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Sample records for zashchitnoj obolochki aehs

  1. [Atypical epithelial hyperplasia of the breast: current state of knowledge and clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Lavoué, V; Bertel, C; Tas, P; Bendavid, C; Rouquette, S; Foucher, F; Audrain, O; Bouriel, C; Levêque, J

    2010-02-01

    The diagnosis of atypical epithelial hyperplasia (AEH) increases with breast cancer screening. AEH is divided in three groups: atypical ductal hyperplasia, columnar cell lesions with atypia, lobular neoplasia. The management of women with AEH is not consensual because of uncertainty about their diagnosis related to the type of the biopsy sampling (core needle biopsy or surgical excision) and their controversial clinical signification between risk marker and true precursor of breast cancer. A systematic review of published studies was performed. Medline baseline interrogation was performed with the following keywords: atypical ductal hyperplasia, columnar cell lesions with atypia, lobular neoplasia, core needle biopsy, breast cancer, precursor lesion, hormonal replacement therapy. For each breast lesion, identified publications (English or French) were assessed for clinical practise in epidemiology, diagnosis and patient management. With immunohistochemistry and molecular studies, AEH seems to be precursor of breast cancer. But, epidemiological studies show low rate of breast cancer in women with AEH. AEH were still classified as risk factor of breast cancer. Because of high rate of breast cancer underestimation, surgical excision is necessary after the diagnosis of AEH at core needle biopsy. Surgical oncology rules and collaboration with radiologist are required for this surgery. A second operation was not required due to involved margins by AEH (except with pleiomorphic lobular neoplasia) because local control of breast cancer seems to be unchanged. Besides, hormonal replacement therapy for patient with AEH is not recommended because of lack of studies about this subject. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Risk Factors for Acute and Early HIV Infection Among Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM) in San Diego, 2008 to 2014: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hoenigl, Martin; Green, Nella; Mehta, Sanjay R; Little, Susan J

    2015-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify risk factors associated with acute and early HIV infection (AEH) among men who have sex with men (MSM) undergoing community HIV testing and to compare demographics in those diagnosed with AEH with those diagnosed at chronic stage of HIV infection.In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed risk factors associated with AEH among 8925 unique MSM (including 200 with AEH [2.2%] and 219 [2.5%] with newly diagnosed chronic HIV infection) undergoing community-based, confidential AEH screening in San Diego, California.The combination of condomless receptive anal intercourse (CRAI) plus ≥5 male partners, CRAI with an HIV-positive male, CRAI with a person who injects drugs, and prior syphilis diagnosis were significant predictors of AEH in the multivariable Cox regression model. Individuals reporting ≥1 of these 4 risk factors had a hazard ratio of 4.6 for AEH. MSM diagnosed with AEH differed in race (P = 0.005; more reported white race [P = 0.001], less black race [P = 0.030], trend toward less Native American race [P = 0.061]), when compared to those diagnosed with chronic HIV infection, while there was no difference observed regarding age.We established a multivariate model for the predicting risk of AEH infection in a cohort of MSM undergoing community HIV screening, which could be potentially used to discern those in need of further HIV nucleic acid amplification testing for community screening programs that do not test routinely for AEH. In addition, we found that race differed between those diagnosed with AEH and those diagnosed at chronic stage of HIV infection underlining the need for interventions that reduce stigma and promote the uptake of HIV testing for black MSM.

  3. Real-World Impact of Neurocognitive Deficits in Acute and Early HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Katie L.; Morgan, Erin E.; Morris, Sheldon; Smith, Davey M.; Little, Susan; Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Moore, David J.; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.; Woods, Steven Paul

    2013-01-01

    The acute and early period of HIV-1 infection (AEH) is characterized by neuroinflammatory and immunopathogenic processes that can alter the integrity of neural systems and neurocognitive functions. However, the extent to which central nervous system changes in AEH confer increased risk of real-world functioning (RWF) problems is not known. In the present study, 34 individuals with AEH and 39 seronegative comparison participants completed standardized neuromedical, psychiatric, and neurocognitive research evaluations, alongside a comprehensive assessment of RWF that included cognitive symptoms in daily life, basic and instrumental activities of daily living, clinician-rated global functioning, and employment. Results showed that AEH was associated with a significantly increased risk of dependence in RWF, which was particularly elevated among AEH persons with global neurocognitive impairment (NCI). Among those with AEH, NCI (i.e., deficits in learning and information processing speed), mood disorders (i.e., Bipolar Disorder), and substance dependence (e.g., methamphetamine dependence) were all independently predictive of RWF dependence. Findings suggest that neurocognitively impaired individuals with AEH are at notably elevated risk of clinically significant challenges in normal daily functioning. Screening for neurocognitive, mood, and substance use disorders in AEH may facilitate identification of individuals at high risk of functional dependence who may benefit from psychological and medical strategies to manage their neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:24277439

  4. Adaptive Learning Resources Sequencing in Educational Hypermedia Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karampiperis, Pythagoras; Sampson, Demetrios

    2005-01-01

    Adaptive learning resources selection and sequencing is recognized as among the most interesting research questions in adaptive educational hypermedia systems (AEHS). In order to adaptively select and sequence learning resources in AEHS, the definition of adaptation rules contained in the Adaptation Model, is required. Although, some efforts have…

  5. A Model for an Adaptive e-Learning Hypermedia System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahnane, Lamia; Tayeb, Laskri Mohamed; Trigano, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have shown increasing awareness for the importance of adaptivity in e-learning. Since the learning style of each learner is different. Adaptive e-learning hypermedia system (AEHS) must fit different learner's needs. A number of AEHS have been developed to support learning styles as a source for adaptation. However, these systems…

  6. State of the art in acoustic energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah Khan, Farid; Izhar

    2015-02-01

    For portable and embedded smart, wireless electronic systems, energy harvesting from the ambient energy sources has gained immense interest in recent years. Several ambient energies exist in the environment of wireless sensor nodes (WSNs) that include thermal, solar, vibration and acoustic energy. This paper presents the recent development in the field of acoustic energy harvesters (AEHs). AEHs convert the acoustic energy into useful electrical energy for the operation of autonomous wireless sensors. Mainly, two types of AEHs (electromagnetic and piezoelectric based) have been developed and reported in literature. The power produced by the reported piezoelectric AEHs ranges from 0.68 pW to 30 mW however, the power generation of the developed electromagnetic AEHs is in the range of 1.5-1.96 mW. The overall size of most of the developed piezoelectric and electromagnetic AEHs are quite comparable and in millimeter scale. The resonant frequencies of electromagnetic AEHs are on the lower side (143-470 Hz), than that of piezoelectric AEHs (146 Hz-16.7 kHz).

  7. Adult Education for the Homeless: A Program in Jeopardy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education and Literacy.

    During its 8-year history, the federal Adult Education for the Homeless Program (AEH) pioneered new methods of service to adults in need and benefited over 320,000 homeless adults and families. Despite an evaluation that documented program success, funding was rescinded from the 1995 federal budget and never reinstated. AEH programs developed the…

  8. Atypical epithelial hyperplasia of the breast: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Dion, Ludivine; Racin, Adelaïde; Brousse, Susie; Beltjens, Françoise; Cauchois, Aurélie; Levêque, Jean; Coutant, Charles; Lavoué, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Atypical epithelial hyperplasia (AEH) of the breast is considered benign histological lesions with breast cancer risk. This review focuses on clinical signification and management of AEH that remains controversial. A review of published studies was performed using medline database. In this review, we fully describe the current evidence available. In particular, we describe 1) data from immunohistochemistry and molecular studies that suggest AEH is a precursor of breast cancer; 2) epidemiological studies demonstrate low rate of breast cancer in women with AEH; 3) surgical excision is necessary after diagnosis of AEH, such as lobular carcinoma in situ or atypical ductal hyperplasia, on core needle biopsy; 4) although current recommendations are evolving to fewer (if not no) excisions for flat epithelial with atypia and classic lobular neoplasia found on percutaneous biopsy (without radiologic indications for excision). Expert commentary: HEA management steel need prospective evidences, but recent retrospective data give some clue for less invasive management for some of HEA.

  9. Antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic activities of aqueous extract of Hericium erinaceus in experimental diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bin; Guo, Zhengdong; Xie, Fang; Zhao, Ainong

    2013-10-03

    Hericium erinaceus, as a commonly used medicine or food, has attracted much attention due to its health effects when used as a home remedy for some diseases. The aim of this work was to investigate the hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of aqueous extract of Hericium erinaceus (AEHE) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by the administration of STZ (55 mg/kg BW.) intraperitoneally. AEHE (100 and 200 mg/kg BW.) was administered for a period of 28 days. The effects of AEHE on glucose, insulin, and lipid files in blood, and oxidative stress parameters in the liver were evaluated. The body weights of rats were recorded at day 0, 14 and 28th days. The administration of AEHE for 28 days in STZ diabetic rats resulted in a significant decrease in serum glucose level and a significant rise in serum insulin level. AEHE treatment attenuated lipid disorders. In addition, AEHE administration increased the activities of CAT, SOD, and GSH-Px, and GSH level, and reduced MDA level in the liver tissue significantly. Our results suggest that AEHE possesses hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, and antioxidant properties in STZ-induced diabetes rats.

  10. Antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic activities of aqueous extract of Hericium erinaceus in experimental diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hericium erinaceus, as a commonly used medicine or food, has attracted much attention due to its health effects when used as a home remedy for some diseases. The aim of this work was to investigate the hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of aqueous extract of Hericium erinaceus (AEHE) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Methods Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by the administration of STZ (55 mg/kg BW.) intraperitoneally. AEHE (100 and 200 mg/kg BW.) was administered for a period of 28 days. The effects of AEHE on glucose, insulin, and lipid files in blood, and oxidative stress parameters in the liver were evaluated. The body weights of rats were recorded at day 0, 14 and 28th days. Results The administration of AEHE for 28 days in STZ diabetic rats resulted in a significant decrease in serum glucose level and a significant rise in serum insulin level. AEHE treatment attenuated lipid disorders. In addition, AEHE administration increased the activities of CAT, SOD, and GSH-Px, and GSH level, and reduced MDA level in the liver tissue significantly. Conclusion Our results suggest that AEHE possesses hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, and antioxidant properties in STZ-induced diabetes rats. PMID:24090482

  11. Polycystic ovary syndrome: early diagnosis and intervention are necessary for fertility preservation in young women with endometrial cancer under 35 years of age.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Yoshinori; Saito, Fumitaka; Takaishi, Kiyomi; Motohara, Takeshi; Honda, Ritsuo; Ohba, Takashi; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a significant risk factor for premenopausal endometrial cancer (EC) and/or atypical endometrial hyperplasia (AEH). The aim was to elucidate the clinical background and detailed menstrual history of EC and/or AEH in young women with PCOS. From January 2001 to December 2013, women under 35 years of age who had been diagnosed with EC and/or AEH and who had been treated at Kumamoto University Hospital, Japan, were recruited. The patients' clinical characteristics, clinical stages of EC and/or AEH, medication and operation methods, endocrine profiles, and menstrual history were assessed retrospectively. Of all the cases of EC and/or AEH, 25 (4.6%) were under 35 years of age. The mean age was 29.0 years and all the patients were nulligravida. The clinical stages of EC and/or AEH that were identified included: AEH (five cases), stage IA (18 cases), IB (one case), and IIIA (one case). Fourteen (56%) cases met the criteria for PCOS. Both the Body Mass Index and Homeostatic Model Assessment-insulin resistance were significantly higher in the patients with PCOS than in the patients without PCOS. Medroxyprogesterone acetate therapy was not effective for the patients with PCOS and they underwent a hysterectomy more often than the patients without PCOS. All the patients with PCOS exhibited irregular menstruation or amenorrhea, the mean duration of which was 13.1 years before PCOS and EC and/or AEH were diagnosed. Although both the patients with and without PCOS had irregular menstruation, the patients with PCOS were less likely to have fertility-sparing surgery than the patients without PCOS because they had more advanced disease or failed to respond to medroxyprogesterone acetate therapy.

  12. Soccer injuries in female youth players: comparison of injury surveillance by certified athletic trainers and internet.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Melissa A; Mack, Christopher D; Polissar, Nayak L; Levy, Marni R; Dow, Sara P; O'Kane, John W

    2010-01-01

    Few authors have evaluated sports injury-surveillance systems that use parental, Internet-based surveys for data collection. To determine whether certified athletic trainers (ATs) and parental, Internet-based surveys provided comparable data for identifying soccer injuries. Prospective feasibility cohort study. A soccer association in Seattle, Washington. Eighty female youth soccer players, ages 12 to 14 years. We compared the data provided by ATs attending 1 soccer practice per week with a weekly soccer-parent, Internet-based system. We measured athlete-exposure hours (AEHs) for each player. We compared injury rates reported by ATs only, Internet-based surveys only, and both systems combined. We evaluated the 2 surveillance systems for agreement on injured body region and laterality of injury using the kappa statistic. For ATs only, Internet-based surveys only, and both systems combined, we found acute injury rates of 3.0 per 1000 AEHs, 3.9 per 1000 AEHs, and 4.7 per 1000 AEHs and overuse injury rates of 1.0 per 1000 AEHs, 2.9 per 1000 AEHs, and 2.9 per 1000 AEHs, respectively. Players sustained 27 acute injuries (44% ankle, 11% knee, 11% hip) reported by at least 1 of the 2 systems, with 63% reported by ATs and 85% by Internet-based survey. Players sustained 17 overuse injuries (35% knee, 29% lower leg) reported by either system, with 35% reported by ATs and 100% by Internet-based survey. Among players for whom we had both ATs' and Internet-based survey injury data, body region injured and laterality had very good agreement (kappa = 0.73 to 1.0). The injury rate based on the weekly parental, Internet-based survey was similar to the rate based on the ATs' reporting and had comparable classifications of injured body region and laterality of injury.

  13. In vitro synergistic effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa aqueous extract in combination with standard antibiotics against Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sherif T S; Berchová, Kateřina; Majerová, Michaela; Pokorná, Marie; Švajdlenka, Emil

    2016-09-01

    Context The increasing problem of drug-resistant strains has led to the failure of current treatment regimens of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection. Recently, a new treatment strategy has been developed to overcome the problem by using natural products in combination with antibiotics to enhance the treatment efficacy. Objective The antimicrobial combinatory effect of the aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae) (AEHS) with antibiotics (clarithromycin, CLA; amoxicillin, AMX; metronidazole, MTZ) has been evaluated in vitro against HP strains. Materials and methods Hibiscus calyces (35 g) were brewed in 250 mL of boiled water for 30 min, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by agar dilution method. The checkerboard assay was used to evaluate the antimicrobial combinatory effect according to the sum of fractional inhibitory concentration (∑FIC) indices. Results In this study, AEHS exerted remarkable bacteriostatic effect against all HP strains tested with MICs values ranging from 9.18 to 16.68 μg/mL. Synergy effect of AEHS with CLA or MTZ was obtained against four of seven HP strains tested with ∑FIC ranging from 0.21 to 0.39. The additive effect of AEHS with AMX was obtained against five of seven HP strains tested with ∑FIC ranging from 0.61 to 0.91. Conclusion This study presents AEHS as a potent therapeutic candidate alone, or in combination with antibiotics for the treatment of HP infection.

  14. Contributed Review: Recent developments in acoustic energy harvesting for autonomous wireless sensor nodes applications.

    PubMed

    Khan, Farid Ullah; Khattak, Muhammad Umair

    2016-02-01

    Rapid developments in micro electronics, micro fabrication, ultra-large scale of integration, ultra-low power sensors, and wireless technology have greatly reduced the power consumption requirements of wireless sensor nodes (WSNs) and make it possible to operate these devices with energy harvesters. Likewise, other energy harvesters, acoustic energy harvesters (AEHs), have been developed and are gaining swift interest in last few years. This paper presents a review of AEHs reported in the literature for the applications of WSNs. Based on transduction mechanism, there are two types of AEHs: piezoelectric acoustic energy harvesters (PEAEHs) and electromagnetic acoustic energy harvesters (EMAEHs). The reported AEHs are mostly characterized under the sound pressure level (SPL) that ranges from 45 to 161 dB. The range for resonant frequency of the produced AEHs is from 146 Hz to 24 kHz and these produced 0.68 × 10(-6) μW to 30 mW power. The maximum power (30 mW) is produced by a PEAEH, when the harvester is subjected to a SPL of 161 dB and 2.64 kHz frequency. However, for EMAEHs, the maximum power reported is about 1.96 mW (at 125 dB and 143 Hz). Under the comparable SPLs, the power production by the reported EMAEHs is relatively better than that of PEAEHs, moreover, due to lower resonant frequency, the EMAEHs are more feasible for the low frequency band acoustical environment.

  15. Contributed Review: Recent developments in acoustic energy harvesting for autonomous wireless sensor nodes applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Farid Ullah; Khattak, Muhammad Umair

    2016-02-01

    Rapid developments in micro electronics, micro fabrication, ultra-large scale of integration, ultra-low power sensors, and wireless technology have greatly reduced the power consumption requirements of wireless sensor nodes (WSNs) and make it possible to operate these devices with energy harvesters. Likewise, other energy harvesters, acoustic energy harvesters (AEHs), have been developed and are gaining swift interest in last few years. This paper presents a review of AEHs reported in the literature for the applications of WSNs. Based on transduction mechanism, there are two types of AEHs: piezoelectric acoustic energy harvesters (PEAEHs) and electromagnetic acoustic energy harvesters (EMAEHs). The reported AEHs are mostly characterized under the sound pressure level (SPL) that ranges from 45 to 161 dB. The range for resonant frequency of the produced AEHs is from 146 Hz to 24 kHz and these produced 0.68 × 10-6 μW to 30 mW power. The maximum power (30 mW) is produced by a PEAEH, when the harvester is subjected to a SPL of 161 dB and 2.64 kHz frequency. However, for EMAEHs, the maximum power reported is about 1.96 mW (at 125 dB and 143 Hz). Under the comparable SPLs, the power production by the reported EMAEHs is relatively better than that of PEAEHs, moreover, due to lower resonant frequency, the EMAEHs are more feasible for the low frequency band acoustical environment.

  16. Helix structure for low frequency acoustic energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming; Cao, Ziping; Luo, Jun; Pang, Zongqiang

    2018-05-01

    In this study, a novel helix acoustic resonator is proposed to realize acoustic energy harvesting (AEH). Compared with the traditional acoustic resonators, the proposed structure occupies a small volume and is suitable for the low frequency range. At a specific incident frequency, the mechanical component of the AEH device can be intensely excited and the bonded piezoelectric patch is utilized to convert the strain energy into electrical energy. Analytical studies are carried out to disclose the acoustic resonant system properties. Meanwhile, the pure acoustic and coupled vibro-acoustic properties of the proposed device are analyzed via the finite element method. The major part of the AEH device is fabricated via 3D printing for experimental study, which is favored for rapid prototyping. At acoustic resonance frequency 175 Hz, 100 dB sound pressure level excitation working condition, the measured experimental data show that the harvested power can be up to 7.3 μW.

  17. Helix structure for low frequency acoustic energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ming; Cao, Ziping; Luo, Jun; Pang, Zongqiang

    2018-05-01

    In this study, a novel helix acoustic resonator is proposed to realize acoustic energy harvesting (AEH). Compared with the traditional acoustic resonators, the proposed structure occupies a small volume and is suitable for the low frequency range. At a specific incident frequency, the mechanical component of the AEH device can be intensely excited and the bonded piezoelectric patch is utilized to convert the strain energy into electrical energy. Analytical studies are carried out to disclose the acoustic resonant system properties. Meanwhile, the pure acoustic and coupled vibro-acoustic properties of the proposed device are analyzed via the finite element method. The major part of the AEH device is fabricated via 3D printing for experimental study, which is favored for rapid prototyping. At acoustic resonance frequency 175 Hz, 100 dB sound pressure level excitation working condition, the measured experimental data show that the harvested power can be up to 7.3 μW.

  18. Expression and characterization of hyperthermostable exo-polygalacturonase TtGH28 from Thermotoga thermophilus

    The gene TtGH28 encoding a putative GH28 polygalacturonase from Pseudothermotoga thermarum DSM 5069 (Theth_0397, NCBI# AEH50492.1) was synthesized, expressed in E. coli, and characterized. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of gene product TtGH28 with other GH28 proteins whose structures and detai...

  19. Non-traumatic spontaneous acute epidural hematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Serarslan, Yurdal; Aras, Mustafa; Altaş, Murat; Kaya, Hasan; Urfalı, Boran

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old female with sickle cell anemia (SCD) was referred to our hospital after two days of hospitalization at another hospital for a headache crisis. This headache crisis was due to a raised intracranial pressure; these symptoms were noted and included in her comprehensive list of symptoms. There was an acute drop in the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. The cranial CT scan demonstrated a left fronto-parietal acute epidural hematoma (AEH) and a calvarial bone expansion, which was suggestive of medullary hematopoiesis. The patient underwent emergent craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma. There were no abnormal findings intra-operatively apart from the AEH, except skull thickening and active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries. Repeated CT scan showed a complete evacuation of the hematoma. The possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. In addition to the factors mentioned in the relevant literature, any active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries on the separated surface of the dura from the skull could have contributed to the expanding of the AEH in our patient. Neurosurgeons and other health care providers should be aware of spontaneous AEH in patients with SCD. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. International Aerospace and Ground Conference on Lightning and Static Electricity Held in Dayton, Ohio on 24-26 June 1986

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    developed by the AEH Group has the advantages: of compactness which makes it easily transportable; computer controlled acquisi- tion, signal processing...be available to a negatively charged aircraft. The experimental arrangement attempts to simulate the streamer propagation and growth in a quasi ...separate foam configurations: the operational configuration of non - conductive foam and a second configuration which contained an experimental

  1. Tunable sub-wavelength acoustic energy harvesting with a metamaterial plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong

    2017-08-01

    We report theoretically on sub-wavelength acoustic energy harvesting (AEH) using a thin acoustic metamaterial (AM) made of spring-mass resonators attached to the surface of a homogeneous elastic thin plate. Considering an incident acoustic wave hitting the AM plate, tunable and highly efficient AEH is achieved by introducing a sub-wavelength defect inside the AM structure to confine the elastic energy into a spot which is then electromechanically converted into electrical power using a ceramic PZT patch. Several types of sub-wavelength cavities capable of confining acoustic energy at the sonic regime are extensively investigated for the optimization of AEH. Three analytical approaches—band structure, sound transmission loss and electrical-to-mechanical energy conversion—are proposed to fully describe the system interaction with the acoustic wave and quantify the AEH performance. The computed results show that an average power of 18 μW can be harvested using a specific cavity design of only 3 × 3 cm2 size from an incident acoustic wave with a sound pressure level of 100 dB at 520 Hz. Such a system can open up a way through the design of effective tunable sub-wavelength acoustic energy harvesters based on AM applied to scavenge energy from sound.

  2. Patterns in Authoring of Adaptive Educational Hypermedia: A Taxonomy of Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Elizabeth; Cristea, Alexandra; Stewart, Craig; Brailsford, Tim

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the use of adaptation patterns in the task of formulating standards for adaptive educational hypermedia (AEH) systems that is currently under investigation by the EU ADAPT project. Within this project, design dimensions for high granularity patterns have been established. In this paper we focus on detailing lower granularity…

  3. Learning To Hope: A Study of the Adult Education for the Homeless Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, Darrel; Koloski, Judy

    A comprehensive study of the Adult Education for the Homeless Program (AEH) was conducted using data from the following sources: program files; focus groups conducted with state project administrators; site visits to 9 local programs in 3 states; surveys of 32 state projects, 230 local programs, 588 service delivery sites, and 2,943 program…

  4. Soccer Injuries in Female Youth Players: Comparison of Injury Surveillance by Certified Athletic Trainers and Internet

    PubMed Central

    Schiff, Melissa A.; Mack, Christopher D.; Polissar, Nayak L.; Levy, Marni R.; Dow, Sara P.; O'Kane, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Few authors have evaluated sports injury-surveillance systems that use parental, Internet-based surveys for data collection. Objective: To determine whether certified athletic trainers (ATs) and parental, Internet-based surveys provided comparable data for identifying soccer injuries. Design: Prospective feasibility cohort study. Setting: A soccer association in Seattle, Washington. Patients or Other Participants: Eighty female youth soccer players, ages 12 to 14 years. Main Outcome Measure(s): We compared the data provided by ATs attending 1 soccer practice per week with a weekly soccer-parent, Internet-based system. We measured athlete-exposure hours (AEHs) for each player. We compared injury rates reported by ATs only, Internet-based surveys only, and both systems combined. We evaluated the 2 surveillance systems for agreement on injured body region and laterality of injury using the κ statistic. Results: For ATs only, Internet-based surveys only, and both systems combined, we found acute injury rates of 3.0 per 1000 AEHs, 3.9 per 1000 AEHs, and 4.7 per 1000 AEHs and overuse injury rates of 1.0 per 1000 AEHs, 2.9 per 1000 AEHs, and 2.9 per 1000 AEHs, respectively. Players sustained 27 acute injuries (44% ankle, 11% knee, 11% hip) reported by at least 1 of the 2 systems, with 63% reported by ATs and 85% by Internet-based survey. Players sustained 17 overuse injuries (35% knee, 29% lower leg) reported by either system, with 35% reported by ATs and 100% by Internet-based survey. Among players for whom we had both ATs' and Internet-based survey injury data, body region injured and laterality had very good agreement (κ  =  0.73 to 1.0). Conclusions: The injury rate based on the weekly parental, Internet-based survey was similar to the rate based on the ATs' reporting and had comparable classifications of injured body region and laterality of injury. PMID:20446836

  5. Substance Use is a Risk Factor for Neurocognitive Deficits and Neuropsychiatric Distress in Acute and Early HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Erica; Morgan, Erin E.; Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Grant, Igor; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott L.; Little, Susan; Morris, Sheldon; Smith, Davey M.; Moore, David J.; Woods, Steven Paul

    2012-01-01

    The acute and early stages of HIV infection (AEH) are characterized by substantial viral replication, immune activation, and alterations in brain metabolism. However, little is known about the prevalence and predictors of neurocognitive deficits and neuropsychiatric disturbances during this period. The present study examined the impact of demographic, HIV disease, and substance use factors on HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment and self-reported neuropsychiatric distress among 46 antiretroviral-naïve adults with median duration of infection of 75 days, relative to sample a of 21 HIV seronegative (HIV-) adults with comparable demographics and risk factors. Participants were administered a brief neurocognitive battery that was adjusted for demographics and assessed executive functions, memory, psychomotor speed, and verbal fluency, as well as the Profile of Mood States (POMS), a self-report measure of neuropsychiatric distress. Odds ratios revealed that AEH participants were nearly four times more likely than their seronegative counterparts to experience neurocognitive impairment, particularly in the areas of learning and information processing speed. Similarly, AEH was associated with a nearly five-fold increase in the odds of neuropsychiatric distress, most notably in anxiety and depression. Within the AEH sample, HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment was associated with problematic methamphetamine use and higher plasma HIV RNA levels, whereas neuropsychiatric distress was solely associated with high-risk alcohol use. Extending prior neuroimaging findings, results from this study indicate that HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment and neuropsychiatric distress are highly prevalent during AEH and are associated with high-risk substance use. PMID:23250704

  6. Development and validation of the San Diego Early Test Score to predict acute and early HIV infection risk in men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Hoenigl, Martin; Weibel, Nadir; Mehta, Sanjay R; Anderson, Christy M; Jenks, Jeffrey; Green, Nella; Gianella, Sara; Smith, Davey M; Little, Susan J

    2015-08-01

    Although men who have sex with men (MSM) represent a dominant risk group for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the risk of HIV infection within this population is not uniform. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a score to estimate incident HIV infection risk. Adult MSM who were tested for acute and early HIV (AEH) between 2008 and 2014 were retrospectively randomized 2:1 to a derivation and validation dataset, respectively. Using the derivation dataset, each predictor associated with an AEH outcome in the multivariate prediction model was assigned a point value that corresponded to its odds ratio. The score was validated on the validation dataset using C-statistics. Data collected at a single HIV testing encounter from 8326 unique MSM were analyzed, including 200 with AEH (2.4%). Four risk behavior variables were significantly associated with an AEH diagnosis (ie, incident infection) in multivariable analysis and were used to derive the San Diego Early Test (SDET) score: condomless receptive anal intercourse (CRAI) with an HIV-positive MSM (3 points), the combination of CRAI plus ≥5 male partners (3 points), ≥10 male partners (2 points), and diagnosis of bacterial sexually transmitted infection (2 points)-all as reported for the prior 12 months. The C-statistic for this risk score was >0.7 in both data sets. The SDET risk score may help to prioritize resources and target interventions, such as preexposure prophylaxis, to MSM at greatest risk of acquiring HIV infection. The SDET risk score is deployed as a freely available tool at http://sdet.ucsd.edu. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Asymptotic Expansion Homogenization for Multiscale Nuclear Fuel Analysis

    SciT

    Hales, J. D.; Tonks, M. R.; Chockalingam, K.

    2015-03-01

    Engineering scale nuclear fuel performance simulations can benefit by utilizing high-fidelity models running at a lower length scale. Lower length-scale models provide a detailed view of the material behavior that is used to determine the average material response at the macroscale. These lower length-scale calculations may provide insight into material behavior where experimental data is sparse or nonexistent. This multiscale approach is especially useful in the nuclear field, since irradiation experiments are difficult and expensive to conduct. The lower length-scale models complement the experiments by influencing the types of experiments required and by reducing the total number of experiments needed.more » This multiscale modeling approach is a central motivation in the development of the BISON-MARMOT fuel performance codes at Idaho National Laboratory. These codes seek to provide more accurate and predictive solutions for nuclear fuel behavior. One critical aspect of multiscale modeling is the ability to extract the relevant information from the lower length-scale sim- ulations. One approach, the asymptotic expansion homogenization (AEH) technique, has proven to be an effective method for determining homogenized material parameters. The AEH technique prescribes a system of equations to solve at the microscale that are used to compute homogenized material constants for use at the engineering scale. In this work, we employ AEH to explore the effect of evolving microstructural thermal conductivity and elastic constants on nuclear fuel performance. We show that the AEH approach fits cleanly into the BISON and MARMOT codes and provides a natural, multidimensional homogenization capability.« less

  8. Temperature Regulation of Shigella Virulence: Identification of Temperature-Regulated Shigella Invasion Genes by the Isolation of inv::lacZ Operon Fusions and the Characterization of the Virulence Gene Regulator virR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-10

    Partial nucleotide sequence of viri? clone pAEH122 102 14. Effects of VirR’ activity on Ipa expression 106 15. Sequencing strategy for the 2.3 kb EcoRl...Confluent monolayers of mammalian cells are challenged with virulent organisms and invasion and intercellular spread result in a cytopathic effect ...destruction of the mucosal surface and an inflammatory response ensues which mimics the effects of invasion and intercellular spread in the mucosa of the

  9. Software Quality Measurement for Distributed Systems. Volume 3. Distributed Computing Systems: Impact on Software Quality.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    Distributed Computing Systems impact DrnwrR - aehR on Sotwar Quaity. PERFORMING 010. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTNOW) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT "UMBER(*)IS ThomasY...C31 Application", "Space Systems Network", "Need for Distributed Database Management", and "Adaptive Routing". This is discussed in the last para ...data reduction, buffering, encryption, and error detection and correction functions. Examples of such data streams include imagery data, video

  10. RNA sequencing reveals significant miRNAs in Atypical endometrial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shiqian; Dai, Yinmei

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we aimed to investigate the miRNAs that played a regulatory role in the development of atypical endometrial hyperplasia (AEH). RNA sequencing was performed for endometrial tissues from 3 AEH patients and 3 endometrial normal hyperplasia patients. RNA sequencing data were processed and differentially expressed (DE) miRNAs were identified between AEH and controls. The target genes for DE miRNAs were identified and mapped to the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. The miRNA related functions were predicted and miRNA-disease gene network was constructed. Total 18 DE miRNAs were overlapped in three sample groups, among which hsa-miR-577, hsa-miR-182-5p and hsa-miR-183-5p were top three miRNAs that targeting largest number of genes. Function analysis showed that the 18 overlapped miRNAs mainly related with cancer and signaling transduction related pathways. PPI network showed that total 12 genes were among top 20 genes based on three network topological features including BCL2, UMPS, MAPK13, PRKCB, CREB1, IGF1, SP1, SMAD3, IGF1R, NOTCH2, WNT5A, TK2. Top 10 miRNAs in miRNA-disease gene network were identified such as hsa-miR-577 (degree = 17), hsa-miR-182-5p (degree = 16) and hsa-miR-3609 (degree = 13). hsa-miR-577 and hsa-miR-182-5p may play regulatory role in AEH through AMPK signal pathway and Wnt signaling pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. In vivo pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyces extracts with simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Showande, S J; Adegbolagun, O M; Igbinoba, S I; Fakeye, T O

    2017-12-01

    Increasing number of patients use herbs with their medications. Such practice may result in beneficial or harmful herb-drug interactions. A recent survey reported that some participants co-administered Hibiscus sabdariffa, a widely used beverage, or tea, with their antihyperlipidaemic medications. This study therefore evaluated the effect of concomitant administration of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyces' extracts with simvastatin on hyperlipidaemia and pharmacokinetics of the drug in vivo. Factorial experimental designs were used to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and interactions between simvastatin and aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa (AEHS) on lipid profile parameters in hyperlipidaemia-induced Wistar rats. Different combinations of low (AEHS 250 mg/kg; simvastatin 10 mg/kg) and high doses (AEHS 500 mg/kg; simvastatin 20 mg/kg) were administered individually and concurrently daily for 2 and 4 weeks. Lipid profile parameters were assessed at these treatment periods. Subsequently, the effect of aqueous beverage of Hibiscus sabdariffa (ABHS) on the pharmacokinetics of single-dose 40 mg simvastatin was also evaluated in six healthy human volunteers using two-period randomized crossover design. Blood samples were collected at predetermined times for 24 hours. The plasma obtained was analysed for simvastatin using RP-HPLC/UV method. Aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa reduced total cholesterol (T c ) better than simvastatin (P = .031). Low-dose AEHS and low-dose simvastatin used concomitantly caused 38.3% and 57.4% reductions in T c and triglyceride levels, respectively, compared with low-dose simvastatin (P < .05). Also, ABHS increased clearance and reduced peak concentration of simvastatin by 44.6% and 18.0%, respectively (P < .05). The geometric mean ratio of simvastatin AUC 0-∞ with or without ABHS was 0.646 with the 90% confidence interval (0.564, 0.758) falling outside the bioequivalent range. Aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa

  12. Risk Behavior and Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Transgender Women and Men Undergoing Community-Based Screening for Acute and Early HIV Infection in San Diego.

    PubMed

    Green, Nella; Hoenigl, Martin; Morris, Sheldon; Little, Susan J

    2015-10-01

    The transgender community represents an understudied population in the literature. The objective of this study was to compare risk behavior, and HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates between transgender women and transgender men undergoing community-based HIV testing.With this retrospective analysis of a cohort study, we characterize HIV infection rates as well as reported risk behaviors and reported STI in 151 individual transgender women and 30 individual transgender men undergoing community based, voluntary screening for acute and early HIV infection (AEH) in San Diego, California between April 2008 and July 2014.HIV positivity rate was low for both, transgender women and transgender men undergoing AEH screening (2% and 3%, respectively), and the self-reported STI rate for the prior 12 months was 13% for both. Although transgender women appeared to engage in higher rates of risk behavior overall, with 69% engaged in condomless receptive anal intercourse (CRAI) and 11% engaged in sex work, it is important to note that 91% of transgender women reported recent sexual intercourse, 73% had more than 1 sexual partner, 63% reported intercourse with males, 37% intercourse with males and females, and 30% had CRAI.Our results indicate that in some settings rates of HIV infection, as well as rates of reported STIs and sexual risk behavior in transgender men may resemble those found in transgender women. Our findings support the need for comprehensive HIV prevention in both, transgender women and men.

  13. Hibiscus sabdariffa L. and Its Bioactive Constituents Exhibit Antiviral Activity against HSV-2 and Anti-enzymatic Properties against Urease by an ESI-MS Based Assay.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sherif T S; Švajdlenka, Emil; Berchová-Bímová, Kateřina

    2017-04-30

    For decades, Hibiscus sabdariffa L. and its phytochemicals have been shown to possess a wide range of pharmacologic properties. In this study, aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa (AEHS) and its bioactive constituent protocatechuic acid (PCA), have been evaluated in vitro for their antiviral activity against HSV-2 clinical isolates and anti-enzymatic activity against urease. Antiherpetic activity was evaluated by the titer reduction assay in infected Vero cells, and cytotoxicity was evaluated by the neutral red dye-uptake method. Anti-urease activity was determined by a developed Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS)-based assay. PCA showed potent anti-HSV-2 activity compared with that of acyclovir, with EC 50 values of 0.92 and 1.43 µg∙mL -1 , respectively, and selectivity indices > 217 and > 140, respectively. For the first time, AEHS was shown to exert anti-urease inhibition activity, with an IC 50 value of 82.4 µg∙mL -1 . This, combined with its safety, could facilitate its use in practical applications as a natural urease inhibitor. Our results present Hibiscus sabdariffa L. and its bioactive compound PCA as potential therapeutic agents in the treatment of HSV-2 infection and the treatment of diseases caused by urease-producing bacteria.

  14. ESP Toolbox: A Computational Framework for Precise, Scale-Independent Analysis of Bulk Elastic and Seismic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. E.; Vel, S. S.; Cook, A. C.; Song, W. J.; Gerbi, C. C.; Okaya, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Owing to the abundance of highly anisotropic minerals in the crust, the Voigt and Reuss bounds on the seismic velocities can be separated by more than 1 km/s. These bounds are determined by modal mineralogy and crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) of the constituent minerals, but where the true velocities lie between these bounds is determined by other fabric parameters such as the shapes, shape-preferred orientations, and spatial arrangements of grains. Thus, the calculation of accurate bulk stiffness relies on explicitly treating the grain-scale heterogeneity, and the same principle applies at larger scales, for example calculating accurate bulk stiffness for a crustal volume with varying proportions and distributions of folds or shear zones. We have developed stand-alone GUI software - ESP Toolbox - for the calculation of 3D bulk elastic and seismic properties of heterogeneous and polycrystalline materials using image or EBSD data. The GUI includes a number of different homogenization techniques, including Voigt, Reuss, Hill, geometric mean, self-consistent and asymptotic expansion homogenization (AEH) methods. The AEH method, which uses a finite element mesh, is most accurate since it explicitly accounts for elastic interactions of constituent minerals/phases. The user need only specify the microstructure and material properties of the minerals/phases. We use the Toolbox to explore changes in bulk elasticity and related seismic anisotropy caused by specific variables, including: (a) the quartz alpha-beta phase change in rocks with varying proportions of quartz, (b) changes in modal mineralogy and CPO fabric that occur during progressive deformation and metamorphism, and (c) shear zones of varying thickness, abundance and geometry in continental crust. The Toolbox allows rapid sensitivity analysis around these and other variables, and the resulting bulk stiffness matrices can be used to populate volumes for synthetic wave propagation experiments that

  15. Human Research Program: Space Human Factors and Habitability Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, Dane M.

    2007-01-01

    The three project areas of the Space Human Factors and Habitability Element work together to achieve a working and living environment that will keep crews healthy, safe, and productive throughout all missions -- from Earth orbit to Mars expeditions. The Advanced Environmental Health (AEH) Project develops and evaluates advanced habitability systems and establishes requirements and health standards for exploration missions. The Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) Project s goal is to ensure a safe and productive environment for humans in space. With missions using new technologies at an ever-increasing rate, it is imperative that these advances enhance crew performance without increasing stress or risk. The ultimate goal of Advanced Food Technology (AFT) Project is to develop and deliver technologies for human centered spacecraft that will support crews on missions to the moon, Mars, and beyond.

  16. Spectral analysis of near-wall turbulence in channel flow at Reτ=4200 with emphasis on the attached-eddy hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Lionel; Leschziner, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation data for channel flow at a friction Reynolds number of 4200, generated by Lozano-Durán and Jiménez [J. Fluid Mech. 759, 432 (2014), 10.1017/jfm.2014.575], are used to examine the properties of near-wall turbulence within subranges of eddy-length scale. Attention is primarily focused on the intermediate layer (mesolayer) covering the logarithmic velocity region within the range of wall-scaled wall-normal distance of 80-1500. The examination is based on a number of statistical properties, including premultiplied and compensated spectra, the premultiplied derivative of the second-order structure function, and three scalar parameters that characterize the anisotropic or isotropic state of the various length-scale subranges. This analysis leads to the delineation of three regions within the map of wall-normal-wise premultiplied spectra, each characterized by distinct turbulence properties. A question of particular interest is whether the Townsend-Perry attached-eddy hypothesis (AEH) can be shown to be valid across the entire mesolayer, in contrast to the usual focus on the outer portion of the logarithmic-velocity layer at high Reynolds numbers, which is populated with very-large-scale motions. This question is addressed by reference to properties in the premultiplied scalewise derivative of the second-order structure function (PMDS2) and joint probability density functions of streamwise-velocity fluctuations and their streamwise and spanwise derivatives. This examination provides evidence, based primarily on the existence of a plateau region in the PMDS2, for the qualified validity of the AEH right down the lower limit of the logarithmic velocity range.

  17. Weaving Together Space Biology and the Human Research Program: Selecting Crops and Manipulating Plant Physiology to Produce High Quality Food for ISS Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Gioia; Hummerick, Mary; Douglas, Grace; Wheeler, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Researchers from the Human Research Program (HRP) have teamed up with plant biologists at KSC to explore the potential for plant growth and food production on the international space station (ISS) and future exploration missions. KSC Space Biology (SB) brings a history of plant and plant-microbial interaction research for station and for future bioregenerative life support systems. JSC HRP brings expertise in Advanced Food Technology (AFT), Advanced Environmental Health (AEH), and Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP). The Veggie plant growth hardware on the ISS is the platform that first drove these interactions. As we prepared for the VEG-01 validation test of Veggie, we engaged with BHP to explore questions that could be asked of the crew that would contribute both to plant and to behavioral health research. AFT, AEH and BHP stakeholders were engaged immediately after the return of the Veggie flight samples of space-grown lettuce, and this team worked with the JSC human medical offices to gain approvals for crew consumption of the lettuce on ISS. As we progressed with Veggie testing we began performing crop selection studies for Veggie that were initiated through AFT. These studies consisted of testing and down selecting leafy greens, dwarf tomatoes, and dwarf pepper crops based on characteristics of plant growth and nutritional levels evaluated at KSC, and organoleptic quality evaluated at JSCs Sensory Analysis lab. This work has led to a successful collaborative proposal to the International Life Sciences Research Announcement for a jointly funded HRP-SB investigation of the impacts of light quality and fertilizer on salad crop productivity, nutrition, and flavor in Veggie on the ISS. With this work, and potentially with other pending joint projects, we will continue the synergistic research that will advance the space biology knowledge base, help close gaps in the human research roadmap, and enable humans to venture out to Mars and beyond.

  18. Trait differences between naturalized and invasive plant species independent of residence time and phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, R V; Randall, R P; Leishman, M R

    2015-01-01

    inclusion of quantitative traits, in particular SLA, into the WRA schemes. Diferencia de Características entre Especies de Plantas Naturalizadas e Invasoras Independientes del Tiempo de Residencia y de la Filogenia Resumen La habilidad para predecir cuáles plantas exóticas harán la transición de naturalizadas a invasoras antes de su introducción a regiones nuevas es un objetivo clave para la conservación y tiene el potencial de incrementar la eficiencia de la evaluación de riesgo de hierbas (ERH). Sin embargo, múltiples factores contribuyen al éxito invasor de las plantas (p. ej.: características funcionales, características de cobertura, tiempo de residencia, filogenia) y todos deben considerarse simultáneamente para poder identificar correlaciones significativas del éxito invasor. Recopilamos en Australia 146 parejas de especies de plantas invasoras y naturalizadas emparejadas filogenéticamente (congéneres) y con tiempos de residencia mínima similares (es decir, el tiempo transcurrido desde su introducción en años). Estas parejas se usaron para probar diferencias en cinco características funcionales (duración de la floración, tamaño de la hoja, altura máxima, área específica de la hoja [AEH], masa de la semilla) y en tres características de cobertura nativa de las especies (ocupación de bioma, temperatura media anual y amplitud de pluviosidad) entre especies invasoras y naturalizadas. Las especies invasoras, en promedio, tuvieron una mayor AEH, periodos de floración más largos y fueron más altas que sus parientes congéneres naturalizadas. Las invasoras también exhibieron una mayor tolerancia a diferentes condiciones ambientales en su cobertura nativa, donde ocuparon más biomas y una mayor amplitud de pluviosidad y condiciones de temperatura que sus congéneres naturalizadas. Sin embargo, ni la masa de la semilla ni el tamaño de hoja difirieron entre las parejas de especies naturalizadas e invasoras. Un hallazgo relevante fue el papel de

  19. Phase II study of medroxyprogesterone acetate plus metformin as a fertility-sparing treatment for atypical endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, A; Sato, Y; Kiyokawa, T; Koshizaka, M; Hanaoka, H; Shozu, M

    2016-02-01

    Metformin, widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, reduces the risk of cancer and relapse after treatment. Fertility-sparing treatment for endometrial cancer (EC) with progestin is associated with a high chance of disease regression, and the high relapse rate continues to be a problem. We assessed the efficacy of metformin in preventing recurrence after medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) as fertility-sparing treatment for atypical endometrial hyperplasia (AEH) and EC. This phase II study enrolled 17 patients with AEH and 19 patients with EC limited to the endometrium (age, 20-40 years). MPA (400 mg/day) and metformin (750-2250 mg/day) were administered for 24-36 weeks to achieve a complete response (CR). Metformin was administered until conception, even after MPA discontinuation. The primary end point was relapse-free survival (RFS) after remission. We analyzed all efficacy end points in the full analysis set. The body mass index was ≥25 kg/m(2) in 27 patients (mean, 31 kg/m(2); range, 19-51 kg/m(2)), and the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance index was ≥2.5 in 24 patients (mean, 4.7; range, 0.7-21). Two patients showed progression at 12 weeks [6%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2-18]. At 36 weeks, 29 (81%; 95% CI 65-90) patients achieved CR, and 5 (14%; 95% CI 6-29) patients achieved partial response. During a median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9-66 months) after remission, relapse was confirmed in three of the patients who had achieved CR (relapse rate, 10%). The 3-year estimated RFS rate was 89%. No patients experienced severe toxicity. Metformin inhibited disease relapse after MPA therapy. The combination of metformin and MPA in EC treatment should be studied further. UMIN 000002210. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Fast computation of close-coupling exchange integrals using polynomials in a tree representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallerberger, Markus; Igenbergs, Katharina; Schweinzer, Josef; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2011-03-01

    The semi-classical atomic-orbital close-coupling method is a well-known approach for the calculation of cross sections in ion-atom collisions. It strongly relies on the fast and stable computation of exchange integrals. We present an upgrade to earlier implementations of the Fourier-transform method. For this purpose, we implement an extensive library for symbolic storage of polynomials, relying on sophisticated tree structures to allow fast manipulation and numerically stable evaluation. Using this library, we considerably speed up creation and computation of exchange integrals. This enables us to compute cross sections for more complex collision systems. Program summaryProgram title: TXINT Catalogue identifier: AEHS_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHS_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 332 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 157 086 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95 Computer: All with a Fortran 95 compiler Operating system: All with a Fortran 95 compiler RAM: Depends heavily on input, usually less than 100 MiB Classification: 16.10 Nature of problem: Analytical calculation of one- and two-center exchange matrix elements for the close-coupling method in the impact parameter model. Solution method: Similar to the code of Hansen and Dubois [1], we use the Fourier-transform method suggested by Shakeshaft [2] to compute the integrals. However, we heavily speed up the calculation using a library for symbolic manipulation of polynomials. Restrictions: We restrict ourselves to a defined collision system in the impact parameter model. Unusual features: A library for symbolic manipulation of polynomials, where polynomials are stored in a space-saving left-child right

  1. Assessment of cellular responses to oxidative stress using MCF-7 breast cancer cells, black seed (N. Sativa L.) extracts and H2O2.

    PubMed

    Farah, Ibrahim O

    2005-12-01

    Black seed (N. Sativa L) is an oriental spice of the family Ranunculaceae that has long been rationally used as a natural medicine for treatment of many acute as well as chronic conditions including cardiovascular disease and immunological disorders. It has been used in the treatment of diabetes, hypertension, and dermatological conditions. There have been very few studies on the effects of N. Sativa as a chemoprevention of chronic diseases as well as in cancer prevention and/or therapy. Oxidative stress is a condition that underlies many acute as well as chronic conditions. The combination and role of oxidative stress and antioxidants in vivo is still a matter of conjecture. Our objective for the present study was to expose MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vitro (as a chronic disease example) to aqueous and alcohol extracts and in combination with H[2]O[2] as an oxidative stressor. Measurement of cell survival under various concentrations and mixtures was conducted using standard cell culture techniques, exposure protocols in 96 well plates and Fluorospectrosphotometry. Following cellular growth to 90% confluencey, exposure to water (WE) and ethanol (AE) extracts of N. sativa and H[2]O[2] was performed. Cell survival indices were calculated from percent survival using regression analysis. Results showed that the alcohol extract and its mixtures were able to influence the survival of MCF-7 cells (indices ranged from 357.15- 809.50 mug/ml in descending potency for H[2]O[2]+AE to the mix of 3). In contrast, H[2]O[2] alone reduced effectively the survival of MCF-7 cells and the least effective combinations in descending potency were AE+H[2]O[2], WE+H[2]O[2], AE+WE, and WE+AE+H[2]O[2]. Mixtures other than AE+H[2]O[2] showed possible interactions and loss of potency. In conclusion, N. Sativa alone or in combination with oxidative stress was found to be effective (in vitro) in influencing the survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, unveiling promising opportunities in the

  2. Human Factors and Habitability Challenges for Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban

    2015-01-01

    As NASA is planning to send humans deeper into space than ever before, adequate crew health and performance will be critical for mission success. Within the NASA Human Research Program (HRP), the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) team is responsible for characterizing the risks associated with human capabilities and limitations with respect to long-duration spaceflight, and for providing mitigations (e.g., guidelines, technologies, and tools) to promote safe, reliable and productive missions. SHFH research includes three domains: Advanced Environmental Health (AEH), Advanced Food Technology (AFT), and Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE). The AEH portfolio focuses on understanding the risk of microbial contamination of the spacecraft and on the development of standards for exposure to potential toxins such as chemicals, bacteria, fungus, and lunar/Martian dust. The two risks that the environmental health project focuses on are adverse health effects due to changes in host-microbe interactions, and risks associated with exposure to dust in planetary surface habitats. This portfolio also proposes countermeasures to these risks by making recommendations that relate to requirements for environmental quality, foods, and crew health on spacecraft and space missions. The AFT portfolio focuses on reducing the mass, volume, and waste of the entire integrated food system to be used in exploration missions, and investigating processing methods to extend the shelf life of food items up to five years, while assuring that exploration crews will have nutritious and palatable foods. The portfolio also delivers improvements in both the food itself and the technologies for storing and preparing it. SHFE sponsors research to establish human factors and habitability standards and guidelines in five risk areas, and provides improved design concepts for advanced crew interfaces and habitability systems. These risk areas include: Incompatible vehicle/habitat design

  3. Expression and Characterization of Hyperthermostable Exo-polygalacturonase TtGH28 from Thermotoga thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Wagschal, Kurt; Rose Stoller, J; Chan, Victor J; Lee, Charles C; Grigorescu, Arabela A; Jordan, Douglas B

    2016-07-01

    D-galacturonic acid is a potential platform chemical comprising the principal component of pectin in the citrus processing waste stream. Several enzyme activities are required for the enzymatic production of galacturonic acid from pectin, including exo- and endo-polygalacturonases. The gene TtGH28 encoding a putative GH28 polygalacturonase from Pseudothermotoga thermarum DSM 5069 (Theth_0397, NCBI# AEH50492.1) was synthesized, expressed in Escherichia coli, and characterized. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of gene product TtGH28 with other GH28 proteins whose structures and details of their catalytic mechanism have been elucidated shows that three catalytic Asp residues and several other key active site residues are strictly conserved. Purified TtGH28 was dimeric and hyperthermostable, with K t (0.5)  = 86.3 °C. Kinetic parameters for activity on digalacturonic acid, trigalacturonic acid, and polygalacturonic acid were obtained. No substrate inhibition was observed for polygalacturonate, while the K si values for the oligogalacturonides were in the low mM range, and K i for product galacturonic acid was in the low μM range. Kinetic modeling of the progress of reaction showed that the enzyme is both fully exo- and fully non-processional.

  4. Fertility-sparing treatment of endometrial cancer precursors among young women: a reproductive point of view.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, E; Maniglio, P; Frega, A; Marci, R; Caserta, D; Moscarini, M

    2012-12-01

    Early-stage endometrial cancer and complex atypical hyperplasia are treated with hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. An emerging issue among younger women affected is the possibility of a fertility-sparing treatment with progestative therapy and close follow-up. To assess the possibility of conceiving after a diagnosis of atypical endometrial hyperplasia among women younger than 40 years old, in term of delaying definitive treatment and achieving pregnancy. 15 women younger than 40 years old with complex CAH or early carcinoma of the endometrium and a wish to preserve fertility. Progestins were administered orally for at least a 12 weeks period. Endometrial biopsies were used at follow-up. In 11 women, a complete pathological remission of the disease was observed. 4 pregnancies were attained in 4 women. 3 showed progression and underwent definitive surgery at 18 months. 1 showed no response at 24 months and 3 cycles and was counseled to receive a hysterectomy. A conservative approach in patients younger than 40 years appears a valid option, and a progestative therapy trial should be attempted whether a valid consensus is attained. Considering the risk to find AEH at biopsies and eventually a carcinoma at hysterectomy (25% of cases) a careful management is strictly required.

  5. 2013 Advanced Environmental Health/Advanced Food Technology Standing Review Panel Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Advanced Environmental Health/Advanced Food Technology (AEH/AFT) Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) participated in a WebEx/teleconference with members of the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) Element, representatives from the Human Research Program (HRP), and NASA Headquarters on November 22, 2013 (list of participants is in Section IX of this report). The SRP reviewed the updated research plans for the Risk of Adverse Health Effects Due to Alterations in Host-Microorganism Interactions (Host Microbe Risk) and the Risk of Performance Decrement and Crew Illness Due to an Inadequate Food System (Food Risk). The SRP also received a status update on the Risk of Adverse Health Effects of Exposure to Dust and Volatiles during Exploration of Celestial Bodies (Dust Risk). Overall, the SRP was impressed with the strong research plans presented by the scientists and staff associated with the SHFH Element. The SRP also thought that the updated research plans were thorough, well organized, and presented in a comprehensive manner. The SRP agrees with the changes made to the Host Microbe Risk and Food Risk portfolios and thinks that the targets for Gap closure are appropriate.

  6. Forensic applications of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes in tracing nitrate sources in urban environments

    Silva, S.R.; Ging, P.B.; Lee, R.W.; Ebbert, J.C.; Tesoriero, A.J.; Inkpen, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ground and surface waters in urban areas are susceptible to nitrate contamination from septic systems, leaking sewer lines, and fertilizer applications. Source identification is a primary step toward a successful remediation plan in affected areas. In this respect, nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of nitrate, in conjunction with hydrologic data and water chemistry, have proven valuable in urban studies from Austin, Texas, and Tacoma, Washington. In Austin, stream water was sampled during stremflow and baseflow conditions to assess surface and subsurface sources of nitrate, respectively. In Tacoma, well waters were sampled in adjacent sewered and un-sewered areas to determine if locally high nitrate concentrations were caused by septic systems in the un-sewered areas. In both studies, sewage was identified as a nitrate source and mixing between sewage and other sources of nitrate was apparent. In addition to source identification, combined nitrogen and oxygen isotopes were important in determining the significance of denitrification, which can complicate source assessment by reducing nitrate concentrations and increasing ??15N values. The two studies illustrate the value of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate for forensic applications in urban areas. ?? Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. on behalf of AEHS.

  7. Pathology of Endometrial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lax, Sigurd F

    2017-01-01

    On a clinicopathological and molecular level, two distinctive types of endometrial carcinoma, type I and type II, can be distinguished. Endometrioid carcinoma, the typical type I carcinoma, seems to develop through an estrogen-driven "adenoma carcinoma" pathway from atypical endometrial hyperplasia/endometrioid intraepithelial neoplasia (AEH/EIN). It is associated with elevated serum estrogen and high body mass index and expresses estrogen and progesterone receptors. They are mostly low grade and show a favorable prognosis. A subset progresses into high-grade carcinoma which is accompanied by loss of receptor expression and accumulation of TP53 mutations and behaves poorly. Other frequently altered genes in type I carcinomas are K-Ras, PTEN, and ß-catenin. Another frequent feature of type I carcinomas is microsatellite instability mainly caused by methylation of the MLH1 promoter. In contrast, the typical type II carcinoma, serous carcinoma, is not estrogen related since it usually occurs in a small uterus with atrophic endometrium. It is often associated with a flat putative precursor lesion called serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma (SEIC). The molecular pathogenesis of serous carcinoma seems to be driven by TP53 mutations, which are present in SEIC. Other molecular changes in serous carcinoma detectable by immunohistochemistry involve cyclin E and p16. Since many of the aforementioned molecular changes can be demonstrated by immunohistochemistry, they are useful ancillary diagnostic tools and may further contribute to a future molecular classification of endometrial carcinoma as recently suggested based on The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data.

  8. Seismic anisotropy from compositional banding in granulites from the deep magmatic arc of Fiordland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyprych, Daria; Piazolo, Sandra; Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.

    2017-11-01

    We present calculated seismic velocities and anisotropies of mafic granulites and eclogites from the Cretaceous deep lower crust (∼40-65 km) of Fiordland, New Zealand. Both rock types show a distinct foliation defined by cm-scale compositional banding. Seismic properties are estimated using the Asymptotic Expansion Homogenisation - Finite Element (AEH-FE) method that, unlike the commonly used Voigt-Reuss-Hill homogenisation, incorporates the phase boundary network into calculations. The predicted mean P- and S-wave velocities are consistent with previously published data for similar lithologies from other locations (e.g., Kohistan Arc), although we find higher than expected anisotropies (AVP ∼ 5.0-8.0%, AVS ∼ 3.0-6.5%) and substantial S-wave splitting along foliation planes in granulites. This seismic signature of granulites results from a density and elasticity contrast between cm-scale pyroxene ± garnet stringers and plagioclase matrix rather than from crystallographic orientations alone. Banded eclogites do not show elevated anisotropies as the contrast in density and elastic constants of garnet and pyroxene is too small. The origin of compositional banding in Fiordland granulites is primarily magmatic and structures described here are expected to be typical for the base of present day magmatic arcs. Hence, we identify a new potential source of anisotropy within this geotectonic setting.

  9. In vitro antioxidant properties, free radicals scavenging activities of extracts and polyphenol composition of a non-timber forest product used as spice: Monodora myristica.

    PubMed

    Moukette, Bruno Moukette; Pieme, Constant Anatole; Njimou, Jacques Romain; Biapa, Cabral Prosper Nya; Marco, Bravi; Ngogang, Jeanne Yonkeu

    2015-03-14

    Excessive production of free radicals causes direct damage to biological molecules such as DNA, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates leading to tumor development and progression. Natural antioxidant molecules from phytochemicals of plant origin may directly inhibit either their production or limit their propagation or destroy them to protect the system. In the present study, Monodora myristica a non-timber forest product consumed in Cameroon as spice was screened for its free radical scavenging properties, antioxidant and enzymes protective activities. Its phenolic compound profile was also realized by HPLC. This study demonstrated that M. myristica has scavenging properties against DPPH(•), OH(•), NO(•), and ABTS(•) radicals which vary in a dose depending manner. It also showed an antioxidant potential that was comparable with that of Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT) and vitamin C used as standard. The aqueous ethanol extract of M. myristica barks (AEH); showed a significantly higher content in polyphenolic compounds (21.44 ± 0.24 mg caffeic acid/g dried extract) and flavonoid (5.69 ± 0.07 quercetin equivalent mg/g of dried weight) as compared to the other studied extracts. The HPLC analysis of the barks and leaves revealed the presence of several polyphenols. The acids (3,4-OH-benzoic, caffeic, gallic, O- and P- coumaric, syringic, vanillic), alcohols (tyrosol and OH-tyrosol), theobromine, quercetin, rutin, catechine and apigenin were the identified and quantified polyphenols. All the tested extracts demonstrated a high protective potential on the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and peroxidase activities. Finally, the different extracts from M. myristica and specifically the aqueous ethanol extract reveal several properties such as higher free radical scavenging properties, significant antioxidant capacities and protective potential effects on liver enzymes.

  10. 2015 Advanced Environmental Health/Advanced Food Technology Standing Review Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 Advanced Environmental Health/Advanced Food Technology (AEH/AFT) Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) met for a site visit in Houston, TX on December 14 - 15, 2015. The SRP met with representatives from the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) Element and members of the Human Research Program (HRP) to review the updated research plans for the Risk of Adverse Health Effects Due to Host-Microorganism Interactions (MicroHost Risk) and the Risk of Performance Decrement and Crew Illness due to an Inadequate Food System (Food Risk). During the meeting, the SRP also met with the vehicle engineers to discuss possible food storage options. The SRP would like to commend Dr. Oubre and Dr. Douglas for their detailed presentations, as well the frank, refreshing, and comprehensive engineering presentation. This gave much needed perspective to the food storage issues and reassured the committee about NASA's approach to the problem. In terms of critiques, the SRP remains unconvinced about the rationale for probiotic use other than for specific applications supported by the literature. It is not clear what gap or problem is being addressed by the use of probiotics, and the rationale for their use needs to be clearly rooted in the available literature. The SRP thinks that if low-Earth orbit is associated with immune system impairment, then there may additional risks linked with the use of probiotics. It is not clear to the SRP how NASA will determine if probiotics are having their intended beneficial effect. A similar concern is raised as to what gaps or problems are being addressed by "functional foods". Mixed infections, rather than single species infections, which can augment severity of disease, also represent a significant concern. Overall, the SRP considers this to be a strong program that is well-organized, well-coordinated and generates valuable data.

  11. Salmonella Typhi-specific multifunctional CD8+ T cells play a dominant role in protection from typhoid fever in humans.

    PubMed

    Fresnay, Stephanie; McArthur, Monica A; Magder, Laurence; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S; Blohmke, Christoph J; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2016-03-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by the human-restricted organism Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi), is a major public health problem worldwide. Development of novel vaccines remains imperative, but is hampered by an incomplete understanding of the immune responses that correlate with protection. Recently, a controlled human infection model was re-established in which volunteers received ~10(3) cfu wild-type S. Typhi (Quailes strain) orally. Twenty-one volunteers were evaluated for their cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses. Ex vivo PBMC isolated before and up to 1 year after challenge were exposed to three S. Typhi-infected targets, i.e., autologous B lymphoblastoid cell-lines (B-LCL), autologous blasts and HLA-E restricted AEH B-LCL cells. CMI responses were evaluated using 14-color multiparametric flow cytometry to detect simultaneously five intracellular cytokines/chemokines (i.e., IL-17A, IL-2, IFN-g, TNF-a and MIP-1b) and a marker of degranulation/cytotoxic activity (CD107a). Herein we provide the first evidence that S. Typhi-specific CD8+ responses correlate with clinical outcome in humans challenged with wild-type S. Typhi. Higher multifunctional S. Typhi-specific CD8+ baseline responses were associated with protection against typhoid and delayed disease onset. Moreover, following challenge, development of typhoid fever was accompanied by decreases in circulating S. Typhi-specific CD8+ T effector/memory (TEM) with gut homing potential, suggesting migration to the site(s) of infection. In contrast, protection against disease was associated with low or no changes in circulating S. Typhi-specific TEM. These studies provide novel insights into the protective immune responses against typhoid disease that will aid in selection and development of new vaccine candidates.

  12. Low-maturity Kulthieth Formation coal: A possible source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in benthic sediment of the northern Gulf of Alaska

    Van Kooten, G. K.; Short, J.W.; Kolak, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The successful application of forensic geology to contamination studies involving natural systems requires identification of appropriate endmembers and an understanding of the geologic setting and processes affecting the systems. Studies attempting to delineate the background, or natural, source for hydrocarbon contamination in Gulf of Alaska (GOA) benthic sediments have invoked a number of potential sources, including seep oils, source rocks, and coal. Oil seeps have subsequently been questioned as significant sources of hydrocarbons present in benthic sediments of the GOA in part because the pattern of relative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance characteristic of benthic GOA sediments is inconsistent with patterns typical of weathered seep oils. Likewise, native coal has been dismissed in part because ratios of labile hydrocarbons to total organic carbon (e.g. PAH:TOC) for Bering River coal field (BRCF) sources are too low - i.e. the coals are over mature - to be consistent with GOA sediments. We present evidence here that native coal may have been prematurely dismissed, because BRCF coals do not adequately represent the geochemical signatures of coals elsewhere in the Kulthieth Formation. Contrary to previous thought, Kulthieth Formation coals east of the BRCF have much higher PAH: TOC ratios, and the patterns of labile hydrocarbons in these low thermal maturity coals suggest a possible genetic relationship between Kulthieth Formation coals and nearby oil seeps on the Sullivan anticline. Analyses of low-maturity Kulthieth Formation coal indicate the low maturity coal is a significant source of PAH. Source apportionment models that neglect this source will underestimate the contribution of native coals to the regional background hydrocarbon signature. ?? Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. on behalf of AEHS.

  13. Immunohistochemical Study of ER, PR, Ki67 and p53 in Endometrial Hyperplasias and Endometrial Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Masjeed, Nayar Musfera Abdul; Joshi, Avinash R; Kulkarni, Maithili Mandar; Pandya, Nidhi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Endometrial carcinoma is the second most common gynecologic malignancy in the developing countries. Endometrial Hyperplasia (EH) is a precursor to Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma (EMAC). A 23% of Atypical Hyperplasias (AEH) progress to EMAC. Aim This study was undertaken to analyse ER, PR, p53 and Ki67 in EH and endometrial carcinomas and attempt correlation with clinical and histopathological findings. Materials and Methods The present study was conducted over a period of seven years. A manual tissue array technique was employed for cases subjected to IHC. Analysis of the expression of IHC markers (ER, PR, p53, Ki67) in EH and endometrial carcinoma was attempted. Results were subjected to statistical analysis. The results were considered to be significant when the p-value <0.05. Results A total of 85 cases of EH and 28 cases of endometrial carcinoma were included in the study. EH (75.22%) was more common than endometrial carcinoma (24.78%). Among 28 cases of endometrial carcinomas, EMAC was most common (78.57%) followed by Clear Cell Carcinoma (CCC) (14.28%), and Uterine Serous Carcinoma (USC) (7.14%). ER and PR expression decreased as lesion progressed from EH to EMAC. ER and PR expression was negative in USC and CCC. The p53 expression and mean Ki67 labelling index increased as the severity of lesion increased from EH to endometrial carcinoma. Conclusion The ER, PR, p53, Ki67 IHC markers may be included in every case of endometrial carcinoma to understand the tumour biological behavior which in turn could help individual treatment strategies. PMID:28969139

  14. Immunohistochemical Study of ER, PR, Ki67 and p53 in Endometrial Hyperplasias and Endometrial Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Masjeed, Nayar Musfera Abdul; Khandeparkar, Siddhi Gaurish Sinai; Joshi, Avinash R; Kulkarni, Maithili Mandar; Pandya, Nidhi

    2017-08-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is the second most common gynecologic malignancy in the developing countries. Endometrial Hyperplasia (EH) is a precursor to Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma (EMAC). A 23% of Atypical Hyperplasias (AEH) progress to EMAC. This study was undertaken to analyse ER, PR, p53 and Ki67 in EH and endometrial carcinomas and attempt correlation with clinical and histopathological findings. The present study was conducted over a period of seven years. A manual tissue array technique was employed for cases subjected to IHC. Analysis of the expression of IHC markers (ER, PR, p53, Ki67) in EH and endometrial carcinoma was attempted. Results were subjected to statistical analysis. The results were considered to be significant when the p-value <0.05. A total of 85 cases of EH and 28 cases of endometrial carcinoma were included in the study. EH (75.22%) was more common than endometrial carcinoma (24.78%). Among 28 cases of endometrial carcinomas, EMAC was most common (78.57%) followed by Clear Cell Carcinoma (CCC) (14.28%), and Uterine Serous Carcinoma (USC) (7.14%). ER and PR expression decreased as lesion progressed from EH to EMAC. ER and PR expression was negative in USC and CCC. The p53 expression and mean Ki67 labelling index increased as the severity of lesion increased from EH to endometrial carcinoma. The ER, PR, p53, Ki67 IHC markers may be included in every case of endometrial carcinoma to understand the tumour biological behavior which in turn could help individual treatment strategies.

  15. GPER and ERα expression in abnormal endometrial proliferations.

    PubMed

    Tica, Andrei Adrian; Tica, Oana Sorina; Georgescu, Claudia Valentina; Pirici, Daniel; Bogdan, Maria; Ciurea, Tudorel; Mogoantă, Stelian ŞtefăniŢă; Georgescu, Corneliu Cristian; Comănescu, Alexandru Cristian; Bălşeanu, Tudor Adrian; Ciurea, Raluca Niculina; Osiac, Eugen; Buga, Ana Maria; Ciurea, Marius Eugen

    2016-01-01

    G-protein coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER), a particular extranuclear estrogen receptor (ER), seems not to be significantly involved in normal female phenotype development but especially associated with severe genital malignancies. This study investigated the GPER expression in different types of normal and abnormal proliferative endometrium, and the correlation with the presence of ERα. GPER was much highly expressed in cytoplasm (than onto cell membrane), contrary to ERα, which was almost exclusively located in the nucleus. Both ERs' densities were higher in columnar epithelial then in stromal cells, according with higher estrogen-sensitivity of epithelial cells. GPER and ERα density decreased as follows: complex endometrial hyperplasia (CEH) > simple endometrial hyperplasia (SHE) > normal proliferative endometrium (NPE) > atypical endometrial hyperplasia (AEH), ERα' density being constantly higher. In endometrial adenocarcinomas, both ERs were significant lower expressed, and widely varied, but GPER÷ERα ratio was significantly increased in high-grade lesions. The nuclear ERα is responsible for the genomic (the most important) mechanism of action of estrogens, involved in cell growth and multiplication. In normal and benign proliferations, ERα expression is increased as an evidence of its effects on cells with conserved architecture, in atypical and especially in malignant cells ERα's (and GPER's) density being much lower. Cytoplasmic GPER probably interfere with different tyrosine÷protein kinases signaling pathways, also involved in cell growth and proliferation. In benign endometrial lesions, GPER's presence is, at least partially, the result of an inductor effect of ERα on GPER gene transcription. In high-grade lesions, GPER÷ERα ratio was increased, demonstrating that GPER is involved per se in malignant endometrial proliferations.

  16. Genome-wide characterization of vibrio phage ϕpp2 with unique arrangements of the mob-like genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Vibrio parahaemolyticus is associated with gastroenteritis, wound infections, and septicemia in human and animals. Phages can control the population of the pathogen. So far, the only one reported genome among giant vibriophages is KVP40: 244,835 bp with 26% coding regions that have T4 homologs. Putative homing endonucleases (HE) were found in Vibrio phage KVP40 bearing one segD and Vibrio cholerae phage ICP1 carrying one mobC/E and one segG. Results A newly isolated Vibrio phage ϕpp2, which was specific to the hosts of V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus, featured a long nonenveloped head of ~90 × 150 nm and tail of ~110 nm. The phage can survive at 50°C for more than one hour. The genome of the phage ϕpp2 was sequenced to be 246,421 bp, which is 1587 bp larger than KVP40. 383 protein-encoding genes (PEGs) and 30 tRNAs were found in the phage ϕpp2. Between the genomes of ϕpp2 and KVP40, 254 genes including 29 PEGs for viral structure were of high similarity, whereas 17 PEGs of KVP40 and 21 PEGs of ϕpp2 were unmatched. In both genomes, the capsid and tail genes have been identified, as well as the extensive representation of the DNA replication, recombination, and repair enzymes. In addition to the three giant indels of 1098, 1143 and 3330 nt, ϕpp2 possessed unique proteins involved in potassium channel, gp2 (DNA end protector), tRNA nucleotidyltransferase, and mob-type HEs, which were not reported in KVP40. The ϕpp2 PEG274, with strong promoters and translational initiation, was identified to be a mobE type, flanked by NrdA and NrdB/C homologs. Coincidently, several pairs of HE-flanking homologs with empty center were found in the phages of Vibrio phages ϕpp2 and KVP40, as well as in Aeromonas phages (Aeh1 and Ae65), and cyanophage P-SSM2. Conclusions Vibrio phage ϕpp2 was characterized by morphology, growth, and genomics with three giant indels and different types of HEs. The gene analysis on the required elements for transcription

  17. Tidal Amplitude for a Self-gravitating, Compressible Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurford, T. A.; Greenberg, R.

    2001-11-01

    Most modern evaluations of tidal amplitude derive from the approach presented by Love [1]. Love's analysis for a homogeneous sphere assumed an incompressible material, which required introduction of a non-rigorously justified pressure term. We solve the more general case of arbitrary compressibility, which allows for a more straightforward derivation. We find the h2 love number of a body of radius R, density ρ , and surface gravity g to be h2 = \\Bigg[\\frac{{5}/{2}}{1+\\frac{19 \\mu}{2 \\rho g R}}\\Bigg] \\Bigg\\{ \\frac{2 \\rho g R (35+28\\frac{\\mu}{\\lambda}) + 19 \\mu (35+28\\frac{\\mu}{\\lambda})} {2 \\rho g R (35+31\\frac{\\mu}{\\lambda}) + 19 \\mu (35+{490}/{19}\\frac{\\mu}{\\lambda})}\\Bigg\\} λ the Lamé constant. This h2 is the product of Love's expression for h2 (in square brackets) and a ``compressibility-correction'' factor (in \\{\\} brackets). Unlike Love's expression, this result is valid for any degree of compressibility (i.e. any λ ). For the incompressible case (λ -> ∞ ) the correction factor approaches 1, so that h2 matches the classical form given by Love. In reality, of course, materials are not incompressible and the difference between our solution and Love's is significant. Assuming that the elastic terms dominate over the gravitational contribution (i.e. 19 μ /(2 ρ g R) >> 1), our solution can be ~ 7% percent larger than Love's solution for large μ /λ . If the gravity dominates (i.e. 19 μ /(2 ρ g R) << 1), our solution is ~ 10 % smaller than Love's solution for large μ /λ . For example, a rocky body (μ /λ ~ 1 [2]), Earth-sized (19μ /(2 ρ g R) ~ 1) body, h2 would be reduced by about 1% from the classical formula. Similarly, under some circumstances the l2 Love number for a uniform sphere could be 22% smaller than Love's evaluation. [1] Love, A.E.H., A Treatise on the Mathematical Theory of Elasticity, New York Dover Publications, 1944 [2] Kaula, W.M., An Introduction to Planetary Physics: The Terrestrial Planets, John

  18. Seismic anisotropy in the lower crust: The link between rock composition, microstructure, texture and seismic properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplinska, Daria; Piazolo, Sandra; Almqvist, Bjarne

    2015-04-01

    techniques, including Voigt, Reuss, Hill, geometric mean and self-consistent and Asymptotic Expansion Homogenization (AEH) methods. To test the advantages and disadvantages of the method, results are compared to measured geophysical properties of equivalent rocks. Such comparison, allows refinement of seismic data interpretation for mid to lower crustal rocks. References: Cook, A., Vel., S., Johnson, S.E., Gerbi, C., Song, W.J., 2013. Elastic and Seismic Properties (ESP) Toolbox (beta version); http://umaine.edu/mecheng/faculty-and-staff/senthil-vel/software/ESP_Toolbox/

  19. Localized Failure Promoted by Heterogeneous Stresses in Tectonic Mélanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, N. J.; Rowe, C. D.; Ujiie, K.

    2017-12-01

    Within the shallow (<10 km depth) portion of subduction zones, tectonic mélanges are produced by distributed shear within downgoing sediments above the oceanic plate. Basaltic slabs (incorporated into the sediments through plucking and underplating) and sandstone layers form boudins within a shale dominated matrix due to strength contrasts within this zone of distributed shear. These tectonic mélanges are the host rocks of seismicity in subduction zones at shallow depths. Fluidized gouge and pseudotachylytes are evidence for paleoseismicity within exposures of mélanges, and occur preferentially along the contacts between shale matrix mélange and sandstone or basaltic layers. Detailed mapping within the Mugi Mélange, Japan has revealed basalt boudins enclosed by a cataclasite matrix derived from basalt. We model the stress concentrations around the strong basaltic boudins and slabs using the Power-Law Creep (PLC) toolbox developed at the University of Maine, which uses Asymptotic Expansion Homogenization (AEH) over a finite element mesh to determine the instantaneous stress distributions in a multiphase system. We model the shale matrix mélange to be deforming through a modified flow law for viscous creep based on coupled frictional sliding and pressure solution, where at a strain rate of 10-12 s-1 the flow stress is 10 MPa under the temperature (190 ºC) and pressure ( 100 MPa) conditions during deformation, and describe the behaviour of the basaltic blocks using experimentally-derived power law flow laws. The results show that at the strain rates calculated based on plate-rate motion, differential stresses high enough to cause comminution of the basalts ( 300 MPa) correspond strongly to areas around the blocks with basalt derived cataclasites. Within the basalt derived cataclasites, thin zones of ultracataclasite record localized slip. We hypothesize that the heterogeneous stress distributions within subduction mélanges: 1) fractures the strong basalt

  20. Cellular features of endometrial hyperplasia and well differentiated adenocarcinoma using the Endocyte sampler: Diagnostic criteria based on the cytoarchitecture of tissue fragments.

    PubMed

    Norimatsu, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Keiko; Kobayashi, Tadao K; Moriya, Takuya; Tsukayama, Choutatsu; Miyake, Yasuyuki; Ohno, Eiji

    2006-04-25

    Because cellular atypia is often limited in endometrial hyperplasia and well-differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma (WHO Grade 1 adenocarcinoma), diagnostic criteria for endometrial cytology have not been fully established. New diagnostic criteria based on the composition and architecture of tissue fragments (cytoarchitecture) in the smears were used in the present study. Cytologic features are of less importance because the distinction between endometrial hyperplasia and Grade 1 adenocarcinoma relies more on architectural features than cellular changes. Cell clumps of various size are usually collected abundantly with cytologic material using a disposable scraping device and it was noticed that those cell clumps reflected the histologic architecture. The purpose of the current study was to determine the form of the cytoarchitecture that reflects the histologic structure and to examine the cellular features in endometrial hyperplasia and Grade 1 adenocarcinoma. The frequency of each type of cell clump (tube or sheet-shaped pattern, dilated or branched pattern, irregular protrusion, and papillotubular pattern) were obtained from 49 cases of normal proliferative endometrium (NPE) (patient age range, 28-51 yrs; average age, 39.9 yrs), 63 cases of endometrial hyperplasia without atypia (EH) (patient age range, 35-65 yrs; average age, 47.7 yrs), 13 cases of endometrial hyperplasia with atypia (AEH) (patient age range 47-65 yrs; average age, 53.8 yrs), and 49 cases of Grade 1 adenocarcinoma (patient age range, 42-73 yrs; average age, 58.9 yrs). Certain characteristics of the cytoarchitecture were observed. In the NPE, cell clumps with a tube or sheet-shaped pattern were found in 97.5% of cases. In the EH, cell clumps with a dilated or branched pattern were found in 34.9% of cases. In the Grade 1 adenocarcinoma, cell clumps with irregular protrusions were found in 61.8% cases, whereas a papillotubular pattern was present in 29.7% of cases. The results of the current

  1. Tides on Self-gravitating, Compressible Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurford, T. A.; Greenberg, R.

    2001-11-01

    Most modern derivations of tidal amplitude follow the approach presented by Love [1]. Love's analysis for a homogeneous sphere assumed an incompressible material, which required introduction of a non-rigorously justified pressure term. We have solved the more general case of arbitrary compressibility, which allows for a more straightforward derivation [2,3]. We find the h2 love number of a body of radius R, density ρ , by solving the deformation equation [4], μ ∇ 2 u = ρ ∇U - (λ + μ ) ∇ (∇ ṡ u) where μ is the rigidity of the body and λ the Lamé constant. The potential U is the sum of (a) the tide raising potential, (b) the potential of surface mass shifted above or below the spherical surface, (c) potential due to the internal density changes and (d) the change in potential of each bit of volume due to its displacement u. A self-consistent solution can be obtained with U = \\sum_{q=0}^{\\infty} b_{(2+2q)} r^{(2+2q)} ( {3}/{2} \\cos2 \\theta - {1}/{2} ). In [1] and [3] only the r2 term was considered, which was valid only if compressibility is small or elasticity governs deformation (i.e. ρ g R << (λ + 2 μ )). The solution with only the r2 term reduces to Love's [1] solution in the limit of zero compressibility (λ = ∞ ). However, for rock μ ~ λ [4], in which case h2 is enhanced by ~ 3 %, and solutions for greater compressibility give up to 8 % enhancement of tidal amplitude. If ρ g R is significant, higher order r(2q+2) terms are important and even greater corrections are required to the classical tidal amplitude. [1] Love, A.E.H., New York Dover Publications, 1944 [2] Hurford, T.A. and R. Greenberg, Lunar Plan. Sci. XXXII 1741, 2001 [3] Hurford, T.A. and R. Greenberg, 2001 DDA meeting, Bull. Amer. Astron. Soc. in press [4] Kaula, W.M., John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1968

  2. Structure Study of Magnetic Thin Films for Voltage Controlled Spintronics by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Experiment and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Congli

    We have studied magnetic thin films for voltage controlled magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) by advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and density functional theory (DFT) simulations. MTJs are the prototypical spintronic device and manipulation of magnetism by electrical means is among the most promising approaches to novel voltage-controlled spin electronics. The voltage controlled magnetic effect can be achieved across many different materials systems, all of which depend on high-quality thin films with minimum crystallographic defects. Cr2O3 is antiferromagnetic in bulk but ferromagnetic on the (0001) surface. Bulk Cr2O3 has two degenerate antiferromagnetic states with opposite (0001) surface spin polarization. As Cr2O3 is also magnetoelectric, the degenerate antiferromagnetic states can be lifted by manipulating the free-energy gain DeltaF = aEH. Therefore, the surface ferromagnetism can be controlled by applied electric field. We have observed vertical grain boundaries in Cr2O 3/Al2O3 systems that are related with a 60° in-plane rotation by diffraction contrast TEM image. STEM as a function of scattering angle points out a simultaneous ⅓[101¯0] basal plane shift. Local boundary electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) shows a pre-peak on the O K-edge, indicating a reduced bandgap along the boundary that provides potential breakdown paths in Cr2O3 thin films. B doping of Cr2O3 is known to increase the Neel temperature. B was found to form either BCr4 tetrahedra or BO 3 triangles in the Cr2O3 lattice, with sigma * and pi* bonds exhibiting different energy loss features. Modeling the experimental spectra as a linear combination of simulated B K edges reproduces the experimental pi* / sigma * ratios for 12 to 43 % of the B in the sample occupying BCr 4 sites. Simulated BCr4 fraction / total B as a function of oxygen partial pressures supports the EELS results and indicates further increase of Neel temperature can be achieved by optimizing

  3. Indexed semi-Markov process for wind speed modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroni, F.; D'Amico, G.; Prattico, F.

    2012-04-01

    wind speed time series at Tangiers, Morocco, Renewable Energy 29 (2004) 1407-1418. [3] F. Youcef Ettoumi, H. Sauvageot, A.-E.-H. Adane, Statistical bivariate modeling of wind using first-order Markov chain and Weibull distribution, Renewable Energy 28 (2003) 1787-1802.

  4. A reward semi-Markov process with memory for wind speed modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroni, F.; D'Amico, G.; Prattico, F.

    2012-04-01

    -order Markov chain with different number of states, and Weibull distribution. All this model use Markov chains to generate synthetic wind speed time series but the search for a better model is still open. Approaching this issue, we applied new models which are generalization of Markov models. More precisely we applied semi-Markov models to generate synthetic wind speed time series. The primary goal of this analysis is the study of the time history of the wind in order to assess its reliability as a source of power and to determine the associated storage levels required. In order to assess this issue we use a probabilistic model based on indexed semi-Markov process [4] to which a reward structure is attached. Our model is used to calculate the expected energy produced by a given turbine and its variability expressed by the variance of the process. Our results can be used to compare different wind farms based on their reward and also on the risk of missed production due to the intrinsic variability of the wind speed process. The model is used to generate synthetic time series for wind speed by means of Monte Carlo simulations and backtesting procedure is used to compare results on first and second oder moments of rewards between real and synthetic data. [1] A. Shamshad, M.A. Bawadi, W.M.W. Wan Hussin, T.A. Majid, S.A.M. Sanusi, First and second order Markov chain models for synthetic gen- eration of wind speed time series, Energy 30 (2005) 693-708. [2] H. Nfaoui, H. Essiarab, A.A.M. Sayigh, A stochastic Markov chain model for simulating wind speed time series at Tangiers, Morocco, Re- newable Energy 29 (2004) 1407-1418. [3] F. Youcef Ettoumi, H. Sauvageot, A.-E.-H. Adane, Statistical bivariate modeling of wind using first-order Markov chain and Weibull distribu- tion, Renewable Energy 28 (2003) 1787-1802. [4]F. Petroni, G. D'Amico, F. Prattico, Indexed semi-Markov process for wind speed modeling. To be submitted.

  5. First and second order semi-Markov chains for wind speed modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prattico, F.; Petroni, F.; D'Amico, G.

    2012-04-01

    -order Markov chain with different number of states, and Weibull distribution. All this model use Markov chains to generate synthetic wind speed time series but the search for a better model is still open. Approaching this issue, we applied new models which are generalization of Markov models. More precisely we applied semi-Markov models to generate synthetic wind speed time series. Semi-Markov processes (SMP) are a wide class of stochastic processes which generalize at the same time both Markov chains and renewal processes. Their main advantage is that of using whatever type of waiting time distribution for modeling the time to have a transition from one state to another one. This major flexibility has a price to pay: availability of data to estimate the parameters of the model which are more numerous. Data availability is not an issue in wind speed studies, therefore, semi-Markov models can be used in a statistical efficient way. In this work we present three different semi-Markov chain models: the first one is a first-order SMP where the transition probabilities from two speed states (at time Tn and Tn-1) depend on the initial state (the state at Tn-1), final state (the state at Tn) and on the waiting time (given by t=Tn-Tn-1), the second model is a second order SMP where we consider the transition probabilities as depending also on the state the wind speed was before the initial state (which is the state at Tn-2) and the last one is still a second order SMP where the transition probabilities depends on the three states at Tn-2,Tn-1 and Tn and on the waiting times t_1=Tn-1-Tn-2 and t_2=Tn-Tn-1. The three models are used to generate synthetic time series for wind speed by means of Monte Carlo simulations and the time lagged autocorrelation is used to compare statistical properties of the proposed models with those of real data and also with a time series generated though a simple Markov chain. [1] F. Youcef Ettoumi, H. Sauvageot, A.-E.-H. Adane, Statistical bivariate modeling

  6. Rivers of Carbon: Carbon Fluxes in a Watershed Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, E.; Tom, B.; Hovius, N.

    2017-12-01

    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" height="30">,in which Cs is organic carbon storage over time t. Inputs are surface and subsurface fluxes from uplands (CIupl) and the floodplain (CIfp), including fossil, soil, and biospheric organic carbon; surface and subsurface fluxes of carbon dioxide to the channel (CICO2); and net primary productivity in the channel (CINPP). Outputs occur via respiration within the channel and carbon dioxide emissions (COgas) and fluxes of dissolved and particulate organic carbon to the floodplain and downstream portions of the river network (COriver). The analogous budget for the floodplain portion of a river corridor is