Science.gov

Sample records for zealand adventure tourism

  1. Safety in New Zealand's adventure tourism industry: the client accident experience of adventure tourism operators.

    PubMed

    Bentley , T A; Page, S J; Laird, I S

    2000-01-01

    Injuries and fatalities among participants of adventure tourism activities have the potential to seriously impact on New Zealand's tourism industry. However, the absence of statistics for tourist accidents in New Zealand, and the lack of detailed academic research into adventure tourism safety, means the extent of the problem is unknown. The aims of the present study were to determine the incidence of client injuries across a range of adventure tourism activity sectors, and to identify common accident events and contributory risk factors. A postal questionnaire survey of New Zealand adventure tourism operators was used. Operators were asked to provide information related to their business; the number of recorded client injuries during the preceding 12 month period, January to December 1998; common accident and injury events associated with their activity; and perceived risk factors for accidents in their sector of the adventure tourism industry. The survey was responded to by 142 New Zealand adventure tourism operators. The operators' reported client injury experience suggests the incidence of serious client injuries is very low. Highest client injury incidence rates were found for activities that involved the risk of falling from a moving vehicle or animal (e.g., cycle tours, quad biking, horse riding, and white-water rafting). Slips, trips, and falls on the level were common accident events across most sectors of the industry. Perceived accident/incident causes were most commonly related to the client, and in particular, failure to attend to and follow instructions. The prevalence of client injuries in activity sectors not presently covered by government regulation, suggests policy makers should look again at extending codes of practice to a wider range of adventure tourism activities. Further research considering adventure tourism involvement in overseas visitor hospitalized injuries in New Zealand, is currently in progress. This will provide supporting evidence

  2. The safety experience of New Zealand adventure tourism operators.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Tim A; Page, Stephen; Walker, Linda

    2004-01-01

    This survey examined parameters of the New Zealand adventure tourism industry client injury risk. The research also sought to establish priorities for intervention to reduce adventure tourism risk, and identify client injury control measures currently in place (or absent) in the New Zealand adventure tourism industry, with a view to establishing guidelines for the development of effective adventure tourism safety management systems. This 2003 survey builds upon an exploratory study of New Zealand adventure tourism safety conducted by us during 1999. A postal questionnaire was used to survey all identifiable New Zealand adventure tourism operators. The questionnaire asked respondents about their recorded client injury experience, perceptions of client injury risk factors, safety management practices, and barriers to safety. Some 27 adventure tourism activities were represented among the responding sample (n=96). The highest client injury risk was reported in the snow sports, bungee jumping and horse riding sectors, although serious underreporting of minor injuries was evident across the industry. Slips, trips and falls (STF) were the major client injury mechanisms, and a range of risk factors for client injuries were identified. Safety management measures were inconsistently applied across the industry. The industry should consider the implications of poor injury reporting standards and safety management practices generally. Specifically, the industry should consider risk management that focuses on minor (e.g., STF) as well as catastrophic events.

  3. How safe is adventure tourism in New Zealand? An exploratory analysis.

    PubMed

    Bentley, T; Page, S; Meyer, D; Chalmers, D; Laird, I

    2001-08-01

    The paper reports findings from a multidisciplinary programme of research, the major aims of which were to determine the nature and extent of the New Zealand adventure tourism injury problem. Analysis of hospital discharge and mortality data for a 15-year period identified adventure tourism-related activities as contributing to approximately 20% of overseas visitor injuries, and 22% of fatalities. Activities that commonly involve independent-unguided adventure tourism, notably mountaineering, skiing and tramping, contributed most to injury and fatality incidence. Horse riding and cycling activities were identified from hospital discharge data and adventure tourism operators' reported client injury-incidence, as the commercial adventure tourism activities most frequently involved in client injuries. Falls were the most common injury events, and a range of client, equipment, environmental and organisational risk factors were identified. Possible interventions to reduce injury risk among overseas and domestic adventure tourists are discussed.

  4. Injuries to New Zealanders participating in adventure tourism and adventure sports: an analysis of Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) claims.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Tim; Macky, Keith; Edwards, Jo

    2006-12-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of adventure tourism and adventure sports activity in injury claims made to the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC). Epidemiological analysis of ACC claims for the period, July 2004 to June 2005, where adventure activities were involved in the injury. 18,697 adventure tourism and adventure sports injury claims were identified from the data, representing 28 activity sectors. Injuries were most common during the summer months, and were most frequently located in the major population centres. The majority of injuries were incurred by claimants in the 20-50 years age groups, although claimants over 50 years of age had highest claims costs. Males incurred 60% of all claims. Four activities (horse riding, mountain biking, tramping/hiking, and surfing) were responsible for approximately 60% of all adventure tourism and adventure sports-related injuries. Slips, trips, and falls were the most common injury initiating events, and injuries were most often to the back/spine, shoulder, and knee. These findings suggest the need to investigate whether regulatory intervention in the form of codes of practice for high injury count activities such as horse riding and mountain biking may be necessary. Health promotion messages and education programs should focus on these and other high-injury risk areas. Improved risk management practices are required for commercial adventure tourism and adventure sports operators in New Zealand if safety is to be improved across this sector.

  5. Monitoring injury in the New Zealand adventure tourism sector: an operator survey.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Tim A; Page, Stephen; Edwards, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    Client safety is a major risk management concern for the commercial adventure tourism sector in New Zealand. This study built on previous exploratory analyses of New Zealand adventure tourism safety, including industry surveys conducted by these authors in 1999 and 2003. The aims of the study were to provide a continuation of injury monitoring across the sector through data collected from self-reported injury incidence by industry operators and to compare findings with those from other primary and secondary research studies conducted by the authors. A postal questionnaire was used to survey all identifiable New Zealand adventure tourism operators during 2006. The questionnaire asked respondents about their recorded client injury experience, perceptions of client injury risk factors, and safety management practices. Some 21 adventure tourism activities were represented among the responding sample (n = 127), with most operations being very small in terms of staff numbers, although responding operators catered to nearly 1 million clients in total annually. Highest ranked risk factors for client injury included clients not following instructions; level of client skill, ability, and fitness; and changeable/unpredictable weather conditions. Highest client injury was reported for horse riding, ecotourism, and white water rafting sectors, although serious underreporting of minor injuries was evidenced across the sector. Slips, trips, and falls were the most frequently reported injury mechanism, while safety management measures were inconsistently applied across the sector. The industry should address reporting culture issues and safety management practices generally. Specifically, the industry should consider risk management that focuses on minor (eg, falls) as well as catastrophic events.

  6. Sustaining Adventure in New Zealand Outdoor Education: Perspectives from Renowned New Zealand Outdoor Adventurers on the Contested Cultural Understanding of Adventure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Maurice; Tucker, Hazel

    2007-01-01

    One of the foundations of New Zealand's representation of itself to the world has been as a premier place of adventure. New Zealanders who have gained world recognition in outdoor leisure pursuits are used to promote this adventurous depiction of New Zealand. They are the focus of and contribute to the discourse which guides the New Zealand…

  7. Outdoor Recreation and Adventure Tourism: Unique but Allied Industries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Andrew W.; Kang, H. K.; Lewis, T. Grant

    2017-01-01

    Outdoor recreation and adventure tourism are overlapping industries serving similar clientele. While descriptive marketing research exists for both industries (George Washington University School of Business [GW], Adventure Travel Trade Association [ATTA], & Xola Consulting [XC], 2010; Outdoor Foundation [OF], 2014), there is no clear…

  8. Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ongena, Jim

    1981-01-01

    Addresses the issue of whether there is reasonable justification to warrant public school sponsorship of adventure programs; considers accident rates, advantages and values, legal implications, and program implementation effects including staffing, facilities, equipment, and scheduling. Concludes that adventure education is a healthy, valuable,…

  9. Adventure Education: Redux

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Mike; Beames, Simon

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the meanings of adventure and its role in learning. An analysis of literature from the fields of education, recreation and tourism suggests that definitions of adventure are constantly undergoing reinterpretation. We highlight how "narrow" views of adventure, which appeal to notions of risk and danger, are…

  10. Applying a Comprehensive Contextual Climate Change Vulnerability Framework to New Zealand's Tourism Industry.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Debbie

    2015-03-01

    Conceptualisations of 'vulnerability' vary amongst scholarly communities, contributing to a wide variety of applications. Research investigating vulnerability to climate change has often excluded non-climatic changes which may contribute to degrees of vulnerability perceived or experienced. This paper introduces a comprehensive contextual vulnerability framework which incorporates physical, social, economic and political factors which could amplify or reduce vulnerability. The framework is applied to New Zealand's tourism industry to explore its value in interpreting a complex, human-natural environment system with multiple competing vulnerabilities. The comprehensive contextual framework can inform government policy and industry decision making, integrating understandings of climate change within the broader context of internal and external social, physical, economic, and institutional stressors.

  11. Adventure Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, John C., Ed.; Priest, Simon, Ed.

    Adventure programming is the deliberate use of adventurous experiences to create learning in individuals or groups, often with the goal of improving society or communities. Adventure programming may focus on recreation, education, individual or group development, or therapy, or on a combination of these. This second edition contains 61 chapters by…

  12. Adventure Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, John C., Ed.; Priest, Simon, Ed.

    Adventure education seeks to promote individual growth and development through the purposeful planning and implementation of educational processes that include risk in some way. This book introduces major topics in the broad literature of adventure education by bringing together 53 writings of adventure education practitioners. The writings are…

  13. Mitigating Litigation for Adventure Recreation Operators: The Ski Safety Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brgoch, Shea; Lower, Leeann M.

    2017-01-01

    Adventure tourism is a rapidly growing segment of the tourism industry, which can be regarded as specific activities that are alluring for their uncertain and potentially dangerous outcomes. Risk-taking attitudes and behaviors may be common among adventure recreationists and increase the potential for litigation against recreation operators. In…

  14. Adventure Playgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Robert F.

    1971-01-01

    At the Milpitas City-School Recreation Department's "adventure playground," piles of scrap wood, cardboard, and other building materials are provided for building at the youngsters' inclinations. (MB)

  15. Behavioural Effects of Tourism on Oceanic Common Dolphins, Delphinus sp., in New Zealand: The Effects of Markov Analysis Variations and Current Tour Operator Compliance with Regulations

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Anna M.; Christiansen, Fredrik; Martinez, Emmanuelle; Pawley, Matthew D. M.; Orams, Mark B.; Stockin, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Common dolphins, Delphinus sp., are one of the marine mammal species tourism operations in New Zealand focus on. While effects of cetacean-watching activities have previously been examined in coastal regions in New Zealand, this study is the first to investigate effects of commercial tourism and recreational vessels on common dolphins in an open oceanic habitat. Observations from both an independent research vessel and aboard commercial tour vessels operating off the central and east coast Bay of Plenty, North Island, New Zealand were used to assess dolphin behaviour and record the level of compliance by permitted commercial tour operators and private recreational vessels with New Zealand regulations. Dolphin behaviour was assessed using two different approaches to Markov chain analysis in order to examine variation of responses of dolphins to vessels. Results showed that, regardless of the variance in Markov methods, dolphin foraging behaviour was significantly altered by boat interactions. Dolphins spent less time foraging during interactions and took significantly longer to return to foraging once disrupted by vessel presence. This research raises concerns about the potential disruption to feeding, a biologically critical behaviour. This may be particularly important in an open oceanic habitat, where prey resources are typically widely dispersed and unpredictable in abundance. Furthermore, because tourism in this region focuses on common dolphins transiting between adjacent coastal locations, the potential for cumulative effects could exacerbate the local effects demonstrated in this study. While the overall level of compliance by commercial operators was relatively high, non-compliance to the regulations was observed with time restriction, number or speed of vessels interacting with dolphins not being respected. Additionally, prohibited swimming with calves did occur. The effects shown in this study should be carefully considered within conservation management

  16. Behavioural effects of tourism on oceanic common dolphins, Delphinus sp., in New Zealand: the effects of Markov analysis variations and current tour operator compliance with regulations.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Anna M; Christiansen, Fredrik; Martinez, Emmanuelle; Pawley, Matthew D M; Orams, Mark B; Stockin, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    Common dolphins, Delphinus sp., are one of the marine mammal species tourism operations in New Zealand focus on. While effects of cetacean-watching activities have previously been examined in coastal regions in New Zealand, this study is the first to investigate effects of commercial tourism and recreational vessels on common dolphins in an open oceanic habitat. Observations from both an independent research vessel and aboard commercial tour vessels operating off the central and east coast Bay of Plenty, North Island, New Zealand were used to assess dolphin behaviour and record the level of compliance by permitted commercial tour operators and private recreational vessels with New Zealand regulations. Dolphin behaviour was assessed using two different approaches to Markov chain analysis in order to examine variation of responses of dolphins to vessels. Results showed that, regardless of the variance in Markov methods, dolphin foraging behaviour was significantly altered by boat interactions. Dolphins spent less time foraging during interactions and took significantly longer to return to foraging once disrupted by vessel presence. This research raises concerns about the potential disruption to feeding, a biologically critical behaviour. This may be particularly important in an open oceanic habitat, where prey resources are typically widely dispersed and unpredictable in abundance. Furthermore, because tourism in this region focuses on common dolphins transiting between adjacent coastal locations, the potential for cumulative effects could exacerbate the local effects demonstrated in this study. While the overall level of compliance by commercial operators was relatively high, non-compliance to the regulations was observed with time restriction, number or speed of vessels interacting with dolphins not being respected. Additionally, prohibited swimming with calves did occur. The effects shown in this study should be carefully considered within conservation management

  17. Astronomy Adventures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Astronomy Adventures." Contents are organized into the following…

  18. The Universe Adventure - Developers

    Science.gov Websites

    The Universe Adventure home | help | links | teachers | developers | credits | glossary | feedback Go Developers This page is meant for developers of the Universe Adventure. It contains various design

  19. HIV / AIDS and tourism.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, S

    1999-01-01

    Since it tends to be significantly affected by HIV/AIDS, the tourism sector is a likely target for HIV/AIDS interventions in many countries. The tourist industry is at particular risk from the pandemic because of the mobility of the work force, the presence of sex tourists, and the heavy reliance of many countries upon tourism revenues. Indeed, tourism is one of the largest and fastest growing industries in many countries. Some people have speculated that potential tourists' fear of AIDS could discourage them from visiting certain countries, while others have even suggested that tourism should be discouraged because the industry contributes to the spread of HIV/AIDS. When traveling, tourists often take risks that they would not take at home. They tend to drink more, use drugs more, and be generally more adventurous while on holiday. Such adventures often include taking sexual risks. When tourists have sex with prostitutes, hotel staff, and others in the local population, a bridge can be created for HIV to cross back and forth between the tourist's home country and the tourist destination. The author reviews selected studies on the relationship between HIV/AIDS and tourism. Overall, the existing literature offers no definitive evidence that AIDS has had any lasting impact upon the tourism industry anywhere in the world. Rather, promoting a healthy tourism industry and HIV/AIDS prevention are likely complementary in many ways.

  20. A Socio-Environmental Case for Skill in Outdoor Adventure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    In response to the crisis of sustainability, this paper revisits understandings of human--environment relations established through skill-based outdoor activities that are used commonly among adventure recreation, education, and tourism. Reconsidering a predominant focus on risk and a persistent tension between technical and environmental…

  1. Ethical Issues Regarding Informed Consent for Minors for Space Tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Melvin S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the difficulty with informed consent and debates whether or not whether adults should be able to ethically, morally, and legally consent for their children during the high-risk activity of space tourism. The experimental nature of space vehicles combined with the high likelihood of medical complications and the destination places space tourism legally in the category of "adventure activities," which include adventure travel to exotic locations as well as adventure sports, such as mountain climbing, rafting, etc. which carry a high risk of danger (http://rescommunis.wordpress.com/2008/02/14/interview-tracey-l-knutson-adventure-sports-defense-attorney-on-space-tourism-risk-and-informed-consente/). However, unlike other adventure sports, adults currently cannot consent for their minor children. Other topics also receive attention, such as a "mature minors" clause, radiation exposure of potential future children, and other difficulties preventing adults from legally consenting to space travel.

  2. Risk and Adventure Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Geoff

    2002-01-01

    In adventure education, risk is important to achieving program objectives. An increased concern with legal liability and the concentration of media attention on negative outcomes have contributed to an increased social aversion to risk. Adventure education must establish that risk leads to personal growth and can be managed constructively in the…

  3. Personal Growth through Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, David; Putnam, Roger

    This book aims to provide a succinct and clear overview of the principles and practices associated with adventure education in order to help practitioners do their work more effectively. Implicit in the book is a belief that adventure education has a positive impact on an individual's self-confidence, understanding of the world, and actual…

  4. The Nature of Adventure Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousineau, Claude

    Man answers a natural call for adventure in many ways including escape into fantasy, vertigo seeking, kinetic euphoria, and by exercising the pioneer spirit. Adventure education can help equip people to satisfy their need for adventure in meaningful, enriching ways. A reaction to unsatisfactory educational milieus, adventure education has emerged…

  5. Adventure Behavior Seeking Scale

    PubMed Central

    Próchniak, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a new tool—the Adventure Behavior Seeking Scale (ABSS). The Adventure Behavior Seeking Scale was developed to assess individuals’ highly stimulating behaviors in natural environments. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted with 466 participants and resulted in one factor. The internal consistency was 0.80. A confirmatory factor analysis was performed using another sample of 406 participants, and results verified the one-factor structure. The findings indicate that people with a lot of experience in outdoor adventure have a higher score on the ABSS scale than control groups without such experience. The results also suggest that the 8-item ABSS scores were highly related to sensation seeking. The author discusses findings in regard to the ABSS as an instrument to measure outdoor adventure. However, further studies need to be carried out in other sample groups to further validate the scale. PMID:28555018

  6. Adventures in Manipulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Bonniejean

    1971-01-01

    Objects to an alleged misrepresentation and inaccurate presentation of a J. R. R. Tolkien quotation in "Adventures in Reading" (Harcourt, Brace & World, 1969), a ninth grade literature anthology. (RD)

  7. Adventure and Extreme Sports.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Andrew Thomas; Rao, Ashwin

    2016-03-01

    Adventure and extreme sports often involve unpredictable and inhospitable environments, high velocities, and stunts. These activities vary widely and include sports like BASE jumping, snowboarding, kayaking, and surfing. Increasing interest and participation in adventure and extreme sports warrants understanding by clinicians to facilitate prevention, identification, and treatment of injuries unique to each sport. This article covers alpine skiing and snowboarding, skateboarding, surfing, bungee jumping, BASE jumping, and whitewater sports with emphasis on epidemiology, demographics, general injury mechanisms, specific injuries, chronic injuries, fatality data, and prevention. Overall, most injuries are related to overuse, trauma, and environmental or microbial exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychosynthesis and Adventure Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Jim

    This paper describes the theory of psychosynthesis and suggests how it may be applied to the facilitation of adventure groups. Robert Assagioli's theory of psychosynthesis emphasizes inner psychological parts or elements and their interrelationships. He theorizes that integration or synthesis of these elements is possible. The goal then of…

  9. Educational Adventure Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Fred D.

    An adventure game is a role-playing game that usually, but not always, has some fantasy aspect. The role-playing aspect is the key element because players become personally involved when they assume a role, and defeat becomes personal and less acceptable than in other types of games. Computer-based role-playing games are extremely popular because…

  10. A Mind for Adventure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strother, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Formal schooling began centuries before scientists would discover how the brains of children actually learn. Not surprisingly, traditional teaching was often boring and brain antagonistic. But great teachers in every era intuitively recognized what has now been validated by neuroscience: powerful learning is an adventure of the mind. Students,…

  11. The Universe Adventure - Teachers

    Science.gov Websites

    Go Teachers The Universe Adventure provides a variety of supplementary resources to bring cosmology Bangs Activity .doc .rtf List of Relevant California Science Standards .doc .rtf Class Discussion Calendar" Activity .doc .rtf Practice with Orders of Magnitude Activity .doc .rtf Ordering the Events

  12. Adventure Therapy with Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Christine Lynn; Tucker, Anita; Russell, Keith C.; Bettmann, Joanna E.; Gass, Michael A.; Gillis, H. L.; Behrens, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    This state of knowledge article provides an overview of Adventure Therapy (AT) as it is practiced with adolescents in North America, presenting (a) current findings in AT research with adolescents, (b) critical issues in AT, (c) the need for training and professional development in AT, and (d) professionalization in AT. Implications of current…

  13. Adventure in a Bun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loynes, Chris

    1998-01-01

    Aspects of outdoor adventure education such as sport and risk are increasingly commercialized, whereas the core value of connection--to community, the environment, or other people--is being lost. A shift from providing challenge to encouraging exploration may enable programs emphasizing connection to find a home in the "third sector"…

  14. International Adventures: A Recreational Main Course with Some Learning on the Side

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertz, Tim

    2008-01-01

    This past Winter, Stout Adventures at the University of Wisconsin-Stout took off for its first International Trip. Nine students, two student trip leaders and the author traveled New Zealand's South Island for twenty-two days. Jumping out of planes, rafting rivers, leaping off bungy platforms, sea-kayaking both Milford Sound and Abel Tasman…

  15. Student Support using Project Adventure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawanishi, Toshimasa

    University students become maladjustment at the time of entrance to school not to have friends. Project adventure is effective in the making of friend and brings up confidence with persons. General concepts of project adventure make from experimental learning cycle, full value contract and challenge by choice. This paper explains purpose of PA, practice, ice breaking, trust and initiative.

  16. Philosophical Issues in Adventure Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurdinger, Scott D.

    Adventure education is filled with "doers," which improves practice but does not necessarily enhance theory. This book addresses that gap by examining the philosophy of adventure education. Chapter 1 examines foundational principles, which have their roots in the ideas of philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, and Dewey, and…

  17. A Review of Adventure Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veletsianos, George; Kleanthous, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Adventure learning (AL) is an approach for the design of digitally-enhanced teaching and learning environments driven by a framework of guidelines grounded on experiential and inquiry-based education. The purpose of this paper is to review the adventure learning literature and to describe the status quo of the practice by identifying the current…

  18. Teaching Through Adventure: A Practical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    Presenting four basic adventure education concepts as defined by Project Adventure (a Demonstrator/Developer Project within the National Diffusion Network and operating out of Massachusetts), this book describes a number of successful high school and middle high adventure programs. Major adventure education concepts are identified as: adventure…

  19. Family Adventure Programming for Troubled Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerstein, Jaclyn S.

    The family adventure program merges traditional family therapy and adventure therapy to provide a more effective therapeutic process for the troubled adolescent. Family adventure programming is based on the assumption that the family has the skills and resources for positive change and growth. The stressful nature of adventure activities removes…

  20. More Like Ourselves: Indigenous Capitalism through Tourism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunten, Alexis Celeste

    2010-01-01

    Through a comparison of Indigenous-owned cultural tourism businesses in southeastern Alaska and New Zealand as well as secondary data examining Indigenous tourism across the Pacific, this article introduces the concept of "Indigenous capitalism" as a distinct strategy to achieve ethical, culturally appropriate, and successful Indigenous…

  1. Adventures in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger D.

    1999-01-01

    Human space flight experience has demonstrated a variety of hazards and risks to health and performance. In developing ways to help respond to these issues, the field of space medicine has developed a comprehensive program of space flight health risk management that has resulted in positive contributions to medicine and society in general. Examples include accelerated focus on critical health issues such as aging and osteoporosis, and development of new technologies such as non-invasive diagnostic testing for diabetics. The role of health care professionals in human space exploration represents a fulfillment of new adventures and expanding frontiers.

  2. The Clam Trail: Blending Science Education, Public Art, and Tourism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muscio, Cara; Flimlin, Gef; Bushnell, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The Barnegat Bay Shellfish Restoration's Clam Trail is an award-winning scavenger hunt that combines science education, public art, and tourism. This family adventure has participants seeking out giant painted fiberglass clams, upweller clam nurseries, and points of interest in search of science facts to record on their forms. Upon returning these…

  3. The Seventh Generation in Adventure Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itin, Christian

    Hypnotic language provides a powerful tool for the transfer of learning in adventure therapy. It allows the therapeutic adventure practitioner to use the client's experiential language to enhance the isomorphic connections of the adventure activity and to draw upon and develop the client's unconscious resources to support client goals. This paper…

  4. Outdoor Adventure Programs Fulfilling Heroic Archetypal Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Johnny

    The experiences found in adventure programs often parallel the archetypes depicted in mythological quests. Drawing on the work of Joseph Campbell, the stages and trials of adventure participants are compared to similar rites of passage and epic adventures experienced by heroes and heroines in epic literature and mythology. The basic pattern of…

  5. Tourism Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document contains teacher materials for a 6-unit, 1-year distributive education course in marketing tourism offered in grades 11 and 12 in North Carolina. Although in general the material presented concerns marketing tourism anywhere, some of it is specifically related to tourism within North Carolina. A purpose statement explains the…

  6. Adventure Learning @ Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, B. G.; Cox, C. J.; Hougham, J.; Walden, V. P.; Eitel, K.; Albano, A.

    2013-12-01

    Teaching the general public and K-12 communities about scientific research has taken on greater importance as climate change increasingly impacts the world we live in. Science researchers and the educational community have a widening responsibility to produce and deliver curriculum and content that is timely, scientifically sound and engaging. To address this challenge, in the summer of 2012 the Adventure Learning @ Greenland (AL@GL) project, a United States' National Science Foundation (NSF) funded initiative, used hands-on and web-based climate science experiences for high school students to promote climate and science literacy. This presentation will report on an innovative approach to education and outreach for environmental science research known as Adventure Learning (AL). The purpose of AL@GL was to engage high school students in the US, and in Greenland, in atmospheric research that is being conducted in the Arctic to enhance climate and science literacy. Climate and science literacy was explored via three fundamental concepts: radiation, the greenhouse effect, and climate vs. weather. Over the course of the project, students in each location engaged in activities and conducted experiments through the use of scientific instrumentation. Students were taught science research principles associated with an atmospheric observatory at Summit Station, Greenland with the objective of connecting climate science in the Arctic to student's local environments. Summit Station is located on the Greenland Ice Sheet [72°N, 38°W, 3200 m] and was the primary location of interest. Approximately 35 students at multiple locations in Idaho, USA, and Greenland participated in the hybrid learning environments as part of this project. The AL@GL project engaged students in an inquiry-based curriculum with content that highlighted a cutting-edge geophysical research initiative at Summit: the Integrated Characterization of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric state, and Precipitation at

  7. Enhancing Fidelity in Adventure Education and Adventure Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Anita R.; Rheingold, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Although the importance of addressing and evaluating treatment and program fidelity is clearly emphasized in the literature on psychology, education, and health, little attention has been given to fidelity in adventure literature or research. Program fidelity refers to whether or not, and how well, a specific intervention or program was…

  8. Myiasis During Adventure Sports Race

    PubMed Central

    Virolainen-Julkunen, Anni; Kakko, Iiro; Vilkamaa, Pekka; Meri, Seppo

    2004-01-01

    Travelers who have visited tropical areas may exhibit aggressive forms of obligatory myiases, in which the larvae (maggots) invasively feed on living tissue. The risk of a traveler’s acquiring a screwworm infestation has been considered negligible, but with the increasing popularity of adventure sports and wildlife travel, this risk may need to be reassessed. PMID:15078610

  9. Mathematical Adventures in Role Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyce, Constance

    2002-01-01

    The provision of role play is vital in every early years setting. It provides opportunities for the development of all areas of learning. With careful thought and planning, all role play situations can provide children with mathematical adventures. Many examples of good quality role play had been observed in a variety of settings throughout…

  10. Adventure Education and Resilience Enhancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beightol, Jesse; Jevertson, Jenn; Carter, Susan; Gray, Sky; Gass, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of an experiential, adventure-based program on levels of resilience in fifth-grade Latino students. A mixed methods, quasi-experimental design was used to measure the impact of the Santa Fe Mountain Center's Anti-Bullying Initiative on internal assets commonly associated with resilient individuals. Results indicated…

  11. Effective Leadership in Adventure Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priest, Simon; Gass, Michael A.

    Organized as a text for undergraduate and graduate students, this book presents the principles and practices of outdoor leadership in a variety of adventure applications: recreational, educational, developmental, and therapeutic. The introduction addresses the need for effective outdoor leadership and examines current research. Part I,…

  12. Viata! Bringing Adventure to Romania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Dana; Bates, Brandi

    2000-01-01

    An adventure education program combines environmental education, character education, and service learning with ropes courses, orienteering, and rock climbing to offer Romanian youth opportunities for trust building and reconciliation in the wake of the economic, environmental, and moral devastation left by the Communist dictator. An ecotourism…

  13. Interpretative Techniques for Adventure Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Adventure educators must elevate participants' experience beyond a parade in the environment. Innovative right-brain strategies that can be used before, during, and after the encounter to capture the wonder of the "natural moment" include visualization, sensitizing, treating flora and fauna as celebrities, thematic photography, the mind…

  14. Adventures in public data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This article contains the slides and transcript of a talk given by Dan Zaharevitz at the "Visions of a Semantic Molecular Future" symposium held at the University of Cambridge Department of Chemistry on 2011-01-19. A recording of the talk is available on the University Computing Service's Streaming Media Service archive at http://sms.cam.ac.uk/media/1095515 (unfortunately the first part of the recording was corrupted, so the talk appears to begin at slide 6, 'At a critical time'). We believe that Dan's message comes over extremely well in the textual transcript and that it would be poorer for serious editing. In addition we have added some explanations and references of some of the concepts in the slides and text. (Charlotte Bolton; Peter Murray-Rust, University of Cambridge) Editorial preface The following paper is part of a series of publications which arose from a Symposium held at the Unilever Centre for Molecular Informatics at the University of Cambridge to celebrate the lifetime achievements of Peter Murray-Rust. One of the motives of Peter's work was and is a better transport and preservation of data and information in scientific publications. In both respects the following publication is relevant: it is about public data and their representation, and the publication represents a non-standard experiment of transporting the content of the scientific presentation. As you will see, it consists of the original slides used by Dan Zaharevitz in his talk "Adventures in Public Data" at the Unilever Centre together with a diligent transcript of his speech. The transcribers have gone through great effort to preserve the original spirit of the talk by preserving colloquial language as it is used at such occasions. For reasons known to us, the original speaker was unable to submit the manuscript in a more conventional form. We, the Editors, have discussed in depth whether such a format is suitable for a scientific journal. We have eventually decided to publish this "as

  15. Adventures in public data.

    PubMed

    Zaharevitz, Dan W

    2011-10-14

    This article contains the slides and transcript of a talk given by Dan Zaharevitz at the "Visions of a Semantic Molecular Future" symposium held at the University of Cambridge Department of Chemistry on 2011-01-19. A recording of the talk is available on the University Computing Service's Streaming Media Service archive at http://sms.cam.ac.uk/media/1095515 (unfortunately the first part of the recording was corrupted, so the talk appears to begin at slide 6, 'At a critical time'). We believe that Dan's message comes over extremely well in the textual transcript and that it would be poorer for serious editing. In addition we have added some explanations and references of some of the concepts in the slides and text. (Charlotte Bolton; Peter Murray-Rust, University of Cambridge) EDITORIAL PREFACE: The following paper is part of a series of publications which arose from a Symposium held at the Unilever Centre for Molecular Informatics at the University of Cambridge to celebrate the lifetime achievements of Peter Murray-Rust. One of the motives of Peter's work was and is a better transport and preservation of data and information in scientific publications. In both respects the following publication is relevant: it is about public data and their representation, and the publication represents a non-standard experiment of transporting the content of the scientific presentation. As you will see, it consists of the original slides used by Dan Zaharevitz in his talk "Adventures in Public Data" at the Unilever Centre together with a diligent transcript of his speech. The transcribers have gone through great effort to preserve the original spirit of the talk by preserving colloquial language as it is used at such occasions. For reasons known to us, the original speaker was unable to submit the manuscript in a more conventional form. We, the Editors, have discussed in depth whether such a format is suitable for a scientific journal. We have eventually decided to publish this

  16. The Use of Foreign Languages in Tourism: Research Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Noel

    1994-01-01

    Examines the research needs relative to the use of foreign languages in tourism activities in Australia and New Zealand. Findings indicate a lack of precise information on the ways in which the tourism industry in these countries provides appropriate language assistance to non-English speaking inbound visitors. Suggestions for future research are…

  17. Tourism and Environmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Proposes that tourism should be part of the environmental education curriculum. Discusses the significance of tourism, the impacts of tourism on the environment, the concept of sustainable tourism, and tourism in education in the United Kingdom. (MDH)

  18. The socio-cultural value of New Zealand wilderness

    Treesearch

    Kerry Wray

    2011-01-01

    New Zealand's wilderness resource has become iconic on both a national and international scale, and provides an important source of cultural identity for many Kiwis (a colloquial term for a New Zealander). Now, in the early 21st Century, however, social changes such as urbanization, globalization, increasing consumerism, and growing international tourism may be...

  19. Tourism Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of tourism education programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan tourism employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various components of the…

  20. Adventure-Based Learning across Domains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garside, Colleen

    With "adventure-based" learning, instructors present activities in a way that allows the group to develop its own abilities, with guidance from the instructor when appropriate. Adventure-based learning activities (which emphasize the importance of play) lend themselves to inclusion in the basic speech communication course, particularly…

  1. Adventure Racing for the Rest of Us

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorman, Marta K.; English, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Adventure racing got started in the 1990s. The Eco-Challenge and Primal Quest races were multi-day events that included challenging physical activities and extreme conditions. Today, highly publicized adventure races like the Eco-Challenge and Amazing Race usually feature elite athletes or celebrities completing exotic tasks or globe-hopping to…

  2. Learning in Action and Adventure Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellmer, Eva; Rynne, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The exponential growth in action and adventure sport (e.g. snowboarding, bicycle motorcross (BMX), surfing, parkour) participation over the past two decades has been showcased in world championship events and the inclusion in Olympic programs. Yet, by virtue of their alternative, escapist and/or adventure-based origins, these sports do not fully…

  3. Toward an Ecological Paradigm in Adventure Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beringer, Almut

    2004-01-01

    Many forms of adventure therapy, in particular wilderness therapy, rely on challenges in the outdoors to achieve objectives of client change. While nature is drawn on as a medium for therapy and healing, some adventure therapists give nature little if any mention when it comes to explaining therapeutic success. The dominant paradigm in psychology…

  4. Conceptualizing the Adventure-Sports Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Loel; Collins, Dave

    2012-01-01

    As a comparatively recent development, the adventure-sports coach struggles for a clear and distinct identity. The generic term "instructor" no longer characterizes the role and function of this subgroup of outdoor professionals. Indeed, although the fields of adventure/outdoor education and leadership are comparatively well researched,…

  5. Gestalt and Adventure Therapy: Parallels and Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilsdorf, Rudiger

    This paper calls attention to parallels in the literature of adventure education and that of Gestalt therapy, demonstrating that both are rooted in an experiential tradition. The philosophies of adventure or experiential education and Gestalt therapy have the following areas in common: (1) emphasis on personal growth and the development of present…

  6. Adventure Recreation: Coming Soon to Your Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorman, Marta; Schlatter, Barbara E.; Hurd, Amy R.

    2007-01-01

    Adventure recreation activities like mountain biking, bouldering, and kayaking used to require considerable travel to unique locations. This is changing, however, as the new trend emerges in the United State of providing adventure recreation experiences in cities and towns, such as New York City and Golden, Colorado. This article highlights…

  7. Administrative Practices of Accredited Adventure Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Michael, Ed.

    In response to the growth and diversification of adventure programming, the Association for Experiential Education developed an accreditation process that addresses both the fluid nature of adventure programming and the need for specificity in standards. This book describes exemplary administrative practices and policies of accredited adventure…

  8. Family Adventure Questionnaire: Results and Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, H. L.; And Others

    This article presents the results of a survey conducted with 44 adventure programs working with families. Results of the survey show that the majority of families served by family adventure programs are step families. The source of the programs' primary referrals were mental health or medical staff. Programs reported that they worked almost…

  9. Sequencing Adventure Activities: A New Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisson, Christian

    Sequencing in adventure education involves putting activities in an order appropriate to the needs of the group. Contrary to the common assumption that each adventure sequence is unique, a review of literature concerning five sequencing models reveals a certain universality. These models present sequences that move through four phases: group…

  10. Skrammellegepladsen: Denmark's first adventure play area

    Treesearch

    Amanda Rae O' Connor; James F. Palmer

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the philosophy of the adventure playground movement and particularly the goals of the original adventure playground, Skrammellegepladsen in Copenhagen, Denmark. We then present a case study investigation of the ways that Skrammellegepladsen is used, the perceptions of the users, and the extent that the play area embodies its original philosophy. The...

  11. Our Heroic Adventure: Creating a Personal Mythology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lawrence C.

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing Joseph Campbell's concept of the hero's adventure, this article provides a technique through which clients can story their lives and challenges as an unfolding personal myth or epic adventure. The use of personal narrative and storytelling has found efficacy in the counseling field and, as such, forms a useful foundation for clinical…

  12. Integrated Outdoor Education and Adventure Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleien, Stuart J.; And Others

    This guide presents a comprehensive framework for the development and provision of outdoor education and adventure programs for people of all abilities, including those who significantly challenge the service delivery system. Chapter 1 provides a rationale for the integration of disabled persons into outdoor education and adventure programs, and…

  13. Nutritional status of adventure racers.

    PubMed

    Zalcman, Ioná; Guarita, Heloisa Vidigal; Juzwiak, Claudia Ridel; Crispim, Cibele Aparecida; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Edwards, Ben; Tufik, Sérgio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2007-05-01

    We describe the usual food intake, body composition, and biochemical profile of adventure racers during their training season and evaluate their energy and nutrient intake in relation to current recommendations for ultraendurance athletes. Twenty-four adventure race athletes (18 men and 6 women), 24 to 42 y of age, participated in the study. Food intake was determined with a 3-d food record and body composition by plethysmography. Blood samples were obtained from all subjects for biochemical analyses. All assessments were made during the usual training phase. Female athletes had a higher body fat percentage than did male athletes (20.2 +/- 5.7% versus 12.5 +/- 3.5%). For men and women, food intake was high in protein (1.9 +/- 0.5 g/kg in men, 2.0 +/- 0.4 g/kg in women) and fat (1.6 +/- 0.3 g/kg in men, 1.5 +/- 1.3 g/kg in women). Carbohydrate intake of male athletes was at the lower limit of that recommended (5.9 +/- 1.8 g/kg). For most vitamins and minerals, athletes' intake was adequate, with the exception of magnesium, zinc, and potassium in men and women and vitamin E and calcium in women, which presented a high probability of being inadequate compared with reference values. High blood levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were found in female athletes (201.0 +/- 44.7 and 104.1 +/- 43.1 mg/dL, respectively) and all other biochemical analyses were within normal reference values. The adventure racers presented an inadequate nutritional profile when compared with recommendations for endurance exercise. These athletes need to be educated about consuming an adequate diet to meet the nutritional needs of their activity.

  14. Transplant tourism.

    PubMed

    Schiano, Thomas D; Rhodes, Rosamond

    2010-04-01

    Because of the ongoing organ donor shortage, transplant tourism is occurring at an increasing rate both in the USA and abroad. To date, there have been little published data to help guide the programmatic philosophy of the USA transplant centers regarding transplant tourism. We summarize position statements from several transplant societies regarding transplant tourism and specifically transplantation occurring in China (because of the use of executed prisoners as organ donors). Transplant tourism is ever increasing and patients may be at risk for greater post-transplant morbidity as well as inadequate follow up care. Transplant centers require some guidance with regard of how to deal with these patients. Transplant tourism is an increasing reality facing the USA transplant centers. Most professional societies do not condone it yet cannot abrogate a physician's right to care for such patients. Ethical principles mandate transplant physicians provide adequate care for returning transplant tourists. Better ways of assessing the scope of the problem are necessary. Transplant tourism may exist because of the disparity between the need for organ donors and their availability and is thus is likely to continue into the future.

  15. Risking a Debate--Redefining Risk and Risk Management: A New Zealand Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zink, Robyn; Leberman, Sarah

    2001-01-01

    Interviews with 12 New Zealand outdoor instructors found that they viewed risk as an opportunity to gain something of value, as opposed to losing something of value. Repositioning risk in this manner could allow the debate around adventure education to move away from being dominated by risk management, allowing consideration of adventure…

  16. Encounters with Transcendence in Adventure Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Problem solving in adventure programs contains physical, social, philosophical, and transcendent (insightful) elements. Through transcendent experiences students reach a high level of performance, tolerance, and understanding. Instructors often attempt to facilitate transcendent experiences through such activities as the Native American…

  17. Medical tourism.

    PubMed

    Leggat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Medical tourism is a burgeoning industry in our region. It involves patients travelling outside of their home country for medical treatment. This article provides an outline of the current research around medical tourism, especially its impact on Australians. Patients are increasingly seeking a variety of medical treatments abroad, particularly those involving cosmetic surgery and dental treatment, often in countries in South-East Asia. Adverse events may occur during medical treatment abroad, which raises medico-legal and insurance issues, as well as concerns regarding follow-up of patients. General practitioners need to be prepared to offer advice, including travel health advice, to patients seeking medical treatment abroad.

  18. Medical tourism.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Olga S

    2010-01-01

    Medical tourism is becoming popular as an alternative to the high cost of health care in the United States and as an inexpensive resource for cosmetic surgery. The occupational health nurse is an excellent resource to assist in the pre-decision due diligence and post-decision travel health counseling. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Caribbean Tourism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prosser, Robert

    1983-01-01

    Describes a teaching unit which explores the concept of development in a study of the Caribbean tourist industry. Intended for use by high school students, its purpose is to make students aware that development must not be equated with economic growth alone and that tourism brings both costs and benefits. (CS)

  20. Two Faces of Outdoor Adventure Leadership: Educational Adventure Programs and Guided Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan; Wu, Guan-Jang

    2007-01-01

    Outdoor adventure activities such as whitewater boating, caving, rock climbing, and mountaineering continue to be popular among the public. As a result of this popularity, numerous organizations "contract out" the leadership and delivery of the adventure portion of their curriculum. This paper explores two widely used venues for offering outdoor…

  1. Circumvention tourism.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Glenn

    2012-09-01

    Under what circumstances should a citizen be able to avoid the penalties set by the citizen's home country's criminal law by going abroad to engage in the same activity where it is not criminally prohibited? Should we view the ability to engage in prohibited activities by traveling outside of the nation state as a way of accommodating cultural or political differences within our polity? These are general questions regarding the power and theory of extraterritorial application of domestic criminal law. In this Article, I examine the issues through a close exploration of one setting that urgently presents them: medical tourism. Medical tourism is a term used to describe the travel of patients who are citizens and residents of one country, the "home country," to another country, the "destination country," for medical treatment. This Article is the first to comprehensively examine a subcategory of medical tourism that I call "circumvention tourism," which involves patients who travel abroad for services that are legal in the patient's destination country but illegal in the patient's home country--that is, travel to circumvent domestic prohibitions on accessing certain medical services. The four examples of this phenomenon that I dwell on are circumvention medical tourism for female genital cutting (FGC), abortion, reproductive technology usage, and assisted suicide. I will briefly discuss the "can" question: assuming that a domestic prohibition on access to one of these services is lawful, as a matter of international law, is the home country forbidden, permitted, or mandated to extend its existing criminal prohibition extraterritorially to home country citizens who travel abroad to circumvent the home country's prohibition? Most of the Article, though, is devoted to the "ought" question: assuming that the domestic prohibition is viewed as normatively well-grounded, under what circumstances should the home country extend its existing criminal prohibition

  2. Effects of pretesting with the Adventure Recreation Model instrument

    Treesearch

    Anderson Young; Lynn Anderson; Dale Anderson

    2002-01-01

    The Adventure Recreation Model, first proposed and tested by Ewert and Hollenhorst (1989), attempts to describe participant characteristics and patterns of use in adventure recreation activities. The Adventure Recreation Model is based on the relationship of level of engagement in an outdoor recreation activity (ranging from beginner, to development, to commitment)...

  3. All-Girls Adventure Programmes: What Are the Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittington, Anja; Mack, Erica Nixon; Budbill, Nadine W.; McKenney, Priscilla

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the benefits of all-girls adventure programmes from the perspective of adolescent girls. Participants included 361 girls aged 10-17 years from diverse ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds who completed a variety of adventure programmes. Adventure activities included rock climbing, sea kayaking, mountaineering, backpacking,…

  4. Reality Television: Altering Participants' Expectations of Adventure Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindner, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his views on how reality television shows have altered participants' expectations of adventure programs and explores how such changes affect what leaders do with groups who sign on for an adventure education program. For some individuals, the chance to participate in an adventure program focused on group building…

  5. Adventure Learning: Motivating Students in a Minnesota Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Daniel C.; Honkomp, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Adventure learning has emerged as a promising technology forum that provides students with opportunities to explore real-world issues through authentic learning experiences. Despite these promises, Adventure learning has received little empirical attention. This study examined how adventure learning affects motivation and learning outcomes with…

  6. The Task of Adventure within the Peace and Reconciliation Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartle, Mike

    This paper introduces the notion of a spiritual component of adventure, with reference to the potential role of adventure within the peace and reconciliation process in Northern Ireland. Influenced by tradition and culture, past constructions of adventure have often associated it with educational benefits and personal development of specific…

  7. Sub-orbital flights, a starting point for space tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubatz, William A.

    2002-07-01

    While there is a growing awareness and interest by the general public in space travel neither the market nor the infrastructure exist to make a commercial space tourism business an attractive risk venture. In addition there is much to be learned about how the general public will respond to space flights and what physiological and psychological needs must be met to ensure a pleasurable as well as adventurous experience. Sub-orbital flights offer an incremental approach to develop the market and the infrastructure, demonstrate the safety of space flight, obtain real flight information regarding the needs of general public passengers and demonstrate the profitability of space tourism. This paper will summarize some of the system, operations, and financial aspects of creating a sub-orbital space tourism business as a stepping-stone to public space travel. A sample business case will be reviewed and impacts of markets, operations and vehicle costs and lifetimes will be assessed.

  8. Tourism in Chile | CTIO

    Science.gov Websites

    Program PIA Program GO-FAAR Program Other Opportunities Tourism Visits to Tololo Astro tourism in Chile Tourism in Chile Information for travelers Visit Tololo Media Relations News Press Release Publications ‹› You are here CTIO Home » Outreach » Tourism » Tourism in Chile Tourism in Chile Map of

  9. It's Time for an Adventure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldam Pommer, R.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, studies have repeatedly illustrated the significance of children seeing themselves reflected in careers and cultures that they may not typically identify with. The current lack of diversity in accessible media, however, limits the potential for self-reflection from children of different socioeconomic, racial, and gender identity backgrounds. This isolates substantial sections of our population from experiencing these moments of recognition and inspiration. As scientists in a rapidly evolving field that requires diversity in perspective and ideas, it is incumbent upon us to innovate new ways to engage with these future generations in the pursuit of inspiring future earth scientists. Inspired by the work of others (e.g. Doc McStuffins, The Sandwich Swap) and through a successful crowdfunding campaign, I was able to develop a project which integrates children's love of adventure with foundational critical thinking skills. That project is MD and Finn. MD and Finn is a self-written/published children's book series which was developed to address the lack of diversity in children's literature. MD is a little girl who continuously explores, discovers, and builds the world around her with her best friend, Finn the fox. They encourage one another to ask questions, brainstorm, make mistakes, and learn from absolutely everything. While the primary goal of the series is to create a character in which young girls can see themselves solving problems, learning from mistakes, and enjoying the little pieces of science in daily life, as the project progresses, characters from different races, ethnicities, gender identities, religions, and disabilities are purposefully introduced. In bringing these books to life, I have been given the unique opportunity to regularly engage with classrooms and families who may be meeting an actual scientist for the very first time. For a few young girls, they may also finally be seeing just a little bit of themselves - in a lab coat

  10. ACHP | Heritage Tourism

    Science.gov Websites

    Search skip specific nav links Home arrow Heritage Tourism Heritage Tourism ACHP Reports Partnering to Promote Heritage Tourism in Local Communities: Guidance for Federal Agencies Federal Programs that Can Support Heritage Tourism Web-Available Studies of the Economic Impacts of Historic Preservation Heritage

  11. Adventure Learning: Transformative Hybrid Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doering, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Adventure learning (AL) is a hybrid distance education approach that provides students with opportunities to explore real-world issues through authentic learning experiences within collaborative learning environments. This article defines this online distance education approach, outlines an AL framework, and showcases an AL archetype. In AL…

  12. 1979 Worldwide Adventure TravelGuide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    Guidebook descriptions of the 3000 worldwide adventure trips open to public participation include highlights, itinerary, level of experience necessary, requirements, location, duration, dates, cost, and addresses and telephone numbers of the operating organizations. The guidebook is organized in four major sections and, within each section, into…

  13. The Tipping Point and the Adventure Advantage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prouty, Dick

    1998-01-01

    Insights from chaos theory--the interconnectedness of everything, nonlinear cause and effect, leverage and the "tipping point," and the importance of aligning interventions within a system--are applied to social action and illustrated via the role of adventure education in school and community interventions in the Brattleboro (Vermont) Leadership…

  14. Outdoor Adventure Leadership at Laurentian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Graduating with a Bachelor of Physical and Health Education (BPHE) degree with a specialty in Outdoor Adventure Leadership (ADVL) is a unique reality in Canada offered by Sudbury's Laurentian University. Developed over 20 years ago, the ADVL program has been one of Laurentian's six landmark Human Kinetics programs. From a scholastic perspective…

  15. Integrated Outdoor Education/Adventure. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleien, Stuart J., Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The 12 brief articles in this "feature" or theme issue describe successful approaches to development of outdoor education programs which successfully integrate individuals with and without disabilities. Titles and authors are: "Outdoor Education and Adventure: Challenges and Rewards for All" (Stuart J. Schleien); "Benefits of Integrated Outdoor…

  16. Ecology and Task Structures in Adventure Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zmudy, Mark H.; Curtner-Smith, Matthew D.; Steffen, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Many of the characteristics of effective physical education lessons have been discovered by sport pedagogy researchers by employing what has become known as the ecological or task structures perspective. The purpose of this study was to describe the task structures and ecology that existed in two consecutive 7-day summer adventure camps run by an…

  17. Decisions and the Environmental-Adventure Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindenmeier, Donna K.

    Historically, outdoor recreation/education (ORE) has been associated with environmental recreation/education, but in the past few decades has become increasingly associated with adventure education/recreation. Many outdoor programs have attempted to combine the two elements; others question the combination of the two elements in a single program.…

  18. Contemporary Youth and the Postmodern Adventure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Steven; Kellner, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Contemporary youth are major players in the postmodern adventure because it is they who will enter the future and further shape the world to come. For youth today, change is the name of the game and they are forced to adapt to a rapidly mutating and crisis-ridden world characterized by novel information, computer and genetic technologies; a…

  19. AIM: Adventures in Movement for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adventures In Movement for the Handicapped, Inc., Dayton, OH.

    The handbook on Adventures in Movement for the Handicapped (AIM) gives information about general organizational goals and suggests activities for use by volunteer teachers with blind, deaf, crippled, cerebral palsied, mentally retarded, and autistic children at five ability/age levels. General Information given about each handicap usually includes…

  20. My Lessons for Living from Adventure Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eilers, Gayleen M.

    1997-01-01

    A woman treated for eating disorders, long-term depression, and attempted suicide describes how adventure therapy helped her to confront her personal issues, deal with feelings of inadequacy, take risks, trust other people, and enjoy the beauty of nature. Discusses the role of the facilitator in ensuring a safe environment and leading reflective…

  1. Student Participation Styles in Adventure Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zmudy, Mark H.; Curtner-Smith, Matthew D.; Steffen, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Sport pedagogy researchers have contributed much to the literature on physical education teaching by describing the participation styles of children, youth and young adults in various settings. The purpose of this study was to describe the participation styles of children enrolled in two consecutive week-long summer adventure camps. Primary…

  2. Psychological Benefits of Outdoor Adventure Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaff, Joseph; Kablach, John

    1987-01-01

    Reports psychological benefits of participation in caving, rock climbing, ropes, and teams course of 30-day adventure program by 56 delinquent youth (ages 11-18). Concludes rope course satisfied independence, rewards, and variety more than caving; rock climbing satisfied independence and rewards more than caving; caving less beneficial than other…

  3. Learning Academic Content the Adventure Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Hector

    1997-01-01

    Describes and gives examples of integrating adventure activities into existing classroom curricula at three levels: review or metaphors, interwoven activities for content delivery, and total integration into classroom design. Example activities include "Speed Rabbit,""Have You Ever,""Stepping Stones,""Whale Watch," and "Mine Field." (SAS)

  4. The Universe Adventure - The Beginnings of Cosmology

    Science.gov Websites

    The Universe Adventure [ next ] [ home ] Go The Beginnings of Cosmology Since the beginning of of stars? What do the stars tell us about the future? Where did the Universe come from? Cosmology is will introduce you to Cosmology and the study of the structure, history, and fate of the Universe. In

  5. Tololo and Tourism | CTIO

    Science.gov Websites

    Program PIA Program GO-FAAR Program Other Opportunities Tourism Visits to Tololo Astro tourism in Chile Tourism in Chile Information for travelers Visit Tololo Media Relations News Press Release Publications ‹› You are here CTIO Home » Outreach » Tololo and Tourism Tololo and Tourism Visits to Cerro

  6. New Zealand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    This image taken from the Suomi NPP satellite's VIIRS instrument of New Zealand was collected on January 9, 2015 when the phytoplankton were blooming — particularly to the east of the islands and along the Chatham Rise. Derived from the Greek words phyto (plant) and plankton (made to wander or drift), phytoplankton are microscopic organisms that live in watery environments, both salty and fresh. Credit: NASA/Goddard/NPP NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  7. Transportation and Tourism

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-08-01

    This project explored the link between transportation and tourism in Texas. A session on transit and tourism was organized and conducted as part of the 2012 Texas Transit Conference. Speakers at the session described public transit services oriented ...

  8. Environment and World Tourism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larre, Dominique

    1979-01-01

    Tourism can create significant impacts on both the social and natural environment; however, many nations have avoided the negative impacts. Consideration of the effects of tourism should be part of national policy toward the tourist industry. (RE)

  9. Tourism in rural Alaska

    Treesearch

    Katrina Church-Chmielowski

    2007-01-01

    Tourism in rural Alaska is an education curriculum with worldwide relevance. Students have started small businesses, obtained employment in the tourism industry and gotten in touch with their people. The Developing Alaska Rural Tourism collaborative project has resulted in student scholarships, workshops on website development, marketing, small...

  10. Tourism Skills Delivery: Sharing Tourism Knowledge Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Patrice; Hollick, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to share the authors' initial insights into tourism industry capacity building via flexibly delivered online skilling and knowledge sharing. Design/methodology/approach: An online research survey approach was employed, involving a sample of 64 micro tourism operators. Findings: The paper finds that the major…

  11. The Meaning of Adventurous Activities for "Women in the Outdoors"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boniface, Maggie

    2006-01-01

    Adventurous activities are growing in popularity as a form of leisure and recreation, yet many non-participants find it difficult to understand what motivates people to seek out situations in which there is an element of danger and risk. This research examines the meanings of long-term participation in outdoor adventure for women working in…

  12. Choose Your Own Adventure: A Hypertext Writing Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulze, Patricia

    The writing program described in this lesson plan guides students to plan an adventure story, write different endings to the story, and create web sites with the parts of the story hyperlinked to each other. During six to eight 50-minute lessons, students will: understand the structure of Choose Your Own Adventure stories; become familiar with the…

  13. Physical Activity Levels during Adventure-Physical Education Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehris, Jeffrey; Myers, Elizabeth; Whitaker, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Adventure-physical education has been proposed to promote adolescents' physical development, but little is known about physical activity levels during such lessons. Using the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time, we observed students' (ages 11-14 years) physical activity levels in co-educational classes during 43 adventure-physical…

  14. Promoting Resiliency in Adolescent Girls through Adventure Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittington, Anja; Aspelmeier, Jeffery E.; Budbill, Nadine W.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether participation in an adventure program increased the resiliency of adolescent girls. Eighty-seven girls who participated in Dirt Divas, a non-profit, adventure program, completed the Resiliency Scale for Children and Adolescents® before and after their experience. Means-comparison tests for within-subjects designs were…

  15. Food for Thought: Eating Disorders and Outdoor Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Kaye; Allin, Linda

    2001-01-01

    The history and etiology of eating disorders are briefly outlined, with attention to their prevalence in adolescent girls. A critical examination of the links among outdoor adventure, eating disorders, and physicality shows how adventure programs can reinforce eating disorders. Strategies are presented that illustrate the potential of outdoor…

  16. Controversial Issues in Adventure Education: A Critical Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurdinger, Scott D.; Potter, Tom G.

    Adventure education has its own set of unique questions that help to define what it is and how it differs from other fields of education. Adventure education has grown rapidly over the past several decades, and with its evolution, many critical topics for deliberation have emerged. This book contains 15 chapters, each arranged in a debate format…

  17. Adventure Learning: Situating Learning in an Authentic Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doering, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, Aaron Doering describes an adventure learning project that connected students to explorers and researchers participating in a trans-Arctic dogsled expedition. Adventure learning (AL) uses a hybrid online educational environment to provide students with opportunities to explore real-world issues through authentic learning…

  18. Museums, Adventures, Discovery Activities: Gifted Curriculum Intrinsically Differentiated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haensly, Patricia A.

    This paper discusses how museums, adventure programs, and discovery activities can become an intrinsically differentiated gifted curriculum for gifted learners. Museums and adventure programs are a forum for meaningful learning activities. The contextual characteristics of effectively designed settings for learning activities can, if the…

  19. Risk and Hazard Management in High Adventure Outdoor Pursuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Joel

    The dilemma in adventure education is to eliminate unreasonable risks to participants without reducing the levels of excitement, challenge, and stress that are inherent in adventure programming. Most accidents in outdoor pursuits are caused by a combination of unsafe conditions; unsafe acts (usually on the part of the student); and error judgments…

  20. Emotional Safety in Adventure Therapy Programs: Can It Be Defined?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Suzanne M.

    1995-01-01

    Ninety-eight adventure therapy professionals analyzed a proposed definition of emotional safety and rated 26 factors hypothesized to affect an individual's level of emotional safety during adventure activities. Factors were related to specific techniques used by instructors, instructor skills and abilities, the physical environment, and group…

  1. Advancing Adventure Education Using Digital Motion-Sensing Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ju-Ling; Hsu, Yu-Jen

    2016-01-01

    This study used the Xbox Kinect and Unity 3D game engine to develop two motion-sensing games in which the participants, in simulated scenarios, could experience activities that are unattainable in real life, become immersed in collaborative activities, and explore the value of adventure education. Adventure Education involves courses that…

  2. Exploring Adventure Therapy as an Early Intervention for Struggling Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobud, Will

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an account of a research project that explored the experiences of adolescents struggling with behavioral and emotional issues, who participated in a 14-day adventure therapy program in Australia referred to by the pseudonym, "Onward Adventures". All participants of this program over the age of 16 who completed within…

  3. Minimizing Accidents and Risks in High Adventure Outdoor Pursuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Joel

    The fundamental dilemma in adventure programming is eliminating unreasonable risks to participants without also reducing levels of excitement, challenge, and stress. Most accidents are caused by a combination of unsafe conditions, unsafe acts, and error judgments. The best and only way to minimize critical human error in adventure programs is…

  4. Going Pro: Point of View Cameras in Adventure Sports Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The role of the adventure sports coach was first identified by Collins and Collins (2012) who suggested that the sports coaching process is significantly different in an adventurous context. Whilst there is a growing body of literature surrounding coaching pedagogy (Hay, Dickens, Crudginton, & Engstrom, 2012), investigation of coaching…

  5. Tourism as science and science as tourism: environment, society, self, and other in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    West, Paige

    2008-08-01

    The experience of villagers in Maimafu, in the Crater Mountain Wildlife Management Area of the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea, calls attention to two forms of social interaction between rural people and outsiders that have been little examined in the anthropological literature. One of these is scientific research and the other is scientific tourism, a form of ecotourism that is linked not to science but to self-fashioning and individual gain. Scientific tourists may be seeking an educational adventure that they can turn into symbolic capital on their return home, a way into the world of science, or an experience that can be turned into economic capital through publication in popular magazines. For both researchers and scientific journalists, New Guinea combines the exotic, the about-to-be-lost, the primitive, the untouched, and the spectacular and is therefore a powerful space for imaginary and representational practice.

  6. Adventurous Physical Activity Environments: A Mainstream Intervention for Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Clough, Peter; Houge Mackenzie, Susan; Mallabon, Liz; Brymer, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Adventurous physical activity has traditionally been considered the pastime of a small minority of people with deviant personalities or characteristics that compel them to voluntarily take great risks purely for the sake of thrills and excitement. An unintended consequence of these traditional narratives is the relative absence of adventure activities in mainstream health and well-being discourses and in large-scale governmental health initiatives. However, recent research has demonstrated that even the most extreme adventurous physical activities are linked to enhanced psychological health and well-being outcomes. These benefits go beyond traditional 'character building' concepts and emphasize more positive frameworks that rely on the development of effective environmental design. Based on emerging research, this paper demonstrates why adventurous physical activity should be considered a mainstream intervention for positive mental health. Furthermore, the authors argue that understanding how to design environments that effectively encourage appropriate adventure should be considered a serious addition to mainstream health and well-being discourse.

  7. Safety in Outdoor Adventure Programs. S.O.A.P. Safety Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Wayne, Comp.; And Others

    Drafted in 1978 as a working document for Safety in Outdoor Adventure Programs (S.O.A.P.) by a council of outdoor adventure programmers, checklists outline standard accepted safety policy for Outdoor Adventure Programs and Wilderness Adventure Programs conducted through public or private agencies in California. Safety policy emphasizes: the…

  8. Cultural Bridging through Shared Adventure: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Adventure Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Christine L.; Hsieh, Chi-Mou

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the importance of the therapeutic relationship and the need for cultural competence in adventure therapy. Cultural differences between therapist and client can sometimes result in possible misinterpretation and conflict, which can lead to problems in the therapeutic relationship and negatively affect treatment outcomes. This…

  9. Outdoor Program Models: Placing Cooperative Adventure and Adventure Education Models on the Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Steven P.

    In two articles on outdoor programming models, Watters distinguished four models on a continuum ranging from the common adventure model, with minimal organizational structure and leadership control, to the guide service model, in which leaders are autocratic and trips are highly structured. Club programs and instructional programs were in between,…

  10. "The Mirror of the Sea": Narrative Identity, Sea Kayak Adventuring and Implications for Outdoor Adventure Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Beau; Wattchow, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the complex and changing nature of adventure as a form of cultural practice. Borrowing from Joseph Conrad's memoirs "The Mirror of The Sea" (1907), sea kayaking is contextualized here as a journey that takes place just as much between "landfall and departure" as it does between the paddler's ears (i.e., in…

  11. Therapy within Adventure: Proceedings of the International Adventure Therapy Conference (2nd, Augsburg, Germany, March 20-24, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Kaye, Ed.; Smith, Barbara, Ed.

    This proceedings presents a variety of international perspectives on the nature of adventure therapy and charts new insights into its historical, philosophical, theoretical, and practical realms. Following an editorial "Adventure and Therapy: 'Dancing in the Moonlight'" (Kaye Richards, Barbara Smith), the 21 papers are: (1)…

  12. Echo the Bat and the Pigeon Adventure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butcher, Ginger

    2000-01-01

    A multimedia, CD ROM to teach 2nd graders about remote sensing was created and developed into a web site. Distribution was expanded for Grades K-4 or 5-8. The idea was to have a story introduction, interactive story and a teacher's website. Interactive Multimedia Adventures in Grade School Education using Remote Sensing (I.M.A.G.E.R.S.) was created. The lessons are easy to use, readily available and aligned with national standards. This resource combines hands-on activities with an interactive web site

  13. Teaching the Anthropology of Tourism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graburn, Nelson H. H.

    1980-01-01

    Explains the organization and objectives of a college level anthropology course devoted to various aspects of tourism. Topics discussed include course content, graduate students and contemporary research on tourism, and the role of tourism in the anthropology curriculum. (DB)

  14. Astro Tourism in Chile | CTIO

    Science.gov Websites

    Program PIA Program GO-FAAR Program Other Opportunities Tourism Visits to Tololo Astro tourism in Chile Tourism in Chile Information for travelers Visit Tololo Media Relations News Press Release Publications ‹› You are here CTIO Home » Outreach » Tourism » Astro Tourism in Chile Astro Tourism in

  15. The Chemical Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The Baker Street Burning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Thomas G.; Rybolt, Thomas R.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the ninth story in a series of chemical mysteries with emphasis on forensic chemistry, physical properties, and qualitative organic analysis. The mystery centers around the adventures of Sherlock Holmes. (DDR)

  16. Tourism and Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longmire, Joan M.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a lesson outline in which students study the application of geography to the tourism industry by first discussing tourism, then researching various tourist destinations and comparing them. Notes the geographic skills and national standards addressed, materials needed, lesson objective, suggested teaching procedures, and a student handout.…

  17. Relevance of the futron/zogby survey conclusions to the current space tourism industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziliotto, Véronique

    2010-06-01

    Thanks to recent technological achievements such as Burt Rutan's SpaceShipOne in 2004, Bigelow's Genesis I in July 2006 and Genesis II in July 2007 and the success of space adventures' flights to the ISS, space tourism is leaving the realm of science-fiction. It is now becoming increasingly familiar to the general public and even recognized by institutional bodies. The Futron/Zogby survey, revised in 2006 and completed with the 2006. Adventurers survey constitutes a good basis to understanding the characteristics of the nascent suborbital market and the profile of the potential customers for both suborbital and orbital travel. The previsions of these studies will be contrasted with recent market and customers' data that was not available at the time.

  18. Autistic phenomena in The Adventures of Pinocchio.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    This paper seeks to demonstrate that the protagonist of Carlo Collodi's The Adventures of Pinocchio illustrates numerous autistic phenomena such as communication difficulties, sensory and perceptual distortions and mindblindness. While Pinocchio is viewed as a literary construct with contraindications of autism, it will be argued that his autistic traits are sufficient to suggest the possibility that Collodi had a partial intuition of the syndrome 60 years before it was identified by Leo Kanner. Approaching Collodi's text in this manner is taken as an opportunity to survey and reflect upon the psychoanalytic literature on autism and to position it in relation to contemporary theories from cognitive neuroscience. © 2017, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  19. Quarked! - Adventures in Particle Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Teresa; Bean, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Particle physics is a subject that can send shivers down the spines of students and educators alike-with visions of long mathematical equations and inscrutable ideas. This perception, along with a full curriculum, often leaves this topic the road less traveled until the latter years of school. Particle physics, including quarks, is typically not introduced until high school or university.1,2 Many of these concepts can be made accessible to younger students when presented in a fun and engaging way. Informal science institutions are in an ideal position to communicate new and challenging science topics in engaging and innovative ways and offer a variety of educational enrichment experiences for students that support and enhance science learning.3 Quarked!™ Adventures in the Subatomic Universe, a National Science Foundation EPSCoR-funded particle physics education program, provides classroom programs and online educational resources.

  20. Infections associated with adventure travel: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gundacker, Nathan D; Rolfe, Robert J; Rodriguez, J Martin

    To review infections associated with adventure travel. The PubMed, Embase and Scopus databases were searched combining the words infection with the following keywords: rafting, whitewater, surfing, (surfer* or windsurf*), (caves or caving or spelunking), (triathlon or trekking) or (hiking or adventure race), bicycling, backpacking, (mountain climb* or bouldering), horseback riding, orienteering, trekking, and skiing. Adventure travel is becoming much more common among travelers and it is associated with a subset of infectious diseases including: leptospirosis, schistosomiasis, viral hemorrhagic fevers, rickettsial diseases and endemic mycosis. Caving and whitewater rafting places individuals at particular risk of leptospirosis, schistosomiasis and endemic mycosis, while adventure races also place individuals at high risk of a variety of infections including campylobacter, norovirus and leptospirosis. Travel practitioners need to be aware of the risks associated with adventure travel and should educate individuals about the risks associated with various activities. Doxycycline prophylaxis should be considered for travelers who are susceptible to leptospirosis due to participation in high-risk sports such as whitewater rafting, caving or adventure races. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Scale issues in tourism development

    Treesearch

    Sinji Yang; Lori Pennington-Gray; Donald F. Holecek

    1998-01-01

    Proponents of Alternative Tourism overwhelmingly believe that alternative forms of tourism development need to be small in scale. Inasmuch as tourists' demand has great power to shape the market, the issues surrounding the tourism development scale deserve further consideration. This paper discusses the implications and effects of the tourism development scale on...

  2. Digital Tools Disrupting Tertiary Students' Notions of Disciplinary Knowledge: Cases in History and Tourism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowie, Bronwen; Khoo, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings from a two year research project that explored the potential of digital tools in support of teaching-learning across different disciplinary areas at a New Zealand university. Two courses (in History and Tourism) are case studied using data collected through interviews with lecturers, tutors and their students,…

  3. Dental implant tourism.

    PubMed

    Barrowman, R A; Grubor, D; Chandu, A

    2010-12-01

    Access and affordability of dental care can be problematic for some in the Australian community. Therefore, dental tourism is increasingly becoming more attractive to some patients due to decreased expense, increased convenience and immediacy of treatment. However, there are significant issues for both clinician and patient in regards to dental tourism. Lack of accountability and regulation are the main issues and this is particularly evident when complications occur. This paper presents five cases where complications have arisen in the setting of dental tourism. © 2010 Australian Dental Association.

  4. Astronomy in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearnshaw, John B.

    2006-01-01

    Although New Zealand is a young country, astronomy played a significant role in its early exploration and discovery during the three voyages of Cook from 1769. In the later 19th century several expeditions came to New Zealand to observe the transits of Venus of 1874 and 1882 and New Zealand's rich history of prominent amateur astronomers dates from this time. The Royal Astronomical Society of New Zealand (founded in 1920) has catered for the amateur community. Professional astronomy however had a slow start in New Zealand. The Carter Observatory was founded in 1941. But it was not until astronomy was taken up by New Zealand's universities, notably by the University of Canterbury from 1963, that a firm basis for research in astronomy and astrophysics was established. Mt John University Observatory with its four optical telescopes (largest 1.8 m) is operated by the University of Canterbury and is the main base for observational astronomy in the country. However four other New Zealand universities also have an interest in astronomical research at the present time. There is also considerable involvement in large international projects such as MOA, SALT, AMOR, IceCube and possibly SKA.

  5. Unplanned health care tourism.

    PubMed

    Powell, Suzanne K

    2015-01-01

    Health care tourism is often a preplanned event carefully laying out all the details. Sometimes, when one least expects it, medical care is needed outside of the mainland. This Editorial speaks to an unplanned experience.

  6. Medical tourism in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vijay; Das, Poonam

    2012-06-01

    The term 'medical tourism' is under debate because health care is a serious business and rarely do patients combine the two. India is uniquely placed by virtue of its skilled manpower, common language, diverse medical conditions that doctors deal with, the volume of patients, and a large nonresident Indian population overseas. Medical tourism requires dedicated services to alleviate the anxiety of foreign patients. These include translation, currency conversion, travel, visa, posttreatment care system,and accommodation of patient relatives during and after treatment.

  7. The Impact of Adventure Video Games on Foreign Language Learning and the Perceptions of Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hao-Jan Howard; Yang, Ting-Yu Christine

    2013-01-01

    Several researchers have highlighted the potential of applying adventure video games in second language acquisition; however, few studies have investigated the impact of adventure games on foreign language learning. This study aimed to examine the effects of a commercial adventure video game on foreign language learning and learners' perceptions…

  8. Adolescent Girls and Body Image: Influence of Outdoor Adventure on Healthy Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr-Wilson, Susie K.; Roberts, Nina S.

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor adventure may improve body image. However, minimal research exists on the effect outdoor adventure has on body image in adolescent girls, a demographic continually plagued by negative body image. In response, this exploratory study considered the influence of one outdoor adventure program in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through…

  9. The Eustress Paradigm: A Strategy for Decreasing Stress in Wilderness Adventure Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrellas, Anjanette

    This essay proposes that stress has been misused in traditional adventure education and presents a new model of risk taking based on the literature on stress and feminist perspectives in adventure education. Proponents of the traditional adventure perspective state that the intentional use of stress is central to the change process in wilderness…

  10. Bridges to Accessibility: A Primer for Including Persons with Disabilities in Adventure Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havens, Mark D.

    This book encourages the inclusion of persons with disabilities in ongoing adventure programs, motivates adventure leaders to learn more about people with disabilities, and assists specialists in advocating for integrated adventure programming. Centered on attitudinal awareness, the book encourages practitioners to want to make their services…

  11. Brain Resilience: Shedding Light into the Black Box of Adventure Procesess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, John F.; McKenna, Jim; Hind, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of the active beneficial processes of adventure learning remains elusive. Resilience may provide one foundation for understanding the positive adaptation derived from Outdoor Adventure Education (OAE) and Adventure Therapy (AT) programming. From a neurological perspective, resilience may be explained by the brain's innate capability…

  12. The Use of Adventure Programming in Traditional Substance Abuse Treatment Programs: An Exploratory Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraes, Ricardo

    As a valuable addition to substance abuse treatment, adventure programming can have positive impacts on clients' self-efficacy, social behavior, and problem solving. A study explored the extent to which traditional substance abuse treatment programs use adventure programming, the level of adventure training and experience among substance abuse…

  13. New Zealand Southern Alps

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-06-20

    This anaglyph from the MISR instrument aboard NASA Terra spacecraft shows the rugged Southern Alps extending some 650 kilometers along the western side of New Zealand South Island. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

  14. Exploring the potential of cultural villages as a model of community based tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi, N. I. K.; Astawa, I. P.; Siwantara, I. W.; Mataram, I. G. A. B.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide better understanding of the potential of cultural villages as a model of Community Based Tourism. The research was held in Buleleng regency, North of Bali, where the tourism is growing in this area. A qualitative research had been applied and data was collected through in-depth interview with informants from the community who directly involve in the tourism businesses. Observation and document review were also utilized. Data was analyzed in qualitative manner following Miles and Huberman method: data reduction, data display and conclusion drawing. Four villages that won the Anugerah Desa Wisata award were selected as the cases namely Pemuteran Village, Munduk Village, Sambangan Village and Kalibukbuk Village. The findings revealed that those four villages have its own uniqueness and strong points to attract tourists. Pemuteran village has strong point on under water attraction and preservation of coral reefs. Munduk village relies on nature scenery, agro-tourism and traditional game as tourist’s attraction. Sambangan village is famous of waterfalls and adventurous activities. Kalibukbuk village depends on black sandy beach with dolphin watching as the main attraction. It is also apparent that the local community is actively involved and gets benefits from the tourism businesses.

  15. Smackdown: Adventures in Simulation Standards and Interoperability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfrey, Priscilla R.; Zacharewicz, Gregory; Ni, marcus

    2011-01-01

    The paucity of existing employer-driven simulation education and the need for workers broadly trained in Modeling & Simulation (M&S) poses a critical need that the simulation community as a whole must address. This paper will describe how this need became an impetus for a new inter-university activity that allows students to learn about simulation by doing it. The event, called Smackdown, was demonstrated for the first time in April at the Spring Simulation Multi-conference. Smackdown is an adventure in international cooperation. Students and faculty took part from the US and Europe supported by IEEE/SISO standards, industry software and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) content of are supply mission to the Moon. The developers see Smackdown providing all participants with a memorable, interactive, problem-solving experience, which can contribute, importantly to the workforce of the future. This is part of the larger need to increase undergraduate education in simulation and could be a prime candidate for senior design projects.

  16. Adventures with Cyanobacteria: A Personal Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Govindjee; Shevela, Dmitriy

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, or the blue-green algae as they used to be called until 1974, are the oldest oxygenic photosynthesizers. We summarize here adventures with them since the early 1960s. This includes studies on light absorption by cyanobacteria, excitation energy transfer at room temperature down to liquid helium temperature, fluorescence (kinetics as well as spectra) and its relationship to photosynthesis, and afterglow (or thermoluminescence) from them. Further, we summarize experiments on their two-light reaction – two-pigment system, as well as the unique role of bicarbonate (hydrogen carbonate) on the electron-acceptor side of their photosystem II, PSII. This review, in addition, includes a discussion on the regulation of changes in phycobilins (mostly in PSII) and chlorophyll a (Chl a; mostly in photosystem I, PSI) under oscillating light, on the relationship of the slow fluorescence increase (the so-called S to M rise, especially in the presence of diuron) in minute time scale with the so-called state-changes, and on the possibility of limited oxygen evolution in mixotrophic PSI (minus) mutants, up to 30 min, in the presence of glucose. We end this review with a brief discussion on the position of cyanobacteria in the evolution of photosynthetic systems. PMID:22645530

  17. Scientific Tourism in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashchyan, Davit

    2016-12-01

    The Scientific Tourism is relatively new direction in the world, however it already has managed to gain great popularity. As it is, it has arisen in 1980s, but its ideological basis comes from the earliest periods of the human history. In Armenia, it is a completely new phenomenon and still not-understandable for many people. At global level, the Scientific Tourism has several definitions: for example, as explains the member of the scientific tourist centre of Zlovlen Mrs. Pichelerova "The essence of the scientific tourism is based on the provision of the educational, cultural and entertainment needs of a group of people of people who are interested in the same thing", which in our opinion is a very comprehensive and discreet definition. We also have our own views on this type of tourism. Our philosophy is that by keeping the total principles, we put the emphasis on the strengthening of science-individual ties. Our main emphasis is on the scientific-experimental tourism. But this does not mean that we do not take steps to other forms of tourism. Studying the global experience and combining it with our resources, we are trying to get a new interdisciplinary science, which will bring together a number of different professionals as well as individuals, and as a result will have a new lore. It is in this way that an astronomer will become an archaeologist, an archaeologist will become an astrophysicist, etc. Speaking on interdisciplinary sciences, it's worth mentioning that in recent years, the role of interdisciplinary sciences at global level every day is being considered more and more important. In these terms, tourism is an excellent platform for the creation of interdisciplinary sciences and, therefore, the preparation of corresponding scholars. Nevertheless, scientific tourism is very important for the revelation, appreciation and promotion of the country's historical-cultural heritage and scientific potential. Let us not forget either that tourism in all its

  18. Agro-tourism and ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioca, L. I.; Giurea, R.; Precazzini, I.; Ragazzi, M.; Achim, M. I.; Schiavon, M.; Rada, E. C.

    2018-05-01

    Nowadays the global tourism growth has caused a significant interest in research focused on the impact of the tourism on environment and community. The purpose of this study is to introduce a new ranking for the classification of tourist accommodation establishments with the functions of agro-tourism boarding house type by examining the sector of agro-tourism based on a research aimed to improve the economic, socio-cultural and environmental performance of agrotourism structures. This paper links the criteria for the classification of agro-tourism boarding houses (ABHs) to the impact of agro-tourism activities on the environment, enhancing an eco-friendly approach on agro-tourism activities by increasing the quality reputation of the agro-tourism products and services. Taking into account the impact on the environment, agrotourism can play an important role by protecting and conserving it.

  19. Nature and tourism in Greenland

    Treesearch

    Berit C. Kaae

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a short summary on the development of tourism in Greenland, the cultural context, and the protection of the nature resources on which tourism heavily depends. Existing research projects related to tourism in Greenland and the focus of these projects are briefly summarized. In general, most research in Greenland focuses on natural resources, but...

  20. Implications of Medical Tourism.

    PubMed

    Cesario, Sandra K

    2018-06-01

    Medical tourism is an emerging industry that facilitates travel to another country for people who seek medical, surgical, or dental care that is unavailable or more affordable than in their home countries. Rapid advances in electronic communication and the ease of international travel have fueled the growth of this industry. More than half of medical travelers are women, especially for services related to cosmetic or reproductive conditions. Medical tourism creates both opportunities and challenges for nurses and other health care providers. Consumers' increased access to the global health care market necessitates the development of a structure that shapes the medical tourism industry and addresses evolving ethical, political, and human rights concerns related to this industry. Copyright © 2018 AWHONN. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Implementation Into Curriculum of Wilderness Adventure Program. Summer of 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonney, James D.

    Environmental awareness, one of eleven components of a Wilderness Adventure Program, is the focus of this guide for teachers. Introductory sections put forth the philosophy and goals of the program and list specific objectives for its components, which include first-aid, emergency preparedness, outdoor skills, and the outdoor solo experience. The…

  2. An Environmental Scan of Adventure Therapy in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Stephen D.; Patrick, Krysten; Corbould, Gordon Marcus; Harper, Nevin J.; Oddson, Bruce E.

    2016-01-01

    We report on an environmental scan (ES) of adventure therapy (AT) literature, organizations, and activities in Canada. The ES methodology involved (a) an examination of final reports related to a series of national symposiums on AT in Canada, (b) a review of academic literature related to AT in Canada, and (c) a summary of AT programs and courses…

  3. Philosophical Adventures in the Lands of Oz and Ev

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Gareth B.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the philosophical adventures of the characters in L. Frank Baum's Lands of Oz and Ev stories and discusses how such stories can stimulate reflections on philosophically interesting questions. Frank Baum is considered as the first American writer of philosophical fantasy for children for writing "The…

  4. Using the Adventure Model to Teach about Diversity and Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latess, Dennis R.; Walker, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    There are a variety of curricular approaches in physical education, any one of which can provide a framework and scheme that is the foundation of a physical education unit of study. This article will discuss the use of an adventure model to teach about diversity, multi-cultural understanding and tolerance. Teaching children diversity and tolerance…

  5. Artificial Intelligence in a German Adventure Game: Spion in PROLOG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molla, Steven R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Spion, an adventure game for intermediate and advanced college German students, requires players to communicate with a fictitious agent in complete, correct German sentences. The spy game was written in PROLOG, runs on an IBM-PC, and is available at no cost for noncommercial purposes. (Author/CB)

  6. Grounds for Play. An Extension of "In Search of Adventure."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Joe

    A report on adventure or "junk" playgrounds--areas that provide opportunities for children to build, dig, and play with materials under their own direction--begins with brief sections on the establishment of the original playground in Copenhagen, and the first American experiment, in Minneapolis, in 1950. The main body of the report is…

  7. Evaluation of Team Development in a Corporate Adventure Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronson, Jim; And Others

    1992-01-01

    An intact work unit of 17 corporate managers participated in a 3-day adventure training program to develop teamwork and group unity. The unit improved significantly on 8 of 10 items of the Team Development Inventory, administered before and 2 months after training, relative to an intact control group. (SV)

  8. Shakespeare Troupe: An Adventure in Words, Fluid Text, and Comedy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biondo-Hench, Susan C.

    2009-01-01

    Though classroom time is an adventure of its own, it is when working with the Carlisle High School Shakespeare Troupe, an extracurricular acting company, that the author most consistently and happily experiences this illusion of indefinite time. She has been working steadily with the troupe since the fall of 1984, and the troupe has produced a…

  9. The Virginia Geocoin Adventure: An Experiential Geospatial Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Laura; McGee, John; Campbell, James; Hays, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Geospatial technologies have become increasingly prevalent across our society. Educators at all levels have expressed a need for additional resources that can be easily adopted to support geospatial literacy and state standards of learning, while enhancing the overall learning experience. The Virginia Geocoin Adventure supports the needs of 4-H…

  10. Transforming Physical Educators through Adventure-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ressler, James Donald

    2012-01-01

    Adventure-based Learning (ABL) is the purposeful use of activities in sequence to improve personal and social development of participants (Cosgriff, 2000). ABL goes beyond instant activities (i.e. ice-breakers, cooperative games) to create an environment in which students enjoy the challenge while developing emotional and social competencies…

  11. The Adventure Sports Coach: All Show and No Substance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Paul; Collins, Dave

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to establish the range of interpersonal strategies, tools and techniques used by adventure sports coaches (ASCs) to influence participants' actions and behaviours, and to determine where these strategies were acquired. An interpretative approach was employed using semi-structured interviews with a…

  12. A Primer on Adventure Education in the Camp Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nei, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Basic concepts of experiential learning theory are presented to assist camp directors in choosing knowledgeable staff and developing successful adventure programs. These concepts include assessment of learner (camper) readiness, activity sequencing, learning cycle, comfort zone, activity framing, task goals versus process goals, and five stages of…

  13. Cardiovascular disease in the Adventures of Sherlock Holmes.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, S V

    2001-03-12

    The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle contains many incidents of medical interest. While disorders of the cardiovascular system do not play an important role in these tales, there are, nevertheless, some illnesses that invite speculation. Eleven such incidents are reviewed and discussed in light of the times in which they occurred and in light of current medical knowledge.

  14. The Legal System as a Proponent of Adventure Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankin, Janna S.

    1978-01-01

    A survey of the law with respect to high risk or adventure programs and activities indicates that the probability of an agency being found liable due to negligence is generally less with more venturous activities than with more traditional programming. (Author)

  15. Manual of Accreditation Standards for Adventure Programs 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, John E., Comp.; Gass, Michael, Comp.

    This manual presents standards for adventure education programs seeking accreditation from the Association for Experiential Education. The manual is set up sequentially, focusing both on objective standards such as technical risk management aspects, and on subjective standards such as teaching approaches used in programs. Chapter titles provide…

  16. The Social System in Outdoor Adventure Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibthorp, Jim; Jostad, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Many components of the social system interact with one another to produce group-level behavior that determines the functionality of the small group in outdoor adventure education (OAE). This article synthesizes the contemporary literature and theory regarding eight aspects of the OAE social system: (a) Macro Contextual Factors, (b) Student…

  17. Understanding Groups in Outdoor Adventure Education through Social Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jostad, Jeremy; Sibthorp, Jim; Paisley, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Relationships are a critical component to the experience of an outdoor adventure education (OAE) program, therefore, more fruitful ways of investigating groups is needed. Social network analysis (SNA) is an effective tool to study the relationship structure of small groups. This paper provides an explanation of SNA and shows how it was used by the…

  18. The Sweat Lodge Ceremony in Challenge/Adventure Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, William J.; Smith, Thomas E.

    This paper advocates the potentials of "sweat lodge" rituals for adventure education programs. Historically, rituals and ceremonies have been instrumental in passing major philosophical and sociological paradigms from one generation to the next. However, there is little theory and research about how ritual and ceremony results in the…

  19. Reactions to Implementing Adventure-Based Learning in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Sue; Stuhr, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the reactions of 13 pre-service teachers (PTs) implementing an adventure-based learning (ABL) unit through the lens of occupational socialization. Data were collected through interviews, critical reflections and reflection of videotaped ABL lesson. Analysis of the data resulted in two themes:…

  20. Fostering Experiential Self-Regulation through Outdoor Adventure Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibthorp, Jim; Collins, Rachel; Rathunde, Kevin; Paisley, Karen; Schumann, Scott; Pohja, Mandy; Gookin, John; Baynes, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Learners thrive when they have the capacity to regulate interest and goal direction. Through direct experiences that are interesting and goal-relevant, learners can internalize and better understand their own agency in the learning process. This article further examines this premise in an outdoor adventure education (OAE) context through two…

  1. Adventure into the Woods: Pathways to Forest Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    As a child the author had the ability to roam and adventure in green space. Every day as a child she had the ability to lead herself in the 700 hectares of forest that was her backyard. The ability to explore in nature alone is not a common activity for children today. A telling study from Sheffield, England (Derbyshire, 2007) highlights the way…

  2. A Psychological Rationale for Adventure Therapy with Hospitalized Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, H. L.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to examine the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) profiles of two treatment populations and present a theoretical rationale for using adventure therapy. Data for the first group were obtained from the psychological testing records of 150 randomly selected inpatients (81 males, 69 females)…

  3. Passages: Helping College Students Matriculate through Outdoor Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stremba, Bob

    Since 1985, freshman entering the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington, have embarked on a 3-day outdoor adventure program as part of their orientation experience prior to their first semester. Most of the 700-800 freshmen entering the university participate in the program titled "Passages." While half of the group is on…

  4. Situating the "beyond": Adventure-Learning and Indigenous Cultural Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Barbara; Mills, Jane

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, an Indigenous Elder from the Wiradjuri nation and a group of academics from Charles Sturt University travelled to Menindee, a small locality on the edge of the Australian outback. They were embarked upon an "adventure-learning" research journey to study ways of learning by creating a community of practice with an Elder from the…

  5. Social psychological benefits of a wilderness adventure program

    Treesearch

    Todd Paxton; Leo H. McAvoy

    2000-01-01

    Wilderness-based outdoor adventure programs are intended to produce positive change in participants. There are a significant number of these programs, with Hattie and others (1997) reporting that in 1994 alone, there were over 40,000 students participating in Outward Bound programs. Not all of these programs occur in wilderness, but significant portions of them do. A...

  6. Tort Liability and Risk Management in Adventure Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubendall, Robert L., Jr.

    On the premise that the benefits of adventure education far outweigh risks in any well managed program, this document provides such programs, which stand on relatively untested ground in the eye of the law in this litigious society, with strategies for reduction of risk by controlling the nature and frequency of accidents. The first section…

  7. Conceptualizing Skill within a Participatory Ecological Approach to Outdoor Adventure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    To answer calls for an ecological approach to outdoor adventure that can respond to the crisis of sustainability, this paper suggests greater theoretical and empirical attention to skill and skill development as shaping participant interactions with and experiences of environments, landscapes, places, and inhabitants. The paper reviews calls for…

  8. Factors that Influence Women's Technical Skill Development in Outdoor Adventure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Karen; Loeffler, TA

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical foundation for understanding women's technical skill development (TSD) in outdoor adventure. An examination of societal and biological factors influencing women's TSD focuses on gender role socialization, sense of competence, technical conditioning, sexism, spatial ability, and risk-taking. The article suggests…

  9. The Role of the Environment in Adventure and Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Todd

    2003-01-01

    Decreasing emphasis on the environment in outdoor and adventure education is resulting in ecologically less knowledgeable participants. It is critical that the environment continue to be part of these programs for three reasons: citizenship and stewardship; empathy and counterbalancing a narcissistic focus on thrills; and opportunities to get in…

  10. Adventure Programming and Spirituality: Integration Models, Methods, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Hanley, Cay

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the relationship of adventure education and experiential learning to spiritual experiences and development. Discusses definitions of spirituality, religion, and related terms; two frameworks for integration of psychology and spirituality and their application to experiential education; specific strategies for integrating…

  11. Camp Greentop's Adventure Camp: We Ain't No Rudypoo's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groff, Diane; Albright, Brian; Purvis, Katie; Creamer, Justin; Pease, Alicia

    2002-01-01

    A day-by-day account describes Camp Greentop's first 5-day adventure camping trip, which was attended by five individuals with disabilities and their counselors. The first day was spent in games and initiatives designed to develop communication, teamwork, and dependability. Other days were devoted to hiking, rock climbing, and whitewater rafting.…

  12. Autonomous Student Experiences in Outdoor and Adventure Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Brad; Bobilya, Andrew J.; Kalisch, Kenneth R.; McAvoy, Leo H.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the current state of knowledge regarding the use of autonomous student experiences (ASE) in outdoor and adventure education (OAE) programs. ASE are defined as components (e.g., solo, final expedition) in which participants have a greater measure of choice and control over the planning, execution, and outcomes of their…

  13. Re-Examining Group Development in Adventure Therapy Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGraaf, Don; Ashby, Jeff

    1998-01-01

    Small-group development is an important aspect of adventure therapy. Supplementing knowledge of sequential stages of group development with knowledge concerning within-stage nonsequential development yields a richer understanding of groups. Integrating elements of the individual counseling relationship (working alliance, transference, and real…

  14. Summer Adventure: You Can Make It Happen in Your Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Bill

    Summer Adventure, a university-based, full-day, community education program for kindergartners and elementary students is described. The program offers physical and enrichment activities, an "extravaganza," and production and leadership in training activities. The physical activities include golf, swimming, volleyball, and gymnastics. Fitness…

  15. The Censorship of the "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn": An Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Michele V.

    1984-01-01

    Explores reasons why "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" has been continuously censored from its publication in 1885 to present. Historical precedents for censorship of library materials in the United States and specific censorship attempts are discussed. Controversial passages are examined in light of both praise and criticism.…

  16. Directory of Experiential Therapy and Adventure-Based Counseling Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerstein, Jackie, Ed.

    This directory lists 257 organizations with therapeutic adventure and experiential programs for special needs populations. The information was generated from a survey of members of the Association for Experiential Education. Special needs populations include youth-at-risk, persons with addictions, juvenile and adult offenders, inpatient and…

  17. Decision Making and Risk Management in Adventure Sports Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Loel; Collins, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Adventure sport coaches practice in environments that are dynamic and high in risk, both perceived and actual. The inherent risks associated with these activities, individuals' responses and the optimal exploitation of both combine to make the processes of risk management more complex and hazardous than the traditional sports where risk management…

  18. The Practical Enactment of Adventure Learning: Where Will You AL@?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Brant G.; Hougham, R. Justin; Eitel, Karla Bradley

    2013-01-01

    The Adventure Learning (AL) approach to designing and implementing learning experiences has great potential for practitioners. This manuscript delineates the practical enactment of AL to support the K-12 community, teacher educators, and residential environmental science program providers in the conceptualization and delivery of their own AL…

  19. Exploring Diversity through Adventure: Feeling Good or Making Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    Adventure programs should go beyond the "four Fs" of diversity activities (food, fashion, festivals, and facts) to explore differences and their implications for social justice. Possible group activities include sharing ethnic and family traditions surrounding a person's name and focusing on the cycle of socialization related to…

  20. Romance tourism or female sex tourism?

    PubMed

    Bauer, Irmgard L

    2014-01-01

    Love, sex and the female traveller: romance tourism or female sex tourism? The phenomenon of women travelling in search of relationships with local men in developing countries has been studied for the last 20 years. However, it appears little known in travel medicine. Relevant literature was found through PubMed, Science Direct, ProQuest and Google Scholar. The reference lists of selected articles identified further sources. Historical records of women travellers to far-away countries abound. Then, as now, women not only searched for the erotic 'other' but made romance and sex the purpose of their trip. Today, increasing numbers of women travel to destinations in developing countries where sex with local men is the main attraction. This pastime raises concerns not only for the women themselves but for the local men involved as well as their sex partners and the local communities. Although more research is necessary, comparing the criteria that describe men travelling for sex and relationships and women travelling for sex and relationships appears to suggest that there is very little difference between the two, regardless of what the pursuit is called. Women looking for sex with local men are sex tourists, too. Recognition of this fact needs to influence the pre and post travel care of female travellers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Andean Geotrail (1): A scientific adventure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassier, C.; Galland, O.; Raufaste, C.; Mair, K.

    2009-12-01

    The role of Geosciences in our society is of primary importance. Its implications for humanity relate to major challenges such as climate change, managing energy resources, natural hazard mitigation, and water scarcity. Despite these issues being familiar to specialists, this is in general not the case for the public. In a world, where the impact of human activity is beginning to be seen on the environment, knowledge of the Earth and its history is paramount to make informed decisions that will influence our future. The necessity to educate the global population and raise awareness of Geosciences has led UNESCO to designate 2009 the International Year of the Planet Earth. In this context and with the label of the UNESCO, we organized and performed a popular science adventure that was followed in real time by both school children and many adults around the world. The Andean Geotrail consisted of a cycling expedition through a spectacular geological environment, the Andean Cordillera. During the nine month expedition, we cycled 8000 km and walked 400 km from Ushuaia in the Southern tip of Argentina to Nazca in Peru to encounter a rich variety of geological environments: active volcanoes, earthquakes, mineral and hydrocarbon deposits, and fantastic geological scenery. All this makes the Andes a great pedagogical natural laboratory. During the expedition, we visited spectacular geological localities that illustrate key Earth Science phenomena (such as mines and hydrocarbon deposits, erupting volcanoes and seismogenically active areas, and national parks) and discovered their implications for the local people. Along the way, we interviewed local geologists and scientists who helped us understand the geology of their areas. We gathered our own observations with those of the local specialists and published essays, articles and photographs on our website and blog (www.georouteandine.fr/English, http://georouteandine.blogspot.com). Seventeen schools in France and Norway

  2. Tourism on Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Bruce

    Thirteen half-hour television programs entitled "The Geography of Tourism" developed for use in Wilfrid Laurier University's (Canada) distance education program are discussed. Distance education embraces teaching, or communicating with, students who are not physically in the classroom with the instructor. The central theme of the series…

  3. Metrics for Recreation & Tourism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gloria S., Ed.; Magisos, Joel H., Ed.

    Designed to meet the job-related metric measurement needs of recreation and tourism students, this instructional package is one of three for the hospitality and recreation occupations cluster, part of a set of 55 packages for metric instruction in different occupations. The package is intended for students who already know the occupational…

  4. Landscape assessment for tourism

    Treesearch

    Clare A. Gunn

    1979-01-01

    Increased development of landscapes for tourism now creates problems of integrating the many parts. Accomplishments at the site scale have not been matched with equal progress at the regional scale. This concept, and its example of application, shows promise of assisting regions in assessing their potential of landscapes before development. With such a concept, not...

  5. Start of space tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, Makoto

    1993-03-01

    Space tourism means commercialization of manned space flight. From the early stage of space development, space commercialization is a profound theme in multidisciplinary fields, on the basis of a principle that the outcomes of advanced technique developed by tax should be returned to citizens. In these days, space satellite system in which users pay a fee for utilization has succeeded commercially in business such as communication network or broadcasting, and an attempt has been made to observe the earth from outer space to resolve global problems, such as environmental destruction. There is also an increasing interest in space tourism, however, many obstacles should be overcome for the realization, especially the medical problems such as effect of acceleration, cosmic ray, noise or weightless condition. In addition, the space flight business should be managed on the commercial base so that reasonable cost and large number of passengers are essential. It is necessary to design rockets suitable for tourism. For attractive design, the policy of space tourism should be clarified.

  6. Adventure as Therapy: Using Adventure as Part of Therapeutic Programmes with Young People in Trouble and at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNutt, Brendan

    This paper defines "adventure-based intervention,""young people," and "trouble and risk" in light of the therapeutic work done at Bryn Melyn Community (Bala, Wales), a therapeutic treatment center. Bryn Melyn provides intensive individualized therapy to young people, aged 15-18, who are in the care of social services…

  7. Adventures in Evaluation: Reviewing a CD-ROM Based Adventure Game Designed for Young People Recovering from Psychosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrimpton, Bradley; Hurworth, Rosalind

    2005-01-01

    Recently the Centre for Program Evaluation (CPE) at the University of Melbourne was approached by a mental health agency to undertake the unique and challenging task of evaluating a prototype CD-ROM based adventure game designed for young people recovering from psychosis. This unusual and inventive game, titled Pogo's Pledge, used…

  8. The Adventure Therapy Experience Scale: The Psychometric Properties of a Scale to Measure the Unique Factors Moderating an Adventure Therapy Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Keith; Gillis, Harold L.

    2017-01-01

    Adventure therapy (AT) is defined as "the prescriptive use of adventure experiences provided by mental health professionals, often conducted in natural settings, that kinesthetically engage clients on cognitive, affective, and behavioral levels". Despite an increase in research and evaluation in recent years examining the relative…

  9. Sustainable transportation for tourism : indicators and standards.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-11-01

    The overall project goal of guiding planning and management of transportation to serve the needs of : sustainable tourism focused on three tourism-related transportation contexts. The first context was : selected types of roads important to tourism i...

  10. Sustainable transportation for tourism : green certification programs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-11-01

    The overall project goal of guiding planning and management of transportation to serve the needs of : sustainable tourism focused on three tourism-related transportation contexts. The first context was : selected types of roads important to tourism i...

  11. PROP taster status and self-perceived food adventurousness influence food preferences.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Natalia V; Touger-Decker, Riva; O'sullivan-Maillet, Julie; Tepper, Beverly J

    2004-04-01

    To determine the influence of 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) taster status and food adventurousness on liking of bitter, hot, and pungent foods. Self-reported survey of food likes/dislikes for 70 foods. Subjects were classified as tasters or nontasters of PROP using a standard screening procedure. By their response to a query regarding their perceived frequency of trying unfamiliar foods, subjects were characterized as being more or less adventurous. A convenience sample of 232 healthy adults, 18 to 55 years of age, was recruited from the local community. Statistical analyses Individual foods were grouped using Principal Component Analysis. Analysis of variance was used to assess differences in liking of food groups as a function of PROP status and food adventurousness. PROP tasters who were more food adventurous liked chili peppers and hot sauce, other pungent condiments, strong alcohol, and bitter fruits and vegetables more than tasters who were less food adventurous (P< or =.05-.001). Nontasters liked most foods, and food adventurousness had little influence on food liking for these individuals. Food adventurous PROP tasters liked a wide variety of strong-tasting foods, whereas tasters who were less food adventurous showed the classic dislike of bitter, hot, and pungent foods. Previous studies might have overestimated the influence of PROP taster status on rejection of strong-tasting foods by not distinguishing individuals by food adventurousness.

  12. New Zealand Glaciers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-09

    New Zealand contains over 3,000 glaciers, most of which are in the Southern Alps on the South Island. Since 1890, the glaciers have been retreating, with short periods of small advances, as shown in this image from NASA Terra spacecraft. The image cover an area of 39 by 46 km, and are located at 43.7 degrees south, 170 degrees east. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21509

  13. A new Starlight Reserve for the central South Island of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearnshaw, John

    2015-03-01

    The Aoraki Mackenzie International Dark Sky Reserve is a new reserve created in 2012 by the International Dark-Sky Association in the central South Island of New Zealand, and covers over 4300 square kilometres around Mt John University Observatory. It is the first such reserve to be recognized at gold tier level and is the largest dark sky reserve in the world. Astro-tourism in the new reserve will be a prominent activity in the coming years.

  14. Adult Learning in Educational Tourism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitman, Tim; Broomhall, Sue; McEwan, Joanne; Majocha, Elzbieta

    2010-01-01

    This article explores notions of learning in the niche market sector of educational tourism, with a focus on organised recreational tours that promote a structured learning experience as a key feature. It analyses the qualitative findings of surveys and interviews with a cross-section of educational tourism providers in Australia, their…

  15. Adventure Learning: Theory and Implementation of Hybrid Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, A.

    2008-12-01

    Adventure Learning (AL), a hybrid distance education approach, provides students and teachers with the opportunity to learn about authentic curricular content areas while interacting with adventurers, students, and content experts at various locations throughout the world within an online learning environment (Doering, 2006). An AL curriculum and online environment provides collaborative community spaces where traditional hierarchical classroom roles are blurred and learning is transformed. AL has most recently become popular in K-12 classrooms nationally and internationally with millions of students participating online. However, in the literature, the term "adventure learning" many times gets confused with phrases such as "virtual fieldtrip" and activities where someone "exploring" is posting photos and text. This type of "adventure learning" is not "Adventure Learning" (AL), but merely a slideshow of their activities. The learning environment may not have any curricular and/or social goals, and if it does, the environment design many times does not support these objectives. AL, on the other hand, is designed so that both teachers and students understand that their online and curriculum activities are in synch and supportive of the curricular goals. In AL environments, there are no disparate activities as the design considers the educational, social, and technological affordances (Kirschner, Strijbos, Kreijns, & Beers, 2004); in other words, the artifacts of the learning environment encourage and support the instructional goals, social interactions, collaborative efforts, and ultimately learning. AL is grounded in two major theoretical approaches to learning - experiential and inquiry-based learning. As Kolb (1984) noted, in experiential learning, a learner creates meaning from direct experiences and reflections. Such is the goal of AL within the classroom. Additionally, AL affords learners a real-time authentic online learning experience concurrently as they

  16. The Romance of Risk: Adventure's Incorporation in Risk Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Martha

    2017-01-01

    Adventure has outgrown its use as a metaphor and motive for educational journeys into the cultural outdoors. Self-reliance cannot counter the mechanisation of everyday life. "Adventure" is produced and serviced by the very people who felt its worth to their own individualisation and now advance its professionalisation for their own…

  17. Outdoor Adventure in Australian Outdoor Education: Is It a Case of Roast for Christmas Dinner?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugg, Alison

    2004-01-01

    Outdoor adventure activities, typically originating from other countries, form the basis of most Australian outdoor education programs. Research on adventure-based outdoor education in Australia and elsewhere has tended to focus on determining the benefits of participating in such programs. Less attention has been paid to a critical examination of…

  18. "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" in Arabic Translations: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdulmalik, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation examines "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" in Arabic Translations, and how translators transformed this masterpiece into Arabic. By examining "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," I adopt the "Translation as Problem and Solution Approach" to investigate translation issues at three levels of…

  19. The Effects of a Treatment Curriculum on the Learning Transfer of Prosocial Behavior in Adventure Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Nathan Neil

    2011-01-01

    The issue of learning transfer is of prime importance to the field of adventure education. Adventure education programs are designed to promote a variety of personal development outcomes for participants, and a significant amount of research has validated these outcomes. However, in order for students to use the learning gained during their…

  20. An Exploratory Examination of Families Engaged in a Children's Adventure Running Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isnor, Heather; Dawson, Kimberley A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to qualitatively explore the experiences of families who participated in an adventure running program (ARP) in Canada. Adventure running is a unique sport that combines navigation and running in a forested setting. Six parents (four males, two females) and five children (two females, three males) were interviewed.…

  1. Perception and Reception: The Introduction of Licensing of Adventure Activities in Great Britain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woollven, Rowland; Allison, Pete; Higgins, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The Lyme Bay kayaking incident of 1993, in which four children died, led to an Act of Parliament and the introduction by the British Government of the Adventure Activities Licensing Authority (AALA), a body established to regulate adventurous recreational and educational outdoor activities. The perception at the time, a view to which some …

  2. Wilderness Medicine: Considerations of Adventure Travel in Tropical Areas of Latin America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Brent

    Adventure travel to Latin America requires careful planning, implementation, and followup to ensure safe, healthy experiences. This paper provides an overview of basic principles of prevention, assessment, and treatment of medical problems common to adventure travel in tropical areas. A brief introduction defines the vegetation and climatic…

  3. Mechanisms of Learning Transfer in Adventure Education: Qualitative Results from the NOLS Transfer Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibthorp, Jim; Furman, Nate; Paisley, Karen; Gookin, John; Schumann, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Transfer of learning from adventure programs remains of critical interest to adventure education professionals. Although some research has investigated what transfers, notably less has focused on mechanisms that might influence transfer. This paper explores the mechanisms of transfer reported by a stratified random sample of National Outdoor…

  4. A Research Summary for Corporate Adventure Training (CAT) and Experience-Based Training and Development (EBTD).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priest, Simon

    Experience-based training and development (EBTD), also known as Outdoor Management Development (OMD) in Great Britain and corporate adventure training (CAT) in Canada and Australia, is a field that uses adventure activities to bring beneficial change to organizations, primarily corporations. Activities used in EBTD and CAT programs include…

  5. Practical Implications for the Development of Applied Metaphor in Adventure Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartford, Gary

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the definitions, role, and use of metaphor in adventure therapy. It provides an overview of theoretical perspectives on metaphor and the related ways in which metaphor is used in adventure therapy. Research on the use of metaphor in counselling and from neuropsychology and linguistics is applied to a model of metaphor use in…

  6. Connecting to the Good Life through Outdoor Adventure Leadership Experiences Designed for Indigenous Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Stephen D.; Wabano, Mary Jo; Corbiere, Rita G.; Restoule, Brenda M.; Russell, Keith C.; Young, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Indigenous voices are largely silent in the outdoor education and adventure therapy literature. The purpose of this research collaboration was to understand how a 10-day outdoor adventure leadership experience (OALE) may promote resilience and well-being for Indigenous youth through their participation in the program. The process was examined…

  7. Outdoor Education and Bush Adventure Therapy: A Socio-Ecological Approach to Health and Wellbeing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Anita; Carpenter, Cathryn; Townsend, Mardie

    2005-01-01

    Together, outdoor education and bush adventure therapy can be seen to constitute a population-wide health intervention strategy. Whether in educational or therapeutic settings, the intentional use of contact with nature, small groups, and adventure provides a unique approach in the promotion of health and wellbeing for the general population, and…

  8. Outdoor Education Opportunities for Middle School Students: Academic and Social Impacts of Adventure Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This study examines components of outdoor adventure programs for middle school students, using a school with a successful program as a model. Outdoor education is often left out of these years for financial and safety reasons, however the benefits of adventure programs are both measurable and profound to self-concept, confidence, identity growth,…

  9. Adventure Counseling as an Adjunct to Group Counseling in Hospital and Clinical Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillen, Mark C.; Balkin, Richard S.

    2006-01-01

    Adventure counseling has been thought of as a highly specialized application of group counseling skills in a wilderness environment. In fact, adventure counseling is based on a developmental theory of group, can be useful for a variety of clients, and can be thoughtfully integrated into clinical and hospital settings. This article describes the…

  10. The Meaning Associated with the Experience of a Sea Kayaking Adventure among Adults with Visual Impairment

    Treesearch

    Nancy Eagan

    2004-01-01

    What is the meaning associated with participation in an outdoor adventure for a person with a disability? A number of studies have investigated the topic of adventure program outcomes for people with and without disabilities. The author located two studies about kayaking with individuals with disabilities: 1) Siegel Taylor and Evans McGruder (1995) found “subjects...

  11. Cultural Issues in Adventure Programming: Applying Hofstede's Five Dimensions to Assessment and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Te-Hsin; Tucker, Anita R.; Norton, Christine Lynn; Gass, Michael A.; Javorski, Stephen E.

    2017-01-01

    Adventure programming has seen considerable growth throughout the world. While newly established programs aim to meet the needs of their prospective clients, failing to account for cultural differences when conducting or designing programs may impede this goal. Non-western approaches to implementing adventure programs have rarely been discussed,…

  12. Effects of a Developmental Adventure on the Self-Esteem of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquette, Linda; Brassard, Audrey; Guérin, Audrey; Fortin-Chevalier, Justine; Tanguay-Beaudoin, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effects of outdoor developmental adventure programming (ODA) on college students' self-esteem. Although some previous studies have shown that outdoor adventure programming has positive effects on self-esteem, others did not find any effect. A quasi-experimental study was conducted over 5 months, which included two pretests…

  13. Outcomes of Adventure Program Participation by Adolescents Involved in Psychiatric Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witman, Jeffrey P.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of adventure program participation upon adolescents in psychiatric treatment. All adventure programs included goal setting, awareness, cooperative and trust activities, and group and individual problem-solving. Participants' total hours of program participation ranged from 8-22 hours. A random…

  14. "All the Places We Were Not Supposed to Go": A Case Study of Formative Class and Gender "Habitus" in Adventure Climbing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland-Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the origins of meaning in adventurous activities. Specifically, the paper reports on a study of 10 adventure climbers in the Scottish mountaineering community. The study explores how formative experiences have influenced engagement in adventure climbing. Work has been done on the phenomenology of adventure and how individuals…

  15. English for Tourism and Hospitality Purposes (ETP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahedpisheh, Nahid; Abu Bakar, Zulqarnain B.; Saffari, Narges

    2017-01-01

    The quick development of the tourism and hospitality industry can straightly influence the English language which is the most widely used and spoken language in international tourism in the twenty-first century. English for tourism has a major role in the delivery of quality service. Employees who work in the tourism and hospitality industry are…

  16. Medical Tourism Abroad

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hinai, Saleh S.; Al-Busaidi, Ahmed S.; Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to understand why people seek medical advice abroad given the trouble and expense this entails. The types of medical problems for which treatment abroad was sought, preferred destinations and satisfaction with the treatment were explored. A secondary aim was to give feedback to stakeholders in the health care system on how to handle this issue and meet the needs of the community. Methods: 45 patients who had recently travelled abroad for treatment were asked to complete a questionnaire or were interviewed by telephone. Results: 40 questionnaires were received. 68% of the respondents were male. Orthopaedic diseases were the most common conditions leading patients to seek treatment abroad. Thailand was the most popular destination followed by India (50% and 30% respectively). 85% of respondents went abroad for treatment only, 10% for treatment and tourism and 2.5% were healthy, but travelled abroad for a checkup. Interestingly, 15% of the participants went abroad without first seeking medical care locally. Out of those initially treated in Oman, 38.2% had no specific diagnosis and 38.2% had received treatment, but it was not effective. 73% of respondents obtained information on treatment abroad from a friend. The Internet and medical tourism offices were the least used sources of information. 15% of the patients experienced complications after their treatment abroad. Conclusion: Various facts about medical treatment abroad need to be disseminated to the public. This will necessitate greater effort in public health promotion and education. PMID:22087396

  17. A medical perspective on the adventures of Sherlock Holmes.

    PubMed

    Reed, J

    2001-12-01

    The adventures of Sherlock Holmes, although primarily famous as stories of detection of crime, offer a considerable amount to interest the medical reader. There are many medical references in the stories, and the influence of Conan Doyle's medical background is clearly seen in the main characters. Aspects of the stories also reflect Conan Doyle's medical career, and also something of his attitude towards the profession. From Holmes's sayings and accounts of his methods, parallels can be drawn between Holmesian deduction and the diagnostic process. It is concluded, however, that deduction cannot be used as a direct paradigm since medical problems are rarely soluble through a process of logic alone.

  18. AIDS and sex tourism.

    PubMed

    Herold, E S; Van Kerkwijk, C

    1992-01-01

    Tourists traveling internationally lower their inhibitions and take greater risks than they would typically in their home cultures. Loneliness, boredom, and a sense of freedom contribute to this behavioral change. Some tourists travel internationally in search of sexual gratification. This motivation may be actively conscious or subconscious to the traveler. Billed as romantic with great natural beauty, Thailand, the Philippines, Brazil, the Dominican Republic, and Kenya are popular destinations of tourists seeking sex. The Netherlands and countries in eastern Europe are also popular. With most initial cases of HIV infection in Europe having histories of international travel, mass tourism is a major factor in the international transmission of AIDS. While abroad, tourists have sex with casual partners, sex workers, and/or other tourists. Far from all tourists, however, carry and consistently use condoms with these partners. One study found female and non white travelers to be less likely than Whites and males to carry condoms. The risk of HIV infection increases in circumstances where condoms are not readily available in the host country and/or are of poor quality. Regarding actual condom use, a study found only 34% of sex tourists from Switzerland to consistently use condoms while abroad. 28% of men in an STD clinic in Melbourne, Australia, reported consistent condom use in sexual relations while traveling in Asia; STDs were identified in 73% of men examined. The few studies of tourists suggest that a significant proportion engage in risky behavior while traveling. HIV prevalence is rapidly increasing in countries known as destinations for sex tourism. High infection rates are especially evident among teenage sex workers in Thailand. Simply documenting the prevalence of risky behavior among sex tourists will not suffice. More research is needed on travelers and AIDS with particular attention upon the motivating factors supporting persistent high-risk behavior.

  19. Landscapes, tourism, and conservation

    PubMed

    Burger

    2000-04-17

    One key aspect of global change is a decrease in ecological integrity as more and more landscapes are developed, leaving a mosaic of intact refuges and degraded patches that may not be sufficient for conserving biodiversity. While increases in human population and shifts in the distribution of people affect land use, the temporary movement of people can have major implications for conservation and biodiversity. Three examples are presented where recreation/tourism can enhance the conservation of land on a landscape scale, leading to habitat protection and biodiversity preservation: (1) Shorebirds often require a matrix of different habitat types during migratory stopovers, and ecotourism can serve as a catalyst for landscape scale protection of habitat. (2) Riparian habitats can serve as corridors to link diverse habitat patches, as well as serving as biodiversity hotspots. (3) Remediation and rehabilitation of contaminated lands, such as those of the US Department of Energy, aimed at developing recreational activities on the uncontaminated portions, can be the most economical form of re-development with no increase in human or ecological risk. Since large areas on many DOE sites have been undisturbed since the Second World War, when they were acquired, they contain unique or valuable ecosystems that serve an important role within their regional landscapes. In all three cases the judicious development of recreational/tourist interests can encourage both the conservation of habitats and the wise management of habitats on a landscape scale. While some species or habitats are too fragile for sustained tourism, many can be managed so that species, ecosystems and ecotourists flourish. By contributing to the economic base of regions, ecotourists/recreationists can influence the protection of land and biodiversity on a landscape scale, contributing to ecosystem management. The human dimensions of land preservation and biodiversity protection are key to long

  20. Sex tourism in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Van Kerkwijk, C

    1992-01-01

    Many foreigners visit Thailand in search of sex. While long-distance tourism was long enjoyed by members of more privileged social classes, even the lower economical classes of Japan, Malaysia, Europe, America, and Australia can now afford to travel over long distances. This relatively new breed of tourist is more likely to be of lower socioeconomic and educational status and less likely to use condoms when having sex. An estimated 30,000 sex workers are active in Bangkok, of whom 7000/10,000 are females who work specifically in the tourism sector. 1/2-1/3 of the 600 commercial sex establishments in the city are visited by foreigners. Phuket, Pattaya, Koh Samui, and Chiangmai are also well-frequented by sex tourists. Overall, a large, diverse, inexpensive, and accessible commercial sex market exists in Thailand. One may meet sex workers quasi-ubiquitously and be assured to find someone capable of meeting one's sexual needs. With these attributes, Thailand strongly attracts tourists in search of sex. A certain degree of recklessness also prevails among those on vacation. Away from the peers and social mores of their native lands, tourists may engage in sexually activities without criticism. Likewise, Thai sex workers who cater to foreigners, especially females, enjoy more freedom and control in sexual relations than their peers who work among nationals. Neither single nor married women in Thailand are allowed much sexual freedom and are traditionally expected to be obliging docile, and submissive. The greater than normal personal latitude enjoyed by both sex worker and foreigner lead to more negotiation on condom use and overall lower use. As such, Thailand's commercial sex market with foreigners' involvement therein threatens to spread HIV to many other countries throughout the world.

  1. Measuring Snow Precipitation in New Zealand- Challenges and Opportunities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renwick, J. A.; Zammit, C.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring plays a pivotal role in determining sustainable strategy for efficient overall management of the water resource. Though periodic monitoring provides some information, only long-term monitoring can provide data sufficient in quantity and quality to determine trends and develop predictive models. These can support informed decisions about sustainable and efficient use of water resources in New Zealand. However the development of such strategies is underpinned by our understanding and our ability to measure all inputs in headwaters catchments, where most of the precipitation is falling. Historically due to the harsh environment New Zealand has had little to no formal high elevation monitoring stations for all climate and snow related parameters outside of ski field climate and snow stations. This leads to sparse and incomplete archived datasets. Due to the importance of these catchments to the New Zealand economy (eg irrigation, hydro-electricity generation, tourism) NIWA has developed a climate-snow and ice monitoring network (SIN) since 2006. This network extends existing monitoring by electricity generator and ski stations and it is used by a number of stakeholders. In 2014 the network comprises 13 stations located at elevation above 700masl. As part of the WMO Solid Precipitation Intercomparison Experiment (SPICE), NIWA is carrying out an intercomparison of precipitation data over the period 2013-2015 at Mueller Hut. The site was commissioned on 11 July 2013, set up on the 17th September 2013 and comprises two Geonor weighing bucket raingauges, one shielded and the other un-shielded, in association with a conventional tipping bucket raingauge and conventional climate and snow measurements (temperature, wind, solar radiation, relative humidity, snow depth and snow pillow). The presentation aims to outline the state of the current monitoring network in New Zealand, as well as the challenge and opportunities for measurement of precipitation in alpine

  2. Scientific Tourism Centres in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Farmanyan, S. V.; Mikayelyan, G. A.; Mikayelyan, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Armenia is rich in scientific sites, among which archaeological sites of scientific nature, modern scientific institutions and science related museums can be mentioned. Examples of archaeological sites are ancient observatories, petroglyphs having astronomical nature, as well as intangible heritage, such as Armenian calendars. Modern institutions having tools or laboratories which can be represented in terms of tourism, are considered as scientific tourism sites. Science related museums are Museum of science and technology, Space museum, Geological museum and other museums. Despite the fact, that scientific tourism is a new direction, it has great perspectives, and Armenia has a great potential in this field. It is very important to introduce Armenia from this angle, including scientific archaeological sites as well as modern institutions and museums. This article presents major scientific tourism centers of Armenia.

  3. Space Tourism and Sustainable Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawkes, S.

    Space tourism and sustainable development may seem an odd combination of topics but this paper outlines direct links between the two on five levels; operational, cultural, economic, resource availability and human survival.

  4. Japanese for Tourism and Trade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klarberg, F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the desirability of Japanese as a second language for Australians in tourism and trade industries. Initial instruction using Roman alphabet followed by job training in Japan is recommended. (RM)

  5. Aging Adventure Athletes Assess Achievements and Alter Aspirations to Maintain Self-Esteem.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Ralf C

    2018-01-01

    Achievements and capabilities influence the self-esteem of skilled adventure athletes. Self-esteem affects individual mental health. Aging commonly reduces adventure capabilities. To avoid loss in self-esteem, aging adventure athletes are forced to adjust their aspirations. Here, I examine this process using participant observation, ethnographic and autoethnographic approaches. The qualitative data for this analysis are derived from 60 years' experience in outdoor adventure activities, and ∼30,000 person-hours of participant observation. I argue that individuals assess their own capabilities against a set of specific feats. For some activities, successful completion of a specific feat is known as nailing it. The selection of these feats depends on factors such as activity and geographic location, as well as individual experience and peer comparisons. I examine the detailed process using a single feat repeated over a period of decades, the bubble-line kayak run through Lava Falls on the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River. I compare other examples of nail or fail to construct a general framework for self-esteem in aging adventure athletes, with both physical and psychological feedback loops. I also identify two key thresholds, as aging adventure athletes recognize their declining skills. These may apply to aging more broadly, beyond outdoor adventure.

  6. Aging Adventure Athletes Assess Achievements and Alter Aspirations to Maintain Self-Esteem

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Ralf C.

    2018-01-01

    Achievements and capabilities influence the self-esteem of skilled adventure athletes. Self-esteem affects individual mental health. Aging commonly reduces adventure capabilities. To avoid loss in self-esteem, aging adventure athletes are forced to adjust their aspirations. Here, I examine this process using participant observation, ethnographic and autoethnographic approaches. The qualitative data for this analysis are derived from 60 years’ experience in outdoor adventure activities, and ∼30,000 person-hours of participant observation. I argue that individuals assess their own capabilities against a set of specific feats. For some activities, successful completion of a specific feat is known as nailing it. The selection of these feats depends on factors such as activity and geographic location, as well as individual experience and peer comparisons. I examine the detailed process using a single feat repeated over a period of decades, the bubble-line kayak run through Lava Falls on the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River. I compare other examples of nail or fail to construct a general framework for self-esteem in aging adventure athletes, with both physical and psychological feedback loops. I also identify two key thresholds, as aging adventure athletes recognize their declining skills. These may apply to aging more broadly, beyond outdoor adventure. PMID:29541044

  7. The tourism resources and possibilities using of its for development of the town and commune of Nałęczów and the commune of Wojciechów

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świeca, Andrzej; Brzezińska-Wójcik, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Structural part of the resources of the tourism potential of the town and commune of Nałęczów and the commune of Wojciechów was studied in this paper. In the study, the attractiveness of tourism resources of the communes was assessed based on 48 features grouped into four divisions: sightseeing assets, recreational and special assets, tourist infrastructure and environmental protection. A field survey (listing, query) and a quantitative evaluation of tourist resources, carried out by means of a multidimensional comparative analysis, indicated an appreciable difference in features between the commune of Nałęczów and commune of Wojciechów. The tourist attractiveness index determined for the commune of Nałęczów was 0.695, almost twice as high as the index for the commune of Wojciechów (0.349). In the light of carrying out of investigations, the tourist attractiveness of the commune of Nałęczów results primarily from its environmental (mineral springs, unique flora) and cultural assets (historic monuments) as well as recreational assets (bioclimate, forest complexes, ravines; more than half of the commune's territory is within the Kazimierz Landscape Park) and special assets (angling). The tourism potential of the commune of Wojciechów is primarily determined by its recreational assets (diverse land relief) and special assets (hunting). The commune of Nałęczów is superior with regard to tourist infrastructure and environmental protection. Owing to the diversity of tourist assets, different degrees of tourist infrastructure development and varying quality of the natural environment, various forms of tourism exist in the two communes, i.e. educational tourism (environmental, geotourism, ecotourism, cultural and festival tourism), recreational tourism (agritourism), adventure tourism (walking, cycling, skiing and cross-country skiing) as well as health tourism (health, spa and wellness tourism).

  8. New Zealand's Southern Alps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The rugged Southern Alps extend some 650 kilometers along the western side of New Zealand's South Island. The mountains are often obscured by clouds, which is probably why the Maoris called New Zealand 'Aotearoa', the long white cloud. The higher peaks are snow-covered all year round. Westerly winds bring clouds that drop over 500 centimeters of rain annually on luxuriant rain forest along the west coast. The drier eastern seaboard is home to the majority of the island's population.

    This pair of MISR images is from April 13, 2000 (Terra orbit 1712). The upper image is a natural color view from the instrument's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. It is presented at a resolution of 550 meters per pixel. The lower image is a stereo anaglyph generated from the instrument's 46-degree and 26-degree forward-viewing cameras, and is presented at 275-meter per pixel resolution to show the portion of the image containing the Southern Alps in greater detail. Viewing the anaglyph in 3-D requires the use of red/blue glasses with the red filter over your left eye. To facilitate stereoscopic viewing, both images have been oriented with north at the left.

    The tallest mountain in the Southern Alps is Mt. Cook, at an elevation of 3754 meters. Its snow-covered peak is visible to the left of center in each of these MISR images. From the high peaks, glaciers have gouged long, slender mountain lakes and coastal fiords. Immediately to the southeast of Mt. Cook (to the right in these images), the glacial pale-blue water of Lake Pukaki stands out. Further to the south in adjacent valleys you can easily see Lakes Hawea and Wanaka, between which (though not visible here) is the Haast Pass Road, the most southerly of the few links between the east and west coast road systems. Further to the south is the prominent 'S' shape of Lake Wakatipu, 83 kilometers long, on the northern shore of which is Queenstown, the principal resort town of the island. The remote and spectacular Fiordland National

  9. Vector Competence of New Zealand Mosquitoes for Selected Arboviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Laura D.; Chin, Pam; Cane, Rachel P.; Kauffman, Elizabeth B.; Mackereth, Graham

    2011-01-01

    New Zealand (NZ) historically has been free of arboviral activity with the exception of Whataroa virus (Togaviridae: Alphavirus), which is established in bird populations and is transmitted by local mosquitoes. This naive situation is threatened by global warming, invasive mosquitoes, and tourism. To determine the threat of selected medically important arboviruses to NZ, vector competence assays were conducted using field collected endemic and introduced mosquito species. Four alphaviruses (Togaviridae): Barmah Forest virus, Chikungunya virus, Ross River virus, and Sindbis virus, and five flaviviruses (Flaviviridae): Dengue virus 2, Japanese encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, and Yellow fever virus were evaluated. Results indicate some NZ mosquito species are highly competent vectors of selected arboviruses, particularly alphaviruses, and may pose a threat were one of these arboviruses introduced at a time when the vector was prevalent and the climatic conditions favorable for virus transmission. PMID:21734146

  10. GoNorth! - An Adventure Learning Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porsild, M.; Doering, A.; Pregont, P.

    2008-12-01

    GoNorth! is an adventure learning series developed at the University of Minnesota in collaboration with NOMADS Online Expeditions. GoNorth! uses real-time experiences of dogsled expeditions on a multimedia saturated website at http://www.PolarHusky.com to motivate and engage millions of K-12 students and teachers. The program is free and research (Doering & Veletsianos, 2007) shows that it can be adopted by any teacher who signs up to use the program. It is currently utilized in 3400+ classrooms across the 50 US States and in 29 countries worldwide. Research (Doering & Veletsianos, 2007; 2008) notes that students working with GoNorth! are excited, motivated, and eager to engage with authentic tasks, solve real-world problems, collaborate with colleagues and experts, and initiate actions in their own community. Our team of educators, scientists and explorers circumnavigate the Arctic traveling by dog team to a new Arctic locale every year. Driven by an environmental question of particular relevance to the given Arctic region, each year a comprehensive natural and social science GoNorth! Curriculum & Activity Guide (450+ pages) is developed reflecting the expedition's current Arctic locale and its indigenous culture. The associated online learning environment delivers comprehensive resources about the region of travel, collaborative opportunities, live field updates and field research findings synched real-time to the curriculum. Field research relevant to understanding patterns of climate change and polar science is conducted with independent researchers featured as "Cool GoNorth! Scientists." Collaborations span from scientists at NASA and the United States Department of Agriculture to student observers in pan-Arctic communities as part of the NSF-supported initiative "What Is Climate Change to You?." This scientific research and fieldwork in turn coincides with the curriculum. The result is a community of learners on the Internet gaining knowledge from Arctic

  11. Do natural spring waters in Australia and New Zealand affect health? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stanhope, Jessica; Weinstein, Philip; Cook, Angus

    2018-02-01

    Therapeutic use of spring waters has a recorded history dating back to at least 1550 BC and includes both bathing in and drinking such waters for their healing properties. In Australia and New Zealand the use of therapeutic spring waters is a much more recent phenomenon, becoming a source of health tourism from the late 1800s. We conducted a systematic review aimed at determining the potential health outcomes relating to exposure to Australian or New Zealand natural spring water. We found only low-level evidence of adverse health outcomes relating to this spring water exposure, including fatalities from hydrogen sulphide poisoning, drowning and primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. We found no studies that investigated the therapeutic use of these waters, compared with similar treatment with other types of water. From the broader literature, recommendations have been made, including fencing potentially harmful spring water, and having signage and media messages to highlight the potential harms from spring water exposure and how to mitigate the risks (e.g. not putting your head under water from geothermal springs). Sound research into the potential health benefits of Australian and New Zealand spring waters could provide an evidence base for the growing wellness tourism industry.

  12. Improving student understanding in web programming material through multimedia adventure games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitriasari, N. S.; Ashiddiqi, M. F.; Nurdin, E. A.

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to make multimedia adventure games and find out the improvement of learners’ understanding after being given treatment of using multimedia adventure game in learning Web Programming. Participants of this study are students of class X (ten) in one of the Vocational Schools (SMK) in Indonesia. The material of web programming is a material that difficult enough to be understood by the participant therefore needed tools to facilitate the participants to understand the material. Solutions offered in this study is by using multimedia adventures game. Multimedia has been created using Construct2 and measured understood with method Non-equivalent Control Group Design. Pre-test and post-test has given to learners who received treatment using the multimedia adventure showed increase in understanding web programming material.

  13. Camp Adventure: Bringing A Slice of America to Military Dependents Overseas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edginton, Christopher R.; Little, Sandra L.

    1988-01-01

    Looks at the mission of Camp Adventure, a U.S. cultural contact summer camp program contracted between the Department of Defense and the University of Oregon for the children of military personnel overseas. (RWB)

  14. An application of the global sustainable tourism criteria in health tourism

    Treesearch

    Robert S. Bristow; Wen-Tsann Yang; Mei-Tsen Lu

    2010-01-01

    Tourism is an important element of the global economy. Yet for the tourism industry to grow and prosper, there is a need to protect local environmental and social well-being. Sustainable tourism seeks a compromise between growth and protection. Today, health tourism is a multi-billion dollar industry tied to individuals' travel overseas for inexpensive and timely...

  15. To Capture Student Interest in Geosciences, Plan an Adventure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassier, Caroline; Galland, Olivier; Mair, Karen

    2011-01-01

    It is dawn, -17°C, and 4700 meters above sea level, and two young scientists are alone in a tiny tent in the middle of the immense desert of the Bolivian Altiplano. Their bicycles and sleeping bags are coated with a thin layer of ice. Muscles aching, as they did yesterday and probably will tomorrow, they shrug off their sleepiness as the sunrise heats up their tent. After a simple breakfast, the researchers peek out and feast their eyes on a stunning view of high volcanic peaks and salt lakes. They are on the Andean Geotrail, a 9-month bike adventure through the Andes mountains, from Ushuaia in Argentinean Tierra del Fuego to Nazca, Peru (see Figure 1). Their goal is to share this spectacular geological setting with primary-, secondary- and high-school students.

  16. Behavior Change after Adventure Education Courses: Do Work Colleagues Notice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Heather M.; Martin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    In this case study, a mixed-method approach is used to examine the extent and type of changes in workplace attitudes and behavior, as self-reported by soldiers who had participated in 6- to 10-day "Experiential Leadership Development Activities" (ELDAs) delivered by the New Zealand Army Leadership Centre. Observations made by workplace…

  17. Sociocultural effects of tourism in Hoonah, Alaska.

    Treesearch

    Lee K. Cerveny

    2007-01-01

    This report examines the growth and development of the tourism industry in Hoonah, Alaska, and its effects on community life and resource use. The report describes the gradual development of tourism in Hoonah and presents resident perceptions of tourism’s effect on the natural and social environment. A multisited ethnographic approach was used featuring indepth, open-...

  18. Transplant tourism: a growing phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Cohen, David J

    2009-03-01

    Medical tourism is increasing owing to high costs of care, lack of availability or long waits for procedures, and improvements in technology and standards of care in many countries. Transplant tourism is one example of medical tourism that has been attracting increasing attention because of concerns over poor treatment and outcomes of both donors and recipients. Most such cases involve vended kidneys obtained from vulnerable populations, and both donors and recipients receive inferior care by US standards. This commentary discusses a paper by Gill et al. that compared outcomes of 33 transplant tourists with those of patients transplanted at a US center. Fewer complications and better outcomes were seen in patients transplanted in the US center than among transplant tourists. Large transplant centers with long waiting times are increasingly likely to see patients return newly transplanted from overseas; such patients require urgent attention, with particular consideration to infectious complications.

  19. Space Tourism: Orbital Debris Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, N.; Shajiee, S.; Moghani, T.; Bahrami, M.

    2002-01-01

    Space activities after a phase of research and development, political competition and national prestige have entered an era of real commercialization. Remote sensing, earth observation, and communication are among the areas in which this growing industry is facing competition and declining government money. A project like International Space Station, which draws from public money, has not only opened a window of real multinational cooperation, but also changed space travel from a mere fantasy into a real world activity. Besides research activities for sending man to moon and Mars and other outer planets, space travel has attracted a considerable attention in recent years in the form of space tourism. Four countries from space fairing nations are actively involved in the development of space tourism. Even, nations which are either in early stages of space technology development or just beginning their space activities, have high ambitions in this area. This is worth noting considering their limited resources. At present, trips to space are available, but limited and expensive. To move beyond this point to generally available trips to orbit and week long stays in LEO, in orbital hotels, some of the required basic transportations, living requirements, and technological developments required for long stay in orbit are already underway. For tourism to develop to a real everyday business, not only the price has to come down to meaningful levels, but also safety considerations should be fully developed to attract travelers' trust. A serious hazard to space activities in general and space tourism in particular is space debris in earth orbit. Orbiting debris are man-made objects left over by space operations, hazardous to space missions. Since the higher density of debris population occurs in low earth orbit, which is also the same orbit of interest to space tourism, a careful attention should be paid to the effect of debris on tourism activities. In this study, after a

  20. Performing Manaaki and New Zealand Refugee Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazou, Rand T.

    2018-01-01

    In September 2015, and in response to the Syrian refugee crisis, there were widespread calls in New Zealand urging the Government to raise its annual Refugee Quota. Maori Party co-leader Marama Fox argued that New Zealand could afford to take on more refugees as part of its global citizenship and suggested that New Zealand's policy might be shaped…

  1. The carbon footprint of global tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenzen, Manfred; Sun, Ya-Yen; Faturay, Futu; Ting, Yuan-Peng; Geschke, Arne; Malik, Arunima

    2018-06-01

    Tourism contributes significantly to global gross domestic product, and is forecast to grow at an annual 4%, thus outpacing many other economic sectors. However, global carbon emissions related to tourism are currently not well quantified. Here, we quantify tourism-related global carbon flows between 160 countries, and their carbon footprints under origin and destination accounting perspectives. We find that, between 2009 and 2013, tourism's global carbon footprint has increased from 3.9 to 4.5 GtCO2e, four times more than previously estimated, accounting for about 8% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Transport, shopping and food are significant contributors. The majority of this footprint is exerted by and in high-income countries. The rapid increase in tourism demand is effectively outstripping the decarbonization of tourism-related technology. We project that, due to its high carbon intensity and continuing growth, tourism will constitute a growing part of the world's greenhouse gas emissions.

  2. Tourism in a Globalizing World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yudina, Elena V.; Uhina, Tatiana V.; Bushueva, Irina V.; Pirozhenko, Natalia T.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the investigated problem is caused by the fact that virtually no comprehensive research on issues related to tourism as an integrative multidimensional phenomenon in the socio-cultural environment in the context of globalization has been made by now. The purpose of this article is based on sociological and cultural approach to…

  3. Analysis of Space Tourism Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnal, Christophe

    2002-01-01

    Space tourism appears today as a new Eldorado in a relatively near future. Private operators are already proposing services for leisure trips in Low Earth Orbit, and some happy few even tested them. But are these exceptional events really marking the dawn of a new space age ? The constraints associated to the space tourism are severe : - the economical balance of space tourism is tricky; development costs of large manned - the technical definition of such large vehicles is challenging, mainly when considering - the physiological aptitude of passengers will have a major impact on the mission - the orbital environment will also lead to mission constraints on aspects such as radiation, However, these constraints never appear as show-stoppers and have to be dealt with pragmatically: - what are the recommendations one can make for future research in the field of space - which typical roadmap shall one consider to develop realistically this new market ? - what are the synergies with the conventional missions and with the existing infrastructure, - how can a phased development start soon ? The paper proposes hints aiming at improving the credibility of Space Tourism and describes the orientations to follow in order to solve the major hurdles found in such an exciting development.

  4. Cochlear implants and medical tourism.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, Brian J; Bhatt, Nishant

    2010-09-01

    To compare the costs of medical tourism in cochlear implant surgery performed in India as compared to the United States. In addition, the cost savings of obtaining cochlear implant surgery in India were compare d to those of other surgical interventions obtained as a medical tourist. Searches were conducted on Medline and Google using the search terms: 'medical tourism', 'medical offshoring', 'medical outsourcing', 'cochlear implants' and 'cochlear implantation'. The information regarding cost of medical treatment was obtained from personal communication with individuals familiar with India's cochlear implantation medical tourism industry. The range of cost depended on length of stay as well as the device chosen. Generally the cost, inclusive of travel, surgery and device, was in the range of $21,000-30,000, as compared to a cost range of $40,000-$60,000 in the US. With the escalating cost of healthcare in the United States, it is not surprising that some patients would seek to obtain surgical care overseas at a fraction of the cost. Participants in medical tourism often have financial resources, but lack health insurance coverage. While cardiovascular and orthopedic surgery performed outside the United States in India at centers that cater to medical tourists are often performed at one-quarter to one-third of the cost that would have been paid in the United States, the cost differential for cochlear implants is not nearly as favorable.

  5. Study on Hainan Tourism Development Strategy from the Perspective of Regional Tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xi

    2017-12-01

    At present, Regional tourism has become the focus of all walks of life. It marks a new stage of China’s tourism development and makes a profound change in development strategy. Regional tourism will lead China’s tourism industry to a new level, open up a new world of the overall strategy. Hainan was identified as the country’s first “regional tourism to create demonstration province”, for the exploration experience, making a demonstration, It’s not only the trend, but also the inevitable result of experience in the construction of Hainan International Tourism Island, which has the overall strategic significance

  6. Learning from Aotearoa New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie

    2010-01-01

    Last February, in search of expanded thinking, the author led a group of 20 early childhood professionals on a study tour to Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ). The group included two Canadians and two Aussies, with everyone else from the United States. While they knew they had much to learn from the overall system of early childhood education in NZ, the…

  7. Ethics committees in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Gillett, Grant; Douglass, Alison

    2012-12-01

    The ethical review of research in New Zealand after the Cartwright Report of 1988 produced a major change in safeguards for and empowerment of participants in health care research. Several reforms since then have streamlined some processes but also seriously weakened some of the existing safeguards. The latest reforms, against the advice of various ethics bodies and the New Zealand Law Society, further reduced and attenuated the role of ethics committees so that New Zealand has moved from being a world leader in ethical review processes to there being serious doubt whether it is in conformity to international Conventions and codes. The latest round of reforms, seemingly driven by narrow economic aspirations, anecdote and innuendo, have occurred without any clear evidence of dysfunction in the system nor any plans for the resourcing required to improve quality of ethical review or to audit the process. It is of serious concern both to ethicists and medical lawyers in New Zealand that such hasty and poorly researched changes should have been made which threaten the hard-won gains of the Cartwright reforms.

  8. Stereo Pair: Wellington, New Zealand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-11

    Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand, is located on the shores of Port Nicholson, a natural harbor at the south end of North Island. The city was founded in 1840 by British emigrants and now has a regional population of more than 400,000 residents.

  9. Public Education in New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education, Wellington (New Zealand).

    Intended to stimulate public discussion on the aims and policies of New Zealand education, this background paper has three major sections. The first section discusses the role of education in relation to equal opportunity, democracy, cultural difference, national development, and personal development. In part two, graphs, tables, and text give a…

  10. Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    All around the world, people live in places where the threat of natural disaster is high. On the North Island of New Zealand, the Mount Ruapehu volcano is just such a threat. A towering, active stratovolcano (the classic cone-shaped volcano), snow-capped Ruapehu Volcano is pictured in this enhanced-color image. The image is made from topography data collected by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000, and imagery collected by the Landsat satellite on October 23, 2002. Ruapehu is one of New Zealand’s most active volcanoes, with ten eruptions since 1861. The eruptions aren’t the only threat from the volcano, however. Among the most serious threats is a volcanic mudflow called a lahar. In between eruptions, a lake forms in the volcano’s caldera from melting snow. If a previous eruption has deposited a dam of ash, rocks and mud in the lake’s natural overflow point, then the lake becomes dangerously full, held back only by the temporary dam. In this scene, the lake is nestled among the ridges at the top of the volcano. Eventually, the dam gives way and a massive flow of mud and debris churns down the mountain toward farmland and towns below. Scientists estimate that Ruapehu has experienced 60 lahars in the last 150 years. A devastating lahar in 1953 killed more than 150 people, who died when a passenger train plunged into a ravine when a railroad bridge was taken out by the lahar. The flank of the volcano below the lake is deeply carved by the path of previous lahars; the gouge can be seen just left of image center. Currently scientists in the region are predicting that the lake will overflow in a lahar sometime in the next year. There is great controversy about how to deal with the threat. News reports from the region indicate that the government is planning to invest in a high-tech warning system that will alert those who might be affected well in advance of any catastrophic release. Others feel

  11. ACHP |Partnering to Promote Heritage Tourism in Local Communities: Guidance

    Science.gov Websites

    Publications Search skip specific nav links Home arrow Heritage Tourism arrow Partnering to Promote Heritage Tourism in Local Communities: Guidance for Federal Agencies Partnering to Promote Heritage Tourism in historic places. Such tourism - heritage tourism -can result in a variety of tangible and intangible

  12. Can Communitas Explain How Young People Achieve Identity Development in Outdoor Adventure in Light of Contemporary Individualised Life?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashworth, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    In contemporary life, young people's identity development is a popular topic for investigation. This includes better understanding their development and their participation in outdoor adventure. From ancient times to modern days, literature conveys the benefits of outdoor adventure on their identity development and more recently there is a growing…

  13. The effectiveness of an outdoor adventure programme for young children with autism spectrum disorder: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Zachor, Ditza A; Vardi, Shira; Baron-Eitan, Shani; Brodai-Meir, Inbal; Ginossar, Noa; Ben-Itzchak, Esther

    2017-05-01

    Outdoor adventure programmes aim to improve interpersonal relationships using adventurous activities. The current study examined the effectiveness of an outdoor adventure programme in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The study included 51 participants (40 males, 11 females; age 3y 4mo-7y 4mo) enrolled in ASD special education kindergartens. Only the intervention group (n=30) participated in the outdoor adventure programme for 13 weeks, completing challenging physical activities that required cooperation and communication with peers and instructors. The control group (n=21) was not significantly different from the research group in age, sex, cognitive, and adaptive behaviour measures. Outcomes after the intervention revealed significant improvement in social-communication and different directions in the two groups in the social cognition, social motivation, and autistic mannerisms subdomains of the Social Responsiveness Scale. While the group that received an outdoor adventure programme showed a tendency toward a reduction in severity, the control group showed the opposite (p<0.010). The outdoor adventure programme required problem-solving skills and forced the child to communicate in exciting situations. This study suggests that an outdoor adventure programme may be an effective intervention in addition to traditional treatments in young children with ASD. Future studies should examine the outcome of outdoor adventure programmes delivered for longer periods of time and maintenance of the achievements over time. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  14. Adventures of Geo: Using comics as a learning tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. K. M.; Wallenta, A.

    2015-12-01

    Illustrations are a good way to visualize what is not readily seen. To take this medium a step further, we use illustrations in the form of comics as a way to teach Earth science concepts. The comic book format lends itself to engaging reading for young and old alike and has been used recently by the American Physical Society (APS) and by NASA as an outreach teaching tool. Due to their sequential nature, comic books make it easy for readers to follow a story and grasp concepts that are covered. The limited text in each panel can also help those where reading is a challenge or for those who become nervous and/or discouraged with long text passages. The illustrations also add visual clues that can aid in understanding the concepts being laid out. In the second installment of "Adventures of Geo," we use the comic book format to introduce the Moon, its formation, evolution, orbit and its interplay with Earth. The exploration of such faraway places is readily disseminated to the public through such a graphical approach. The comic books are aimed at middle school students in the New Haven Public Schools (NHPS) where Earth Science topics are covered in the curriculum.

  15. Adventures of Geo: Using comics as a learning tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. K. M.; Wallenta, A.

    2014-12-01

    Illustrations are a good way to visualize what is not readily seen. To take this medium a step further, we use illustrations in the form of comics as a way to teach Earth science concepts. The comic book format lends itself to engaging reading for young and old alike and has been used recently by the American Physical Society (APS) and by NASA as an outreach teaching tool. Due to their sequential nature, comic books make it easy for readers to follow a story and grasp concepts that are covered. The limited text in each panel can also help those where reading is a challenge or for those who become nervous and/or discouraged with long text passages. The illustrations also add visual clues that can aid in understanding the concepts being laid out. In the second installment of "Adventures of Geo," we use the comic book format to introduce the Moon, its formation, evolution, orbit and its interplay with Earth. The exploration of such faraway places is readily disseminated to the public through such a graphical approach. The comic books are aimed at middle school students in the New Haven Public Schools (NHPS) where Earth Science topics are covered in the curriculum.

  16. Adventures in supercomputing: An innovative program for high school teachers

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, C.E.; Hicks, H.R.; Summers, B.G.

    1994-12-31

    Within the realm of education, seldom does an innovative program become available with the potential to change an educator`s teaching methodology. Adventures in Supercomputing (AiS), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is such a program. It is a program for high school teachers that changes the teacher paradigm from a teacher-directed approach of teaching to a student-centered approach. {open_quotes}A student-centered classroom offers better opportunities for development of internal motivation, planning skills, goal setting and perseverance than does the traditional teacher-directed mode{close_quotes}. Not only is the process of teaching changed, but the cross-curricula integration within the AiS materials ismore » remarkable. Written from a teacher`s perspective, this paper will describe the AiS program and its effects on teachers and students, primarily at Wartburg Central High School, in Wartburg, Tennessee. The AiS program in Tennessee is sponsored by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).« less

  17. Pre-Participation Medical Evaluation for Adventure and Wilderness Watersports.

    PubMed

    Nathanson, Andrew T; Young, Justin Mark J; Young, Craig

    2015-12-01

    A request for a preparticipation medical evaluation for wilderness watersports may be made by guiding agencies, instructional camps, or by patients presenting for an annual visit. Although guidelines have been published regarding preparticipation physical evaluation for traditional competitive high school and collegiate sports, little has been written about medical evaluations for those wishing to engage in wilderness and adventure watersports. in this article, we offer guidance based on literature review and expert opinion. Watersports are among the most common recreational activities in the United states and are generally safe. Drowning, however, is a significant risk, particularly in small, self-propelled craft, and among children. Medical counseling before participation in watersports should include screening for medical conditions which may impair swimming ability, including a history of seizures, heart disease, and lung disease. Physicians should also promote preventive health measures such as use of lifejackets and sun protection, as well as alcohol avoidance. Swim testing tailored to specific activities should be strongly considered for children and those with questionable swimming ability. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Integration of professional judgement and decision-making in high-level adventure sports coaching practice.

    PubMed

    Collins, Loel; Collins, Dave

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the integration of professional judgement and decision-making processes in adventure sports coaching. The study utilised a thematic analysis approach to investigate the decision-making practices of a sample of high-level adventure sports coaches over a series of sessions. Results revealed that, in order to make judgements and decisions in practice, expert coaches employ a range of practical and pedagogic management strategies to create and opportunistically use time for decision-making. These approaches include span of control and time management strategies to facilitate the decision-making process regarding risk management, venue selection, aims, objectives, session content, and differentiation of the coaching process. The implication for coaches, coach education, and accreditation is the recognition and training of the approaches that "create time" for the judgements in practice, namely "creating space to think". The paper concludes by offering a template for a more expertise-focused progression in adventure sports coaching.

  19. [Post-operative infections after cosmetic tourism].

    PubMed

    Holst-Albrechtsen, Sine; Sørensen, Lene Birk; Juel, Jacob

    2018-06-11

    Cosmetic tourism is defined as patient mobility across borders, typically constituted by patients seeking cosmetic surgery at lower costs abroad. The most common procedures are abdominoplasty, fat grafting and breast augmentation. Very little is known about the complication rates after cosmetic tourism, and there is a paucity of evidence in all aspects of cosmetic tourism. In this review, we focus on post-operative complications i.e. post-operative infections, in particular with rare microorganisms such as mycobacteria.

  20. The Non-Consonance between Tourism Universities' Programs and the Needs of Tourism Employment in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustafa, Mairna Hussein

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims at exploring the reasons behind the contradiction between the outputs of tourism educational programs in Jordanian universities and expectations of tourism employers from the perception of tourism private businesses (travel agents and hotels), also to make an evaluation of universities' educational outcomes. Seventy-nine tourism…

  1. Impacts of Tourism in Ubud Bali Indonesia: a community-based tourism perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernawati, N. M.; Sudarmini, N. M.; Sukmawati, N. M. R.

    2018-01-01

    The impact of tourism is vital to be assessed to measure the results of the development, in order to maximize the benefits gained from tourism. Academics are encouraged to conduct research on this field. This study aims to identify the impact of tourism in Ubud tourist destination, Bali, Indonesia. It is a quantitative method, study using survey method, and Factor analysis, Frequency and Mean analyses as analytical tools. The impact of tourism is assessed against impact measurement instrument developed by Koster and Randall. The study used a sample of 170 respondents consisting of teenagers, productive age population, and senior citizens of Ubud. The result of the Average analysis shows that the impact of tourism in Ubud in general lies at 1.9 which indicates that the people are agreed that the impact of tourism in Ubud is positive. Factor analysis classified the impacts of tourism based on the positive or negative influences inflicted on society. Further, the four Factors extracted show: Factor 1 indicates areas of the most obvious positive impact, Factor 4 lies the issues, wherein the community members disagree that tourism effects Ubud positively. It is expected that the analysis of tourism impacts at Ubud could be used as an input by tourism stakeholders in developing a plan for future tourism in Ubud tourist destination, and to anticipate and mitigate the undesirable impacts that may occur and in order to maximise the positive results from tourism.

  2. Understanding Action and Adventure Sports Participation-An Ecological Dynamics Perspective.

    PubMed

    Immonen, Tuomas; Brymer, Eric; Orth, Dominic; Davids, Keith; Feletti, Francesco; Liukkonen, Jarmo; Jaakkola, Timo

    2017-12-01

    Previous research has considered action and adventure sports using a variety of associated terms and definitions which has led to confusing discourse and contradictory research findings. Traditional narratives have typically considered participation exclusively as the pastime of young people with abnormal characteristics or personalities having unhealthy and pathological tendencies to take risks because of the need for thrill, excitement or an adrenaline 'rush'. Conversely, recent research has linked even the most extreme forms of action and adventure sports to positive physical and psychological health and well-being outcomes. Here, we argue that traditional frameworks have led to definitions, which, as currently used by researchers, ignore key elements constituting the essential merit of these sports. In this paper, we suggest that this lack of conceptual clarity in understanding cognitions, perception and action in action and adventure sports requires a comprehensive explanatory framework, ecological dynamics which considers person-environment interactions from a multidisciplinary perspective. Action and adventure sports can be fundamentally conceptualized as activities which flourish through creative exploration of novel movement experiences, continuously expanding and evolving beyond predetermined environmental, physical, psychological or sociocultural boundaries. The outcome is the emergence of a rich variety of participation styles and philosophical differences within and across activities. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (a) to point out some limitations of existing research on action and adventure sports; (b) based on key ideas from emerging research and an ecological dynamics approach, to propose a holistic multidisciplinary model for defining and understanding action and adventure sports that may better guide future research and practical implications.

  3. Socio-cultural impacts of contemporary tourism.

    PubMed

    Jovicić, Dobrica

    2011-06-01

    The topic of the paper is devoted to analysis of socio-cultural impacts of tourism, as effects on the people of host communities resulting from their direct and indirect associations with tourists. The social and cultural impacts of tourism are the ways in which tourism is contributing to changes in value systems, individual behavior, family structure and relationships, collective lifestyles, safety levels, moral conduct, traditional ceremonies and community organizations. Special attention is devoted to considering complexity of tourists/host interrelationships and discussing the techniques for appraisal of quality and quantity of socio-cultural changes which tourism provokes in local communities.

  4. Analysis of Development Environment and Development Trend of Chinese Tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liyun; Li, Lingzhi

    2018-01-01

    Since the reform and opening up of Chinese tourism industry, the scale has been continuously expanded and the income from tourism has been continuously increasing. Chinese tourism industry has become one of the most potential industries in the service industry. By analyzing the development environment and development trend of Chinese tourism industry from 2000 to 2016, we can understand the current situation of Chinese tourism development and provide suggestions for better development of Chinese tourism industry.

  5. Australian senior adventure travellers to Peru: Maximising older tourists' travel health experience.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Irmgard

    2012-03-01

    Financially comfortable, with ample spare time and much better health, older people travel more than ever and to more adventurous destinations. Taking Australian senior adventure travellers to Peru as an example, travel health preparations need to take into account the phenomenon 'senior traveller', the destination with its attractions and challenges, and age-related changes and restrictions. The need for routine travel health advice, vaccinations and prophylaxis remains unchanged. However, more emphasis should be placed on locality-specific issues so that age-appropriate advice and preparations maximize the chances for a safe and memorable travel experience. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anatomy adventure: a board game for enhancing understanding of anatomy.

    PubMed

    Anyanwu, Emeka G

    2014-01-01

    Certain negative factors such as fear, loss of concentration and interest in the course, lack of confidence, and undue stress have been associated with the study of anatomy. These are factors most often provoked by the unusually large curriculum, nature of the course, and the psychosocial impact of dissection. As a palliative measure, Anatomy Adventure, a board game on anatomy was designed to reduce some of these pressures, emphasize student centered and collaborative learning styles, and add fun to the process of learning while promoting understanding and retention of the subject. To assess these objectives, 95 out of over 150 medical and dental students who expressed willingness to be part of the study were recruited and divided into a Game group and a Non-game group. A pretest written examination was given to both groups, participants in the Game group were allowed to play the game for ten days, after which a post-test examination was also given. A 20-item questionnaire rated on a three-point scale to access student's perception of the game was given to the game group. The post-test scores of the game group were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of the non-game counterparts. Also the post-test score of the game based group was significantly better (P < 0.05) than their pretest. The students in their feedback noted in very high proportions that the game was interesting, highly informative, encouraged team work, improved their attitude, and perception to gross anatomy. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  7. Adventures in supercomputing: Scientific exploration in an era of change

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, E.; Helland, B.; Summers, B.

    1997-11-01

    Students deserve the opportunity to explore the world of science surrounding them. Therefore it is important that scientific exploration and investigation be a part of each student`s educational career. The Department of Energy`s Adventures in Superconducting (AiS) takes students beyond mere scientific literacy to a rich embodiment of scientific exploration. AiS provides today`s science and math students with a greater opportunity to investigate science problems, propose solutions, explore different methods of solving the problem, organize their work into a technical paper, and present their results. Students learn at different rates in different ways. Science classes with students having varying learningmore » styles and levels of achievement have always been a challenge for teachers. The AiS {open_quotes}hands-on, minds-on{close_quotes} project-based method of teaching science meets the challenge of this diversity heads on! AiS uses the development of student chosen projects as the means of achieving a lifelong enthusiasm for scientific proficiency. One goal of AiS is to emulate the research that takes place in the everyday environment of scientists. Students work in teams and often collaborate with students nationwide. With the help of mentors from the academic and scientific community, students pose a problem in science, investigate possible solutions, design a mathematical and computational model for the problem, exercise the model to achieve results, and evaluate the implications of the results. The students then have the opportunity to present the project to their peers, teachers, and scientists. Using this inquiry-based technique, students learn more than science skills, they learn to reason and think -- going well beyond the National Science Education Standard. The teacher becomes a resource person actively working together with the students in their quest for scientific knowledge.« less

  8. Geyser decline and extinction in New Zealand: energy development impacts and implications for environmental management.

    PubMed

    Barrick, Kenneth A

    2007-06-01

    Geysers are rare natural phenomena that represent increasingly important recreation, economic, and scientific resources. The features of geyser basins, including hot springs, mud pots, and fumaroles, are easily damaged by human development. In New Zealand, the extinction of more than 100 geysers provides important lessons for the environmental management of the world's remaining geyser basins. The impacts on New Zealand's geysers are described in sequential "phases," including the following: the first use of geothermal resources by the indigenous people-the Maori; early European-style tourism and spa development; streamside geyser decline caused by river level modification at the Spa geyser basin; multiple geyser basin extinctions caused by industrial-scale geothermal well withdrawal at Wairakei; the drowning of geysers at Orakeikorako after the filling of a hydroelectric reservoir; and geyser decline caused by geothermal well heating systems in Rotorua City. The crisis in Rotorua prompted preservation of the few remaining geysers at Whakarewarewa -- the last major geyser basin in New Zealand. The New Zealand government ordered the geothermal wells within 1.5 km of Pohutu Geyser, Whakarewarewa, to be closed, which was a locally controversial measure. The well closure program resulted in a partial recovery of the Rotorua geothermal reservoir, but no extinct geysers recovered. The implications of recent geothermal computer modeling and future planning are discussed. The New Zealand case suggests that the protection of geysers requires strong regulations that prevent incompatible development at the outset, a prescription that is especially relevant for the future management of the geothermal fields adjacent to the geyser basins of Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A.

  9. New Zealand geothermal: Wairakei -- 40 years

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    This quarterly bulletin highlights the geothermal developments in New Zealand with the following articles: A brief history of the Wairakei geothermal power project; Geothermal resources in New Zealand -- An overview; Domestic and commercial heating and bathing -- Rotorua area; Kawerau geothermal development: A case study; Timber drying at Kawerau; Geothermal greenhouses at Kawerau; Drying of fibrous crops using geothermal steam and hot water at the Taupo Lucerne Company; Prawn Park -- Taupo, New Zealand; Geothermal orchids; Miranda hot springs; and Geothermal pipeline.

  10. Electronic Medical Consultation: A New Zealand Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brebner, Campbell; Jones, Raymond; Marshall, Wendy; Parry, Graham

    2001-01-01

    Electronic medical consultation is available worldwide through access to the World Wide Web (WWW). This article outlines a research study on the adoption of electronic medical consultation as a means of health delivery. It focuses on the delivery of healthcare specifically for New Zealanders, by New Zealanders. It is acknowledged that the WWW is a global marketplace and that it is therefore difficult to identify New Zealanders' use of such a global market; nevertheless, we attempt to provide a New Zealand perspective on electronic medical consultation. PMID:11720955

  11. Tourism Village Model Based on Local Indigenous: Case Study of Nongkosawit Tourism Village, Gunungpati, Semarang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniasih; Nihayah, Dyah Maya; Sudibyo, Syafitri Amalia; Winda, Fajri Nur

    2018-02-01

    Officially, Nongkosawit Village has become a tourism village since 2012. However, the economic impact has not been received by the society yet because of inappropriate tourism village model. Therefore, this study aims to find out the best model for the development of Nongkosawit Tourism Village. This research used Analytical Hierarchy Process method. The results of this research shows that the model of tourism village which was suitable to the local indigenous of Nongkosawit Tourism Village was the cultural based tourism village with the percentage of 58%. Therefore, it is necessary to do re-orientation from the natural-based village model into the cultural-based village model by raising and exploring the existing culture through unique and different tourism products.

  12. Using Educational Tourism in Geographical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prakapiene, Dalia; Olberkyte, Loreta

    2013-01-01

    The article analyses and defines the concept of educational tourism, presents the structure of the concept and looks into the opportunities for using educational tourism in geographical education. In order to reveal such opportunities a research was carried out in the Lithuanian national and regional parks using the qualitative method of content…

  13. Rural Tourism and Livelihood Strategies in Romania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iorio, Monica; Corsale, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Substantial changes in the Romanian countryside accompanied by the need for more robust economic activities have caused some families to turn to tourism as an economic diversification strategy. A qualitative study of selected rural tourism entrepreneurs indicates positive experiences, both economically and in other aspects of their lives. However,…

  14. Sustainability in outdoor recreation and tourism

    Treesearch

    Patricia L. Winter; Kelly Bricker; Jeremy Schultz

    2013-01-01

    Outdoor recreation and tourism represents a major service by which the public identifies with and better understands natural resources, even to the extent that it can foster environmental stewardship (for example, see Winter and Chavez 2008). Yet, myriad threats to recreation and tourism exist which need to be addressed. Addressing these threats can be...

  15. Medical Tourism in Malaysia: Prospect and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tourism, combined with the phrase medical, seems to be a new form of tourism which has gained huge popularity in recent decades. Though, a number of literatures available with regard to the tourism industry and the competitiveness of the destination, however, the major aspects which determine the satisfaction of medical tourists are hardly focused specifically on Malaysia. There is a lack of empirical evidence in this area of study which needs to be bridged. Hence, this study aimed at investigating the various factors contributing towards the development of medical tourism in Malaysia. Methods: As the purpose of the research was to find out various factors contributing towards the development of medical tourism in Malaysia, so this study used Structural Equation modeling (SEM) for data analysis. The target population for this study consisted of the medical tourists coming to Malaysia with the primary intension of seeking medical procedures other than sightseeing. A total sample size of 266 was collected through non-probability judgment sampling during the period between December 2012 and February 2013. Results: The result confirms that destination competitiveness and service quality play an important role in the medical tourist’s mind towards medical tourism aspect in Malaysia. Thus, Malaysia need to promote various medical success stories together with the services they offer to attract more foreign patients. Conclusion: This study contributes to the theoretical development in the tourism industry by offering the structured relationship among various aspects contributing towards the development of medical tourism in Malaysia. PMID:26056632

  16. Tourism. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This brochure, part of a series about good practices in vocational training in the European Union, describes 10 projects that have promoted investment in human resources through training in the tourism sector to promote sustainable, or responsible, tourism. The projects and their countries of origin are as follows: (1) BEEFT, training of mobility…

  17. Rethinking reproductive "tourism" as reproductive "exile".

    PubMed

    Inhorn, Marcia C; Patrizio, Pasquale

    2009-09-01

    Whereas reproductive "tourism" implies leisure travel, reproductive "exile" bespeaks the numerous difficulties and constraints faced by infertile patients who are "forced" to travel globally for assisted reproduction. Given this reality, it is time to rethink the language of "reproductive tourism," replacing it with more accurate and patient-centered terms.

  18. Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Susan S.

    This teacher's guide is the core publication of a series of instructional materials developed for the hospitality and tourism industry. It includes the entry-level competencies students will need to enter any of the occupational areas identified in the four cluster areas of the hospitality and tourism industry: lodging, food service, travel and…

  19. Penetrating the Language Frontier in Tourism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, D. E.

    For Australia's tourism industry to be commercially effective, all of its workers must develop second language skills, intercultural skills, and support and tolerance of foreign guests. Community attitudes, education, the tourism industry itself, and research and development must change to foster cultural understanding and intercultural…

  20. Medical Tourism in Malaysia: Prospect and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Abdullah

    2013-08-01

    Tourism, combined with the phrase medical, seems to be a new form of tourism which has gained huge popularity in recent decades. Though, a number of literatures available with regard to the tourism industry and the competitiveness of the destination, however, the major aspects which determine the satisfaction of medical tourists are hardly focused specifically on Malaysia. There is a lack of empirical evidence in this area of study which needs to be bridged. Hence, this study aimed at investigating the various factors contributing towards the development of medical tourism in Malaysia. As the purpose of the research was to find out various factors contributing towards the development of medical tourism in Malaysia, so this study used Structural Equation modeling (SEM) for data analysis. The target population for this study consisted of the medical tourists coming to Malaysia with the primary intension of seeking medical procedures other than sightseeing. A total sample size of 266 was collected through non-probability judgment sampling during the period between December 2012 and February 2013. The result confirms that destination competitiveness and service quality play an important role in the medical tourist's mind towards medical tourism aspect in Malaysia. Thus, Malaysia need to promote various medical success stories together with the services they offer to attract more foreign patients. This study contributes to the theoretical development in the tourism industry by offering the structured relationship among various aspects contributing towards the development of medical tourism in Malaysia.

  1. UNBC: Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Pat

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the University of Northern British Columbia's (UNBC's) Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management (ORTM) Program, which focuses squarely on the management of outdoor recreation as it relates to conservation (i.e., in and around parks and protected areas), tourism that is both based in and concerned with the natural/cultural…

  2. Complications After Cosmetic Surgery Tourism.

    PubMed

    Klein, Holger J; Simic, Dario; Fuchs, Nina; Schweizer, Riccardo; Mehra, Tarun; Giovanoli, Pietro; Plock, Jan A

    2017-04-01

    Cosmetic surgery tourism characterizes a phenomenon of people traveling abroad for aesthetic surgery treatment. Problems arise when patients return with complications or need of follow-up care. To investigate the complications of cosmetic surgery tourism treated at our hospital as well as to analyze arising costs for the health system. Between 2010 and 2014, we retrospectively included all patients presenting with complications arising from cosmetic surgery abroad. We reviewed medical records for patients' characteristics including performed operations, complications, and treatment. Associated cost expenditure and Diagnose Related Groups (DRG)-related reimbursement were analyzed. In total 109 patients were identified. All patients were female with a mean age of 38.5 ± 11.3 years. Most procedures were performed in South America (43%) and Southeast (29.4%) or central Europe (24.8%), respectively. Favored procedures were breast augmentation (39.4%), abdominoplasty (11%), and breast reduction (7.3%). Median time between the initial procedure abroad and presentation was 15 days (interquartile range [IQR], 9) for early, 81.5 days (IQR, 69.5) for midterm, and 4.9 years (IQR, 9.4) for late complications. Main complications were infections (25.7%), wound breakdown (19.3%), and pain/discomfort (14.7%). The majority of patients (63.3%) were treated conservatively; 34.8% became inpatients with a mean hospital stay of 5.2 ± 3.8 days. Overall DRG-related reimbursement premiums approximately covered the total costs. Despite warnings regarding associated risks, cosmetic surgery tourism has become increasingly popular. Efficient patients' referral to secondary/tertiary care centers with standardized evaluation and treatment can limit arising costs without imposing a too large burden on the social healthcare system. 4. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. A Hybrid Approach on Tourism Demand Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor, M. E.; Nurul, A. I. M.; Rusiman, M. S.

    2018-04-01

    Tourism has become one of the important industries that contributes to the country’s economy. Tourism demand forecasting gives valuable information to policy makers, decision makers and organizations related to tourism industry in order to make crucial decision and planning. However, it is challenging to produce an accurate forecast since economic data such as the tourism data is affected by social, economic and environmental factors. In this study, an equally-weighted hybrid method, which is a combination of Box-Jenkins and Artificial Neural Networks, was applied to forecast Malaysia’s tourism demand. The forecasting performance was assessed by taking the each individual method as a benchmark. The results showed that this hybrid approach outperformed the other two models

  4. Medical tourism in Iran: Issues and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Alireza; Delgoshaei, Bahram; Mardani, Raja; Tabibi, Seid Jamaledin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Medical tourism is rapidly becoming a worldwide, multibillion-dollar industry. Iran has a high potential for this industry. The purpose of this study was to examine the medical tourism cluster, using Diamond Analysis tool. Materials and Methods: This study is a descriptive, analytical and qualitative one. Thirty professionals and researchers in this field were interviewed and official documents belonging to the Health ministry as well as tourism organization and finally related literature were examined. The data was analyzed using content analysis method. Results: Positive and negative parts of the medical tourism industry of Iran were determined according to diamond of advantage. Conclusion: The strategic issues were identified and a number of possible solutions for addressing them were recommended. More and effective public-private participations, aggressive marketing, improving infrastructures, and international accreditation of health care facilities and human resources development could improve medical tourism industry in the country. PMID:23555142

  5. Medical tourism in Iran: Issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Alireza; Delgoshaei, Bahram; Mardani, Raja; Tabibi, Seid Jamaledin

    2012-01-01

    Medical tourism is rapidly becoming a worldwide, multibillion-dollar industry. Iran has a high potential for this industry. The purpose of this study was to examine the medical tourism cluster, using Diamond Analysis tool. This study is a descriptive, analytical and qualitative one. Thirty professionals and researchers in this field were interviewed and official documents belonging to the Health ministry as well as tourism organization and finally related literature were examined. The data was analyzed using content analysis method. Positive and negative parts of the medical tourism industry of Iran were determined according to diamond of advantage. The strategic issues were identified and a number of possible solutions for addressing them were recommended. More and effective public-private participations, aggressive marketing, improving infrastructures, and international accreditation of health care facilities and human resources development could improve medical tourism industry in the country.

  6. Procreative tourism and reproductive freedom.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jean

    2006-07-01

    In many societies, the use of assisted reproduction technology has produced a desire to control and regulate this form of treatment. Politicians have taken most decisions. These regulations hold important implications for patients, and there are no two countries with the same regulations. These important differences have led to a traffic of infertile couples across legislative borders to seek a solution to their problem. Would harmonization of laws have positive effects? It seems that it would lead to a minimal common legislation. Procreative tourism is actually a 'safety valve' for many European couples.

  7. Why Randomized Trials Are Challenging within Adventure Therapy Research: Lessons Learned in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabrielsen, Leiv Einar; Fernee, Carina Ribe; Aasen, Gunnar Oland; Eskedal, Leif Torvald

    2016-01-01

    There are few high-quality studies using randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the adventure and wilderness therapy literature. Thus, a unison call is heard for more such studies to be carried out. This article presents a Norwegian wilderness therapy research project that planned to incorporate this "gold standard" that is regarded as…

  8. Adventure Education and the Acculturation of First-Generation Chinese Canadians in Vancouver, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Simon; Gidlow, Bob; Cushman, Grant

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on research that demonstrates how parents in first-generation Chinese families in Vancouver, Canada, most of them from Hong Kong, control their children's involvement in local adventure education (AE) programs and in so doing minimize the likelihood of intergenerational culture conflict involving those children. The research…

  9. Breaking Down the Stigma of Mental Illness through an Adventure Camp: A Collaborative Education Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuhlmiller, Cynthia M.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an outdoor adventure camp to help mental health consumers and nursing students explore the issues of mental health and illness through experiential and perceived risk challenges. Evaluation data reveals a breakdown in the stigma of mental illness as consumers and students came to know, trust, and count on each other in order to succeed…

  10. An Authoring Tool for Educational Adventure Games: Concept, Game Models and Authoring Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehm, Florian; Göbel, Stefan; Steinmetz, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    The genre of educational adventure games is a common and successful choice in game-based learning. The games combine captivating narratives that motivate players to continue playing with game mechanics that are conductive to learning: the gameplay is slow-paced, allowing players to learn at their own pace, and focused on puzzles that can be…

  11. Positive Motivational Experience over a Three-Day Outdoor Adventure Trek in Peru

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houge Mackenzie, Susan; Kerr, John H.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the motivational and emotional experience of an experienced outdoor activity participant during a three-day guided adventure trek in Colca Canyon, Peru. The research adopted a qualitative autoethnographic approach which provided unique data in the form of diary entries, experiential diagrams, field notes and email content.…

  12. Effects of a College Adventure Orientation Program on Student Development Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlamis, Ekaterini; Bell, Brent J.; Gass, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an adventure orientation program on the student development behaviors of incoming first-year students at Hartwick College in Oneonta, New York. Student development was measured by a condensed version of the Student Development Task Inventory-2 (CSDTI-2; Gass, 1986; Winston, Miller, & Prince, 1979). Data…

  13. A Profile of Outdoor Adventure Interventions for Young People in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Daniel J.; Neill, James T.; Williams, Ian R.; Mak, Anita S.; Allen, Nicholas B.; Olsson, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we describe characteristics of outdoor adventure interventions (OAIs) that aim to address problem behaviors in young people in Australia. A national online survey was completed by 98 program leaders and 24 program managers. OAIs for youth in Australia are diverse, but typically incorporate several days in the outdoors, during which…

  14. Revisiting the Common Adventure Concept: An Annotated Review of the Literature, Misconceptions and Contemporary Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watters, Ron

    In the 1970s a new form of outdoor trip programming appeared. Known as "common adventure," its best known trait is the absence of a designated leader. In 1970, Gary Grimm, the University of Oregon's first outdoor program coordinator, laid out the key principles: self-directed learning, formation of groups of people with similar interests…

  15. An Investigation of Highly Effective Leaders in Outdoor Adventure Programs Using a Multi-Method Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, William D.

    2009-01-01

    Research on leadership in outdoor adventure programs has focused primarily on Educational and Outdoor Skills. Anecdotal and practical experience has suggested that the performance of highly effective leaders may depend instead on distinctive qualities and components closely tied to individual character--a perspective of transformational…

  16. Landfullness in Adventure-Based Programming: Promoting Reconnection to the Land

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Molly

    2005-01-01

    Nearly a half-century ago. Aldo Leopold acknowledged the threat of "landlessness" in our society as measured by the loss of our collective awareness of, and admiration for, the land (Leopold. 1966). At present, this disconnect has evolved to the point where participants in adventure-based programs may find themselves traveling through "Any Woods,…

  17. More than Activities: Using a "Sense of Place" to Enrich Student Experience in Adventure Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leather, Mark; Nicholls, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in recent years in the significance of a sense of place in the literature of outdoor adventure education. In the UK relationships between outdoor education and the environment still appear largely focused on the science of the natural environment and the activity in question. In this paper, we present empirical…

  18. Bringing People Together in the Wilderness: Conjoint Adventure Trips for Special Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lais, Greg; Smith, Tom

    The article describes a 5-day winter camping expedition experienced conjointly by two groups: one a blend of able-bodied and physically disabled adults, and the second consisting of sexually exploited adolescents who were placed in a group home setting. The first group were members of Wilderness Inquiry II, a community based adventure program that…

  19. "A Question of Balance:" A Conference on Risk and Adventure in Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Chris

    2000-01-01

    In November 2000, a conference in London hosted by three outdoor education associations examined the growing culture of risk aversion in the United Kingdom, the role of risk in learning, the increasing difficulty of finding a balance between risk and adventure, and the challenges of tempting children away from computer games and dealing with…

  20. Rethinking the Adventure Education Experience: An Inquiry of Meanings, Culture and Educational Virtue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingman, Benjamin Charles

    2013-01-01

    This study is an investigation of the adventure education (AE) experience with particular attention to what happens during the AE experience, the meanings participants ascribe to the experience, how personal backgrounds and institutional cultures coalesce in AE, and the significance of the AE experience for schooling. These topics are explored…

  1. Cranking Out Adventure: A Bike Leader's Guide to Trial and Error Touring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohnke, Karl

    The product of a 3,355 mile bicycle trip involving a co-ed group of teenagers and a leader (N=12), this guide to bike riding trips presents practical and philosophical insights gained by the Project Adventure leader who conducted the trip. Detailed lists of pre- and on-trip requirements are presented. Specifically, there are sections devoted to…

  2. It's Never Too Late to Dare: Outdoor Adventure Programming for the Age Wave

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kluge, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    The population pyramid is being turned upside down. Baby boomers are beginning to flood the market for goods and services. It is never too late to encourage people of all ages to "dare" to be active through outdoor adventure activities. This article provides readers with a general understanding of older adults' needs and interests as they relate…

  3. Exploring Post-Program Psychological Adjustment for Adult Staff Facilitating a Wilderness Adventure Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence-Wood, Ellie; Raymond, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines a pilot study of the post-program psychological adjustment outcomes of adult staff facilitating an Australian-based wilderness adventure program for youth at risk. The descriptive and correlational survey study (N = 62) examined the psychological adjustment processes staff underwent following program completion, and the factors…

  4. CSI Web Adventures: A Forensics Virtual Apprenticeship for Teaching Science and Inspiring STEM Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Leslie; Chang, Ching-I; Hoyt, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    CSI: The Experience, a traveling museum exhibit and a companion web adventure, was created through a grant from the National Science Foundation as a potential model for informal learning. The website was designed to enrich and complement the exhibit by modeling the forensic process. Substantive science, real-world lab techniques, and higher-level…

  5. Using Systematic Feedback and Reflection to Improve Adventure Education Teaching Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Rick; Kalvaitis, Darius; Delparte, Donna

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how adventure educators could use systematic feedback to improve their teaching skills. Evaluative instruments demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in teaching skills when applied at an outdoor education center in Western Canada. Concurrent focus group interviews enabled instructors to reflect on student…

  6. Adlerian Adventure-Based Counseling to Enhance Self-Esteem in School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Holly H.; Elliott, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a rationale for using adventure-based counseling (ABC) principles to promote children's self-esteem through group work within the school setting. The effectiveness of combining Adlerian theory with ABC to promote self-esteem is established. The process that would allow a school counselor to plan, organize, facilitate,…

  7. What Would Happen if...? About the Elective Affinity between Adventure and the "Coniunctivus Potentialis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Adventure is a playful pacemaker for real border crossings from reality to possibility; it can, from a benevolent point of view, be the trigger for individual changes of reality, a provider of impulses for the development of self. Confronted with the unpredictability of the wilderness, the turbulences of torrents, the chaotic state of the oceans,…

  8. Amazing Soil Stories: Adventure and Activity Book [and] Teacher's Guide to the Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Association of Resource Conservation Districts, Sacramento.

    The student activity book offers a variety of written exercises and "hands on" experiments and demonstrations for students at the fourth grade level. The book begins with a cartoon story that follows the adventures of a student investigating a soil erosion crisis and what her community can do to prevent soil erosion. Interspersed within…

  9. The "Nature" of Leadership Philosophy in Outdoor and Adventure Education: Partnership or Predation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhlik, Kim S.

    2006-01-01

    Nature continually impresses humans in its role as an omnipresent, if not ultimate, source of power. One hallmark of outdoor and adventure education (OAE) has been its presumption that humans' interaction with aspects of Nature's "power" promotes the antecedents of leadership: measurable, persistent psychological effects and behavioral…

  10. A Wilderness Adventure Program as an Alternative for Juvenile Probationers: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterdyk, John Albert

    A true experimental design with 60 male probationers, ages 13-16, was used to evaluate the viability of an Ontario-based 21-day wilderness adventure program as an alternative for adjudicated juveniles placed on probation. Participants were randomly assigned to a control group and an experimental group. The experimental group was subdivided into 3…

  11. Woven into the Fabric of Experience: Residential Adventure Education and Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Randall

    2013-01-01

    Residential adventure education is a surprisingly powerful developmental experience. This paper reports on a mixed-methods study focused on English primary school pupils aged 9-11, which used complexity theory to throw light on the synergistic inter-relationships between the different aspects of that experience. Broadly expressed, the research…

  12. The Influence of Short-Term Adventure-Based Experiences on Levels of Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan; Yoshino, Aiko

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated the impact of participation in a three-week adventure education (AE) expedition upon levels of resilience of university students. Resilience is considered to be a dynamic process of positive adaptation to significant threat or adversity and may be an important variable to study as college students often live…

  13. Reconceptualising Outdoor Adventure Education: Activity in Search of an Appropriate Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Experiential approaches to learning underpin teaching and learning strategies in outdoor adventure education (OAE). Recent critiques of experiential learning have problematised the individualistic and overly cognitive focus of this approach which creates binaries between experience-reflection and the learner-situation. This paper summarises these…

  14. Cognitive and Physiological Impacts of Adventure Activities: Beyond Self-Report Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Andrew W.; Johann, Josh; Kang, Hyoung-Kil

    2017-01-01

    Outdoor adventure activities have been used to facilitate a variety of positive outcomes. However, the practical challenge of collecting data in the field and a heavy reliance on self-report data render it difficult to understand the process of the experience. This study examined the association between self-reported valence and arousal and…

  15. Judgment and Decision Making in Outdoor Adventure Leadership: A Dual-Process Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, Clinton A.

    2016-01-01

    From an examination of the current textbooks and literature concerning judgment and decision-making models used in outdoor adventure leadership, it is easy to see that they are still deeply rooted in the classical decision-making theory. In this article, I will (a) outline the importance of good judgment and decision making in an outdoor adventure…

  16. Co-creating Emotionally Safe Environments at Camp: Training Staff To Facilitate Adventure Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownlee, Matt; Yerkes, Rita

    2003-01-01

    An emotionally safe environment helps campers participate in adventure activities. Staff development tips for creating a safe environment include using cooperative goal setting; using parallel training processes; developing working lesson plans that outline facilitation techniques for creating emotionally safe environments; and using co-created…

  17. Learning Transferable Skills through Adventure Education: The Role of an Authentic Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibthorp, Jim

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is threefold: (a) to explore what 18 adolescents learned while participating in a three week long adventure program, (b) to examine how they learned while on the program, and (c) to determine what program outcomes they considered most applicable to their home environments, or which learning is "transferable". To address…

  18. Thrill and adventure seeking in risky driving at work: The moderating role of safety climate.

    PubMed

    Wishart, Darren; Somoray, Klaire; Evenhuis, Amanda

    2017-12-01

    Introduction Within many industrialized countries, the leading cause of worker fatalities and serious injuries can be attributed to road trauma. In non-occupational research, high levels of sensation seeking personality, and specifically thrill and adventure seeking, have been associated with risky driving behaviors. In work driving literature, high organizational safety climate has been associated with reduced risky driving in work drivers. However, the extent that factors such as safety climate and thrill seeking interact in regard to work driving safety remains unclear, and the current research examined this interaction. Methods A total of 1,011 work drivers from four organizations participated in the research. Surveys were distributed online and hardcopies were sent via mail. The survey included measures of thrill and adventure seeking, safety climate and work-related driving behaviors, as well as questions relating to participant demographics and information about their work driving. Results The results demonstrated that safety climate significantly moderated the effect of thrill and adventure seeking trait on driving errors, driving violations, and driving while fatigued. Conclusion These results suggest that the development of a strong safety climate has the potential to improve work driving safety outcomes by reducing the impact of particular personality traits such as thrill seeking within an organizational context. Practical application To improve work driving safety, organizations and management need to develop strategies to encourage and foster positive work driving safety climate, particularly within work settings that may attract thrill and adventure seeking employees. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Understanding Complex Ecologies: An Investigation of Student Experiences in Adventure Learning Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koseoglu, Suzan; Doering, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The GoNorth! Adventure Learning (AL) Series delivered educational programs about global climate change and sustainability from 2006 to 2010 via a hybrid-learning environment that included a curriculum designed with activities that worked in conjunction with the travels of Team GoNorth! as they dog sledded throughout the circumpolar Arctic. This…

  20. The Family Expedition Program: Adventure Family Therapy in the Home As Well As in the Outdoors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Michael; Dolcino, Carina

    The Family Expedition is a federally funded program designed to foster healthy changes in families with troubled adolescents through multifamily adventure therapy experiences. Each Family Expedition cycle is 4 months long, consisting of six multifamily sessions and three home visits. Each 90-minute home visit gives families time to focus on…

  1. The Possibilities of "Doing" Outdoor and/or Adventure Education in Physical Education/Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Sue; Legge, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical education has a long association with teaching outdoor and/or adventure education (OAE). As physical education teacher educators, with a special interest in teaching OAE, we wanted to examine perceptions of models based practices in physical education/teacher education. Purpose: This manuscript; explores and critiques a range…

  2. Constructing the Runaway Youth Problem: Boy Adventurers to Girl Prostitutes, 1960-1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staller, Karen M.

    2003-01-01

    Examines, using a qualitative case study of stories printed in "The New York Times," the social construction of "runaway youth" in print media during 1960-1978. Finds that running away was an unconstructed problem (or simmering social condition) in the early 1960s and featured harmless adventures. Contributes to the…

  3. "Adventures in Science": Casting Scientifically Talented Youth as National Resources on American Radio, 1942-1958

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzian, Sevan G.

    2008-01-01

    From 1942 to 1958, a national weekly programme on CBS radio and presented by Science Service, Inc. devoted 37 of its broadcasts to profiling American high school students' achievements in science talent searches, clubs and fairs. These "Adventures in Science" radio programmes cast scientifically talented youth as potential contributors to national…

  4. Students' Perception of Relationship Skills during an Adventure-Based Learning Unit within Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuhr, Paul T.; Sutherland, Sue; Ressler, James; Ortiz-Stuhr, Esther M.

    2015-01-01

    Adventure-based learning (ABL) is a sequenced curriculum using structured physical and team building activities that create the space for participants to work on group communication, cooperation, trust, and problem solving. Reflection (i.e., debriefing) is an essential aspect of the ABL curriculum (Cosgriff, 2000). A debrief in ABL is the…

  5. The Identity, Epistemology and Developmental Experiences of High-Level Adventure Sports Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Ed; Berry, Matt; Kearney, Phil

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research was to further the literature on the identity and practices of adventure sports coaches (ASCs). Current research indicates that these coaches hold well-defined epistemic beliefs that underpin their approaches to coaching. We sought to explore whether these findings applied to a more diverse sample and to examine their…

  6. Students' Views on Physical Development and Physical Self-Concept in Adventure-Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehris, Jeffrey; Kress, Jeff; Swalm, Ricky

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated 10th-grade students' views concerning the physical effects of an adventure-physical education curriculum and the potential of such a curriculum to enhance components of a multidimensional model of physical self-concept. Semistructured interviews were used to obtain students' views and participant observations were conducted…

  7. The Conscious Use (or Avoidance) of Metaphor in Outdoor Adventure Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beames, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Facilitated discussion before, during and after experiences is widely accepted practice in the field of outdoor adventure education. Much of the literature appears to house the assumption that individual learning may be considerably restricted if participants' experiences are not processed with the help of an external facilitator, as they may not…

  8. The Role of Outdoor Adventure Education in Facilitating Groupwork in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooley, Sam J.; Burns, Victoria E.; Cumming, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Groupwork is an increasingly popular method of learning in higher education and the ability to work effectively with others is important for academic success and employability. This systematic review investigated the use of outdoor adventure education (OAE) in facilitating the development of transferable groupwork skills in higher education. The…

  9. Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, and Something Blue. New Ideas for Challenge and Adventure Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Jim

    This paper provides information sources and ideas for challenge and adventure activities. Main information sources are listed: libraries, ERIC, and several publishers and programs. Some useful publications are described that provide activities and ideas related to outdoor education, environmental issues, games, special populations, educational…

  10. Adventure Learning and Learner-Engagement: Frameworks for Designers and Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrickson, Jeni; Doering, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    There is a recognized need for theoretical frameworks that can guide designers and educators in the development of engagement-rich learning experiences that incorporate emerging technologies in pedagogically sound ways. This study investigated one such promising framework, adventure learning (AL). Data were gathered via surveys, interviews, direct…

  11. Teaching Tip: Active Learning via a Sample Database: The Case of Microsoft's Adventure Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitri, Michel

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the use and benefits of Microsoft's Adventure Works (AW) database to teach advanced database skills in a hands-on, realistic environment. Database management and querying skills are a key element of a robust information systems curriculum, and active learning is an important way to develop these skills. To facilitate active…

  12. Influence of Occupational Socialization on the Practices and Perspectives of Two Inexperienced Adventure Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zmudy, Mark H.; Curtner-Smith, Matthew D.; Steffen, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    A relatively small number of researchers have found it interesting and useful to examine why and how persons choose to be and become adventure educators (AEs) and why they teach as they do. The implications of this knowledge are: (1) gaining insight into novice AEs' perceptions of what is required to provide in-depth and high quality instruction…

  13. Gender Matters: Exploring the Process of Developing Resilience through Outdoor Adventure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overholt, Jillisa R.; Ewert, Alan

    2015-01-01

    This two-phase study investigates the process of developing resilience through participation in outdoor adventure programming. In this study, resilience is conceptualized as experiencing growth through a disruptive event. In the first phase, a pre-post survey measure was used to assess resilience in university students who were enrolled in a…

  14. Reflections about Outdoor Adventure Sports and Professional Competencies of Physical Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinho, Alcyane; dos Santos, Priscila Mari; Manfroi, Miraíra Noal; de Paula Figueiredo, Juliana; Brasil, Vinicius Zeilmann

    2017-01-01

    Universities have been entrusted with the task of qualifying professionals for their future practice. In light of this, the present study analysed the competencies perceived by 80 physical education students of a public university in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, enrolled in the subject Outdoor Adventure Sports. An exploratory descriptive…

  15. Multiple Methods for Identifying Outcomes of a High Challenge Adventure Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Curt; Ewert, Alan; Chang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide insight into what occurs in moments of high challenge within participants during an outdoor adventure education (OAE) program. Given the inherent risk and remote locations often associated with OAE programs, it has remained challenging to measure selected psychological constructs while the program is taking…

  16. Risk Management in Adventure Programs with Special Populations: Two Hidden Dangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stich, Thomas; Gaylor, Michael S.

    The paper addresses two significant risk management considerations in conducting an adventure program in a therapeutic setting: the potential hazards of psychiatric medications and psychological emergencies. Focusing on the potential hazards of psychiatric medications, the first section discusses climatic conditions (heat, cold, and sun) and the…

  17. Dangerous Liaisons: Exploring Employer Engagement Relationships in Vocational Undergraduate Adventure and Outdoor Management Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melhuish, Lynsey

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the aspects of employer engagement in higher education (HE). The vocational field of the adventure and outdoor industry provides the context, with associated undergraduate degrees offering contemporary "real-world" provision, underpinned by values of inclusivity and widening participation--an approach that addresses…

  18. An Exploration of Transformational Learning in Adults as a Result of Adventure Travel Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory qualitative research study was to identify the elements of adventure travel experiences that contribute to the process of transformational learning in adults. A qualitative research design was employed for this study. The sources of data were twelve pre-existing and de-identified interview transcriptions. A textual…

  19. Using Outdoor Adventure Education to Develop Students' Groupwork Skills: A Quantitative Exploration of Reaction and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooley, Sam J.; Burns, Victoria E.; Cumming, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the initial development of groupwork skills through outdoor adventure education (OAE) and the factors that predict the extent of this development, using the first two levels of Kirkpatrick's model of training evaluation. University students (N = 238) completed questionnaires measuring their initial reactions to OAE (Level 1…

  20. Building Self-Esteem of Children and Adolescents through Adventure-Based Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassar-McMillan, Sylvia C.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    1997-01-01

    Explores ways in which communities and school counselors can foster self-esteem in children and adolescents through adventure-based counseling (ABC). Discusses the importance of self-esteem, the philosophy and tenets of ABC, the effectiveness of ABC, and ways to integrate ABC concepts into groups. Focuses on prevention and intervention. (RJM)

  1. First Steps to the Last Frontier: Programming Suggestions for Alaskan Adventures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Todd

    This article provides an overview of trip programming in Alaska for those seeking a low-cost wilderness adventure. Alaska is a land of glaciers, mountains, lakes, rivers, forests, and wildlife. Safety is a major concern when traveling in Alaska. A local guide or outdoor educator can assist with safety and logistical planning. Travelers should plan…

  2. Outdoor Adventure Education in East Asia: Interpreting Data from Outward Bound Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibthorp, Jim; Funnell, Aaron; Riley, Mike; Chan, Bacon; Meerts-Brandsma, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Outdoor adventure education (OAE) is philosophically rooted in Western values, yet it has been implemented in non-Western cultures, such as East Asia. This paper examines how OAE functions in East Asia, through data from Hong Kong. Although some cultural differences are clear, there is no compelling evidence that OAE cannot provide benefits in…

  3. Orienteering with Adventure Education: New Games for the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammes, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    Orienteering is an outdoor pursuit in which participants try to locate a series of different control points, using only a map and compass (Laubach, 1998). It is a life-long skill that can be taught to all ages in both a natural and urban setting. Adventure education is an approach to teaching where an individual is placed in an unfamiliar…

  4. TOP Outdoors: Outdoor and Adventurous Activities for Every Teacher and Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, David; Perry, Frank

    1999-01-01

    The Youth Sport Trust developed a package of activities to support the teaching of outdoor and adventurous activities, integrated into the British national curriculum through physical education programs for preschool through secondary school age. Activity categories are physical challenges, trails, and orienteering. Teaching resources and their…

  5. Crossing the Threshold Mindfully: Exploring Rites of Passage Models in Adventure Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Julian

    2011-01-01

    Rites of passage models, drawing from ethnographic descriptions of ritualized transition, are widespread in adventure therapy programmes. However, critical literature suggests that: (a) contemporary rites of passage models derive from a selective and sometimes misleading use of ethnographic materials, and (b) the appropriation of initiatory…

  6. Fifty-four Years of Adventures in Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becklin, Eric Eric

    2018-01-01

    My adventures in infrared astronomy started when I was a grad student in 1965 with the discovery of an infrared-bright object (now known as the Becklin-Neugebauer Object) in the Orion Nebula. In 1966, I made the first measurements of the infrared radiation from the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. I was fortunate enough to be able to take advantage of the 2.2 micron sky survey carried out by Neugebauer and Leighton (1969), which produced many remarkable discoveries, the most spectacular being the heavily dust-embedded carbon star IRC+10216, thebrightest object in the sky at 5 microns outside the solar system. In the 1970’s there was a growth in Infrared astronomy with the availability of many new facilities such as the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, (KAO) which I used extensively with Mike Werner and Ian Gatley for many unique observations. In 1977, I moved to Hawaii to work on the NASA IRTF 3- meter telescope. Many discoveries were made, including the first direct measurements of the rings of Jupiter at 2.2 microns (with Gareth Wynn-Williams) and the discovery of the first L dwarf star around a white dwarf (with Ben Zuckerman). In the 1980’s the introduction of large format arrays changed the way we did infrared astronomy. With Ian McLean, I moved to UCLA in 1990 to start the IR lab and get involved in Keck development and science. In 1995, Andrea, Ghez, Mark Morris and I started looking for evidence of a possible massive Black Hole in the Galactic Center. Spectacular observations using the Keck10 meter telescopes with large format near-infrared arrays and adaptive optics led to the confirmation of the presence of such a black hole and an estimate of its mass (4xE6 M (Sun)). In 1996, I began working on the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and I will finish my talk by discussing SOFIA observations of the ring of dust and gas orbiting the massive black hole in the center

  7. Adventure sports and sexual freedom hip replacement: the tripolar hip.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, James W

    2018-01-01

    Certain athletic activities and lifestyles require a completely stable and very mobile hip. Total hip replacement with a natural femoral head size and two mobile-bearing surfaces (i.e., a "tripolar" prosthesis) is the most stable prosthesis. Elegant design and wear-resistant bearing surfaces are the keys to long-term implant survivorship. The hypothesis is that a ceramic-coated tripolar prosthesis using highly cross-linked polyethylene can provide full function and complete stability with low wear. This study sought to determine: (1) patient-reported outcomes, (2) functional outcomes, (3) implant survivorship and complications, and (4) postoperative sexual limitations. Between 1998 and 2011, the author performed 160 primary total hip replacements using tripolar prostheses in patients participating in adventure sports and other physically demanding activities. The institutional review board approved this study. The inclusion criteria were patients who needed unrestricted activity and who were not candidates for or did not choose hip resurfacing. Patients were followed every second year and assessed with radiographs, Harris Hip Score, WOMAC, SF-12, and UCLA functional outcome scores. Patients were asked about symptoms of instability and satisfaction with their hip replacement. Patients were asked both preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively four questions about their sexual activity. Mean follow-up was 11 years. At 2 years' postoperatively, 98% of patients reported their satisfaction as excellent or good and 99% were not limited for sexual activity following surgery. Seventy-four percent of patients reported they were recovered within 6 weeks of surgery. There were no dislocations. There were three revision procedures for implant loosening, infection, and periprosthetic fracture, but there were no failures of the tripolar articulation. The mean postoperative UCLA score was the highly athletic score of 8. There were no signs of osteolysis, wear, or metal

  8. Selection of School Counsellors in New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manthei, R. J.

    This paper presents the views of the New Zealand Counselling and Guidance Association regarding the need for changes in the system of selecting individuals for training as school counselors in New Zealand. A number of options are offered for improving the mechanics of selection, recommending selection criteria, and suggesting procedures for…

  9. California's coast redwood in New Zealand

    Treesearch

    Tom Gaman

    2012-01-01

    New Zealanders are making a significant effort to develop their forest industry to benefit from rapid growth exhibited by Sequoia sempervirens on both the North Island and South Island. US and New Zealand forest products companies have established redwood plantations in the past decade, and have found that microclimate, site preparation, soil chemistry, fertilization...

  10. Evolution of campylobacter species in New Zealand

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    New Zealand is an isolated archipelago in the South-West Pacific with a unique fauna and flora, a feature partly attributable to it being the last sizable land mass to be colonized by man. In this chapter we test the hypothesis that different periods in the history of New Zealand – from pre-history ...

  11. Early Childhood Services in New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oborn, Glennie

    2002-01-01

    Describes the types and characteristics of New Zealand early childhood education services. Specific areas addressed include: (1) Te Whaariki, the New Zealand early childhood curriculum; (2) great outdoors as a feature of early education; (3) education and care centers; (4) kindergartens and playcenters; and (5) Te Kohanga Reo, Maori language and…

  12. The Cost Efficiency New Zealand's Polytechnics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Malcolm; Doucouliagos, Hristos

    2004-01-01

    In New Zealand the most important institutions that are responsible for the delivery of vocational education and training programs are the government owned and operated tertiary education institutions known as polytechnics. The New Zealand polytechnics deliver programs at the certificate, diploma and degree level. During the course of the 1990s,…

  13. New Zealand Police and Restorative Justice Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfree, L. Thomas, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In New Zealand, selected sworn police officers called youth aid officers participate in discussions and deliberations concerning the actions required to restore the sense of community balance upset by the actions of juvenile offenders. The author explores a representative sample of all sworn police officers serving in the New Zealand Police,…

  14. Obesity and Intellectual Disability in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stedman, Kurstyn V.; Leland, Louis S., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The international literature suggests that obesity is likely to be more pronounced in the population of people with intellectual disability (ID). However, there are no published New Zealand data for this population. Method: We accessed a database containing anonymous data for a New Zealand ID population. Ninety-eight people of 141 had…

  15. Tourism and natural resource management: a general overview of research and issues.

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey D. Kline

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, growing awareness among tourism researchers of the relations between tourism and natural resource management has resulted in a substantial body of academic literature examining tourism issues under a relatively new set of tourism concepts. Seemingly new forms of tourism, such as nature-based tourism, ecotourism, and sustainable tourism, now are...

  16. An Analysis on Teaching Reform of Tourism Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Min

    2006-01-01

    The goal of tourism education in Chinese undergraduate courses is to develop the student with ability of the application, the skill and meet the demand of the post for the administration of tourism. The tourism psychology took the core role of tourism specialty, whose educational model, the content, the teaching method, the way of examination and…

  17. Sustainable tourism development: the case study of Antalya, Turkey

    Treesearch

    Latif Gurkan Kaya; Richard Smardon

    2001-01-01

    This paper discuss ideas about how tourism can be made base for sustainable tourism development in Antalya, Turkey. The introduction is a general overview of sustainable tourism development in coastal areas. The paper also addresses the role of NGOs in the course of development. Information is given about coastal tourism facilities in Turkey. Finally, sustainable...

  18. Syntactic Analysis of Online Tourism Slogans: Frequency, Forms and Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huadhom, Narumon; Trakulkasemsuk, Wannapa

    2017-01-01

    Tourism has been growing fast as a global industry. Promoting national tourism is therefore an important part of a country's economic plan and can contribute to its economic success. Tourism slogans have always been part of the promotion of national tourism. Almost every country has their own catchy, pungent taglines to attract new tourists. This…

  19. Tourism Curriculum in a Global Perspective: Past, Present, and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wattanacharoensil, Walanchalee

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the development of tourism curricula over the past 20 years from the perspective of global tourism. The paper proposes a generic framework for a future tourism curriculum on the basis of a review of literature in the American, British, and other European contexts. The proposed tourism curriculum aims to create well-rounded…

  20. Managing the wildlife tourism commons.

    PubMed

    Pirotta, Enrico; Lusseau, David

    2015-04-01

    The nonlethal effects of wildlife tourism can threaten the conservation status of targeted animal populations. In turn, such resource depletion can compromise the economic viability of the industry. Therefore, wildlife tourism exploits resources that can become common pool and that should be managed accordingly. We used a simulation approach to test whether different management regimes (tax, tax and subsidy, cap, cap and trade) could provide socioecologically sustainable solutions. Such schemes are sensitive to errors in estimated management targets. We determined the sensitivity of each scenario to various realistic uncertainties in management implementation and in our knowledge of the population. Scenarios where time quotas were enforced using a tax and subsidy approach, or they were traded between operators were more likely to be sustainable. Importantly, sustainability could be achieved even when operators were assumed to make simple rational economic decisions. We suggest that a combination of the two regimes might offer a robust solution, especially on a small spatial scale and under the control of a self-organized, operator-level institution. Our simulation platform could be parameterized to mimic local conditions and provide a test bed for experimenting different governance solutions in specific case studies.

  1. Fast Access to Space Tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favata', P.; Martineau, N.

    2002-01-01

    creating a revolutionary space-orbiting habitat dedicated to tourism. Up to now, such proposals have focused on two approaches. The first accounts for financial and technological constraints on space flight and living, and sacrifices creativity for practicality. The second is more utopic in nature and proposes projects, which are imaginative but unfeasible in the near future. This proposal is innovative because it considers the current obstacles to space tourism and utilizes existing technologies and infrastructures, but also includes the forethinking of futuristic commercial projects. Project Objectives: NASA claims that commercialization of space activities is so difficult that it will require decades more funding of so-called space-technology development. The benefits of this project show that this is not true. First, safety has been addressed because this proposal utilizes already space tested and assured technologies. Second, the project demonstrates potential for significant economic profit within the near future. Because we are using the least expensive technology available, we have limited start up costs. We forecast up to forty flights per year, with a potential capacity of eighty tourists. The design objectives focus on the proposal of a new approach to space tourism. These include: the expansion of the living space in the interiors, innovative and creative interior design, increased concern for the physiological and psychological comfort of tourists, and attention to entertainment possibilities. Project Content: The efficiency of the launch and configuration phase is one of the strengths of the proposed project. We propose the use of the Zenith 2 launcher, a large two-stage vehicle developed in the Soviet Union in the early 1980s, for the configuration of the orbiting platform. Following the Russian outfitting philosophy, once in orbit, the platform is already functional. The interior design is based on advanced lightweight inflatable technologies which

  2. Business Context of Space Tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Harrison H.

    2003-01-01

    Broadly speaking, two types of potential commercial activity in space can be defined. First, there are those activities that represent an expansion and improvement on services with broad existing commercial foundations such as telecommunications. The second type of potential commercial activity in space is one that may offer a type of service with few or any existing commercial foundations such as space-based remote sensing. Space tourism clearly belongs in the first category of potential commercial activity in space. Roles in cooperation with the private sector that might be considered for NASA include 1) acceleration of the ``Professional-in Space'' initiative, 2) research and technology developments related to a) a ``Tourist Destination Module'' for the Space Station, b) an ``Extra Passengers Module'' for the payload bay of the Space Shuttle, and c) a ``Passenger-rated Expendable Launch Vehicle,'' 3) definition of criteria for qualifying candidate space tourists, and 4) initiatives to protect space tourism from unreasonable tort litigation. As baseline information for establishing fees, the cost of a possible tourist flight should be fully and objectively delineated. If it is correct that the marginal cost of each Space Shuttle flight to Earth-orbit is about $100 million and the effective Shuttle payload is about 50,000 pounds, then the marginal cost would be roughly $2,000 per pound.

  3. Medical tourism in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Ramírez de Arellano, Annette B

    2011-01-01

    Although travel for medical reasons has a long history, it has more recently evolved from a cottage industry to a worldwide enterprise. A number of countries are positioning themselves to attract visitors who are willing to travel to obtain health services that are more accessible, less expensive, or more available than in their countries of origin. This has in turn given rise to medical packages that combine tourism with health. Several Caribbean nations - including Cuba, Barbados, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico - hope to expand their revenues in this new market. Each country has selected specific service niches and promotes its services accordingly. While Cuba has been promoting its services to other countries for several decades, medical tourism is just beginning in the other islands. Ultimately, these nations' economic success will hinge on their comparative advantage vis-à-vis other options, while their success in terms of improving their own health care depends on the extent to which the services for tourists are also available to the islands' populations.

  4. Relevance for Work in the Western Cape Tourism Industry of the National Certificate Vocational in Tourism Education at TVET Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbrecht, Mardine; Spencer, John; van der Bijl, Andre

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the relevance of the National Certificate Vocational (NCV) tourism programme for the South African tourism industry in terms of skills needed by tourism students to work in the tourism industry after graduating. The NCV programmes were introduced in 2007 at public Further Education and Training Colleges (now Technical,…

  5. Organ trading, tourism, and trafficking within Europe.

    PubMed

    Pattinson, Shaun D

    2008-03-01

    This article argues for a regulatory and institutional response towards organ trading, tourism and trafficking that differs from extant approaches. European countries have hitherto adopted blanket prohibitions on organ trading (i.e. the buying or selling of human organs). This article advances the view that policy makers have thereby overreacted to legitimate public health concerns and the evils of organ trafficking (i.e. organ trading and tourism involving coercion or deception). It argues for a trial of a very tightly regulated system of organ trading that could eventually lead to a limited system of organ tourism (i.e. organ trading involving more than one jurisdiction).

  6. M-tourism as increasing trend within current tourism and recreation - Polish and international experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuska, Michalina; Augustyńska, Beata; Mikołajewska, Emilia; Mikołajewski, Dariusz

    2017-11-01

    Mobile solutions (smartphones, tablet computers, smartwatches, smartbands, gps locallzators, and associated software) become normal part of our daily activities. Thus novel part of e-commerce named m-tourism is developing rapidly. It may maximise profitability across national boundaries and make tourism easier, quicker and cheaper than before. We should be prepared to associated changes and novel economics. Aim of the article is to investigate factors associated with m-tourism experiences, and the association between use of e-services and tourism experiences and subsequent satisfaction.

  7. Detecting emotion in others: increased insula and decreased medial prefrontal cortex activation during emotion processing in elite adventure racers

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Douglas C.; Flagan, Taru; Simmons, Alan N.; Kotturi, Sante A.; Van Orden, Karl F.; Potterat, Eric G.; Swain, Judith L.; Paulus, Martin P.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the neural processes that characterize elite performers is a first step to develop a neuroscience model that can be used to improve performance in stressful circumstances. Adventure racers are elite athletes that operate in small teams in the context of environmental and physical extremes. In particular, awareness of team member’s emotional status is critical to the team’s ability to navigate high-magnitude stressors. Thus, this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study examined the hypothesis that adventure racers would show altered emotion processing in brain areas that are important for resilience and social awareness. Elite adventure racers (n = 10) were compared with healthy volunteers (n = 12) while performing a simple emotion face-processing (modified Hariri) task during fMRI. Across three types of emotional faces, adventure racers showed greater activation in right insula, left amygdala and dorsal anterior cingulate. Additionally, compared with healthy controls adventure racers showed attenuated right medial prefrontal cortex activation. These results are consistent with previous studies showing elite performers differentially activate neural substrates underlying interoception. Thus, adventure racers differentially deploy brain resources in an effort to recognize and process the internal sensations associated with emotions in others, which could be advantageous for team-based performance under stress. PMID:23171614

  8. Architectural design for space tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vera

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes the main issues for the design of an appropriately planned habitat for tourists in space. Due study and analysis of the environment of space stations (ISS, MIR, Skylab) delineate positive and negative aspects of architectonical design. Analysis of the features of architectonical design for touristic needs and verification of suitability with design for space habitat. Space tourism environment must offer a high degree of comfort and suggest correct behavior of the tourists. This is intended for the single person as well as for the group. Two main aspects of architectural planning will be needed: the design of the private sphere and the design of the public sphere. To define the appearance of environment there should be paid attention to some main elements like the materiality of surfaces used; the main shapes of areas and the degree of flexibility and adaptability of the environment to specific needs.

  9. Captain Haddock's health issues in the adventures of Tintin. Comparison with Tintin's health issues.

    PubMed

    Caumes, Eric; Epelboin, Loïc; Guermonprez, Geraldine; Leturcq, France; Clarke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We currently lack a comprehensive and systematic description of the challenges and health impairments (HI) faced by Captain Haddock over the course of the 15 Tintin adventures in which he appears. Their respective HIs have yet to be compared. We evaluated the spectrum of HIs that Haddock sustains in these 15 adventures as well as their causes, consequences, and their relationship to alcohol or travel beyond Belgium. We diagnosed Haddock's HIs according to descriptive terms in the text. We then classified HIs as traumatic and non-traumatic, and distinguished between intentional and unintentional events. We compared the depiction of HIs involving Haddock and Tintin. We found 225 events leading to 249 HIs, two hospitalisations, and three medical consultations. There was a median of 19 HIs/adventure (range 4-27/adventure) with 193 cases of trauma (77.5%) and 56 non-traumatic problems (22.5%). There were 109 cases of concussion (43% of all HI, 56% of all trauma). We encountered 12 burns including ten relating to Haddock's tobacco habit. The most common forms of non-traumatic problems were linked to alcoholism (57%), and specifically drunkenness (37%). Haddock is diagnosed with cirrhosis early in Tintin's adventures. He significantly decreases his consumption of alcohol after he meets Tintin (58.3% of HI before vs 10.7% of HI after; P<0.001; OR 5.4) but not his use of tobacco. He is also susceptible to certain travel-related illnesses such as mosquito bites, ear discomfort, exposure to exotic animals, and perhaps jet lag. Overall, Haddock presents as many HIs (249 vs 244) and trauma (190 vs 193) as Tintin, but suffers significantly more HIs/adventure than Tintin (median 19 vs 8, P=0.03), and the traumas are significantly less severe, LoCs accounting for 23% of Tintin's traumatic HIs vs 2.5% for Haddock (P<0.001; OR: 5.1). Traumatic HIs and concussion are the leading cause of HIs for Tintin and Haddock but are clearly less severe for Haddock. Haddock evolves from

  10. An International Polar Year Adventure in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wartes, D.

    2008-12-01

    Native students in the UA system who participated in RAHI are nearly twice as likely to earn a bachelor's degree, than those who did not attend RAHI. The past two summers, in celebration of the International Polar Year, in collaboration with Ilisagvik College, at the completion of the traditional RAHI program, ten RAHI students flew to Barrow for an additional two weeks of study. Five students participated in an archaeological dig and five students performed research with the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium scientists studying climate change. And another student was the Alaskan delegate to the Students on Ice, a 2-week ship-based adventure in northern Canada. In addition, ten students from Greenland visited the program, with plans to more fully participate next summer. This added dimension to the program has proved successful, allowing the students to compare and contrast between their own countries and indigenous perspectives. Global warming was an issue that was hotly debated, as its effects are so evident in the Polar Regions. In the Arctic, one's life is directly tied to the ice and snow. As the ice disappears and/or changes, the Indigenous people have to adapt. RAHI would like to share with you some of the results of this past summer's IPY activities.

  11. CULTURE, PSYCHIATRY AND NEW ZEALAND

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, A.N.; Dobson, Teara Wharemate

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a critical appraisal of the importance of cultural perspective in the psychiatric diagnosis and management plan. The working philosophy of mental health services in New Zealand is primarily monocultural and based on Western medical conceptualisation of diagnosis and treatment protocol. In view of the emphasis on bicultural health perspectives in recent years and in tune with the objectives of the Treaty of Waitangi's ethnocultural partnership, the provision of a culturally safe and sensitive mental health coverage of Maori and Pacific Islander clients has become an important health issue in the country. The present discussion of the ethnocultural influence on clinical psychiatry highlights some of the relevant issues from the transcultural perspective. PMID:21206600

  12. Management Development in Hospitality and Tourism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teare, Richard, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A theme issue devoted to management development in hospitality and tourism includes nine articles on assessing human resource needs and priorities, management development and training, preparing managers, curriculum design, supervised work experience, manager role, and the current business environment. (JOW)

  13. Medical tourism-A New Arena.

    PubMed

    Puri, S; Singh, A; Yashik

    2010-01-01

    Globalisation has given birth to medical tourism. Health and medical tourism are the fastest growing segments in not only developed nations but in developing countries too. India has become a hot destination, as the Indian medical standards match up to the highly prescribed international standards at a very low cost. However, it is an unmixed blessing; along with advantages, it has many unintended side effects also.

  14. Medical tourism-A New Arena

    PubMed Central

    Puri, S; Singh, A; Yashik

    2010-01-01

    Globalisation has given birth to medical tourism. Health and medical tourism are the fastest growing segments in not only developed nations but in developing countries too. India has become a hot destination, as the Indian medical standards match up to the highly prescribed international standards at a very low cost. However, it is an unmixed blessing; along with advantages, it has many unintended side effects also. PMID:23113017

  15. Coastal tourism and climate change in Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henia, Latifa; Hlaoui, Zouhaier; Alouane, Tahar

    2014-05-01

    Tunisia is a major tourist destination on the southern shore of the Mediterranean. The tourism sector occupies an important place in the Tunisian economy with 816 hotels, 229,873 beds and a more than six million tourists at the end of the first decade of the 21th century, i.e. , more than half of the population. It offers a large number of direct and indirect jobs: One out of five people work in the tourism sector. The 1960s tourism boom was caused by a number of factors including long days of sunshine, 1,300 km of sandy coast, and a location close to Europe. Tunisian tourism is fundamentally based on two natural determinants: the sun and the sea. The coastline accounts for 95% of tourism investments and functional beds. The high season extends from April to October and it records 73% of nonresident tourists. This results in a homogenous growth of the "product" and its "consumers". This standardization is an important factor in the vulnerability of the Tunisian tourism to climate change. Global warming may affect the comfort level of the swimming season as well as its structure. An estimation of air and water temperature evolution near the Tunisian coasts was conducted under the CLIM-RUN project "Climate Local Information in the Mediterranean Region: Responding to User Needs" funded by the European Union's Seventh Framework Program (FP7). The University of Tunis research unit "GREVACHOT", project partner in charge of the case study of Tunisian tourism, has made the study of comfort indices of the present climate. This paper presents: - The climate comfort indices for seaside tourism in Tunisia, - The approach and results of the future evolution of air and water temperatures by the Tunisian coasts, - The future evolution of climate seaside comfort indices of Tunisia as well as the evolution of the swimming season in relation to global warming.

  16. A systematic review of publications studies on medical tourism.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Ferdosi; Alireza, Jabbari; Mahmoud, Keyvanara; Zahra, Agharahimi

    2013-01-01

    Medical tourism for any study area is complex. Using full articles from other databases, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI), Science Direct, Emerald, Oxford, Magiran, and Scientific Information Database (SID), to examine systematically published articles about medical tourism in the interval 2000-2011 paid. Articles were obtained using descriptive statistics and content analysis categories were analyzed. Among the 28 articles reviewed, 11 cases were a kind of research articles, three cases were case studies in Mexico, India, Hungary, Germany, and Iran, and 14 were case studies, review documents and data were passed. The main topics of study included the definition of medical tourism, medical tourists' motivation and development of medical tourism, ethical issues in medical tourism, and impact on health and medical tourism marketing. The findings indicate the definition of medical tourism in various articles, and medical tourists are motivated. However, most studies indicate the benefits of medical tourism in developing countries and more developed countries reflect the consequences of medical tourism.

  17. Seeking health care through international medical tourism.

    PubMed

    Eissler, Lee Ann; Casken, John

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was the exploration of international travel experiences for the purpose of medical or dental care from the perspective of patients from Alaska and to develop insight and understanding of the essence of the phenomenon of medical tourism. The study is conceptually oriented within a model of health-seeking behavior. Using a qualitative design, 15 Alaska medical tourists were individually interviewed. The data were analyzed using a hermeneutic process of inquiry to uncover the meaning of the experience. Six themes reflecting the experiences of Alaska medical tourists emerged: "my motivation," "I did the research," "the medical care I need," "follow-up care," "the advice I give," and "in the future." Subthemes further categorized data for increased understanding of the phenomenon. The thematic analysis provides insight into the experience and reflects a modern approach to health-seeking behavior through international medical tourism. The results of this study provide increased understanding of the experience of obtaining health care internationally from the patient perspective. Improved understanding of medical tourism provides additional information about a contemporary approach to health-seeking behavior. Results of this study will aid nursing professionals in counseling regarding medical tourism options and providing follow-up health care after medical tourism. Nurses will be able to actively participate in global health policy discussions regarding medical tourism trends. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Rethinking tourism: Bali’s failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamdevi, M.; Bott, H.

    2018-03-01

    Bali is famous as the tourist destination in the world. Ironically, most of the people of Bali thought that tourism in Bali is a failure. The negative impact showed on modernization in South Bali, including Denpasar, Kuta, and Ubud. Cultural imperialism has shifted local culture in many aspects, especially the traditional houses and buildings. The climax of this problem is the development of Benoa Bay Reclamation, where the sacred location for the traditional ceremony will be built for new tourism development that offers pleasure and leisure. This raised hard protest from the people of Bali. They are also afraid that the Balinese cultural and natural environment will vanish. On the other hand, some movement of sustainable tourism in North Bali, that ran by the local community has also arisen. What is tourism? Is it only for pleasure and leisure only? This research will discuss the rethinking of tourism definition with Bali as a reflection case. The purpose of this paper is to find its right definition with qualitative methodology. A more sustainable tourism that more on local context would be a research result.

  19. The effects of medical tourism: Thailand's experience.

    PubMed

    NaRanong, Anchana; NaRanong, Viroj

    2011-05-01

    To explore the positive and negative effects of medical tourism on the economy, health staff and medical costs in Thailand. The financial repercussions of medical tourism were estimated from commerce ministry data, with modifications and extrapolations. Survey data on 4755 foreign and Thai outpatients in two private hospitals were used to explore how medical tourism affects human resources. Trends in the relative prices of caesarean section, appendectomy, hernia repair, cholecystectomy and knee replacement in five private hospitals were examined. Focus groups and in-depth interviews with hospital managers and key informants from the public and private sectors were conducted to better understand stakeholders' motivations and practices in connection with these procedures and learn more about medical tourism. Medical tourism generates the equivalent of 0.4% of Thailand's gross domestic product but has exacerbated the shortage of medical staff by luring more workers away from the private and public sectors towards hospitals catering to foreigners. This has raised costs in private hospitals substantially and is likely to raise them in public hospitals and in the universal health-care insurance covering most Thais as well. The "brain drain" may also undermine medical training in future. Medical tourism in Thailand, despite some benefits, has negative effects that could be mitigated by lifting the restrictions on the importation of qualified foreign physicians and by taxing tourists who visit the country solely for the purpose of seeking medical treatment. The revenue thus generated could then be used to train physicians and retain medical school professors.

  20. Ethical, Legal, and Administrative Considerations for Preparticipation Evaluation for Wilderness Sports and Adventures.

    PubMed

    Young, Craig C; Campbell, Aaron D; Lemery, Jay; Young, David S

    2015-12-01

    Preparticipation evaluations (PPEs) are common in team, organized, or traditional sports but not common in wilderness sports or adventures. Regarding ethical, legal, and administrative considerations, the same principles can be used as in traditional sports. Clinicians should be trained to perform such a PPE to avoid missing essential components and to maximize the quality of the PPE. In general, participants' privacy should be observed; office-based settings may be best for professional and billing purposes, and adequate documentation of a complete evaluation, including clearance issues, should be essential components. Additional environmental and personal health issues relative to the wilderness activity should be documented, and referral for further screening should be made as deemed necessary, if unable to be performed by the primary clinician. Travel medicine principles should be incorporated, and recommendations for travel or adventure insurance should be made. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Ethical, Legal, and Administrative Considerations for Preparticipation Evaluation for Wilderness Sports and Adventures.

    PubMed

    Young, Craig C; Campbell, Aaron D; Lemery, Jay; Young, David S

    2015-09-01

    Preparticipation evaluations (PPEs) are common in team, organized, or traditional sports but not common in wilderness sports or adventures. Regarding ethical, legal, and administrative considerations, the same principles can be used as in traditional sports. Clinicians should be trained to perform such a PPE to avoid missing essential components and to maximize the quality of the PPE. In general, participants' privacy should be observed; office-based settings may be best for professional and billing purposes, and adequate documentation of a complete evaluation, including clearance issues, should be essential components. Additional environmental and personal health issues relative to the wilderness activity should be documented, and referral for further screening should be made as deemed necessary, if unable to be performed by the primary clinician. Travel medicine principles should be incorporated, and recommendations for travel or adventure insurance should be made.

  2. [Current situation of acupuncture in New Zealand].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoji; Hu, Youping

    2017-04-12

    The beginning of TCM acupuncture in New Zealand dates back to the middle of 19th century. After self-improvement for more than 100 years, TCM acupuncture has gained a considerable development. From the perspective of history and current situation, the development of acupuncture in New Zealand was elaborated in this article; in addition, the sustainable development of acupuncture was discussed from the perspective of education and training. In New Zealand, the TCM acupuncture and dry needling have played a dominant role in acupuncture treatments, which are practiced by TCM practitioners and physical therapists. The TCM acupuncture is widely applied in department of internal medicine, surgery, gynecology, and pediatrics, etc., while the dry needling is li-mited for traumatology and pain disorder. Therefore, including TCM acupuncture into the public medical and educational system in New Zealand should be an essential policy of Ministry of Health to provide welfare for the people.

  3. International migration and New Zealand labour markets.

    PubMed

    Farmer, R S

    1986-06-01

    "This paper seeks to assess the value of the overseas-born members of the labour force in ensuring a flexible labour supply in New Zealand since the beginning of the 1970s. Three main issues are considered: first, the role of the labour market in New Zealand's immigration policy; second, international migration trends and the labour market; and third, the evidence on migration and labour market segmentation in New Zealand." Data used are from official external migration statistics, quinquennial censuses, and recent research. The author notes that "in New Zealand immigration measures are currently being taken that emphasize that immigration continues to add to the flexibility of the labour market while uncontrolled emigration is a major cause of labour market instability." (SUMMARY IN FRE AND SPA) excerpt

  4. Anaglyph, Landsat Overlay: Wellington, New Zealand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-11

    This anaglyph, from NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, is of Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand, located on the shores of Port Nicholson, a natural harbor. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

  5. Splintering of tourism market: new appearing forms of cultural tourism as a consequence of changes in everyday lives.

    PubMed

    Jelincić, Daniela Angelina

    2009-03-01

    Within the concept of cultural tourism, this article defines relatively new concepts of creative and hobby tourism, which are detected as recent niche markets. Cultural tourism is a narrow specialized market, while creative and hobby tourism relate to even more specialized segments. Even these specialized forms of tourism have their market whose growth is very probable taking into account changes in everyday work as well as changes in the values of human activity in general. These changes reflect also the sector of tourism, which is obvious in the ever growing splintering of tourism market as well as of tourism forms. The article reviews theoretical concepts of cultural, creative and hobby tourism as to prepare the basis for applied tourist programmes. It looks into the history of cultural tourism as to see what changes occurred and brought it to life. Changes that have taken place in everyday lives of people and the impact of everyday free time activities on tourism are also analysed. Further splintering of the cultural tourism sector is noticed and cultural tourism sub-forms are detected by analysing some of the leading home style and creativity magazines. The article also proposes possible application of push/pull factors to creative/hobby tourism.

  6. Sustainable tourism and harmonious culture: a case study of cultic model at village tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astawa, I. P.; Triyuni, N. N.; Santosa, I. D. M. C.

    2018-01-01

    The research aims to analyze an event model of Culture and Tourism International Camp (Cultic) from two aspects, harmonious culture and sustainable tourism. Currently, Indonesian government promotes village tourism by involving more villagers to achieve village independence in its development. The program has faced various obstacles, such as the eroded local cultures due to the development of a massive and money-oriented tourism with less attention on the environmental damage. One of the offered programs is a green tourism model for an event named Culture and Tourism International Camps - Cultic. The research is conducted in several stages. The first stage is the development of model based on the theoretical study. The second stage is the implementation of the model with 85 participants. The third stage is the evaluation of the model through harmonious culture and sustainable tourism approaches. The data is collected through a direct observation and a questionnaire. The result of qualitative analysis indicates that the developed event model supports the harmonious culture, especially the natural environment. Whereas, the result of quantitative analysis indicates that the participants enjoy the activities, such as green food, material natural, waste management, and ecosystem. Another finding is that the community strongly supports the concept of sustainable tourism.

  7. Relationship between Geography-Tourism and Tourism's Effects According to High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koca, Nusret; Yildirim, Ramazan

    2018-01-01

    This research was designed in the screening model to determine the opinions of high school students on tourism effects and geography-tourism relations. The data were gathered from 760 students who were educated in high schools in the central district of Kütahya, identified by cluster sampling method. The data were collected with the help of a…

  8. Bicentenary 2016: The First New Zealand School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Alison; Jenkins, Kuni Kaa

    2016-01-01

    Maori leaders visiting Australia invited a Pakeha (in this case, English) teacher to come to New Zealand to teach the children to read and write. On 12th August 1816, 200 years ago this year, the first school in New Zealand opened. Twenty-four Maori children came on that day, and each had his or her name written down. The teacher Thomas Kendall…

  9. Outdoor adventure therapy to increase physical activity in young adult cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Gill, Elizabeth; Goldenberg, Marni; Starnes, Heather; Phelan, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Despite the health benefits of physical activity (PA), limited research has examined PA interventions in young adult cancer survivors (YACS). This study used a two-group parallel design to examine the effects of a 7-day outdoor adventure camp vs. waitlist control on PA levels among YACS. Secondary aims examined effects on sedentary behavior and PA correlates. 50 camp and 66 control participants were assessed at baseline, end of camp, and 3 months. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated that, relative to baseline, camp participants had significantly (p = 0.0001) greater increases in PA than controls during camp (+577 vs. +9 minutes/week) and 3 months post-camp (+133 vs. -75 minutes/week, p = 0.001). Camp participants also reported significantly greater improvements in TV viewing (p = 0.001), hours sitting (p = 0.001), PA variety (p = 0.0001), barriers to PA (p = 0.007), and enjoyment of structured activities (p = 0.04) during camp but not 3 months post-camp. A week-long outdoor adventure therapy camp increased PA levels during camp and 3 months after camp termination, although effects were attenuated over time. Outdoor adventure therapy camps may increase PA and its correlates in YACS, but future research should explore methods to promote sustained PA after camp termination.

  10. Professional judgement and decision-making in adventure sports coaching: the role of interaction.

    PubMed

    Collins, Loel; Collins, Dave

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study presents the view that coaching practice places demands on the coach's adaptability and flexibility. These requirements for being adaptive and flexible are met through a careful process of professional judgement and decision-making based on context-appropriate bodies of knowledge. Adventure sports coaches were selected for study on the basis that adventure sports create a hyper-dynamic environment in which these features can be examined. Thematic analysis revealed that coaches were generally well informed and practised with respect to the technical aspects of their sporting disciplines. Less positively, however, they often relied on ad hoc contextualisation of generalised theories of coaching practice to respond to the hyper-dynamic environments encountered in adventure sports. We propose that coaching practice reflects the demands of the environment, individual learning needs of the students and the task at hand. Together, these factors outwardly resemble a constraints-led approach but, we suggest, actually reflect manipulation of these parameters from a cognitive rather than an ecological perspective. This process is facilitated by a refined judgement and decision-making process, sophisticated epistemology and an explicit interaction of coaching components.

  11. [Medical tourism and travel - an interdisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Freyer, W; Kim, B-S

    2014-01-01

    Medical tourism (or medical travel, international patient service, cross-border or global health care) is a new current phenomenon with increasing relevance for the two disciplines of medicine and tourism. Both sides hope to improve their reputation and image, as well as to increase their revenues and rate of employment; furthermore, they want to provide better care and service for patients and tourists: Medical tourism can close the gap of the health care system at home, providing better quality, quicker access and cheaper procedures abroad, also with treatments, not - legally - available in the sending country. For the tourism sector it broadens the variety of tourism products and supply of the host country and combines medical treatments and recovery with an attractive stay in a tourism destination for patients and their companions. But in spite of all popularity of this new type of tourism and treatment, there is quite a lack of theory and academic analysis. This article outlines the status quo of scientific research both from a medical and tourism point of view. This interdisciplinary method of approach is based mainly on a state-of-the art review of the current literature. There is a great need for more scientific research in the field of medical tourism, based on the common knowledge of both disciplines tourism and medicine. First there is neither an internationally agreed definition nor a common methodology for data collection. So the real impact of touristic and medical services both for the source and for the receiving countries is un-known and imprecise. Second the internal processes of the health system have to be adapted to the needs of international patients, e. g., medical fee schedule, billing, language, inter-cultural qualifications of the staff. Moreover the whole service chain has to be taken into account, especially the pre- and post-processes, which mostly start or end abroad. Here quality standards as well as accreditations are current

  12. New Zealand's National Landslide Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosser, B.; Dellow, S.; Haubrook, S.; Glassey, P.

    2016-12-01

    Since 1780, landslides have caused an average of about 3 deaths a year in New Zealand and have cost the economy an average of at least NZ$250M/a (0.1% GDP). To understand the risk posed by landslide hazards to society, a thorough knowledge of where, when and why different types of landslides occur is vital. The main objective for establishing the database was to provide a centralised national-scale, publically available database to collate landslide information that could be used for landslide hazard and risk assessment. Design of a national landslide database for New Zealand required consideration of both existing landslide data stored in a variety of digital formats, and future data, yet to be collected. Pre-existing databases were developed and populated with data reflecting the needs of the landslide or hazard project, and the database structures of the time. Bringing these data into a single unified database required a new structure capable of storing and delivering data at a variety of scales and accuracy and with different attributes. A "unified data model" was developed to enable the database to hold old and new landslide data irrespective of scale and method of capture. The database contains information on landslide locations and where available: 1) the timing of landslides and the events that may have triggered them; 2) the type of landslide movement; 3) the volume and area; 4) the source and debris tail; and 5) the impacts caused by the landslide. Information from a variety of sources including aerial photographs (and other remotely sensed data), field reconnaissance and media accounts has been collated and is presented for each landslide along with metadata describing the data sources and quality. There are currently nearly 19,000 landslide records in the database that include point locations, polygons of landslide source and deposit areas, and linear features. Several large datasets are awaiting upload which will bring the total number of landslides to

  13. Egmont National Park, New Zealand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The lush forests of Egmont National Park, on New Zealand's North Island, contrast with the pasturelands outside the circular park boundaries. The unique shape of the park results from its first protection in 1881, which specified that a forest reserve would extend in a 9.6 km radius from the summit of Mt. Taranaki (named Mt. Egmont by Captain Cook). The park covers about 33,500 hectares and Mt. Egmont stands at 2518 m. The volcano began forming 70,000 years ago, and last erupted in 1755. A series of montane habitats occur in procession up the flanks of the volcano-from rainforest, to shrubs, to alpine, and finally snow cover. Image STS110-726-6, was taken by Space Shuttle crewmembers on 9 April 2002 using a Hasselblad film camera. Image provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  14. Comparative Study on the Characteristics of Community-Based Tourism between Pentingsari and Nglanggeran Tourism Village, Special Region Yogyakarta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purbasari, Novia; Manaf, Asnawi

    2018-02-01

    Community-based tourism is one of the tourism development models that effectively used as a tool to alleviate poverty through empowerment strategy of the local community. Nevertheless, many people do not have adequate understanding on the characteristics of community-based tourism, which are used as a determinant in the tourism development. This article describes the comparison on characteristics of community-based tourism between Pentingsari and Nglanggeran. These villages were chosen because Pentingsari was a tourism village that able to apply the principles ethical codes of world tourism, shown by an award from the World Committee on Tourism Ethics Code and Nglanggeran was awarded as Best Tourism Village award in Indonesia from ASEAN Community Based Tourism Award 2017.The objectives of this study is to explore the characteristics of community-based tourism applied in the Pentingsari and Nglanggeran, and to identify any indicators that could be used to indicate those characteristics. The research achieves through in-depth interviews, observation, and review of documents. There were 17 persons as informants. Further, the observation was reached by directly observing in the both study cases. In addition, the data obtained through the review of secondary data from the local manager of tourism village. Generally, Pentingsari has characteristics as a community-based rural tourism, while Nglanggeran has characteristics as community-based ecotourism.

  15. Geographical tourism research and education at the Jagiellonian University School of Tourism in Poland (1936-1939)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackowski, Antoni; Sołjan, Izabela; Bilska-Wodecka, Elżbieta; Liro, Justyna

    2016-11-01

    The beginning of the twentieth century was a time of intensive development of geographical research on tourism, as well as the establishment of tourism research centers in many European countries. The Jagiellonian University School of Tourism played an important role in the development of tourism geography and education, spatial and regional planning, and personnel training for tourism developing in the 1930s in Poland. Tourism education in the school was characterized by a modern curriculum and forms of teaching, including fieldwork, focusing on developing practical skills, and linking research topics with the teaching process. The school conducted extensive research, publishing and documentary activities. The achievements of the Jagiellonian University School of Tourism helped raise awareness in society of the importance of tourism in the socio-economic development of regions and cities. This article presents the history of the Jagiellonian University School of Tourism and highlights its role in the development of tourism research and education in Europe. The school is mentioned among the pioneering centers of tourism, i.e., Robert Glucksmann's Tourism Research Institute at the Berlin School of Commerce, Walter Hunziker's and Kurt Krapf's tourism seminar in St. Gallen, and Raoul Blanchard's Institute of Alpine Geography in Grenoble.

  16. Editorial Introduction. After the Carnival: Tourism and Community Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovel, Hermione; Feuerstein, Marie-Therese

    1992-01-01

    Considers the following questions: How is tourism linked to community development? Who benefits economically? What is the impact on the environment? Does tourism promote respect for other cultures, or does it trivialize cultural differences? (SK)

  17. Leaders' Perspectives on Rural Tourism: Case Studies in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourke, Lisa; Luloff, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    Data from nearly 50 community leaders in 4 nonmetropolitan Pennsylvania counties show that both positive and negative impacts from tourism development were expected; local support was essential. Some feared that tourism was a threat to the rural atmosphere. (SK)

  18. Public parks as urban tourism in Jakarta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adiati, M. P.; Lestari, N. S.; Wiastuti, R. D.

    2018-03-01

    Sustainable urban tourism development should provide better places for people to live in and for people to visit. Jakarta as the capital city has a potential for its urban tourism. Thus, urban tourism attribute such as Public Park should be in high- quality to cope with the needs of urban people and outside visitors. The purpose of this study is to investigate Public Park attributes and to analyze its compliance refer to Public Park that eventually supports sustainable urban tourism. This paper used a qualitative approach. Primary data obtain from direct field observation in seven Public Parks in Jakarta; Menteng Park, Suropati Park, Situ Lembang Park, Ayodhya Park, Cattleya Park, Kodok Park, and Langsat Park. Observation checks list use as guidance. The result provides an assessment of Public Park based on four categories; the accessibility, park activities, safety, and user. The implication of this study offers recommendations to enhance Public Park so that it complies with good public park design- attributes and with the obligations of sustainable urban tourism in Jakarta.

  19. Health tourism in a Czech health spa.

    PubMed

    Speier, Amy R

    2011-04-01

    This paper is about the changing shape of health tourism in a Czech spa town. The research focuses on balneotherapy as a traditional Czech healing technique, which involves complex drinking and bathing therapies, as it is increasingly being incorporated into the development of a Czech health tourism industry. Today, the health tourism industry in Mariánske Lázne is attempting to 'harmoniously' combine three elements--balneology, travel and business activities. One detects subtle shifts and consequent incongruities as doctors struggle for control over the medical portion of spa hotels. At the same time, marketing groups are creating new packages for a general clientele, and the implementation of these new packages de-medicalizes balneotherapy. Related to the issue of the doctor's authority in the spa, the changes occurring with the privatization of tourism entails the entrance of 'tourists' to Mariánske Lázne who are not necessarily seeking spa treatment but who are still staying at spa hotels. There is a general consensus among spa doctors and employees that balneotherapy has become commodified. Thus, while balneotherapy remains a traditional form of therapy, the commercial context in which it exists has created a new form of health tourism.

  20. Why do patients engage in medical tourism?

    PubMed

    Runnels, Vivien; Carrera, P M

    2012-12-01

    Medical tourism is commonly perceived and popularly depicted as an economic issue, both at the system and individual levels. The decision to engage in medical tourism, however, is more complex, driven by patients' unmet need, the nature of services sought and the manner by which treatment is accessed. In order to beneficially employ the opportunities medical tourism offers, and address and contain possible threats and harms, an informed decision is crucial. This paper aims to enhance the current knowledge on medical tourism by isolating the focal content of the decisions that patients make. Based on the existing literature, it proposes a sequential decision-making process in opting for or against medical care abroad, and engaging in medical tourism, including considerations of the required treatments, location of treatment, and quality and safety issues attendant to seeking care. Accordingly, it comments on the imperative of access to health information and the current regulatory environment which impact on this increasingly popular and complex form of accessing and providing medical care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Case Study of Russification in Two Translations of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" by Vladimir Nabokov and Boris Zakhoder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Mee Ryoung

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines the domestication of children literature through the comparative study of two translations of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" by Vladimir Nabokov and Boris Zakhoder. "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" has a reputation for being difficult to translate into foreign languages due to its strong linguistic…

  2. The Opportunities for Star Tourism as a Motivation for Space Tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spennemann, D. H. R.

    By necessity, current star tourism is an outward looking, Earth-bound and geo-centric opportunity with the observer's window to the skies constrained by his/her location. The emergent area of space tourism offers to remove such constraints. Moreover, as it visually and experientially places Earth into the context of other planets, space tourism will provide the tourist with a literally different perspective. While the selling point of sub-orbital tourism is still largely focused on weightlessness and the opportunity of seeing Earth from orbit, it will also offer the tourist brief opportunities for viewing stars from a different point of view. Orbital, lunar and planetary tourism, be it `real' (through tourists in space) or virtual (via pay-per-drive remote controlled rovers), moves from a geo-centric opportunity spectrum to one that provides views of Earth in space as part of a suite of offerings that encompasses views of planets and stars wholly unencumbered by atmospheric disturbances, and also unencumbered by constraints of the spatial positioning of the observer in relation to the sector of the universe viewed. This paper reviews various proposed scenarios of orbital, lunar and interplanetary tourism and examines the opportunity spectra each these provide for star tourism.

  3. Al-Qaida’s (Mis)Adventures in the Horn of Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    move capital to safer, more stable markets. The economies of states that depend on tourism —like Kenya—are especially hard hit when their state is...will hurt the vital tourism industry .84 Less visibly, reducing cooperation with American anti-terrorism efforts may also be a card to be played with...popular music -several people remembered him dancing like Michael Jackson-and liked to show off his prowess at twirling around kung fu fighting

  4. 78 FR 77103 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration United States Travel and Tourism... extended deadline for application for membership on the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board... Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The November 25, 2013 notice provided that all applications...

  5. Back to the future? Tourism, place, and sustainability

    Treesearch

    Daniel R. Williams; Susan Van Patten

    1998-01-01

    Tourism, especially rural tourism, epitomizes the problematic elements of sustainability. On the one hand, as a service industry trading on the uniqueness of a place and region, tourism is seen as more environmentally benign than industrial production, manufacturing, extractive industries, and even agriculture. When traditional resource dependent industries decline (...

  6. The Impacts of Heritage Tourism on Gadara, Northern Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alobiedat, Ammar Abdelkarim

    2014-01-01

    As the tourism industry continues to grow and the desire to visit heritage sites becomes a popular pursuit, heritage has turn into a commodity in the marketplace. This dissertation analyzes the economic, sociocultural and environmental implications of tourism in Gadara, northwest Jordan. It also elaborates on the changing force of tourism and its…

  7. Assessing changes in the importance of tourism in the Northeast

    Treesearch

    Tommy L. Brown

    1980-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that tourism is a vital component of the economy of counties and states in the Northeast, as well as in other regions of the US. Nearly all states claim tourism as one of their three largest industries. Yet data which accurately measure tourism and its economic impacts are woefully lacking.

  8. 78 FR 70275 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration United States Travel and Tourism... an opportunity to apply for membership on the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board... Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The purpose of the Board is to advise the Secretary of...

  9. Consideration of historical authenticity in heritage tourism planning and development

    Treesearch

    Craig Wiles; Gail Vander Stoep

    2008-01-01

    A review of heritage tourism literature reveals a fundamental tension over the use, function, and degree of authenticity of historic resources used for tourism development. Using a case study approach, this paper explores how stakeholder beliefs regarding historical authenticity influence the heritage tourism products, services, and experiences created for visitors and...

  10. ACHP | Heritage Tourism and the Federal Government: Summit II Proceedings

    Science.gov Websites

    Search skip specific nav links Home arrow Publications arrow Intro: Heritage Tourism and the Federal Government: Summit II—Report of Proceedings Heritage Tourism and the Federal Government: Summit II—Report Heritage tourism promotes the preservation of communities' historic resources, educates tourists and local

  11. ACHP | Heritage Tourism and the Federal Government: Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov Websites

    Publications Search skip specific nav links Home arrow Publications arrow Intro: Heritage Tourism and the Federal Government: Northern New Mexico Perspectives Heritage Tourism and the Federal Government: Northern information Heritage tourism offers a triple benefit to communities—it promotes the preservation of their

  12. State-Sponsored Tourism: A Growth Field for Public Administration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter, Linda K.

    1985-01-01

    This article explores the growth of public sector tourism development. It reports the findings of a 1984 survey of state and territorial tourism offices regarding their budgets, personnel needs, intergovernmental relations, and political support functions. The impact of public sector tourism management on public administration careers and…

  13. Needs Assessment of Hospitality/Tourism Industry in Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Shirley

    This report of an assessment of the hospitality/tourism industry in Kentucky begins with a history/description of the hospitality/tourism industry written from research; the hospitality/tourism training programs conducted by various institutions in the state are also described. For the assessment itself, two survey instruments were prepared and…

  14. Medical tourism: globalization of the healthcare marketplace.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Michael D; Rosensweig, Jeffrey A; Jones, Christopher A

    2007-11-13

    The citizens of many countries have long traveled to the United States and to the developed countries of Europe to seek the expertise and advanced technology available in leading medical centers. In the recent past, a trend known as medical tourism has emerged wherein citizens of highly developed countries choose to bypass care offered in their own communities and travel to less developed areas of the world to receive a wide variety of medical services. Medical tourism is becoming increasingly popular, and it is projected that as many as 750,000 Americans will seek offshore medical care in 2007. This phenomenon is driven by marketplace forces and occurs outside of the view and control of the organized healthcare system. Medical tourism presents important concerns and challenges as well as potential opportunities. This trend will have increasing impact on the healthcare landscape in industrialized and developing countries around the world.

  15. Designing the Orbital Space Tourism Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Derek

    2006-01-01

    Sub-orbital space tourism is now well on its way to becoming a reality, with offerings by Virgin Galactic, Rocketplane, and others soon to be made available. Orbital space tourism is harder to achieve, but, if successful as a business model, will make significant contributions towards improved operational efficiencies, reusability, reliability and economies of scale to the world of crewed space flight. Some responses to the President's Vision for Space Exploration have included public space travel in low Earth orbit as sustaining and enabling elements of the vision in a post-Shuttle space architecture. This paper addresses the steps necessary to make possible such a US-based orbital space tourism business, and will assist commercial and government agencies concerned with the development of this new sector.

  16. Interpretation of clothing heritage for contemporary tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilman Proje, J.; Bizjak, M.

    2017-10-01

    In tourism is the first impression of essential meaning as tourists falling by what they see. In designing the clothing image, for commercial use in tourist sector, should be considered that clothes are consistent with the clothing habits of the region and that comply with the heritage story and style of the geographical area. Clothing image of the tourism representatives of the Bohinj region (Slovenia) has been developed. When designing, the inspiration was sought in historical and contemporary clothing image and heritage stories, in elements that representatives of the community recognize as their own cultural heritage. Affiliated clothes for tourism employees should have a useful function of comfortable workwear with heritage expression, meaning clothes are to be accepted as “everyday” clothes and not as a costume.

  17. Tourism and its hypersensitivity to oil spills.

    PubMed

    Cirer-Costa, Joan Carles

    2015-02-15

    The sinking of the Don Pedro merchant ship in 2007 near the island of Ibiza is a good example of the extreme sensitivity of the tourism sector to oil spills. Despite the limited scale of the spill (only some 20 tonnes), its minimal ecological impact, and the rapid deployment of personnel and equipment to contain it, the accident nonetheless caused significant economic damage to the island's tourism sector. This particular case demonstrates the importance of the beach as a factor of production in the holiday tourism sector, and the capacity of even small amounts of oil to render it unusable and cause heavy losses to holiday firms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Medical Tourism: Globalization of the Healthcare Marketplace

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Michael D.; Rosensweig, Jeffrey A.; Jones, Christopher A.

    2007-01-01

    The citizens of many countries have long traveled to the United States and to the developed countries of Europe to seek the expertise and advanced technology available in leading medical centers. In the recent past, a trend known as medical tourism has emerged wherein citizens of highly developed countries choose to bypass care offered in their own communities and travel to less developed areas of the world to receive a wide variety of medical services. Medical tourism is becoming increasingly popular, and it is projected that as many as 750,000 Americans will seek offshore medical care in 2007. This phenomenon is driven by marketplace forces and occurs outside of the view and control of the organized healthcare system. Medical tourism presents important concerns and challenges as well as potential opportunities. This trend will have increasing impact on the healthcare landscape in industrialized and developing countries around the world. PMID:18311383

  19. Reproductive tourism as moral pluralism in motion

    PubMed Central

    Pennings, G

    2002-01-01

    Reproductive tourism is the travelling by candidate service recipients from one institution, jurisdiction, or country where treatment is not available to another institution, jurisdiction, or country where they can obtain the kind of medically assisted reproduction they desire. The more widespread this phenomenon, the louder the call for international measures to stop these movements. Three possible solutions are discussed: internal moral pluralism, coerced conformity, and international harmonisation. The position is defended that allowing reproductive tourism is a form of tolerance that prevents the frontal clash between the majority who imposes its view and the minority who claim to have a moral right to some medical service. Reproductive tourism is moral pluralism realised by moving across legal borders. As such, this pragmatic solution presupposes legal diversity. PMID:12468650

  20. Immersive video for virtual tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Luis A.; Taibo, Javier; Seoane, Antonio J.

    2001-11-01

    This paper describes a new panoramic, 360 degree(s) video system and its use in a real application for virtual tourism. The development of this system has required to design new hardware for multi-camera recording, and software for video processing in order to elaborate the panorama frames and to playback the resulting high resolution video footage on a regular PC. The system makes use of new VR display hardware, such as WindowVR, in order to make the view dependent on the viewer's spatial orientation and so enhance immersiveness. There are very few examples of similar technologies and the existing ones are extremely expensive and/or impossible to be implemented on personal computers with acceptable quality. The idea of the system starts from the concept of Panorama picture, developed in technologies such as QuickTimeVR. This idea is extended to the concept of panorama frame that leads to panorama video. However, many problems are to be solved to implement this simple scheme. Data acquisition involves simultaneously footage recording in every direction, and latter processing to convert every set of frames in a single high resolution panorama frame. Since there is no common hardware capable of 4096x512 video playback at 25 fps rate, it must be stripped in smaller pieces which the system must manage to get the right frames of the right parts as the user movement demands it. As the system must be immersive, the physical interface to watch the 360 degree(s) video is a WindowVR, that is, a flat screen with an orientation tracker that the user holds in his hands, moving it like if it were a virtual window through which the city and its activity is being shown.

  1. Key issues in transplant tourism.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2012-02-24

    Access to organ transplantation depends on national circumstances, and is partly determined by the cost of health care, availability of transplant services, the level of technical capacity and the availability of organs. Commercial transplantation is estimated to account for 5%-10% (3500-7000) of kidney transplants performed annually throughout the world. This review is to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation associated with transplant tourism (TT) and the key challenges with such transplantation. The stakeholders of commercial transplantation include: patients on the waiting lists in developed countries or not on any list in developing countries; dialysis funding bodies; middlemen, hosting transplant centres; organ-exporting countries; and organ vendors. TT and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection which cause major morbidity and mortality. There are ethical and medical concerns regarding the management of recipients of organs from vendors. The growing demand for transplantation, the perceived failure of altruistic donation in providing enough organs has led to calls for a legalised market in organ procurement or regulated trial in incentives for donation. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool and making TT unnecessary. Meanwhile there is a need to re-examine intrinsic attitudes to TT bearing in mind the cultural and economic realities of globalisation. Perhaps the World Health Organization in conjunction with The Transplantation Society would set up a working party of stakeholders to study this matter in greater detail and make recommendations.

  2. Key issues in transplant tourism

    PubMed Central

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2012-01-01

    Access to organ transplantation depends on national circumstances, and is partly determined by the cost of health care, availability of transplant services, the level of technical capacity and the availability of organs. Commercial transplantation is estimated to account for 5%-10% (3500-7000) of kidney transplants performed annually throughout the world. This review is to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation associated with transplant tourism (TT) and the key challenges with such transplantation. The stakeholders of commercial transplantation include: patients on the waiting lists in developed countries or not on any list in developing countries; dialysis funding bodies; middlemen, hosting transplant centres; organ-exporting countries; and organ vendors. TT and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection which cause major morbidity and mortality. There are ethical and medical concerns regarding the management of recipients of organs from vendors. The growing demand for transplantation, the perceived failure of altruistic donation in providing enough organs has led to calls for a legalised market in organ procurement or regulated trial in incentives for donation. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool and making TT unnecessary. Meanwhile there is a need to re-examine intrinsic attitudes to TT bearing in mind the cultural and economic realities of globalisation. Perhaps the World Health Organization in conjunction with The Transplantation Society would set up a working party of stakeholders to study this matter in greater detail and make recommendations. PMID:24175191

  3. An overview of New Zealand's trauma system.

    PubMed

    Paice, Rhondda

    2007-01-01

    Patterns of trauma and trauma systems in New Zealand are similar to those in Australia. Both countries have geographical considerations, terrain and distance, that can cause delay to definitive care. There are only 7 hospitals in New Zealand that currently manage major trauma patients, and consequently, trauma patients are often hospitalized some distance from their homes. The prehospital services are provided by one major provider throughout the country, with a high level of volunteers providing these services in the rural areas. New Zealand has a national no-fault accident insurance system, the Accident Compensation Corporation, which funds all trauma-related healthcare from the roadside to rehabilitation. This insurance system provides 24-hour no-fault personal injury insurance coverage. The Accident Compensation Corporation provides bulk funding to hospitals for resources to manage the care of trauma patients. Case managers are assigned for major trauma patients. This national system also has a rehabilitation focus. The actual funds are managed by the hospitals, and this allows hospital staff to provide optimum care for trauma patients. New Zealand works closely with Australia in the development of a national trauma registry, research, and education in trauma care for patients in Australasia (the islands of the southern Pacific Ocean, including Australia, New Zealand, and New Guinea).

  4. Space tourism optimized reusable spaceplane design

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, J.P.; Lindley, C.A.

    Market surveys suggest that a viable space tourism industry will require flight rates about two orders of magnitude higher than those required for conventional spacelift. Although enabling round-trip cost goals for a viable space tourism business are about {dollar_sign}240 per pound ({dollar_sign}529/kg), or {dollar_sign}72,000 per passenger round-trip, goals should be about {dollar_sign}50 per pound ({dollar_sign}110/kg) or approximately {dollar_sign}15,000 for a typical passenger and baggage. The lower price will probably open space tourism to the general population. Vehicle reliabilities must approach those of commercial aircraft as closely as possible. This paper addresses the development of spaceplanes optimized for the ultra-high flightmore » rate and high reliability demands of the space tourism mission. It addresses the fundamental operability, reliability, and cost drivers needed to satisfy this mission need. Figures of merit similar to those used to evaluate the economic viability of conventional commercial aircraft are developed, including items such as payload/vehicle dry weight, turnaround time, propellant cost per passenger, and insurance and depreciation costs, which show that infrastructure can be developed for a viable space tourism industry. A reference spaceplane design optimized for space tourism is described. Subsystem allocations for reliability, operability, and costs are made and a route to developing such a capability is discussed. The vehicle{close_quote}s ability to also satisfy the traditional spacelift market is shown. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}« less

  5. Infectious disease risk and international tourism demand.

    PubMed

    Rosselló, Jaume; Santana-Gallego, Maria; Awan, Waqas

    2017-05-01

     For some countries, favourable climatic conditions for tourism are often associated with favourable conditions for infectious diseases, with the ensuing development constraints on the tourist sectors of impoverished countries where tourism's economic contribution has a high potential. This paper evaluates the economic implications of eradication of Malaria, Dengue, Yellow Fever and Ebola on the affected destination countries focusing on the tourist expenditures.  A gravity model for international tourism flows is used to provide an estimation of the impact of each travel-related disease on international tourist arrivals. Next the potential eradication of these diseases in the affected countries is simulated and the impact on tourism expenditures is estimated.  The results show that, in the case of Malaria, Dengue, Yellow Fever and Ebola, the eradication of these diseases in the affected countries would result in an increase of around 10 million of tourist worldwide and a rise in the tourism expenditure of 12 billion dollars.  By analysing the economic benefits of the eradication of Dengue, Ebola, Malaria, and Yellow Fever for the tourist sector-a strategic economic sector for many of the countries where these TRD are present-this paper explores a new aspect of the quantification of health policies which should be taken into consideration in future international health assessment programmes. It is important to note that the analysis is only made of the direct impact of the diseases' eradication and consequently the potential multiplicative effects of a growth in the GDP, in terms of tourism attractiveness, are not evaluated. Consequently, the economic results can be considered to be skeleton ones. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Ethical and medical dilemmas of space tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Melinda

    Space tourism is an important new venture, however it raises several issues that must be addressed; namely, the medical implications associated with space flight and potential for ethical problems surrounding the safety of such travel. It seems highly likely that businesses involved in space tourism could find themselves liable for any passenger deaths or injuries, if they are found to have been negligent. This paper, therefore, discusses such issues as the medical facilities that need to be made available on board a space facility, and the companies' duty to disclose to potential passengers the risks associated with microgravity and the likelihood of space sickness, loss of bone density, disease, and pregnancy.

  7. 78 FR 3398 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade... the schedule and agenda for an open meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board...

  8. 78 FR 70274 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade... the schedule and agenda for an open meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board...

  9. Services Available to Visually Impaired Persons in New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaGrow, S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The Royal New Zealand Foundation for the Blind is primarily responsible for services to visually impaired people in New Zealand. The article describes its history, structure, services, and plans for the future. (Author/JDD)

  10. Predator-Free New Zealand: Conservation Country.

    PubMed

    Russell, James C; Innes, John G; Brown, Philip H; Byrom, Andrea E

    2015-05-01

    Eradications of invasive species from over 1000 small islands around the world have created conservation arks, but to truly address the threat of invasive species to islands, eradications must be scaled by orders of magnitude. New Zealand has eradicated invasive predators from 10% of its offshore island area and now proposes a vision to eliminate them from the entire country. We review current knowledge of invasive predator ecology and control technologies in New Zealand and the biological research, technological advances, social capacity and enabling policy required. We discuss the economic costs and benefits and conclude with a 50-year strategy for a predator-free New Zealand that is shown to be ecologically obtainable, socially desirable, and economically viable. The proposal includes invasive predator eradication from the two largest offshore islands, mammal-free mainland peninsulas, very large ecosanctuaries, plus thousands of small projects that will together merge eradication and control concepts on landscape scales.

  11. Electroconvulsive Therapy Practice in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Mark Wilkinson; Morrison, John; Jones, Paul Anthony

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the contemporary practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in New Zealand. A 53-item questionnaire was sent to all services providing ECT as of December 2015. Electroconvulsive therapy was provided by 16 services covering 15 district health boards funded by the New Zealand government. No private facilities provided ECT. All services providing ECT responded to an online survey questionnaire. Rates of ECT utilization were low relative to similar countries. Survey results indicated ECT was practiced to an overall good standard. Several resource and logistical issues potentially contributing to low ECT utilization were identified. Electroconvulsive therapy in New Zealand is provided using modern equipment and practices. However, overall rates of utilization remain low, perhaps as a result of controversy surrounding ECT and some resourcing issues.

  12. Predator-Free New Zealand: Conservation Country

    PubMed Central

    Russell, James C.; Innes, John G.; Brown, Philip H.; Byrom, Andrea E.

    2015-01-01

    Eradications of invasive species from over 1000 small islands around the world have created conservation arks, but to truly address the threat of invasive species to islands, eradications must be scaled by orders of magnitude. New Zealand has eradicated invasive predators from 10% of its offshore island area and now proposes a vision to eliminate them from the entire country. We review current knowledge of invasive predator ecology and control technologies in New Zealand and the biological research, technological advances, social capacity and enabling policy required. We discuss the economic costs and benefits and conclude with a 50-year strategy for a predator-free New Zealand that is shown to be ecologically obtainable, socially desirable, and economically viable. The proposal includes invasive predator eradication from the two largest offshore islands, mammal-free mainland peninsulas, very large ecosanctuaries, plus thousands of small projects that will together merge eradication and control concepts on landscape scales. PMID:26955079

  13. A new inequality? Privatisation, urban bias, migration and medical tourism.

    PubMed

    Connell, John

    2011-01-01

    Access to health care in developing countries, the main destinations of medical tourists, is notoriously uneven, and often becoming more so. Medical tourism, urban bias and privatisation have combined to exacerbate this trend. This is exemplified in both Thailand and India, where regional areas have been disadvantaged by the migration of health-care workers to hospitals focusing on medical tourism, neo-liberal national financial provision for medical tourism (and related tourism campaigns) and evidence of trickle-down gains is lacking. Medical tourism challenges rather than complements local health care providers, distorts national health care systems, and raises critical national economic, ethical and social questions.

  14. Evolution of modern treatment of childhood acute leukemia and cancer: adventures and battles in the 1970s and 1980s.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi

    2015-02-01

    This article summarizes the adventures and explorations in the 1970s and 1980s in the treatment of children with leukemia and cancer that paved the way for the current success in childhood cancers. Indeed, these were adventures and bold steps into unchartered waters. Because childhood leukemia the most common of the childhood cancers, success in childhood leukemia was pivotal in the push toward cure of all childhood cancers. The success in childhood leukemia illustrates how treatment programs were designed using clinical- and biology-based risk factors seen in the patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Marine biodiversity of Aotearoa New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Dennis P; Beaumont, Jennifer; MacDiarmid, Alison; Robertson, Donald A; Ahyong, Shane T

    2010-08-02

    The marine-biodiversity assessment of New Zealand (Aotearoa as known to Māori) is confined to the 200 nautical-mile boundary of the Exclusive Economic Zone, which, at 4.2 million km(2), is one of the largest in the world. It spans 30 degrees of latitude and includes a high diversity of seafloor relief, including a trench 10 km deep. Much of this region remains unexplored biologically, especially the 50% of the EEZ deeper than 2,000 m. Knowledge of the marine biota is based on more than 200 years of marine exploration in the region. The major oceanographic data repository is the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), which is involved in several Census of Marine Life field projects and is the location of the Southwestern Pacific Regional OBIS Node; NIWA is also data manager and custodian for fisheries research data owned by the Ministry of Fisheries. Related data sources cover alien species, environmental measures, and historical information. Museum collections in New Zealand hold more than 800,000 registered lots representing several million specimens. During the past decade, 220 taxonomic specialists (85 marine) from 18 countries have been engaged in a project to review New Zealand's entire biodiversity. The above-mentioned marine information sources, published literature, and reports were scrutinized to give the results summarized here for the first time (current to 2010), including data on endemism and invasive species. There are 17,135 living species in the EEZ. This diversity includes 4,315 known undescribed species in collections. Species diversity for the most intensively studied phylum-level taxa (Porifera, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, Bryozoa, Kinorhyncha, Echinodermata, Chordata) is more or less equivalent to that in the ERMS (European Register of Marine Species) region, which is 5.5 times larger in area than the New Zealand EEZ. The implication is that, when all other New Zealand phyla are equally well studied, total marine

  16. New Zealand environmental standards and energy policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    vant, William N.; McGlinchy, Brian J.

    1983-11-01

    This paper describes the primary energy resources of New Zealand and their relative importance. It describes the principal legislation that provides environmental protection and public participation with which State and private agencies are bound to comply. The paper then discusses air pollution in further detail and cites three examples where there is cause for concern. By international standards, air pollution is not a serious problem in New Zealand and so the economic consequences have received little attention Two simple examples are cited. A map showing the main centers and the location of facilities referred to in the text is included

  17. Marine Biodiversity of Aotearoa New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Dennis P.; Beaumont, Jennifer; MacDiarmid, Alison; Robertson, Donald A.; Ahyong, Shane T.

    2010-01-01

    The marine-biodiversity assessment of New Zealand (Aotearoa as known to Māori) is confined to the 200 nautical-mile boundary of the Exclusive Economic Zone, which, at 4.2 million km2, is one of the largest in the world. It spans 30° of latitude and includes a high diversity of seafloor relief, including a trench 10 km deep. Much of this region remains unexplored biologically, especially the 50% of the EEZ deeper than 2,000 m. Knowledge of the marine biota is based on more than 200 years of marine exploration in the region. The major oceanographic data repository is the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), which is involved in several Census of Marine Life field projects and is the location of the Southwestern Pacific Regional OBIS Node; NIWA is also data manager and custodian for fisheries research data owned by the Ministry of Fisheries. Related data sources cover alien species, environmental measures, and historical information. Museum collections in New Zealand hold more than 800,000 registered lots representing several million specimens. During the past decade, 220 taxonomic specialists (85 marine) from 18 countries have been engaged in a project to review New Zealand's entire biodiversity. The above-mentioned marine information sources, published literature, and reports were scrutinized to give the results summarized here for the first time (current to 2010), including data on endemism and invasive species. There are 17,135 living species in the EEZ. This diversity includes 4,315 known undescribed species in collections. Species diversity for the most intensively studied phylum-level taxa (Porifera, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, Bryozoa, Kinorhyncha, Echinodermata, Chordata) is more or less equivalent to that in the ERMS (European Register of Marine Species) region, which is 5.5 times larger in area than the New Zealand EEZ. The implication is that, when all other New Zealand phyla are equally well studied, total marine diversity

  18. Wilderness adventure therapy effects on the mental health of youth participants.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Daniel J; Neill, James T; Crisp, Simon J R

    2016-10-01

    Adventure therapy offers a prevention, early intervention, and treatment modality for people with behavioural, psychological, and psychosocial issues. It can appeal to youth-at-risk who are often less responsive to traditional psychotherapeutic interventions. This study evaluated Wilderness Adventure Therapy (WAT) outcomes based on participants' pre-program, post-program, and follow-up responses to self-report questionnaires. The sample consisted of 36 adolescent out-patients with mixed mental health issues who completed a 10-week, manualised WAT intervention. The overall short-term standardised mean effect size was small, positive, and statistically significant (0.26), with moderate, statistically significant improvements in psychological resilience and social self-esteem. Total short-term effects were within age-based adventure therapy meta-analytic benchmark 90% confidence intervals, except for the change in suicidality which was lower than the comparable benchmark. The short-term changes were retained at the three-month follow-up, except for family functioning (significant reduction) and suicidality (significant improvement). For participants in clinical ranges pre-program, there was a large, statistically significant reduction in depressive symptomology, and large to very large, statistically significant improvements in behavioural and emotional functioning. These changes were retained at the three-month follow-up. These findings indicate that WAT is as effective as traditional psychotherapy techniques for clinically symptomatic people. Future research utilising a comparison or wait-list control group, multiple sources of data, and a larger sample, could help to qualify and extend these findings. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The ABC's of Delivering A Research-Driven Adventure Learning Program From the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pregont, P.; Porsild, M.

    2008-12-01

    A is for anchoring the delivery of your research to your audience in a standard-aligned curriculum. B is for BGAN Satellite Communication System assisting in delivering real-time authentic media. C is for a collaborative online learning environment to engage learners" Z is for the peaceful sleep you will get once your program is up and running! As part of Team GoNorth! (http://www.PolarHusky.com) it is our job to deliver adventure learning. We set out to do this back when the computer was a 4-foot, 50-lb box powered by a hand-crank where one would have a window of ten minutes in a 24-hour period to catch the satellite (before Al Gore created the Internet!). Every year we review the quantum leaps in what is now possible from the field and in the classroom, and over the years we have wrestled technical issues, solutions and numerous re-structures in the process of our of curriculum development. With this presentation we will provide some basic ABC's on how you can remained focused on your research, yet deliver an adventure learning program for learners to investigate real-world issues within your scientific research. Our scales are most likely different. The volume of our curriculum is an annual production of 4-500 pages to be used from Kindergarden through 12th grade around the world. The framework of our online learning environment must be able to supports millions of users at a time. "In the field" means on a a 3-4 month dogsled expedition - so sending out our live updates involve thawing out the computers and setting up the satellite communication system to work in a ground blizzard! But regardless of the scope and location of your field research, you can probably build on some of our experiences in the planning of an upcoming adventure learning program to engage learners of all or any ages in your scientific explorations!

  20. An Overview of New Zealand Career Development Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furbish, Dale

    2012-01-01

    Career development services have existed in New Zealand since the early part of the 20th century. In many aspects, the profession has developed in New Zealand parallel to the development of career guidance and counselling in other Western countries but New Zealand also represents a unique context. In acknowledgement of the distinctive…

  1. 7 CFR 319.56-32 - Peppers from New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Peppers from New Zealand. 319.56-32 Section 319.56-32... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-32 Peppers from New Zealand. Peppers (fruit) (Capsicum spp.) from New Zealand may be imported into the United...

  2. The New Zealand Curriculum: Emergent Insights and Complex Renderings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovens, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The launch of New Zealand Curriculum (Ministry of Education, 2007) brings into question the future of the reforms introduced in the 1999 curriculum, Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand National Curriculum (Ministry of Education, 1999). The aim of this paper is to critique recent physical education curriculum policy in New Zealand and…

  3. The adaptive capacity of New Zealand communities to wildfire

    Treesearch

    Pamela J. Jakes; E.R. Langer

    2012-01-01

    When we think of natural disasters in New Zealand, we tend to think of earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. However, a series of events is placing New Zealand communities at greater risk of wildfire. In a case study of a rural New Zealand community that experienced wildfire, process elements such as networks and relationships among locals, development and application of...

  4. Stamina, speed and adventure: Australian women and competitive cycling in the 1890s.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Fiona

    2011-01-01

    The scholarship surrounding women's cycling in Australia during the 1890s is slim. However, a focus on female competitive cycling, just one of many diverse cycling activities that women pursued in this era, reveals a rich seam of information. Accordingly, this paper surveys endurance riding, adventure touring and racing, introducing new historical and biographical detail and highlighting the significance of competitive cycling for women in the late nineteenth century. The discussion shows that women's competitive cycling constituted a significant component of Australian cycling history, and helped to re-define women's identity in an era when feminine roles were in flux and the traditional gender order was being contested.

  5. Economic impacts of wine tourism in Michigan

    Treesearch

    Mi-Kyung Kim; Seung Hyun Kim

    2003-01-01

    In Michigan, wine tourism is perceived as increasingly important concept because more and more tourists visit wineries and wine tasting rooms annually. However there have been few studies conducted concerning the economic impacts of wineries in Michigan even though the industry has been recognized as having significant economic impact potential. The primary purpose of...

  6. Senior Games as Serious Sport Tourism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Jimmoo; King, Carina

    2009-01-01

    Stebbins (1992) defined serious leisure as the systematic pursuit of amateur, hobbyist, or volunteer activity that is substantial and interesting for the participants involved. This study investigated associations between serious leisure and sport tourism using Indiana Senior Games participants. This study used a self-report questionnaire to…

  7. Usability testing of indonesia tourism promotion website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunus, U.; Anindito; Tanuar, E.; Maryani

    2018-03-01

    Indonesian tourism has been viewed as one of the source of foreign exchange, therefore visit Indonesia campaign through Wonderful Indonesia should be given attention. This research aims to test the usability of web http://www.indonesia.travel/en, at the end can give input to the Tourism Ministry of the Republic of Indonesia. The concept used based on usabilitygeek.com which mentions the three main categories for usability testing, i. e. explorative, assessment and comparative with the users are three classes of Communication Department students of Bina Nusantara University with a total of 120 students, however finally only 22 students were elected because of the criteria are the students should be like travelling and access to the tourism website more than 12 times. The methodology used is qualitative descriptive and experiments, with data collection techniques through observation and interviews after participants’ access to the web: Due to their one-on-one nature, interviews enable the observer to ask direct questions to the user and the participants posted their opinion in online discussion forum. The results mentioned that the elements web of Wonderful Indonesia has a high learning ability and memorability but less efficiency and satisfaction, as well as several times errors when used. In conclusion, to maximize about the visit of tourism to Indonesia, this web is only able to learn and impress the visitor, but do not give satisfaction to users.

  8. Participatory modeling of recreation and tourism

    Treesearch

    Lisa C. Chase; Roelof M.J. Boumans; Stephanie Morse

    2007-01-01

    Communities involved in recreation and tourism planning need to understand the broad range of benefits and challenges--economic, social, and ecological--in order to make informed decisions. Participatory computer modeling is a methodology that involves a community in the process of collectively building a model about a particular situation that affects participants...

  9. A practical approach to city tourism sustainability

    Treesearch

    Sotiris H. Avgoustis; Francis Achana

    2003-01-01

    Generally, destinations with pristine natural attributes are the ones faced with issues related to tourism sustainability. However, this narrow focus often leads to the establishment of dogmatic 'dos' and 'don'ts' that are not always practical in all circumstances. Secondly, depending on the definition that is given to the concept of...

  10. Development of Creative Potential of Cinema Tourism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dzhandzhugazova, Elena A.; Ilinaa, Elena L.; Latkin, Aleksander N.; Koshelevava, Anna I.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the problem indicated in the article is caused by the fact that under current conditions it is necessary to offer high-quality and demanded tourist products, formed at the combination of various industries on the basis of wide application of creative potential of different industries, including tourism and cinema, a harmonious…

  11. Improving our understanding of recreation and tourism.

    Treesearch

    Linda E. Kruger; Susan J. Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Over the past century, American society has hanged in many ways that affect the management of natural resources for recreation and tourism. The nation's population is more racially and ethnically diverse. Baby boomers are reaching retirement age and many have money to travel. The nation's population has more than tripled, causing our once rural country to...

  12. Developing Viable Financing Models for Space Tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilingsfeld, F.; Schaetzler, D.

    2002-01-01

    Increasing commercialization of space services and the impending release of government's control of space access promise to make space ventures more attractive. Still, many investors shy away from going into the space tourism market as long as they do not feel secure that their return expectations will be met. First and foremost, attracting investors from the capital markets requires qualifying financing models. Based on earlier research on the cost of capital for space tourism, this paper gives a brief run-through of commercial, technical and financial due diligence aspects. After that, a closer look is taken at different valuation techniques as well as alternative ways of streamlining financials. Experience from earlier ventures has shown that the high cost of capital represents a significant challenge. Thus, the sophistication and professionalism of business plans and financial models needs to be very high. Special emphasis is given to the optimization of the debt-to-equity ratio over time. The different roles of equity and debt over a venture's life cycle are explained. Based on the latter, guidelines for the design of an optimized loan structure are given. These are then applied to simulating the financial performance of a typical space tourism venture over time, including the calculation of Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) and Net Present Value (NPV). Based on a concluding sensitivity analysis, the lessons learned are presented. If applied properly, these will help to make space tourism economically viable.

  13. An ESP Course for Tourism Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coskun, Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at developing a course based on the level and the needs of second-grade tourism students at a vocational school in Turkey. Two data collection instruments, a needs analysis and an oral interview, were used to reveal students' level of English and their needs. It was found that the average level of English in the classroom is A2…

  14. Monitoring Diffuse Impacts: Australian Tourism Developments.

    PubMed

    Warnken; Buckley

    2000-04-01

    / The scientific quality of monitoring for diffuse environmental impacts has rarely been quantified. This paper presents an analysis of all formal environmental monitoring programs for Australian tourism developments over a 15-year period from 1980 to 1995. The tourism sector provides a good test bed for this study because tourism developments are (1) often adjacent to or even within conservation reserves and other relatively undisturbed natural environments, and (2) often clustered, with resulting cumulative impacts that require detection at an early stage. Here we analyze the precision and reliability with which monitoring programs as actually implemented can detect diffuse environmental impacts against natural variation. Of 175 Australian tourism developments subject to EIA from 1980 to 1993 inclusive, only 13 were subject to formal monitoring. Only 44 individual parameters, in total, were monitored for all these developments together. No baseline monitoring was conducted for nine of the 44 parameters. For the remaining 35, only one was monitored for a full year. Before, after, control, impact, paired sampling (BACIP) monitoring designs were used for 24 of the 44 parameters, and power analysis in 10. The scientific quality of monitoring was significantly better for developments subject to control by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA). The key factor appears to be the way in which GBRMPA uses external referees and manages external consultants. The GBRMPA model merits wider adoption.

  15. Culture, heritage and tourism destination choices

    Treesearch

    Achana Francis; Joseph T. O' Leary; Alastair Morrison

    2001-01-01

    An important question often asked in trying to develop information for marketing activities is whether it is necessary to develop separate programs for the customers, clients, or visitors you are involved with. In other words, are there any differences that we should be aware of? This is particularly true in the area of tourism where we observe all types of marketing...

  16. Transmission of zoonoses through immigration and tourism.

    PubMed

    Mavroidi, Nikoletta

    2008-01-01

    More than 200 of the documented zoonoses represent a high proportion of the infectious diseases that cause cases of morbidity and mortality and almost 75% are emerging infections. Immigration and tourism are human activities that are included in the broader field of human migration and travel. Travel plays a significant role in the emergence and spread of disease. The migration of humans has provided the route of spread for infectious diseases and zoonoses (for example, plague, yellow fever, monkey pox and severe acute respiratory syndrome). Tourism constitutes a small fraction of overall movements of humans but a point worthy of note is the number of international travellers has increased by more than 1 300% over the last 50 years. In addition, over 80 million people, mostly from developing countries, are legal or illegal immigrants. The consequences of travel extend beyond the traveller to the population visited and the ecosystem. Tourism and immigration may constitute an interface for mixing different genetic and ecological profiles, as well as cultural and social aspects, which is of particular interest in regard to zoonoses. Primary prevention, epidemiological surveillance and health education in the framework of intersectoral and international collaboration remain the cornerstone for response to and control of zoonoses in the context of tourism and immigration.

  17. Medical innovation versus stem cell tourism.

    PubMed

    Lindvall, Olle; Hyun, Insoo

    2009-06-26

    Stem cell tourism is criticized on grounds of consumer fraud, blatant lack of scientific justification, and patient safety. However, the issues are complex because they invoke questions concerning the limits of acceptable medical innovation and medical travel. Here we discuss these issues and articulate conditions under which "unproven" therapies may be offered to patients outside of regular clinical trials.

  18. Globalization and healthcare: understanding health and medical tourism.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Percivil M; Bridges, John Fp

    2006-08-01

    Faced with long waiting lists, the high cost of elective treatment and fewer barriers to travel, the idea of availing healthcare in another country is gaining greater appeal to many. The objective of this review is to perform a literature review of health and medical tourism, to define health and medical tourism based on the medical literature and to estimate the size of trade in healthcare. The Medline database was used for our literature review. In our initial search for 'health tourism' and 'medical tourism' we found a paucity of formal literature as well as conceptual ambiguity in the literature. Subsequently, we reviewed the literature on 'tourism' in general and in the context of healthcare. On the basis of 149 papers, we then sought to conceptualize health tourism and medical tourism. Based on our definitions, we likewise sought to estimate market capacity internationally. We defined health tourism as "the organized travel outside one's local environment for the maintenance, enhancement or restoration of an individual's wellbeing in mind and body". A subset of this is medical tourism, which is "the organized travel outside one's natural healthcare jurisdiction for the enhancement or restoration of the individual's health through medical intervention". At the international level, health tourism is an industry sustained by 617 million individuals with an annual growth of 3.9% annually and worth US$513 billion. In conclusion, this paper underscored the issue of a severely limited formal literature that is compounded by conceptual ambiguity facing health and medical tourism scholarship. In clarifying the concepts and standardizing definitions, and providing evidence with regard to the scale of trade in healthcare, we hope to assist in furthering fundamental research tasks, including the further development of reliable and comparable data, the push and pull factors for engaging in health and medical tourism, and the impact of health tourism but, more so, medical

  19. The first decade of commercial space tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yi-Wei

    2015-03-01

    In order to provide a basis for assessing the future prospects and challenges of space tourism, this paper begins with a brief overview of the history of space tourism. This is followed by a discussion on market demand and current developments in the academic community, as well as the status of traffic tools, regulations and legalization. In market demand, although studies conducted in 1990s assumed the possibility of 500,000 per year in space tourists and several billion USD of annual revenue, in 2008 a relatively modest 13,000 per year was predicted. At this time traffic transport tools including the Soyuz system, CST-100, DragonRider and International Space Station (ISS) can only provide a few tens in spare seats for space tourists per year compared to the projected 20,000 plus seat capacity of the Lynx, Dream Chaser and SpaceShipTwo (SS2) fleets, which have the potential to conduct their first full suborbital test flight and first commercial flight within the coming decade. Added to this, the US government has only a regulatory regime that supports privately owned suborbital space tourism (SST) and no government funded orbital space tourism (OST). These evidences reveal a very high and advantageous potential for SST to form a space tourism industry in the coming decade, whereas the possibility of OST is relatively low. However, even though the prosperity of SST in the coming years is expectable, its maturity, reliability and safety still need to win the confidence of the general public. For examples, the announcement of changes to fuel used in the SS2 rocket engine in May 2014 and the crash of one SS2 while performing test flight on 31 October 2014 indicated the need for much careful preparation, as any accident in commercial operation could seriously damage or even kill its future prospects.

  20. Medical tourism: reverse subsidy for the elite.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Amit

    2011-01-01

    The medical tourism sector in India has attracted global attention, given its phenomenal growth in the past decade. India is second only to Thailand in the number of medical tourists that it attracts every year. Estimates indicate that the medical tourism market in India could grow from $310 million in 2005 to $2 billion by 2012. These figures are significant when contrasted with India's overall health care expenditure - $10 billion in the public sector and $50 billion in the private sector. Factors that have contributed to this growth include the relative proficiency in English among health care providers and the cost effectiveness of medical procedures in India. Generally, most procedures in Indian hospitals cost a quarter (or less) of what they would cost in developed countries. The expansion of medical tourism has also been fueled by the growth of the private medical sector in India, a consequence of the neglect of public health by the government. India has one of the poorest records in the world regarding public financing and provisioning of health care. A growing driver of medical tourism is the attraction of facilities in India that offer access to assisted reproductive care technologies. Ironically, this is in sharp contrast with the acute neglect of the health care needs of Indian women. The Indian government is vigorously promoting medical tourism by providing tax concessions and by creating an environment enabling it to thrive. However, there is a distinct disjunction between the neglect of the health care needs of ordinary Indians and public policy that today subsidizes the health care of wealthy foreigners.

  1. Toward a Pedagogical Framework: New Zealand Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Squirrel

    2007-01-01

    Educators in New Zealand (NZ) stand poised to shift from a humanistic to a pedagogical viewpoint in their induction practices. Survey results discussed in this research brief are part of the first study to combine qualitative and quantitative methods in low-socio-economic primary schools. As part of her research for the New Teachers Center in…

  2. A case of botulism in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Duncan; Deverall, Eamonn; Balm, Michelle; Nesdale, Annette; Rosemergy, Ian

    2015-11-20

    We describe the first case of food-borne botulism seen in New Zealand for 30 years. Botulism is an important diagnosis to consider in a patient with rapidly progressive descending paralysis and normal sensorium. Early recognition, timely institution of intensive care support and administration of botulism antitoxin are the most important aspects of management.

  3. School Property Funding in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PEB Exchange, 2004

    2004-01-01

    New Zealand's special funding system allows state schools a greater level of independence in managing their property compared to most other countries. Schools receive a fixed budget as an entitlement from the three "pots" of the educational property funding structure. The government's unique use of accrual accounting together with a new…

  4. Critical Health Education in Aotearoa New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Katie; Burrows, Lisette

    2017-01-01

    Health education in Aotearoa New Zealand is an enigma. Premised on ostensibly open and holistic philosophical premises, the school curriculum not only permits, but in some ways prescribes, pedagogies and teacher dispositions that engage with the diversity of young people at its centre. A capacity, to not only understand contemporary health…

  5. Ten Ideas Worth Stealing from New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarchow, Elaine

    1992-01-01

    New Zealand educators have some ideas worth stealing, including morning tea-time, the lie-flat manifold duplicate book for recording classroom observation comments, school uniforms, collegial planning and grading of college assignments, good meeting etiquette, a whole-child orientation, portable primary architecture, group employment interviews…

  6. Early Childhood Inclusion in Aotearoa New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster-Cohen, Susan H.; van Bysterveldt, Anne K.

    2016-01-01

    Early childhood education is encouraged for all 3- to 5-year-old children in New Zealand (known in the Maori language as Aotearoa) and is supported by a well-constructed bicultural curriculum (Te Whariki) and reasonably generous government funding. However, a number of factors mitigate against inclusion of children with developmental delays and…

  7. New Zealand Dairy Farmers as Organisational Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Claire; Hurley, Evelyn

    2001-01-01

    A strategy for improving learning and competitiveness in the New Zealand dairy industry examined barriers to farmers' learning and adopted action research with a group of women farmers. This form of participant involvement appeared to facilitate individual learning and technology transfer. (Contains 30 references.) (SK)

  8. Tsunami Forecasting and Monitoring in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, William; Gale, Nora

    2011-06-01

    New Zealand is exposed to tsunami threats from several sources that vary significantly in their potential impact and travel time. One route for reducing the risk from these tsunami sources is to provide advance warning based on forecasting and monitoring of events in progress. In this paper the National Tsunami Warning System framework, including the responsibilities of key organisations and the procedures that they follow in the event of a tsunami threatening New Zealand, are summarised. A method for forecasting threat-levels based on tsunami models is presented, similar in many respects to that developed for Australia by Allen and Greenslade (Nat Hazards 46:35-52, 2008), and a simple system for easy access to the threat-level forecasts using a clickable pdf file is presented. Once a tsunami enters or initiates within New Zealand waters, its progress and evolution can be monitored in real-time using a newly established network of online tsunami gauge sensors placed at strategic locations around the New Zealand coasts and offshore islands. Information from these gauges can be used to validate and revise forecasts, and assist in making the all-clear decision.

  9. Lessons from New Zealand: Leadership for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Sarah; Borthwick, Arlene

    2011-01-01

    Last February, members of ISTE's Special Interest Group for Teacher Educators (SIGTE) traveled to New Zealand as part of a SIG-sponsored study tour. While there, the 13-member group visited seven schools and attended the Learning@School 2010 conference. In this third and final installment about their trip, they share observations about New…

  10. Earthquakes in the New Zealand Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Cleland

    1995-01-01

    Presents a thorough overview of earthquakes in New Zealand, discussing plate tectonics, seismic measurement, and historical occurrences. Includes 10 figures illustrating such aspects as earthquake distribution, intensity, and fissures in the continental crust. Tabular data includes a list of most destructive earthquakes and descriptive effects…

  11. Development Education Revisited: The New Zealand Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, David

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes the educational implications of the "no-comparison message" that is present in almost all of the publicity material produced by New Zealand-based agencies working in the area of aid and development. Calls for a radical reorientation of the messages being promoted and actions undertaken. Contains 20 references. (AMA)

  12. Ethics Education in New Zealand Medical Schools.

    PubMed

    McMillan, John; Malpas, Phillipa; Walker, Simon; Jonas, Monique

    2018-07-01

    This article describes the well-developed and long-standing medical ethics teaching programs in both of New Zealand's medical schools at the University of Otago and the University of Auckland. The programs reflect the awareness that has been increasing as to the important role that ethics education plays in contributing to the "professionalism" and "professional development" in medical curricula.

  13. Worker Education in Australia and New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagglund, George

    The history of the recent development of worker education in Australia and New Zealand shows that, in just the past 15 years or so, very significant improvements have occurred in delivery of trade union education. To a very large degree these developments took place because of the existence of a close relationship between the union movement and…

  14. Fractures in New Zealand Elementary School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubie-Davies, Christine M.; Townsend, Michael A. R.

    2007-01-01

    Background: There is a need for greater international understanding of student safety in schools. This New Zealand study investigated the causes and school location of fractures sustained by students attending elementary school, with special emphasis on the types of fractures sustained following falls from playground equipment of various heights.…

  15. Culture and Crisis Response in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annan, Jean; Dean, Shelley; Henry, Geoff; McGhie, Desiree; Phillipson, Roger

    2010-01-01

    New Zealand is a bicultural nation, founded on the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi by the native Maori and the British Crown. It is also home to people from many countries, cultures and ethnicities. Therefore, culturally-relevant response to crisis events has become a significant aspect of the Ministry of Education's interdisciplinary Traumatic…

  16. Teaching Gender Geography in Aotearoa New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longhurst, Robyn

    2011-01-01

    In New Zealand universities, gender is still not a substantial part of the curriculum in most geography departments. Although at the University of Waikato, the situation is different. Its specific history of radical scholarship has enabled feminist academics in a variety of disciplines including geography to have had a stronger voice than in other…

  17. Project ACTIVate: Innovations from New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yelas, Janet; Engles, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This case study discusses a collaborative three year project involving two school clusters located in the North Island and South Island of New Zealand. The project was named "Project ACTIVate" and its main thrust was to study how the use of the interactive whiteboard (IWB) combined with teaching, learning and research across schools. The…

  18. OUTLINE OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING IN NEW ZEALAND.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Dept. of Labour and National Service, Perth.

    NEW ZEALAND HAS A POPULATION OF 2.6 MILLION AND AN ECONOMY BASED UPON AGRICULTURAL EXPORTS. THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION IS RESPONSIBLE FOR PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS. EDUCATION IS FREE, COMPULSORY, AND SECULAR FOR ALL TO AGE 15, AND FREE TO AGE 19. IN THE FIRST 2 YEARS OF SECONDARY EDUCATION, BEGINNING AT AGE 13, STUDY IS IN GENERAL SUBJECTS…

  19. Health Promoting Schools: A New Zealand Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushman, Penni

    2008-01-01

    In the last 20 years the health promoting schools movement has gained momentum internationally. Without strong national leadership and direction its development in New Zealand has been ad hoc and sporadic. However, as the evidence supporting the role of health promoting schools in contributing to students' health and academic outcomes becomes more…

  20. Workload and Stress in New Zealand Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Sally; Wylie, Cathy

    This study examined the workloads of academic, general, support, library, and technical staff of New Zealand universities. It focused on current levels of workload, changes in workload levels and content, connections between workload and stress, and staff attitudes towards the effects of workload changes and educational reforms on the quality of…