive control over emotional material predicts depressive symptoms through negative attention and interpretation biases. Bootstrapping analyses demonstrated that deficient inhibitory control over negative material was related to negative attention bias which in turn predicted a congruent bias in interpretation and subsequently depressive symptoms. Both shifting and updating impairments in response to negative material had an indirect effect on depression severity through negative interpretation bias. No evidence was found for direct effects of deficient cognitive control over emotional material on depressive symptoms. These findings may help to formulate an integrated understanding of the cognitive foundations of depressive symptoms.

  7. High Step-Up DC—DC Converter for AC Photovoltaic Module with MPPT Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Govindasamy; Karthick, Narashiman; Rama Reddy, Sasi

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the high gain step-up BOOST converter which is essential to step up the low output voltage from PV panel to the high voltage according to the requirement of the application. In this paper a high gain BOOST converter with coupled inductor technique is proposed with the MPPT control. Without extreme duty ratios and the numerous turns-ratios of a coupled inductor this converter achieves a high step-up voltage-conversion ratio and the leakage energy of the coupled inductor is efficiently recycled to the load. MPPT control used to extract the maximum power from PV panel by controlling the Duty ratio of the converter. The PV panel, BOOST converter and the MPPT are modeled using Sim Power System blocks in MATLAB/SIMULINK environment. The prototype model of the proposed converter has been implemented with the maximum measured efficiency is up to 95.4% and full-load efficiency is 93.1%.

  8. Intensity Modulation: A Novel Approach to Percept Control in Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Daniel; Tyler, Dustin; Sweet, Jennifer; Miller, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) can be effective for neuropathic pain, but clinical benefit is sometimes inadequate or is offset by stimulation-induced side-effects, and response can be inconsistent among patients. Intensity-modulated stimulation (IMS) is an alternative to tonic stimulation (TS) that involves continuous variation of stimulation intensity in a sinusoidal pattern between two different values, sequentially activating distinct axonal populations to produce an effect that resembles natural physiological signals. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of IMS on the clinical effect of SCS. Seven patients undergoing a percutaneous SCS trial for postlaminectomy syndrome were enrolled. Thresholds for perception, pain relief, and discomfort were measured and used to create patient-specific models of axonal activation and charge delivery for both TS and IMS. All participants underwent three two-min periods of blinded stimulation using TS, IMS, and placebo, and were asked to describe the effect on quality of the sensory percept and pain relief. All participants perceived IMS differently from placebo, and five noted significant differences from TS that resulted in a more comfortable sensation. TS was described as electric and tingling, whereas IMS was described as producing a focal area of deep pressure with a sense of motion away from that focus. The anatomic location of coverage was similar between the two forms of stimulation, although one participant reported better lower back coverage with IMS. Computer modeling revealed that, compared with TS, IMS involved 36.4% less charge delivery and produced 78.7% less suprathreshold axonal activation. IMS for SCS is feasible, produces a more comfortable percept than conventional TS, and appears to provide a similar degree of pain relief with significantly lower energy requirements. Further studies are necessary to determine whether this represents an effective alternative to tonic SCS for treatment of

  9. An m6A-YTH Module Controls Developmental Timing and Morphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Arribas-Hernández, Laura; Bressendorff, Simon; Hansen, Mathias Henning; Poulsen, Christian; Erdmann, Susanne; Brodersen, Peter

    2018-04-11

    Methylation of N6-adenosine (m6A) in mRNA is an important post-transcriptional gene regulatory mechanism in eukaryotes. m6A provides a binding site for effector proteins ("readers") that influence pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA degradation or translational efficiency. YT521-B homology (YTH) domain proteins are important m6A readers with established functions in animals. Plants contain more YTH domain proteins than other eukaryotes, but their biological importance remains unknown. Here, we show that the cytoplasmic Arabidopsis thaliana YTH domain proteins EVOLUTIONARILY CONSERVED C-TERMINAL REGION2/3 (ECT2/3) are required for the correct timing of leaf formation and for normal leaf morphology. These functions depend fully on intact m6A binding sites of ECT2 and ECT3, indicating that they function as m6A readers. Mutation of the close ECT2 homolog, ECT4, enhances the delayed leaf emergence and leaf morphology defects of ect2/ect3 mutants, and all three ECT proteins are expressed at leaf formation sites in the shoot apex of young seedlings and in the division zone of developing leaves. ECT2 and ECT3 are also highly expressed at early stages of trichome development and are required for trichome morphology, as previously reported for m6A itself. Overall, our study establishes the relevance of a cytoplasmic m6A-YTH regulatory module in the timing and execution of plant organogenesis. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Development and modulation of intrinsic membrane properties control the temporal precision of auditory brain stem neurons.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Delwen L; Gleiss, Sarah A; Berger, Christina; Kümpfbeck, Franziska S; Ammer, Julian J; Felmy, Felix

    2015-01-15

    Passive and active membrane properties determine the voltage responses of neurons. Within the auditory brain stem, refinements in these intrinsic properties during late postnatal development usually generate short integration times and precise action-potential generation. This developmentally acquired temporal precision is crucial for auditory signal processing. How the interactions of these intrinsic properties develop in concert to enable auditory neurons to transfer information with high temporal precision has not yet been elucidated in detail. Here, we show how the developmental interaction of intrinsic membrane parameters generates high firing precision. We performed in vitro recordings from neurons of postnatal days 9-28 in the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus of Mongolian gerbils, an auditory brain stem structure that converts excitatory to inhibitory information with high temporal precision. During this developmental period, the input resistance and capacitance decrease, and action potentials acquire faster kinetics and enhanced precision. Depending on the stimulation time course, the input resistance and capacitance contribute differentially to action-potential thresholds. The decrease in input resistance, however, is sufficient to explain the enhanced action-potential precision. Alterations in passive membrane properties also interact with a developmental change in potassium currents to generate the emergence of the mature firing pattern, characteristic of coincidence-detector neurons. Cholinergic receptor-mediated depolarizations further modulate this intrinsic excitability profile by eliciting changes in the threshold and firing pattern, irrespective of the developmental stage. Thus our findings reveal how intrinsic membrane properties interact developmentally to promote temporally precise information processing. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Axin and GSK3- control Smad3 protein stability and modulate TGF- signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xing; Ramirez, Alejandro; Waddell, David S; Li, Zhizhong; Liu, Xuedong; Wang, Xiao-Fan

    2008-01-01

    The broad range of biological responses elicited by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in various types of tissues and cells is mainly determined by the expression level and activity of the effector proteins Smad2 and Smad3. It is not fully understood how the baseline properties of Smad3 are regulated, although this molecule is in complex with many other proteins at the steady state. Here we show that nonactivated Smad3, but not Smad2, undergoes proteasome-dependent degradation due to the concerted action of the scaffolding protein Axin and its associated kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK3-beta). Smad3 physically interacts with Axin and GSK3-beta only in the absence of TGF-beta. Reduction in the expression or activity of Axin/GSK3-beta leads to increased Smad3 stability and transcriptional activity without affecting TGF-beta receptors or Smad2, whereas overexpression of these proteins promotes Smad3 basal degradation and desensitizes cells to TGF-beta. Mechanistically, Axin facilitates GSK3-beta-mediated phosphorylation of Smad3 at Thr66, which triggers Smad3 ubiquitination and degradation. Thr66 mutants of Smad3 show altered protein stability and hence transcriptional activity. These results indicate that the steady-state stability of Smad3 is an important determinant of cellular sensitivity to TGF-beta, and suggest a new function of the Axin/GSK3-beta complex in modulating critical TGF-beta/Smad3-regulated processes during development and tumor progression.

  12. Dynamic engagement of cognitive control modulates recovery from misinterpretation during real-time language processing

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Nina S.; Novick, Jared M.

    2016-01-01

    Speech unfolds swiftly, yet listeners keep pace by rapidly assigning meaning to what they hear. Sometimes though, initial interpretations turn out wrong. How do listeners revise misinterpretations of language input moment-by-moment, to avoid comprehension errors? Cognitive control may play a role by detecting when processing has gone awry, and then initiating behavioral adjustments accordingly. However, no research has investigated a cause-and-effect interplay between cognitive control engagement and overriding erroneous interpretations in real-time. Using a novel cross-task paradigm, we show that Stroop-conflict detection, which mobilizes cognitive control procedures, subsequently facilitates listeners’ incremental processing of temporarily ambiguous spoken instructions that induce brief misinterpretation. When instructions followed Stroop-incongruent versus-congruent items, listeners’ eye-movements to objects in a scene reflected more transient consideration of the false interpretation and earlier recovery of the correct one. Comprehension errors also decreased. Cognitive control engagement therefore accelerates sentence re-interpretation processes, even as linguistic input is still unfolding. PMID:26957521

  13. Dynamic Engagement of Cognitive Control Modulates Recovery From Misinterpretation During Real-Time Language Processing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Nina S; Novick, Jared M

    2016-04-01

    Speech unfolds swiftly, yet listeners keep pace by rapidly assigning meaning to what they hear. Sometimes, though, initial interpretations turn out to be wrong. How do listeners revise misinterpretations of language input moment by moment to avoid comprehension errors? Cognitive control may play a role by detecting when processing has gone awry and then initiating behavioral adjustments accordingly. However, no research to date has investigated a cause-and-effect interplay between cognitive-control engagement and the overriding of erroneous interpretations in real time. Using a novel cross-task paradigm, we showed that Stroop-conflict detection, which mobilizes cognitive-control procedures, subsequently facilitates listeners' incremental processing of temporarily ambiguous spoken instructions that induce brief misinterpretation. When instructions followed incongruent Stroop items, compared with congruent Stroop items, listeners' eye movements to objects in a scene reflected more transient consideration of the false interpretation and earlier recovery of the correct one. Comprehension errors also decreased. Cognitive-control engagement therefore accelerates sentence-reinterpretation processes, even as linguistic input is still unfolding. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Modulation of Language Switching by Cue Timing: Implications for Models of Bilingual Language Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khateb, Asaid; Shamshoum, Rana; Prior, Anat

    2017-01-01

    The current study examines the interplay between global and local processes in bilingual language control. We investigated language-switching performance of unbalanced Arabic-Hebrew bilinguals in cued picture naming, using 5 different cuing parameters. The language cue could precede the picture, follow it, or appear simultaneously with it. Naming…

  15. Inhibitory Control in Anxious and Healthy Adolescents Is Modulated by Incentive and Incidental Affective Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Michael G.; Mandell, Darcy; Mueller, Sven C.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2009-01-01

    Background: Anxiety disorders are characterized by elevated, sustained responses to threat, that manifest as threat attention biases. Recent evidence also suggests exaggerated responses to incentives. How these characteristics influence cognitive control is under debate and is the focus of the present study. Methods: Twenty-five healthy…

  16. Contamination control in hybrid microelectronic modules. Identification of critical process and contaminants, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himmel, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    Hybrid processes, handling procedures, and materials were examined to identify the critical process steps in which contamination is most likely to occur, to identify the particular contaminants associated with these critical steps, and to propose method for the control of these contaminants.

  17. Delivery strategies to control inflammatory response: Modulating M1-M2 polarization in tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Liu, Julie C; Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Cha, Byung-Hyun; Vishwakarma, Ajaykumar; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-10-28

    Macrophages are key players in many physiological scenarios including tissue homeostasis. In response to injury, typically the balance between macrophage sub-populations shifts from an M1 phenotype (pro-inflammatory) to an M2 phenotype (anti-inflammatory). In tissue engineering scenarios, after implantation of any device, it is desirable to exercise control on this M1-M2 progression and to ensure a timely and smooth transition from the inflammatory to the healing stage. In this review, we briefly introduce the current state of knowledge regarding macrophage function and nomenclature. Next, we discuss the use of controlled release strategies to tune the balance between the M1 and M2 phenotypes in the context of tissue engineering applications. We discuss recent literature related to the release of anti-inflammatory molecules (including nucleic acids) and the sequential release of cytokines to promote a timely M1-M2 shift. In addition, we describe the use of macrophages as controlled release agents upon stimulation by physical and/or mechanical cues provided by scaffolds. Moreover, we discuss current and future applications of "smart" implantable scaffolds capable of controlling the cascade of biochemical events related to healing and vascularization. Finally, we provide our opinion on the current challenges and the future research directions to improve our understanding of the M1-M2 macrophage balance and properly exploit it in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Delivery strategies to control inflammatory response: Modulating M1-M2 polarization in tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Liu, Julie C.; Santiago, Grissel Trujillo-de; Cha, Byung-Hyun; Vishwakarma, Ajaykumar; Ghaemmaghami, Amir; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are key players in many physiological scenarios including tissue homeostasis. In response to injury, typically the balance between macrophage sub-populations shifts from an M1 phenotype (pro-inflammatory) to an M2 phenotype (anti-inflammatory). In tissue engineering scenarios, after implantation of any device, it is desirable to exercise control on this M1-M2 progression and to ensure a timely and smooth transition from the inflammatory to the healing stage. In this review, we briefly introduce the current state of knowledge regarding macrophage function and nomenclature. Next, we discuss the use of controlled release strategies to tune the balance between the M1 and M2 phenotypes in the context of tissue engineering applications. We discuss recent literature related to the release of anti-inflammatory molecules (including nucleic acids) and the sequential release of cytokines to promote a timely M1-M2 shift. In addition, we describe the use of macrophages as controlled release agents upon stimulation by physical and/or mechanical cues provided by scaffolds. Moreover, we discuss current and future applications of “smart” implantable scaffolds capable of controlling the cascade of biochemical events related to healing and vascularization. Finally, we provide our opinion on the current challenges and the future research directions to improve our understanding of the M1-M2 macrophage balance and properly exploit it in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26778695

  19. Using Simulation Module, PCLAB, for Steady State Disturbance Sensitivity Analysis in Process Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Emad; Idriss, Arimiyawo

    2009-01-01

    Recently, chemical engineering education moves towards utilizing simulation soft wares to enhance the learning process especially in the field of process control. These training simulators provide interactive learning through visualization and practicing which will bridge the gap between the theoretical abstraction of textbooks and the…

  20. Quality Control for Scoring Tests Administered in Continuous Mode: An NCME Instructional Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allalouf, Avi; Gutentag, Tony; Baumer, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Quality control (QC) in testing is paramount. QC procedures for tests can be divided into two types. The first type, one that has been well researched, is QC for tests administered to large population groups on few administration dates using a small set of test forms (e.g., large-scale assessment). The second type is QC for tests, usually…