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Sample records for zener diode-based travelling

  1. Zener diode controls switching of large direct currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    High-current zener diode is connected in series with the positive input terminal of a dc supply to block the flow of direct current until a high-frequency control signal is applied across the zener diode. This circuit controls the switching of large dc signals.

  2. Landau-Zener transitions for Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebnikov, Sergei

    2018-05-01

    One-dimensional systems obtained as low-energy limits of hybrid superconductor-topological insulator devices provide means of production, transport, and destruction of Majorana bound states (MBSs) by variations of the magnetic flux. When two or more pairs of MBSs are present in the intermediate state, there is a possibility of a Landau-Zener transition wherein even a slow variation of the flux leads to production of a quasiparticle pair. We study numerically a version of this process with four MBSs produced and subsequently destroyed and find that, quite universally, the probability of quasiparticle production in it is 50%. This implies that the effect may be a limiting factor in applications requiring a high degree of quantum coherence.

  3. Cavity-mediated entanglement generation via Landau-Zener interferometry.

    PubMed

    Quintana, C M; Petersson, K D; McFaul, L W; Srinivasan, S J; Houck, A A; Petta, J R

    2013-04-26

    We demonstrate quantum control and entanglement generation using a Landau-Zener beam splitter formed by coupling two transmon qubits to a superconducting cavity. Single passage through the cavity-mediated qubit-qubit avoided crossing provides a direct test of the Landau-Zener transition formula. Consecutive sweeps result in Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interference patterns, with a visibility that can be sensitively tuned by adjusting the level velocity through both the nonadiabatic and adiabatic regimes. Two-qubit state tomography indicates that a Bell state can be generated via a single passage, with a fidelity of 78% limited by qubit relaxation.

  4. Resonant Zener tunneling in two-dimensional periodic photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Desyatnikov, Anton S; Kivshar, Yuri S; Shchesnovich, Valery S; Cavalcanti, Solange B; Hickmann, Jandir M

    2007-02-15

    We study Zener tunneling in two-dimensional photonic lattices and derive, for the case of hexagonal symmetry, the generalized Landau-Zener-Majorana model describing resonant interaction between high-symmetry points of the photonic spectral bands. We demonstrate that this effect can be employed for the generation of Floquet-Bloch modes and verify the model by direct numerical simulations of the tunneling effect.

  5. SHORT COMMUNICATION: Transportable Zener-diode Voltage Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, O. V.; Shulga, V. M.; Shakirzyanova, F. R.; Sarandi, A. E.

    1994-01-01

    Five transportable Zener-diode dc voltage standards have been developed, fabricated and investigated at the NPO VNIIFTRI. The standards were designed to transfer the unit of electromotive force (emf) from Josephson reference standards to measuring instruments. Following the results of these investigations, standard N 02 has been used for intercomparison of the Russian Josephson reference standards.

  6. A Simple Approach to the Landau-Zener Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vutha, Amar C.

    2010-01-01

    The Landau-Zener formula provides the probability of non-adiabatic transitions occurring when two energy levels are swept through an avoided crossing. The formula is derived here in a simple calculation that emphasizes the physics responsible for non-adiabatic population transfer. (Contains 2 figures.)

  7. Constraints on scattering amplitudes in multistate Landau-Zener theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.; Lin, Jeffmin; Chernyak, Vladimir Y.

    2017-01-01

    We derive a set of constraints, which we will call hierarchy constraints, on scattering amplitudes of an arbitrary multistate Landau-Zener model (MLZM). The presence of additional symmetries can transform such constraints into nontrivial relations between elements of the transition probability matrix. This observation can be used to derive complete solutions of some MLZMs or, for models that cannot be solved completely, to reduce the number of independent elements of the transition probability matrix.

  8. Constraints on scattering amplitudes in multistate Landau-Zener theory

    SciT

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.; Lin, Jeffmin; Chernyak, Vladimir Y.

    2017-01-30

    Here, we derive a set of constraints, which we will call hierarchy constraints, on scattering amplitudes of an arbitrary multistate Landau-Zener model (MLZM). The presence of additional symmetries can transform such constraints into nontrivial relations between elements of the transition probability matrix. This observation can be used to derive complete solutions of some MLZMs or, for models that cannot be solved completely, to reduce the number of independent elements of the transition probability matrix.

  9. The quest for solvable multistate Landau-Zener models

    DOE PAGES

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.; Chernyak, Vladimir Y.

    2017-05-24

    Recently, integrability conditions (ICs) in mutistate Landau-Zener (MLZ) theory were proposed. They describe common properties of all known solved systems with linearly time-dependent Hamiltonians. Here we show that ICs enable efficient computer assisted search for new solvable MLZ models that span complexity range from several interacting states to mesoscopic systems with many-body dynamics and combinatorially large phase space. This diversity suggests that nontrivial solvable MLZ models are numerous. Additionally, we refine the formulation of ICs and extend the class of solvable systems to models with points of multiple diabatic level crossing.

  10. 75 FR 24747 - SCI, LLC/Zener-Rectifier Operations Division A Wholly Owned Subsidiary of SCI, LLC/ON...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-70,235] SCI, LLC/Zener-Rectifier... Adjustment Assistance on October 19, 2009, applicable to workers of SCI LLC/Zener-Rectifier, Operations... Technical Resources were employed on-site at the Phoenix Arizona location of SCI LLC/Zener-Rectifier...

  11. Landau-Zener interferometry in a Cooper pair box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillanpää, Mika; Lehtinen, Teijo; Paila, Antti; Makhlin, Yuriy; Hakonen, Pertti

    2006-03-01

    Quantum-mechanical systems having two crossing energy levels are ubiquitous in nature. The rate v = d (E1- E0)/dt at which such levels in a driven system approach each other determines the probability PLZ of a Landau-Zener (LZ) tunneling between them. The traditional treatment of the LZ process, however, ignores quantum-mechanical interference. Here we report an observation of phase-sensitive interference between consecutive LZ tunneling attempts in an artificial two-state system, a superconducting charge qubit. We interpret the experiment in terms of a multi-pass analog to the optical Mach- Zehnder interferometer: The beam splitting occurs by LZ tunneling at the charge degeneracy, while the arms of the Mach- Zehnder interferometer in energy space are represented by the ground and excited state. In accord with theory, we observe constructive interference when the Stokes phase φS picked up during the LZ interaction, and the dynamical phase of one drive period φ= (E1- E0) dt satisfy the condition: (φ- 2 φS) = m .2π. Our LZ interferometer can be used as a high-resolution detector for phase and charge owing to interferometric sensitivity- enhancement.

  12. Hyperbolic cooling of graphene Zener-Klein transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Berthou, Simon; Lu, Xiaobo; Baudin, Emmanuel; Wilmart, Quentin; Denis, Anne; Rosticher, Michael; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Feve, Gwendal; Berroir, Jean-Marc; Zhang, Guangyu; Voisin, Christophe; Placais, Bernard

    Engineering of cooling mechanisms is a bottleneck in nanoelectroniscs. In graphene/hBN transistors, Wiedemann-Frantz cooling and supercollision-cooling prevails, and the latter is suppressed in high mobility graphene/hBN samples and substituted by the super-Planckian radiation of hyperbolic phonon-polaritons (HPPs) in the hBN substrate. Using electrical Joule heating and sensitive noise thermometry in several GHz range we report on prevailing HPP cooling in the upper Reststrahlen-band of hBN at high bias. We predict and observe its activation threshold, along with interband Zener-Klein tunneling. HPP cooling is able to evacuate at least several GW/m2 to the bottom gate, resulting in an unusual clipping of electronic temperature. As a scattering counterpart, HPPs of the lower Reststrahlen-band control current saturation at high doping. The combination of both mechanisms promotes graphene/hBN as a valuable nanotechnology for applications in the high power devices and radio frequency electronics.

  13. Molecular diodes based on conjugated diblock co-oligomers.

    PubMed

    Ng, Man-Kit; Lee, Dong-Chan; Yu, Luping

    2002-10-09

    This report describes synthesis and characterization of a molecular diode based upon a diblock conjugated oligomer system. This system consists of two conjugated blocks with opposite electronic demand. The molecular structure exhibits a built-in electronic asymmetry, much like a semiconductor p-n junction. Electrical measurements by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) clearly revealed a pronounced rectifying effect. Definitive proof for the molecular nature of the rectifying effect in this conjugated diblock molecule is provided by control experiments with a structurally similar reference compound.

  14. Integrable time-dependent Hamiltonians, solvable Landau-Zener models and Gaudin magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuzbashyan, Emil A.

    2018-05-01

    We solve the non-stationary Schrödinger equation for several time-dependent Hamiltonians, such as the BCS Hamiltonian with an interaction strength inversely proportional to time, periodically driven BCS and linearly driven inhomogeneous Dicke models as well as various multi-level Landau-Zener tunneling models. The latter are Demkov-Osherov, bow-tie, and generalized bow-tie models. We show that these Landau-Zener problems and their certain interacting many-body generalizations map to Gaudin magnets in a magnetic field. Moreover, we demonstrate that the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the above models has a similar structure and is integrable with a similar technique as Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equations. We also discuss applications of our results to the problem of molecular production in an atomic Fermi gas swept through a Feshbach resonance and to the evaluation of the Landau-Zener transition probabilities.

  15. Power MOSFET-diode-based limiter for high-frequency ultrasound systems.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hojong; Kim, Min Gon; Cummins, Thomas M; Hwang, Jae Youn; Shung, K Kirk

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the limiter circuits used in the ultrasound imaging systems is to pass low-voltage echo signals generated by ultrasonic transducers while preventing high-voltage short pulses transmitted by pulsers from damaging front-end circuits. Resistor-diode-based limiters (a 50 Ω resistor with a single cross-coupled diode pair) have been widely used in pulse-echo measurement and imaging system applications due to their low cost and simple architecture. However, resistor-diode-based limiters may not be suited for high-frequency ultrasound transducer applications since they produce large signal conduction losses at higher frequencies. Therefore, we propose a new limiter architecture utilizing power MOSFETs, which we call a power MOSFET-diode-based limiter. The performance of a power MOSFET-diode-based limiter was evaluated with respect to insertion loss (IL), total harmonic distortion (THD), and response time (RT). We compared these results with those of three other conventional limiter designs and showed that the power MOSFET-diode-based limiter offers the lowest IL (-1.33 dB) and fastest RT (0.10 µs) with the lowest suppressed output voltage (3.47 Vp-p) among all the limiters at 70 MHz. A pulse-echo test was performed to determine how the new limiter affected the sensitivity and bandwidth of the transducer. We found that the sensitivity and bandwidth of the transducer were 130% and 129% greater, respectively, when combined with the new power MOSFET-diode-based limiter versus the resistor-diode-based limiter. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the power MOSFET-diode-based limiter is capable of producing lower signal attenuation than the three conventional limiter designs at higher frequency operation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Polarization-induced Zener tunnel diodes in GaN/InGaN/GaN heterojunctions

    SciT

    Yan, Xiaodong; Li, Wenjun; Islam, S. M.

    By the insertion of thin In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N layers into Nitrogen-polar GaN p-n junctions, polarization-induced Zener tunnel junctions are studied. The reverse-bias interband Zener tunneling current is found to be weakly temperature dependent, as opposed to the strongly temperature-dependent forward bias current. This indicates tunneling as the primary reverse-bias current transport mechanism. The Indium composition in the InGaN layer is systematically varied to demonstrate the increase in the interband tunneling current. Comparing the experimentally measured tunneling currents to a model helps identify the specific challenges in potentially taking such junctions towards nitride-based polarization-induced tunneling field-effect transistors.

  17. Landau-Zener transitions and Dykhne formula in a simple continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, Yujin; Garmon, Savannah

    The Landau-Zener model describing the interaction between two linearly driven discrete levels is useful in describing many simple dynamical systems; however, no system is completely isolated from the surrounding environment. Here we examine a generalizations of the original Landau-Zener model to study simple environmental influences. We consider a model in which one of the discrete levels is replaced with a energy continuum, in which we find that the survival probability for the initially occupied diabatic level is unaffected by the presence of the continuum. This result can be predicted by assuming that each step in the evolution for the diabatic state evolves independently according to the Landau-Zener formula, even in the continuum limit. We also show that, at least for the simplest model, this result can also be predicted with the natural generalization of the Dykhne formula for open systems. We also observe dissipation as the non-escape probability from the discrete levels is no longer equal to one.

  18. Zener Diode Compact Model Parameter Extraction Using Xyce-Dakota Optimization.

    SciT

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; Wilcox, Ian Zachary; Sandoval, Andrew J

    This report presents a detailed process for compact model parameter extraction for DC circuit Zener diodes. Following the traditional approach of Zener diode parameter extraction, circuit model representation is defined and then used to capture the different operational regions of a real diode's electrical behavior. The circuit model contains 9 parameters represented by resistors and characteristic diodes as circuit model elements. The process of initial parameter extraction, the identification of parameter values for the circuit model elements, is presented in a way that isolates the dependencies between certain electrical parameters and highlights both the empirical nature of the extraction andmore » portions of the real diode physical behavior which of the parameters are intended to represent. Optimization of the parameters, a necessary part of a robost parameter extraction process, is demonstrated using a 'Xyce-Dakota' workflow, discussed in more detail in the report. Among other realizations during this systematic approach of electrical model parameter extraction, non-physical solutions are possible and can be difficult to avoid because of the interdependencies between the different parameters. The process steps described are fairly general and can be leveraged for other types of semiconductor device model extractions. Also included in the report are recommendations for experiment setups for generating optimum dataset for model extraction and the Parameter Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) for Zener diodes.« less

  19. Exploring the mechanical behavior of degrading swine neural tissue at low strain rates via the fractional Zener constitutive model.

    PubMed

    Bentil, Sarah A; Dupaix, Rebecca B

    2014-02-01

    The ability of the fractional Zener constitutive model to predict the behavior of postmortem swine brain tissue was examined in this work. Understanding tissue behavior attributed to degradation is invaluable in many fields such as the forensic sciences or cases where only cadaveric tissue is available. To understand how material properties change with postmortem age, the fractional Zener model was considered as it includes parameters to describe brain stiffness and also the parameter α, which quantifies the viscoelasticity of a material. The relationship between the viscoelasticity described by α and tissue degradation was examined by fitting the model to data collected in a previous study (Bentil, 2013). This previous study subjected swine neural tissue to in vitro unconfined compression tests using four postmortem age groups (<6h, 24h, 3 days, and 1 week). All samples were compressed to a strain level of 10% using two compressive rates: 1mm/min and 5mm/min. Statistical analysis was used as a tool to study the influence of the fractional Zener constants on factors such as tissue degradation and compressive rate. Application of the fractional Zener constitutive model to the experimental data showed that swine neural tissue becomes less stiff with increased postmortem age. The fractional Zener model was also able to capture the nonlinear viscoelastic features of the brain tissue at low strain rates. The results showed that the parameter α was better correlated with compressive rate than with postmortem age. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Solvable multistate model of Landau-Zener transitions in cavity QED

    DOE PAGES

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Li, Fuxiang

    2016-06-29

    We consider the model of a single optical cavity mode interacting with two-level systems (spins) driven by a linearly time-dependent field. When this field passes through values at which spin energy level splittings become comparable to spin coupling to the optical mode, a cascade of Landau-Zener (LZ) transitions leads to co-flips of spins in exchange for photons of the cavity. We derive exact transition probabilities between different diabatic states induced by such a sweep of the field.

  1. Polarization-induced Zener tunnel junctions in wide-band-gap heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Simon, John; Zhang, Ze; Goodman, Kevin; Xing, Huili; Kosel, Thomas; Fay, Patrick; Jena, Debdeep

    2009-07-10

    The large electronic polarization in III-V nitrides allows for novel physics not possible in other semiconductor families. In this work, interband Zener tunneling in wide-band-gap GaN heterojunctions is demonstrated by using polarization-induced electric fields. The resulting tunnel diodes are more conductive under reverse bias, which has applications for zero-bias rectification and mm-wave imaging. Since interband tunneling is traditionally prohibitive in wide-band-gap semiconductors, these polarization-induced structures and their variants can enable a number of devices such as multijunction solar cells that can operate under elevated temperatures and high fields.

  2. Exact transition probabilities in a 6-state Landau–Zener system with path interference

    SciT

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.

    2015-04-23

    In this paper, we identify a nontrivial multistate Landau–Zener (LZ) model for which transition probabilities between any pair of diabatic states can be determined analytically and exactly. In the semiclassical picture, this model features the possibility of interference of different trajectories that connect the same initial and final states. Hence, transition probabilities are generally not described by the incoherent successive application of the LZ formula. Finally, we discuss reasons for integrability of this system and provide numerical tests of the suggested expression for the transition probability matrix.

  3. Multistate Landau-Zener models with all levels crossing at one point

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Fuxiang; Sun, Chen; Chernyak, Vladimir Y.; ...

    2017-08-04

    Within this paper, we discuss common properties and reasons for integrability in the class of multistate Landau-Zener models with all diabatic levels crossing at one point. Exploring the Stokes phenomenon, we show that each previously solved model has a dual one, whose scattering matrix can be also obtained analytically. For applications, we demonstrate how our results can be used to study conversion of molecular into atomic Bose condensates during passage through the Feshbach resonance, and provide purely algebraic solutions of the bowtie and special cases of the driven Tavis-Cummings model.

  4. Travelers' Health: Immunocompromised Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... clinical and epidemiologic studies are insufficient at this time to evaluate the actual risk of severe adverse effects associated with YF vaccine among recipients with limited immune deficits. If international travel requirements, and not true exposure risk, are the ...

  5. Travelers' Health: Pregnant Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most experts recommend a slower ascent with adequate time for acclimatization. No studies or case reports show harm to a fetus if the mother travels briefly to high altitudes during pregnancy. However, it ...

  6. Solvable four-state Landau-Zener model of two interacting qubits with path interference

    DOE PAGES

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.

    2015-11-30

    In this paper, I identify a nontrivial four-state Landau-Zener model for which transition probabilities between any pair of diabatic states can be determined analytically and exactly. The model describes an experimentally accessible system of two interacting qubits, such as a localized state in a Dirac material with both valley and spin degrees of freedom or a singly charged quantum dot (QD) molecule with spin orbit coupling. Application of the linearly time-dependent magnetic field induces a sequence of quantum level crossings with possibility of interference of different trajectories in a semiclassical picture. I argue that this system satisfies the criteria ofmore » integrability in the multistate Landau-Zener theory, which allows one to derive explicit exact analytical expressions for the transition probability matrix. Finally, I also argue that this model is likely a special case of a larger class of solvable systems, and present a six-state generalization as an example.« less

  7. Travelers' Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers Road Safety Senior Citizens Sex Tourism STDs Sun Exposure Swimming and Diving Study Abroad ...

  8. Travelers' Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  9. Floquet spectrum and driven conductance in Dirac materials: Effects of Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg-Majorana interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, Yaroslav; Kugel, Kliment; Nori, Franco

    Using the Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana-type (LZSM) semiclassical approach, we study both graphene and a thin film of a Weyl semimetal subjected to a strong ac electromagnetic field. The spectrum of quasienergies in the Weyl semimetal turns out to be similar to that of a graphene sheet. It has been predicted qualitatively that the transport properties of strongly irradiated graphene oscillate as a function of the radiation intensity. Here we obtain rigorous quantitative results for a driven linear conductance of graphene and a thin film of a Weyl semimetal. The exact quantitative structure of oscillations exhibits two contributions. The first one is a manifestation of the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, while the second contribution is a consequence of the LZSM interference defining the spectrum of quasienergies.

  10. Continuous-Time Monitoring of Landau-Zener Interference in a Cooper-Pair Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillanpää, Mika; Lehtinen, Teijo; Paila, Antti; Makhlin, Yuriy; Hakonen, Pertti

    2006-05-01

    Landau-Zener (LZ) tunneling can occur with a certain probability when crossing energy levels of a quantum two-level system are swept across the minimum energy separation. Here we present experimental evidence of quantum interference effects in solid-state LZ tunneling. We used a Cooper-pair box qubit where the LZ tunneling occurs at the charge degeneracy. By employing a weak nondemolition monitoring, we observe interference between consecutive LZ-tunneling events; we find that the average level occupancies depend on the dynamical phase. The system’s unusually strong linear response is explained by interband relaxation. Our interferometer can be used as a high-resolution Mach-Zehnder type detector for phase and charge.

  11. Continuous-time monitoring of Landau-Zener interference in a cooper-pair box.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, Mika; Lehtinen, Teijo; Paila, Antti; Makhlin, Yuriy; Hakonen, Pertti

    2006-05-12

    Landau-Zener (LZ) tunneling can occur with a certain probability when crossing energy levels of a quantum two-level system are swept across the minimum energy separation. Here we present experimental evidence of quantum interference effects in solid-state LZ tunneling. We used a Cooper-pair box qubit where the LZ tunneling occurs at the charge degeneracy. By employing a weak nondemolition monitoring, we observe interference between consecutive LZ-tunneling events; we find that the average level occupancies depend on the dynamical phase. The system's unusually strong linear response is explained by interband relaxation. Our interferometer can be used as a high-resolution Mach-Zehnder-type detector for phase and charge.

  12. A graphene Zener-Klein transistor cooled by a hyperbolic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Berthou, Simon; Lu, Xiaobo; Wilmart, Quentin; Denis, Anne; Rosticher, Michael; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Fève, Gwendal; Berroir, Jean-Marc; Zhang, Guangyu; Voisin, Christophe; Baudin, Emmanuel; Plaçais, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    The engineering of cooling mechanisms is a bottleneck in nanoelectronics. Thermal exchanges in diffusive graphene are mostly driven by defect-assisted acoustic phonon scattering, but the case of high-mobility graphene on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is radically different, with a prominent contribution of remote phonons from the substrate. Bilayer graphene on a hBN transistor with a local gate is driven in a regime where almost perfect current saturation is achieved by compensation of the decrease in the carrier density and Zener-Klein tunnelling (ZKT) at high bias. Using noise thermometry, we show that the ZKT triggers a new cooling pathway due to the emission of hyperbolic phonon polaritons in hBN by out-of-equilibrium electron-hole pairs beyond the super-Planckian regime. The combination of ZKT transport and hyperbolic phonon polariton cooling renders graphene on BN transistors a valuable nanotechnology for power devices and RF electronics.

  13. Supercurrent survival under a Rosen-Zener quench of hard-core bosons.

    PubMed

    Klich, I; Lannert, C; Refael, G

    2007-11-16

    We study the survival of supercurrents in a system of impenetrable bosons on a lattice, subject to a quantum quench from its critical superfluid phase to an insulating phase. We show that the evolution of the current when the quench follows a Rosen-Zener profile is exactly solvable. This allows us to analyze a quench of arbitrary rate, from a sudden destruction of the superfluid to a slow opening of a gap. The decay and oscillations of the current are analytically derived and studied numerically along with the momentum distribution after the quench. In the case of small supercurrent boosts nu, we find that the current surviving at long times is proportional to nu3.

  14. Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana Interferometry of a Single Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogan, Alex; Studenikin, Sergei; Korkusinski, Marek; Gaudreau, Louis; Zawadzki, Piotr; Sachrajda, Andy S.; Tracy, Lisa; Reno, John; Hargett, Terry

    2018-05-01

    We perform Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana (LZSM) spectroscopy on a system with strong spin-orbit interaction (SOI), realized as a single hole confined in a gated double quantum dot. Analogous to electron systems, at a magnetic field B =0 and high modulation frequencies, we observe photon-assisted tunneling between dots, which smoothly evolves into the typical LZSM funnel-shaped interference pattern as the frequency is decreased. In contrast to electrons, the SOI enables an additional, efficient spin-flip interdot tunneling channel, introducing a distinct interference pattern at finite B . Magnetotransport spectra at low-frequency LZSM driving show the two channels to be equally coherent. High-frequency LZSM driving reveals complex photon-assisted tunneling pathways, both spin conserving and spin flip, which form closed loops at critical magnetic fields. In one such loop, an arbitrary hole spin state is inverted, opening the way toward its all-electrical manipulation.

  15. A large class of solvable multistate Landau–Zener models and quantum integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyak, Vladimir Y.; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.; Sun, Chen

    2018-06-01

    The concept of quantum integrability has been introduced recently for quantum systems with explicitly time-dependent Hamiltonians (Sinitsyn et al 2018 Phys. Rev. Lett. 120 190402). Within the multistate Landau–Zener (MLZ) theory, however, there has been a successful alternative approach to identify and solve complex time-dependent models (Sinitsyn and Chernyak 2017 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 50 255203). Here we compare both methods by applying them to a new class of exactly solvable MLZ models. This class contains systems with an arbitrary number of interacting states and shows quick growth with N number of exact adiabatic energy crossing points, which appear at different moments of time. At each N, transition probabilities in these systems can be found analytically and exactly but complexity and variety of solutions in this class also grow with N quickly. We illustrate how common features of solvable MLZ systems appear from quantum integrability and develop an approach to further classification of solvable MLZ problems.

  16. Dynamics of a Landau-Zener non-dissipative system with fluctuating energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fai, L. C.; Diffo, J. T.; Ateuafack, M. E.; Tchoffo, M.; Fouokeng, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper considers a Landau-Zener (two-level) system influenced by a three-dimensional Gaussian and non-Gaussian coloured noise and finds a general form of the time dependent diabatic quantum bit (qubit) flip transition probabilities in the fast, intermediate and slow noise limits. The qubit flip probability is observed to mimic (for low-frequencies noise) that of the standard LZ problem. The qubit flip probability is also observed to be the measure of quantum coherence of states. The transition probability is observed to be tailored by non-Gaussian low-frequency noise and otherwise by Gaussian low-frequency coloured noise. Intermediate and fast noise limits are observed to alter the memory of the system in time and found to improve and control quantum information processing.

  17. Travel medicine

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  18. Connected Traveler

    SciT

    2016-06-01

    The Connected Traveler framework seeks to boost the energy efficiency of personal travel and the overall transportation system by maximizing the accuracy of predicted traveler behavior in response to real-time feedback and incentives. It is anticipated that this approach will establish a feedback loop that 'learns' traveler preferences and customizes incentives to meet or exceed energy efficiency targets by empowering individual travelers with information needed to make energy-efficient choices and reducing the complexity required to validate transportation system energy savings. This handout provides an overview of NREL's Connected Traveler project, including graphics, milestones, and contact information.

  19. Experimental realization of non-adiabatic universal quantum gates using geometric Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Tu, Tao; Gong, Bo; Zhou, Cheng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-01-01

    High fidelity universal gates for quantum bits form an essential ingredient of quantum information processing. In particular, geometric gates have attracted attention because they have a higher intrinsic resistance to certain errors. However, their realization remains a challenge because of the need for complicated quantum control on a multi-level structure as well as meeting the adiabatic condition within a short decoherence time. Here, we demonstrate non-adiabatic quantum operations for a two-level system by applying a well-controlled geometric Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry. By characterizing the gate quality, we also investigate the operation in the presence of realistic dephasing. Furthermore, the result provides an essential model suitable for understanding an interplay of geometric phase and Landau-Zener-Stückelberg process which are well explored separately. PMID:26738875

  20. Zener behaviour of p-SnS/ZnO and p-SnS/ZnS heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Yashika; Arun, P.

    2018-03-01

    p-SnS absorbing layers were grown by thermal evaporation on layers of various Zinc compounds, like ZnO and ZnS. This present work reports the J-V characteristics of thus obtained p-SnS/ZnO and p-SnS/ZnS heterojunctions. The pn junctions of these structures did not show any photovoltaic activity, however a zener like behaviour was observed in the 3rd quadrant of the J-V characteristics. Our analysis of the diodes suggest that the reverse breakdown or zener voltage obtained from the dark J-V characteristics can be used to estimate the energy band diagram of the junction and in turn the band-alignment at the junction. This makes it an easy alternative to x-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy method usually used.

  1. Research and Development of Laser Diode Based Instruments for Applications in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael; Abshire, James; Cornwell, Donald; Dragic, Peter; Duerksen, Gary; Switzer, Gregg

    1999-01-01

    Laser diode technology continues to advance at a very rapid rate due to commercial applications such as telecommunications and data storage. The advantages of laser diodes include, wide diversity of wavelengths, high efficiency, small size and weight and high reliability. Semiconductor and fiber optical-amplifiers permit efficient, high power master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) transmitter systems. Laser diode systems which incorporate monolithic or discrete (fiber optic) gratings permit single frequency operation. We describe experimental and theoretical results of laser diode based instruments currently under development at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center including miniature lidars for measuring clouds and aerosols, water vapor and wind for Earth and planetary (Mars Lander) use.

  2. Common-path interference and oscillatory Zener tunneling in bilayer graphene p-n junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nandkishore, Rahul; Levitov, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    Interference and tunneling are two signature quantum effects that are often perceived as the yin and yang of quantum mechanics: a particle simultaneously propagating along several distinct classical paths versus a particle penetrating through a classically inaccessible region via a single least-action path. Here we demonstrate that the Dirac quasiparticles in graphene provide a dramatic departure from this paradigm. We show that Zener tunneling in gapped bilayer graphene, which governs transport through p-n heterojunctions, exhibits common-path interference that takes place under the tunnel barrier. Due to a symmetry peculiar to the gapped bilayer graphene bandstructure, interfering tunneling paths form conjugate pairs, giving rise to high-contrast oscillations in transmission as a function of the gate-tunable bandgap and other control parameters of the junction. The common-path interference is solely due to forward-propagating waves; in contrast to Fabry–Pérot-type interference in resonant-tunneling structures, it does not rely on multiple backscattering. The oscillations manifest themselves in the junction I–V characteristic as N-shaped branches with negative differential conductivity. The negative dI/dV, which arises solely due to under-barrier interference, can enable new high-speed active-circuit devices with architectures that are not available in electronic semiconductor devices. PMID:21825159

  3. Loss of adiabaticity with increasing tunneling gap in nonintegrable multistate Landau-Zener models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malla, Rajesh K.; Raikh, M. E.

    2017-09-01

    We consider the simplest nonintegrable model of the multistate Landau-Zener transition. In this model, two pairs of levels in two tunnel-coupled quantum dots are swept past each other by the gate voltage. Although this 2 ×2 model is nonintegrable, it can be solved analytically in the limit when the interlevel energy distance is much smaller than their tunnel splitting. The result is contrasted to the similar 2 ×1 model, in which one of the dots contains only one level. The latter model does not allow interference of the virtual transition amplitudes, and it is exactly solvable. In the 2 ×1 model, the probability for a particle, residing at time t →-∞ in one dot, to remain in the same dot at t →∞ , falls off exponentially with tunnel coupling. By contrast, in the 2 ×2 model, this probability grows rapidly with tunnel coupling. The physical origin of this growth is the formation of the tunneling-induced collective states in the system of two dots. This can be viewed as a manifestation of the Dicke effect.

  4. Travelers' thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Raymond V; Hudson, Martin F

    2014-02-01

    The suggestion that venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with air travel has for several decades been the subject of both "media hype" and extensive debate in the medical literature. As emotion and anecdote is often a feature in this debate, it is therefore necessary to separate evidence from anecdote. "Travelers' thrombosis" is a more appropriate term because the evidence suggests that any form of travel involving immobility lasting more than 4 h can predispose to thrombosis. There is no unique factor in the air travel cabin environment that has been shown to have any effect on the coagulation cascade. Prevention of thrombosis in any form of travel, including air travel, requires being aware of the issue and making an adequate risk assessment together with appropriate prophylactic measures.

  5. Air-stable memory array of bistable rectifying diodes based on ferroelectric-semiconductor polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manasvi; Sharifi Dehsari, Hamed; Anwar, Saleem; Asadi, Kamal

    2018-03-01

    Organic bistable diodes based on phase-separated blends of ferroelectric and semiconducting polymers have emerged as promising candidates for non-volatile information storage for low-cost solution processable electronics. One of the bottlenecks impeding upscaling is stability and reliable operation of the array in air. Here, we present a memory array fabricated with an air-stable amine-based semiconducting polymer. Memory diode fabrication and full electrical characterizations were carried out in atmospheric conditions (23 °C and 45% relative humidity). The memory diodes showed on/off ratios greater than 100 and further exhibited robust and stable performance upon continuous write-read-erase-read cycles. Moreover, we demonstrate a 4-bit memory array that is free from cross-talk with a shelf-life of several months. Demonstration of the stability and reliable air operation further strengthens the feasibility of the resistance switching in ferroelectric memory diodes for low-cost applications.

  6. Radial tunnel diodes based on InP/InGaAs core-shell nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizno, Ofogh; Ganjipour, Bahram; Heurlin, Magnus; Thelander, Claes; Borgström, Magnus T.; Samuelson, Lars

    2017-03-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of radial tunnel diodes based on InP(n+)/InGaAs(p+) core-shell nanowires, where the effect of Zn-dopant precursor flow on the electrical properties of the devices is evaluated. Selective and local etching of the InGaAs shell is employed to access the nanowire core in the contact process. Devices with an n+-p doping profile show normal diode rectification, whereas n+-p+ junctions exhibit typical tunnel diode characteristics with peak-to-valley current ratios up to 14 at room temperature and 100 at 4.2 K. A maximum peak current density of 28 A/cm2 and a reverse current density of 7.3 kA/cm2 at VSD = -0.5 V are extracted at room temperature after normalization with the effective junction area.

  7. High current density Esaki tunnel diodes based on GaSb-InAsSb heterostructure nanowires.

    PubMed

    Ganjipour, Bahram; Dey, Anil W; Borg, B Mattias; Ek, Martin; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Dick, Kimberly A; Wernersson, Lars-Erik; Thelander, Claes

    2011-10-12

    We present electrical characterization of broken gap GaSb-InAsSb nanowire heterojunctions. Esaki diode characteristics with maximum reverse current of 1750 kA/cm(2) at 0.50 V, maximum peak current of 67 kA/cm(2) at 0.11 V, and peak-to-valley ratio (PVR) of 2.1 are obtained at room temperature. The reverse current density is comparable to that of state-of-the-art tunnel diodes based on heavily doped p-n junctions. However, the GaSb-InAsSb diodes investigated in this work do not rely on heavy doping, which permits studies of transport mechanisms in simple transistor structures processed with high-κ gate dielectrics and top-gates. Such processing results in devices with improved PVR (3.5) and stability of the electrical properties.

  8. High performance MIIM diode based on cobalt oxide/titanium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herner, S. B.; Weerakkody, A. D.; Belkadi, A.; Moddel, G.

    2017-05-01

    Optical rectennas for infrared energy harvesting commonly incorporate metal/double-insulator/metal diodes. Required diode characteristics include high responsivity and low resistance near zero bias with a sub-micron area, which have not been obtainable simultaneously. Diodes based on a new material set, Co/Co3O4/TiO2/Ti and an area of 0.071 μm2, provide a median maximum responsivity of 4.1 A/W, a median zero-bias responsivity of 1.2 A/W, and a median resistance of 14 kΩ. The highest performing diode has a maximum responsivity of 4.4 A/W, a zero-bias responsivity of 2.2 A/W, and a resistance of 18 kΩ.

  9. Quantum thermal diode based on two interacting spinlike systems under different excitations.

    PubMed

    Ordonez-Miranda, Jose; Ezzahri, Younès; Joulain, Karl

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate that two interacting spinlike systems characterized by different excitation frequencies and coupled to a thermal bath each, can be used as a quantum thermal diode capable of efficiently rectifying the heat current. This is done by deriving analytical expressions for both the heat current and rectification factor of the diode, based on the solution of a master equation for the density matrix. Higher rectification factors are obtained for lower heat currents, whose magnitude takes their maximum values for a given interaction coupling proportional to the temperature of the hotter thermal bath. It is shown that the rectification ability of the diode increases with the excitation frequencies difference, which drives the asymmetry of the heat current, when the temperatures of the thermal baths are inverted. Furthermore, explicit conditions for the optimization of the rectification factor and heat current are explicitly found.

  10. Compact "diode-based" multi-energy soft x-ray diagnostic for NSTX.

    PubMed

    Tritz, K; Clayton, D J; Stutman, D; Finkenthal, M

    2012-10-01

    A novel and compact, diode-based, multi-energy soft x-ray (ME-SXR) diagnostic has been developed for the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment. The new edge ME-SXR system tested on NSTX consists of a set of vertically stacked diode arrays, each viewing the plasma tangentially through independent pinholes and filters providing an overlapping view of the plasma midplane which allows simultaneous SXR measurements with coarse sub-sampling of the x-ray spectrum. Using computed x-ray spectral emission data, combinations of filters can provide fast (>10 kHz) measurements of changes in the electron temperature and density profiles providing a method to "fill-in" the gaps of the multi-point Thomson scattering system.

  11. Travel Overview

    Top Department of Administration logo Alaska Department of Administration Division of Finance Search Search the Division of Finance site DOF State of Alaska Finance Home Content Area Accounting Charge Cards You are here Administration / Finance / Travel Travel The Department of Administration administers the

  12. Landau-Zener-Stückelberg Interferometry in Quantum Dots with Fast Rise Times: Evidence for Coherent Phonon Driving.

    PubMed

    Korkusinski, M; Studenikin, S A; Aers, G; Granger, G; Kam, A; Sachrajda, A S

    2017-02-10

    Manipulating qubits via electrical pulses in a piezoelectric material such as GaAs can be expected to generate incidental acoustic phonons. In this Letter we determine theoretically and experimentally the consequences of these phonons for semiconductor spin qubits using Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry. Theoretical calculations predict that phonons in the presence of the spin-orbit interaction produce both phonon-Rabi fringes and accelerated evolution at the singlet-triplet anticrossing. Observed features confirm the influence of these mechanisms. Additionally, evidence is found that the pulsed gates themselves act as phonon cavities increasing the influence of phonons under specific resonant conditions.

  13. Travellers' diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Charles D

    2003-02-01

    Risk of travellers' diarrhoea is about 7% in developed countries and 20-50% in the developing world. Options for prevention include education and chemoprophylaxis. Vaccination is a promising but incomplete option. Achieving behaviour modification of food and water choices among tourists is difficult. Bismuth subsalicylate (BSS)-containing compounds are about 62% effective in the prevention of travellers' diarrhoea. Antibiotics are about 84% effective in preventing travellers' diarrhoea. Routine prophylaxis of travellers' diarrhoea, especially with antibiotics, should be discouraged. Oral rehydration is generally important in the treatment of diarrhoea, but travellers' diarrhoea is only infrequently dehydrating in adults. The addition of oral rehydration solutions confers no additional benefit to loperamide in the treatment of travellers' diarrhoea in adults. Presently, the most active of the antibiotics routinely available for treatment are members of the fluoroquinolone group. Antibiotics that are not absorbed such as aztreonam and a rifampicin-like agent, rifaximin, are both effective. The latter might become a therapy of choice once it is routinely available, due to predictably less adverse reactions with a non-absorbed antibiotic. Preliminary results with azithromycin look very promising. Less severe disease can be treated with a variety of non-antibiotic agents (e.g. BSS-containing compounds, loperamide and a calmodulin inhibitor, zaldaride). The combination of an antibiotic and loperamide is superior to treatment with either agent alone in a several studies and is arguably the treatment of choice for distressing travellers' diarrhoea.

  14. TRAVEL FORECASTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    Business travel planning within an organization is often a time-consuming task. Travel Forecaster is a menu-driven, easy-to-use program which plans, forecasts cost, and tracks actual vs. planned cost for business-related travel of a division or branch of an organization and compiles this information into a database to aid the travel planner. The program's ability to handle multiple trip entries makes it a valuable time-saving device. Travel Forecaster takes full advantage of relational data base properties so that information that remains constant, such as per diem rates and airline fares (which are unique for each city), needs entering only once. A typical entry would include selection with the mouse of the traveler's name and destination city from pop-up lists, and typed entries for number of travel days and purpose of the trip. Multiple persons can be selected from the pop-up lists and multiple trips are accommodated by entering the number of days by each appropriate month on the entry form. An estimated travel cost is not required of the user as it is calculated by a Fourth Dimension formula. With this information, the program can produce output of trips by month with subtotal and total cost for either organization or sub-entity of an organization; or produce outputs of trips by month with subtotal and total cost for international-only travel. It will also provide monthly and cumulative formats of planned vs. actual outputs in data or graph form. Travel Forecaster users can do custom queries to search and sort information in the database, and it can create custom reports with the user-friendly report generator. Travel Forecaster 1.1 is a database program for use with Fourth Dimension Runtime 2.1.1. It requires a Macintosh Plus running System 6.0.3 or later, 2Mb of RAM and a hard disk. The standard distribution medium for this package is one 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette. Travel Forecaster was developed in 1991. Macintosh is a registered trademark of

  15. Gyrotropic Zener tunneling and nonlinear IV curves in the zero-energy Landau level of graphene in a strong magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, Antti; Kumar, Manohar; Hakonen, Pertti; Sonin, Edouard

    2018-01-12

    We have investigated tunneling current through a suspended graphene Corbino disk in high magnetic fields at the Dirac point, i.e. at filling factor ν = 0. At the onset of the dielectric breakdown the current through the disk grows exponentially before ohmic behaviour, but in a manner distinct from thermal activation. We find that Zener tunneling between Landau sublevels dominates, facilitated by tilting of the source-drain bias potential. According to our analytic modelling, the Zener tunneling is strongly affected by the gyrotropic force (Lorentz force) due to the high magnetic field.

  16. Fitting stress relaxation experiments with fractional Zener model to predict high frequency moduli of polymeric acoustic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinxin; Yan, Guqi; Benyahia, Lazhar; Sahraoui, Sohbi

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a time domain method to determine viscoelastic properties of open-cell foams on a wide frequency range. This method is based on the adjustment of the stress-time relationship, obtained from relaxation tests on polymeric foams' samples under static compression, with the four fractional derivatives Zener model. The experimental relaxation function, well described by the Mittag-Leffler function, allows for straightforward prediction of the frequency-dependence of complex modulus of polyurethane foams. To show the feasibility of this approach, complex shear moduli of the same foams were measured in the frequency range between 0.1 and 16 Hz and at different temperatures between -20 °C and 20 °C. A curve was reconstructed on the reduced frequency range (0.1 Hz-1 MHz) using the time-temperature superposition principle. Very good agreement was obtained between experimental complex moduli values and the fractional Zener model predictions. The proposed time domain method may constitute an improved alternative to resonant and non-resonant techniques often used for dynamic characterization of polymers for the determination of viscoelastic moduli on a broad frequency range.

  17. Travel Virginia

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-01-01

    Prepared ca. 2000. This report summarizes the results of a fifteen-month study to assess the feasibility of expanding Travel Shenandoah, a pilot rural ATIS service developed for Virginia's Northern Shenandoah Valley, into a comprehensive, statewide s...

  18. Travelers' Health: Cruise Ship Travel

    MedlinePlus

    ... Motion Sickness ). PRECAUTIONS FOR CRUISE SHIP TRAVELERS Pretravel Evaluate the type and length of the planned cruise ... Peake DE, Gray CL, Ludwig MR, Hill CD. Descriptive epidemiology of injury and illness among cruise ship ...

  19. Pulsed corona generation using a diode-based pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemen, A. J. M.; Grekhov, I. V.; van Heesch, E. J. M.; Yan, K.; Nair, S. A.; Korotkov, S. V.

    2003-10-01

    Pulsed plasma techniques serve a wide range of unconventional processes, such as gas and water processing, hydrogen production, and nanotechnology. Extending research on promising applications, such as pulsed corona processing, depends to a great extent on the availability of reliable, efficient and repetitive high-voltage pulsed power technology. Heavy-duty opening switches are the most critical components in high-voltage pulsed power systems with inductive energy storage. At the Ioffe Institute, an unconventional switching mechanism has been found, based on the fast recovery process in a diode. This article discusses the application of such a "drift-step-recovery-diode" for pulsed corona plasma generation. The principle of the diode-based nanosecond high-voltage generator will be discussed. The generator will be coupled to a corona reactor via a transmission-line transformer. The advantages of this concept, such as easy voltage transformation, load matching, switch protection and easy coupling with a dc bias voltage, will be discussed. The developed circuit is tested at both a resistive load and various corona reactors. Methods to optimize the energy transfer to a corona reactor have been evaluated. The impedance matching between the pulse generator and corona reactor can be significantly improved by using a dc bias voltage. At good matching, the corona energy increases and less energy reflects back to the generator. Matching can also be slightly improved by increasing the temperature in the corona reactor. More effective is to reduce the reactor pressure.

  20. Light-emitting diode-based multiwavelength diffuse optical tomography system guided by ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guangqian; Alqasemi, Umar; Chen, Aaron; Yang, Yi; Zhu, Quing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Laser diodes are widely used in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) systems but are typically expensive and fragile, while light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are cheaper and are also available in the near-infrared (NIR) range with adequate output power for imaging deeply seated targets. In this study, we introduce a new low-cost DOT system using LEDs of four wavelengths in the NIR spectrum as light sources. The LEDs were modulated at 20 kHz to avoid ambient light. The LEDs were distributed on a hand-held probe and a printed circuit board was mounted at the back of the probe to separately provide switching and driving current to each LED. Ten optical fibers were used to couple the reflected light to 10 parallel photomultiplier tube detectors. A commercial ultrasound system provided simultaneous images of target location and size to guide the image reconstruction. A frequency-domain (FD) laser-diode-based system with ultrasound guidance was also used to compare the results obtained from those of the LED-based system. Results of absorbers embedded in intralipid and inhomogeneous tissue phantoms have demonstrated that the LED-based system provides a comparable quantification accuracy of targets to the FD system and has the potential to image deep targets such as breast lesions. PMID:25473884

  1. Optoacoustic diagnostic modality: from idea to clinical studies with highly compact laser diode-based systems

    PubMed Central

    Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract. Optoacoustic (photoacoustic) diagnostic modality is a technique that combines high optical contrast and ultrasound spatial resolution. We proposed using the optoacoustic technique for a number of applications, including cancer detection, monitoring of thermotherapy (hyperthermia, coagulation, and freezing), monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation in patients with traumatic brain injury, neonatal patients, fetuses during late-stage labor, central venous oxygenation monitoring, and total hemoglobin concentration monitoring as well as hematoma detection and characterization. We developed and built optical parametric oscillator-based systems and multiwavelength, fiber-coupled highly compact, laser diode-based systems for optoacoustic imaging, monitoring, and sensing. To provide sufficient output pulse energy, a specially designed fiber-optic system was built and incorporated in ultrasensitive, wideband optoacoustic probes. We performed preclinical and clinical tests of the systems and the optoacoustic probes in backward mode for most of the applications and in forward mode for the breast cancer and cerebral applications. The high pulse energy and repetition rate allowed for rapid data acquisition with high signal-to-noise ratio from cerebral blood vessels, such as the superior sagittal sinus, central veins, and peripheral veins and arteries, as well as from intracranial hematomas. The optoacoustic systems were capable of automatic, real-time, continuous measurements of blood oxygenation in these blood vessels. PMID:28444150

  2. Inverse design of an ultra-compact broadband optical diode based on asymmetric spatial mode conversion

    PubMed Central

    Callewaert, Francois; Butun, Serkan; Li, Zhongyang; Aydin, Koray

    2016-01-01

    The objective-first inverse-design algorithm is used to design an ultra-compact optical diode. Based on silicon and air only, this optical diode relies on asymmetric spatial mode conversion between the left and right ports. The first even mode incident from the left port is transmitted to the right port after being converted into an odd mode. On the other hand, same mode incident from the right port is reflected back by the optical diode dielectric structure. The convergence and performance of the algorithm are studied, along with a transform method that converts continuous permittivity medium into a binary material design. The optimal device is studied with full-wave electromagnetic simulations to compare its behavior under right and left incidences, in 2D and 3D settings as well. A parametric study is designed to understand the impact of the design space size and initial conditions on the optimized devices performance. A broadband optical diode behavior is observed after optimization, with a large rejection ratio between the two transmission directions. This illustrates the potential of the objective-first inverse-design method to design ultra-compact broadband photonic devices. PMID:27586852

  3. Reconfigurable Diodes Based on Vertical WSe2 Transistors with van der Waals Bonded Contacts.

    PubMed

    Avsar, Ahmet; Marinov, Kolyo; Marin, Enrique Gonzalez; Iannaccone, Giuseppe; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Fiori, Gianluca; Kis, Andras

    2018-05-01

    New device concepts can increase the functionality of scaled electronic devices, with reconfigurable diodes allowing the design of more compact logic gates being one of the examples. In recent years, there has been significant interest in creating reconfigurable diodes based on ultrathin transition metal dichalcogenide crystals due to their unique combination of gate-tunable charge carriers, high mobility, and sizeable band gap. Thanks to their large surface areas, these devices are constructed under planar geometry and the device characteristics are controlled by electrostatic gating through rather complex two independent local gates or ionic-liquid gating. In this work, similar reconfigurable diode action is demonstrated in a WSe 2 transistor by only utilizing van der Waals bonded graphene and Co/h-BN contacts. Toward this, first the charge injection efficiencies into WSe 2 by graphene and Co/h-BN contacts are characterized. While Co/h-BN contact results in nearly Schottky-barrier-free charge injection, graphene/WSe 2 interface has an average barrier height of ≈80 meV. By taking the advantage of the electrostatic transparency of graphene and the different work-function values of graphene and Co/h-BN, vertical devices are constructed where different gate-tunable diode actions are demonstrated. This architecture reveals the opportunities for exploring new device concepts. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Optoacoustic diagnostic modality: from idea to clinical studies with highly compact laser diode-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2017-09-01

    Optoacoustic (photoacoustic) diagnostic modality is a technique that combines high optical contrast and ultrasound spatial resolution. We proposed using the optoacoustic technique for a number of applications, including cancer detection, monitoring of thermotherapy (hyperthermia, coagulation, and freezing), monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation in patients with traumatic brain injury, neonatal patients, fetuses during late-stage labor, central venous oxygenation monitoring, and total hemoglobin concentration monitoring as well as hematoma detection and characterization. We developed and built optical parametric oscillator-based systems and multiwavelength, fiber-coupled highly compact, laser diode-based systems for optoacoustic imaging, monitoring, and sensing. To provide sufficient output pulse energy, a specially designed fiber-optic system was built and incorporated in ultrasensitive, wideband optoacoustic probes. We performed preclinical and clinical tests of the systems and the optoacoustic probes in backward mode for most of the applications and in forward mode for the breast cancer and cerebral applications. The high pulse energy and repetition rate allowed for rapid data acquisition with high signal-to-noise ratio from cerebral blood vessels, such as the superior sagittal sinus, central veins, and peripheral veins and arteries, as well as from intracranial hematomas. The optoacoustic systems were capable of automatic, real-time, continuous measurements of blood oxygenation in these blood vessels.

  5. Travelers' diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barrett-Connor, E

    1973-03-01

    On the average, one-fourth of North Americans visiting developing countries experience a self-limited diarrheal illness that interferes with holiday or business activities. Recent work suggests that these episodes are caused by a small inoculum of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli which are common in the country visited and rare in the country of origin. Neither antimicrobial treatment nor anti-diarrheal agents have proven benefit once the illness has begun. Despite its frequent use, iodochlorhydroxyquin has not been shown in double blind studies to be effective as a preventive agent, and may be dangerous. The status of furazolidone for prevention of tourist diarrhea is questionable. Both neomycin sulfate and phythalylsulfathiazole have demonstrated efficacy as chemoprophylactics in Mexico. However, their use should be restricted to limited types of travel and travelers. General admonitions concerning avoidance of certain ingestibles are recommended; despite questionable value in preventing travelers' diarrhea such precautions may prevent more serious gastrointestinal illness.

  6. Travelers' Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    1973-01-01

    On the average, one-fourth of North Americans visiting developing countries experience a self-limited diarrheal illness that interferes with holiday or business activities. Recent work suggests that these episodes are caused by a small inoculum of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli which are common in the country visited and rare in the country of origin. Neither antimicrobial treatment nor anti-diarrheal agents have proven benefit once the illness has begun. Despite its frequent use, iodochlorhydroxyquin has not been shown in double blind studies to be effective as a preventive agent, and may be dangerous. The status of furazolidone for prevention of tourist diarrhea is questionable. Both neomycin sulfate and phythalylsulfathiazole have demonstrated efficacy as chemoprophylactics in Mexico. However, their use should be restricted to limited types of travel and travelers. General admonitions concerning avoidance of certain ingestibles are recommended; despite questionable value in preventing travelers' diarrhea such precautions may prevent more serious gastrointestinal illness. PMID:4570092

  7. Interstellar Travel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabayda, Adam; Keller, Luke

    Interstellar space travel is a topic that is often dismissed as highly unlikely due to the vast distances involved and to considerable engineering and socioeconomic challenges. Some are left believing that it may be far from possible for us, as a species, to go anywhere beyond our solar system. We demonstrate not only the possibility of covering interstellar distances in decades or less, but also that interstellar travel is possible (in principle) with existing technology. For example: Using only special relativity and calculus, we calculated that an interstellar spacecraft could reach the Andromeda Galaxy (2.5 Million light-years from Earth) in just over 28 years at an acceleration of 9 . 81m/s , which would emulate Earth gravity. We also calculated that the energy required for interstellar space travel, often deemed impossible with current technology, is, in fact, possible through certain methods such as nuclear fusion.

  8. [Travelers' diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Markwalder, K

    2001-06-01

    Diarrhea is the most common health problem of travelers to tropical destinations, affecting up to over 50%, with however considerable regional and seasonal variation. Orally acquired bacterial pathogens, particularly enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, are the most frequent etiology of travelers' diarrhea occurring during the first three weeks of travel. Protozoal infections, e.g. giardia and Entamoeba histolytica, are more often the cause of diarrhea and prolonged problems of intestinal motility of the returning traveler--as are postinfectious irritable bowel syndromes. Prevention seems theoretically simple by avoiding any potentially contaminated food and drinks, but the principle of 'cook it, boil it, peel it, or avoid it is obviously a goal difficult to achieve. Several antibiotics have shown to be able to prevent diarrhea for a short period of time, but the potential of adverse effects and selection of resistant pathogens calls for a restrictive use for short trips of particularly vulnerable subjects only. The use of probiotics--e.g. Saccharomyces boulardi, Streptococcus faecium--gave conflicting results--both in prevention and treatment. The basics of treatment is appropriate fluid replacement--mostly by the oral route. Although this measure can safely bridge the time until spontaneous remission, it fails to reduce the duration of illness. Appropriate antibiotics are fairly effective to reduce the duration of travelers' diarrhea, especially if combined with loperamid. The administration of the later is contraindicated in small children. The most commonly used and well documented antibiotics belong to the fluoroquinolones. Alternatives for pediatric use are azithromycin and cotrimoxazole. Considering the mostly short duration of travelers' diarrhea the administration of antibiotics can be limited to cases of acute febrile dysentery and violent diarrhea when rapid relief is essential. In cases of febrile diarrhea malaria must be considered if the patient has been

  9. Human travel and traveling bedbugs.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, Pascal

    2012-12-01

    A dramatic increase of reported bedbug (Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus) infestations has been observed worldwide over the past decade. Bedbug infestations have also been detected across a wide range of travel accommodations, regardless of their comfort and hygiene levels. Travelers are increasingly exposed to the risks of bedbug bites, infestation of personal belongings, and subsequent contamination of newly visited accommodations and their homes. We searched Medline publications via the PubMed database. National bedbug recommendations, textbooks, newspapers, and Centers for Disease Control websites were also searched manually. To detect infested sites, avoid or limit bedbug bites, and reduce the risk of contaminating one's belongings and home, bedbug biology and ecology must be understood. A detailed search of their most classic hiding niches is a key to finding adult bedbugs, nymphs, eggs, and feces or traces of blood from crushed bedbugs. Locally, bedbugs move by active displacement to feed (bite) during the night. Bed, mattress, sofa, and/or curtains are the most frequently infested places. If you find bedbugs, change your room or, even better, the hotel. Otherwise, travelers should follow recommendations for avoiding bedbugs and their bites during the night and apply certain simple rules to avoid infesting other sites or their home. Travelers exposed to bedbugs can minimize the risks of bites and infestation of their belongings, and must also do their civic duty to avoid contributing to the subsequent contamination of other hotels and, finally, home. © 2012 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  10. Floquet spectrum and driven conductance in Dirac materials: Effects of Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, Ya. I.; Kugel, K. I.; Nori, Franco

    2016-11-01

    Using the Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana-type (LZSM) semiclassical approach, we study both graphene and a thin film of a Weyl semimetal subjected to a strong ac electromagnetic field. The spectrum of quasienergies in the Weyl semimetal turns out to be similar to that of a graphene sheet. It has been predicted qualitatively that the transport properties of strongly irradiated graphene oscillate as a function of the radiation intensity [S. V. Syzranov et al., Phys. Rev. B 88, 241112 (2013)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.241112. Here we obtain rigorous quantitative results for a driven linear conductance of graphene and a thin film of a Weyl semimetal. The exact quantitative structure of oscillations exhibits two contributions. The first one is a manifestation of the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, while the second contribution is a consequence of the LZSM interference defining the spectrum of quasienergies.

  11. Hot-air forming of Al-Mg-Cr alloy and prediction of failure based on Zener-Holloman parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. J.; Kim, W. Y.; Kim, H. K.

    2010-12-01

    The microstructure of an Al-Mg-Cr alloy tube fabricated through indirect extrusion at 673 K showed elongated grains with a mean size of ˜26 μm. The strain rate-stress relationship at high temperatures (753 K to 793 K) revealed that dislocation climb creep was the rate-controlling deformation mechanism. The hot-air forming process was successful at a pressure of 70 bar. The Zener-Hollomon parameter based failure criterion was 3602+, and was used to explain the failure behavior of a deforming body. The forming and fracture behavior of the Al-Mg-Cr alloy tube was analyzed with the aid of finite element (FE) simulation, into which the failure criterion was incorporated. Comparison of the simulation and the experimental results indicated that the proposed fracture criterion was useful in predicting the fracture behavior of aluminum tube deforming by means of gas pressure.

  12. Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana interference in a 3D transmon driven by a chirped microwave

    SciT

    Gong, Ming; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045; Zhou, Yu

    2016-03-14

    By driving a 3D transmon with microwave fields, we generate an effective avoided energy-level crossing. Then we chirp microwave frequency, which is equivalent to driving the system through the avoided energy-level crossing by sweeping the avoided crossing. A double-passage chirp produces Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana (LZSM) interference that agree well with the numerical results, especially with the initial state being an eigen-energy state in the center of an avoided level crossing. A time-resolved state tomography measurement is performed in the evolution of LZSM interference, showing an experimental evidence for the dynamical evolution of quantum state. Our method is fully applicable to other quantummore » systems that contain no intrinsic avoided level crossing, providing an alternative approach for quantum control and quantum simulation.« less

  13. [Traveler's thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Riedel, M; Bohanes, V

    2002-08-01

    It is pathophysiologically conceivable that prolonged sitting in a tight space (e.g., in airplane or other transport vehicle) may lead to leg vein thrombosis. The association between the incidence of venous thromboembolism and long travel has not been sufficiently documented but seems probable. However, this association is only weak and the incidence of symptomatic thromboembolism much lower than the impression given by the recent publicity. In a healthy person, the risk of suffering a clinically relevant leg vein thrombosis solely because of a flight is extreme low. In persons with risk factors for venous thromboembolism, the flight represents an additional, as yet not quantifiable risk. This risk increases with the duration of the travel. The most important cause of thrombosis during long journeys seems to be venostasis due to relative immobilization. It is not clear whether flight travel represents a higher risk of thrombosis compared to other transport vehicles with comparable duration and immobilization. Until more exact information becomes available, it seems reasonable to recommend simple isometric and isotonic leg exercises during long travel. More aggressive measures must be considered for persons with risk factors for thromboembolism, but these measures should be individualized.

  14. Travellers' diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Arduino, R C; DuPont, H L

    1993-06-01

    Although TD is usually a mild and self-limited illness, 30-50% of travellers from industrialized to less developed countries are affected. Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) remain the most frequent cause, being identified in 40-70% of cases. TD frequently occurs within the first 2 weeks of arrival in the foreign country. The clinical manifestation is variable, but watery diarrhoea is the most common clinical presentation. Chronic diarrhoea or remitting symptoms after empirical therapy in the returning traveller are indications for a stool culture and a careful search for stool parasites. Since the major precaution against TD is to avoid exposure to the infectious agents, careful selection of food and beverage is crucial. Bismuth subsalicylate has been proven to be safe and effective in the treatment and prophylaxis of TD. The tablet form has removed the inconvenience of previously required luggage space. Doxycycline, trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole, trimethoprim and the quinolones have been shown to be effective for prevention of diarrhoea. However, side-effects, superinfection, development of antibiotic resistance and easy-to-treat illness may limit the use of these antimicrobial agents to those travellers with concomitant serious medical conditions that would be adversely affected by diarrhoea, or travellers with unaffordable temporary incapacity. A new oral-killed whole-cell and B-subunit cholera toxin vaccine was demonstrated to induce protection against severe ETEC-associated diarrhoea. This is a promising field under investigation. Finally, fluid replacement is the most important aspect of treatment. Patients with moderate to severe TD can be treated with one of the above-mentioned antimicrobial agents for 3-5 days. Selection of the antimicrobial agent is based on the pattern of resistance and the enteric organism prevalent in the geographical area. While TMP-SMX remains active against the strains prevalent in Mexico during summertime, the quinolones represent

  15. Traveling with breathing problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... obstructive lung disease - travel; Chronic bronchitis - travel; Emphysema - travel ... you: Are short of breath most of the time Get short of breath ... doctor if you plan to travel in a place at a high altitude (such ...

  16. Travel Medical Kit.

    PubMed

    Terry, Anne C; Haulman, N Jean

    2016-03-01

    "The traveler's medical kit is an essential tool for both the novice and expert traveler. It is designed to treat travel-related illness and injury and to ensure preexisting medical conditions are managed appropriately. Travelers are at increased risk for common gastrointestinal issues during travel. Respiratory illnesses make up approximately 8% of the ailments present in returned international travelers. Approximately 12% of travelers experience a travel-related skin condition. First aid treatment for minor injuries is essential to all travel medical kits. The complexity ranges from a small, simple case for the urban traveler to a larger, extensive case for wilderness travel." Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Travel Schooling: Helping Children Learn through Travel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrnes, Deborah A.

    2001-01-01

    Provides information for teachers to help parents create rewarding and educational travel experiences for children. Examines the benefits of travel schooling, fundamental elements of a meaningful travel schooling experience, fostering cross cultural sensitivity through travel, and returning to the traditional classroom. (SD)

  18. Plains Traveler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    10 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a dust devil traveling across a plain west-southwest of Schiaparelli Crater, in far eastern Sinus Meridiani. The dust devil is casting a shadow toward the northeast, just south (below) of an egg-shaped crater.

    Location near: 6.4oS, 349.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  19. Novel diode-based laser system for combined transcutaneous monitoring and computer-controlled intermittent treatment of jaundiced neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Mostafa; El-Ahl, Mohammad H. S.; Hamza, Ahmad M.

    2001-06-01

    The high efficacy of laser phototherapy combined with transcutaneous monitoring of serum bilirubin provides optimum safety for jaundiced infants from the risk of bilirubin encephalopathy. In this paper the authors introduce the design and operating principles of a new laser system that can provide simultaneous monitoring and treatment of several jaundiced babies at one time. The new system incorporates diode-based laser sources oscillating at selected wavelengths to achieve both transcutaneous differential absorption measurements of bilirubin concentration in addition to the computer controlled intermittent laser therapy through a network of optical fibers. The detailed description and operating characteristics of this system are presented.

  20. Vaccinations for international travellers travelling from Greece.

    PubMed

    Pavli, Androula; Spilioti, Athina; Lymperi, Ioanna; Katerelos, Panagiotis; Maltezou, Helena C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this prospective, questionnaire-based study is to assess pre-travel vaccinations for international travellers who receive pre-travel advice in Greece. A total of 2494 travellers were studied from January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2010. Travellers sought pre-travel advice at a median of 16 days (range: 0-349 days) before departure. Sub-Saharan Africa was the most common destination (34.7%). Most travellers (60.8%) travelled for <1 month, for recreation purposes (58.9%), stayed in hotels (65.3%), and in urban areas (53.6%). Yellow fever, tetravalent meningococcal, typhoid fever, cholera, and rabies vaccines were administered to 1629 (65.3%), 666 (26.7%), 615 (24.7%), 28 (1.1%), and/or 12 (0.5%) travellers, respectively. Of those who received Yellow fever vaccine, 737 (45.2%) travelled to sub-Saharan Africa, 332 (20.4%) travelled to South America, 949 (58.3%) stayed for short term, and 762 (46.8%) stayed in urban areas. Of the 1629 travellers vaccinated against Yellow fever, 150 (9.2%) and 226 (13.8%) travelled to areas of sub-Saharan Africa and South America respectively, where the vaccine is not or generally not recommended. Of those travellers who received meningococcal vaccine, 327 (49.1%) travelled to the Middle East for the Hajj, 251 (29%) travelled to sub-Saharan Africa, 410 (61.6%) for short term, and 540 (64.4%) stayed in urban areas. Of those travellers who received typhoid vaccine, 241 (39.2%) travelled to sub-Saharan Africa, 78 (12.7%) to the Indian subcontinent, 234 (38%) for short term, and 419 (68.1%) stayed in urban areas. Regarding routine vaccines, tetanus-diphtheria, poliomyelitis, and measles-mumps-rubella vaccines were administered to 707 (28.3%), 639 (25.6%) and/or 149 (6%) travellers, respectively. Of those to whom poliomyelitis vaccine was recommended, 295 (46.2%) and 137 (21.4%) travelled to sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East, respectively, and 362 (56.7%) travelled for short term. In conclusion, this study revealed that

  1. Application of the Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana dynamics to the electrically driven flip of a hole spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasek, W. J.; Maialle, M. Z.; Degani, M. H.

    2018-03-01

    An idea of employing the Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana dynamics to flip a spin of a single ground state hole is introduced and explored by a time-dependent simulation. This configuration interaction study considers a hole confined in a quantum molecule formed in an InSb 〈111 〉 quantum wire by application of an electrostatic potential. An up-down spin-mixing avoided crossing is formed by nonaxial terms in the Kohn-Luttinger Hamiltonian and the Dresselhaus spin-orbit one. Manipulation of the system is possible by the dynamic change of an external vertical electric field, which enables the consecutive driving of the hole through two anticrossings. Moreover, a simple model of the power-law-type noise that impedes precise electric control of the system is included in the form of random telegraph noise to estimate the limitations of the working conditions. We show that in principle the process is possible, but it requires precise control of the parameters of the driving impulse.

  2. Summary travel characteristics : Arkansas

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  3. Summary travel characteristics : Massachusetts

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  4. Traveling with Food Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... to know Tips for Traveling with Food Allergies Restaurants and Travel All-Inclusive Resorts See All Resources ... risk of exposure to allergens on the flight. Restaurants and Travel Watch these webinars for expert advice ...

  5. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers Road Safety Senior Citizens Sex Tourism STDs Sun Exposure Swimming and Diving Study Abroad ...

  6. Travelers' Health: Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers Road Safety Senior Citizens Sex Tourism STDs Sun Exposure Swimming and Diving Study Abroad ...

  7. Travelers' Health: Scabies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers Road Safety Senior Citizens Sex Tourism STDs Sun Exposure Swimming and Diving Study Abroad ...

  8. Travelers' Health: Diphtheria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers Road Safety Senior Citizens Sex Tourism STDs Sun Exposure Swimming and Diving Study Abroad ...

  9. Summary travel characteristics : Pennsylvania

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  10. Summary travel characteristics : Hawaii

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-10-01

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  11. Summary travel characteristics : Florida

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  12. Summary travel characteristics : Kansas

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  13. Summary travel characteristics : California

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  14. Summary travel characteristics : Texas

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  15. Summary travel characteristics : Illinois

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  16. Summary travel characteristics : Montana

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  17. Summary travel characteristics : Kentucky

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  18. Summary travel characteristics : Wisconsin

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-10-01

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  19. Summary travel characteristics : Maryland

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-19

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  20. Summary travel characteristics : Nevada

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  1. Summary travel characteristics : Iowa

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  2. Summary travel characteristics : Washington

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-10-01

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  3. Summary travel characteristics : Alabama

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  4. Summary travel characteristics : Nebraska

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  5. Summary travel characteristics : Oregon

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-10-01

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  6. Summary travel characteristics : Maine

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  7. Summary travel characteristics : Utah

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  8. Summary travel characteristics : Michigan

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  9. Summary travel characteristics : Missouri

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  10. Summary travel characteristics : Colorado

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  11. Summary travel characteristics : Alaska

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  12. Summary travel characteristics : Oklahoma

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  13. Summary travel characteristics : Indiana

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  14. Summary travel characteristics : Idaho

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  15. Summary travel characteristics : Tennessee

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  16. Summary travel characteristics : Georgia

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  17. Summary travel characteristics : Delaware

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  18. Summary travel characteristics : Ohio

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  19. Summary travel characteristics : Arizona

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  20. Summary travel characteristics : Wyoming

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-01-01

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  1. Summary travel characteristics : Minnesota

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  2. Summary travel characteristics : Vermont

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  3. Summary travel characteristics : Louisiana

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  4. Summary travel characteristics : Mississippi

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  5. Summary travel characteristics : Connecticut

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-29

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  6. Summary travel characteristics : Virgina

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  7. Travelers' Health: Yellow Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... and local rate of virus transmission at the time of travel. Although reported cases of human disease are the ... be receiving yellow fever vaccine for the first time. If travel is unavoidable, the decision to vaccinate travelers aged ≥ ...

  8. Travelers' Health: Rabies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  9. Travelers' Health: Poliomyelitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  10. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  11. Travelers' Health: Meningococcal Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  12. Travelers' Health: HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  13. Travelers' Health: Leishmaniasis, Visceral

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  14. Travelers' Health: Rubella

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  15. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  16. Travelers' Health: Cryptosporidiosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  17. Travelers' Health: Varicella (Chickenpox)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  18. Travelers' Health: Japanese Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  19. Travelers' Health: Leishmaniasis, Cutaneous

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  20. A fiber optic, ultraviolet light-emitting diode-based, two wavelength fluorometer for monitoring reactive adsorption

    SciT

    Granz, Christopher D.; Whitten, James E., E-mail: James-Whitten@uml.edu; Schindler, Bryan J.

    Construction and use of an ultraviolet light-emitting diode-based fluorometer for measuring photoluminescence (PL) from powder samples with a fiber optic probe is described. Fluorescence at two wavelengths is detected by miniature photomultiplier tubes, each equipped with a different band pass filter, whose outputs are analyzed by a microprocessor. Photoluminescent metal oxides and hydroxides, and other semiconducting nanoparticles, often undergo changes in their emission spectra upon exposure to reactive gases, and the ratio of the PL intensities at two wavelengths is diagnostic of adsorption. Use of this instrument for reactive gas sensing and gas filtration applications is illustrated by measuring changesmore » in the PL ratio for zirconium hydroxide and zinc oxide particles upon exposure to air containing low concentrations of sulfur dioxide.« less

  1. Childhood and Travel Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espey, David

    If children are not present in most travel literature--precisely because the genre has most typically been the domain of solitary male travelers who are escaping domestic obligation, routine, the familiar, and the family--they nevertheless are an integral part of the genre. The traveler is in many ways a child, an innocent abroad. Traveler writers…

  2. Regional travel survey

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1992-04-01

    Mid-America Regional Council, the designated Metropolitan Planning Organization for the Kansas City Metropolitan Area, performed a Small Sample Travel Survey for the Kansas City region to collect data to update the MARC travel demand models. The resu...

  3. Illinois travel statistics, 1996

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-01-01

    The mileage and vehicle miles of travel data in the following tables are based on : roads/streets located within the District's geographical boundaries (Administrative : District). : Vehicle miles of travel (VMT) are calculated by multiplying the mil...

  4. Illinois travel statistics, 1995

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-01-01

    The mileage and vehicle miles of travel data in the following tables are based on : roads/streets located within the District's geographical boundaries (Administrative : District). : Vehicle miles of travel (VMT) are calculated by multiplying the mil...

  5. HIV and travel.

    PubMed

    Schuhwerk, M A; Richens, J; Zuckerman, Jane N

    2006-01-01

    There is a high demand for travel among HIV-positive individual. This demand arises partly from those who have benefited from advances in antiretroviral therapy as well as those with disease progression. The key to a successful and uneventful holiday lies in careful pre-trip planning, yet many patients fail to obtain advice before travelling. Travel advice for HIV patients is becoming increasingly specialized. In addition to advice on common travel-related infectious diseases, HIV-positive travellers are strongly advised to carry information with them and they need specific advice regarding country entry restrictions, HIV inclusive travel insurance, safety of travel vaccinations and highly active antiretroviral therapy-related issues. A wide range of relevant issues for the HIV-positive traveller are discussed in this review and useful websites can be found at the end.

  6. Illinois travel statistics, 1997

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-01-01

    The mileage and vehicle miles of travel data in the following tables are based on : roads/streets located within the District's geographical boundaries (Administrative : District). : Vehicle miles of travel (VMT) are calculated by multiplying the mil...

  7. Illinois travel statistics, 1998

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-01-01

    The mileage and vehicle miles of travel data in the following tables are based on : roads/streets located within the District's geographical boundaries (Administrative : District). : Vehicle miles of travel (VMT) are calculated by multiplying the mil...

  8. Efficient Carrier-to-Exciton Conversion in Field Emission Tunnel Diodes Based on MIS-Type van der Waals Heterostack.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shunfeng; Wang, Junyong; Zhao, Weijie; Giustiniano, Francesco; Chu, Leiqiang; Verzhbitskiy, Ivan; Zhou Yong, Justin; Eda, Goki

    2017-08-09

    We report on efficient carrier-to-exciton conversion and planar electroluminescence from tunnel diodes based on a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) van der Waals heterostack consisting of few-layer graphene (FLG), hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and monolayer tungsten disulfide (WS 2 ). These devices exhibit excitonic electroluminescence with extremely low threshold current density of a few pA·μm -2 , which is several orders of magnitude lower compared to the previously reported values for the best planar EL devices. Using a reference dye, we estimate the EL quantum efficiency to be ∼1% at low current density limit, which is of the same order of magnitude as photoluminescence quantum yield at the equivalent excitation rate. Our observations reveal that the efficiency of our devices is not limited by carrier-to-exciton conversion efficiency but by the inherent exciton-to-photon yield of the material. The device characteristics indicate that the light emission is triggered by injection of hot minority carriers (holes) to n-doped WS 2 by Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and that hBN serves as an efficient hole-transport and electron-blocking layer. Our findings offer insight into the intelligent design of van der Waals heterostructures and avenues for realizing efficient excitonic devices.

  9. The Jet Travel Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Airplane travelers are dismayed by the long lines and seemingly chaotic activities that precede boarding a full airplane. Surely, the one who can solve this problem is going to make many travelers happy. This article describes the Jet Travel Challenge, an activity that challenges students to create some alternatives to this now frustrating…

  10. Travel during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... are 36 weeks pregnant. When is the best time to travel during pregnancy? The best time to travel is the middle of your pregnancy—between week ... Sitting or not moving for long periods of time, such as during long-distance travel, can increase the risk of DVT. Pregnancy further ...

  11. Travel Agent Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    Written for college entry-level travel agent training courses, this course outline can also be used for inservice training programs offered by travel agencies. The outline provides information on the work of a travel agent and gives clear statements on what learners must be able to do by the end of their training. Material is divided into eight…

  12. Study of degradation processes kinetics in ohmic contacts of resonant tunneling diodes based on nanoscale AlAs/GaAs heterostructures under influence of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeev, M. O.; Meshkov, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    The artificial aging of resonant tunneling diodes based on nanoscale AlAs/GaAs heterostructures was conducted. As a result of the thermal influence resonant tunneling diodes IV curves degrade firstly due to ohmic contacts' degradation. To assess AlAs/GaAs resonant tunneling diodes degradation level and to predict their reliability, a functional dependence of the contact resistance of resonant tunneling diode AuGeNi ohmic contacts on time and temperature was offered.

  13. Improving health sector travel.

    PubMed

    Hurdle, David; Davis, Adrian

    2004-10-01

    Preventing ill health and obesity and building more physical activity into our daily lives have never been so high on the agenda, and the way we travel can help. Many workplaces and schools are drawing up travel plans, with the aims usually to minimise car use and encourage healthier and more environmentally friendly travel. The Transport White Paper of 1998 advocated travel plans and singled out hospitals for action. Travel plans continue to be a focus within the latest Transport White Paper, launched in July 2004. This article covers various prompts to the health sector to implement travel plans. It addresses issues and concerns facing NHS Trusts, the practical things Trusts can do, and the increasing amount of good practice available. Finally, it demonstrates that travel plans can work, and are working, in the health sector.

  14. Travel/Travelers and Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Be Acquired During Travel* From Contaminated Food and Water More Common Giardiasis Cryptosporidiosis Cyclosporiasis Less Common Amebiasis ... Page last updated: April 20, 2018 Content source: Global Health – Division of Parasitic Diseases Email Recommend Tweet ...

  15. Student Travel: Policies - Regulations - Exhibits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujillo, Lorenzo A.; And Others

    The Jefferson County (Colorado) Public Schools' regulations and policies concerning student travel covers these forms of travel: student activity travel, extended student travel, district sponsored student travel, district authorized student travel, student exchange, and bonus learning trips. Issues and items addressed include: (1) authorization…

  16. White Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes Based on Exciplex Electroluminescence from Polymer Blends and a Single Polymer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Junfei; Zhao, Sen; Jiang, Xiao-Fang; Guo, Ting; Yip, Hin-Lap; Ying, Lei; Huang, Fei; Yang, Wei; Cao, Yong

    2016-03-09

    In this Article, we designed and synthesized a series of polyfluorene derivatives, which consist of the electron-rich 4,4'-(9-alkyl-carbazole-3,6-diyl)bis(N,N-diphenylaniline) (TPA-Cz) in the side chain and the electron-deficient dibenzothiophene-5,5-dioxide (SO) unit in the main chain. The resulting copolymer PF-T25 that did not comprise the SO unit exhibited blue light-emission with the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates of (0.16, 0.10). However, by physically blending PF-T25 with a blue light-emitting SO-based oligomer, a novel low-energy emission correlated to exciplex emerged due to the appropriate energy level alignment of TPA-Cz and the SO-based oligomers, which showed extended exciton lifetime as confirmed by time-resolved photoluminescent spectroscopy. The low-energy emission was also identified in copolymers consisting of SO unit in the main chain, which can effectively compensate for the high-energy emission to produce binary white light-emission. Polymer light-emitting diodes based on the exciplex-type single greenish-white polymer exhibit the peak luminous efficiency of 2.34 cd A(-1) and the maximum brightness of 12 410 cd m(-2), with Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage color coordinates (0.27, 0.39). The device based on such polymer showed much better electroluminescent stability than those based on blending films. These observations indicated that developing a single polymer with the generated exciplex emission can be a novel and effective molecular design strategy toward highly stable and efficient white polymer light-emitting diodes.

  17. Immunizations for foreign travel.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of preparing travelers for destinations throughout the world is providing them with immunizations. Before administering any vaccines, however, a careful health and immunization history and travel itinerary should be obtained in order to determine vaccine indications and contraindications. There are three categories of immunizations for foreign travel. The first category includes immunizations which are routinely recommended whether or not the individual is traveling. Many travelers are due for primary vaccination or boosting against tetanus-diphtheria, measles-mumps-rubella, pneumococcal pneumonia, and influenza, for example, and the pre-travel visit is an ideal time to administer these. The second category are immunizations which might be required by a country as a condition for entry; these are yellow fever and cholera. The final category contains immunizations which are recommended because there is a risk of acquiring a particular disease during travel. Typhoid fever, meningococcal disease, rabies, and hepatitis are some examples. Travelers who are pregnant or who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus require special consideration. Provision of appropriate immunizations for foreign travel is an important aspect of preventing illness in travelers. PMID:1337807

  18. Pre-Travel Medical Preparation of Business and Occupational Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nomana M.; Jentes, Emily S.; Brown, Clive; Han, Pauline; Rao, Sowmya R.; Kozarsky, Phyllis; Hagmann, Stefan H.F.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Ryan, Edward T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to understand more about pre-travel preparations and itineraries of business and occupational travelers. Methods: De-identified data from 18 Global TravEpiNet clinics from January 2009 to December 2012 were analyzed. Results: Of 23,534 travelers, 61% were non-occupational and 39% occupational. Business travelers were more likely to be men, had short times to departure and shorter trip durations, and commonly refused influenza, meningococcal, and hepatitis B vaccines. Most business travelers indicated that employers suggested the pre-travel health consultation, whereas non-occupational travelers sought consultations because of travel health concerns. Conclusions: Sub-groups of occupational travelers have characteristic profiles, with business travelers being particularly distinct. Employers play a role in encouraging business travelers to seek pre-travel consultations. Such consultations, even if scheduled immediately before travel, can identify vaccination gaps and increase coverage. PMID:26479857

  19. Travel health prevention.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    All around the world there has been a rapid growth in the number of international travels. According to the World Tourism Organisation the number of international tourist arrivals reached 1,235 billion in 2016 and continues to grow at a high rate. This has been much due to the development of air transport (including low-cost airlines), increasingly common economic migration, a growing number of travellers visiting friends and relatives, and an increase in medical tourism. With tropical destinations becoming increasingly popular among travellers, doctors have seen a rising number of patients who seek medical advice on health risks prevalent in hot countries and health prevention measures to be taken in tropical destinations, especially where sanitation is poor. The risk for developing a medical condition while staying abroad depends on a variety of factors, including the traveller's general health condition, health prevention measures taken before or during travel (vaccinations, antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, health precautions during air, road and sea travel, proper acclimatisation, prevention of heat injuries, protection against local flora and fauna, personal hygiene, water, food and feeding hygiene), as well as the prevalence of health risk factors in a given location. Health prevention is a precondition for safe travel and maintaining good physical health; in the era of a rapid growth in international tourism it has become of key importance for all travellers.

  20. Value of travel time.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-08-01

    Knowingly or not, people generally place economic value on their time. Wage workers are paid a rate per hour, and service providers may charge per hour of their time. In the transportation realm, travelers place a value on their travel time and have ...

  1. Pregnancy and travel

    MedlinePlus

    ... a cruise, it may not be the best time to go. Travel by sea may cause motion sickness or nausea. ... out of the country. Plan ahead to allow time for any shots or medicines you may need. When you travel, take a copy of your prenatal care record ...

  2. Air Travel Health Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... health Before your flight One key to air travel is to prepare ahead of time. If you are carrying on a bag, make ... need to change if your eating and sleeping times will change at your destination. If you have diabetes or epilepsy, you should travel with your ID card. For instance, the American ...

  3. Many intercity travelers face longer travel schedules

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-10-01

    Since 1995, scheduled travel times for direct : intercity air, bus, and rail service without an en : route transfer have measurably lengthened in : most major-market city-pairs. : Long-haul rail city-pairs affected by service : changes and short-...

  4. Michigan's Statewide Travel Demand Model

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-09-01

    The Travel Demand and Intermodal Services Section of Michigan's Department of Transportation is responsible for the development, maintenance and application of the Statewide Travel Demand Model. Michigan's Statewide and Urban Travel Demand Models are...

  5. Summary travel characteristics : Rhode Island

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  6. Summary travel characteristics : New Jersey

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  7. Summary travel characteristics : New Hampshire

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  8. Summary travel characteristics : New York

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  9. Summary travel characteristics : New Mexico

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  10. Summary travel characteristics : South Carolina

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  11. Summary travel characteristics : North Carolina

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  12. Summary travel characteristics : West Virginia

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-10-01

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  13. Summary travel characteristics : North Dakota

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  14. Summary travel characteristics : South Dakota

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-30

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  15. Travel time data collection handbook

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-03-01

    This Travel Time Data Collection Handbook provides guidance to transportation : professionals and practitioners for the collection, reduction, and presentation : of travel time data. The handbook should be a useful reference for designing : travel ti...

  16. Travel diaries : an annotated catalog

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1995-06-01

    The travel diary is the central survey instrument for travel behavior research. In its current form it reflects forty years of development. This paper discusses the current and possible contents of the travel diary against the background of a rapidly...

  17. Travelers' Health: Injuries and Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  18. Traveler's Health: Avoid Bug Bites

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  19. Understanding taxi travel patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hua; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhu, Ji; Jia, Xiaoping; Chiu, Anthony S. F.; Xu, Ming

    2016-09-01

    Taxis play important roles in modern urban transportation systems, especially in mega cities. While providing necessary amenities, taxis also significantly contribute to traffic congestion, urban energy consumption, and air pollution. Understanding the travel patterns of taxis is thus important for addressing many urban sustainability challenges. Previous research has primarily focused on examining the statistical properties of passenger trips, which include only taxi trips occupied with passengers. However, unoccupied trips are also important for urban sustainability issues because they represent potential opportunities to improve the efficiency of the transportation system. Therefore, we need to understand the travel patterns of taxis as an integrated system, instead of focusing only on the occupied trips. In this study we examine GPS trajectory data of 11,880 taxis in Beijing, China for a period of three weeks. Our results show that taxi travel patterns share similar traits with travel patterns of individuals but also exhibit differences. Trip displacement distribution of taxi travels is statistically greater than the exponential distribution and smaller than the truncated power-law distribution. The distribution of short trips (less than 30 miles) can be best fitted with power-law while long trips follow exponential decay. We use radius of gyration to characterize individual taxi's travel distance and find that it does not follow a truncated power-law as observed in previous studies. Spatial and temporal regularities exist in taxi travels. However, with increasing spatial coverage, taxi trips can exhibit dual high probability density centers.

  20. Travel medicine and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Ricardo

    2008-09-01

    The number of HIV-infected persons who travel is increasing. This increase arises from those who have benefited from advances in antiretroviral therapy. The key to successful travel is careful pre-trip planning although many patients do not obtain advice before travelling. Travel advice for HIV patients is becoming increasingly specialized, and includes travel vaccination and highly active antiretroviral therapy-related issues. A closer collaboration between HIV and travel health clinics could provide better care for HIV-infected individuals.

  1. Travel characteristics and health practices among travellers at the travellers' health and vaccination clinic in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vernon J; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2006-10-01

    Singapore has a fast-growing travel industry, but few studies have been done on travel characteristics and travel health practices. This study describes the profile and healthseeking behaviour of travellers attending a travel health clinic in Singapore. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on travellers attending the Traveller's Health and Vaccination Centre (THVC) between September and November 2002 using a standardised questionnaire. Information obtained included individual demographic and medical information, travel patterns, vaccination status and travel health practices. Four hundred and ninetyfive (74%) eligible travellers seen at THVC responded to the questionnaire. Their mean age was 36 years; 77% were professionals, managers, executives, and businessmen, students, and white collar workers. Asia was the main travel destination, and most travelled for leisure and resided in hotels or hostels. The median duration of travel was 16 days. Although >90% had previously travelled overseas, only 20% had previously sought pre-travel advice. Malays were significantly underrepresented (P < 0.01); and Caucasians and Eurasians were significantly more likely (P < 0.01) to have previously sought pre-travel advice compared with Chinese, Indians and Malays. Factors associated with seeking pre-travel advice included travel outside of Asia, especially Africa and South America. Singaporean travellers travel more often to cities rather than rural areas, compared with non-Asian travellers. Asia is the preferred destination, and travel outside of Asia is perceived as more risky and is associated with seeking pre-travel advice and vaccinations. Travel patterns and behaviours need to be taken into account when developing evidence-based travel medicine in Asia.

  2. Semi-transparent all-oxide ultraviolet light-emitting diodes based on ZnO/NiO-core/shell nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhi-Feng; Xu, Ting-Ting; Wu, Di; Zhang, Yuan-Tao; Zhang, Bao-Lin; Tian, Yong-Tao; Li, Xin-Jian; Du, Guo-Tong

    2016-05-01

    Semi-transparent all-oxide light-emitting diodes based on ZnO/NiO-core/shell nanowire structures were prepared on double-polished c-Al2O3 substrates. The entire heterojunction diode showed an average transparency of ~65% in the ultraviolet and visible regions. Under forward bias, the diode displayed an intense ultraviolet emission at ~382 nm, and its electroluminescence performance was remarkable in terms of a low emission onset, acceptable operating stability, and the ability to optically excite emissive semiconductor nanoparticle chromophores.Semi-transparent all-oxide light-emitting diodes based on ZnO/NiO-core/shell nanowire structures were prepared on double-polished c-Al2O3 substrates. The entire heterojunction diode showed an average transparency of ~65% in the ultraviolet and visible regions. Under forward bias, the diode displayed an intense ultraviolet emission at ~382 nm, and its electroluminescence performance was remarkable in terms of a low emission onset, acceptable operating stability, and the ability to optically excite emissive semiconductor nanoparticle chromophores. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07236k

  3. [Air travel during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Rabinerson, David; Ninio, Avraham; Glezerman, Marek

    2008-04-01

    Nowadays, millions of people travel by air every day and it is common to find pregnant women among the passengers. Travelling during pregnancy raises the question of the woman's safety during the flight. This is due to the risk of exposure to cosmic radiation, the drop in air pressure, and the possibility of thromboembolism due to seating conditions and flight duration. Other risks include obstetric emergencies, such as hemorrhage, premature contractions and actual labor. Further issues associated with air travel during pregnancy have to do with the safety of pregnant aircrew, if emergency evacuation becomes necessary and the airline's view regarding the admittance of pregnant women on flights. We discuss these issues extensively in our review. We conclude that for a healthy woman whose pregnancy involves no risk factors, air travel is safe up to the 36th gestational week.

  4. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  5. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1993-01-01

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

  6. Tips for Travel

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Avoid bringing bed bugs home by taking precautions when traveling such as inspecting bedding and luggage racks in hotel rooms, and upon returning home unpacking directly into a washing machine and dry at high temperatures.

  7. Space Traveler Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes the winners of the Space Traveler Project, a contest jointly sponsored by Rockwell International, NASA, and this magazine to identify worthwhile elementary science programs relating to the Space Shuttle. (SJL)

  8. Caregiving and travel patterns.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-06-01

    This study explored the impact of caregiving for older adults on mobility and travel : patterns. Specifically, the focus was on how caregivers managed trips on behalf of : another who receives care. Caregiving is becoming increasingly common as the :...

  9. Traveling with Portable Oxygen

    MedlinePlus

    ... preferred for patients in areas without access to electricity. Liquid oxygen is classi ed by the FAA ... ahead of time to make arrangements for any electrical power you will need. 4 TRAVELING WITH PORTABLE ...

  10. Zika Travel Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Pacific Islands: Fiji , Papua New Guinea , Samoa , Solomon Islands , Tonga South America: Argentina , Bolivia , Brazil , Colombia , ... travel plans. Area Date of interruption American Samoa 4/13/2017 The Bahamas 2/2/2018 Cayman ...

  11. Illinois travel statistics, 2009

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  12. Illinois travel statistics, 2001

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-01-01

    The 2001 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this : level of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  13. Illinois travel statistics, 2003

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2004-01-01

    The 2003 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  14. Illinois travel statistics, 2010

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  15. Illinois travel statistics, 2005

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  16. Illinois travel statistics, 2007

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  17. Illinois travel statistics, 2000

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-01-01

    The 2000 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this : level of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  18. Illinois travel statistics, 2006

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-01-01

    The 2006 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  19. Illinois travel statistics, 2002

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  20. Illinois travel statistics, 2008

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  1. Illinois travel statistics, 2004

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-01-01

    The 2004 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  2. Illinois travel statistics, 1999

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-01-01

    The 1999 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this : level of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  3. Travel patterns in China.

    PubMed

    Garske, Tini; Yu, Hongjie; Peng, Zhibin; Ye, Min; Zhou, Hang; Cheng, Xiaowen; Wu, Jiabing; Ferguson, Neil

    2011-02-02

    The spread of infectious disease epidemics is mediated by human travel. Yet human mobility patterns vary substantially between countries and regions. Quantifying the frequency of travel and length of journeys in well-defined population is therefore critical for predicting the likely speed and pattern of spread of emerging infectious diseases, such as a new influenza pandemic. Here we present the results of a large population survey undertaken in 2007 in two areas of China: Shenzhen city in Guangdong province, and Huangshan city in Anhui province. In each area, 10,000 randomly selected individuals were interviewed, and data on regular and occasional journeys collected. Travel behaviour was examined as a function of age, sex, economic status and home location. Women and children were generally found to travel shorter distances than men. Travel patterns in the economically developed Shenzhen region are shown to resemble those in developed and economically advanced middle income countries with a significant fraction of the population commuting over distances in excess of 50 km. Conversely, in the less developed rural region of Anhui, travel was much more local, with very few journeys over 30 km. Travel patterns in both populations were well-fitted by a gravity model with a lognormal kernel function. The results provide the first quantitative information on human travel patterns in modern China, and suggest that a pandemic emerging in a less developed area of rural China might spread geographically sufficiently slowly for containment to be feasible, while spatial spread in the more economically developed areas might be expected to be much more rapid, making containment more difficult.

  4. Travel Patterns in China

    PubMed Central

    Garske, Tini; Yu, Hongjie; Peng, Zhibin; Ye, Min; Zhou, Hang; Cheng, Xiaowen; Wu, Jiabing; Ferguson, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The spread of infectious disease epidemics is mediated by human travel. Yet human mobility patterns vary substantially between countries and regions. Quantifying the frequency of travel and length of journeys in well-defined population is therefore critical for predicting the likely speed and pattern of spread of emerging infectious diseases, such as a new influenza pandemic. Here we present the results of a large population survey undertaken in 2007 in two areas of China: Shenzhen city in Guangdong province, and Huangshan city in Anhui province. In each area, 10,000 randomly selected individuals were interviewed, and data on regular and occasional journeys collected. Travel behaviour was examined as a function of age, sex, economic status and home location. Women and children were generally found to travel shorter distances than men. Travel patterns in the economically developed Shenzhen region are shown to resemble those in developed and economically advanced middle income countries with a significant fraction of the population commuting over distances in excess of 50 km. Conversely, in the less developed rural region of Anhui, travel was much more local, with very few journeys over 30 km. Travel patterns in both populations were well-fitted by a gravity model with a lognormal kernel function. The results provide the first quantitative information on human travel patterns in modern China, and suggest that a pandemic emerging in a less developed area of rural China might spread geographically sufficiently slowly for containment to be feasible, while spatial spread in the more economically developed areas might be expected to be much more rapid, making containment more difficult. PMID:21311745

  5. Advice to Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    1975-01-01

    Travelers, particularly those whose tastes or occupations lead to deviation from the usual tourist routes, are at a small but significant risk of acquiring certain diseases they would be unlikely to encounter had they remained in the continental United States. Many of these infections can be rendered unlikely even for the most adventuresome traveler through the appropriate use of immunization and chemoprophylaxis. Other infections are currently unpreventable and the physician's responsibility lies in their premorbid detection. PMID:1154779

  6. The New England travel market: changes in generational travel patterns

    Rodney B. Warnick

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and explore the New England domestic travel market trends, from 1979 through 1991 within the context of generations. The existing travel markets, who travel to New England, are changing by age cohorts and specifically within different generations. The New England changes in generational travel patterns do not reflect national...

  7. Travel health knowledge, attitudes and practices among Australasian travelers.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Khairullah, Nor S; Song, Jae-Hoon; Chen, Ching-Yu; Torresi, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Although the Asia Pacific region is the focus of the fastest-growing tourist and travel industry, few data are available on the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of travelers from this region with regard to travel-related infectious diseases. We conducted a cross-sectional survey among travelers at the departure lounges of five airports in Australasia (Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Taipeh, Melbourne, Seoul) whose travel destinations were Asia, Africa or South America. Two standardized questionnaires directed towards KAP in travel health, travel immunizations and malaria were administered. Of 2,101 respondents (82% Asian, 17% Western), 31% had sought pretravel health advice and only 4% sought travel health advice from the travel medicine specialist. The risk of vaccine-preventable infectious diseases and malaria at the destination country was perceived to be low. Overall, fewer than 5% of travelers had been vaccinated in preparation for their trip. The most frequent travel vaccinations were for hepatitis A and B. Only 40% of travelers to malaria-endemic areas carried malaria prophylaxis. Compared to Western travelers, those of Asian nationality were significantly less likely to obtain pretravel advice and malaria prophylaxis and to receive travel vaccinations. There is an urgent need for increased awareness about travel-related infectious diseases among Asian travelers, and greater uptake of pretravel health advice, vaccinations and malaria prophylactic measures.

  8. [Vaccination for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Arrazola, M Pilar; Serrano, Almudena; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-05-01

    Traveler's vaccination is one of the key strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases during international travel. The risk of acquiring an infectious disease is determined in each case by the characteristics of the traveler and the travel, so the pre-departure medical advice of the traveler must be individualized. The World Health Organization classifies travelerś vaccines into three groups. - Vaccines for routine use in national immunization programs: Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis B, polio, measles-mumps-rubella, tetanus-diphtheria-whooping a cough, and chickenpox. - Vaccinations required by law in certain countries before to enter them: yellow fever, meningococcal disease and poliomyelitis. - Vaccines recommended depending on the circumstances: cholera, japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, meningococcal disease, typhoid fever, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, rabies and BCG. This review is intended to introduce the reader to the field of international vaccination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  9. Travel health attitudes among Turkish business travellers to African countries.

    PubMed

    Selcuk, Engin Burak; Kayabas, Uner; Binbasioglu, Hulisi; Otlu, Baris; Bayindir, Yasar; Bozdogan, Bulent; Karatas, Mehmet

    The number of international travellers is increasing worldwide. Although health risks related to international travel are important and generally well-understood, the perception of these risks was unclear among Turkish travellers. We aimed to evaluate the attitudes and health risk awareness of Turkish travellers travelling to African countries. A survey was performed of Turkish travellers bound for Africa from Istanbul International Ataturk Airport in July 2013. A total of 124 travellers were enrolled in the study. Among them, 62.9% had information about their destination but only 11.3% had looked for information on health problems related to travel and their destination. Of all travellers, 53.2% had at least one vaccination before travelling. The most commonly administered vaccine was for typhoid. Among the travellers, 69.3% and 80.6% had "no idea" about yellow fever vaccination and malaria prophylaxis, respectively. A positive correlation was found between a higher level of travellers' education and receiving the recommended vaccination for the destination. Our study revealed significant gaps in the vaccination and chemoprophylaxis uptake of Turkish travellers departing to Africa. An awareness and training program should be developed for travellers, as well as public health workers, to address health risks related to travel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hazardous Gas Detection Sensor Using Broadband Light-Emitting Diode-Based Absorption Spectroscopy for Space Applications

    SciT

    Terracciano, Anthony; Thurmond, Kyle; Villar, Michael

    As space travel matures and extended duration voyages become increasingly common, it will be necessary to include arrays of early fire detection systems aboard spacefaring vessels, space habitats, and in spacesuits. As gasses that are relevant to combustion and pyrolysis have absorption features in the midinfrared range, it is possible to utilize absorption spectroscopy as a means of detecting and quantifying the concentration of these hazardous compounds. Within this work, a sensor for detecting carbon dioxide has been designed and tested autonomously on a high-altitude balloon flight. The sensor utilizes a 4.2-mm lightemitting diode source, amplitude modulation to characterize speciesmore » concentrations, and frequency modulation to characterize ambient temperature. Future work will include expanding the sensor design to detect other gases, and demonstrating suborbital flight capability.« less

  11. Hazardous Gas Detection Sensor Using Broadband Light-Emitting Diode-Based Absorption Spectroscopy for Space Applications

    DOE PAGES

    Terracciano, Anthony; Thurmond, Kyle; Villar, Michael; ...

    2018-03-12

    As space travel matures and extended duration voyages become increasingly common, it will be necessary to include arrays of early fire detection systems aboard spacefaring vessels, space habitats, and in spacesuits. As gasses that are relevant to combustion and pyrolysis have absorption features in the midinfrared range, it is possible to utilize absorption spectroscopy as a means of detecting and quantifying the concentration of these hazardous compounds. Within this work, a sensor for detecting carbon dioxide has been designed and tested autonomously on a high-altitude balloon flight. The sensor utilizes a 4.2-mm lightemitting diode source, amplitude modulation to characterize speciesmore » concentrations, and frequency modulation to characterize ambient temperature. Future work will include expanding the sensor design to detect other gases, and demonstrating suborbital flight capability.« less

  12. Travel Health Advisory Group: a joint travel industry and travel health Special Interest Group promoting healthy travel in Australia.

    PubMed

    Leggat, Peter A; Zwar, Nicholas; Hudson, Bernie

    2012-09-01

    The Travel Health Advisory Group (THAG), established in 1997, is a joint initiative between the travel industry and travel health professionals in Australia that aims to promote healthy travel. THAG seeks to promote cooperation in improving the health of travellers between the travel industry and travel medicine professionals and to raise public awareness of the importance of travel health. From 2011, THAG has been a Special Interest Group of The Australasian College of Tropical Medicine and its membership has been active in several areas, including web-based travel health information, travel health promotion, media releases, research and education in Australia. Information is given on the objectives, membership and an overview of the various activities of the group. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Travel-related thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Cannegieter, Suzanne C

    2012-09-01

    Travel-related thrombosis is a serious public health concern considering the large and increasing number of travellers. Due to a lack of evidence, counselling air travellers on their venous thrombosis risk is not immediately straightforward, and advice will have to be based mostly on theoretical grounds. In this review a basis for these considerations is given. First of all it needs to be recognized that venous thrombosis is a multicausal disease, i.e. several risk factors have to be present before an event occurs. This is reflected in the literature where clearly increased risks have been described for certain groups, such as subjects with factor V Leiden, those who use oral contraceptives or are obese. Also, an increased risk for tall and short people has been reported. So, for subjects with a known risk factor who plan to travel, benefits and risks of thrombosis prophylaxis, (pharmacological or other), need to be weighed. This review provides some theoretical examples. For all other travellers, the advice to move and exercise as much as possible is likely to be sufficient. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Colored Traveling Salesman Problem.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhou, MengChu; Sun, Qirui; Dai, Xianzhong; Yu, Xiaolong

    2015-11-01

    The multiple traveling salesman problem (MTSP) is an important combinatorial optimization problem. It has been widely and successfully applied to the practical cases in which multiple traveling individuals (salesmen) share the common workspace (city set). However, it cannot represent some application problems where multiple traveling individuals not only have their own exclusive tasks but also share a group of tasks with each other. This work proposes a new MTSP called colored traveling salesman problem (CTSP) for handling such cases. Two types of city groups are defined, i.e., each group of exclusive cities of a single color for a salesman to visit and a group of shared cities of multiple colors allowing all salesmen to visit. Evidences show that CTSP is NP-hard and a multidepot MTSP and multiple single traveling salesman problems are its special cases. We present a genetic algorithm (GA) with dual-chromosome coding for CTSP and analyze the corresponding solution space. Then, GA is improved by incorporating greedy, hill-climbing (HC), and simulated annealing (SA) operations to achieve better performance. By experiments, the limitation of the exact solution method is revealed and the performance of the presented GAs is compared. The results suggest that SAGA can achieve the best quality of solutions and HCGA should be the choice making good tradeoff between the solution quality and computing time.

  15. Travel-related health problems in Japanese travelers.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yasutaka; Kudo, Koichiro

    2009-09-01

    Although the number of Japanese individuals traveling abroad has increased steadily, reaching approximately 17.3 million in 2007, the incidence of various travel-related health problems in Japan remains unknown. The travel-related health problems of Japanese travelers returning to Japan from abroad are analyzed by assessing the records. Data were collected retrospectively on returning travelers who visited the authors' travel clinic during the period from January 2005 through to December 2006 with any health problem acquired overseas. A total of 345 patients were included in this study (200 male, 145 female; average age, 34+/-12.3 years). Reasons for travel included leisure (45.8%); business (39.1%); visiting friends and relatives or accompanying other travelers (8.7%); volunteering (3.8%); and long stays in order to study or live (2.6%). The most visited destination was Asia (n=260), followed by Africa (n=105). The most commonly reported health problems were gastro-intestinal infections (39.1%), followed by respiratory tract infections (16.2%), animal bites (8.1%), and skin problems (5.8%). Together, malaria and dengue accounted for 10% of diagnoses in 125 febrile patients (36.2%). Although the profile of travel-related health problems in Japanese travelers is similar to that of Western travelers, the characteristics of travel were quite different. Therefore Japanese travel advice should be tailored to suit the Japanese traveler.

  16. Travel, migration and HIV.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, S J; Hart, G J

    1993-01-01

    This is a review of recent publications on the subject of travel (taken in its widest sense) and HIV/AIDS. As with all epidemics caused by transmissible pathogens, AIDS has been seen in many countries as an imported problem. What this perspective fails to recognize is that with the explosion of international travel in the past thirty years it is virtually impossible to prevent the spread of infectious disease across international frontiers. Here we highlight the relative paucity of studies that describe or investigate the context in which sexual risk behaviour of travellers takes place, and suggest areas of further research which could increase understanding of the nature of sexual risk taking, and help in the design of health education programmes.

  17. The elderly traveller.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Sesma, V; Górgolas-Hernández Mora, M; Ramos-Rincón, J M

    2018-04-20

    Improved living conditions and advances in medicine have extended life expectancy and quality of life, resulting in an increasing number of elderly travellers. Pathophysiological changes and treatments can reduce the efficacy of vaccines and facilitate drug interactions. Elderly travellers have various characteristics that should be considered when offering pre-trip counselling, which should include proper management of chronic diseases that are susceptible to worsening during the trip, as well as an appropriate study and follow-up after the trip. We performed a narrative review of the main problems of elderly travellers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  18. Schistosomiasis and international travel.

    PubMed

    Corachan, Manuel

    2002-08-15

    Infection with Schistosoma species is acquired by exposure to fresh water that harbors cercariae released by infected snails. Although the route of infection is clear, clinical presentation of the established infection in the nonimmune tourist typically differs from that in the local population of areas of endemicity. For the health care practitioner, the traveler's syndrome presents distinctive management problems: water-transmitted bacterial and viral infections may coexist, and identification of the stage of disease at presentation, along with identification of the causative species, will maximize treatment options. Travel medicine clinics serve as epidemiological antennae, helping to identify the dynamics of species transmission in geographically distinct areas. Education of persons traveling to areas of endemicity and the development of mechanical protection against exposure are needed.

  19. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    PubMed

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health

  20. Culture shock and travelers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L; Leggat, P A

    1998-06-01

    As travel has become easier and more affordable, the number of people traveling has risen sharply. People travel for many and varied reasons, from the business person on an overseas assignment to backpackers seeking new and exotic destinations. Others may take up residence in different regions, states or countries for family, business or political reasons. Other people are fleeing religious or political persecution. Wherever they go and for whatever reason they go, people take their culture with them. Culture, like language, is acquired innately in early childhood and is then reinforced through formal and complex informal social education into adulthood. Culture provides a framework for interpersonal and social interactions. Therefore, the contact with a new culture is often not the exciting or pleasurable experience anticipated. When immersed in a different culture, people no longer know how to act when faced with disparate value systems. Contact with the unfamiliar culture can lead to anxiety, stress, mental illness and, in extreme cases, physical illness and suicide. "Culture shock" is a term coined by the anthropologist Oberg. It is the shock of the new. It implies that the experience of the new culture is an unpleasant surprise or shock, partly because it is unexpected and partly because it can lead to a negative evaluation of one's own culture. It is also known as cross-cultural adjustment, being that period of anxiety and confusion experienced when entering a new culture. It affects people intellectually, emotionally, behaviorally and physically and is characterized by symptoms of psychological distress. Culture shock affects both adults and children. In travelers or workers who have prolonged sojourns in foreign countries, culture shock may occur not only as they enter the new culture, but also may occur on their return to their original culture. Children may also experience readjustment problems after returning from leading sheltered lives in expatriate

  1. Intergalactic Travel Bureau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koski, Olivia; Rosin, Mark; Guerilla Science Team

    2014-03-01

    The Intergalactic Travel Bureau is an interactive theater outreach experience that engages the public in the incredible possibilities of space tourism. The Bureau is staffed by professional actors, who play the role of space travel agents, and professional astrophysicists, who play the role of resident scientists. Members of the public of all ages were invited to visit with bureau staff to plan the vacation of their dreams-to space. We describe the project's successful nine day run in New York in August 2013. Funded by the American Physical Society Public Outreach and Informing the Public Grants.

  2. High-performance planar green light-emitting diodes based on a PEDOT:PSS/CH3NH3PbBr3/ZnO sandwich structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhi-Feng; Sun, Xu-Guang; Wu, Di; Xu, Ting-Ting; Zhuang, Shi-Wei; Tian, Yong-Tao; Li, Xin-Jian; Du, Guo-Tong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, perovskite-based light-emitting diodes based on organometal halide emitters have attracted much attention because of their excellent properties of high color purity, tunable emission wavelength and a low-temperature processing technique. As is well-known, organic light-emitting diodes have shown powerful capabilities in this field; however, the fabrication of these devices typically relies on high-temperature and high-vacuum processes, which increases the final cost of the product and renders them uneconomical for use in large-area displays. Organic/inorganic hybrid halide perovskites match with these material requirements, as it is possible to prepare such materials with high crystallinity through solution processing at low temperature. Herein, we demonstrated a high-brightness green light-emitting diode based on PEDOT:PSS/CH3NH3PbBr3/ZnO sandwich structures by a spin-coating method combined with a sputtering system. Under forward bias, a dominant emission peak at ~530 nm with a low full width of half-maximum (FWHM) of 30 nm can be achieved at room temperature. Owing to the high surface coverage of the CH3NH3PbBr3 layer and a device design based on carrier injection and a confinement configuration, the proposed diode exhibits good electroluminescence performance, with an external quantum efficiency of 0.0645%. More importantly, we investigated the working stability of the studied diode under continuous operation to verify the sensitivity of the electroluminescence performance to ambient atmosphere and to assess the suitability of the diode for practical applications. Moreover, the underlying reasons for the undesirable emission decay are tentatively discussed. This demonstration of an effective green electroluminescence based on CH3NH3PbBr3 provides valuable information for the design and development of perovskites as efficient emitters, thus facilitating their use in existing applications and suggesting new potential applications.

  3. Hepatitis A - prevention in travellers.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Cora A; Neilson, Amy A

    2010-12-01

    Hepatitis A is the second most common vaccine preventable infection in travellers. Highly effective vaccines exist for its prevention for travellers from 12 months of age, including last minute travellers and those in special risk groups. Information about hepatitis A infection, its epidemiology and existing vaccine options is presented for use in travel related consultations in general practice. Most travellers at risk of hepatitis A should be vaccinated, as the vaccine is a safe and effective means of prevention. Combination vaccines - hepatitis A/hepatitis B and hepatitis A/typhoid - aim to facilitate the vaccination process for travellers, who are often also at risk of exposure to hepatitis B and typhoid fever.

  4. Travel and transplantation: travel-related diseases in transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kotton, Camille N

    2012-12-01

    Travel-related diseases may be seen in transplant recipients after travel, after transplant tourism, and via transmission from blood and organ donors, augmented by recent increases in travel, migration, and globalization. Such infections include tuberculosis, Plasmodium (malaria), Babesia, Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease), Strongyloides, Coccidioides, Histoplasma, Leishmania, Brucella, HTLV, dengue, among numerous others. Review of cohorts of transplant recipients show that they tend to have minimal or suboptimal preparation prior to travel, with limited pretravel vaccination, medications, and education, which poses a greatly increased risk of travel-related infections and complications. The epidemiology of such travel-related infections in transplant recipients, along with methods for prevention, including vaccines, chemoprophylaxis, and education may help SOT recipients avoid travel-related infections, and are discussed in this review. Optimizing the understanding of the risk of tropical, geographically restricted, and other unusual or unexpected, travel-related infections will enhance the safety of vulnerable transplant recipients from potentially life-threatening infections.

  5. Risk for Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... measures instituted in each country to prevent BSE contamination of human food, and 5) details about cattle products from one ... To reduce any risk of acquiring vCJD from food, concerned travelers to ... opportunity for contamination with tissues that may harbor the BSE agent. ...

  6. The stress of travel.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, J; Reilly, T; Edwards, B

    2004-10-01

    International travel is an essential part of the life of elite athletes, both for competition and training. It is also becoming increasingly common among recreational sportspersons. Long-distance travel is associated with a group of transient negative effects, collectively referred to as 'travel fatigue', which result from anxiety about the journey, the change to an individual's daily routine, and dehydration due to time spent in the dry air of the aircraft cabin. Travel fatigue lasts for only a day or so, but for those who fly across several time zones, there are also the longer-lasting difficulties associated with 'jet lag'. The problems of jet lag can last for over a week if the flight crosses 10 time zones or more, and they can reduce performance and the motivation to train effectively. Knowledge of the properties of the body clock enables the cause of the difficulties to be understood (an unadjusted body clock), and forms the basis of using light in the new time zone to promote adjustment of the body clock. Sleep loss and its effects are important components of jet lag, and attempts to promote sleep by the use of melatonin and other hypnotics are also relevant. Sleep loss is also found in those who undertake challenges that involve long periods where the normal consolidated sleep of 8 h length is not possible. Advice on sleep regimens in such circumstances is given.

  7. Travel trends and energy

    Thomas M. Corsi; Milton E. Harvey

    1980-01-01

    This paper utilizes available data sources to construct a picture of adjustment patterns in vacation/recreation travel with respect to both past and prospective fuel price/availability developments. The increases in fuel prices coupled with supply uncertainties that have occurred during the 1970's have strained the traditional vacation patterns of many American...

  8. Mentors as Fellow Travelers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrosino, Roberta

    2009-01-01

    A junior faculty member arrives at an unfamiliar university for a new teaching assignment. She is poised for the adventure, but feels like a traveler at the edge of long, unknown road. She does not know what obstacles or vistas may appear on the road, and wants to avoid major potholes. She takes a nervous look around and finds an experienced…

  9. Travel time reliability modeling.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-07-01

    This report includes three papers as follows: : 1. Guo F., Rakha H., and Park S. (2010), "A Multi-state Travel Time Reliability Model," : Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, n 2188, : pp. 46-54. : 2. Park S.,...

  10. Traveling Safely with Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... TSA web site . If you’ll be changing time zones, talk to your doctor or pharmacist to work out a travel action plan for when you should take your medicine. This will keep you from taking too much or not enough medicine. Even if you are not changing time zones, be sure to stick to your regular ...

  11. Interstellar Travel without 'Magic'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, G.

    The possibility of interstellar space travel has become a popular subject. Distances of light years are an entirely new realm for human space travel. New means of propulsion are needed. Speculation about propulsion has included "magic", space warps, faster-than-light travel, known physics such as antimatter for which no practical implementation is known and also physics for which current research offers at least a hint of implementation, i.e. fusion. Performance estimates are presented for the latter and used to create vehicle concepts. Fusion propulsion will mean travel times of hundreds of years, so we adopt the "space colony" concepts of O'Neill as a ship design that could support a small civilization indefinitely; this provides the technical means. Economic reasoning is presented, arguing that development and production of "space colony" habitats for relief of Earth's population, with addition of fusion engines, will lead to vessels that can go interstellar. Scenarios are presented and a speculative estimate of a timetable is given.

  12. [Pre-travel advice and patient education of Hungarian travellers].

    PubMed

    Lengyel, Ingrid; Felkai, Péter

    2018-03-01

    According to international surveys, over half of the travellers face some kind of health issue when travelling. The overwhelming majority of travel-related illnesses can be prevented with pre-travel medical consultations, but the syllabus and content of the consultation have to match the travel habits and culture of the given society. This publication explores the specificities and travel habits of Hungarian travellers. One hundred participants of a travel exhibition completed a survey about their international travel. As the survey was not representative, the data could only be processed through simple statistical methods. However, since the exhibition was presumably attended by those wishing to travel, the conclusions drawn from the results are worth publishing, since no similar survey in Hungary has been published before. Based on the suitable classification of age groups in travel medicine, 11% of the participants were adolescents / young adults (aged 15-24), 81% adults (25-59) and 8% elderly (60-74). Twenty-eight percent of the participants travel multiple times a year, 40% yearly and 32% of them less frequently; 16% of the adults, 8% of the adolescents and 4% of the elderly age group travel multiple times a year. The travel destinations of Hungarian travellers have remained practically unchanged since a study was conducted 13 years ago: the vast majority (95%) travelled within Europe, 2% to the United States, and 11% of them elsewhere. Since Hungarians do not travel to endemic areas, only 5% consulted their general practitioners (GPs) prior to travelling, and 29% did when they had to be vaccinated. Forty-two percent of those wishing to travel never consult their GPs, even though 29% of them are aware of some chronic illness. Instead, 51% gather their health information from the internet and only 6% from their doctors. By the contradiction between the poor health status of the majority of Hungarian travellers and the negligence of seeking pre-travel advice

  13. Do British travel agents provide adequate health advice for travellers?

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, D A; Burke, J; Bouskill, E; Conn, G; Edwards, P; Gillespie, D

    2000-01-01

    Travel-related illness is a burden for primary care, with more than two million travellers consulting a general practitioner each year. The annual cost of travel-related illness in the United Kingdom is 11 million Pounds. Travel agents are in a unique position to influence this burden as the most common and most serious problems are preventable with simple advice and/or immunisation. This study, using covert researchers, suggests this potential is not being fully utilised. PMID:10954940

  14. Malaria: prevention in travellers.

    PubMed

    Croft, Ashley M

    2007-11-29

    Malaria transmission occurs most frequently in environments with humidity over 60% and ambient temperature of 25-30 degrees C. Risks increase with longer visits and depend on activity. Infection can follow a single mosquito bite. Incubation is usually 10-14 days but can be up to 18 months depending on the strain of parasite. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug preventive interventions in adult travellers? What are the effects of drug prophylaxis in adult travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria vaccines in travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria interventions in child travellers, pregnant travellers, and in airline pilots? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to February 2006 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 69 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acoustic buzzers, aerosol insecticides, amodiaquine, air conditioning and electric fans, atovaquone-proguanil, biological control measures, chloroquine (alone or with proguanil), diethyltoluamide (DEET), doxycycline, full-length and light-coloured clothing, insecticide-treated clothing/nets, mefloquine, mosquito coils and vaporising mats, primaquine, pyrimethamine-dapsone, pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine, smoke, topical (skin-applied) insect repellents, and vaccines.

  15. Malaria: prevention in travellers.

    PubMed

    Croft, Ashley M

    2010-07-12

    Malaria transmission occurs most frequently in environments with humidity greater than 60% and ambient temperature of 25 °C to 30 °C. Risks increase with longer visits and depend on activity. Infection can follow a single mosquito bite. Incubation is usually 10 to 14 days but can be up to 18 months depending on the strain of parasite. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug preventive interventions in non-pregnant adult travellers? What are the effects of drug prophylaxis in non-pregnant adult travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria vaccines in adult and child travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria interventions in child travellers, pregnant travellers, and in airline pilots? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 79 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aerosol insecticides, amodiaquine, air conditioning and electric fans, atovaquone-proguanil, biological control measures, chloroquine (alone or with proguanil), diethyltoluamide (DEET), dietary supplementation, doxycycline, electronic mosquito repellents, full-length and light-coloured clothing, insecticide-treated clothing/nets, mefloquine, mosquito coils and vapourising mats, primaquine, pyrimethamine-dapsone, pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine, smoke, topical (skin-applied) insect repellents, and vaccines.

  16. Epidemic spreading by objective traveling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ming; Liu, Zonghua; Li, Baowen

    2009-07-01

    A fundamental feature of agent traveling in social networks is that traveling is usually not a random walk but with a specific destination and goes through the shortest path from starting to destination. A serious consequence of the objective traveling is that it may result in a fast epidemic spreading, such as SARS etc. In this letter we present a reaction-traveling model to study how the objective traveling influences the epidemic spreading. We consider a random scale-free meta-population network with sub-population at each node. Through a SIS model we theoretically prove that near the threshold of epidemic outbreak, the objective traveling can significantly enhance the final infected population and the infected fraction at a node is proportional to its betweenness for the traveling agents and approximately proportional to its degree for the non-traveling agents. Numerical simulations have confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  17. Scan of recent travel surveys

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-06-01

    A specific objective of this scan of recent travel surveys is to facilitate the exchange of information among agencies and individuals having an interest in the design and conduct of household and other types of travel surveys. The information contai...

  18. Strategies for improving traveler information.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    This project developed a clear, concise, and fiscally sound plan to improve traveler information : for the Michigan Department of Transportation (DOT). The DOT has a long history of innovation : in the field of ITS, including a robust traveler inform...

  19. Commercializing diarrhea vaccines for travelers

    PubMed Central

    López-Gigosos, Rosa; Segura-Moreno, Marina; Díez-Díaz, Rosa; Plaza, Elena; Mariscal, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Continued growth in international travel and forecasts for a great increase in the number of people who travel from industrialized to emerging and developing countries make it necessary to develop and improve the capacity to provide health protection to travelers. Measures available to prevent some diseases include a currently limited number of marketed vaccines which represent extremely useful tools to protect travelers. Travelers very often experience diarrheal and gastrointestinal diseases for which some vaccines are available. Use of these vaccines should be evaluated based on traveler and travel destination and characteristics. Vaccines available include those against cholera, typhoid fever, hepatitis A, hepatitis E (only available in China), and rotavirus. The aim of this review is to provide an updated summary about each of the abovementioned vaccines that may be useful for making decisions regarding their use and assessing their indications in recommendations for travelers. PMID:24496054

  20. International business travel: impact on families and travellers.

    PubMed

    Espino, C M; Sundstrom, S M; Frick, H L; Jacobs, M; Peters, M

    2002-05-01

    Spouses and staff of the World Bank Group (WBG) were questioned about the impact of international business travel on families and travellers. Dependent variables were self reported stress, concern about the health of the traveller, and negative impact on the family. We hypothesised that several travel factors (independent variables) would be associated with these impacts. These travel factors had to do with the frequency, duration, and predictability of travel and its interference with family activities. Survey forms were developed and distributed to all spouses of travelling staff as well as a small sample of operational staff. Kendall's tau b correlation coefficients of response frequencies were computed with the data from scaled items. Written responses to open ended questions were categorised. Response rates for spouses and staff were 24% and 36%, respectively. Half the spouse sample (n=533) and almost 75% of the staff sample (n=102) reported high or very high stress due to business travel. Self reported spouse stress was associated with six out of eight travel factors. Female spouses, those with children, and younger spouses reported greater stress. Self reported staff stress was significantly associated with four out of nine travel factors. Further insight into how business travel affects families and staff (including children's behavioural changes) and how families cope was gained through responses to written questions. The findings support the notion that lengthy and frequent travel and frequent changes in travel dates which affect family plans, all characteristic of WBG missions, negatively affects many spouses and children (particularly young children) and that the strain on families contributes significantly to the stress staff feel about their travel. Policies or management practices that take into consideration family activities and give staff greater leeway in controlling and refusing travel may help relieve stress.

  1. International business travel: impact on families and travellers

    PubMed Central

    Espino, C; Sundstrom, S; Frick, H; Jacobs, M; Peters, M

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Spouses and staff of the World Bank Group (WBG) were questioned about the impact of international business travel on families and travellers. Dependent variables were self reported stress, concern about the health of the traveller, and negative impact on the family. We hypothesised that several travel factors (independent variables) would be associated with these impacts. These travel factors had to do with the frequency, duration, and predictability of travel and its interference with family activities. Methods: Survey forms were developed and distributed to all spouses of travelling staff as well as a small sample of operational staff. Kendall's tau b correlation coefficients of response frequencies were computed with the data from scaled items. Written responses to open ended questions were categorised. Results: Response rates for spouses and staff were 24% and 36%, respectively. Half the spouse sample (n=533) and almost 75% of the staff sample (n=102) reported high or very high stress due to business travel. Self reported spouse stress was associated with six out of eight travel factors. Female spouses, those with children, and younger spouses reported greater stress. Self reported staff stress was significantly associated with four out of nine travel factors. Further insight into how business travel affects families and staff (including children's behavioural changes) and how families cope was gained through responses to written questions. Conclusions: The findings support the notion that lengthy and frequent travel and frequent changes in travel dates which affect family plans, all characteristic of WBG missions, negatively affects many spouses and children (particularly young children) and that the strain on families contributes significantly to the stress staff feel about their travel. Policies or management practices that take into consideration family activities and give staff greater leeway in controlling and refusing travel may help relieve

  2. Travel and Adventure Medicine Resources.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Christopher A; Pottinger, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    Given the ever-changing nature of travel medicine, practitioners who provide pretravel and posttravel care are obligatorily students for the duration of their professional careers. A large variety of resources are available for medical practitioners. Providers should join at least one travel or tropical medicine professional association, attend its annual meeting, and read its journal. The largest general travel medicine association is the International Society of Travel Medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Legionnaires' disease in travellers].

    PubMed

    Jarraud, S; Reyrolle, M; Riffard, S; Lo Presti, F; Etienne, J

    1998-01-01

    The outbreak of pneumonia involving delegates to the 1976 American Legion convention at a Philadelphia hotel was the first example of travel-associated legionnaires' disease. Travel is now well known as a common risk factor for legionnaires' disease. This travel-associated disease is a preoccupation among European countries because of morbidity among citizens of the European Union. The definition of the case of legionellosis is a patient who presents an acute lower respiratory tract infection with focal signs of pneumonia and/or radiological features, and microbiological evidence of Legionella infection. A case is considered to be travel associated if the patient has spent one or more nights away from home during the ten days before becoming ill. An European Surveillance Scheme for Travel-Associated Legionnaires' Disease was established in 1987 to identify clusters and outbreaks of cases of the disease. This group centralizes the case reports of twenty-nine collaborating centres in twenty-five countries. Outbreaks of legionnaires' disease were described in hotels, camps or cruise ships. In 1996, the number of travel-associated cases of legionnaires' disease represented 16% of the total number cases. The increase of the number of reported cases may reflect improved surveillance and increased ascertainment. In Europe in 1996, the diagnosis of legionellosis was confirmed by detection of Legionella pneumophila sero-group 1 antigen in urine (36%), seroconversion (fourfold rise in antibody titre, 33%) and culture of the organism (16%). Fifteen per cent of legionellosis was diagnosed by the identification of a single high antibody titre. In France a coordination between Public Health Institutions (Réseau National de Santé Public and DDASS), clinicians, laboratories and National Reference Center was established to improve prevention and control of legionnaires' disease outbreaks. Legislation obliges to report each case. When more two cases in the same area are notified

  4. Program Tracks Cost Of Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, Lemuel E., III

    1993-01-01

    Travel Forecaster is menu-driven, easy-to-use computer program that plans, forecasts cost, and tracks actual vs. planned cost of business-related travel of division or branch of organization and compiles information into data base to aid travel planner. Ability of program to handle multiple trip entries makes it valuable time-saving device.

  5. Travel health: sun protection and skin cancer prevention for travellers.

    PubMed

    Wood, Cate

    The UK population likes to travel to sunny parts of the world, where the risk of sunburn is greater than it is at home. Sunburn and the cultural desire for a tan is one of the risk factors for the increase in skin cancer. The rise in foreign travel has resulted in an increased demand for pre-travel health services, with nurses in primary care acting as the main providers.Within these consultations, the traveller and their travel plans are risk assessed.Travel health consultations give an ideal opportunity to discuss and advise the public regarding sun burn and skin cancer protection. However, there are also other ways to impart safety in the sun message to travellers. Skin protection is a health promoting activity provided as a part of public health provision and all nurses can play a role in prevention.

  6. Travelers In The Night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauer, Albert D.

    2014-11-01

    Travelers In The Night is an engaging and informative series of two minute radio programs about asteroids, comets, spacecraft, and other objects in space. The pieces are evergreen in that they are current but not dated. They are published on the Public Radio Exchange and carried by a number of radio stations. For teachers, students, and kids of all ages, the script for each piece and the start of a path for further inquiry can be found on the website travelersinthenight.org . The Travelers InThe Night Pieces are written and produced by an observing member of the Catalina Sky Survey Team at the University of Arizona. DPS members are encouraged to submit program ideas which can be developed to feature their research efforts.

  7. Aging and space travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohler, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The matter of aging and its relation to space vehicle crewmembers undertaking prolonged space missions is addressed. The capabilities of the older space traveler to recover from bone demineralization and muscle atrophy are discussed. Certain advantages of the older person are noted, for example, a greater tolerance of monotony and repetitious activities. Additional parameters are delineated including the cardiovascular system, the reproductive system, ionizing radiation, performance, and group dynamics.

  8. When travel is a challenge: Travel medicine and the 'dis-abled' traveller.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Irmgard

    Travellers with recognised disabilities or the dis-ability to function as required during a trip have been overlooked in the travel medicine literature. This paper provides a starting point for further discussion and research into this neglected traveller population. In contrast, tourism research has explored travel with a disability for some time in order to understand the travellers' needs and to improve services accordingly. The contemporary bio-psycho-social understanding of disability serves as the framework for exploring motivations to travel as well as barriers, such as inter and intrapersonal, economic, structural and attitudinal obstacles. The demands of complex travel planning are acknowledged. Attention is also drawn to the particular issue of acquired disability. The theoretical discussion is complemented by travellers' own accounts using as examples mobility impairment on aeroplanes, sensory impairments, and obesity. These insights should inform high quality travel health care starting with an exploration of the health professionals' own views on such endeavours. Important are appropriate communication skills, an understanding of the travellers'/carers' views, wishes and judgment of abilities, as well as the appreciation of the reason for the trip, destination and planned activities. Challenging may be the need to accept that the traveller/carer will be more knowledgeable about the disability, needs, potential problems and solutions than the health professional. Finally, medical requirements for destination and activity need to be combined with the medical requirements for the dis-abling condition. Scarce literature and increasing numbers of travellers with disabilities should make this field a research priority in travel medicine. Unless there is an absolute medical contraindication, travel health professionals should encourage and support travellers for whom travel is a challenge. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Update on traveler's diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Strum, W B

    1988-07-01

    Traveler's diarrhea affects a substantial number of travelers to high-risk areas of the world. The key to controlling this troublesome disease is prevention. The most important preventive measures depend on educating patients to consume only safe foods and pure water. Physicians cannot overemphasize the importance of avoiding high-risk foods and of boiling water if a safe water supply is not available. Prophylactic medications are a secondary consideration and should be prescribed with discretion. In most cases, diarrhea is mild and self-limited, requiring only fluid and electrolyte replacement and perhaps an antidiarrheal agent. In moderate to severe cases, the addition of an antimicrobial agent may be of benefit. Until an efficacious polyvalent vaccine is developed, caution and common sense, together with discretionary dietary and hygienic practices, are the best defenses against traveler's diarrhea. The ultimate solution is greatly improved sanitation and personal hygiene, especially in high-risk countries. However, only dreamers will consider waiting for this transformation to occur.

  10. Time - A Traveler's Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickover, Clifford A.

    1999-09-01

    "Bucky Fuller thought big," Wired magazine recently noted, "Arthur C. Clarke thinks big, but Cliff Pickover outdoes them both." In his newest book, Cliff Pickover outdoes even himself, probing a mystery that has baffled mystics, philosophers, and scientists throughout history--What is the nature of time?In Time: A Traveler's Guide , Pickover takes readers to the forefront of science as he illuminates the most mysterious phenomenon in the universe--time itself. Is time travel possible? Is time real? Does it flow in one direction only? Does it have a beginning and an end? What is eternity? Pickover's book offers a stimulating blend of Chopin, philosophy, Einstein, and modern physics, spiced with diverting side-trips to such topics as the history of clocks, the nature of free will, and the reason gold glitters. Numerous diagrams ensure readers will have no trouble following along.By the time we finish this book, we understand a wide variety of scientific concepts pertaining to time. And most important, we will understand that time travel is, indeed, possible.

  11. Family planning for travellers.

    PubMed

    Rustom, A

    1990-11-01

    A public health nurse from London describes the customs of nomadic people in the British Isles, known as "travellers," as they affect provision of family planning services. Most are of British or Irish stock, some migrate and others live in caravan sites all year. Their traditions dictate that men work and women are housewives. Early, often arranged, marriage, early childbearing and large families are the norm. Sex and contraception are not considered appropriate for discussion between the sexes, or in the presence of children. Large families and financial hardship force many women to space pregnancies. Women often have to hide contraceptives from their husbands, difficult in conditions without privacy. Therefore they prefer IUDs, but some use oral contraceptives, although sometimes erratically because most are illiterate. Traveller women are usually unwilling to do self-examination, as needed with IUDs. They often have difficulty attending regular Pap smear clinics. Cervical cancer rates are high. They experience discrimination in clinics, and need extra care about modesty. It is worth while to take time to develop trust in the clinical relationship, to deal with the traveller woman's uneasy among outsiders.

  12. Superconducting traveling wave accelerators

    SciT

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-11-01

    This note considers the applicability of superconductivity to traveling wave accelerators. Unlike CW operation of a superconducting standing wave or circulating wave accelerator section, which requires improvement factors (superconductor conductivity divided by copper conductivity) of about 10/sup 6/ in order to be of practical use, a SUperconducting TRaveling wave Accelerator, SUTRA, operating in the pulsed mode requires improvement factors as low as about 10/sup 3/, which are attainable with niobium or lead at 4.2K, the temperature of liquid helium at atmospheric pressure. Changing from a copper traveling wave accelerator to SUTRA achieves the following. (1) For a given gradient SUTRAmore » reduces the peak and average power requirements typically by a factor of 2. (2) SUTRA reduces the peak power still further because it enables us to increase the filling time and thus trade pulse width for gradient. (3) SUTRA makes possible a reasonably long section at higher frequencies. (4) SUTRA makes possible recirculation without additional rf average power. 8 references, 6 figures, 1 table.« less

  13. Evidence on global medical travel.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Kai; Záliš, Ladislav; Meurice, Christopher R; Hilton, Ian; Ly, Terry-Lisa; Zupan, Zorana; Hinrichs, Saba

    2015-11-01

    The potential benefits of travelling across national borders to obtain medical treatment include improved care, decreased costs and reduced waiting times. However, medical travel involves additional risks, compared to obtaining treatment domestically. We review the publicly-available evidence on medical travel. We suggest that medical travel needs to be understood in terms of its potential risks and benefits so that it can be evaluated against alternatives by patients who are seeking care. We propose three domains -quality standards, informed decision-making, economic and legal protection - in which better evidence could support the development of medical travel policies.

  14. Evidence on global medical travel

    PubMed Central

    Záliš, Ladislav; Meurice, Christopher R; Hilton, Ian; Ly, Terry-Lisa; Zupan, Zorana; Hinrichs, Saba

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The potential benefits of travelling across national borders to obtain medical treatment include improved care, decreased costs and reduced waiting times. However, medical travel involves additional risks, compared to obtaining treatment domestically. We review the publicly-available evidence on medical travel. We suggest that medical travel needs to be understood in terms of its potential risks and benefits so that it can be evaluated against alternatives by patients who are seeking care. We propose three domains –quality standards, informed decision-making, economic and legal protection – in which better evidence could support the development of medical travel policies. PMID:26549906

  15. Home range and travels

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  16. Fellow travellers: Working memory and mental time travel in rodents.

    PubMed

    Dere, Ekrem; Dere, Dorothea; de Souza Silva, Maria Angelica; Huston, Joseph P; Zlomuzica, Armin

    2017-03-19

    The impairment of mental time travel is a severe cognitive symptom in patients with brain lesions and a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Whether animals are also able to mentally travel in time both forward and backward is still a matter of debate. In this regard, we have proposed a continuum of mental time travel abilities across different animal species, with humans being the species with the ability to perform most sophisticated forms of mental time travel. In this review and perspective article, we delineate a novel approach to understand the evolution, characteristics and function of human and animal mental time travel. Furthermore, we propose a novel approach to measure mental time travel in rodents in a comprehensive manner using a test battery composed of well-validated and easy applicable tests. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Health hazards of international travel.

    PubMed

    Cossar, J H; Reid, D

    1989-01-01

    The growth of travel and the increasing numbers of those affected by travel-related illnesses, some of a serious nature, will cause this subject to demand the attention of the medical profession, the travel trade, travellers themselves and the health authorities of countries receiving tourists. Provision of appropriate advice for the traveller is a shared responsibility, best channelled mainly through travel agencies; it can moreover be shown to be cost-beneficial. Continued monitoring of illness in travellers and provision of information systems geared to this problem and its prevention are fully justified. They should be based on traditional channels of communication and currently-available modern technology, and be readily accessible to medical and related workers. Increased collaboration between medical workers, health educators and those involved in the travel trade would be a positive and useful contribution towards the reduction of illness and discomfort among travellers and the associated expense incurred by the various national health services concerned. There are clearly economic benefits from the development of international tourism, but these have to be balanced in countries accepting tourists by attention to the prevention of illnesses associated with travel.

  18. Portable, universal, and visual ion sensing platform based on the light emitting diode-based self-referencing-ion selective field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Han, Yanchao; Li, Jing; Zhang, Libing; Jia, Xiaofang; Wang, Erkang

    2014-02-04

    In this work, a novel and universal ion sensing platform was presented, which enables the visual detection of various ions with high sensitivity and selectivity. Coaxial potential signals (millivolt-scale) of the sample from the self-referencing (SR) ion selective chip can be transferred into the ad620-based amplifier with an output of volt-scale potentials. The amplified voltage is high enough to drive a light emitting diode (LED), which can be used as an amplifier and indicator to report the sample information. With this double amplification device (light emitting diode-based self-referencing-ion selective field-effect transistor, LED-SR-ISFET), a tiny change of the sample concentration can be observed with a distinguishable variation of LED brightness by visual inspection. This LED-based luminescent platform provided a facile, low-cost, and rapid sensing strategy without the need of additional expensive chemiluminescence reagent and instruments. Moreover, the SR mode also endows this device excellent stability and reliability. With this innovative design, sensitive determination of K(+), H(+), and Cl(-) by the naked eye was achieved. It should also be noticed that this sensing strategy can easily be extended to other ions (or molecules) by simply integrating the corresponding ion (or molecule) selective electrode.

  19. Traveling-Wave Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1998-01-01

    The traveling-wave tube (TWT) is a vacuum device invented in the early 1940's used for amplification at microwave frequencies. Amplification is attained by surrendering kinetic energy from an electron beam to a radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic wave. The demand for vacuum devices has been decreased largely by the advent of solid-state devices. However, although solid state devices have replaced vacuum devices in many areas, there are still many applications such as radar, electronic countermeasures and satellite communications, that require operating characteristics such as high power (Watts to Megawatts), high frequency (below 1 GHz to over 100 GHz) and large bandwidth that only vacuum devices can provide. Vacuum devices are also deemed irreplaceable in the music industry where musicians treasure their tube-based amplifiers claiming that the solid-state and digital counterparts could never provide the same "warmth" (3). The term traveling-wave tube includes both fast-wave and slow-wave devices. This article will concentrate on slow-wave devices as the vast majority of TWTs in operation fall into this category.

  20. The Travelling Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murabona Oduori, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The telescope has been around for more than 400 years, and through good use of it scientists have made many astonishing discoveries and begun to understand our place in the universe. Most people, however, have never looked through one. Yet it is a great tool for cool science and observation especially in a continent and country with beautifully dark skies. The Travelling Telescope project aims to invite people outside under the stars to learn about those curious lights in the sky.The Travelling Telescope aims to promote science learning to a wide range of Kenyan schools in various locations exchanging knowledge about the sky through direct observations of celestial bodies using state of the art telescopes. In addition to direct observing we also teach science using various hands-on activities and astronomy software, ideal for explaining concepts which are hard to understand, and for a better grasp of the sights visible through the telescope. We are dedicated to promoting science using astronomy especially in schools, targeting children from as young as 3 years to the youth, teachers, their parents and members of the public. Our presentation focuses on the OAD funded project in rural coastal Kenya.

  1. Visiting Astronomers Travel Guide | CTIO

    please advise Ximena Herreros at the time that you initiate travel plans, if your stay in Chile will , well in advance of their travel time, regarding current visa requirements for Chile. back to top Visiting Astronomers Travel Guide Director's Discretionary (DD) Time CTIO 2016 Ephemeris ToO Policy CTIO

  2. Travel Grants Benefit 120 Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-12-01

    AGU is pleased to announce that 120 students from 21 countries will travel to the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco to present their research. The travel grants are made possible through the generosity of Exxon Mobil, Northrup Grumman, Elsevier, Sequoia Scientific, Li-Cor Biogeosciences, Cassidy Associates, Decagon Devices, RBR Ltd., Springer, Jamie A. Austin Jr., the Max Hammond Student Travel Endowment, and 157 AGU members. The number of grants for students to travel to the Fall Meeting represents an increase of four times from those given in the previous years.

  3. A traveling opera troupe.

    PubMed

    Gao, M

    1995-08-01

    In China, Mr. Chang Junjie, a retired middle school principal has personally organized and financed the "Family Planning Retired Cadre's Troupe," which travels around the countryside performing newly written costume operas. In the six years since he first began to organize the troupe, Chang's players have performed more than 1700 times for more than a million people. The operas draw their material from the real life situations faced by farmers and emphasize the importance of family planning by setting good examples. Chang's operas have been well received, and it is not unusual for his audiences to be moved to laughter and tears. Despite his widespread success, Chang is not content with what he has accomplished and is currently organizing a children's opera troupe and seeking ways to make a greater impact on the promotion of family planning.

  4. [The travelling sports physician].

    PubMed

    Jenoure, Peter

    2016-07-13

    Travelling around your own country or even further abroad with a sports team or individual athletes as a sports physician is to be considered as a fundamental part of the various activities of a sports medicine practitioner.However, in our modern and quickly changing world, it is imperative to understand the different aspects of caring for athletes, also the legal ones. These may include licensing issues, malpractice coverage, access to care at outside institutions and prescribing and transporting medication of all sorts, including narcotics and substances of the list of prohibited ones (doping).With significant changes in healthcare at state and national levels, physicians must be aware of how these policy differences can affect their way of working, their ability to provide the expected care.

  5. Travel Demand Modeling

    SciT

    Southworth, Frank; Garrow, Dr. Laurie

    This chapter describes the principal types of both passenger and freight demand models in use today, providing a brief history of model development supported by references to a number of popular texts on the subject, and directing the reader to papers covering some of the more recent technical developments in the area. Over the past half century a variety of methods have been used to estimate and forecast travel demands, drawing concepts from economic/utility maximization theory, transportation system optimization and spatial interaction theory, using and often combining solution techniques as varied as Box-Jenkins methods, non-linear multivariate regression, non-linear mathematical programming,more » and agent-based microsimulation.« less

  6. International Travelers' Sociodemographic, Health, and Travel Characteristics: An Italian Study.

    PubMed

    Troiano, Gianmarco; Mercone, Astrid; Bagnoli, Alessandra; Nante, Nicola

    Approximately the 8% of travelers requires medical care, with the diagnosis of a vaccine-preventable disease. The aim of our study was to analyze the socio-demographic, health and travel characteristics of the Italian international travelers. We conducted a cross sectional study from January 2015 to June 2016, at the Travel Medicine Clinic of Siena, asking the doctor to interview patients who attended the Clinic, recording socio-demographic and travel information, malaria prophylaxis, vaccinations. The data were organized in a database and processed by software Stata®. We collected 419 questionnaires. Patients chose 71 countries for their travels; the favorite destinations were: India (6.31%), Thailand (6.31%), and Brazil (5.10%). The mean length of stay was 36.17 days. Italians, students, and freelancers tended to stay abroad for a longer time (mean: 36.4 days, 59.87 days and 64.16 days respectively). 33.17% of our sample used drugs for malaria chemoprophylaxis: 71.9% of them used Atovaquone/Proguanil (Malarone®), 26.6% used Mefloquine (Lariam®), 1.5% other drugs. The vaccinations that travelers mostly got in our study were to prevent hepatitis A (n = 264), the typhoid fever (n = 187), the Tetanus + Diphtheria + Pertussis (n = 165), the Yellow fever (n = 118) and the cholera (n = 78). Twenty-eight (6.68%) refused some recommended vaccinations. The vaccines mostly refused were for Typhoid fever (n = 20), hepatitis a (n = 9), and cholera (n = 9). Our results demonstrated that Italian international travelers are at-risk because of their poor vaccinations adherence. This implies that pre-travel counseling is fundamental to increase the knowledge of the risks and the compliance of future travelers. Copyright © 2016 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Travel immunization update for older adults.

    PubMed

    Spain, Margaret P; Edlund, Barbara J

    2010-04-01

    Older Americans are among the most widely traveled group in our society. Recent trends point to more international travel, more travel to Third World countries, and more travel by older adults with significant health problems. Regardless of the reason for travel, older adults need to plan for healthy travel. Primary care providers need to inquire at routine visits if patients have plans for international travel. If travel to other countries or regions is being considered, patients must be advised of the importance of early travel preparation. To begin with, older adults should be up to date on all routine immunizations. Those planning on international travel may need additional required and/or recommended immunizations, depending on the individual's health status, travel itinerary, length of stay, and health risks associated with destination sites. Primary care providers should be knowledgeable about travel medicine resources in the community to make referrals for travelers requiring additional immunizations and health information. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Pre-travel advice seeking from GPs by travellers with chronic illness seen at a travel clinic.

    PubMed

    Gagneux-Brunon, Amandine; Andrillat, Carole; Fouilloux, Pascale; Daoud, Fatiha; Defontaine, Christiane; Charles, Rodolphe; Lucht, Frédéric; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth

    2016-03-01

    Travellers are ageing and frequently report chronic illness. Pre-travel health advice is crucial, particularly in this subgroup, and general practitioners (GPs) are first in line for treatment adjustment before departure. Our aim is to evaluate pre-travel health advice seeking from GPs by travellers with chronic illness seen at a travel clinic. A cross-sectional observational survey using a questionnaire was conducted between August 2013 and July 2014 in travellers attending the travel medicine clinic of a tertiary university hospital in France. During the study, 2019 travellers were included. Mean age was 39.4 years (±18.8). Three hundred and ninety-one (19.4%) travellers reported a history of a chronic illness. Arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus were the most frequently reported illnesses, affecting, respectively, 168 (8.3%) travellers and 102 (5.1%). Hajj pilgrims were more likely to report a history of chronic illness than other travellers. Only 810 (40.1%) travellers sought pre-travel advice from their GP. Six hundred and fifty-two (40.1%) healthy travellers and 158 (40.5%) travellers reporting chronic illness sought pre-travel advice from their GP (P = 0.96). Travellers with a history of chronic illness do not seek pre-travel health advice from their GP more frequently than healthy travellers. Travel health specialists are generally not the best practitioners to manage the care of underlying medical conditions presenting risks during travel. However, GPs offer continuity and disease management expertise to improve the specificity of pre-travel planning. Thus, ongoing collaboration between the traveller, GP and travel health specialist is likely to yield the best outcomes. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Travel and Adult Transformative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Steven K.

    2011-01-01

    This phenomenological research study examines the lived experience of individual adult transformation in the context of travel. Adults throughout history have experienced profound personal and perception changes as a result of significant travel events. Transformative learning occurs through experience, crisis, and reflection, all of which are…

  10. U.S. business travel

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-10-01

    Americans make more than 405 million long-distance business trips per year, : accounting for 16% of all long-distance travel, according to a : preliminary analysis of the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS). : Conducted from 2001 to 2002, the NHT...

  11. Preparing for Travel in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswald, James M.

    The complexity of the Indian society can be overwhelming, and preparation for travel in India requires careful and detailed advance planning. Practical suggestions are provided for travelers to help them understand cultural differences, avoid illnesses, and select appropriate clothing for the intense heat. Explanations are given about the monetary…

  12. 1995 American travel survey : profile

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-10-01

    This is US summary data from the American Travel Survey. Complete data is available from the Bureau and from the BTS website at http://www.transtats.bts.gov/Tables.asp?DB_ID=505&DB_Name=American%20Travel%20Survey%20%28ATS%29%201995&DB_Short_Name=ATS ...

  13. Winter Wilderness Travel and Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilchrest, Norman

    Knowledge and skill are needed for safe and enjoyable travel and camping in the wilderness in winter. The beauty of snow and ice, reduced human use, and higher tolerance of animals toward humans make the wilderness attractive during winter. The uniqueness of winter travel presents several challenges that are not present in other seasons. Safety is…

  14. Travel and the Consumer 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idleman, Hillis K.

    The State Education Department of New York has prepared a series of modules--Expanded Programs in Consumer Education. "Travel and the Consumer" is the most recently produced module. It can be used as a discrete unit or with others in the series. The module stresses the importance of making travel creative, getting the most for one's…

  15. 49 CFR 229.55 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piston travel. 229.55 Section 229.55... Piston travel. (a) Brake cylinder piston travel shall be sufficient to provide brake shoe clearance when... piston travel may not exceed 11/2 inches less than the total possible piston travel. The total possible...

  16. Travel health advice: benefits, compliance, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Angelin, Martin; Evengård, Birgitta; Palmgren, Helena

    2014-06-01

    Travel health advice is an important and difficult part of a pre-travel consultation. The aim of this study was to determine whether the travel health advice given is followed by the traveller and whether it affects disease and injury experienced during travel. A prospective survey study was carried out from October 2009 to April 2012 at the Travel Medicine Clinic of the Department of Infectious Diseases, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. The Travel Medicine Clinic in Umeå is the largest travel clinic in northern Sweden. We included 1277 individuals in the study; 1059 (83%) responded to the post-travel questionnaire. Most visitors (88%) remembered having received travel health advice; among these, 95% found some of the health advice useful. Two-thirds (67%) claimed to have followed the advice, but fell ill during travel to the same extent as those who did not. Younger travellers (< 31 y) found our travel health advice less beneficial, were less compliant with the advice, took more risks during travel, and fell ill during travel to a greater extent than older travellers. Helping travellers stay healthy during travel is the main goal of travel medicine. Younger travellers are a risk group for illness during travel and there is a need to find new methods to help them avoid illness. Travellers find travel health advice useful, but it does not protect them from travel-related illness. Factors not easily influenced by the traveller play a role, but a comprehensive analysis of the benefits of travel health advice is needed.

  17. Acquisition of traveler information and its effects on travel choices : evidence from a Seattle-area travel diary survey

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-04-07

    Advanced Traveler Information Systems offer the promise of better informed travel decisions and more efficient use of transportation infrastructure. However, no firm consensus has emerged as to how travelers decide to access information, or how they ...

  18. President's Address: Travel Medicine and Principles of Safe Travel

    PubMed Central

    DuPont, Herbert L.

    2008-01-01

    Persons crossing international boundaries away from their medical support systems are put at risk for illness and injury. Travel medicine is a new medical discipline that quantifies these health risks and develops strategies for reducing them. Obtaining health and evacuation insurance for a future trip is important for persons with medical conditions, those planning trips to developing tropical or semi-tropical regions of the world or when an international stay anywhere will be as long as a month. Pre-travel medical evaluation, vaccines against endemic infectious diseases and medications to reduce the occurrence of diarrhea and malaria during trips to endemic areas, and medications for self-treatment of common illnesses such as diarrhea are fundamental to travel medicine. There are a number of miscellaneous areas to consider in travel medicine including preventing deep vein thrombosis and minimizing jet lag during long haul air travel and reducing the occurrence of accidents and water- and altitude-related illnesses. An important recently defined challenge to the field is the growing number of ill-prepared persons put at great risk for illness while visiting friends and relatives living in areas of reduced hygiene. All persons need to have an idea of how and where they may find medical care if they develop illness while abroad. This article summarizes essential elements in travel medicine and offers 10 recommendations for safe travel. PMID:18596858

  19. Bilateral comparison of 10 V standards between the NSAI-NML (Ireland) and the BIPM, March to April 2011 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, O.; Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.

    2011-01-01

    As a part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b, a comparison of the 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the National Standards Authority of Ireland-National Metrology Laboratory (NSAI-NML), Dublin, Ireland, was carried out from March to April 2011. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B) were transported by freight to NSAI-NML. At NSAI-NML, the 10 V output EMF of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with a group of characterized Zener diode-based electronic voltage standards. At the BIPM, the travelling standards were calibrated before and after the measurements at NSAI-NML, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages on internal temperature and ambient pressure. The comparison results show that the voltage standards maintained by NSAI-NML and the BIPM were equivalent, within their stated expanded uncertainties, on the mean date of the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  20. 25 CFR 700.533 - Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense reimbursement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense... travel and travel expense reimbursement. (a) When an employee is on officially authorized travel his or... in cash or kind for travel expenses from any other source, even when the employee's expenses exceed...

  1. 25 CFR 700.533 - Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense reimbursement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense... travel and travel expense reimbursement. (a) When an employee is on officially authorized travel his or... in cash or kind for travel expenses from any other source, even when the employee's expenses exceed...

  2. 25 CFR 700.533 - Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense reimbursement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense... travel and travel expense reimbursement. (a) When an employee is on officially authorized travel his or... in cash or kind for travel expenses from any other source, even when the employee's expenses exceed...

  3. 41 CFR Appendix C to Chapter 301 - Standard Data Elements for Federal Travel [Traveler Identification

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for Federal Travel [Traveler Identification] C Appendix C to Chapter 301 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES Ch. 301, App. C Appendix C to Chapter 301—Standard Data Elements for Federal Travel [Traveler Identification] Group name Data...

  4. 25 CFR 700.533 - Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense reimbursement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense... travel and travel expense reimbursement. (a) When an employee is on officially authorized travel his or... in cash or kind for travel expenses from any other source, even when the employee's expenses exceed...

  5. 25 CFR 700.533 - Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense reimbursement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense... travel and travel expense reimbursement. (a) When an employee is on officially authorized travel his or... in cash or kind for travel expenses from any other source, even when the employee's expenses exceed...

  6. Passenger Travel Facts and Figures 2016

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-08-10

    Passenger Travel Facts and Figures 2016 is a snapshot of the characteristics and trends of personal travel in the United States; the network over which passenger travel takes place; and the related economic, safety, and environmental aspects of passe...

  7. Travelers' Health: Trypanosomiasis, American (Chagas Disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers Road Safety Senior Citizens Sex Tourism STDs Sun Exposure Swimming and Diving Study Abroad ...

  8. Passenger Travel Facts and Figures 2014

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-12-17

    Passenger Travel Facts and Figures 2014 is a snapshot of the characteristics and trends of personal travel in the United States; the network over which passenger travel takes place; and the related economic, safety, and environmental implications. An...

  9. Passenger Travel Facts and Figures 2015

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-09-16

    Passenger Travel Facts and Figures 2015 is a snapshot of the characteristics and trends of personal travel in the United States; the network over which passenger travel takes place; and the related economic, safety, and environmental aspects of passe...

  10. Summary travel characteristics : District of Columbia

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-10-01

    The Summary Travel Characteristics publication series contains summary tables of travel statistics for census regions and divisions, States, and metropolitan areas. The tables in this report provide an overview of the findings of the American Travel ...

  11. Travelers' Health: MERS in the Arabian Peninsula

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  12. Travelers' Health: Animal-Associated Hazards

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  13. Travelers' Health: Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  14. Travelers with Disabilities and Medical Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rule Special Procedures Disabilities & Medical Military Children Seniors Law Enforcement Cultural TSA Pre✓® Airports & Airlines Schedule FAQ Passenger Support Civil Rights Travel Redress Claims Travel Tips Travel Checklist ...

  15. Health status of Gypsy Travellers.

    PubMed

    Van Cleemput, P; Parry, G

    2001-06-01

    Although previous studies suggest that Gypsy Travellers have poorer health status and excess mortality compared with the general population, there is no epidemiological evidence using validated measures in this nomadic ethnic group. The aim of this study was to compare the health status of traditional Gypsy Travellers with norms from the UK population, and with a concurrent comparison group using the Euroqol health status measure (EQ-5D). Eighty-seven adult Gypsy Travellers were matched for age and sex with English or Irish residents, registered with an urban general practice in an area of high social deprivation. Both samples completed the EQ-5D questionnaire by interview. A comparison was also made with normative data from the UK general population. Travellers had poorer health status than their settled counterparts on two of the five dimensions (mobility and activity) but not on the overall summary score. Travellers reported significantly poorer health than the matched comparison group on the EQ-5D visual analogue scale. Both the Travellers and the comparison group had much poorer health status on the EQ-5D index than the UK population norms, even when compared with the lowest socioeconomic group. Health status of Gypsy Travellers was significantly poorer than in the lowest socio-economic UK population group, but was not so markedly different from a concurrent, matched, socially deprived resident group. Gypsy Travellers did have poorer health status than matched comparators in relation to mobility, activity and perception of overall health. Quantitative assessment of health status in the Traveller community is feasible.

  16. Traveller gypsies and primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Feder, G

    1989-01-01

    Traveller gypsies have resided in the British Isles for over 500 years, making them one of our oldest ethnic minorities. They experience widespread prejudice and discrimination from the settled population. In the sphere of health care the marginalization of traveller gypsies has resulted in poor access to services and relative neglect of their health needs. In this paper the health of traveller gypsies is reviewed from the perspective of primary care, and the role of general practitioners in improving health care for this community is discussed. PMID:2560026

  17. 49 CFR 230.76 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and...) Maximum piston travel. The maximum piston travel when steam locomotive is standing shall be as follows...

  18. Tuberculosis Information for International Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... shelters). Travelers who will be working in clinics, hospitals, or other health care settings where TB patients are likely to be encountered should consult infection control or occupational health experts. They should ask about ...

  19. Travel reliability inventory for Chicago.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-04-01

    The overarching goal of this research project is to enable state DOTs to document and monitor the reliability performance : of their highway networks. To this end, a computer tool, TRIC, was developed to produce travel reliability inventories from : ...

  20. Sandy Hook Traveler Information System

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-09-01

    This report focuses on equipment and procedural solutions for gathering and disseminating a wide range of visitor information, including real-time traveler information data relating to traffic and parking at the Sandy Hook Unit of the Gateway Recreat...

  1. Notification: Management of Travel Cards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OA-FY15-0156, April 20, 2015. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Inspector General (OIG), plans to begin preliminary research for an audit of the management of travel cards.

  2. Travel time estimation using Bluetooth.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a Bluetooth Probe Detection System (BPDS) to : estimate travel time in an urban area. Specifically, the study investigated the possibility of measuring overall congestion, the : ...

  3. Travel and the home advantage.

    PubMed

    Pace, A; Carron, A V

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relative contributions of various travel related variables to visiting team success in the National Hockey League. A multiple regression design was used with game outcome as the dependent variable. The independent variables of interest included, as main effects and interactions, number of time zones crossed, direction of travel, distance traveled, preparation/adjustment time, time of season, game number on the road trip, and the home stand. Visiting team success was negatively associated with the interaction of number of time zones crossed and increased preparation time between games, and was positively associated with game number on the road. It was concluded that only a small portion of the variance in the home advantage/visitor disadvantage can be explained by travel related factors.

  4. Influenza Prevention: Information for Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... season and are traveling to parts of the world where influenza activity is ongoing should get a ... have been circulating in other parts of the world. People should get vaccinated at least 2 weeks ...

  5. Infectious diseases and travelers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Different areas of the world have different diseases and different prevalence rates of diseases. Travelers going to foreign countries may encounter diseases to which they have no natural immunity and should take any possible precautions.

  6. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J [Livermore, CA; Nelson, Scott D [Patterson, CA; Poole, Brian R [Tracy, CA

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  7. Characteristics and pre-travel preparation of travelers at a Canadian pediatric tertiary care travel clinic: A retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao Wei; Pell, Lisa G; Akseer, Nadia; Khan, Sarah; Lam, Ray E; Louch, Debra; Science, Michelle; Morris, Shaun K

    2016-01-01

    International travelers are susceptible to a wide spectrum of travel related morbidities. Despite rising number of international travelers in Canada, the demographics, risk profiles, and preventative strategies of high-risk traveler groups, including pediatric travelers visiting friends and relatives (VFRs) are not well described. A descriptive analysis was conducted on pre-travel consultations completed between January 2013 and August 2014 at a large pediatric tertiary care center in Toronto, Canada. Data on demographics, travel characteristics, and pre-travel interventions were extracted from 370 pre-travel consultations. Results were compared between all VFR and non-VFR travelers, as well as between children traveling to visit friends and relatives, for vacation, and for education and/or volunteer purposes. Forty-eight percent of consultations were for children <18 years of age (n = 177), of which 31% were for young children (<5 years of age). Young children were more likely to travel to visit friends and/or relatives than for other purposes (29% vs 9%, p < 0.0001). Children VFRs (cVFRs) were more likely to travel for >28 days than children traveling for vacation (43% vs 1%, p < 0.0001), and children traveling for education/volunteer purposes (43% vs 21%, p = 0.03). Around half of cVFRs traveled to destinations in Asia (51%). The majority stayed with locals, friends and/or relatives (85%), and nearly all traveled to urban destinations (98%). The most prescribed interventions for children were azithromycin (84%), Dukoral (66%), and the hepatitis A vaccine (60%). Atovaquone/proguanil was the most commonly prescribed antimalarial for children. Children that travel to visit friends and relatives represent a unique travel group and may require specific considerations during pre-travel preparations. Our findings can help develop targeted pre-travel strategies for children VFRs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Infectious Risks of Traveling Abroad.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin H; Blair, Barbra M

    2015-08-01

    A popular leisure activity, international travel can be associated with some infections. The most common travel-related illnesses appear to be gastrointestinal, dermatologic, respiratory, and systemic febrile syndromes. The pretravel medical consultation includes immunizations, malaria chemoprophylaxis, self-treatment for traveler's diarrhea, and advice on the prevention of a myriad of other infectious causes including dengue, chikungunya, rickettsiosis, leptospirosis, schistosomiasis, and strongyloidiasis. Travel to locations experiencing outbreaks such as Ebola virus disease, Middle East respiratory syndrome, avian influenza, and chikungunya call for specific alerts on preventive strategies. After travel, evaluation of an ill traveler must explore details of exposure, including destinations visited; activities; ingestion of contaminated food or drinks; contact with vectors, animals, fresh water, or blood and body fluids; and other potential exposures. Knowledge of the geographic distribution of infectious diseases is important in generating the differential diagnoses and testing accordingly. Empiric treatment is sometimes necessary when suspicion of a certain diagnosis is strong and confirmatory tests are delayed or lacking, particularly for infections that are rapidly progressive (for example, malaria) or for which timing of testing is prolonged (such as leptospirosis).

  9. Morbidity among Israeli paediatric travellers.

    PubMed

    Rabinowicz, Shira; Schwartz, Eli

    2017-09-01

    International travel, particularly to developing countries, is becoming increasingly common among the Israeli population, including an increase in the number of travelling children. Since children are a distinct travellers' population, data about their post-travel morbidity are needed. A retrospective study which examined all children (0-19 years old) who presented to our centre after international travel from 1999 to 2015. About 314 children were seen. The mean age was 10 years (SD ± 5.8). Most of the patients (80.6%) were tourists, and the rest were expatriates. The main destinations visited were South-Asia (46.5%), Sub-Saharan Africa (33.4%), Latin-America (7%) and Europe (6.4%). Overall, the most common diagnoses were gastrointestinal (GI) (mainly chronic) disorders (30.6%), followed by febrile diseases (26.4%), among which 18.1% of patients were diagnosed with dengue fever and 12% with malaria. Dermatologic conditions accounted for 25.2%. Additional diagnoses were schistosomiasis (6.4%) and neuropsychiatric symptoms (2.2%). A substantial part, 10.8%, had eosinophilia, either symptomatic or asymptomatic. Travellers to Asia, compared to travellers to Africa, presented more commonly with GI illness (OR 2.02, 95% confidence interval 1.13-3.61), and dermatologic conditions (OR 1.94, 95% confidence interval 1.05-3.61). Morbidity was associated with a variety of transmission modes, such as food-borne illnesses (30.9%), bite and sting wounds (10.2%), mosquito-borne infections (8%), freshwater contact (6.7%) and tick-borne infections (2.2%). The main conditions seen in paediatric returning travellers were GI, febrile and dermatologic illnesses, some may be rare in their country of origin. Targeting care for the suspected pathogens based on updated knowledge of epidemiology and thorough travel history is essential. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. 8 CFR 244.15 - Travel abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Travel abroad. 244.15 Section 244.15 Aliens... NATIONALS OF DESIGNATED STATES § 244.15 Travel abroad. (a) After the grant of Temporary Protected Status... to travel abroad. Permission to travel may be granted by the director pursuant to the Service's...

  11. 28 CFR 2.93 - Travel approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Travel approval. 2.93 Section 2.93... Travel approval. (a) A parolee's Supervision Officer may approve travel outside the district of... possibilities. (3) Recurring travel across a district boundary, not to exceed fifty miles outside the district...

  12. 8 CFR 1244.15 - Travel abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Travel abroad. 1244.15 Section 1244.15... REGULATIONS TEMPORARY PROTECTED STATUS FOR NATIONALS OF DESIGNATED STATES § 1244.15 Travel abroad. (a) After... Status shall not constitute permission to travel abroad. Permission to travel may be granted by the...

  13. Community Travel for Physically Impaired Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millet Learning Center, Saginaw, MI.

    The community travel program for physically impaired children at the Millet Learning Center (Saginaw, Michigan) blends skills from two professions: orientation and mobility, and physical therapy. Program goals include enabling students to overcome travel fears, to learn travel skills, to learn to make adaptations necessary for successful travel,…

  14. Segmenting Michigan tourists based on distance traveled

    Xiamei Xu; Tsao-Fang Yuan; Edwin Gomez; Joseph D. Fridgen

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to segment Michigan travelers into short, medium and long distance traveler groups by distance that they traveled from home to a primary destination in Michigan, and to compare travel behavior, trip characteristics and sociodemographics among these segments. Significant differences were identified in past trip experiences in Michigan,...

  15. Further We Travel the Faster We Go

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Levente; Kovács, András; Tóth, Géza; Papp, István; Néda, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    The average travelling speed increases in a nontrivial manner with the travel distance. This leads to scaling-like relations on quite extended spatial scales, for all mobility modes taken together and also for a given mobility mode in part. We offer a wide range of experimental results, investigating and quantifying this universal effect and its measurable causes. The increasing travelling speed with the travel distance arises from the combined effects of: choosing the most appropriate travelling mode; the structure of the travel networks; the travel times lost in the main hubs, starting or target cities; and the speed limit of roads and vehicles. PMID:26863605

  16. Further We Travel the Faster We Go.

    PubMed

    Varga, Levente; Kovács, András; Tóth, Géza; Papp, István; Néda, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    The average travelling speed increases in a nontrivial manner with the travel distance. This leads to scaling-like relations on quite extended spatial scales, for all mobility modes taken together and also for a given mobility mode in part. We offer a wide range of experimental results, investigating and quantifying this universal effect and its measurable causes. The increasing travelling speed with the travel distance arises from the combined effects of: choosing the most appropriate travelling mode; the structure of the travel networks; the travel times lost in the main hubs, starting or target cities; and the speed limit of roads and vehicles.

  17. Exploring the Positive Utility of Travel and Mode Choice

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-08-01

    Why do people travel? Underlying most travel behavior research is the derived-demand paradigm of travel analysis, which assumes that travel demand is derived from the demand for spatially separated activities, traveling is a means to an end (reaching...

  18. Tour Recommendation Guide- Personalized travel sequence recommendation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, Akshitha; Prabadevi, B.

    2017-11-01

    Presents a personalized travel sequence for the given area the individual wants to visit. It not only helps to personalize the travel but also recommend a travel sequence based on the area mentioned. Firstly the frequently visited routes are ranked then top ranked routes are chosen based on previous travel records. The data is being collected using data mining and the famous routes are ranked based on user and the route. It helps in bridging the gap between user travel preference and routes.

  19. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices evaluation about travel medicine in international travelers and medical students in Chile.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Lillo, Lisette; Medrano-Díaz, Jorge; Pérez, Carmen; Chacón, Rodrigo; Silva-Urra, Juan; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2009-01-01

    Because information about travel medicine in Chile is lacking, a knowledge, attitudes, and practices evaluation in international travelers and medical students was done. The travelers and medical students did not know the travel medicine and sanitary conditions of their destinations, although they perceived travel-associated health risks, but <10% had any vaccination and 5% got sick during international trips.

  20. 76 FR 46216 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR): Temporary Duty (TDY) Travel Allowances: Notice of Public Meeting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ...; Sequence 5] Federal Travel Regulation (FTR): Temporary Duty (TDY) Travel Allowances: Notice of Public... and the general public in an effort to streamline travel policies, incorporated travel efficiency and.... Flynn, Deputy Director, Office of Travel, Transportation & Asset Management. [FR Doc. 2011-19482 Filed 8...

  1. 76 FR 43236 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR): Temporary Duty (TDY) Travel Allowances: Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ...; Sequence 5] Federal Travel Regulation (FTR): Temporary Duty (TDY) Travel Allowances: Notice of Public... public meeting. SUMMARY: The General Services Administration (GSA) is revising the Federal Travel Regulation (FTR) in an effort to streamline travel policies, increase travel efficiency and effectiveness...

  2. Health, sustainability and student travel.

    PubMed

    Green, Gill; Morris, Jenny; Wade, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    A survey of 246 pre-registration nursing students in a University in the South West of England was carried out to explore the impact of course related travel on the student experience. Results from the survey indicated that students' main mode of transport to practice placements was by car which reflects the rural nature of the South West and the relative paucity of public transport. Long distances that many students travel to their study centre and to placements, and the concurrent financial strain that this creates, impacted negatively on the student experience. Students recognised the need to travel to a place of study and clinical placements and suggestions of minimising the negative impact of travel were offered. These included the increased use of electronic delivery of lectures, attendance at local university premises, the provision of shared transport to placements and placements closer to the student's home. Few students, however, considered the environmental impact of travel. Higher Education Institutions need to address issues of sustainability through promoting student wellbeing and taking steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It is therefore important that student awareness of sustainability related issues is increased as well as focusing on reducing the environmental impact through organisational change. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Future Trends in Business Travel Decision Making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Keith J.

    2002-01-01

    This research surveys twenty large companies and their travellers to identify and evaluate the effects of pressures on the business travel market in the future. The influence of the following areas on the decision making process are addressed: (1) Corporate travel policies and increasing professionalism in corporate purchasing; (2) The development of global strategic airline alliances; (3) The emergence of low cost airlines on short haul markets; and (4) The development of internet based booking tools and travel agency IT. The survey shows differences in views between travel managers, and travellers with regard to corporate travel policies. While travel managers see policy rules, travellers interpret these as guidelines, indicating travel managers will need to take further actions to exercise true control of travel budgets. The data shows that companies are more likely to prescribe a class of airline ticket, than the choice of airline itself. Corporate hierarchical bias in travel policies is still common both for short and particularly long haul flying. Other findings show that while travel managers believe that their companies are likely to sign global deals with strategic airline groups within a five year period in a bid to consolidating spending, they also believe that nearly a third of short haul flying will be taken with low cost carriers, indicating further penetration in this business travel market by these carriers. The paper also provides other predictions about the business travel market, based on the survey findings.

  4. Fundamental Travel Demand Model Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanssen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Instances of transportation models are abundant and detailed "how to" instruction is available in the form of transportation software help documentation. The purpose of this paper is to look at the fundamental inputs required to build a transportation model by developing an example passenger travel demand model. The example model reduces the scale to a manageable size for the purpose of illustrating the data collection and analysis required before the first step of the model begins. This aspect of the model development would not reasonably be discussed in software help documentation (it is assumed the model developer comes prepared). Recommendations are derived from the example passenger travel demand model to suggest future work regarding the data collection and analysis required for a freight travel demand model.

  5. Toxoplasmosis as a travel risk.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda-Arias, Juan C; Gómez-Marin, Jorge E; Bobić, Branko; Naranjo-Galvis, Carlos A; Djurković-Djaković, Olgica

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite with worldwide distribution that infects more than one third of the global population. Primary infection in immunocompetent individuals is usually asymptomatic; however, different organs can be affected in immunocompromised individuals leading to the development of encephalitis, myocarditis or pneumonitis. The prevalence of infection with Toxoplasma as well as its genetic structure varies geographically and for that reason travel may be considered as a risk factor to acquire the infection. As toxoplasmosis is a foodborne disease, health care providers should give health education on prevention measures to all prospective travelers in order to decrease the risk of infection in endemic areas. This review presents an overview of the infection with T. gondii with some considerations for travelers to and from endemic zones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Traveling-Wave Membrane Photomixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyss, R. A.; Martin, S. C.; Nakamura, B. J.; Neto, A.; Pasqualini, D.; Siegel, P. H.; Kadow, C.; Gossard, A. C.

    2001-01-01

    Traveling-wave photomixers have superior performance when compared with lumped area photomixers in the 1 to 3 THz frequency range. Their large active area and distributed gain mechanism assure high thermal damage threshold and elimination of the capacitive frequency roll-off. However, the losses experienced by the radio frequency wave traveling along the coplanar strips waveguide (due to underlying semi-infinite GaAs substrate) were a serious drawback. In this paper we present device designs and an experimental setup that make possible the realization of photomixers on membranes which eliminate the losses.

  7. Navigation: traveling the water highways!

    Fisher, Marion; Vandas, Stephen; Farrar, Frank

    1996-01-01

    NAVIGATION is travel or transportation over water. Many different kinds of boats and ships are used on rivers and oceans to move people and products from one place to another. Navigation was extremely important for foreign and domestic trade and travel in the early days of our country before cars, trucks, trains, and airplanes were invented. In those days, rivers were used as "roads" to connect inland settlements to river and coastal ports. Communities established at these commercial ports became important economic, cultural, and social hubs in the development of our Nation.

  8. Collection Development "Mini-Travel Guides": Traveling Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufmann, Linda M.

    2009-01-01

    Predictions regarding how much traveling Americans will be doing this year and where they might go vary, but it is expected that many will cut back on what is increasingly considered a luxury. Even so, gasoline prices are down substantially from a year ago, the stronger dollar means better prices in Europe, and there are discounts in all areas of…

  9. 41 CFR Appendix C to Chapter 301 - Standard Data Elements for Federal Travel [Traveler Identification

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES Ch. 301, App. C Appendix C... Description Transportation Payment Method employee used to purchase transportation tickets Method Indicator...

  10. Individual traveller health priorities and the pre-travel health consultation.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Gerard T; Chen, Bingling; Avalos, Gloria

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the principal travel health priorities of travellers. The most frequently selected travel health concerns were accessing medical care abroad, dying abroad, insect bites, malaria, personal safety and travel security threats. The travel health risks of least concern were culture shock, fear of flying, jet lag and sexually transmitted infections. This study is the first to develop a hierarchy of self-declared travel health risk priorities among travellers. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Travels with Gates - August 2010

    combat floods that are affecting 14 million people. Story Biography Speeches Travels Photo Essays Gates Visits Navy Special Warefare Training More Photo Essays Gates Attends Graduation in San Diego Gates Photo Essays News Photos Week In Photos Videos DIMOC DOD/Military Seals DoD Flickr Secretary of Defense

  12. Twitter for travel medicine providers.

    PubMed

    Mills, Deborah J; Kohl, Sarah E

    2016-03-01

    Travel medicine practitioners, perhaps more so than medical practitioners working in other areas of medicine, require a constant flow of information to stay up-to-date, and provide best practice information and care to their patients. Many travel medicine providers are unaware of the popularity and potential of the Twitter platform. Twitter use among our travellers, as well as by physicians and health providers, is growing exponentially. There is a rapidly expanding body of published literature on this information tool. This review provides a brief overview of the ways Twitter is being used by health practitioners, the advantages that are peculiar to Twitter as a platform of social media, and how the interested practitioner can get started. Some key points about the dark side of Twitter are highlighted, as well as the potential benefits of using Twitter as a way to disseminate accurate medical information to the public. This article will help readers develop an increased understanding of Twitter as a tool for extracting useful facts and insights from the ever increasing volume of health information. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Travel: The World's Great Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Maureen

    1994-01-01

    Discusses benefits of travel for school library media specialists. Topics addressed include individual awareness of flexibility and adaptability; adapting to and accepting cultural differences; developing better perspectives on our own countries and programs; and sources of information on courses or study tours for university credit that are…

  14. Preparing Students for Travel Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novotny, Jeanne

    1989-01-01

    This article outlines information which can be provided by the school nurse or health educator to help make student trips abroad healthy as well as educational. Topics covered include: food and water, traveler's diarrhea, handwashing, insect and animal bites, stress, and prior health problems. (IAH)

  15. Music Travel: Avoiding the Potholes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2010-01-01

    Even given the countless hours clocked in class and rehearsal time, there's nothing that compares to a road trip to seal the bond among band, orchestra, and vocal music students. "Nothing can replace travel," says Peter Markes, orchestra director at Edmond North High School in Oklahoma. "It's safe, well-structured and, for many of…

  16. Travel Abroad as Culture Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantz, Richard K.; Weaver, V. Phillips

    1992-01-01

    Encourages traveling by teachers to enrich the multicultural curriculum in their classes. Includes suggestions and resources for planning overseas trips and using them to broaden teachers' perspectives and to provide background material for curriculum development. Outlines "case studies" of trips to Hungary and Greece. (CFR)

  17. Your Travel Dollar. Money Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Nancy H., Ed.

    This illustrated guide was designed to familiarize consumers with planning a vacation trip, whether domestic or abroad. The guide covers setting up a budget; package tours; cruises and charter flights; travel agencies and clubs; and arranging stays in hotels/motels, rental condominiums, bed-and-breakfasts, hostels, campsites, and private…

  18. Travel Agent. Occupational Simulation Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Wayne

    This career exploration instructional booklet on the travel agent's occupation is one of several resulting from the rural southwestern Colorado CEPAC Project (Career Education Process of Attitude Change). Based on a job analysis and utilizing a programed instructional format, the following content is included: A brief description of what a travel…

  19. Economic Downturn Limits Conference Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    Attendance is down at many academic and professional conferences in higher education this year, and next year's numbers are expected to be far worse, as campus budgets take further beatings. With many colleges limiting travel to professors or administrators who are speaking at events they are attending, will anyone be left in the audience? A new…

  20. Defense Travel Management Office (DTMO)

    ) Bullet Allowance Tables Bullet Allowance Calculators Bullet Restricted Fares Training Resources Training Resources Bullet Training Resource Lookup Bullet Listing of Available Training Resources Bullet New and Updated Training Resources Bullet Instructions for Accessing Training in Travel Explorer Bullet Enterprise

  1. Time Travel in the Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Donna W.

    2005-01-01

    A Time Travel project in the library gives enthusiasm to students to connect with the past and reinforces their research skills while instilling respect for the past years. The librarian should choose one specific decade to highlight in the library and create an extravaganza that would allow memorabilia from that time period to be located without…

  2. 77 FR 5252 - Federal Travel Regulation; GSA E-Gov Travel Service (ETS) Transition to E-Gov Travel Service 2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... Travel Regulation; GSA E-Gov Travel Service (ETS) Transition to E-Gov Travel Service 2 (ETS2) AGENCY... (QMC), at [email protected]gov or (703) 605-2151. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Travel...-GOV TRAVEL SERVICE GSA Bulletin ETS 12-01 TO: Heads of Federal Agencies SUBJECT: GSA E-Gov Travel...

  3. Risk factors and pre-travel healthcare of international travellers attending a Dutch travel clinic: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Wieten, Rosanne W; van der Schalie, Maurice; Visser, Benjamin J; Grobusch, Martin P; van Vugt, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    The number of international travellers is currently estimated to exceed one billion annually. To address travel related health risks and facilitate risk reduction strategies, detailed knowledge of travellers' characteristics is important. In this cross-sectional study, data of a 20% sample of travellers visiting the Academic Medical Center (AMC) travel clinic Amsterdam from July 2011 to July 2012 was collected. Itineraries and protection versus exposure rates of preventable infectious diseases were mapped and reported according to STROBE guidelines. 1749 travellers were included. South-Eastern Asia, South-America and West-Africa were most frequently visited. 26.2% of the population had pre-existing medical conditions (often cardiovascular). Young and VFR travellers had a longer median travel time (28 and 30 days) compared to the overall population (21 days). Young adult travellers were relatively often vaccinated against hepatitis B (43.9% vs. 20.5%, p < .001) and rabies (16.6% vs. 4.3%, p < .001). VFRs were less often vaccinated against hepatitis B (11.6% vs. 30.6%, p < .001) and rabies (1.3% vs. 9.0%, p .012) compared to non-VFR travellers. Pre-travel guidelines were well adhered to. Young adult travellers had high-risk itineraries but were adequately protected. Improvement of hepatitis B and rabies protection would be desirable, specifically for VFRs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vaccination knowledge, attitude and practice among Chinese travelers who visit travel clinics in Preparation for international travel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Jianming; Hao, Yutong; Fan, ZhengXing; Li, Lei; Li, Yiguang; Ju, Wendong; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Mengzhang; Wu, Di; He, Hongtao

    2016-06-01

    Although international travel has become increasingly more common in main land China, few data are available on vaccination knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) among Chinese travelers. In each of 14 International Travel Healthcare Centers (ITHCs) situated in mainland China 200 volunteers were recruited for a cross-sectional investigation by questionnaire on KAP related to travel vaccinations. For the evaluation the study subjects were grouped by demographic data, past travel experience, travel destination, duration of stay abroad, purpose of travel. Among the 2,800 Chinese travelers who participated in the study, 67.1% were aware of national and travel vaccination recommendations. The knowledge about vaccine preventable diseases was low. The most common sources (73.4%) of information were requirements by destination countries obtained in connection with the visa application, Chinese companies employing workers/laborers for assignments overseas, and foreign schools. The overall acceptance rate of recommended vaccines was 68.7%, but yellow fever was accepted by 99.8% of the participants when recommended. Among 81.1% respondents who recalled to have received vaccinations in the past, only 25.9% of them brought the old vaccination records with them to their ITHC consultations. The results indicate that increased awareness of the importance of pre-travel vaccination is needed among the travellers in order to improve their KAP. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Demographics, health and travel characteristics of international travellers at a pre-travel clinic in Marseille, France.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Camille; Gaudart, Jean; Gaillard, Catherine; Delmont, Jean; Parola, Philippe; Brouqui, Philippe; Gautret, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    With the aim to identify at-risk individuals among a cohort of international travellers, 3442 individuals who sought advice at Marseille travel health centre in 2009 were prospectively included. Demographics, travel characteristics, chronic medical conditions, vaccinations and antimalarial chemoprophylaxis were documented. Chronic medical conditions were reported by 11% of individuals, including hypertension (39%), asthma (20%), thyroid disease (15%) and depression (13%). 4% reported taking a daily medication, and psychotropic and cardiovascular medications were the most commonly used. Older travellers (≥60 years) accounted for 10% of the travellers and the prevalence of chronic medical conditions was 27% in this group. Individuals aged 15 years or less accounted for 13% of the travellers. Age, last minute travel (17%) and neurological and psychiatric diseases were the most frequent factors that influenced Yellow fever vaccination and malaria chemoprophylaxis, with more than one tenth of the travellers reporting at least one risk factor for which adjusted advice may be necessary. Migrants visiting their relatives in their origin country accounted for 14% of travellers and 73% of this group travelled with their family including young children. We demonstrate that a significant proportion of travellers are at-risk (43%) because of their travel conditions (VFR), their age, or their health status, and should be targeted for risk reduction strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 75 FR 63184 - Temporary Duty (TDY) Travel Allowances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ... agency travel programs, save money on travel costs, better protect the environment, and conserve natural... these strategies into their travel management policies, procedures, and activities related to official...

  7. Estimating the Effects of Urban Travel Policies

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1976-04-01

    The report presents models and procedures for quick evaluation of transportation policy options on urban travel behavior. The methods described in this report can be used to estimate the travel demand effects of a wide variety of transportation polic...

  8. Saint Louis region : small sample travel survey

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1991-02-01

    This report summarizes results of the St. Louis Region Small Sample Travel Survey. A total of 1,446 households participated in the survey, which was designed to collect travel characteristics data from residents of the St. Louis metropolitan region. ...

  9. North American trade and travel trends

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-03-01

    Canada and Mexico are the United States largest trading and travel partnersaccounting for one-third of the value of U.S. international tradeand are the top destinations for Americans traveling abroad. Since the North American Free Trade Agre...

  10. Report: EPA Travel Program Lacks Necessary Controls

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #10-P-0078, March 9, 2010. The EPA travel program, which comprises EPA policies and GovTrip, lacks necessary control procedures to assure all travel authorizations were necessary and in the best interest of the government.

  11. Bellevue Smart Traveler And Cellular Telecommunication

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1993-05-01

    SEATTLE (BELLEVUE) SMART TRAVELER OR SST : PHASE I OF THE BELLEVUE SMART TRAVELER PROJECT WAS FUNDED BY THE FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE ADVANCED PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS (APTS) PROGRAM. THE GRANTEE, THE MUNICIPALITY OF METROPOLIT...

  12. 511 travel information service development & documentation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-10-01

    "511 New York was deployed as a free, comprehensive travel information system geared to meet the multimodal needs of commuters, long-distance and local travelers, tourists and commercial-vehicle operators. The up-to-the-minute, comprehensive transpor...

  13. The practice of travel medicine in Europe.

    PubMed

    Schlagenhauf, P; Santos-O'Connor, F; Parola, P

    2010-03-01

    Europe, because of its geographical location, strategic position on trade routes, and colonial past, has a long history of caring for travellers' health. Within Europe, there is great diversity in the practice of travel medicine. Some countries have travel medicine societies and provisions for a periodic distribution of recommendations, but many countries have no national pre-travel guidelines and follow international recommendations such as those provided by the WHO. Providers of travel medicine include tropical medicine specialists, general practice nurses and physicians, specialist 'travel clinics', occupational physicians, and pharmacists. One of the core functions of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control-funded network of travel and tropical medicine professionals, EuroTravNet, is to document the status quo of travel medicine in Europe. A three-pronged approach is used, with a real-time online questionnaire, a structured interview with experts in each country, and web searching.

  14. University of Maryland MRSEC - For Members: Travel

    Educational Education Pre-College Programs Homeschool Programs Undergraduate & Graduate Programs Teacher University of Maryland requires pre-approval for all travel. Domestic travel approval requests must be

  15. Network Structure and Travel Time Perception

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathi, Pavithra; Levinson, David; Hochmair, Hartwig

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to test the systematic variation in the perception of travel time among travelers and relate the variation to the underlying street network structure. Travel survey data from the Twin Cities metropolitan area (which includes the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul) is used for the analysis. Travelers are classified into two groups based on the ratio of perceived and estimated commute travel time. The measures of network structure are estimated using the street network along the identified commute route. T-test comparisons are conducted to identify statistically significant differences in estimated network measures between the two traveler groups. The combined effect of these estimated network measures on travel time is then analyzed using regression models. The results from the t-test and regression analyses confirm the influence of the underlying network structure on the perception of travel time. PMID:24204932

  16. Dynamic travel time estimation using regression trees.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-10-01

    This report presents a methodology for travel time estimation by using regression trees. The dissemination of travel time information has become crucial for effective traffic management, especially under congested road conditions. In the absence of c...

  17. Network structure and travel time perception.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathi, Pavithra; Levinson, David; Hochmair, Hartwig

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to test the systematic variation in the perception of travel time among travelers and relate the variation to the underlying street network structure. Travel survey data from the Twin Cities metropolitan area (which includes the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul) is used for the analysis. Travelers are classified into two groups based on the ratio of perceived and estimated commute travel time. The measures of network structure are estimated using the street network along the identified commute route. T-test comparisons are conducted to identify statistically significant differences in estimated network measures between the two traveler groups. The combined effect of these estimated network measures on travel time is then analyzed using regression models. The results from the t-test and regression analyses confirm the influence of the underlying network structure on the perception of travel time.

  18. Travel Recommendations for the Nursing Mother

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Breastfeeding Information for Families Breastfeeding Hotline The HHS Office ... Related Topics Diabetes Nutrition Travel Recommendations for the Nursing Mother Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Travel ...

  19. Safe travels? HIV transmission among Britons travelling abroad.

    PubMed

    Rice, B; Gilbart, V L; Lawrence, J; Smith, R; Kall, M; Delpech, V

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the study was to identify and describe the characteristics of persons born in the UK who acquire HIV infection abroad. Analyses using case reports and follow-up data from the national HIV database held at the Health Protection Agency were performed. Fifteen per cent (2066 of 13 891) of UK-born adults diagnosed in England, Wales and Northern Ireland between 2002 and 2010 acquired HIV infection abroad. Thailand (534), the USA (117) and South Africa (108) were the countries most commonly reported. As compared with UK-born adults acquiring HIV infection in the UK, those acquiring HIV infection abroad were significantly (P < 0.01) more likely to have acquired it heterosexually (70% vs. 22%, respectively), to be of older age at diagnosis (median 42 years vs. 36 years, respectively), and to have reported sex with a commercial sex worker (5.6% vs. 1%, respectively). Among men infected in Thailand, 11% reported sex with a commercial sex worker. A substantial number of UK-born adults are acquiring HIV infection in countries with generalized HIV epidemics, and in common holiday destinations. Of particular concern is the high proportion of men infected reporting sex with a commercial sex worker. We recommend HIV prevention and testing efforts be extended to include travellers abroad, and that sexual health advice be provided routinely in travel health consultations and in occupational health travel advice packs, particularly to those travelling to high HIV prevalence areas and destinations for sex tourism. Safer sex messages should include an awareness of the potential detrimental health and social impacts of the sex industry. © 2012 British HIV Association.

  20. Recommended vaccines for international travelers to India.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ramesh; Khanna, Pardeep; Chawla, Suraj

    2014-06-18

    India's tourism industry generated 6.6% of the nation's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) during 2012. International travel to India is predicted to grow at an average annual rate of ~8% over the next decade. The number of foreign tourists has increased by 9% to 5.8 million. Approximately 8% of travelers to developing countries require medical care during or after travel; the main diagnoses are vaccine-preventable diseases. Travelers to India can be exposed to various infectious diseases; water-borne, water-related, and zoonotic diseases may be imported to India where the disease is not endemic. The World Health Organization (WHO) emphasizes that all international travelers should be up to date with routine vaccinations. The recommended vaccinations for travelers to India vary according to the traveler's age, immunization history, existing medical conditions, duration, legal requirements for entry into countries being visited, travelers preferences, and values. Travelers should consult with a doctor so that there is sufficient time for completion of optimal vaccination schedules. No matter where traveling, one should be aware of potential exposure to certain organisms that can cause severely illnesses, even death. There is no doubt that vaccines have reduced or virtually eliminated many diseases that killed or severely disabled children and adults just a few generations ago. Thus, travelers must take recommended vaccines per schedule before traveling to India.

  1. Recommended vaccines for international travelers to India.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ramesh; Khanna, Pardeep; Chawla, Suraj

    2015-01-01

    India's tourism industry generated 6.6% of the nation's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) during 2012. International travel to India is predicted to grow at an average annual rate of ∼ 8% over the next decade. The number of foreign tourists has increased by 9% to 5.8 million. Approximately 8% of travelers to developing countries require medical care during or after travel; the main diagnoses are vaccine-preventable diseases. Travelers to India can be exposed to various infectious diseases; water-borne, water-related, and zoonotic diseases may be imported to India where the disease is not endemic. The World Health Organization (WHO) emphasizes that all international travelers should be up to date with routine vaccinations. The recommended vaccinations for travelers to India vary according to the traveler's age, immunization history, existing medical conditions, duration, legal requirements for entry into countries being visited, travelers preferences, and values. Travelers should consult with a doctor so that there is sufficient time for completion of optimal vaccination schedules. No matter where traveling, one should be aware of potential exposure to certain organisms that can cause severely illnesses, even death. There is no doubt that vaccines have reduced or virtually eliminated many diseases that killed or severely disabled children and adults just a few generations ago. Thus, travelers must take recommended vaccines per schedule before traveling to India.

  2. Family structure and its relationship to travel

    Christine Cornell McCreedy; Joseph T. O' Leary; Daniel Fesenmaier

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between family structure and travel to further understand what differences exist between family groups. Results indicate that the absence of a husband delays travel for single mothers and that they are not as well-off as their married counterparts. We examine other travel and leisure studies to make comparisons with these data,...

  3. The Traveler with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Willen, Shaina M.; Thornburg, Courtney D.; Lantos, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common genetic disease among persons with African ancestry. This article provides a background on SCD and reviews many important aspects of travel preparation in this population. Methods The medical literature was searched for studies about travel-associated preparedness and complications in individuals with SCD. Topics researched included malaria, bacterial infections, vaccinations, dehydration, altitude, air travel, and travel preparedness. Results There is very little published literature that specifically addresses the risks faced by travelers with SCD. Rates of medical complications during travel appear to be high. There is a body of literature that describes complications of SCD in indigenous populations, particularly within Africa. The generalizability of these data to a traveler are uncertain. Combining these sources of data and the broader medical literature we address major travel-related questions that may face a provider preparing an individual with SCD for safe travel. Conclusions Travelers with SCD face considerable medical risks when traveling to developing tropical countries; these include malaria, bacterial infections, hypovolemia, and sickle cell-associated vaso-occlusive crises. Frank counseling about risks, vigilant preventative measures, and contingency planning for illness while abroad are necessary parts of the pre-travel visit for individuals with SCD. PMID:24947546

  4. 5 CFR 630.207 - Travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Travel time. 630.207 Section 630.207... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave § 630.207 Travel time. The travel time granted an employee under section 6303(d) of title 5, United States Code, is inclusive of the time necessarily...

  5. 5 CFR 630.207 - Travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Travel time. 630.207 Section 630.207... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave § 630.207 Travel time. The travel time granted an employee under section 6303(d) of title 5, United States Code, is inclusive of the time necessarily...

  6. 5 CFR 630.207 - Travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Travel time. 630.207 Section 630.207... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave § 630.207 Travel time. The travel time granted an employee under section 6303(d) of title 5, United States Code, is inclusive of the time necessarily...

  7. 5 CFR 630.207 - Travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Travel time. 630.207 Section 630.207... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave § 630.207 Travel time. The travel time granted an employee under section 6303(d) of title 5, United States Code, is inclusive of the time necessarily...

  8. Summer Travel: Plan Ahead To Stay Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twery says. “It’s especially important before and during travel to consciously schedule time to sleep.” Too little sleep leads to poor ... and their ability to meet the challenges of travel.” Jet lag is another sleep concern for travelers crossing multiple time zones. Jet lag is often more severe for ...

  9. 5 CFR 630.207 - Travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Travel time. 630.207 Section 630.207... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave § 630.207 Travel time. The travel time granted an employee under section 6303(d) of title 5, United States Code, is inclusive of the time necessarily...

  10. 28 CFR 2.41 - Travel approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Travel approval. 2.41 Section 2.41..., YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.41 Travel approval. (a) The probation officer may approve travel outside the district without approval of the...

  11. 20 CFR 617.46 - Travel allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Travel allowance. 617.46 Section 617.46... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Relocation Allowances § 617.46 Travel allowance. (a) Computation. The amount of travel allowance (including lodging and meals) payable under § 617.45(a)(1) shall...

  12. 32 CFR 726.6 - Travel orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Travel orders. 726.6 Section 726.6 National... MENTALLY INCOMPETENT MEMBERS OF THE NAVAL SERVICE § 726.6 Travel orders. The Chief of Naval Personnel or the Deputy Commandant, Manpower & Reserve Affairs, may issue travel orders to a member to appear...

  13. 38 CFR 21.7103 - Travel expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Travel expenses. 21.7103...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION All Volunteer Force Educational Assistance Program (Montgomery GI Bill-Active Duty) Counseling § 21.7103 Travel expenses. (a) Travel for veterans and servicemembers. (1...

  14. Travellers' profile, travel patterns and vaccine practices--a 10-year prospective study in a Swiss Travel Clinic.

    PubMed

    Boubaker, Rim; Meige, Pierrette; Mialet, Catherine; Buffat, Chantal Ngarambe; Uwanyiligira, Mediatrice; Widmer, Francine; Rochat, Jacynthe; Fossati, Annie Hérard; Souvannaraj-Blanchant, Manisinh; Payot, Sylvie; Rochat, Laurence; de Vallière, Serge; Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    The travel clinic in Lausanne serves a catchment area of 700 000 of inhabitants and provides pre- and post-travel consultations. This study describes the profile of attendees before departure, their travel patterns and the travel clinic practices in terms of vaccination over time. We included all pre-travel first consultation data recorded between November 2002 and December 2012 by a custom-made program DIAMM/G. We analysed client profiles, travel characteristics and vaccinations prescribed over time. Sixty-five thousand and forty-six client-trips were recorded. Fifty-one percent clients were female. Mean age was 32 years. In total, 0.1% were aged <1 year and 0.2% ≥80 years. Forty-six percent of travellers had pre-existing medical conditions. Forty-six percent were travelling to Africa, 35% to Asia, 20% to Latin America and 1% (each) to Oceania and Europe; 19% visited more than one country. India was the most common destination (9.6% of travellers) followed by Thailand (8.6%) and Kenya (6.4%). Seventy-three percent of travellers were planning to travel for ≤ 4 weeks. The main reasons for travel were tourism (75%) and visiting friends and relatives (18%). Sixteen percent were backpackers. Pre-travel advice were sought a median of 29 days before departure. Ninety-nine percent received vaccine(s). The most frequently administered vaccines were hepatitis A (53%), tetanus-diphtheria (46%), yellow fever (39%), poliomyelitis (38%) and typhoid fever (30%). The profile of travel clinic attendees was younger than the general Swiss population. A significant proportion of travellers received vaccinations that are recommended in the routine national programme. These findings highlight the important role of travel clinics to (i) take care of an age group that has little contact with general practitioners and (ii) update vaccination status. The most commonly prescribed travel-related vaccines were for hepatitis A and yellow fever. The question remains to know whether

  15. Respiratory infections during air travel.

    PubMed

    Leder, K; Newman, D

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of individuals undertake air travel annually. Issues regarding cabin air quality and the potential risks of transmission of respiratory infections during flight have been investigated and debated previously, but, with the advent of severe acute respiratory syndrome and influenza outbreaks, these issues have recently taken on heightened importance. Anecdotally, many people complain of respiratory symptoms following air travel. However, studies of ventilation systems and patient outcomes indicate the spread of pathogens during flight occurs rarely. In the present review, aspects of the aircraft cabin environment that affect the likelihood of transmission of respiratory pathogens on airplanes are outlined briefly and evidence for the occurrence of outbreaks of respiratory illness among airline passengers are reviewed.

  16. Dietary Advice for Airline Travel.

    PubMed

    Leggat; Nowak

    1997-03-01

    In addition to their regular meal service, most of the major domestic and international airlines offer special meals. It should be noted that regular meal services on international flights often give a choice of meals, even in economy class, and often include a salad and or fruit dish, which could be consumed by most people. More airlines also seem to be moving towards having at least one more culturally appropriate meal on the menu, particularly for relevant flight sectors. However, these meals may be inappropriate for some passengers, and there is a need for this special meals service. Meals services on airlines have improved greatly in recent years, particularly with the employment of consultant dietitians to the catering staff of airlines and advances in chef training. Special meal services are designed to cater to the most common variations of meals required by most passengers for medical, religious, or other reasons. The special requirements for these meals are described elsewhere.1 It is important to realize that the meals are designed and the ingredients interpreted by that airline, and may not necessarily reflect what the traveler might eat at home. So it is important to advise travelers not to have high expectations of this special meal service. This paper aims to provide some basic practical advice for selection of special diets for airline travelers.

  17. Traveling-wave induction launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David G.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of traveling-wave induction launchers shows that induction is a feasible method of producing armature current and that efficient accelerators can be built without sliding contacts or arcs. In a traveling-wave induction launcher the armature current is induced by a slip speed between the armature and a traveling magnetic field. At 9 m/s slip speed a 9 kg projectile with an aluminum armature weighing 25 percent of the total mass can be accelerated to 3000 m/s in a 5 m-long barrel with a total ohmic loss in the barrel coils and armature of 4 percent of the launch kinetic energy and with an average armature temperature rise of 220 deg C, but a peak excitation frequency of 8600 Hz is required. With a 2 kg launch mass the ohmic loss is 7 percent. A launcher system optimized for rotating generators would have a peak frequency of 4850 Hz; with an aluminum armature weighing 33 percent of the launch mass and a slip speed of 30 m/s the total ohmic loss in the generators, cables, and accelerator would be 43 percent of the launch kinetic energy, and the average armature temperature rise would be 510 deg C.

  18. Travel-related infections in children.

    PubMed

    Fox, Thomas G; Manaloor, John J; Christenson, John C

    2013-04-01

    Malaria, diarrhea, respiratory infections, and cutaneous larva migrans are common travel-related infections observed in children and adolescents returning from trips to developing countries. Children visiting friends and relatives are at the highest risk because few visit travel clinics before travel, their stays are longer, and the sites they visit are more rural. Clinicians must be able to prepare their pediatric-age travelers before departure with preventive education, prophylactic and self-treating medications, and vaccinations. Familiarity with the clinical manifestations and treatment of travel-related infections will secure prompt and effective therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. EPA’s Travel Efficiency Method (TEAM) AMPO Presentation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presentation describes EPA’s Travel Efficiency Assessment Method (TEAM) assessing potential travel efficiency strategies for reducing travel activity and emissions, includes reduction estimates in Vehicle Miles Traveled in four different geographic areas.

  20. [The profile of Israeli travelers to developing countries: perspectives of a travel clinic].

    PubMed

    Stienlauf, Shmuel; Meltzer, Eyal; Leshem, Eyal; Rendi-Wagner, Pamela; Schwartz, Eli

    2010-09-01

    The number of Israeli travelers is increasing, including the number of travelers to developing countries. This study aimed to characterize the profile of Israeli travelers to developing countries. Data regarding demographics, travel destinations, trip duration and the purpose of travel were collected on travelers attending the pre-travel clinic at the Sheba Medical Center during a period of 9 years. Between the dates 1/1/1999 and 31/12/2007, 42,771 travelers presented for consultation at the Sheba Medical Center pre-travel clinic. The average age was 30.8 +/- 13.4 years and 54% of the travelers were males. The female proportion increased from 42% in 1999 to 49% in 2006. There was a steady increase in the number of travelers attending our clinic, except in 2003 (coinciding with the SARS epidemic). Post-army backpackers (20-25 year-old age group) were only 43% of the travelers. Children (<18 years), and elderly (>60 years) comprised 4.4% and 4.6% of the travelers, respectively. The favorite destinations were Asia (55%), followed by Latin America (27%) and Africa (13%). The distribution of travel destinations varied significantly during the study period. Of note is the sharp decline in travel to Africa following the terrorist attack in Mombassa, Kenya (November 2002). The median trip duration changed during the study period, from 30 to 45 days, between 1999-2004 and 2005-2007 respectively. The majority (87%) of voyagers traveled for pleasure, 6% went for business, and 7% were representatives of governmental organizations. This study found an increasing diversity in the traveler population (more women, more children and older travelers) and more diversity in travel destinations. Disease outbreaks and terrorist attacks had transient negative impacts on the number of travelers.

  1. Profile of Travelers With Preexisting Medical Conditions Attending a Specialist Travel Medicine Clinic in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Han, Calvin Teo Jia; Flaherty, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Patients with complex medical comorbidities travel for protracted periods to remote destinations, often with limited access to medical care. Few descriptions are available of their preexisting health burden. This study aimed to characterize preexisting medical conditions and medications of travelers seeking pre-travel health advice at a specialized travel medicine clinic. Records of travelers attending the Galway Tropical Medical Bureau clinic between 2008 and 2014 were examined and information relating to past medical history was entered into a database. Data were recorded only where the traveler had a documented medical history and/or was taking medications. Of the 4,817 records available, 56% had a documented medical history and 24% listed medications. The majority of travelers with preexisting conditions were female. The mean age of the cohort was 31.68 years. The mean period remaining before the planned trip was 40 days. Southeast Asia was the most popular single destination, and 17% of travelers with medical conditions were traveling alone. The most frequently reported conditions were allergies (20%), insect bite sensitivity (15%), asthma (11%), psychiatric conditions (4%), and hypertension (3%). Of the 30 diabetic travelers, 14 required insulin; 4.5% of travelers were taking immunosuppressant drugs, including corticosteroids. Half of the female travelers were taking the oral contraceptive pill while 11 travelers were pregnant at the time of their pre-travel consultation. This study provides an insight into the medical profile of travelers attending a travel health clinic. The diverse range of diseases reported highlights the importance of educating physicians and nurses about the specific travel health risks associated with particular conditions. Knowledge of the effects of travel on underlying medical conditions will inform the pre-travel health consultation. © 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  2. The impact of injection anxiety on education of travelers about common travel risks.

    PubMed

    Noble, Lorraine M; Farquharson, Lorna; O'Dwyer, Niamh A; Behrens, Ron H

    2014-01-01

    Despite many travelers receiving at least one vaccination during the pre-travel consultation, little is known about travelers' fear of injections and the impact this may have on educating travelers about health risks associated with their trip. This study aimed to investigate: (1) the prevalence of injection anxiety in travelers attending a pre-travel consultation, (2) whether anxiety due to anticipating a vaccination adversely affects recall of information and advice, and (3) whether clinicians can recognize travelers' anxiety, and how they respond to anxious travelers. Consecutive adult travelers (N = 105) attending one of two inner-city travel clinics completed self-report measures of state anxiety, injection anxiety, and symptoms of needle phobia immediately before and after their pre-travel consultation. Clinicians were also asked to rate travelers' anxiety and report any anxiety management strategies. Standardized information was presented during the consultation and recall of information and advice was assessed immediately post-consultation. Delayed recall (24 hours) was assessed for a subsample (20%) of participants. More than one third of travelers reported feeling nervous or afraid when having an injection (39%). Travelers' state anxiety was related to their psychological and physiological reactions to needles, and reduced significantly post-consultation. Recall of information and advice varied, with failure of recall ranging from 2 to 70% across 15 items, and delayed recall being significantly lower. No relationship was found between recall and anxiety. Clinician-rated anxiety moderately correlated with travelers' self-reported anxiety. A significant proportion of travelers experienced injection anxiety when attending the pre-travel consultation, with some travelers reporting symptoms consistent with criteria for Blood Injection Injury phobia. There were important gaps in recall of information and advice about common travel risks. Although no

  3. Drug use, travel and HIV risk.

    PubMed

    Lee, D; Bell, D C; Hinojosa, M

    2002-08-01

    A study was conducted to examine the travel experiences of a community sample of 160 drug users and 44 non-users recruited as part of a study of HIV risk. Of the sample, 47% (96/204) reported intercity travel in the previous ten years. Results showed that men were more likely to travel than women, Anglos more than minorities, and young persons more than old. When travellers testing HIV-seropositive (n = 13) were compared with seronegative travellers, HIV-positive travellers reported more sex while travelling than HIV-negative persons, but virtually all of the difference reported involved sex with condoms. There were no significant differences in sex risk behaviours while travelling between drug users and non-drug users, or in sex risk behaviors between drug injectors and non-injectors. Travellers had fewer injection partners while travelling than they had while at home. There was also a significant difference in number of sex partners with whom a condom was not used, with fewer sex partners while travelling.

  4. Clostridium difficile infection in returning travellers.

    PubMed

    Michal Stevens, A; Esposito, Douglas H; Stoney, Rhett J; Hamer, Davidson H; Flores-Figueroa, Jose; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Connor, Bradley A; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Goorhuis, Abraham; Hynes, Noreen A; Libman, Michael; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; McCarthy, Anne E; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Schwartz, Eli; van Genderen, Perry J J; Scott Benson, L; Leung, Daniel T

    2017-05-01

    There is increasing recognition of the contribution of community-acquired cases to the global burden of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The epidemiology of CDI among international travellers is poorly understood, and factors associated with international travel, such as antibiotic use and changes in gut microbiota, could potentially put travellers at higher risk. We summarized demographic, travel-associated and geographic characteristics of travellers with CDI in the GeoSentinel database from 1997 to 2015. We also surveyed GeoSentinel sites to compare various testing indications, approaches, and diagnostic modalities. We identified 260 GeoSentinel records, including 187 that satisfied criteria for analysis (confirmed cases in non-immigrant travellers aged >2 years, seen <12 weeks post-travel). CDI was reported in all age groups and in travellers to all world regions; the largest proportions of cases having destinations in Asia (31%), Central/South America or the Caribbean (30%) and Africa (24%). Our site survey revealed substantial heterogeneity of testing approaches between sites; the most commonly used test was the C. difficile toxin gene PCR. CDI is encountered in returning international travellers, although there is considerable variability in testing practices. These data underscore the importance of awareness of C. difficile as a potential cause of travel-associated diarrhoea. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Business travelers: vaccination considerations for this population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin H; Leder, Karin; Wilson, Mary E

    2013-04-01

    Illness in business travelers is associated with reduced productivity on the part of the employee as well as the employer. Immunizations offer a reliable method of preventing infectious diseases for international business travelers. The authors review the travel patterns of business travelers, available data on illnesses they encounter, their potential travel-associated risks for vaccine-preventable diseases and recommendations on immunizations for this population. Routine vaccines (e.g., measles, tetanus and influenza) should be reviewed to assure that they provide current coverage. The combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccine with a rapid schedule offers options for those with time constraints. Other vaccine recommendations for business travelers need to focus on their destinations and activities and underlying health, taking into account the concept of cumulative risk for those with frequent travel, multiple trips or long stays.

  6. Travellers and influenza: risks and prevention.

    PubMed

    Goeijenbier, M; van Genderen, P; Ward, B J; Wilder-Smith, A; Steffen, R; Osterhaus, A D M E

    2017-01-01

    Influenza viruses are among the major causes of serious human respiratory tract infection worldwide. In line with the high disease burden attributable to influenza, these viruses play an important, but often neglected, role in travel medicine. Guidelines and recommendations regarding prevention and management of influenza in travellers are scarce. Of special interest for travel medicine are risk populations and also circumstances that facilitate influenza virus transmission and spread, like travel by airplane or cruise ship and mass gatherings. We conducted a PUBMED/MEDLINE search for a combination of the MeSH terms Influenza virus, travel, mass gathering, large scale events and cruise ship. In addition we gathered guidelines and recommendations from selected countries and regarding influenza prevention and management in travellers. By reviewing these search results in the light of published knowledge in the fields of influenza prevention and management, we present best practice advice for the prevention and management of influenza in travel medicine. Seasonal influenza is among the most prevalent infectious diseases in travellers. Known host-associated risk factors include extremes of age and being immune-compromised, while the most relevant environmental factors are associated with holiday cruises and mass gatherings. Pre-travel advice should address influenza and its prevention for travellers, whenever appropriate on the basis of the epidemiological situation concerned. Preventative measures should be strongly recommended for travellers at high-risk for developing complications. In addition, seasonal influenza vaccination should be considered for any traveller wishing to reduce the risk of incapacitation, particularly cruise ship crew and passengers, as well as those participating in mass gatherings. Besides advice concerning preventive measures and vaccination, advice on the use of antivirals may be considered for some travellers. © International Society of

  7. Travel agents and the prevention of health problems among travelers in Québec.

    PubMed

    Provost, Sylvie; Gaulin, Colette; Piquet-Gauthier, Blandine; Emmanuelli, Julien; Venne, Sylvie; Dion, Réjean; Grenier, Jean-Luc; Dessau, Jean-Claude; Dubuc, Martine

    2002-01-01

    Among the factors influencing travelers to seek preventive health advice before departure, the travel agent's recommendation plays an important role. The objective of our study was to document the practices and needs of travel agents in Québec (Canada) in relation to the prevention of health problems among travelers. In June 2000, a cross-sectional descriptive survey was carried out among travel agents from all travel agencies in Québec. One agent per agency was asked to answer our questions. Data were collected using a 32-item telephone questionnaire. Altogether, 708 travel agents from the 948 agencies contacted answered our questionnaire (participation rate: 75%). Most respondents (81%) believed that the travel agent has a role to play in the prevention of health problems among travelers, especially to recommend that travelers consult a travel clinic before departure. Although over 80% of the agents interviewed mentioned recommending a visit to a travel clinic before an organized tour to Thailand or a backpacking trip in Mexico, less than half said they make the same recommendation for a stay in a seaside resort in Mexico. The majority of respondents were acquainted with the services offered in travel health clinics, and these clinics were the source of travel health information most often mentioned by travel agents. However, nearly 60% of the agents questioned had never personally consulted a travel clinic. When asked about the best way to receive information about travelers' health, more than 40% of respondents favoured receiving information newsletters from public health departments regularly whereas 28% preferred the Internet. Despite the limits of this study, our results should help the public health network better target its interventions aimed to inform travel agents on prevention of health problems among travelers.

  8. A profile of travelers--an analysis from a large swiss travel clinic.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Silja; Rüegg, Rolanda; Steffen, Robert; Hatz, Christoph; Jaeger, Veronika K

    2014-01-01

    Globally, the Swiss have one of the highest proportions of the population traveling to tropical and subtropical countries. Large travel clinics serve an increasing number of customers with specific pre-travel needs including uncommon destinations and preexisting medical conditions. This study aims to identify health characteristics and travel patterns of travelers seeking advice in the largest Swiss travel clinic so that tailored advice can be delivered. A descriptive analysis was performed on pre-travel visits between July 2010 and August 2012 at the Travel Clinic of the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, Switzerland. A total of 22,584 travelers sought pre-travel advice. Tourism was the main reason for travel (17,875, 81.5%), followed by visiting friends and relatives (VFRs; 1,715, 7.8%), traveling for business (1,223, 5.6%), and "other reasons" (ie, volunteer work, pilgrimage, study abroad, and emigration; 1,112, 5.1%). The main travel destination was Thailand. In the VFR group, the highest proportions of traveling children (258, 15.1%) and of pregnant or breastfeeding women (23, 3.9%) were observed. Mental disorders were more prominent in VFRs (93, 5.4%) and in travel for "other reasons" (63, 5.7%). The latter stayed for the longest periods abroad; 272 (24.9%) stayed longer than 6 months. VFR travelers received the highest percentage of yellow fever vaccinations (523, 30.5%); in contrast, rabies (269, 24.2%) and typhoid vaccinations (279, 25.1%) were given more often to the "other travel reasons" group. New insights into the characteristics of a selected and large population of Swiss international travelers results in improved understanding of the special needs of an increasingly diverse population and, thus, in targeted preventive advice and interventions. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  9. What proportion of international travellers acquire a travel-related illness? A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Kristina M; Kozarsky, Phyllis E; Ryan, Edward T; Chen, Lin H; Sotir, Mark J

    2017-09-01

    As international travel increases, travellers may be at increased risk of acquiring infectious diseases not endemic in their home countries. Many journal articles and reference books related to travel medicine cite that between 22-64% of international travellers become ill during or after travel; however, this information is minimal, outdated and limited by poor generalizability. We aim to provide a current and more accurate estimate of the proportion of international travellers who acquire a travel-related illness. We identified studies via PubMed or travel medicine experts, published between January 1, 1976-December 31, 2016 that included the number of international travellers acquiring a travel-related illness. We excluded studies that focused on a single disease or did not determine a rate based on the total number of travellers. We abstracted information on traveller demographics, trip specifics, study enrollment and follow-up and number of ill travellers and their illnesses. Of 743 studies, nine met the inclusion criteria. The data sources were from North America (four studies) and Europe (five studies). Most travellers were tourists, the most frequent destination regions were Asia and Africa, and the median trip duration ranged from 8-21 days. Six studies enrolled participants at the travellers' pre-travel consultation. All studies collected data through either extraction from the medical record, weekly diaries, or pre- and post-travel questionnaires. Data collection timeframes varied by study. Between 6-87% of travellers became ill across all studies. Four studies provided the best estimate: between 43-79% of travellers who frequently visited developing nations (e.g. India, Tanzania, and Kenya) became ill; travellers most frequently reported diarrhoea. This is the most comprehensive assessment available on the proportion of international travellers that develop a travel-related illness. Additional cohort studies would provide needed data to more precisely

  10. Travel itinerary uncertainty and the pre-travel consultation--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Gerard; Md Nor, Muhammad Najmi

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessment relies on the accuracy of the information provided by the traveller. A questionnaire was administered to 83 consecutive travellers attending a travel medicine clinic. The majority of travellers was uncertain about destinations within countries, transportation or type of accommodation. Most travellers were uncertain if they would be visiting malaria regions. The degree of uncertainty about itinerary potentially impacts on the ability of the travel medicine specialist to perform an adequate risk assessment, select appropriate vaccinations and prescribe malaria prophylaxis. This study reveals high levels of traveller uncertainty about their itinerary which may potentially reduce the effectiveness of their pre-travel consultation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International society of travel medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Clostridium difficile infection in returning travellers

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A. Michal; Esposito, Douglas H.; Stoney, Rhett J.; Hamer, Davidson H.; Flores-Figueroa, Jose; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Connor, Bradley A.; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Goorhuis, Abraham; Hynes, Noreen A.; Libman, Michael; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; McCarthy, Anne E.; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Schwartz, Eli; van Genderen, Perry J.J.; Benson, L. Scott; Leung, Daniel T.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is increasing recognition of the contribution of community-acquired cases to the global burden of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The epidemiology of CDI among international travellers is poorly understood, and factors associated with international travel, such as antibiotic use and changes in gut microbiota, could potentially put travellers at higher risk. Methods We summarized demographic, travel-associated and geographic characteristics of travellers with CDI in the GeoSentinel database from 1997 to 2015. We also surveyed GeoSentinel sites to compare various testing indications, approaches, and diagnostic modalities. Results We identified 260 GeoSentinel records, including 187 that satisfied criteria for analysis (confirmed cases in non-immigrant travellers aged >2 years, seen <12 weeks post-travel). CDI was reported in all age groups and in travellers to all world regions; the largest proportions of cases having destinations in Asia (31%), Central/South America or the Caribbean (30%) and Africa (24%). Our site survey revealed substantial heterogeneity of testing approaches between sites; the most commonly used test was the C. difficile toxin gene PCR. Conclusions CDI is encountered in returning international travellers, although there is considerable variability in testing practices. These data underscore the importance of awareness of C. difficile as a potential cause of travel-associated diarrhoea. PMID:28355613

  12. Hepatitis B Vaccination Status among Japanese Travelers.

    PubMed

    Yaita, Kenichiro; Yahara, Koji; Sakai, Yoshiro; Iwahashi, Jun; Masunaga, Kenji; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2017-05-08

    This study clarified the characteristics of travelers who received hepatitis B vaccinations. Subjects were 233 Japanese travelers who visited our clinic prior to travel. We summarized the characteristics of the clients and performed two comparative studies: first, we compared a hepatitis B-vaccinated group with an unvaccinated group; second, we compared a group that had completed the hepatitis B vaccine series with a group that did not complete the series. The hepatitis B vaccine was administered to 152 clients. Factors positively associated with the hepatitis B vaccination (after adjusting for age and sex) included the following: travel for business or travel as an accompanying family member; travel to Asia; travel for a duration of a month or more; and, inclusion of the vaccine in a company or organization's payment plan. Meanwhile, factors negatively associated with the vaccination were travel for leisure or education, and travel to North America or Africa. Among 89 record-confirmed cases, only 53 completed 3 doses. The completion rate was negatively associated with the scheduled duration of travel if it was from a month to less than a year (after adjusting for age and sex). The present study provides a basis for promoting vaccination compliance more vigorously among Japanese adults.

  13. Travellers and influenza: risks and prevention

    PubMed Central

    van Genderen, P.; Ward, B. J.; Wilder-Smith, A.; Steffen, R.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Influenza viruses are among the major causes of serious human respiratory tract infection worldwide. In line with the high disease burden attributable to influenza, these viruses play an important, but often neglected, role in travel medicine. Guidelines and recommendations regarding prevention and management of influenza in travellers are scarce. Of special interest for travel medicine are risk populations and also circumstances that facilitate influenza virus transmission and spread, like travel by airplane or cruise ship and mass gatherings. Methods: We conducted a PUBMED/MEDLINE search for a combination of the MeSH terms Influenza virus, travel, mass gathering, large scale events and cruise ship. In addition we gathered guidelines and recommendations from selected countries and regarding influenza prevention and management in travellers. By reviewing these search results in the light of published knowledge in the fields of influenza prevention and management, we present best practice advice for the prevention and management of influenza in travel medicine. Results: Seasonal influenza is among the most prevalent infectious diseases in travellers. Known host-associated risk factors include extremes of age and being immune-compromised, while the most relevant environmental factors are associated with holiday cruises and mass gatherings. Conclusions: Pre-travel advice should address influenza and its prevention for travellers, whenever appropriate on the basis of the epidemiological situation concerned. Preventative measures should be strongly recommended for travellers at high-risk for developing complications. In addition, seasonal influenza vaccination should be considered for any traveller wishing to reduce the risk of incapacitation, particularly cruise ship crew and passengers, as well as those participating in mass gatherings. Besides advice concerning preventive measures and vaccination, advice on the use of antivirals may be considered for some

  14. On traveling waves in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Robert W; Budiansky, Bernard

    1954-01-01

    The basic equations of Timoshenko for the motion of vibrating nonuniform beams, which allow for effects of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia, are presented in several forms, including one in which the equations are written in the directions of the characteristics. The propagation of discontinuities in moment and shear, as governed by these equations, is discussed. Numerical traveling-wave solutions are obtained for some elementary problems of finite uniform beams for which the propagation velocities of bending and shear discontinuities are taken to be equal. These solutions are compared with modal solutions of Timoshenko's equations and, in some cases, with exact closed solutions. (author)

  15. Australian senior adventure travellers to Peru: Maximising older tourists' travel health experience.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Irmgard

    2012-03-01

    Financially comfortable, with ample spare time and much better health, older people travel more than ever and to more adventurous destinations. Taking Australian senior adventure travellers to Peru as an example, travel health preparations need to take into account the phenomenon 'senior traveller', the destination with its attractions and challenges, and age-related changes and restrictions. The need for routine travel health advice, vaccinations and prophylaxis remains unchanged. However, more emphasis should be placed on locality-specific issues so that age-appropriate advice and preparations maximize the chances for a safe and memorable travel experience. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Analysis of prevention of diseases in travellers on the basis of latest results in travel medicine].

    PubMed

    Felkai, Péter

    2008-09-07

    When we survey the possibilities of prevention in travel medicine, it is soon detected that the "classical" or "infectology-oriented" approach of prevention (vaccination - chemoprophylaxis - pretravel advice) cannot respond to all peritravel medical problems. These newly arisen challenges require a new, complex outlook for travel medicine, mainly in the field of prevention, treatment and management of travel-related illnesses. Although travellers are still exposed to various infectious diseases, which are mostly preventable by the primary prevention methods (biomedical prophylaxis), the majority of travellers suffer from non-infectious diseases and fall ill or suffer accident by other, travel-relating factors. Moreover, the predominant destination is Europe for an average Hungarian traveller. The travellers, whose destination is not any tropical or developing country, i.e. adventure travellers, people in extreme sports, chronic patients all require same-level peritravel (prevention-oriented) advice, too. Thus besides vaccination, helmets, salt-tablets, medical kit, mobile oxygenator must belong to a travel doctors' arsenal. We also have to mention the travellers' acute illness/accident abroad, travellers who require repatriation, and also the appropriate travel insurance policy which should be worked out following evidence-based medical considerations. The above-mentioned complex task requires not only a broad-spectrum, multidisciplinary knowledge, but an appropriate co-operation between the travel medicine physician, the general practitioner of the patient, and the doctor of the insurance company. But, above all, we have to redefine the topic of travel medicine, its subspecialties and role in the three-level (primary, secondary and tertiary) prevention. We have to redefine the different prevention levels and the used methods relating to the different subdisciplines of travel medicine. Upon the recent scientific researches, we can lay down four topics of travel

  17. Travel medicine: Part 1-The basics.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Kazuhiro; Birrer, Richard B; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2017-04-01

    International travels for tourism and business purposes continue to increase annually, while the global terrorism and the risk of lethal viral infections are currently real concerns. It is important that primary care physicians assess travel risk and adequately prepare the prospective traveler for trips. Appropriate vaccines should be administered and an emergency self-kit recommended. Patient should be educated about safe travel habits and a posttravel follow-up process established. Further, traveling healthcare professionals may be called upon to assist an ill patient at any time during their journey. In these 2-part special articles, we provide a practical brief summary of up-to-date travel medicine basics for primary care physicians.

  18. Medical oxygen and air travel.

    PubMed

    Lyznicki, J M; Williams, M A; Deitchman, S D; Howe, J P

    2000-08-01

    This report responds to a resolution that asked the American Medical Association (AMA) to take action to improve airport and airline accommodations for passengers requiring medical oxygen. Information for the report was derived from a search of the MEDLINE database and references listed in pertinent articles, as well as through communications with experts in aerospace and emergency medicine. Based on this information, the AMA Council on Scientific Affairs determined that commercial air travel exposes passengers to altitude-related hypoxia and gas expansion, which may cause some passengers to experience significant symptoms and medical complications during flight. Medical guidelines are available to help physicians evaluate and counsel potential passengers who are at increased risk of inflight hypoxemia. Supplemental oxygen may be needed for some passengers to maintain adequate tissue oxygenation and prevent hypoxemic complications. For safety and security reasons, federal regulations prohibit travelers from using their own portable oxygen system onboard commercial aircraft. Many U.S. airlines supply medical oxygen for use during flight but policies and procedures vary. Oxygen-dependent passengers must make additional arrangements for the use of supplemental oxygen in airports. Uniform standards are needed to specify procedures and equipment for the use of medical oxygen in airports and aboard commercial aircraft. Revision of federal regulations should be considered to accommodate oxygen-dependent passengers and permit them to have an uninterrupted source of oxygen from departure to destination.

  19. [Foodborne dermatosis after traveling: gnathostomiasis].

    PubMed

    Orduna, Tomás A; Lloveras, Susana C; Echazarreta, Sofía E; Garro, Santiago L; González, Gustavo D; Falcone, Claudia C

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of a 32-year-old man, resident in Buenos Aires, with dermatologic manifestations compatible with gnathostomiasis. The patient had traveled to Colombia in the month prior to the onset of symptoms. There, he repeatedly ate ceviche (raw fish marinated in lemon juice). He presented with an erythematous migratory panniculitis accompanied by eosinophilia. He underwent skin biopsy of a lesion and pathological diagnosis was "eosinophilic panniculitis". The triad of migratory panniculitis, eosinophilia and consume of raw fish during the trip to Colombia was suggestive of gnathostomiasis. Ivermectin treatment started out with good initial response but subsequent relapse. We performed a new treatment with the same drug with good results and no relapses during three years of follow up. The dermatological disease is common upon return from a trip, and is the third leading cause of morbidity in travelers. It is very important to recognize cutaneous manifestations of disease as many of them are potentially serious and may compromise the patient's life if not promptly diagnosed and treated.

  20. Diarrhea in the International Traveler.

    PubMed

    Duchini; Rodgers

    1999-06-01

    International travelers to developing countries have a 40% risk of developing a diarrheal illness, usually acute and occasionally chronic. Preventive measures, including diet and lifestyle modifications, are highly recommended but may not be sufficient. Prophylaxis with bismuth subsalicylate or an antimicrobial should be considered in travelers with immunodeficiencies, co-morbid conditions, achlorhydria, or those who cannot afford a loss of time. Oral rehydration is the primary goal of therapy. Bismuth-subsalicylate is a first-line agent for treatment of milder cases with less than three watery bowel movements per day and prominent nausea. Use of an antibiotic is indicated for more severe cases or in the presence of fever, dysentery, or severe dehydration. A short course of a quinolone is highly effective, safe and well tolerated. Antimicrobial resistance among enteropathogens is growing and appropriate therapeutic modifications should be considered according to specific geographic areas. Metronidazole may be empirically added in those cases that do not respond to quinolones. Specific guidelines for particular pathogens are highlighted.

  1. Travelers' Diarrhea and Other Gastrointestinal Symptoms Among Boston-Area International Travelers.

    PubMed

    Stoney, Rhett J; Han, Pauline V; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Wilson, Mary E; Jentes, Emily S; Benoit, Christine M; MacLeod, William B; Hamer, Davidson H; Chen, Lin H

    2017-06-01

    AbstractThis prospective cohort study describes travelers' diarrhea (TD) and non-TD gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms among international travelers from the Boston area, the association of TD with traveler characteristics and dietary practices, use of prescribed antidiarrheal medications, and the impact of TD and non-TD GI symptoms on planned activities during and after travel. We included adults who received a pre-travel consultation at three Boston-area travel clinics and who completed a three-part survey: pre-travel, during travel, and post-travel (2-4 weeks after return). TD was defined as self-reported diarrhea with or without nausea/vomiting, abdominal pain, or fever. Demographic and travel characteristics were evaluated by χ 2 test for categorical and Wilcoxon rank-sum test for continuous variables. Analysis of dietary practices used logistic generalized estimating equation models or logistic regression models. Of 628 travelers, 208 (33%) experienced TD and 45 (7%) experienced non-TD GI symptoms. Of 208 with TD, 128 (64%), 71 (36%), and 123 (62%) were prescribed ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, and/or loperamide before travel, respectively. Thirty-nine (36%) of 108 took ciprofloxacin, 20 (38%) of 55 took azithromycin, and 28 (28%) of 99 took loperamide during travel. Of 172 with TD during travel, 24% stopped planned activities, and 2% were hospitalized. Of 31 with non-TD GI symptoms during travel, six (13%) stopped planned activities. International travelers continue to experience diarrhea and other GI symptoms, resulting in disruption of planned activities and healthcare visits for some. Although these illnesses resulted in interruption of travel plans, a relatively small proportion took prescribed antibiotics.

  2. Travelers' Diarrhea and Other Gastrointestinal Symptoms Among Boston-Area International Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Stoney, Rhett J.; Han, Pauline V.; Barnett, Elizabeth D.; Wilson, Mary E.; Jentes, Emily S.; Benoit, Christine M.; MacLeod, William B.; Hamer, Davidson H.; Chen, Lin H.

    2017-01-01

    This prospective cohort study describes travelers' diarrhea (TD) and non-TD gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms among international travelers from the Boston area, the association of TD with traveler characteristics and dietary practices, use of prescribed antidiarrheal medications, and the impact of TD and non-TD GI symptoms on planned activities during and after travel. We included adults who received a pre-travel consultation at three Boston-area travel clinics and who completed a three-part survey: pre-travel, during travel, and post-travel (2–4 weeks after return). TD was defined as self-reported diarrhea with or without nausea/vomiting, abdominal pain, or fever. Demographic and travel characteristics were evaluated by χ2 test for categorical and Wilcoxon rank-sum test for continuous variables. Analysis of dietary practices used logistic generalized estimating equation models or logistic regression models. Of 628 travelers, 208 (33%) experienced TD and 45 (7%) experienced non-TD GI symptoms. Of 208 with TD, 128 (64%), 71 (36%), and 123 (62%) were prescribed ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, and/or loperamide before travel, respectively. Thirty-nine (36%) of 108 took ciprofloxacin, 20 (38%) of 55 took azithromycin, and 28 (28%) of 99 took loperamide during travel. Of 172 with TD during travel, 24% stopped planned activities, and 2% were hospitalized. Of 31 with non-TD GI symptoms during travel, six (13%) stopped planned activities. International travelers continue to experience diarrhea and other GI symptoms, resulting in disruption of planned activities and healthcare visits for some. Although these illnesses resulted in interruption of travel plans, a relatively small proportion took prescribed antibiotics. PMID:28719282

  3. Trends and characteristics among HIV-infected and diabetic travelers seeking pre-travel advice.

    PubMed

    Elfrink, Floor; van den Hoek, Anneke; Sonder, Gerard J B

    2014-01-01

    The number of individuals with a chronic disease increases. Better treatment options have improved chronic patients' quality of life, likely increasing their motivation for travel. This may have resulted in a change in the number of HIV-infected travelers and/or travelers with Diabetes Mellitus (DM) visiting our travel clinic. We retrospectively analyzed the database of the travel clinic of the Public Health Service Amsterdam, between January 2001 and December 2011 and examined the records for patients with these conditions. Of the 25,000 travelers who consult our clinic annually, the proportion of travelers with HIV or DM has increased significantly. A total of 564 HIV-infected travelers visited our clinic. The mean age was 41 years, 86% were male, 43% visited a yellow fever endemic country and 46.5% had a CD4 count <500 cells/mm(3). Travelers with low CD4 counts traveled significantly more often to visit friends or relatives. A total of 3704 diabetics visited our clinic. The mean age was 55 years, 52% were male, 27% visited a yellow fever endemic country and 36% were insulin-dependent. Insulin-dependent diabetics traveled more often for work than non-insulin-dependent diabetics. Adequately trained and qualified travel health professionals and up-to-date guidelines for travelers with chronic diseases are of increasing importance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Do travel clinic visitors read information on sexual risk abroad in travel health brochures?

    PubMed Central

    Croughs, Mieke; de Gouw, Annemarie; Remmen, Roy; Van den Ende, Jef

    2016-01-01

    Background: A substantial proportion of travel clinic visitors have sexual encounters while abroad. Hence, guidelines on travel health recommend discussing sexual risk in a pre-travel consultation. However, previous studies showed that it often is not discussed. Although travel clinic visitors usually do receive written information on sexual risk abroad, few data are available on whether this information is read. Therefore, this prospective cohort study in travel clinic visitors was performed. Methods: Travel clinic visitors were invited to complete a questionnaire after return from their journey. Results: A total of 130 travellers (55%) responded. Half of them recorded they read the information on sexual risk. Male gender (OR 9.94 95% CI 3.12 – 31.63) and ‘travelling with others’ (OR 2.7 95% CI 1.29 – 5.78) were significant independent predictors of reading the information on sexual risk. High risk travellers, i.e. those travelling without a steady partner, were less likely to have read it. Although websites and apps were mentioned as better methods of providing information, none of the participants visited the websites on sexual behaviour and sexually transmitted infections recommended in the travel health brochure. Conclusion: Only half of travel clinic visitors read information on sexual risk in the health brochure received in the clinic and none of them visited the related websites mentioned in the brochure. Further research to identify the most effective way to inform travellers about sexual risk is needed. PMID:28989499

  5. Travel health preparation and travel-related morbidity of splenectomised individuals.

    PubMed

    Boeddha, Christien; de Graaf, Wilmar; Overbosch, David; van Genderen, Perry J J

    2012-07-01

    Asplenic or hyposplenic patients are at an increased risk of encapsulated bacterial and intraerythrocytic parasitic infections, which are endemic at many travel destinations. With proper travel health advice and preparation splenectomised individuals could have comparable travel-related morbidity as healthy control subjects. We conducted a prospective case-control study with 21 travel pairs. Each pair consisted of a splenectomised patient (case) and a healthy, non-splenectomised travel companion (control) in order to match for travel destination, duration and potential exposures to travel-related health risks. All participants filled out a questionnaire detailing travel health preparation including vaccination and malaria prophylaxis as well as travel-related morbidity. Cases and controls were comparable for age and gender. Cases received significantly more information about on demand use of antibiotics in case of fever. Immunisation coverage against encapsulated bacteria and adherence to malaria prophylaxis guidelines was suboptimal. There were no significant differences in the occurrence of travel-related ailments nor differences in severity of ailments. The immunisation coverage against encapsulated bacteria and adherence to malaria prophylaxis guidelines was suboptimal in some splenectomised patients and should be improved. Strict adherence to national travel health advice guidelines and specific guidelines for asplenic patients is advisable. However, with regard to travel-related morbidity there are no significant differences in morbidity between splenectomised patients and healthy controls, at least in the setting of short-term travel. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Do travel clinic visitors read information on sexual risk abroad in travel health brochures?

    PubMed

    Croughs, Mieke; de Gouw, Annemarie; Remmen, Roy; Van den Ende, Jef

    2017-01-01

    A substantial proportion of travel clinic visitors have sexual encounters while abroad. Hence, guidelines on travel health recommend discussing sexual risk in a pre-travel consultation. However, previous studies showed that it often is not discussed. Although travel clinic visitors usually do receive written information on sexual risk abroad, few data are available on whether this information is read. Therefore, this prospective cohort study in travel clinic visitors was performed. Travel clinic visitors were invited to complete a questionnaire after return from their journey. A total of 130 travellers (55%) responded. Half of them recorded they read the information on sexual risk. Male gender (OR 9.94 95% CI 3.12 - 31.63) and 'travelling with others' (OR 2.7 95% CI 1.29 - 5.78) were significant independent predictors of reading the information on sexual risk. High risk travellers, i.e. those travelling without a steady partner, were less likely to have read it. Although websites and apps were mentioned as better methods of providing information, none of the participants visited the websites on sexual behaviour and sexually transmitted infections recommended in the travel health brochure. Only half of travel clinic visitors read information on sexual risk in the health brochure received in the clinic and none of them visited the related websites mentioned in the brochure. Further research to identify the most effective way to inform travellers about sexual risk is needed.

  7. 38 CFR 60.5 - Travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Travel. 60.5 Section 60.5... TEMPORARY LODGING § 60.5 Travel. As a condition for receiving temporary lodging under this part, a veteran must be required to travel either 50 or more miles, or at least two hours from his or her home to the...

  8. Standardized training in nurse model travel clinics.

    PubMed

    Sofarelli, Theresa A; Ricks, Jane H; Anand, Rahul; Hale, Devon C

    2011-01-01

    International travel plays a significant role in the emergence and redistribution of major human diseases. The importance of travel medicine clinics for preventing morbidity and mortality has been increasingly appreciated, although few studies have thus far examined the management and staff training strategies that result in successful travel-clinic operations. Here, we describe an example of travel-clinic operation and management coordinated through the University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases. This program, which involves eight separate clinics distributed statewide, functions both to provide patient consult and care services, as well as medical provider training and continuing medical education (CME). Initial training, the use of standardized forms and protocols, routine chart reviews and monthly continuing education meetings are the distinguishing attributes of this program. An Infectious Disease team consisting of one medical doctor (MD) and a physician assistant (PA) act as consultants to travel nurses who comprise the majority of clinic staff. Eight clinics distributed throughout the state of Utah serve approximately 6,000 travelers a year. Pre-travel medical services are provided by 11 nurses, including 10 registered nurses (RNs) and 1 licensed practical nurse (LPN). This trained nursing staff receives continuing travel medical education and participate in the training of new providers. All nurses have completed a full training program and 7 of the 11 (64%) of clinic nursing staff serve more than 10 patients a week. Quality assurance measures show that approximately 0.5% of charts reviewed contain a vaccine or prescription error which require patient notification for correction. Using an initial training program, standardized patient intake forms, vaccine and prescription protocols, preprinted prescriptions, and regular CME, highly trained nurses at travel clinics are able to provide standardized pre-travel care to

  9. [Mental Space Navigation and Mental Time Travel].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2017-11-01

    We examined patients with mental space navigation or mental time travel disorder to identify regions in the brain that may play a critical role in mental time travel in terms of clinical neuropsychology. These regions included the precneus, posterior cingulate gyrus, retrosplenial cortex, and hippocampus, as well as the orbitofrontal cortex: the anterior and posterior medial areas were both shown to be important in this process. Further studies are required to define whether these form a network for mental time travel.

  10. Vaccination for safe travel to India.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Bharti; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Kumar, Vijay; Singh Choudhary, Satvinder

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide more than 900 million international journeys are undertaken every year. India is one of the favorite tourist destinations around the world. International travel exposes travelers to a range of health risks. Traveling to India possess a threat to travelers with waterborne diseases like bacterial diarrhea, hepatitis A and E, and typhoid fever; vector borne diseases like dengue fever, Japanese encephalitis, and malaria; animal contact disease like rabies. Furthermore diseases spreading through behavior aspects cannot be ruled out hence posing a risk for hepatitis B, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C as well. Hence, before travel the travelers are advised about the risk of disease in the country or countries they plan to visit and the steps to be taken to prevent illness. Vaccination offers the possibility of avoiding a number of infectious diseases that may be countered abroad. There is no single vaccination schedule that fits all travelers. Each schedule must be individualized according to the traveler's previous immunizations, countries to be visited, type and duration of travel, and the amount of time available before departure.

  11. Approach to Immunization for the Traveling Child.

    PubMed

    Myers, Angela L; Christenson, John C

    2015-12-01

    Children are traveling to regions of the world that could pose a risk of acquiring diseases such as malaria, dermatosis, and infectious diarrhea. Most of these can be prevented by modifying high-risk behaviors or through the use of medications. Many of these same regions are endemic with diseases that are preventable through vaccination. Clinicians must be able to effectively prepare their pediatric-age travelers for international travel. Preventive education, prophylactic and self-treating medications, and vaccinations are all important components of this preparation. Familiarity with the use of travel vaccines is imperative. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prospects for dengue vaccines for travelers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Travel-acquired dengue cases have been increasing as the overall global dengue burden has expanded. In Korea, imported dengue cases have been reported since 2000 when it first became a notifiable disease. During the first four months of 2016, three times more dengue cases were reported in Korea than during the same period the previous year. A safe and efficacious vaccine for travelers would be beneficial to prevent dengue disease in individual travelers and potentially decrease the risk of virus spread to non-endemic areas. Here, we summarize the characteristics of dengue vaccines for travelers and review dengue vaccines currently licensed or in clinical development. PMID:27489798

  13. Health preparations and travel-related morbidity of kidney transplant recipients traveling to developing countries.

    PubMed

    Roukens, A H E; van Dissel, J T; de Fijter, J W; Visser, L G

    2007-01-01

    A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted among Dutch kidney transplant recipients to investigate travel health knowledge, attitudes and practices while staying abroad. A total of 290 individuals visiting the nephrology outpatient clinic completed the questionnaires. Thirty four percent of the responders had traveled outside Western Europe (WE) and Northern America (NA); 22% of these travelers did not seek pre-travel health advice. Transplant physicians were most frequently consulted for pre-travel advice (53%). Of the responders traveling outside WE and NA 29% were ill during their most recent journey. Diabetic transplant recipients were at the highest risk. Four of seventeen ill recipients (24%) were hospitalized, reflecting the high morbidity of travel-related disease in this patient group. Our data show that there is need for improvement of pre-travel healthcare, and suggest an important role for transplant physicians in providing adequate counseling.

  14. Analyzing the travel behavior of home-based workers in the 1991 Caltrans Statewide Travel Survey

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-10-01

    This study compares the travel patterns of three different groups of workers identified in the 1991 Caltrans Statewide Travel Survey: home based business (HBB) workers, home based telecommuters (HBT), and non-home based (NHB) workers. HBB workers hav...

  15. Global Positioning Systems for Personal Travel Surveys - Lexington Area Travel Data Collection Test: Appendixes

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-15

    Personal travel and how it changes is of continuing concern to transportation : planners and policy makers. This project, Global Positioning Systems for : Personal Travel Surveys, would combine self-reported information with GPS : recorded informatio...

  16. San Francisco Bay Area 1990 Regional Travel Characteristics, Working Paper #4: 1990 MTC Travel Survey

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1994-12-01

    This working paper is the fourth in a series to document analysis and results : from the 1990 MTC household travel survey. Previous working papers on the 1990 : travel survey covered survey design issues, sample weighting and expansion, and : trip li...

  17. Effectiveness of different approaches to disseminating traveler information on travel time reliability. [supporting datasets

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-11-30

    Travel time reliability information includes static data about traffic speeds or trip times that capture historic variations from day to day, and it can help individuals understand the level of variation in traffic. Unlike real-time travel time infor...

  18. Challenges to providing pre-travel care for travellers visiting friends and relatives: an audit of a specialist travel medicine clinic.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Kate; Chaves, Nadia; Leder, Karin

    2017-09-01

    Travellers visiting friends and relatives (VFRs) often have complex pre-travel needs. We identified the characteristics, destinations, vaccinations and pre-travel advice provided to VFRs and compared these with non-VFR travellers. The significant differences we found suggest that future research should focus on improving the uptake of recommended interventions in VFR travellers. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. KEY COMPARISON Bilateral comparison of 1.018 V and 10 V standards between the NSAI-NML (Ireland) and the BIPM, March to April 2010 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, O.; Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.

    2010-01-01

    As a part of the ongoing BIPM key comparisons BIPM.EM-K11.a and b, a comparison of the 1.018 V and 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and of the National Standards Authority of Ireland-National Metrology Laboratory (NSAI-NML), Dublin, Ireland, was carried out from March to April 2010. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards were transported by freight to NSAI-NML. At NSAI-NML, the reference standard for DC voltage is maintained at the 10 V level by means of a group of characterized Zener diode-based electronic voltage standards. The output EMF of each travelling standard, at the 10 V output terminals, was measured by direct comparison with the group standard. Measurements of the output EMF of the travelling standards at the 1.018 V output terminals were made using a potentiometer, standardized against the local 10 V reference standard. At the BIPM, the travelling standards were calibrated at both voltages before and after the measurements at NSAI-NML, using the BIPM Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages on internal temperature and ambient pressure. The comparison results show that the voltage standards maintained by NSAI-NML and the BIPM were equivalent, within their stated expanded uncertainties, on the mean date of the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  20. A travel clinic in your office: grow your practice and protect international travelers.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Medical practices today face economic challenges from declining reimbursements and rising overhead costs. Physicians need to develop new income sources to invigorate their practices and remain viable. Travel medicine-advising and immunizing international travelers-is a rapidly growing specialty in the United States that generates substantial cash reimbursements and professional satisfaction. Travel Clinics of America, a physician-operated company, specializes in helping physicians to incorporate travel medicine into their existing practices.

  1. Problems associated with hemodialysis and travel.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Richard W; Prout, Virginia; Haynes, Deborah; Edwards, Claire; Frankel, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    While there is a recognized risk of hepatitis C acquisition associated with dialysis away from the "home" center, there is little documented data on the effect that dialysis while traveling has on the dialysis patient's health. This study was designed to examine the incidence of travel within a hemodialysis population and to ascertain whether travel was associated with morbidity for patients on hemodialysis. Travel data were collected prospectively over a 6-month period, from April 2009, for all patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis across our dialysis centers. Biochemical, microbiological, and hematological parameters as well as hepatitis serology and antibiotic starts were recorded for 12 weeks prior to and following dialysis away from center. A total of 172 individuals traveled on 200 occasions. The blood stream infection rate for travelers with a central venous catheter was 0.25 versus 0.83/1,000 access days (p = 0.038) in the 12 weeks pre-travel versus post-travel. Parenteral and oral antibiotic starts were both significantly elevated post-travel and were mainly instituted for either chest or urinary sepsis. There was evidence of raised inflammatory markers and anemia on return to center but no evidence of hepatitis B or hepatitis C seroconversion. Travel and dialysis away from a patient's usual hemodialysis unit is a common occurrence but is associated with an increased risk of bacterial infection, anemia, and inflammatory response. This study provides evidence for the concern that hemodialysis away from center is associated with increased morbidity. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  2. Lewis Online Travel System: Preparer's/Traveler's Manual, Release 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seese, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The Lewis Online Travel System (LOTS) is a menu-driven interactive application that automates nearly all of the functions associated with government travel. The purpose of this manual is to provide LOTS users with concise instructions for using the computerized application. As such, it will not go into the details of travel regulations.

  3. Managed lane travelers : do they pay for travel as they claimed they would?

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-05-01

    This study examined if travelers are paying for travel on managed lanes (MLs) as they indicated that they : would in a 2008 survey. To achieve the objectives, an Internet-based stated preference (SP) survey of : Houstons Katy Freeway travelers was...

  4. The New England travel market: generational travel patterns, 1979 to 1996

    Rod Warnick

    2002-01-01

    Generations of travelers who select New England as a primary destination are examined over time from the years of 1979 through 1996 and the analysis serves to update an earlier review of generational travel patterns of the region (Warnick, 1994). Changes in travel patterns are noted by overall adjusted annual change rates by demographic and geographic regions of...

  5. The Concept of Travel Medicine and the Actual Situation of Travel-Related Illnesses.

    PubMed

    Tunalı, Varol; Turgay, Nevin

    2017-06-01

    Travel medicine defines all diseases and medical situations that are related to travel. Travel medicine comprises infectious diseases, traumas, altitude sickness, sun burns, embolisms, jet lag, and many more travel-related situations. With the increasing possibility and ease of travel, the number of people who have travelled internationally has exceeded 1.13 billion in 2014, and the revenues of international travel have exceeded 1.25 trillion dollars. With every passing day, international travels are shifting toward the developing countries and to more exotic regions of the world, and travelers tend to be more adventurous and daring, thereby increasing risky behaviors during travels. Traveling plays an important role in transmitting infections such as Zika virus infection, Ebola, avian flu, severe acute respiratory syndrome, Chikungunya, and dengue fever and is the principal reason for the epidemics of these types of infections on a global scale. With this background, we suggest that travel medicine is an important but "neglected" medical discipline as the discipline of Parasitology itself like most parasitic diseases.

  6. Examining the Relationship between Online Travel Agency Information and Traveler Destination Transaction Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerby, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the role that available Online Travel Agency (OTA) destination information may have on a traveler's perceptions and intent in transaction decisions with that respective OTA. Specifically, this research examined a pleasure traveler's transaction perceptions and intentions with an OTA…

  7. [Ciguatera poisoning in Spanish travellers].

    PubMed

    Gascón, Joaquim; Macià, Maria; Oliveira, Inés; Corachán, Manuel

    2003-05-31

    Ciguatera poisoning appears after ingestion of contaminated fish from tropical coral reefs. Due to the diversity of clinical symptoms and the absence of a specific test in humans, the diagnosis is often difficult. A retrospective study of 10 patients consulting for a clinical and epidemiological picture compatible with ciguatera poisoning after a trip to tropical countries between 1993 and 2000. Most infections but one were acquired in the Caribbean area and there were 8 females. Clinical manifestations started within the first 24 hours after fish ingestion. Chief symptoms were diarrhea and nausea, followed by neurological symptoms, mainly limbs paresthesias that persisted for several weeks. The severity of clinical symptoms was variable and not related to age or initial symptoms. Ciguatera poisoning has to be considered in the diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis affecting travellers to tropical areas.

  8. Travel guidance system for vehicles

    SciT

    Takanabe, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Ito, K.

    1987-02-24

    A travel guidance system is described for vehicles including: a heading sensor for detecting a direction of movement of a vehicle; a distance sensor for detecting a distance traveled by the vehicle; a map data storage medium preliminarily storing map data; a control unit for receiving a heading signal from the heading sensor and a distance signal from the distance sensor to successively compute a present position of the vehicle and for generating video signals corresponding to display data including map data from the map data storage medium and data of the present position; and a display having first andmore » second display portions and responsive to the video signals from the control unit to display on the first display portion a map and a present portion mark, in which: the map data storage medium comprises means for preliminarily storing administrative division name data and landmark data; and the control unit comprises: landmark display means for: (1) determining a landmark closest to the present position, (2) causing a position of the landmark to be displayed on the map and (3) retrieving a landmark massage concerning the landmark from the storage medium to cause the display to display the landmark message on the second display portion; division name display means for retrieving the name of an administrative division to which the present position belongs from the storage medium and causing the display to display a division name message on the second display portion; and selection means for selectively actuating at least one of the landmark display means and the division name display means.« less

  9. Surgical Travellers: Tapestry to Bayeux

    PubMed Central

    Hedley-Whyte, John; Milamed, Debra R

    2014-01-01

    The planning for surgery in war was revisited in 1937 when Ian Fraser was elected a member of the Surgical Travellers. At their 1938 Surgical Travellers meeting in Vienna, Ian and Eleanor Fraser were evicted from their hotel room by the Nazis. The 1939 meeting in Belfast discussed the organization of surgery and the conduct of Emergency Medical Service Hospitals in the United Kingdom; the vast majority were to be under civilian government and military control. From 1943 lengthy and informative organizational meetings were held at least monthly under the chairmanship of Sir Alexander Hood, KBE, Head of the RAMC. Surgical Consultants, now Major Generals, Brigadiers or Full Colonels in the British and U.S. Armies stationed in the UK, prepared for the invasion of Europe. The allocation of medical, surgical, nursing and auxiliary responsibilities was delineated. Liaison with the RAF and US Army Air Force was close as it was with the proposed leaders, Ulstermen Brooke and Montgomery. Montgomery chose Arthur Porritt as Surgeon in Chief to Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF), and Eisenhower, General Albert W. Kenner. Just after D-Day, Porritt met Ian Fraser, who had waded in on Arromanches Beach. The triage and evacuation plans for Allied casualties had been controversial, particularly as regards Landing Ship Tanks (LSTs). The dispute with the Hood-selected surgeons on one side, against medical and surgical deployment of LSTs, and Admiral Ernest King and Winston Churchill on the other, favouring LST use for surgery and evacuation. King and Churchill were correct but total Allied air superiority allowed wide use of many of the Allies' Dakotas; 10,000 DC-3s were eventually in service. Supported by forty Allied combat planes to each Luftwaffe, the dispute about Landing Ship Tank use in about a fortnight became moot. The multifaceted role of the Princess Royal in the Emergency Medical Services of the United Kingdom and her close liaison with the Consultant

  10. Surgical travellers: tapestry to Bayeux.

    PubMed

    Hedley-Whyte, John; Milamed, Debra R

    2014-09-01

    The planning for surgery in war was revisited in 1937 when Ian Fraser was elected a member of the Surgical Travellers. At their 1938 Surgical Travellers meeting in Vienna, Ian and Eleanor Fraser were evicted from their hotel room by the Nazis. The 1939 meeting in Belfast discussed the organization of surgery and the conduct of Emergency Medical Service Hospitals in the United Kingdom; the vast majority were to be under civilian government and military control. From 1943 lengthy and informative organizational meetings were held at least monthly under the chairmanship of Sir Alexander Hood, KBE, Head of the RAMC. Surgical Consultants, now Major Generals, Brigadiers or Full Colonels in the British and U.S. Armies stationed in the UK, prepared for the invasion of Europe. The allocation of medical, surgical, nursing and auxiliary responsibilities was delineated. Liaison with the RAF and US Army Air Force was close as it was with the proposed leaders, Ulstermen Brooke and Montgomery. Montgomery chose Arthur Porritt as Surgeon in Chief to Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF), and Eisenhower, General Albert W. Kenner. Just after D-Day, Porritt met Ian Fraser, who had waded in on Arromanches Beach. The triage and evacuation plans for Allied casualties had been controversial, particularly as regards Landing Ship Tanks (LSTs). The dispute with the Hood-selected surgeons on one side, against medical and surgical deployment of LSTs, and Admiral Ernest King and Winston Churchill on the other, favouring LST use for surgery and evacuation. King and Churchill were correct but total Allied air superiority allowed wide use of many of the Allies' Dakotas; 10,000 DC-3s were eventually in service. Supported by forty Allied combat planes to each Luftwaffe, the dispute about Landing Ship Tank use in about a fortnight became moot. The multifaceted role of the Princess Royal in the Emergency Medical Services of the United Kingdom and her close liaison with the Consultant

  11. 38 CFR 21.9585 - Travel expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Counseling § 21.9585 Travel expenses. VA will not pay for any costs of travel to and from the place of counseling regardless of whether the individual requests educational and vocational counseling or whether the counseling is required. (Authority: 38 U.S.C...

  12. 38 CFR 21.9585 - Travel expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Counseling § 21.9585 Travel expenses. VA will not pay for any costs of travel to and from the place of counseling regardless of whether the individual requests educational and vocational counseling or whether the counseling is required. (Authority: 38 U.S.C...

  13. 38 CFR 21.9585 - Travel expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Counseling § 21.9585 Travel expenses. VA will not pay for any costs of travel to and from the place of counseling regardless of whether the individual requests educational and vocational counseling or whether the counseling is required. (Authority: 38 U.S.C...

  14. 38 CFR 21.9585 - Travel expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Counseling § 21.9585 Travel expenses. VA will not pay for any costs of travel to and from the place of counseling regardless of whether the individual requests educational and vocational counseling or whether the counseling is required. (Authority: 38 U.S.C...

  15. Gibbon travel paths are goal oriented.

    PubMed

    Asensio, Norberto; Brockelman, Warren Y; Malaivijitnond, Suchinda; Reichard, Ulrich H

    2011-05-01

    Remembering locations of food resources is critical for animal survival. Gibbons are territorial primates which regularly travel through small and stable home ranges in search of preferred, limited and patchily distributed resources (primarily ripe fruit). They are predicted to profit from an ability to memorize the spatial characteristics of their home range and may increase their foraging efficiency by using a 'cognitive map' either with Euclidean or with topological properties. We collected ranging and feeding data from 11 gibbon groups (Hylobates lar) to test their navigation skills and to better understand gibbons' 'spatial intelligence'. We calculated the locations at which significant travel direction changes occurred using the change-point direction test and found that these locations primarily coincided with preferred fruit sources. Within the limits of biologically realistic visibility distances observed, gibbon travel paths were more efficient in detecting known preferred food sources than a heuristic travel model based on straight travel paths in random directions. Because consecutive travel change-points were far from the gibbons' sight, planned movement between preferred food sources was the most parsimonious explanation for the observed travel patterns. Gibbon travel appears to connect preferred food sources as expected under the assumption of a good mental representation of the most relevant sources in a large-scale space.

  16. Traveling Policies: Hijacked in Central Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silova, Iveta

    2005-01-01

    Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Central Asian education reform discourses have become increasingly similar to distinctive Western policy discourses traveling globally across national boundaries. Tracing the trajectory of "traveling policies" in Central Asia, this article discusses the way Western education discourses have been…

  17. Acceptability of hypothetical dengue vaccines among travelers.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Christine M; MacLeod, William B; Hamer, Davidson H; Sanchez-Vegas, Carolina; Chen, Lin H; Wilson, Mary E; Karchmer, Adolf W; Yanni, Emad; Hochberg, Natasha S; Ooi, Winnie W; Kogelman, Laura; Barnett, Elizabeth D

    2013-01-01

    Dengue viruses have spread widely in recent decades and cause tens of millions of infections mostly in tropical and subtropical areas. Vaccine candidates are being studied aggressively and may be ready for licensure soon. We surveyed patients with past or upcoming travel to dengue-endemic countries to assess rates and determinants of acceptance for four hypothetical dengue vaccines with variable efficacy and adverse event (AE) profiles. Acceptance ratios were calculated for vaccines with varied efficacy and AE risk. Acceptance of the four hypothetical vaccines ranged from 54% for the vaccine with lower efficacy and serious AE risk to 95% for the vaccine with higher efficacy and minor AE risk. Given equal efficacy, vaccines with lower AE risk were better accepted than those with higher AE risk; given equivalent AE risk, vaccines with higher efficacy were better accepted than those with lower efficacy. History of Japanese encephalitis vaccination was associated with lower vaccine acceptance for one of the hypothetical vaccines. US-born travelers were more likely than non-US born travelers to accept a vaccine with 75% efficacy and a risk of minor AEs (p = 0.003). Compared with North American-born travelers, Asian- and African-born travelers were less likely to accept both vaccines with 75% efficacy. Most travelers would accept a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine if one were available. Travelers valued fewer potential AEs over increased vaccine efficacy. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  18. Beyond Europe: The New Student Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deresiewicz, William

    2009-01-01

    The academic year has ended, and over the past few weeks, thousands of students have traveled abroad for the summer or the first year after college. However, students aren't heading abroad in the same direction, or the same spirit, that their parents or grandparents did. This article examines why the patterns of student travel has changed.

  19. 38 CFR 60.5 - Travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Travel. 60.5 Section 60.5 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) FISHER HOUSES AND OTHER TEMPORARY LODGING § 60.5 Travel. As a condition for receiving temporary lodging under this part, a veteran...

  20. Cybermediation in the Tourism and Travel Industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killion, Les

    Travel and tourism are second only to pornography in adopting Internet-based technologies to intermediate between those supplying the total travel experience, and those seeking to satisfy leisure needs by engaging in tourism. From Thomas Cook in the 1800s, traditional ‘travel trade networks’ have provided the components of the travel experience: transport, accommodation and attractions. However, the Internet has encouraged customer self-service, and on-going debate regarding the future of traditional travel trade intermediaries. The intermediation debate suggests the emergence of ‘hybrid’ intermediation systems combining customer self-service with face-to-face customer contacts characteristic of traditional travel agents. A focus group investigation identified profiles and motives of customers using the Internet to make holiday arrangements. Potential cost savings are a primary motivation for customer self-service. Using the Internet for travel and tourism is becoming commonplace among older travellers as well as younger people. In gathering information before making holiday decisions, potential tourists also engage in a Web 2.0 environment where family and friends, not established intermediaries, provide reliable and authentic information via their individual blogs.

  1. The Measurement of Stress in Nonvisual Travel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponchillia, Paul E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Measurement of stress in nonvisual travel was attempted with both an electromyograph and a galvonic skin response unit in four travel situations. Results revealed significantly greater stress response when unexpected contact with objects was made than with expected contacts and street crossings. Instructors' intervention also increased stress.…

  2. Home Education, School, Travellers and Educational Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Arcy, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The difficulties Traveller pupils experience in school are well documented. Yet those in home educating go unreported. Monk suggests this is because some groups are overlooked; that gypsies and Travellers are often not perceived as home educators. This article highlights how the move to home education is seldom a free choice for Traveller…

  3. Travel assistance device deployment to transit agencies.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-08-01

    The ability to travel where and when one desires is a basic requirement for independent living that most people take for granted. To travel independently, a transit rider practices at least 23 skills including finding the route, arriving at the corre...

  4. Traveling with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of restrooms related to their daily routines. Treat travel time with the same respect. When booking a reserved ... Check it out before you embark on air travel; you may need to make a verbal ... have them with you at all times. You will be able to purchase water and ...

  5. Code for Calculating Regional Seismic Travel Time

    SciT

    BALLARD, SANFORD; HIPP, JAMES; & BARKER, GLENN

    The RSTT software computes predictions of the travel time of seismic energy traveling from a source to a receiver through 2.5D models of the seismic velocity distribution within the Earth. The two primary applications for the RSTT library are tomographic inversion studies and seismic event location calculations. In tomographic inversions studies, a seismologist begins with number of source-receiver travel time observations and an initial starting model of the velocity distribution within the Earth. A forward travel time calculator, such as the RSTT library, is used to compute predictions of each observed travel time and all of the residuals (observed minusmore » predicted travel time) are calculated. The Earth model is then modified in some systematic way with the goal of minimizing the residuals. The Earth model obtained in this way is assumed to be a better model than the starting model if it has lower residuals. The other major application for the RSTT library is seismic event location. Given an Earth model, an initial estimate of the location of a seismic event, and some number of observations of seismic travel time thought to have originated from that event, location codes systematically modify the estimate of the location of the event with the goal of minimizing the difference between the observed and predicted travel times. The second application, seismic event location, is routinely implemented by the military as part of its effort to monitor the Earth for nuclear tests conducted by foreign countries.« less

  6. Evolutionary Stability in the Traveler's Dilemma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Andrew T.

    2009-01-01

    The traveler's dilemma is a generalization of the prisoner's dilemma which shows clearly a paradox of game theory. In the traveler's dilemma, the strategy chosen by analysis and theory seems obviously wrong intuitively. Here we develop a measure of evolutionary stability and show that the evolutionarily stable equilibrium is in some sense not very…

  7. 38 CFR 21.3105 - Travel expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Travel expenses. 21.3105...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Survivors' and Dependents' Educational Assistance Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 35 Counseling § 21.3105 Travel expenses. (a) General. VA shall determine and pay the necessary...

  8. 38 CFR 21.5103 - Travel expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Travel expenses. 21.5103...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-Vietnam Era Veterans' Educational Assistance Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 32 Counseling § 21.5103 Travel expenses. (a) General. VA shall determine and pay the necessary...

  9. Melioidosis in Travelers: Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Dan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is a bacterial infection endemic essentially in Southeast Asia and northern Australia. In temperate areas, the infection is extremely rare and is almost always imported by travelers or immigrants. The infection may affect almost any organ in the body, with various degrees of severity. We reviewed the literature on melioidosis in travelers. For this purpose we searched PubMed and Google for relevant articles up to July 2015. We have identified 72 cases of melioidosis in travelers published in the literature. Melioidosis in travelers was acquired mostly in Thailand (46% of cases). The mean duration of stay in the endemic area was 36 days (range 7-330 days). Symptoms usually started at 23 days (range 1-360 days) after leaving the endemic area. The clinical presentation was varied, sepsis being the most common (34%) followed by pneumonia (29%) and abscess formation (25%). Melioidosis in travelers was less often associated with predisposing risk factors (37.5%), diabetes mellitus being the most common (21%), and had lower mortality (17%) than had the infection in autochthonous cases in Southeast Asia. Melioidosis in travelers has its own characteristics, which distinguish it from other autochthonous diseases in indigenous populations. The possibility of melioidosis should be considered not only in patients originating from endemic areas, but also in patients returning from travel in those regions. © 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  10. Travel and the Social Studies Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Doris, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Travel allows teachers to gather the data and realia to enliven history or global education in the classroom. In this special issue teachers describe personal travel experiences to many parts of the globe. Points of interest, itineraries, budgets, and artifacts collected are discussed. (RM)

  11. 5 CFR 550.1404 - Creditable travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Creditable travel time. 550.1404 Section... ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Compensatory Time Off for Travel § 550.1404 Creditable travel time. (a) General. Subject... off for time in a travel status if— (1) The employee is required to travel away from the official duty...

  12. 5 CFR 550.1404 - Creditable travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Creditable travel time. 550.1404 Section... ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Compensatory Time Off for Travel § 550.1404 Creditable travel time. (a) General. Subject... off for time in a travel status if— (1) The employee is required to travel away from the official duty...

  13. 26 CFR 1.162-2 - Traveling expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Traveling expenses. 1.162-2 Section 1.162-2...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.162-2 Traveling expenses. (a) Traveling expenses include travel fares, meals and lodging, and expenses incident to travel...

  14. 5 CFR 550.1404 - Creditable travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Creditable travel time. 550.1404 Section... ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Compensatory Time Off for Travel § 550.1404 Creditable travel time. (a) General. Subject... off for time in a travel status if— (1) The employee is required to travel away from the official duty...

  15. 5 CFR 550.1404 - Creditable travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Creditable travel time. 550.1404 Section... ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Compensatory Time Off for Travel § 550.1404 Creditable travel time. (a) General. Subject... off for time in a travel status if— (1) The employee is required to travel away from the official duty...

  16. 5 CFR 550.1404 - Creditable travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Creditable travel time. 550.1404 Section... ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Compensatory Time Off for Travel § 550.1404 Creditable travel time. (a) General. Subject... off for time in a travel status if— (1) The employee is required to travel away from the official duty...

  17. 41 CFR 301-30.1 - What is emergency travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is emergency travel? 301-30.1 Section 301-30.1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ALLOWABLE TRAVEL EXPENSES 30-EMERGENCY TRAVEL § 301-30.1 What is...

  18. 41 CFR 301-30.1 - What is emergency travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true What is emergency travel? 301-30.1 Section 301-30.1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ALLOWABLE TRAVEL EXPENSES 30-EMERGENCY TRAVEL § 301-30.1 What is...

  19. Travel and vaccination patterns: a report from a travel medicine clinic in northern Sweden.

    PubMed

    Angelin, Martin; Evengård, Birgitta; Palmgren, Helena

    2011-09-01

    The Travel Medicine Clinic in Umeå is one of Sweden's largest public providers of vaccination and counselling prior to international travel. During the study period it was the only travel medicine clinic in Umeå. This study describes the demography of the visitors to the clinic and travel destinations and durations, as well as vaccinations administered. This was a retrospective study for the period January 2005 to April 2008 based on pre-travel consultation questionnaires and on vaccine expenditure data. A 10% sample of 16,735 first visits prior to international travel was consecutively selected according to the chronology of the visits. Data on 1698 travellers were included in the study. Thailand was the most common destination among visitors, accounting for one third of all destinations. Medical problems affecting pre-travel health planning were rare. Four out of 5 visitors (79%) received only 1 vaccination, mainly for hepatitis A. Travellers to Thailand more often sought travel health advice compared to travellers to Turkey, despite the fact that the 2 destinations were almost equally distributed among travellers from Umeå. We found differences between men and women in money spent on vaccines and in particular in vaccination against Japanese encephalitis. To assess the optimal vaccination level at a travel medicine clinic is difficult. Decisions are affected by general recommendations and the risk perception of the travel medicine practitioner, as well as the risk perception of the traveller. The sex difference found in this study might be due to gender differences in risk perception and should be further investigated.

  20. Substituting telecommunications for travel - Feasible or desirable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Vleck, E. M.

    1974-01-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in telecommunications and examines the detailed structure of travel to estimate the feasibility of substituting telecommunications for various travel objectives. The impact of travel is analyzed from a social, economic, energy, and pollution standpoint to assess the desirability of substitution. Perhaps 35-50% of the nation's travel could, in theory, be replaced by very advanced telecommunications (such as a much improved large-screen teleconferencing network), but public resistance would be massive. Much economic dislocation would result since, for example, over 25% of retail sales are travel-related. The energy savings would be modest since only 25% of the nation's energy is consumed by transportation. However, all pollution would be reduced substantially since transportation accounts for 75% of the carbon monoxide, 60% of the hydrocarbon, and 55% of the nitrogen oxide pollution in the nation. Problems related to the implementation of large-scale substitution are discussed.

  1. Travel and the emergence of infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M. E.

    1995-01-01

    Travel is a potent force in the emergence of disease. Migration of humans has been the pathway for disseminating infectious diseases throughout recorded history and will continue to shape the emergence, frequency, and spread of infections in geographic areas and populations. The current volume, speed, and reach of travel are unprecedented. The consequences of travel extend beyond the traveler to the population visited and the ecosystem. When they travel, humans carry their genetic makeup, immunologic sequelae of past infections, cultural preferences, customs, and behavioral patterns. Microbes, animals, and other biologic life also accompany them. Today's massive movement of humans and materials sets the stage for mixing diverse genetic pools at rates and in combinations previously unknown. Concomitant changes in the environment, climate, technology, land use, human behavior, and demographics converge to favor the emergence of infectious diseases caused by a broad range of organisms in humans, as well as in plants and animals. PMID:8903157

  2. [Vaccinations and malaria prophylaxis for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Alberer, Martin; Löscher, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The prevention of infectious diseases by vaccination and by counselling about malaria prophylaxis is a central aspect of travel medicine. Besides mandatory vaccinations required for entry to certain countries various vaccinations may be indicated depending on destination and type of travel as well as on individual risks of the traveler. In addition, pre-travel counselling should always include a check-up of standard vaccinations. Protection against mosquito bites is the basis of malaria prophylaxis. The addition of chemoprophylaxis is warranted in high risk areas. When regular chemoprophylaxis is not applied it is recommended to carry an appropriate antimalarial drug which can be used for emergency stand-by treatment in case of unexplained fever and when medical attention is not available within 24 hours. Travelers should realize that self-treatment is a first-aid measure and that they should still seek medical advice as soon as possible. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Travel fosters tool use in wild chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Thibaud; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Neumann, Christof

    2016-07-19

    Ecological variation influences the appearance and maintenance of tool use in animals, either due to necessity or opportunity, but little is known about the relative importance of these two factors. Here, we combined long-term behavioural data on feeding and travelling with six years of field experiments in a wild chimpanzee community. In the experiments, subjects engaged with natural logs, which contained energetically valuable honey that was only accessible through tool use. Engagement with the experiment was highest after periods of low fruit availability involving more travel between food patches, while instances of actual tool-using were significantly influenced by prior travel effort only. Additionally, combining data from the main chimpanzee study communities across Africa supported this result, insofar as groups with larger travel efforts had larger tool repertoires. Travel thus appears to foster tool use in wild chimpanzees and may also have been a driving force in early hominin technological evolution.

  4. Neurologic Aspects of Infections in International Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Han, May H.; Zunt, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Background As international travel for business and pleasure becomes part of contemporary lifestyle, the clinician today is confronted with an increasing number of travelers returning ill with unfamiliar syndromes. The physician will encounter a myriad of patients with exotic infections, emerging infectious diseases, or resurgent Old-World infections. Review Summary This review article will discuss salient points of important infectious diseases associated with overseas travel, provide a syndromic approach to the traveler who returns with neurologic manifestations, and list resources for additional diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive information. Conclusions As many of infections acquired in other countries can directly or indirectly affect the nervous system, the care of the ill traveler often falls into the hands of neurologists. The contemporary neurologist should therefore be knowledgeable of the clinical manifestations, potential complications, and appropriate management of region-specific infections. PMID:15631642

  5. Positioner with long travel in two dimensions

    DOEpatents

    Trumper, David L.; Williams, Mark E.

    1997-12-23

    A precision positioning system is provided which provides long travel in two of the linear dimensions, while using non-contact bearings for both a first subassembly which provides long travel in one of the linear dimension and a second subassembly which provides long travel in the second linear dimension. The first or upper subassembly is preferably a magnetic subassembly which, in addition to providing long travel, also compensates or positions in three rotary dimensions and in the third linear dimension. The second subassembly is preferably either an air bearing or magnetic subassembly and is normally used only to provide long travel. Angled surfaces may be provided for magnetic bearings and capacitive or other gap sensing probes may be mounted to the stage and ground flush with the bearing actuators to provide more precise gap measurements.

  6. International travel patterns and travel risks for stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Mikati, Tarek; Griffin, Kenneth; Lane, Dakotah; Matasar, Matthew; Shah, Monika K

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation (SCT) is being increasingly utilized for multiple medical illnesses. However, there is limited knowledge about international travel patterns and travel-related illnesses of stem cell transplant recipients (SCTRs). An observational cross-sectional study was conducted among 979 SCTRs at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center using a previously standardized and validated questionnaire. International travel post SCT, pre-travel health advice, exposure risks, and travel-related illnesses were queried. A total of 516 SCTRs completed the survey (55% response rate); of these, 40% were allogeneic SCTRs. A total of 229 (44.3%) respondents reported international travel outside the United States and Canada post SCT. The international travel incidence was 32% [95% confidence interval CI 28-36] within 2 years after SCT. Using multivariable Cox regression analysis, variables significantly associated with international travel within first 2 years after SCT were history of international travel prior to SCT [hazard ratio (HR) = 5.3, 95% CI 2.3-12.0], autologous SCT (HR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.6-2.8), foreign birth (HR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.5-3.3), and high income (HR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.8-3.7). During their first trip, 64 travelers (28%) had traveled to destinations that may have required vaccination or malaria chemoprophylaxis. Only 56% reported seeking pre-travel health advice. Of those who traveled, 16 travelers (7%) became ill enough to require medical attention during their first trip after SCT. Ill travelers were more likely to have visited high-risk areas (60 vs 26%, p = 0.005), to have had a longer mean trip duration (24 vs 12 days, p = 0.0002), and to have visited friends and relatives (69 vs 21%, p < 0.0001). International travel was common among SCTRs within 2 years after SCT and was mainly to low-risk destinations. Although the overall incidence of travel-related illnesses was low, certain subgroups of travelers were at a

  7. Nonlinear refraction and reflection travel time tomography

    Zhang, Jiahua; ten Brink, Uri S.; Toksoz, M.N.

    1998-01-01

    We develop a rapid nonlinear travel time tomography method that simultaneously inverts refraction and reflection travel times on a regular velocity grid. For travel time and ray path calculations, we apply a wave front method employing graph theory. The first-arrival refraction travel times are calculated on the basis of cell velocities, and the later refraction and reflection travel times are computed using both cell velocities and given interfaces. We solve a regularized nonlinear inverse problem. A Laplacian operator is applied to regularize the model parameters (cell slownesses and reflector geometry) so that the inverse problem is valid for a continuum. The travel times are also regularized such that we invert travel time curves rather than travel time points. A conjugate gradient method is applied to minimize the nonlinear objective function. After obtaining a solution, we perform nonlinear Monte Carlo inversions for uncertainty analysis and compute the posterior model covariance. In numerical experiments, we demonstrate that combining the first arrival refraction travel times with later reflection travel times can better reconstruct the velocity field as well as the reflector geometry. This combination is particularly important for modeling crustal structures where large velocity variations occur in the upper crust. We apply this approach to model the crustal structure of the California Borderland using ocean bottom seismometer and land data collected during the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment along two marine survey lines. Details of our image include a high-velocity zone under the Catalina Ridge, but a smooth gradient zone between. Catalina Ridge and San Clemente Ridge. The Moho depth is about 22 km with lateral variations. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Post-infectious sequelae of travelers' diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Connor, Bradley A; Riddle, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Travelers' diarrhea (TD) has generally been considered a self-limited disorder which resolves more quickly with expeditious and appropriate antibiotic therapy given bacteria are the most frequently identified cause. However, epidemiological, clinical, and basic science evidence identifying a number of chronic health conditions related to these infections has recently emerged which challenges this current paradigm. These include serious and potentially disabling enteric and extra-intestinal long-term complications. Among these are rheumatologic, neurologic, gastrointestinal, renal, and endocrine disorders. This review aims to examine and summarize the current literature pertaining to three of these post-infectious disorders: reactive arthritis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome and the relationship of these conditions to diarrhea associated with travel as well as to diarrhea associated with gastroenteritis which may not be specifically travel related but relevant by shared microbial pathogens. It is hoped this review will allow clinicians who see travelers to be aware of these post-infectious sequelae thus adding to our body of knowledge in travel medicine. Data for this article were identified by searches of PubMed and MEDLINE, and references from relevant articles using search terms "travelers' diarrhea" "reactive arthritis" "Guillain-Barré syndrome" "Post-Infectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome." Abstracts were included when related to previously published work. A review of the published literature reveals that potential consequences of travelers' diarrhea may extend beyond the acute illness and these post-infectious complications may be more common than currently recognized. In addition since TD is such a common occurrence it would be helpful to be able to identify those who might be at greater risk of post-infectious sequelae in order to target more aggressive prophylactic or therapeutic approaches to such individuals. It is

  9. Air travel in women with lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock‐BarZiv, Stacey; Cohen, Marsha M; Downey, Gregory P; Johnson, Simon R; Sullivan, Eugene; McCormack, Francis X

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective The safety of air travel in patients with pneumothorax‐prone pulmonary diseases, such as lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), has not been studied to any great extent. A questionnaire‐based evaluation of air travel in patients with LAM was conducted to determine experiences aboard commercial aircraft. Methods A survey was sent to women listed in the US LAM Foundation registry (n = 389) and the UK LAM Action registry (n = 59) to assess air travel, including problems occurring during flight. Women reporting a pneumothorax in flight were followed up to ascertain further details about the incident. Results 327 (73%) women completed the survey. 308 women answered the travel section, of whom 276 (90%) had “ever” travelled by aeroplane for a total of 454 flights. 95 (35%) women had been advised by their doctor to avoid air travel. Adverse events reported included shortness of breath (14%), pneumothorax (2%, 8/10 confirmed by chest radiograph), nausea or dizziness (8%), chest pain (12%), unusual fatigue (11%), oxygen desaturation (8%), headache (9%), blue hands (2%), haemoptysis (0.4%) and anxiety (22%). 5 of 10 patients with pneumothorax had symptoms that began before the flight: 2 occurred during cruising altitude, 2 soon after landing and 1 not known. The main symptoms were severe chest pain and shortness of breath. Discussion and conclusion Adverse effects occurred during air travel in patients with LAM, particularly dyspnoea and chest pain. Hypoxaemia and pneumothorax were reported. The decision to travel should be individualised; patients with unexplained shortness of breath or chest pain before scheduled flights should not board. Patients with borderline oxygen saturations on the ground should be evaluated for supplemental oxygen therapy during flight. Although many women had been advised not to travel by air, most travelled without the occurrence of serious adverse effects. PMID:17040934

  10. Health Behavior of International Travelers to Calcutta: Identifying the Need for a Travelers' Clinic.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee

    1994-12-01

    With the growing rates of travel and, potentially therefore, of travel-related illness in India, this study was conducted to establish both the need of a travelers' clinic in Calcutta and a profile of the group or groups at risk of illness best served by such facilities. A total of 452 visitors, half business and package holiday travelers (group A) and half younger, low-budget tourists with less pretravel advice (group B), were compared. Through a questionnaire, their health, pretravel advice and prophylaxis, use of first aid, safe water use, posttravel treatment, and opinion concerning the need for a travelers' clinic were determined. Group A travelers stayed in deluxe hotels with more pretravel advice (90% compared to 72% in group B), were taking antimalarial agents (82% compared to 61% in group B), remained healthy (72% compared to 58% in group B), consumed safe water (87% compared to 47% in group B), and were more likely to seek posttravel treatment (75% compared to 60% in group B). The group B travelers, consequently, felt an increasing need for a travelers' clinic (92% compared to 82% in group A). Given the complexities of travel in India, there is a palpable need for appropriate medical attention to travelers, especially among the young, budget tourists, which is best provided at a travelers' clinic.

  11. Travel Behavior Change in Older Travelers: Understanding Critical Reactions to Incidents Encountered in Public Transport.

    PubMed

    Sundling, Catherine

    2015-11-18

    Accessibility of travel may be better understood if psychological factors underlying change in travel behavior are known. This paper examines older (65+) travelers' motives for changing their travel behavior. These changes are grounded in critical incidents earlier encountered in public-transport travel. A scientific framework is developed based on cognitive and behavioral theory. In 29 individual interviews, travelers' critical reactions (i.e., cognitive, emotional, and/or behavioral) to 77 critical incidents were examined. By applying critical incident technique (CIT), five reaction themes were identified that had generated travel-behavior change: firm restrictions, unpredictability, unfair treatment, complicated trips, and earlier adverse experiences. To improve older travelers' access to public transport, key findings were: (a) service must be designed so as to strengthen the feeling of being in control throughout the journey; (b) extended personal service would increase predictability in the travel chain and decrease travel complexity; consequently, (c) when designing new services and making effective accessibility interventions, policy makers should consider and utilize underlying psychological factors that could direct traveler behavior.

  12. IMPATT Diodes Based on 〈111〉, 〈100〉, and 〈110〉 Oriented GaAs: A Comparative Study to Search the Best Orientation for Millimeter-Wave Atmospheric Windows

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Bhadrani; Tripathi, Anvita; Das, Adrija; Singh, Kumari Alka; Banerjee, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    The authors have carried out the large-signal (L-S) simulation of double-drift region (DDR) impact avalanche transit time (IMPATT) diodes based on 〈111〉, 〈100〉, and 〈110〉 oriented GaAs. A nonsinusoidal voltage excited (NSVE) L-S simulation technique is used to investigate both the static and L-S performance of the above-mentioned devices designed to operate at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) atmospheric window frequencies, such as 35, 94, 140, and 220 GHz. Results show that 〈111〉 oriented GaAs diodes are capable of delivering maximum RF power with highest DC to RF conversion efficiency up to 94 GHz; however, the L-S performance of 〈110〉 oriented GaAs diodes exceeds their other counterparts while the frequency of operation increases above 94 GHz. The results presented in this paper will be helpful for the future experimentalists to choose the GaAs substrate of appropriate orientation to fabricate DDR GaAs IMPATT diodes at mm-wave frequencies. PMID:27347524

  13. Travel During Pregnancy: Considerations for the Obstetric Provider.

    PubMed

    Antony, Kathleen M; Ehrenthal, Deborah; Evensen, Ann; Iruretagoyena, J Igor

    2017-02-01

    Travel among US citizens is becoming increasingly common, and travel during pregnancy is also speculated to be increasingly common. During pregnancy, the obstetric provider may be the first or only clinician approached with questions regarding travel. In this review, we discuss the reasons women travel during pregnancy, medical considerations for long-haul air travel, destination-specific medical complications, and precautions for pregnant women to take both before travel and while abroad. To improve the quality of pretravel counseling for patients before or during pregnancy, we have created 2 tools: a guide for assessing the pregnant patient's risk during travel and a pretravel checklist for the obstetric provider. A PubMed search for English-language publications about travel during pregnancy was performed using the search terms "travel" and "pregnancy" and was limited to those published since the year 2000. Studies on subtopics were not limited by year of publication. Eight review articles were identified. Three additional studies that analyzed data from travel clinics were found, and 2 studies reported on the frequency of international travel during pregnancy. Additional publications addressed air travel during pregnancy (10 reviews, 16 studies), high-altitude travel during pregnancy (5 reviews, 5 studies), and destination-specific illnesses in pregnant travelers. Travel during pregnancy including international travel is common. Pregnant travelers have unique travel-related and destination-specific risks. We review those risks and provide tools for obstetric providers to use in counseling pregnant travelers.

  14. German travelers' preferences for travel vaccines assessed by a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Poulos, Christine; Curran, Desmond; Anastassopoulou, Anastassia; De Moerlooze, Laurence

    2018-02-08

    Many travelers to regions with endemic infectious diseases do not follow health authorities' recommendations regarding vaccination against vaccine-preventable infectious diseases, before traveling. The determinants of individual travelers' decisions to vaccinate before traveling are largely unknown. This study aimed to provide this information using a discrete choice experiment (DCE) administered to four types of German travelers: (1) business travelers; (2) travelers visiting friends and relatives (VFR); (3) leisure travelers; and (4) backpackers. A DCE survey was developed, pretested and administered online. It included a series of choice questions in which respondents chose between two hypothetical vaccines, each characterized by four disease attributes with varying levels describing the of risk, health impact, curability and transmissibility of the disease they would prevent (described with four disease attributes with varying levels of risk, health impact, curability and transmissibility), and varying levels of four vaccine attributes (duration of protection, number of doses required, time required for vaccination, and vaccine cost). A random-parameters logit model was used to estimate the importance weights each traveler type placed on the various attribute levels. These weights were used to calculate mean monetary equivalents (MMEs) of changes in each attribute (holding all others constant) and of hypothetical disease-vaccine combinations. All traveler types' choices indicated that they attached the greatest importance to the risk and health impact of disease and to the vaccine cost whereas the other disease and vaccine attributes were less important for their decisions about travel vaccines. An option of not choosing any of the vaccine-pairs presented was rarely selected indicating that travelers' generally prefer to be vaccinated rather than not. The MMEs of changes in vaccine attributes indicated a very high variability between the individual travelers

  15. NHTS : highlights of the 2001 National Household Travel Survey

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-01-01

    The 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) is the first comprehensive household survey of both daily and long-distance travel, allowing for analysis of the full continuum of personal travel by Americans. This report presents selected highlights...

  16. Travelers' Health: Protection against Mosquitoes, Ticks, and Other Arthropods

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers Road Safety Senior Citizens Sex Tourism STDs Sun Exposure Swimming and Diving Study Abroad ...

  17. Dynamic travel information personalized and delivered to your cell phone.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    The policy of FDOT is to use the Florida Advance Traveler Information System as the primary method to disseminate timely and important travel information to the public so that the public can make informed decisions regarding their travel plans....

  18. Interstellar Travel. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning travel between the stars. Topics include cost considerations, hyperspace navigation, exploration, and propulsion systems for vehicles to be used in interstellar travel. Human factor issues and social aspects of interstellar travel are also discussed.

  19. Travelers' Health: Vaccine Recommendations for Infants and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  20. Travels with the Fossil Hunters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whybrow, Peter J.

    2000-04-01

    Whether dodging bullets in West Africa, or rabid dogs in Pakistan, surviving yak-butter tea in Tibet, or eating raw fish in China, the life of a globe-trotting fossil hunter is often hazardous and always filled with surprises. Travels with the Fossil Hunters lets readers share the wonder, joys of discovery, and excitement of these intrepid scientists. Packed with more than 100 beautiful, full-color photographs, the volume takes readers on twelve expeditions to remote parts of the world in search of diverse fossil remains, from those of dinosaurs to human ancestors. Each expedition by paleontologists from London's Natural History Museum reveals the problems and challenges of working in extreme conditions, from the deserts of the Sahara and Yemen to the frozen wastes of Antarctica, from the mountains of India to the forests of Latvia. Along the way they also describe the paleontology and geology of the countries they visit and the scientific reasons for their expeditions. With a foreword from Sir David Attenborough and an introduction from Richard Fortey, this fascinating book will appeal to amateur and professional fossil hunters alike and to readers interested in accounts of exotic locales. Peter Whybrow is a research scientist at the Natural History Museum, London. His research interests include Arabian Miocene vertebrates, paleoclimates, paleogeography, and biotic diversity. He is senior editor with A. Hill of Fossil Vertebrates of Arabia (Yale University Press, New Haven, 1999).

  1. Analysis of travelling salesman problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Belal; Singh Chouhan, Shivank; Biswas, Subham; Gayathri, P.; Santhi, H.

    2017-11-01

    The multiple Traveling Salesman Problem (mTSP) is the general type of TSP, in which at least one than one sales representatives can be utilized as a part of the arrangement set. The Constraint in the improvement undertaking is that every sales representative comes back to beginning stage at end of outing, heading out to a particular arrangement of urban areas in the middle of and with the exception of the first, every last city is gone to by precisely one sales representative. The thought is to scan for the briefest course that is the slightest separation required for every salesperson to go from the beginning area to individual urban areas and back to the area from where he has begun. It is an intricate NP-Hard issue and has different applications for the most part in the field of planning and steering. The measure of algorithm time to take care of this issue develops exponentially as number of urban areas builds thus, the meta-heuristic streamlining algorithms, for example, Genetic Algorithm (GAs) are should have been investigated. The objective of this paper is to discover different algorithms utilized as a part of writing to understand mTSP.

  2. Traveling with children: beyond car seat safety.

    PubMed

    Polli, Janaina Borges; Polli, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    To spread knowledge and instigate the health professional to give advice on childcare during travels and on child transport safety. Literature review through the LILACS and MEDLINE(®) databases, using the terms: travel, safety, protective equipment, child, preventive medicine, retrieving articles published in the last 21 years. The authors analyzed 93 articles, of which 66 met the inclusion criteria after summaries were read. For drafting this article, the following sub-themes were proposed: getting ready to travel with children; knowing some of the transfer risks (air, land and water transportation) and exploring the destination with children (sun exposure, accommodations, altitude, food, traveler's diarrhea, insect bites) and return from the trip with children. Over the years, there has been an increase in the number of children who travel around the world. However, this population is still subject to health problems while traveling and may be even more susceptible than the adult age group. These problems arise from a variety of factors, including exposure to infectious organisms, the use of certain types of transportation, and participation in some activities, such as hiking at high altitudes, among others. However, when traveling with children, these risk factors can be overlooked; a trip that is considered safe for an adult might not be a good choice for this age group. The pediatric consultation should be a good opportunity to optimize preventive guidelines at the pre-trip planning. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Globalization of leptospirosis through travel and migration.

    PubMed

    Bandara, Medhani; Ananda, Mahesha; Wickramage, Kolitha; Berger, Elisabeth; Agampodi, Suneth

    2014-08-12

    Leptospirosis remains the most widespread zoonotic disease in the world, commonly found in tropical or temperate climates. While previous studies have offered insight into intra-national and intra-regional transmission, few have analyzed transmission across international borders. Our review aimed at examining the impact of human travel and migration on the re-emergence of Leptospirosis. Results suggest that alongside regional environmental and occupational exposure, international travel now constitute a major independent risk factor for disease acquisition. Contribution of travel associated leptospirosis to total caseload is as high as 41.7% in some countries. In countries where longitudinal data is available, a clear increase of proportion of travel-associated leptospirosis over the time is noted. Reporting patterns is clearly showing a gross underestimation of this disease due to lack of diagnostic facilities. The rise in global travel and eco-tourism has led to dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Leptospirosis. We explore the obstacles to prevention, screening and diagnosis of Leptopirosis in health systems of endemic countries and of the returning migrant or traveler. We highlight the need for developing guidelines and preventive strategies of Leptospirosis related to travel and migration, including enhancing awareness of the disease among health professionals in high-income countries.

  4. Globalization of leptospirosis through travel and migration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis remains the most widespread zoonotic disease in the world, commonly found in tropical or temperate climates. While previous studies have offered insight into intra-national and intra-regional transmission, few have analyzed transmission across international borders. Our review aimed at examining the impact of human travel and migration on the re-emergence of Leptospirosis. Results suggest that alongside regional environmental and occupational exposure, international travel now constitute a major independent risk factor for disease acquisition. Contribution of travel associated leptospirosis to total caseload is as high as 41.7% in some countries. In countries where longitudinal data is available, a clear increase of proportion of travel-associated leptospirosis over the time is noted. Reporting patterns is clearly showing a gross underestimation of this disease due to lack of diagnostic facilities. The rise in global travel and eco-tourism has led to dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Leptospirosis. We explore the obstacles to prevention, screening and diagnosis of Leptopirosis in health systems of endemic countries and of the returning migrant or traveler. We highlight the need for developing guidelines and preventive strategies of Leptospirosis related to travel and migration, including enhancing awareness of the disease among health professionals in high-income countries. PMID:25112368

  5. Health information given by Swiss travel agencies.

    PubMed

    Schwitz, Fabienne M; Haley, Timothy J L; Stat, C; Hatz, Christoph F R

    2006-01-01

    Many of the 1 million Swiss traveling to tropical or subtropical countries book their trip through travel agencies every year. These agencies are thus an important source of information about malaria and other important health risks and little is known about the appropriate health information provided by these. A study was conducted to assess health-related information in members of the Swiss Federation of Travel Agencies in the metropolitan area of Zurich, Switzerland. A covert investigator (F.M.S.) visited these agencies and requested information on a package holiday for 2 or 3 weeks to Kenya. Following an in-person interview, the investigator recorded any health-related information provided on a pretested form. If none was mentioned, the agent was prompted using a standardized procedure. A total of 88 agencies were visited. Spontaneous health advice was given in 44% of all visits. After prompting, 99% of all travel agents mentioned preventive measures against malaria, but only 69% indicated the need for vaccinations against other diseases. Spontaneous advice on malaria risk and vaccinations was better than advice given upon prompting. One fifth of all travel agents neither mentioned malaria prevention measures spontaneously nor recommended seeing a health specialist. Overall, travel medicine knowledge of travel agents in the Zurich area needs improvement as many tended to draw attention to health risks only when prompted. Attitude, personal knowledge, and experience of individual travel agents were key to the health information given. Up-to-date and readily available information on health risks should be provided to travel agencies and structured training given in collaboration with health professionals.

  6. Travel behaviour of patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Ringwald, Juergen; Rudolph, Pamela; Biner, Melanie; Fießler, Cornelia; Mayr, Andreas; Lohmann, Martin; Strobel, Julian; Eckstein, Reinhold; Kurnik, Karin

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to identify socio-demographic, or illness-specific variables, influencing travel behaviour of haemophilic patients. A standardised questionnaire was sent to more than 2000 members of two German Haemophilia associations. Multivariable logistic regression with the outcomes frequent (at least two journeys per year) and long-haul travel (outside of Europe) was applied separately on adult patients and patients younger than 18 years. Among 345 adults, high education level, living in a partnership or travelling alone was significantly associated with frequent travel with odds ratios (ORs)/95%-confidence intervals (95%-CI) of 3.10/1.72-5.80, 1.99/1.10-3.62 and 1.73/1.01-3.62, respectively. High education level and self-application of clotting factors were significant variables for long-haul travel (OR/95%-CI: 2.45/1.43-4.26 and 3.25/1.33-8.52, respectively). Among 144 non-adults, a younger age or performing permanent prophylactic treatment was significantly associated with a lower likelihood for long-haul travel (OR/95%-CI: 0.51/0.22-0.95 and 0.10/0.01-0.65, respectively). Longer awareness of the disease increased the likelihood for long-haul travel (OR/95%-CI: 1.06/1.01-1.14). High education level and self-application of clotting factors influence travel intensity of adult patients most strikingly. Parents of very young patients on permanent prophylactic treatment might need special education to facilitate holiday travel for these families. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Health risks of travelers in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Waner, S

    1999-09-01

    Large numbers of tourists visit South Africa every year. Travelers to urban areas are at little risk of contracting an infectious disease, however the adventure traveler is at increased risk. Yellow fever is not known to occur in South Africa. Malaria is endemic in Mpumalanga and KwaZula-Natal. Schistosomiasis is endemic in large parts of the country. Although rabies is found throughout the country, only a small number of human cases is reported. High risk areas are KwaZulu-Natal, the eastern Cape and Mpumalanga provinces. The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is high and counseling regarding sexually transmitted diseases is important. Sanitation of water is excellent in most large cities and towns; however travelers to rural areas should exercise caution. Arbovirus infections do occur but relatively few cases are reported. The hiker is at risk for tick bite fever and should be counseled. Since the abolition of apartheid, South Africa has been seen as an inexpensive, high quality destination by many tourists. In 1997, a total of 5,436,848 travelers from many different countries visited the country. Areas most frequently visited include Johannesburg, Cape Town, Durban, the Garden Route, Kruger National Park, KwaZulu-Natal and Pretoria. The most common reason for visiting the country was holiday (44%), followed by visiting friends and relatives (23%), business travel (27%) other (6%).1 Travelers, to the larger cities such as Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban are at little risk of acquiring an infectious disease. The adventure traveler however is at greater risk as parts of the country are endemic for malaria, schistosomiasis, rabies, food and waterborne diseases, sexually transmitted diseases and arbovirus infections. Accidental deaths due to motor vehicle accidents and interpersonal violence are important health risks in South Africa. Travelers visiting popular attractions are at significantly lower risk. However this has never been

  8. Promoting advanced traveler information systems among cellular and land-line phone users : SmarTraveler experience in Boston

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-01-01

    In 1993 the SmarTraveler advanced traveler information system (ATIS) was introduced to travelers in the greater Boston area as part of an operational test jointly funded by FHWA and the Massachusetts Executive Office of Transportation and Constructio...

  9. Pre-travel advice: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Christopher

    2002-12-01

    The message of the pre-travel provider is necessarily paradoxic. First the provider lists a score of causes of illness and premature demise, and then states, "But it sounds like a great trip and I think you'll have fun." Pre-travel providers need to walk a fine line: they must encourage patients to be cautious but not paranoid, optimistic but realistic. This discussion is complicated further by the fact that risk reduction is not the only consideration; if it were, practitioners would advise patients to remain in the developed world and foray from their homes only to visit health clubs and the fruit-and-vegetable section of grocery stores. A tacit assumption in travel medicine is that some degree of acceptance of heightened risk is tolerated for the benefit of improved quality of life offered by travel abroad. The amount of risk that is reasonable to accept for a given benefit in quality of life yielded by travel cannot be quantified, however. Providers must render judgments on what is "reasonable" and what is not, and this complex decision is based on equal parts medical knowledge and intuition. At one extreme, mountaineers in Nepal have been found to have a 2.4% mortality rate per expedition [83,84]. The travel provider might make the reasonable decision to counsel these travelers to avoid that activity. These travelers most likely will ignore that advice, at which point the provider must endeavor to reduce risk to the extent possible. Other situations in which the provider should advise a change in itinerary or activities include counseling parents who plan to take an infant to high altitude or a pregnant woman who plans to scuba dive. If travelers remain cloistered in their hotel rooms, eating all meals from room service and watching CNN, then it could be suggested that they are overly risk-adverse and might consider foraying out of the hotel, despite the potential associated increased risks to health. Conversely, if travelers find themselves on motorcycles

  10. Ocean acoustic tomography - Travel time biases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiesberger, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The travel times of acoustic rays traced through a climatological sound-speed profile are compared with travel times computed through the same profile containing an eddy field. The accuracy of linearizing the relations between the travel time difference and the sound-speed deviation at long ranges is assessed using calculations made for two different eddy fields measured in the eastern Atlantic. Significant nonlinearities are found in some cases, and the relationships of the values of these nonlinearities to the range between source and receiver, to the anomaly size associated with the eddies, and to the positions of the eddies are studied. An analytical model of the nonlinearities is discussed.

  11. Pre-travel counselling in Greece for travellers visiting friends and relatives.

    PubMed

    Pavli, Androula; Katerelos, Panagiotis; Pierroutsakos, Ioannis N; Maltezou, Helen C

    2009-09-01

    Pre-travel services are underused by travellers visiting friends and relatives (VFRs). The objective of this study was to define the proportion and the profile of VFRs who seek pre-travel counselling in Greece. The study was conducted prospectively, from July, 2005 to December, 2007, in seven Health Departments of the Prefectures in Athens and Attica, where 35.6% of the Greek population resides; migrants account for 17% and 8% of the population in these areas, respectively. 2548 travellers seeking pre-travel advice were studied; 23 (0.9%) were identified as VFRs. Children younger than 15 years accounted for 30.4% of VFRs, compared to 2.3% among non-VFRs. VFRs were younger than non-VFRs (mean ages: 29.9 versus 40.4 years, respectively). A comparison of VFRs with non-VFRs revealed that VFRs travelled for longer periods of time, stayed at local people's home more frequently (87% versus 15.5%), and travelled on an organized trip less frequently (4.3% versus 54.6%). Considering the fact that 36,056 VFRs travelled from Greece to Africa and Asia during 2005-2007, and that only 1 out of 700 VFRs to these destinations pre-travel advice in Greece, communication strategies to access efficiently this group of travellers should be explored urgently.

  12. A Heart for Travel: Travel Health Considerations for Patients with Heart Disease and Cardiac Devices.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, G; De Freitas, S

    2016-12-12

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in adult international travellers. Patients living with heart disease should receive specific, individualised pre-travel health advice. The purpose of this article is to provide evidence-based advice to physicians who are consulted by travellers with cardiovascular disease. Fitness-to-travel evaluation will often be conducted by the general practitioner but other medical specialists may also be consulted for advice. Patients with chronic medical conditions should purchase travel health insurance. The general pre-travel health consultation addresses food and water safety, insect and animal bite avoidance, malaria chemoprophylaxis, and travel vaccinations. Patients with devices such as cardiac pacemakers should be familiar with how these may be affected by travel. Cardiac medications may cause adverse effects in cold or hot environments, and specific precautions must be followed by anticoagulated travellers. The physician should be aware of how to access medical care abroad, and of the potential for imported tropical diseases in returned travellers.

  13. Health risks, travel preparation, and illness among public health professionals during international travel.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Victor; Warnock, Eli; Ramana Dhara, V; Jean-Louis, Lee Ann; Sotir, Mark J; Kozarsky, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Few data currently exist on health risks faced by public health professionals (PHP) during international travel. We conducted pre- and post-travel health surveys to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP), and illnesses among PHP international travelers. Anonymous surveys were completed by PHP from a large American public health agency who sought a pre-travel medical consult from September 1, 2009, to September 30, 2010. Surveys were completed by 122 participants; travelers went to 163 countries. Of the 122 respondents, 97 (80%) reported at least one planned health risk activity (visiting rural areas, handling animals, contact with blood or body fluids, visiting malarious areas), and 50 (41%) reported exposure to unanticipated health risks. Of the 62 travelers who visited malarious areas, 14 (23%) reported inconsistent or no use of malaria prophylaxis. Illness during travel was reported by 33 (27%) respondents. Most of the PHP travelers in our study reported at least one planned health risk activity, and almost half reported exposure to unanticipated health risks, and one-quarter of travelers to malarious areas reported inconsistent or no use of malaria chemoprophylaxis. Our findings highlight that communication and education outreach for PHP to prevent travel-associated illnesses can be improved. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Risk factors for psychological stress among international business travellers

    PubMed Central

    Striker, J.; Luippold, R. S.; Nagy, L.; Liese, B.; Bigelow, C.; Mundt, K. A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study investigated sources of self reported psychological stress among international business travellers at the World Bank, following up on a previous study showing that travellers submitted more insurance claims for psychological disorders. Hypotheses were that work, personal, family, and health concerns, as well as time zone travel, contribute to travel stress. METHODS: A travel survey was developed from focus groups and consisted of questions about these potential sources of travel stress. Surveys were sent to a random sample of staff, stratified by number of travel missions, age range, and sex. Canonical correlation analyses estimated the association between key survey items on sources of stress and two measures of travel stress. RESULTS: 498 staff completed the survey. More than a third reported high to very high travel stress. Correlations between predictors and travel stress showed that social and emotional concerns (such as impact of travel on family and sense of isolation) contributed the most to such stress, followed by health concerns, and workload upon return from travel. Surprisingly, time zone travel did not contribute to the self reported stress of these travellers. There were few modifiers of stress, although respondents suggested that a day of rest after travel and reduced workloads would help. CONCLUSIONS: The current study confirms clinical impressions about several correlates of travel stress. Similar research with travellers in other organisations could help to determine whether the findings from this study are valid and what measures can be taken to reduce the psychological health risks to travellers.   PMID:10450241

  15. Risk factors for psychological stress among international business travellers.

    PubMed

    Striker, J; Luippold, R S; Nagy, L; Liese, B; Bigelow, C; Mundt, K A

    1999-04-01

    This study investigated sources of self reported psychological stress among international business travellers at the World Bank, following up on a previous study showing that travellers submitted more insurance claims for psychological disorders. Hypotheses were that work, personal, family, and health concerns, as well as time zone travel, contribute to travel stress. A travel survey was developed from focus groups and consisted of questions about these potential sources of travel stress. Surveys were sent to a random sample of staff, stratified by number of travel missions, age range, and sex. Canonical correlation analyses estimated the association between key survey items on sources of stress and two measures of travel stress. 498 staff completed the survey. More than a third reported high to very high travel stress. Correlations between predictors and travel stress showed that social and emotional concerns (such as impact of travel on family and sense of isolation) contributed the most to such stress, followed by health concerns, and workload upon return from travel. Surprisingly, time zone travel did not contribute to the self reported stress of these travellers. There were few modifiers of stress, although respondents suggested that a day of rest after travel and reduced workloads would help. The current study confirms clinical impressions about several correlates of travel stress. Similar research with travellers in other organisations could help to determine whether the findings from this study are valid and what measures can be taken to reduce the psychological health risks to travellers.

  16. Tuberculosis and the traveller: evaluating and reducing risk through travel consultation.

    PubMed

    Denholm, Justin T; Thevarajan, Irani

    2016-03-01

    Although the last 10 years have seen a slow decline in global tuberculosis (TB) incidence, it remains one of the most significant infectious diseases worldwide, with an estimated 9.6 million new cases and 1.5 million deaths in 2014. The consequences of contracting TB can be significant for the individual, with extended treatment requirements, risk of long-term health consequences and the possibility of transmitting infection to others among the complications of disease. This review article discusses the risk of TB infection as a result of international travel including evaluation of risk, risk reduction and a proposed testing strategy for travel-related TB infection. A review of the relevant literature combined with expert opinion was used to formulate this article. The global TB epidemic is varied and dynamic, including changing patterns of both drug sensitive and drug resistant disease. The annual incidence of TB in individual countries such as South Africa may be greater than 800/100,000, while multidrug resistance is found in up to 19% of new cases in the Russian Federation. Recent surveys of traveller risk are presented for short and long-term travellers to various countries and settings. Overall, risk to travelers is low, with rates of acquiring latent TB less than 1% per travel year for most settings. However, detailed travel evaluation is necessary to evaluate individual risk. Travellers with immunosuppressive conditions are at high risk for progression to active disease if infected, and should have special consideration in travel consultation. It is important for practitioners giving advice regarding tuberculosis risk and travel to access up-to-date information regarding local conditions. This article provides an approach to assessment and management of TB in travellers, including a guide to pre- and post-travel evaluation, testing and vaccination. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press

  17. Paediatric international travellers from Greece: characteristics and pre-travel recommendations.

    PubMed

    Maltezou, Helena C; Pavli, Androula; Spilioti, Athina; Katerelos, Panos; Theodoridou, Maria

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the children who seek pre-travel advice in Greece. During 2008-2010, 4065 persons sought pre-travel services in the 57 Prefectures, including 128 (3.15%) children <15 years. Main travel destinations were sub-Saharan Africa (54 children; 42.2%), South America (18; 14.1%), the Middle East (16; 12.5%), the Indian subcontinent (12; 9.4%), and South East Asia (7; 5.5%). Seventy-six children (59.4%) stayed for <1 month, 34 (26.6%) for 1-6 months, and 10 (7.8%) for >6 months. Recreation was the main purpose of travel (81 children; 63.3%), followed by work (24; 18.8%), and to visit friends and relatives (VFRs) (14; 10.9%). Paediatric travellers VFRs stayed more frequently in local residences compared to non-VFR paediatric travellers (85.7% and 20.2%). Children stayed more frequently in local residences and travelled more frequently for recreational purposes or to VFRs (27.3%, 63.3%, and 10.9%, respectively), compared to older travellers (11.9%, 58.8%, and 4%, respectively). Malaria chemoprophylaxis was prescribed for 64.8% of children travelling to sub-Saharan Africa. This study demonstrated clearly that only a very small number of international paediatric travellers seek pre-travel services in Greece. Communication strategies to access paediatric travellers should be developed in order to improve travel medicine services for children in Greece. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characteristics of Travellers from Bosnia and Herzegovina to Africa

    PubMed Central

    Obradovic, Zarema; Obradovic, Amina

    2013-01-01

    Conflict of interest: none declared. Introduction Travellers from Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H) travel to different world countries. The awareness of people is changing every day and nowadays travellers seek advices related to their travel and destination more often than before. In the previous years, travellers came to Travel Clinics almost only to get the vaccines which were obligatory for entry into a country. In B&H travel clinics are a part of public health institutes. The largest Travel Clinic which provides service for the highest number of travellers is in the Public Health Institute of Sarajevo Canton, in the city of Sarajevo, which is the capital of B&H. In the last years we have seen an increasing interest for travel to Africa because the highest number of travellers travel to African countries. Objective To show the characteristics of persons travelling to Africa, the reasons of their travel, the destination countries and the types of vaccines applied. Materials and methods We used protocol books of the Travel Clinic in Public Health Institute of Sarajevo Canton and the data from individual forms of travellers. Results Persons travelling to Africa make 55% of all travellers that are advised and vaccinated in the Travel Clinic in Public Health Institute of Sarajevo Canton. There are significantly more men than women among people travelling to Africa. The highest number of travellers is in the category of working population which means age group of 20-50 years. The most visited countries are Kenya, Ethiopia, Somalia and Ghana. Travellers received the following vaccines: yellow fever, VHA, VHB, meningitis, tetanus. All travellers were given the advice on how to dress, feed and protect against malaria. PMID:24082834

  19. Travel characteristics and risk-taking attitudes in youths traveling to nonindustrialized countries.

    PubMed

    Han, Pauline; Balaban, Victor; Marano, Cinzia

    2010-01-01

    International travel to developing countries is increasing with rising levels of disposable income; this trend is seen in both adults and children. Risk-taking attitude is fundamental to research on the prevention of risky health behaviors, which can be an indicator of the likelihood of experiencing illness or injury during travel. The aim of this study is to investigate whether risk-taking attitudes of youths are associated with travel characteristics and likelihood of experiencing illness or injury while traveling to nonindustrialized countries. Data were analyzed from the 2008 YouthStyles survey, an annual mail survey gathering demographics and health knowledge, attitudes, and practices of individuals from 9 through 18 years of age. Travelers were defined as respondents who reported traveling in the last 12 months to a destination other than the United States, Canada, Europe, Japan, Australia, or New Zealand. Risk-taking attitude was measured by using a four-item Brief Sensation-Seeking Scale. All p values ≤ 0.05 were considered significant. Of 1,704 respondents, 131 (7.7%) traveled in the last 12 months. Females and those with higher household income were more likely to travel (odds ratio = 1.6,1.1). Of those who traveled, 16.7% reported seeking pretravel medical care, with most visiting a family doctor for that care (84.0%). However, one-fifth of respondents reported illness and injury during travel; of these, 83.3% traveled with their parents. Males and older youths had higher mean sensation-seeking scores. Further, travelers had a higher mean sensation-seeking score than nontravelers. Those who did not seek pretravel medical care also had higher mean sensation-seeking scores (p = 0.1, not significant). Our results show an association between risk-taking attitudes and youth travel behavior. However, adult supervision during travel and parental directives prior to travel should be taken into consideration. Communication messages should emphasize the

  20. Travelers' health problems and behavior: prospective study with post-travel follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vilkman, Katri; Pakkanen, Sari H; Lääveri, Tinja; Siikamäki, Heli; Kantele, Anu

    2016-07-13

    The annual number of international tourist arrivals has recently exceeded one billion, yet surprisingly few studies have characterized travelers' behavior, illness, and risk factors in a prospective setting. Particularly scarce are surveys of data spanning travel, return, and follow-up of the same cohort. This study examines behavior and illness among travelers while abroad, after return home, and at follow-up. Patterns of behavior connected to type of travel and illness are characterized so as to identify risk factors and provide background data for pre-travel advice. Volunteers to this prospective cohort study were recruited at visits to a travel clinic prior to departure. Data on the subjects' health and behavior were collected by questionnaires before and after journeys and over a three-week follow-up. In addition, the subjects were asked to fill in health diaries while traveling. The final study population consisted of 460 subjects, 79 % of whom reported illness during travel or on arrival: 69 % had travelers' diarrhea (TD), 17 % skin problems, 17 % fever, 12 % vomiting, 8 % respiratory tract infection, 4 % urinary tract infection, 2 % ear infection, 4 % gastrointestinal complaints other than TD or vomiting, and 4 % other symptoms. Of all subjects, 10 % consulted a doctor and 0.7 % were hospitalized; 18 % took antimicrobials, with TD as the most common indication (64 %). Ongoing symptoms were reported by 25 % of all travelers upon return home. During the three-week follow-up (return rate 51 %), 32 % of respondents developed new-onset symptoms, 20 % visited a doctor and 1.7 % were hospitalized. Factors predisposing to health problems were identified by multivariable analysis: certain regions (Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, and Eastern Africa), female gender, young age, and long travel duration. Despite proper preventive measures like vaccinations, malaria prophylaxis, and travel advice, the majority of our subjects fell ill during or