Science.gov

Sample records for zenith angle ozone

  1. Chapman Solar Zenith Angle variations at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Emilie M.; Ajello, Joseph; Holsclaw, Gregory; West, Robert; Esposito, Larry W.; Bradley, Eric Todd

    2016-10-01

    Solar XUV photons and magnetospheric particles are the two main sources contributing to the airglow in the Titan's upper atmosphere. We are focusing here on the solar XUV photons and how they influence the airglow intensity. The Cassini-UVIS observations analyzed in this study consist each in a partial scan of Titan, while the center of the detector stays approximately at the same location on Titan's disk. We used observations from 2008 to 2012, which allow for a wide range of Solar Zenith Angle (SZA). Spectra from 800 km to 1200 km of altitude have been corrected from the solar spectrum using TIMED/SEE data. We observe that the airglow intensity varies as a function of the SZA and follows a Chapman curve. Three SZA regions are identified: the sunlit region ranging from 0 to 50 degrees. In this region, the intensity of the airglow increases, while the SZA decreases. Between SZA 50 and 100 degrees, the airglow intensity decreases from it maximum to its minimum. In this transition region the upper atmosphere of Titan changes from being totally sunlit to being in the shadow of the moon. For SZA 100 to 180 degrees, we observe a constant airglow intensity close to zero. The behavior of the airglow is also similar to the behavior of the electron density as a function of the SZA as observed by Ågren at al (2009). Both variables exhibit a decrease intensity with increasing SZA. The goal of this study is to understand such correlation. We demonstrate the importance of the solar XUV photons contribution to the Titan airglow and prove that the strongest contribution to the Titan dayglow occurs by solar fluorescence rather than the particle impact that predominates at night.

  2. Retrieval of Total Ozone Amounts from Zenith-Sky Intensities in the Ultraviolet Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bojkov, B. R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Hilsenrath, E.; Labow, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    A new method to determine the total ozone column from zenith-sky intensities in the ultraviolet region has been developed for the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Spectrometer (SSBUV) operating at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The total ozone column amounts are derived by comparing the ratio of measured intensities from three wavelengths with the equivalent ratios calculated by a radiative transfer model. The differences between the retrieved ozone column amounts and the collocated Brewer double monochromator are within 2% for the measurement period beginning in April 2001. The methodology, as well as the influences of the ozone profiles, aerosols, surface albedo, and the solar zenith angle on the retrieved total ozone amounts will be presented.

  3. Asronomical refraction: Computational methods for all zenith angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, L. H.; Standish, E. M.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the problem of computing astronomical refraction for any value of the zenith angle may be reduced to a simple, nonsingular, numerical quadrature when the proper choice is made for the independent variable of integration.

  4. Zenith angle dependence of the geocoronal Lyman-alpha glow.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paresce, F.; Kumar, S.; Bowyer, S.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the observations made on the zenith angle dependence and intensity of the geocoronal hydrogen Lyman-alpha glow by means of one of four extreme ultraviolet photometers flown to an altitude of 264 km on a Nike Tomahawk rocket launched from Thumba, India, in March 1970. The results obtained are compared with Meier and Mange's (1970) theoretical predictions. The possible causes for the discrepancies found are discussed.

  5. Midlatitude ionospheric D region: Height, sharpness, and solar zenith angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Neil R.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Rodger, Craig J.

    2017-08-01

    VLF radio amplitude and phase measurements are used to find the height and sharpness of the D region of the ionosphere at a mid to high geomagnetic dip latitude of 52.5°. The two paths used are both from the 23.4 kHz transmitter, DHO, in north Germany with the first path being northward and mainly over the sea along the west coast of Denmark over a range of 320-425 km, and the second, also mainly all-sea, to a single fixed recording receiver at Eskdalemuir in Scotland ( 750 km). From plots of the measured amplitudes and phases versus distance for the first of these paths compared with calculations using the U.S. Navy code, ModeFinder, the Wait height and sharpness parameters of the D region at midday in summer 2015 are found to be H' = 72.8 ± 0.2 km and β = 0.345 ± 0.015 km-1 at a solar zenith angle 33°. From phase and amplitude measurements at other times of day on the second path, the daytime changes in H' and β as functions of solar zenith angle are determined from shortly after dawn to shortly before dusk. Comparisons are also made between the modal ModeFinder calculations and wave hop calculations, with both giving similar results. The parameters found here should be useful in understanding energy inputs to the D region from the radiation belts, solar flares, or transient luminous events. The midday values may be sufficiently precise to be useful for monitoring climate change.

  6. Assessment of satellite retrieval algorithms for chlorophyll-a concentration under high solar zenith angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; He, Xianqiang; Bai, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyan; Gong, Fang; Zhu, Qiankun; Hu, Zifeng

    2016-10-01

    Numerous empirical algorithms have been operationally used to retrieve the global ocean chlorophyll-a concentration (Chla) from ocean color satellite data, e.g., the OC4V4 algorithm for SeaWiFS and OC3M for MODIS. However, the algorithms have been established and validated based on the in situ data mainly measured under low to moderate solar zenith angle (<70°). Currently, with the development of the geostationary satellite ocean color remote sensing which observes from early morning to later afternoon, it is necessary to know whether the empirical Chla algorithms could be applied to high solar zenith angle. In this study, the performances of seven widely-used Chla algorithms under high solar zenith angles, i.e., OC2, OC3M, OC3V, OC4V4, CLARK, OCI, and YOC algorithms, were evaluated using the NOMAD global in situ ocean color dataset. The results showed that the performances of all the seven algorithms decreased significantly under high solar zenith angles as compared to those under low-moderate solar zenith angles. For instance, for the OC4V4 algorithm, the relative percent difference (RPD) and root-mean-square error (RMSE) were 13.78% and 1.66 μg/l for the whole dataset, and 3.95% and 1.49 μg/l for the solar zenith angles ranged from 30° to 40°, respectively. However, the RPD and RMSE increased to 30.45% and 6.10μg/l for solar zenith angle larger than 70°.

  7. An investigation of the solar zenith angle variation of D-region ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnasiri, P. A. J.; Sechrist, C. F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Model calculations are carried out with a view to interpreting the solar zenith angle variation of D-region ionization. A model is developed for the neutral chemistry including the transport terms relating to molecular and eddy diffusion. The diurnal behavior is described of the minor neutral constituents formed in an oxygen-hydrogen-nitrogen atmosphere, in the height interval between 30 and 120 km. Computations carried out for two cases of the eddy diffusion coefficients models indicate that the constituents which are important for the D-region positive-ion chemistry do not show a significant variation with zenith angle for values up to 75 deg over the D-region heights. In the ion chemistry model, ion-pair production rates are calculated for solar X-rays between 1 A and 100 A, EUV radiations from 100 A up to the Lyman-alpha line, precipitating electrons, and galactic cosmic rays. The solar zenith angle variation of the positive-ion composition, negative-ion composition, and the electron densities are described up to 75 deg zenith angle, in the height interval between 60 and 100 km.

  8. Interpreting vegetation reflectance measurements as a function of solar zenith angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Smith, J. A.; Ranson, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    Spectral hemispherical-conical reflectances of a nadir looking sensor were taken throughout the day for a lodgepole pine and two grass canopies. Mathematical simulations of both spectral hemispherical-conical and bi-hemispherical reflectances were performed for two theoretical canopies of contrasting geometric structure. These results and comparisons with literature studies showed a great amount of variability of vegetation canopy reflectances as a function of solar zenith angle. Explanations for this variability are discussed and recommendations for further measurements are proposed.

  9. Determination of coupling coefficients at various zenith angles of the basis of the cosmic ray azimuth effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belskiy, S. A.; Dmitriev, B. A.; Romanov, A. M.

    1975-01-01

    The value of EW asymmetry and coupling coefficients at different zenith angles were measured by means of a double coincidence crossed telescope which gives an opportunity to measure simultaneously the intensity of the cosmic ray hard component at zenith angles from 0 to 84 deg in opposite azimuths. The advantages of determining the coupling coefficients by the cosmic ray azimuth effect as compared to their measurement by the latitudinal effect are discussed.

  10. Performance verification of adaptive optics for satellite-to-ground coherent optical communications at large zenith angle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mo; Liu, Chao; Rui, Daoman; Xian, Hao

    2018-02-19

    Although there is an urgent demand, it is still a tremendous challenge to use the coherent optical communication technology to the satellite-to-ground data transmission system especially at large zenith angle due to the influence of atmospheric turbulence. Adaptive optics (AO) is a considerable scheme to solve the problem. In this paper, we integrate the adaptive optics (AO) to the coherent laser communications and the performances of mixing efficiency as well as bit-error-rate (BER) at different zenith angles are studied. The analytical results show that the increasing of zenith angle can severely decrease the performances of the coherent detection, and increase the BER to higher than 10 -3 , which is unacceptable. The simulative results of coherent detection with AO compensation indicate that the larger mixing efficiency and lower BER can be performed by the coherent receiver with a high-mode AO compensation. The experiment of correcting the atmospheric turbulence wavefront distortion using a 249-element AO system at large zenith angles is carried out. The result demonstrates that the AO system has a significant improvement on satellite-to-ground coherent optical communication system at large zenith angle. It also indicates that the 249-element AO system can only meet the needs of coherent communication systems at zenith angle smaller than 65̊ for the 1.8m telescope under weak and moderate turbulence.

  11. High zenith angle observations of PKS 2155-304 with the MAGIC-I telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Asensio, M.; Backes, M.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido, D.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Kellermann, H.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Paiano, S.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puerto Gimenez, I.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vankov, H.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.

    2012-08-01

    Context. The high frequency peaked BL Lac PKS 2155-304 with a redshift of z = 0.116 was discovered in 1997 in the very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray range by the University of Durham Mark VI γ-ray Cherenkov telescope in Australia with a flux corresponding to 20% of the Crab Nebula flux. It was later observed and detected with high significance by the southern Cherenkov observatory H.E.S.S. establishing this source as the best studied southern TeV blazar. Detection from the northern hemisphere is difficult due to challenging observation conditions under large zenith angles. In July 2006, the H.E.S.S. collaboration reported an extraordinary outburst of VHE γ-emission. During the outburst, the VHE γ-ray emission was found to be variable on the time scales of minutes and with a mean flux of ~7 times the flux observed from the Crab Nebula. Follow-up observations with the MAGIC-I standalone Cherenkov telescope were triggered by this extraordinary outburst and PKS 2155-304 was observed between 28 July to 2 August 2006 for 15 h at large zenith angles. Aims: We studied the behavior of the source after its extraordinary flare. Furthermore, we developed an analysis method in order to analyze these data taken under large zenith angles. Methods: Here we present an enhanced analysis method for data taken at high zenith angles. We developed improved methods for event selection that led to a better background suppression. Results: The quality of the results presented here is superior to the results presented previously for this data set: detection of the source on a higher significance level and a lower analysis threshold. The averaged energy spectrum we derived has a spectral index of (-3.5 ± 0.2) above 400 GeV, which is in good agreement with the spectral shape measured by H.E.S.S. during the major flare on MJD 53 944. Furthermore, we present the spectral energy distribution modeling of PKS 2155-304. With our observations we increased the duty cycle of the source

  12. Analytical Model for Estimating the Zenith Angle Dependence of Terrestrial Cosmic Ray Fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A new model called “PHITS-based Analytical Radiation Model in the Atmosphere (PARMA) version 4.0” was developed to facilitate instantaneous estimation of not only omnidirectional but also angular differential energy spectra of cosmic ray fluxes anywhere in Earth’s atmosphere at nearly any given time. It consists of its previous version, PARMA3.0, for calculating the omnidirectional fluxes and several mathematical functions proposed in this study for expressing their zenith-angle dependences. The numerical values of the parameters used in these functions were fitted to reproduce the results of the extensive air shower simulation performed by Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS). The angular distributions of ground-level muons at large zenith angles were specially determined by introducing an optional function developed on the basis of experimental data. The accuracy of PARMA4.0 was closely verified using multiple sets of experimental data obtained under various global conditions. This extension enlarges the model’s applicability to more areas of research, including design of cosmic-ray detectors, muon radiography, soil moisture monitoring, and cosmic-ray shielding calculation. PARMA4.0 is available freely and is easy to use, as implemented in the open-access EXcel-based Program for Calculating Atmospheric Cosmic-ray Spectrum (EXPACS). PMID:27490175

  13. Analytical Model for Estimating the Zenith Angle Dependence of Terrestrial Cosmic Ray Fluxes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A new model called "PHITS-based Analytical Radiation Model in the Atmosphere (PARMA) version 4.0" was developed to facilitate instantaneous estimation of not only omnidirectional but also angular differential energy spectra of cosmic ray fluxes anywhere in Earth's atmosphere at nearly any given time. It consists of its previous version, PARMA3.0, for calculating the omnidirectional fluxes and several mathematical functions proposed in this study for expressing their zenith-angle dependences. The numerical values of the parameters used in these functions were fitted to reproduce the results of the extensive air shower simulation performed by Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS). The angular distributions of ground-level muons at large zenith angles were specially determined by introducing an optional function developed on the basis of experimental data. The accuracy of PARMA4.0 was closely verified using multiple sets of experimental data obtained under various global conditions. This extension enlarges the model's applicability to more areas of research, including design of cosmic-ray detectors, muon radiography, soil moisture monitoring, and cosmic-ray shielding calculation. PARMA4.0 is available freely and is easy to use, as implemented in the open-access EXcel-based Program for Calculating Atmospheric Cosmic-ray Spectrum (EXPACS).

  14. A relation between landsat digital numbers, surface reflectance, and the cosine of the solar zenith angle

    Kowalik, William S.; Marsh, Stuart E.; Lyon, Ronald J. P.

    1982-01-01

    A method for estimating the reflectance of ground sites from satellite radiance data is proposed and tested. The method uses the known ground reflectance from several sites and satellite data gathered over a wide range of solar zenith angles. The method was tested on each of 10 different Landsat images using 10 small sites in the Walker Lake, Nevada area. Plots of raw Landsat digital numbers (DNs) versus the cosine of the solar zenith angle (cos Z) for the the test areas are linear, and the average correlation coefficients of the data for Landsat bands 4, 5, 6, and 7 are 0.94, 0.93, 0.94, and 0.94, respectively. Ground reflectance values for the 10 sites are proportional to the slope of the DN versus cos Z relation at each site. The slope of the DN versus cos Z relation for seven additional sites in Nevada and California were used to estimate the ground reflectances of those sites. The estimates for nearby sites are in error by an average of 1.2% and more distant sites are in error by 5.1%. The method can successfully estimate the reflectance of sites outside the original scene, but extrapolation of the reflectance estimation equations to other areas may violate assumptions of atmospheric homogeneity.

  15. Ozone and nitrogen dioxide ground based monitoring by zenith sky visible spectrometry in Arctic and Antarctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pommereau, J. P.; Goutail, F.

    1988-01-01

    Unattended diode array spectrometers have been designed for ground based stratospheric trace species monitoring by zenith sky visible spectrometry. Measurements are performed with a 1.0 nm resolution between 290 nm and 590 nm in order to allow simultaneous evaluations of column densities of ozone, nitrogen dioxide. Field tests have shown that the species can be monitored with a precision of + or - 2 Dobson for the first and + or - 2.10 to the 15th mol/sq cm for the second, although the absolute accuracy of the method is limited by the error of the estimation of the atmospheric optical path of the scattered light. Two identical instruments were set up in January 1988, one in Antarctica at Dumont d'Urville (66 S, 140 E) to be operated all year and another one in the Arctic at ESRANGE at Kiruna (68 N; 22 E) which will operate to the final warming of spring 1988. The data are processed in real time at both stations. O3 and NO2 columns are transmitted together with surface and stratospheric temperature and winds. They are also recorded for further treatment and search for OClO and BrO. Only one month of data from Antarctica is available at the moment. Obtained during polar summer, they cannot show more than stable columns of O3 and NO2 and for the last species, the buildup of its diurnal variation.

  16. Derivation of Cloud Heating Rate Profiles using observations of Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds: Impacts of Solar Zenith Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; McFarquhar, G.; Poellot, M.; Verlinde, J.; Heymsfield, A.; Kok, G.

    2005-12-01

    Arctic stratus clouds play an important role in the energy balance of the Arctic region. Previous studies have suggested that Arctic stratus persist due to a balance among cloud top radiation cooling, latent heating, ice crystal fall out and large scale forcing. In this study, radiative heating profiles through Arctic stratus are computed using cloud, surface and thermodynamic observations obtained during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) as input to the radiative transfer model STREAMER. In particular, microphysical and macrophycial cloud properties such as phase, water content, effective particle size, particle shape, cloud height and cloud thickness were derived using data collected by in-situ sensors on the University of North Dakota (UND) Citation and ground-based remote sensors at Barrow and Oliktok Point. Temperature profiles were derived from radiosonde launches and a fresh snow surface was assumed. One series of sensitivity studies explored the dependence of the heating profile on the solar zenith angle. For smaller solar zenith angles, more incoming solar radiation is received at cloud top acting to counterbalance infrared cooling. As solar zenith angle in the Arctic is large compared to low latitudes, a large solar zenith angle may contribute to the longevity of these clouds.

  17. Compensating Atmospheric Turbulence Effects at High Zenith Angles with Adaptive Optics Using Advanced Phase Reconstructors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggemann, M.; Soehnel, G.; Archer, G.

    Atmospheric turbulence degrades the resolution of images of space objects far beyond that predicted by diffraction alone. Adaptive optics telescopes have been widely used for compensating these effects, but as users seek to extend the envelopes of operation of adaptive optics telescopes to more demanding conditions, such as daylight operation, and operation at low elevation angles, the level of compensation provided will degrade. We have been investigating the use of advanced wave front reconstructors and post detection image reconstruction to overcome the effects of turbulence on imaging systems in these more demanding scenarios. In this paper we show results comparing the optical performance of the exponential reconstructor, the least squares reconstructor, and two versions of a reconstructor based on the stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm in a closed loop adaptive optics system using a conventional continuous facesheet deformable mirror and a Hartmann sensor. The performance of these reconstructors has been evaluated under a range of source visual magnitudes and zenith angles ranging up to 70 degrees. We have also simulated satellite images, and applied speckle imaging, multi-frame blind deconvolution algorithms, and deconvolution algorithms that presume the average point spread function is known to compute object estimates. Our work thus far indicates that the combination of adaptive optics and post detection image processing will extend the useful envelope of the current generation of adaptive optics telescopes.

  18. Multiple View Zenith Angle Observations of Reflectance From Ponderosa Pine Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Lee F.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Reflectance factors (RF(lambda)) from dense and sparse ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) stands, derived from radiance data collected in the solar principal plane by the Advanced Solid-State Array Spectro-radiometer (ASAS), were examined as a function of view zenith angle (theta(sub v)). RF(lambda) was maximized with theta(sub v) nearest the solar retrodirection, and minimized near the specular direction throughout the ASAS spectral region. The dense stand had much higher RF anisotropy (ma)dmurn RF is minimum RF) in the red region than did the sparse stand (relative differences of 5.3 vs. 2.75, respectively), as a function of theta(sub v), due to the shadow component in the canopy. Anisotropy in the near-infrared (NIR) was more similar between the two stands (2.5 in the dense stand and 2.25 in the sparse stand); the dense stand exhibited a greater hotspot effect than 20 the sparse stand in this spectral region. Two common vegetation transforms, the NIR/red ratio and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), both showed a theta(sub v) dependence for the dense stand. Minimum values occurred near the retrodirection and maximum values occurred near the specular direction. Greater relative differences were noted for the NIR/red ratio (2.1) than for the NDVI (1.3). The sparse stand showed no obvious dependence on theta(sub v) for either transform, except for slightly elevated values toward the specular direction.

  19. [Radiance Simulation of BUV Hyperspectral Sensor on Multi Angle Observation, and Improvement to Initial Total Ozone Estimating Model of TOMS V8 Total Ozone Algorithm].

    PubMed

    Lü, Chun-guang; Wang, Wei-he; Yang, Wen-bo; Tian, Qing-iju; Lu, Shan; Chen, Yun

    2015-11-01

    New hyperspectral sensor to detect total ozone is considered to be carried on geostationary orbit platform in the future, because local troposphere ozone pollution and diurnal variation of ozone receive more and more attention. Sensors carried on geostationary satellites frequently obtain images on the condition of larger observation angles so that it has higher requirements of total ozone retrieval on these observation geometries. TOMS V8 algorithm is developing and widely used in low orbit ozone detecting sensors, but it still lack of accuracy on big observation geometry, therefore, how to improve the accuracy of total ozone retrieval is still an urgent problem that demands immediate solution. Using moderate resolution atmospheric transmission, MODT-RAN, synthetic UV backscatter radiance in the spectra region from 305 to 360 nm is simulated, which refers to clear sky, multi angles (12 solar zenith angles and view zenith angles) and 26 standard profiles, moreover, the correlation and trends between atmospheric total ozone and backward scattering of the earth UV radiation are analyzed based on the result data. According to these result data, a new modified initial total ozone estimation model in TOMS V8 algorithm is considered to be constructed in order to improve the initial total ozone estimating accuracy on big observation geometries. The analysis results about total ozone and simulated UV backscatter radiance shows: Radiance in 317.5 nm (R₃₁₇.₅) decreased as the total ozone rise. Under the small solar zenith Angle (SZA) and the same total ozone, R₃₁₇.₅ decreased with the increase of view zenith Angle (VZA) but increased on the large SZA. Comparison of two fit models shows: without the condition that both SZA and VZA are large (> 80°), exponential fitting model and logarithm fitting model all show high fitting precision (R² > 0.90), and precision of the two decreased as the SZA and VZA rise. In most cases, the precision of logarithm fitting

  20. Search for neutrino generated air shower candidates with energy ≥ 1019 eV and Zenith angle θ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knurenko, Stanislav; Petrov, Igor; Sabourov, Artem

    2017-06-01

    The description of the methodology and results of searching for air showers generated by neutral particles such as high energy gamma quanta and astroneutrinos are presented. For this purpose, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of the data: the electron, the muon and the EAS Cerenkov light, and their response time in scintillation and Cherenkov detectors. Air showers with energy more than 5·1018 eV and zenith angle θ ≥ 55∘ are selected and analyzed. Search results indicate a lack of air shower events formed by gamma-rays or high-energy neutrinos, but it does not mean that such air showers do not exist in nature; for example, experiments that recorded showers having a marked low muon content, i.e., "Muonless", are likely to be candidates for showers produced by neutral primary particles.

  1. Assessment of performances of sun zenith angle and altitude parameterisations of atmospheric radiative transfer for spectral surface downwelling solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, L.; Blanc, Ph.

    2010-09-01

    change in irradiance with a specific variable. The communication discusses two parameterisations found in the literature. One deals with the solar zenith angle, the other with the altitude. We assess their performances in retrieving solar irradiance for 32 spectral bands, from 240 nm to 4606 nm. The model libRadtran is run to create data sets for all sun zenith angles (every 5 degrees) and all altitudes (every km). These data sets are considered as a reference. Then, for each parameterisation, we compute the parameters using two irradiance values for specific values of angle (e.g., 0 and 60 degrees) or altitude (e.g., 0 and 3 km). The parameterisations are then applied to other values of angle and altitude. Differences between these assessments and the reference values of irradiance are computed and analysed. We conclude on the level of performances of each parameterisation for each spectral band as well as for the total irradiance. We discuss the possible use of these parameterisations in the future method Heliosat-4 and possible improvements. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement no. 218793 (MACC project).

  2. Looking at Ozone From a New Angle: Shuttle Ozone Limb Sounding Experiment-2 (SOLSE-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard; Hilsenrath, Ernest; Janz, Scott; Brown, Tammy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ozone layer above Earth is our planet's fragile sunscreen, protecting people, vegetation, and wildlife. NASA has been measuring ozone for more than 20 years by looking down, but SOLSE-2 will show that more information is available by looking at ozone from the side, at Earth's limb or atmospheric boundary. When the ozone layer is compromised, increased ultraviolet (UV) levels from the sun cause health problems ranging from severe sunburns to skin cancer and cataracts. A concerted global effort has been made to reduce or eliminate the production of chemicals that deplete ozone, but the ozone layer is not expected to recover for many decades because these chemicals can remain active in the atmosphere for up to 100 years. We know now that ozone monitoring needs to be focused in the lower stratosphere. The discovery of the ozone hole in 1985 demonstrated that very large changes in ozone were occurring in the lower stratosphere near 20 km, instead of the upper stratosphere as first expected, and where current ozone instruments are focused. Measuring ozone from a tangential perspective that is centered at the limb provides ozone profiles concentrated in the lower stratosphere. The first flight of SOLSE proved that this technique achieves the accuracy and coverage of traditional measurements, and surpasses the altitude resolution and depth of retrieval of conventional techniques. Results from the first flight convinced the science community to design the next generation ozone monitoring satellite based on SOLSE. The Ozone Mapping and Profiling Suite (OMPS) is currently being built for the NPOESS satellite. The primary objective of SOLSE-2 is to confirm the promising results of the first flight over a wider range of viewing conditions and spectral wavelengths. Sometimes a really hard problem can be solved when you look at it from a different angle! While scientists conduct research, protect yourself by observing the UV index and spend less unprotected time outdoors.

  3. A simulation study on few parameters of Cherenkov photons in extensive air showers of different primaries incident at various zenith angles over a high altitude observation level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, G. S.; Hazarika, P.; Goswami, U. D.

    2018-07-01

    We have studied the distribution patterns of lateral density, arrival time and angular position of Cherenkov photons generated in Extensive Air Showers (EASs) initiated by γ-ray, proton and iron primaries incident with various energies and at various zenith angles. This study is the extension of our earlier work [1] to cover a wide energy range of ground based γ-ray astronomy with a wide range of zenith angles (≤40°) of primary particles, as well as the extension to study the angular distribution patterns of Cherenkov photons in EASs. This type of study is important for distinguishing the γ-ray initiated showers from the hadronic showers in the ground based γ-ray astronomy, where Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique (ACT) is being used. Importantly, such study gives an insight on the nature of γ-ray and hadronic showers in general. In this work, the CORSIKA 6.990 simulation code is used for generation of EASs. Similarly to the case of Ref. [1], this study also revealed that, the lateral density and arrival time distributions of Cherenkov photons vary almost in accordance with the functions: ρch(r) =ρ0e-βr and tch(r) =t0eΓ/rλ respectively by taking different values of the parameters of functions for the type, energy and zenith angle of the primary particle. The distribution of Cherenkov photon's angular positions with respect to shower axis shows distinctive features depending on the primary type, its energy and the zenith angle. As a whole this distribution pattern for the iron primary is noticeably different from those for γ-ray and proton primaries. The value of the angular position at which the maximum number of Cherenkov photons are concentrated, increases with increase in energy of vertically incident primary, but for inclined primary it lies within a small value (≤1°) for almost all energies and primary types. No significant difference in the results obtained by using the high energy hadronic interaction models, viz., QGSJETII and EPOS has been

  4. Integrated cosmic muon flux in the zenith angle range 0 < cosθ < 0.37 for momentum threshold up to 11.6 GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hirofumi; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hayashi, Kohei; Kakuno, Hidekazu; Kodama, Hideyo; Nagamine, Kanetada; Sato, Kazuyuki; Sato, Kotaro; Kim, Shin-Hong; Suzuki, Atsuto; Takahashi, Kazuki; Takasaki, Fumihiko

    2017-12-01

    We have measured the cosmic muon flux in the zenith angle range {<} cos θ {<} 0.37 with a detector comprising planes of scintillator hodoscope bars and iron blocks inserted between them. The muon ranges for up to 9.5 m-thick iron blocks allow the provision of muon flux data integrated over corresponding threshold momenta up to 11.6 GeV/c. Such a dataset covering the horizontal direction is extremely useful for a technique called muon radiography, where the mass distribution inside a large object is investigated from the cosmic muon distribution measured behind the object.

  5. Large scale distribution of ultra high energy cosmic rays detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with zenith angles up to 80°

    DOE PAGES

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-30

    In this study, we present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60° and 80°. We perform two Rayleigh analyses, one in the right ascension and one in the azimuth angle distributions, that are sensitive to modulations in right ascension and declination, respectively. The largest departure from isotropy appears in themore » $$E\\gt 8$$ EeV energy bin, with an amplitude for the first harmonic in right ascension $$r_{1}^{\\alpha }=(4.4\\pm 1.0)\\times {{10}^{-2}}$$, that has a chance probability $$P(\\geqslant r_{1}^{\\alpha })=6.4\\times {{10}^{-5}}$$, reinforcing the hint previously reported with vertical events alone.« less

  6. Zenith angle distribution of cosmic ray showers measured with the Yakutsk array and its application to the analysis of arrival directions in equatorial coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    The Yakutsk array data set in the energy interval (1017,1019) eV is revisited in order to interpret the zenith angle distribution of an extensive air shower event rate of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. The close relation of the distribution to the attenuation of the main measurable parameter of showers, ρ600, is examined. Measured and expected distributions are used to analyze the arrival directions of cosmic rays on an equatorial map including the energy range below 1018 eV , which was previously avoided due to the reduced trigger efficiency of the array in the range. While the null hypothesis cannot be rejected with data from the Yakutsk array, an upper limit on the fraction of cosmic rays from a separable source in the uniform background is derived as a function of declination and energy.

  7. Estimation of Canopy Clumping Index From MISR and MODIS Sensors Using the Normalized Difference Hotspot and Darkspot (NDHD) Method: The Influence of BRDF Models and Solar Zenith Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, S.; Fang, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Clumping index (CI) describes the spatial distribution pattern of foliage, and is a critical parameter used to characterize the terrestrial ecosystem and model land-surface processes. Global and regional scale CI maps have been generated from POLDER, MODIS, and MISR sensors based on an empirical relationship with the normalized difference between hotspot and darkspot (NDHD) index by previous studies. However, the hotspot and darkspot values and CI values can be considerably different from different bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) models and solar zenith angles (SZA). In this study, we evaluated the effects of different configurations of BRDF models and SZA values on CI estimation using the NDHD method. CI maps estimated from MISR and MODIS were compared with reference data at the VALERI sites. Results show that for moderate to least clumped vegetation (CI > 0.5), CIs retrieved with the observational SZA agree well with field values, while SZA =0° results in underestimates, and SZA = 60° results in overestimates. For highly clumped (CI < 0.5) and sparsely vegetated areas (FCOVER<25%), the Ross-Li model with 60° SZA is recommended for CI estimation. The suitable NDHD configuration was further used to estimate a 15-year time series CI from MODIS BRDF data. The time series CI shows a reasonable seasonal trajectory, and varies consistently with the MODIS leaf area index (LAI). This study enables better usage of the NDHD method for CI estimation, and can be a useful reference for research on CI validation.

  8. A New Technique for Retrieval of Tropospheric and Stratospheric Ozone Profiles using Sky Radiance Measurements at Multiple View Angles: Application to a Brewer Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzortziou, Maria; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Cede, Alexander; Herman, Jay R.; Vasilkov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes and applies a new technique for retrieving diurnal variability in tropospheric ozone vertical distribution using ground-based measurements of ultraviolet sky radiances. The measured radiances are obtained by a polarization-insensitive modified Brewer double spectrometer located at Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt, Maryland, USA. Results demonstrate that the Brewer angular (0-72deg viewing zenith angle) and spectral (303-320 nm) measurements of sky radiance in the solar principal plane provide sufficient information to derive tropospheric ozone diurnal variability. In addition, the Brewer measurements provide stratospheric ozone vertical distributions at least twice per day near sunrise and sunset. Frequent measurements of total column ozone amounts from direct-sun observations are used as constraints in the retrieval. The vertical ozone profile resolution is shown in terms of averaging kernels to yield at least four points in the troposphere-low stratosphere, including good information in Umkehr layer 0 (0-5 km). The focus of this paper is on the derivation of stratospheric and tropospheric ozone profiles using both simulated and measured radiances. We briefly discuss the necessary modifications of the Brewer spectrometer that were used to eliminate instrumental polarization sensitivity so that accurate sky radiances can be obtained in the presence of strong Rayleigh scattering and aerosols. The results demonstrate that including a site-specific and time-dependent aerosol correction, based on Brewer direct-sun observations of aerosol optical thickness, is critical to minimize the sky radiance residuals as a function of observing angle in the optimal estimation inversion algorithm and improve the accuracy of the retrieved ozone profile.

  9. Very short-term reactive forecasting of the solar ultraviolet index using an extreme learning machine integrated with the solar zenith angle.

    PubMed

    Deo, Ravinesh C; Downs, Nathan; Parisi, Alfio V; Adamowski, Jan F; Quilty, John M

    2017-05-01

    Exposure to erythemally-effective solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) that contributes to malignant keratinocyte cancers and associated health-risk is best mitigated through innovative decision-support systems, with global solar UV index (UVI) forecast necessary to inform real-time sun-protection behaviour recommendations. It follows that the UVI forecasting models are useful tools for such decision-making. In this study, a model for computationally-efficient data-driven forecasting of diffuse and global very short-term reactive (VSTR) (10-min lead-time) UVI, enhanced by drawing on the solar zenith angle (θ s ) data, was developed using an extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm. An ELM algorithm typically serves to address complex and ill-defined forecasting problems. UV spectroradiometer situated in Toowoomba, Australia measured daily cycles (0500-1700h) of UVI over the austral summer period. After trialling activations functions based on sine, hard limit, logarithmic and tangent sigmoid and triangular and radial basis networks for best results, an optimal ELM architecture utilising logarithmic sigmoid equation in hidden layer, with lagged combinations of θ s as the predictor data was developed. ELM's performance was evaluated using statistical metrics: correlation coefficient (r), Willmott's Index (WI), Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient (E NS ), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute error (MAE) between observed and forecasted UVI. Using these metrics, the ELM model's performance was compared to that of existing methods: multivariate adaptive regression spline (MARS), M5 Model Tree, and a semi-empirical (Pro6UV) clear sky model. Based on RMSE and MAE values, the ELM model (0.255, 0.346, respectively) outperformed the MARS (0.310, 0.438) and M5 Model Tree (0.346, 0.466) models. Concurring with these metrics, the Willmott's Index for the ELM, MARS and M5 Model Tree models were 0.966, 0.942 and 0.934, respectively. About 57% of the ELM model

  10. Mesospheric ozone measurements by SAGE II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D. A.; Cunnold, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    SAGE II observations of ozone at sunrise and sunset (solar zenith angle = 90 deg) at approximately the same tropical latitude and on the same day exhibit larger concentrations at sunrise than at sunset between 55 and 65 km. Because of the rapid conversion between atomic oxygen and ozone, the onion-peeling scheme used in SAGE II retrievals, which is based on an assumption of constant ozone, is invalid. A one-dimensional photochemical model is used to simulate the diurnal variation of ozone particularly within the solar zenith angle of 80 deg - 100 deg. This model indicates that the retrieved SAGE II sunrise and sunset ozone values are both overestimated. The Chapman reactions produce an adequate simulation of the ozone sunrise/sunset ratio only below 60 km, while above 60 km this ratio is highly affected by the odd oxygen loss due to odd hydrogen reactions, particularly OH. The SAGE II ozone measurements are in excellent agreement with model results to which an onion peeling procedure is applied. The SAGE II ozone observations provide information on the mesospheric chemistry not only through the ozone profile averages but also from the sunrise/sunset ratio.

  11. Effective recombination coefficient and solar zenith angle effects on low-latitude D-region ionosphere evaluated from VLF signal amplitude and its time delay during X-ray solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Tamal; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    Excess solar X-ray radiation during solar flares causes an enhancement of ionization in the ionospheric D-region and hence affects sub-ionospherically propagating VLF signal amplitude and phase. VLF signal amplitude perturbation (DeltaA) and amplitude time delay (Deltat) (vis- ´a-vis corresponding X-ray light curve as measured by GOES-15) of NWC/19.8 kHz signal have been computed for solar flares which is detected by us during Jan-Sep 2011. The signal is recorded by SoftPAL facility of IERC/ICSP, Sitapur (22(°) 27'N, 87(°) 45'E), West Bengal, India. In first part of the work, using the well known LWPC technique, we simulated the flare induced excess lower ionospheric electron density by amplitude perturbation method. Unperturbed D-region electron density is also obtained from simulation and compared with IRI-model results. Using these simulation results and time delay as key parameters, we calculate the effective electron recombination coefficient (alpha_{eff}) at solar flare peak region. Our results match with the same obtained by other established models. In the second part, we dealt with the solar zenith angle effect on D-region during flares. We relate this VLF data with the solar X-ray data. We find that the peak of the VLF amplitude occurs later than the time of the X-ray peak for each flare. We investigate this so-called time delay (Deltat). For the C-class flares we find that there is a direct correspondence between Deltat of a solar flare and the average solar zenith angle Z over the signal propagation path at flare occurrence time. Now for deeper analysis, we compute the Deltat for different local diurnal time slots DT. We find that while the time delay is anti-correlated with the flare peak energy flux phi_{max} independent of these time slots, the goodness of fit, as measured by reduced-chi(2) , actually worsens as the day progresses. The variation of the Z dependence of reduced-chi(2) seems to follow the variation of standard deviation of Z along

  12. Effective recombination coefficient and solar zenith angle effects on low-latitude D-region ionosphere evaluated from VLF signal amplitude and its time delay during X-ray solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Tamal; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2013-12-01

    Excess solar X-ray radiation during solar flares causes an enhancement of ionization in the ionospheric D-region and hence affects sub-ionospherically propagating VLF signal amplitude and phase. VLF signal amplitude perturbation (Δ A) and amplitude time delay (Δ t) (vis-á-vis corresponding X-ray light curve as measured by GOES-15) of NWC/19.8 kHz signal have been computed for solar flares which is detected by us during Jan-Sep 2011. The signal is recorded by SoftPAL facility of IERC/ICSP, Sitapur (22∘ 27'N, 87∘ 45'E), West Bengal, India. In first part of the work, using the well known LWPC technique, we simulated the flare induced excess lower ionospheric electron density by amplitude perturbation method. Unperturbed D-region electron density is also obtained from simulation and compared with IRI-model results. Using these simulation results and time delay as key parameters, we calculate the effective electron recombination coefficient ( α eff ) at solar flare peak region. Our results match with the same obtained by other established models. In the second part, we dealt with the solar zenith angle effect on D-region during flares. We relate this VLF data with the solar X-ray data. We find that the peak of the VLF amplitude occurs later than the time of the X-ray peak for each flare. We investigate this so-called time delay (Δ t). For the C-class flares we find that there is a direct correspondence between Δ t of a solar flare and the average solar zenith angle Z over the signal propagation path at flare occurrence time. Now for deeper analysis, we compute the Δ t for different local diurnal time slots DT. We find that while the time delay is anti-correlated with the flare peak energy flux ϕ max independent of these time slots, the goodness of fit, as measured by reduced- χ 2, actually worsens as the day progresses. The variation of the Z dependence of reduced- χ 2 seems to follow the variation of standard deviation of Z along the T x - R x propagation

  13. Stratospheric NO2 vertical profile retrieved from ground-based Zenith-Sky DOAS observations at Kiruna, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Myojeong; Enell, Carl-Fredrik; Hendrick, François; Pukite, Janis; Van Roozendael, Michel; Platt, Ulrich; Raffalski, Uwe; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Stratospheric NO2 destroys ozone and acts as a buffer against halogen-catalyzed ozone loss through the formation of reservoir species (ClONO2, BrONO2). Since the importance of both mechanisms depends on the altitude, the investigation of stratospheric NO2 vertical distribution can provide more insight into the role of nitrogen compounds in the destruction of ozone. Here we present stratospheric NO2 vertical profiles retrieved from twilight ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations at Kiruna, Sweden (68.84°N, 20.41°E) covering 1997 - 2013 periods. This instrument observes zenith scattered sunlight. The sensitivity for stratospheric trace gases is highest during twilight due to the maximum altitude of the scattering profile and the light path through the stratosphere, which vary with the solar zenith angle. The profiling algorithm, based on the Optimal Estimation Method, has been developed by IASB-BIRA and successfully applied at other stations (Hendrick et al., 2004). The basic principle behind this profiling approach is that during twilight, the mean Rayleigh scattering altitude scans the stratosphere rapidly, providing height-resolved information on the absorption by stratospheric NO2. In this study, the long-term evolution of the stratospheric NO2 profile at polar latitude will be investigated. Hendrick, F., B. Barret, M. Van Roozendael, H. Boesch, A. Butz, M. De Mazière, F. Goutail, C. Hermans, J.-C. Lambert, K. Pfeilsticker, and J.-P. Pommereau, Retrieval of nitrogen dioxide stratospheric profiles from ground-based zenith-sky UV-visible observations: Validation of the technique through correlative comparisons, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 4, 2091-2106, 2004

  14. Comparison of stratospheric NO2 profiles above Kiruna, Sweden retrieved from ground-based zenith sky DOAS measurements, SAOZ balloon measurements and SCIAMACHY limb observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Myojeong; Enell, Carl-Fredrik; Hendrick, François; Pukite, Janis; Van Roozendael, Michel; Platt, Ulrich; Raffalski, Uwe; Wagner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Stratospheric NO2 not only destroys ozone but acts as a buffer against halogen catalyzed ozone loss by converting halogen species into stable nitrates. These two roles of stratospheric NO2 depend on the altitude. Hence, the objective of this study is to investigate the vertical distribution of stratospheric NO2. We compare the NO2 profiles derived from the zenith sky DOAS with those obtained from, SAOZ balloon measurements and satellite limb observations. Vertical profiles of stratospheric NO2 are retrieved from ground-based zenith sky DOAS observations operated at Kiruna, Sweden (68.84°N, 20.41°E) since 1996. To determine the profile of stratospheric NO2 measured from ground-based zenith sky DOAS, we apply the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM) to retrieval of vertical profiles of stratospheric NO2 which has been developed by IASB-BIRA. The basic principle behind this profiling approach is the dependence of the mean scattering height on solar zenith angle (SZA). We compare the retrieved profiles to two additional datasets of stratospheric NO2 profile. The first one is derived from satellite limb observations by SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY) on EnviSAT. The second is derived from the SAOZ balloon measurements (using a UV/Visible spectrometer) performed at Kiruna in Sweden.

  15. Zenith 1 truss transfer ceremony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A wide-angle view of the floor of the Space Station Processing Facility. The floor is filled with racks and hardware for processing and testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). At center left is the Zenith-1 (Z-1) Truss, the cornerstone truss of the Space Station. The Z-1 Truss was officially turned over to NASA from The Boeing Co. on July 31. It is scheduled to fly in Space Shuttle Discovery's payload pay on STS-92 targeted for launch Oct. 5, 2000. The Z-1 is considered a cornerstone truss because it carries critical components of the Station's attitude, communications, thermal and power control systems as well as four control moment gyros, high and low gain antenna systems, and two plasma contactor units used to disperse electrical charge build-ups. The Z-1 truss and a Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3), also flying to the Station on the same mission, will be the first major U.S. elements flown to the ISS aboard the Shuttle since the launch of the Unity element in December 1998. The large module in the upper right hand corner of the floor is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. Expected to be a major feature in future research, Destiny will provide facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch).

  16. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    Ozone is a gas. It can be good or bad, depending on where it is. "Good" ozone occurs naturally about 10 to 30 miles above ... the sun's ultraviolet rays. Part of the good ozone layer is gone. Man-made chemicals have destroyed ...

  17. Reanalysis of Mariner 9 UV Spectrometer Data for Ozone, Cloud, and Dust Abundances, and Their Interaction Over Climate Timescales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1994-01-01

    Mariner 9 UV spectrometer data have been reinverted for the ozone abundance. The spectra were fit by models which covered the full range in observed solar zenith angle, cloud, dust and ozone amount, ice albedo and look angles. Errors in ozone retrieval with this data are tabulated over a range in theses conditions and are shown graphically. This work shows that significant underestimation of ozone occurred in earlier analysis of Mariner 9 data, and that much of the observed variability in Mars ozone is due to masking of ozone by clouds and dust. An in-situ measurement by balloon is recommended as it is the only technique capable of accurately inferring the ozone abundance in all conditions. Recommendations for future research are also presented. 7 manuscripts have been published in refereed journals, and three are in review. A review of these publications and presentations is in the report.

  18. Checking ozone amounts by measurements of UV-irradiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seckmeyer, Gunther; Kettner, Christiane; Thiel, Stephen

    1994-01-01

    Absolute measurements of UV-irradiances in Germany and New Zealand are used to determine the total amounts of ozone. UV-irradiances measured and calculated for clear skies and for solar zenith angles less than 60 deg generally show a good accordance. The UVB-irradiances, however, show that the actual Dobson values are about 5 percent higher in Germany and about 3 percent higher in New Zealand compared to those obtained by our method. Possible reasons for these deviations are discussed.

  19. Actinometric measurements and theoretical calculations of j/O3/, the rate of photolysis of ozone to O/1D/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Stedman, D. H.; Chameides, W. L.; Crutzen, P. J.; Fishman, J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents an experimental technique which measures j/O3-O(1-D)/, the rate of solar photolysis of ozone to singlet oxygen atoms. It is shown that a flow actinometer carries dilute O3 in N2O into direct sunlight where the O(1D) formed reacts with N2O to form NO which chemiluminescence detects, with a time resolution of about one minute. Measurements indicate a photolysis rate of 1.2 (+ or - .2) x 10 to the -5/s for a cloudless sky, 45 deg zenith angle, 0.345 cm ozone column and zero albedo. Finally, ground level results compare with theoretical calculations based on the UV actinic flux as a function of ozone column and solar zenith angle.

  20. Analysis of error in TOMS total ozone as a function of orbit and attitude parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, W. W.; Ardanuy, P. E.; Braun, W. C.; Vallette, B. J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ray, S. N.

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations of orbital scenarios were performed to examine the effects of orbital altitude, equator crossing time, attitude uncertainty, and orbital eccentricity on ozone observations by future satellites. These effects were assessed by determining changes in solar and viewing geometry and earth daytime coverage loss. The importance of these changes on ozone retrieval was determined by simulating uncertainties in the TOMS ozone retrieval algorithm. The major findings are as follows: (1) Drift of equator crossing time from local noon would have the largest effect on the quality of ozone derived from TOMS. The most significant effect of this drift is the loss of earth daytime coverage in the winter hemisphere. The loss in coverage increases from 1 degree latitude for + or - 1 hour from noon, 6 degrees for + or - 3 hours from noon, to 53 degrees for + or - 6 hours from noon. An additional effect is the increase in ozone retrieval errors due to high solar zenith angles. (2) To maintain contiguous earth coverage, the maximum scan angle of the sensor must be increased with decreasing orbital altitude. The maximum scan angle required for full coverage at the equator varies from 60 degrees at 600 km altitude to 45 degrees at 1200 km. This produces an increase in spacecraft zenith angle, theta, which decreases the ozone retrieval accuracy. The range in theta was approximately 72 degrees for 600 km to approximately 57 degrees at 1200 km. (3) The effect of elliptical orbits is to create gaps in coverage along the subsatellite track. An elliptical orbit with a 200 km perigee and 1200 km apogee produced a maximum earth coverage gap of about 45 km at the perigee at nadir. (4) An attitude uncertainty of 0.1 degree in each axis (pitch, roll, yaw) produced a maximum scan angle to view the pole, and maximum solar zenith angle).

  1. Spectral changes in the zenith skylight during total solar eclipses.

    PubMed

    Hall, W N

    1971-06-01

    The relative spectral intensity of the zenith sky was measured with an optical scanning spectrometer at Nantucket Island, Massachusetts, during the total solar eclipse of 7 March 1970. The spectral ratios I(5100 A)/I(4300 A) and I(5900 A)/I(5100 A) at Nantucket remained unchanged for 96% or less obscuration of the sun by the moon. The results are compared with other recent relative spectral intensity measurements made during total solar eclipses. Comparison with other eclipse measurements for solar elevation angle at totality less than 45 degrees shows a blue color shift consistent with rayleigh scattering. Eclipses with solar elevation angles at totality greater than 45 degrees do not show consistent color shifts. This inconsistency may be due to difficulty in establishing a suitable reference spectrum for comparison with the spectral distribution of the zenith sky at totality. Selection of a suitable reference spectrum is discussed.

  2. Equatorial ozone profile comparisons using OSO-8 UVMCS and Nimbus 4 BUV data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.; Millier, F.; Emery, B.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison is made of equatorial ozone altitude profiles derived from data taken during near-coincident passes of the French solar occultation experiment on OSO-8 and the BUV instrument on Nimbus 4. The period of observation is August through October 1975. OSO-8 data are confined to sunset and the BUV measures ozone during the day for a range of solar zenith angles. Good agreement is found between ozone concentrations from OSO-8 and Nimbus 4 in the region of near overlap, 0.7 mb (52 km). Data indicate that the diurnal variation in ozone below 55 km is less than 20 percent in agreement with current models. The equatorial ozone profile can be described frequently by a single scale height from 34 to 60 km.

  3. Multipurpose Spectroradiometer for Satellite Instrument Calibration and Zenith Sky Remote Sensing Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Donald F.; Ahmad, Zia

    2001-01-01

    In the early 1990s a series of surface-based direct sun and zenith sky measurements of total column ozone were made with SBUV/2 flight models and the SSBUV Space Shuttle instrument in Boulder, Colorado which were compared with NOAA Dobson Instrument direct sun observations and TOMS instrument overpass observations of column ozone. These early measurements led to the investigation of the accuracy of derived total column ozone amounts and aerosol optical depths from zenith sky observations. Following the development and availability of radiometrically stable IAD narrow band interference filter and nitrided silicon photodiodes a simple compact multifilter spectroradiometer was developed which can be used as a calibration transfer standard spectroradiometer (CTSS) or as a surface based instrument remote sensing instruments for measurements of total column ozone and aerosol optical depths. The total column ozone derived from zenith sky observations agrees with Dobson direct sun AD double wavelength pair measurements and with TOMS overpass ozone amounts within uncertainties of about 1%. When used as a calibration transfer standard spectroradiometer the multifilter spectroradiometer appears to be capable of establishing instrument radiometric calibration uncertainties of the order of 1% or less relative to national standards laboratory radiometric standards.

  4. A simple parameterization for the height of maximum ozone heating rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Can; Li, Jiangnan; Liu, Renqiang; Liu, Cuiping

    2017-12-01

    It is well-known that the height of the maximum ozone heating rate is much higher than the height of the maximum ozone concentration in the stratosphere. However, it lacks an analytical expression to explain it. A simple theoretical model has been proposed to calculate the height of maximum ozone heating rate and further understand this phenomenon. Strong absorption of ozone causes the incoming solar flux to be largely attenuated before reaching the location of the maximum ozone concentration. By comparing with the exact radiative transfer calculations, the heights of the maximum ozone heating rate produced by the theoretical model are generally very close to the true values. When the cosine of solar zenith angle μ0 = 1.0 , in US Standard atmosphere, the heights of the maximum ozone heating rate by the theoretical model are 41.4 km in the band 0.204-0.233 μm, 47.9 km in the band 0.233-0.270 μm, 44.5 km in the band 0.270-0.286 μm, 37.1 km in the band 0.286-0.303 μm, and 30.2 km in the band 0.303-0.323 μm, respectively. The location of the maximum ozone heating rate is sensitive to the solar spectral range. In band 1, the heights of the maximum ozone heating rate by the theoretical model are 52.3 km for μ0 = 0.1 , 47.1 km for μ0 = 0.3 , 44.6 km for μ0 = 0.5 , 43.1 km for μ0 = 0.7 , 41.9 km for μ0 = 0.9 , 41.4 km for μ0 = 1.0 in US Standard atmosphere, respectively. This model also illustrates that the location of the maximum ozone heating rate is sensitive to the solar zenith angle.

  5. Atmospheric effects on radiometry from zenith of a plane with dark vertical protrusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.

    1983-01-01

    Effects of an optically thin plane-parallel scattering atmosphere on radiometric imaging from the zenith of a specific surface-type are analyzed. The surface model was previously developed to describe arid steppe, where the sparse vegetation forms dark vertical protrusions from the bright soil-plane. The analysis is in terms of the surface reflectivity to the zenith r sub p for the direct beam, which is formulated as r sub p = r sub i exp (-s tan theta sub 0), where v sub i is the Lambert law reflectivity of the soil, the protrusions parameters s is the projection on a vertical plane of protrusions per unit area and theta sub 0 is the zenith angle. The surface reflectivity r sub p is approximately equal to that for the global irradiance (which is directly measured in the field) only for a narrow range of the solar zenith angles. The effects of the atmosphere when imaging large uniform areas of this type are comparable to those in imaging a Lambert surface with a reflectivity r sub p. Thus, the effects can be approximated by those in the case of a dark Lambert surface (analyzed previously), inasmuch as r sub p is smaller than the soil reflectivity r sub i for any off-zenith illumination. The surface becomes effectively darker with increasing solar zenith angle. Adjacency effects of a reflection from one area and scattering in the instantaneous field of view (object pixel) are analyzed as cross radiance and cross irradiance.

  6. Inclusion of the second Umkehr in the conventional Umkehr retrieval analysis as a means of improving ozone retrievals in the upper stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gioulgkidis, Konstantinos; Lowe, Robert P.; Mcelroy, C. Tom

    1994-01-01

    The Umkehr method for retrieving the gross features of the vertical ozone distribution requires measurements of the ratio of zenith-sky radiances at two wavelengths in the near-UV region while the solar zenith angle (SZA) changes from 60 to 90 degrees. A Brewer spectrophotometer was used for taking such measurements extending the SZA range down to 96 degrees. Analyzed data from the Spring of 1991 imply that observations at twilight are of great significance in improving ozone retrievals in the upper stratosphere. Judged by the variance reduction for Umkehr layers 9 to 12 (25-30 percent for layer 11) and the increase in separation and amplitude of the averaging kernels for the relevant layers, the ozone retrievals in the upper stratosphere are shown to be in better agreement with climatological means.

  7. TOMS total ozone data compared with northern latitude Dobson ground stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heese, B.; Barthel, K.; Hov, O.

    1994-01-01

    Ozone measurements from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer on the Nimbus 7 satellite are compared with ground-based measurements from five Dobson stations at northern latitudes to evaluate the accuracy of the TOMS data, particularly in regions north of 50 deg N. The measurements from the individual stations show mean differences from -2.5 percent up to plus 8.3 percent relative to TOMS measurements and two of the ground stations, Oslo and Longyearbyen, show a significant drift of plus 1.2 percent and plus 3.7 percent per year, respectively. It can be shown from nearly simultaneous measurements in two different wavelength double pairs at Oslo that at least 2 percent of the differences result from the use of the CC' wavelength double pair instead of the standard AD wavelength double pair. Since all Norwegian stations used the CC' wavelength double pair exclusively a similar error can be assumed for Tromso and Longyearbyren. A comparison between the tropospheric ozone content in TOMS data and from ECC ozonesonde measurements at Ny-Alesund and Bear Island shows that the amount of tropospheric ozone in the standard profiles used in the TOMS algorithm is too low, which leads to an error of about 2 percent in total ozone. Particularly at high solar zenith angles (greater than 80 deg), Dobson measurements become unreliable. They are up to 20 percent lower than TOMS measurements averaged over solar zenith angles of 88 deg to 89 deg.

  8. Zenith 1 truss transfer ceremony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Zenith-1 (Z-1) Truss is officially presented to NASA by The Boeing Co. on the Space Station Processing Facility floor on July 31. STS-92 Commander Col. Brian Duffy, comments on the presentation. Pictured are The Boeing Co. processing team and STS-92 astronauts. The Z-1 Truss is the cornerstone truss of the International Space Station and is scheduled to fly in Space Shuttle Discovery's payload pay on STS-92 targeted for launch Oct. 5, 2000. The Z-1 is considered a cornerstone truss because it carries critical components of the Station's attitude, communications, thermal and power control systems as well as four control moment gyros, high and low gain antenna systems, and two plasma contactor units used to disperse electrical charge build- ups. The Z-1 truss and a Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3), also flying to the Station on the same mission, will be the first major U.S. elements flown to the ISS aboard the Shuttle since the launch of the Unity element in December 1998.

  9. Zenith 1 truss transfer ceremony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The STS-92 astronaut team study the the Zenith-1 (Z-1) Truss during the Crew Equipment Interface Test. The Z-1 Truss was officially presented to NASA by The Boeing Co. on the Space Station Processing Facility floor on July 31. The truss is the cornerstone truss of the International Space Station and is scheduled to fly in Space Shuttle Discovery's payload pay on STS- 92 targeted for launch Oct. 5, 2000. The Z-1 is considered a cornerstone truss because it carries critical components of the Station's attitude, communications, thermal and power control systems as well as four control moment gyros, high and low gain antenna systems, and two plasma contactor units used to disperse electrical charge build-ups. The Z-1 truss and a Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3), also flying to the Station on the same mission, will be the first major U.S. elements flown to the ISS aboard the Shuttle since the launch of the Unity element in December 1998.

  10. Zenith 1 truss transfer ceremony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Zenith-1 (Z-1) Truss is officially presented to NASA by The Boeing Co. on the Space Station Processing Facility floor on July 31. STS-92 Commander Col. Brian Duffy, comments on the presentation. At his side is Tip Talone, NASA director of International Space Station and Payload Processing at KSC. Talone and Col. Duffy received a symbolic key for the truss from John Elbon, Boeing director of ISS ground operations. The Z-1 Truss is the cornerstone truss of the International Space Station and is scheduled to fly in Space Shuttle Discovery's payload pay on STS- 92 targeted for launch Oct. 5, 2000. The Z-1 is considered a cornerstone truss because it carries critical components of the Station's attitude, communications, thermal and power control systems as well as four control moment gyros, high and low gain antenna systems, and two plasma contactor units used to disperse electrical charge build-ups. The Z-1 truss and a Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3), also flying to the Station on the same mission, will be the first major U.S. elements flown to the ISS aboard the Shuttle since the launch of the Unity element in December 1998.

  11. ADEOS Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Data Products User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, A.; Bhartia, P. K.; McPeters, R.; Herman, J.; Wellemeyer, C.; Jaross, G.; Seftor, C.; Torres, O.; Labow, G.; Byerly, W.; hide

    1998-01-01

    Two data products from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (ADEOS/TOMS) have been archived at the Distributed Active Archive Center, in the form of Hierarchical Data Format files. The ADEOS/ TOMS began taking measurements on September 11, 1996, and ended on June 29, 1997. The instrument measured backscattered Earth radiance and incoming solar irradiance; their ratio was used in ozone retrievals. Changes in the reflectivity of the solar diffuser used for the irradiance measurement were monitored using a carousel of three diffusers, each exposed to the degrading effects of solar irradiation at different rates. The algorithm to retrieve total column ozone compares measured Earth radiances at sets of three wavelengths with radiances calculated for different total ozone values, solar zenith angles, and optical paths. The initial error in the absolute scale for TOMS total ozone is 3 percent, the one standard deviation random error is 2 percent, and the drift is less than 0.5 percent over the 9-month data record. The Level 2 product contains the measured radiances, the derived total ozone amount, and reflectivity information for each scan position. The Level 3 product contains daily total ozone and reflectivity in a 1-degree latitude by 1.25 degrees longitude grid. The Level 3 files containing estimates of UVB at the Earth surface and tropospheric aerosol information will also be available. Detailed descriptions of both HDF data files and the CDROM product are provided.

  12. Extended and refined multi sensor reanalysis of total ozone for the period 1970-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der A, R. J.; Allaart, M. A. F.; Eskes, H. J.

    2015-07-01

    The ozone multi-sensor reanalysis (MSR) is a multi-decadal ozone column data record constructed using all available ozone column satellite data sets, surface Brewer and Dobson observations and a data assimilation technique with detailed error modelling. The result is a high-resolution time series of 6-hourly global ozone column fields and forecast error fields that may be used for ozone trend analyses as well as detailed case studies. The ozone MSR is produced in two steps. First, the latest reprocessed versions of all available ozone column satellite data sets are collected and then are corrected for biases as a function of solar zenith angle (SZA), viewing zenith angle (VZA), time (trend), and stratospheric temperature using surface observations of the ozone column from Brewer and Dobson spectrophotometers from the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre (WOUDC). Subsequently the de-biased satellite observations are assimilated within the ozone chemistry and data assimilation model TMDAM. The MSR2 (MSR version 2) reanalysis upgrade described in this paper consists of an ozone record for the 43-year period 1970-2012. The chemistry transport model and data assimilation system have been adapted to improve the resolution, error modelling and processing speed. Backscatter ultraviolet (BUV) satellite observations have been included for the period 1970-1977. The total record is extended by 13 years compared to the first version of the ozone multi sensor reanalysis, the MSR1. The latest total ozone retrievals of 15 satellite instruments are used: BUV-Nimbus4, TOMS-Nimbus7, TOMS-EP, SBUV-7, -9, -11, -14, -16, -17, -18, -19, GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME-2. The resolution of the model runs, assimilation and output is increased from 2° × 3° to 1° × 1°. The analysis is driven by 3-hourly meteorology from the ERA-Interim reanalysis of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) starting from 1979, and ERA-40 before that date. The chemistry

  13. Modeling Solar Zenith Angle Effects on the Polar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, A; Kitamura, N.; Toth, G; Gombosi, T.

    2012-01-01

    We use the Polar Wind Outflow Model (PWOM) to study the geomagnetically quiet conditions in the polar cap during solar maximum. The PWOM solves the gyrotropic transport equations for O+, H+, and He+ along several magnetic field lines in the polar region in order to reconstruct the full 3D solution. We directly compare our simulation results to the data based empirical model of Kitamura et al. (2011) of electron density which is based on 63 months of Akebono satellite observations. The modeled ion and electron temperatures are also compared with a statistical compilation of quiet time data obtained by the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR) and Intercosmos Satellites. The data and model agree reasonably well, albeit with some differences. This study shows that photoelectrons play an important role in explaining the differences between sunlit and dark results of electron density, ion composition, as well as ion and electron temperatures of the quiet time polar wind solution. Moreover, these results provide an initial validation of the PWOM s ability to model the quiet time "background" solution.

  14. Comparison of GOME-2/MetOp total ozone data with Brewer spectroradiometer data over the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, M.; Loyola, D.; López, M.; Vilaplana, J. M.; Bañón, M.; Zimmer, W.; Serrano, A.

    2009-04-01

    The main objective of this article is to compare the total ozone data from the new Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment instrument (GOME-2/MetOp) with reliable ground-based measurement recorded by five Brewer spectroradiometers in the Iberian Peninsula. In addition, a similar comparison for the predecessor instrument GOME/ERS-2 is described. The period of study is a whole year from May 2007 to April 2008. The results show that GOME-2/MetOp ozone data already has a very good quality, total ozone columns are on average 3.05% lower than Brewer measurements. This underestimation is higher than that obtained for GOME/ERS-2 (1.46%). However, the relative differences between GOME-2/MetOp and Brewer measurements show significantly lower variability than the differences between GOME/ERS-2 and Brewer data. Dependencies of these relative differences with respect to the satellite solar zenith angle (SZA), the satellite scan angle, the satellite cloud cover fraction (CF), and the ground-based total ozone measurements are analyzed. For both GOME instruments, differences show no significant dependence on SZA. However, GOME-2/MetOp data show a significant dependence on the satellite scan angle (+1.5%). In addition, GOME/ERS-2 differences present a clear dependence with respect to the CF and ground-based total ozone; such differences are minimized for GOME-2/MetOp. The comparison between the daily total ozone values provided by both GOME instruments shows that GOME-2/MetOp ozone data are on average 1.46% lower than GOME/ERS-2 data without any seasonal dependence. Finally, deviations of a priori climatological ozone profile used by the satellite retrieval algorithm from the true ozone profile are analyzed. Although excellent agreement between a priori climatological and measured partial ozone values is found for the middle and high stratosphere, relative differences greater than 15% are common for the troposphere and lower stratosphere.

  15. Solar UV-B irradiance and total ozone in Italy: Fluctuations and trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casale, G. R.; Meloni, D.; Miano, S.; Palmieri, S.; Siani, A. M.; Cappellani, F.

    2000-02-01

    Solar UV irradiance spectra (290-325 nm) together with daily total ozone column observations have been collected since 1992 by means of Brewer spectrophotometers at two Italian stations (Rome and Ispra). The available Brewer irradiance data, recorded around noon and at fixed solar zenith angles, together with the output of a radiative transfer model (the STAR model) are presented and analyzed. The Brewer irradiance measurements and total ozone fluctuations and anomalies are investigated, pointing out the correlation between the high-frequency O3 components and irradiance at 305 nm. In addition, the total ozone long time series of Arosa (170 km apart from Ispra) and Vigna di Valle (very close to Rome) are analyzed to illustrate evidence of temporal variations and a possible trend.

  16. Combined Characterisation of GOME and TOMS Total Ozone Using Ground-Based Observations from the NDSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, J.-C.; VanRoozendael, M.; Simon, P. C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Goutail, F.; Andersen, S. B.; Arlander, D. W.; BuiVan, N. A.; Claude, H.; deLaNoee, J.; hide

    1998-01-01

    Several years of total ozone measured from space by the ERS-2 GOME, the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), and the ADEOS TOMS, are compared with high-quality ground-based observations associated with the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC), over an extended latitude range and a variety of geophysical conditions. The comparisons with each spaceborne sensor are combined altogether for investigating their respective solar zenith angle (SZA) dependence, dispersion, and difference of sensitivity. The space- and ground-based data are found to agree within a few percent on average. However, the analysis highlights for both Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and TOMS several sources of discrepancies, including a dependence on the SZA at high latitudes and internal inconsistencies.

  17. Spectral dependence on the correction factor of erythemal UV for cloud, aerosol, total ozone, and surface properties: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Seo; Jung, Yeonjin; Lee, Yun Gon

    2016-07-01

    Radiative transfer model simulations were used to investigate the erythemal ultraviolet (EUV) correction factors by separating the UV-A and UV-B spectral ranges. The correction factor was defined as the ratio of EUV caused by changing the amounts and characteristics of the extinction and scattering materials. The EUV correction factors (CFEUV) for UV-A [CFEUV(A)] and UV-B [CFEUV(B)] were affected by changes in the total ozone, optical depths of aerosol and cloud, and the solar zenith angle. The differences between CFEUV(A) and CFEUV(B) were also estimated as a function of solar zenith angle, the optical depths of aerosol and cloud, and total ozone. The differences between CFEUV(A) and CFEUV(B) ranged from -5.0% to 25.0% for aerosols, and from -9.5% to 2.0% for clouds in all simulations for different solar zenith angles and optical depths of aerosol and cloud. The rate of decline of CFEUV per unit optical depth between UV-A and UV-B differed by up to 20% for the same aerosol and cloud conditions. For total ozone, the variation in CFEUV(A) was negligible compared with that in CFEUV(B) because of the effective spectral range of the ozone absorption band. In addition, the sensitivity of the CFEUVs due to changes in surface conditions (i.e., surface albedo and surface altitude) was also estimated by using the model in this study. For changes in surface albedo, the sensitivity of the CFEUVs was 2.9%-4.1% per 0.1 albedo change, depending on the amount of aerosols or clouds. For changes in surface altitude, the sensitivity of CFEUV(B) was twice that of CFEUV(A), because the Rayleigh optical depth increased significantly at shorter wavelengths.

  18. The total ozone and UV solar radiation over Stara Zagora, Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendeva, B.; Gogosheva, Ts.; Petkov, B.; Krastev, D.

    Direct ground-based UV measurements and the total ozone content (TOC) over Stara Zagora, Bulgaria are presented. The observations are conducted by a scanning spectrophotometer, which measures the direct solar radiation in the range 290 - 360 nm with 1 nm resolution. For the time period 1998 -- 2003 the TOC data show seasonal variations, typical for the middle latitudes -- maximum in the spring and minimum in the autumn. The comparison of these TOC ground-based data to TOC satellite-borne data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) shows a seasonal dependence of the differences between the ground-based and satellite data. The relation between the UV radiation and TOC is investigated. Clear negative relationship is recognized between the total ozone and the irradiance of the wavelength 305 nm. The opposition of the two variables is significant ( r = - 0,62 ± 0,18) at 98 % confidence level. Yet, for 325 nm it is almost independent with the total ozone. The dependence of the UV-B radiation on the solar zenith angle at given TOC is also analyzed. A decrease of all wavelengths intensities with increase of the solar zenith angle is obtained but with different rate for each of them. The direct sun UV doses for some specific biological effects (erythema and eyes) are obtained as the integral in the wavelength interval 290-330 nm of the measured UV solar spectrum, weighted with an action spectrum, typical for each effect. The estimation of the radiation amplification factor RAF shows that the ozone reduction by 1% increases the erythemal dose by 2,3 %.The eye-damaging doses are more influenced by the TOC changes and in this case RAF=-2,7%. The amount of these biological doses is in a direct ratio with the solar altitude over the horizon. This dependence is more markedly expressed at lower total ozone content in the atmosphere.

  19. Study of the anticorrelations between ozone and UV-B radiation using linear and exponential fits in Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnieri, R.; Padilha, L.; Guarnieri, F.; Echer, E.; Makita, K.; Pinheiro, D.; Schuch, A.; Boeira, L.; Schuch, N.

    Ultraviolet radiation type B (UV-B 280-315nm) is well known by its damage to life on Earth, including the possibility of causing skin cancer in humans. However, the atmo- spheric ozone has absorption bands in this spectral radiation, reducing its incidence on Earth's surface. Therefore, the ozone amount is one of the parameters, besides clouds, aerosols, solar zenith angles, altitude, albedo, that determine the UV-B radia- tion intensity reaching the Earth's surface. The total ozone column, in Dobson Units, determined by TOMS spectrometer on board of a NASA satellite, and UV-B radiation measurements obtained by a UV-B radiometer model MS-210W (Eko Instruments) were correlated. The measurements were obtained at the Observatório Espacial do Sul - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (OES/CRSPE/INPE-MCT) coordinates: Lat. 29.44oS, Long. 53.82oW. The correlations were made using UV-B measurements in fixed solar zenith angles and only days with clear sky were selected in a period from July 1999 to December 2001. Moreover, the mathematic behavior of correlation in dif- ferent angles was observed, and correlation coefficients were determined by linear and first order exponential fits. In both fits, high correlation coefficients values were ob- tained, and the difference between linear and exponential fit can be considered small.

  20. Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data products user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeters, Richard D.; Krueger, Arlin J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Herman, Jay R.; Oaks, Arnold; Ahmad, Ziuddin; Cebula, Richard P.; Schlesinger, Barry M.; Swissler, Tom; Taylor, Steven L.

    1993-01-01

    Two tape products from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) aboard the Nimbus-7 have been archived at the National Space Science Data Center. The instrument measures backscattered Earth radiance and incoming solar irradiance; their ratio -- the albedo -- is used in ozone retrievals. In-flight measurements are used to monitor changes in the instrument sensitivity. The algorithm to retrieve total column ozone compares the observed ratios of albedos at pairs of wavelengths with pair ratios calculated for different ozone values, solar zenith angles, and optical paths. The initial error in the absolute scale for TOMS total ozone is 3 percent, the one standard-deviation random error is 2 percent, and the drift is +/- 1.5 percent over 14.5 years. The High Density TOMS (HDTOMS) tape contains the measured albedos, the derived total ozone amount, reflectivity, and cloud-height information for each scan position. It also contains an index of SO2 contamination for each position. The Gridded TOMS (GRIDTOMS) tape contains daily total ozone and reflectivity in roughly equal area grids (110 km in latitude by about 100-150 km in longitude). Detailed descriptions of the tape structure and record formats are provided.

  1. Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Data Products User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard D.; Bhartia, P. K.; Krueger, Arlin J.; Herman, Jay R.; Schlesinger, Barry M.; Wellemeyer, Charles G.; Seftor, Colin J.; Jaross, Glen; Taylor, Steven L.; Swissler, Tom; hide

    1996-01-01

    Two data products from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) onboard Nimbus-7 have been archived at the Distributed Active Archive Center, in the form of Hierarchical Data Format files. The instrument measures backscattered Earth radiance and incoming solar irradiance; their ratio is used in ozone retrievals. Changes in the instrument sensitivity are monitored by a spectral discrimination technique using measurements of the intrinsically stable wavelength dependence of derived surface reflectivity. The algorithm to retrieve total column ozone compares measured Earth radiances at sets of three wavelengths with radiances calculated for different total ozone values, solar zenith angles, and optical paths. The initial error in the absolute scale for TOMS total ozone is 3 percent, the one standard deviation random error is 2 percent, and drift is less than 1.0 percent per decade. The Level-2 product contains the measured radiances, the derived total ozone amount, and reflectivity information for each scan position. The Level-3 product contains daily total ozone amount and reflectivity in a I - degree latitude by 1.25 degrees longitude grid. The Level-3 product also is available on CD-ROM. Detailed descriptions of both HDF data files and the CD-ROM product are provided.

  2. Comparison of TOMS, SBW & SBUV/2 Version 8 Total Column Ozone Data with Data from Groundstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labow, G. J.; McPeters, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    The Nimbus-7 and Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data as well as SBUV and SBUV/2 data have been reprocessed with a new retrieval algorithm (Version 8) and an updated calibration procedure. An overview will be presented systematically comparing ozone values to an ensemble of Brewer and Dobson spectrophotometers. The comparisons were made as a function of latitude, solar zenith angle, reflectivity and total ozone. Results show that the accuracy of the TOMS retrieval has been improved when aerosols are present in the atmosphere, when snow/ice and sea glint are present, and when ozone in the northern hemisphere is extremely low. TOMS overpass data are derived from the single TOMS best match measurement, almost always located within one degree of the ground station and usually made within an hour of local noon. The Version 8 Earth Probe TOMS ozone values have decreased by an average of about 1% due to a much better understanding of the calibration of the instrument. N-7 SBUV as well as the series of NOAA SBUV/2 column ozone values have also been processed with the Version 8 algorithm and have been compared to values from an ensemble of groundstations. Results show that the SBW column ozone values agree well with the groundstations and the datasets are useful for trend studies.

  3. Atmospheric ozone and colors of the Antarctic twilight sky.

    PubMed

    Lee, Raymond L; Meyer, Wolfgang; Hoeppe, Götz

    2011-10-01

    Zenith skylight is often distinctly blue during clear civil twilights, and much of this color is due to preferential absorption at longer wavelengths by ozone's Chappuis bands. Because stratospheric ozone is greatly depleted in the austral spring, such decreases could plausibly make Antarctic twilight colors less blue then, including at the zenith. So for several months in 2005, we took digital images of twilight zenith and antisolar skies at Antarctica's Georg von Neumayer Station. Our colorimetric analysis of these images shows only weak correlations between ozone concentration and twilight colors. We also used a spectroradiometer at a midlatitude site to measure zenith twilight spectra and colors. At both locations, spectral extinction by aerosols seems as important as ozone absorption in explaining colors seen throughout the twilight sky.

  4. Initial estimate of NOAA-9 SBUV/2 total ozone drift: Based on comparison with re-calibrated TOMS measurements and pair justification of SBUV/2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellemeyer, C. G.; Taylor, S. L.; Gu, X. U.; Mcpeters, Richard D.; Hudson, R. D.

    1990-01-01

    Newly recalibrated version 6 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data are used as a reference measurement in a comparison of monthly means of total ozone in 10 degree latitude zones from SBUV/2 and the nadir measurements from TOMS. These comparisons indicate a roughly linear long-term drift in SBUV/2 total ozone relative to TOMS of about 2.5 Dobson units per year at the equator over the first three years of SBUV/2. The pari justification technique is also applied to the SBUV/2 measurements in a manner similar to that used for SBUV and TOMS. The higher solar zenith angles associated with the afternoon orbit of NOAA-9 and the large changes in solar zenith angle associated with its changing equator crossing time degrade the accuracy of the pair justification method relative to its application to SBUV and TOMS, but the results are consistent with the SBUV/2-TOMS comparisons, and show a roughly linear drift in SBUV/2 of 2.5 to 4.5 Dobson units per year in equatorial ozone.

  5. Ozone and UV-B variations at Ispra from 1993 to 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellani, F.; Kochler, C.

    An analysis of the variability of the total ozone column at Ispra (Italy) has been performed to ascertain if, even in a short-time interval of 5 years (1993-1997), a decline of the monthly mean ozone values could be demonstrated. A linear fit of the data displays a decrease of 0.21% per year with a mean value equal to 319±2 D.U. and an amplitude of the annual cycle of about 10% of the mean. A linear regression of the surface monthly mean ozone values has also been performed showing a decreasing trend (-1% per year) that could contribute, even if for a very small amount, to the decline of the total ozone values. Ispra monthly mean total ozone data have been compared with those of three stations located within 2° latitude and 3° longitude from Ispra (Haute Provence, Hohenpeissenberg and Arosa). A linear fit of the data shows some discrepancies in the ozone changes, which can be attributed to the limited length of the observational period. An analysis has been performed to verify if the variation of ozone at Ispra is in agreement with that of the solar UV measured at a wavelength (305 nm) where the ozone absorption is still remarkable. The results, taken at a fixed solar zenith angle of 68°, show a clear anticorrelation between the monthly mean values of UV and the corresponding values of the total ozone column; the linear fit of the UV data displays an increase of 2.0% per year, much higher than expected from the ozone decrease, and a mean value of 1.4±0.1 mW m -2 nm -1.

  6. Total ozone column derived from GOME and SCIAMACHY using KNMI retrieval algorithms: Validation against Brewer measurements at the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, M.; Kroon, M.; López, M.; Vilaplana, J. M.; Bañón, M.; van der A, R.; Veefkind, J. P.; Stammes, P.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2011-11-01

    This article focuses on the validation of the total ozone column (TOC) data set acquired by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) satellite remote sensing instruments using the Total Ozone Retrieval Scheme for the GOME Instrument Based on the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (TOGOMI) and Total Ozone Retrieval Scheme for the SCIAMACHY Instrument Based on the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (TOSOMI) retrieval algorithms developed by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute. In this analysis, spatially colocated, daily averaged ground-based observations performed by five well-calibrated Brewer spectrophotometers at the Iberian Peninsula are used. The period of study runs from January 2004 to December 2009. The agreement between satellite and ground-based TOC data is excellent (R2 higher than 0.94). Nevertheless, the TOC data derived from both satellite instruments underestimate the ground-based data. On average, this underestimation is 1.1% for GOME and 1.3% for SCIAMACHY. The SCIAMACHY-Brewer TOC differences show a significant solar zenith angle (SZA) dependence which causes a systematic seasonal dependence. By contrast, GOME-Brewer TOC differences show no significant SZA dependence and hence no seasonality although processed with exactly the same algorithm. The satellite-Brewer TOC differences for the two satellite instruments show a clear and similar dependence on the viewing zenith angle under cloudy conditions. In addition, both the GOME-Brewer and SCIAMACHY-Brewer TOC differences reveal a very similar behavior with respect to the satellite cloud properties, being cloud fraction and cloud top pressure, which originate from the same cloud algorithm (Fast Retrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A-Band (FRESCO+)) in both the TOSOMI and TOGOMI retrieval algorithms.

  7. Vertical distribution of ozone at the terminator on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maattanen, Anni; Lefevre, Franck; Guilbon, Sabrina; Listowski, Constantino; Montmessin, Franck

    2016-10-01

    The SPICAM/Mars Express UV solar occultation dataset gives access to the ozone vertical distribution via the ozone absorption in the Hartley band (220-280 nm). We present the retrieved ozone profiles and compare them to the LMD Mars Global Climate Model (LMD-MGCM) results.Due to the photochemical reactivity of ozone, a classical comparison of local density profiles is not appropriate for solar occultations that are acquired at the terminator, and we present here a method often used in the Earth community. The principal comparison is made via the slant profiles (integrated ozone concentration on the line-of-sight), since the spherical symmetry hypothesis made in the onion-peeling vertical inversion method is not valid for photochemically active species (e.g., ozone) around terminator. For each occultation, we model the ozone vertical and horizontal distribution with high solar zenith angle (or local time) resolution around the terminator and then integrate the model results following the lines-of-sight of the occultation to construct the modeled slant profile. We will also discuss the difference of results between the above comparison method and a comparison using the local density profiles, i.e., the observed ones inverted by using the spherical symmetry hypothesis and the modeled ones extracted from the LMD-MGCM exactly at the terminator. The method and the results will be presented together with the full dataset.SPICAM is funded by the French Space Agency CNES and this work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 Programme (H2020-Compet-08-2014) under grant agreement UPWARDS-633127.

  8. Improvements in Total Column Ozone in GEOSCCM and Comparisons with a New Ozone-Depleting Substances Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, Luke D.; Douglass, Anne R.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of ozone is examined in the latest version of the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOSCCM) using old and new ozone-depleting substances (ODS) scenarios. This version of GEOSCCM includes a representation of the quasi-biennial oscillation, a more realistic implementation of ozone chemistry at high solar zenith angles, an improved air/sea roughness parameterization, and an extra 5 parts per trillion of CH3Br to account for brominated very short-lived substances. Together these additions improve the representation of ozone compared to observations. This improved version of GEOSCCM was used to simulate the ozone evolution for the A1 2010 and the newStratosphere-troposphere Processes and their Role in Climate (SPARC) 2013 ODS scenario derived using the SPARC Lifetimes Report 2013. This new ODS scenario results in a maximum Cltot increase of 65 parts per trillion by volume (pptv), decreasing slightly to 60 pptv by 2100. Approximately 72% of the increase is due to the longer lifetime of CFC-11. The quasi-global (60degS-60degN) total column ozone difference is relatively small and less than 1Dobson unit on average and consistent with the 3-4% larger 2050-2080 average Cly in the new SPARC 2013 scenario. Over high latitudes, this small change in Cly compared to the relatively large natural variabilitymakes it not possible to discern a significant impact on ozone in the second half of the 21st century in a single set of simulations.

  9. Cirrus properties deduced from CO2 lidar observations of zenith-enhanced backscatter from oriented crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.

    1993-01-01

    Many lidar researchers have occasionally observed zenith-enhanced backscatter (ZEB) from middle and high clouds. The ZEB signature consists of strong backscatter when the lidar is pointed directly at zenith and a dramatic decline in backscatter as the zenith angle dips slightly off zenith. Mirror-like reflection from horizontal facets of oriented crystals (especially plates) is generally accepted as the cause. It was found during a 3-year observation program that approximately 50 percent of ice clouds had ZEB, regardless of cloud height. The orientation of crystals and the ZEB they cause are important to study and understand for several reasons. First, radiative transfer in clouds with oriented crystals is different than if the same particles were randomly oriented. Second, crystal growth depends partly on the orientation of the particles. Third, ZEB measurements may provide useful information about cirrus microphysical and radiative properties. Finally, the remarkable effect of ZEB on lidar signals should be understood in order to properly interpret lidar data.

  10. Magnetic zenith effect in the ionospheric modification by an X-mode HF heater wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Borisova, T. D.; Haggstrom, I.; Rietveld, M. T.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2013-12-01

    We report experimental results aimed at an investigation of the magnetic zenith effect in the high latitude ionosphere F region from ionospheric modification by powerful HF heater wave with X-polarization. The ionospheric modification was produced by the HF heating facility at Tromsø (Norway) using the phased array with a narrow beam with of 6 degrees. Effective radiated power was varied between 450 and 1000 MW. The HF pump wave radiated in different directions relative to the magnetic field from 90 degrees (vertical) to 78 degrees (magnetic zenith) at frequencies near or above the ordinary-mode critical frequency. The response of the ionosphere plasma to the HF pump wave impact was checked by the UHF incoherent scatter radar located in the immediate vicinity of the HF heater. UHF radar was probing the plasma parameters, such as electron density and temperature (Ne and Te), HF-induced plasma and ion lines in the altitude range from 90 to 600 km. It was running in a scanning mode when UHF radar look angles were changed from 74 to 90 degrees by 1 or 2 degree step. It was clearly demonstrated that the strongest heater-induced effects took place in the magnetic field-aligned direction when HF pointing was also to the magnetic zenith. It was found that strong Ne enhancement of up to 80 % along magnetic field (artificial density ducts) were excited only under HF pumping towards magnetic zenith. The width of the artificial ducts comes to only 2 degrees. The Ne increases were accompanied by the Te enhancements of up to about 50 %. Less pronounced Te increases were also observed in the directions of 84 and 90 degrees. Strong Ne enhancements can be accompanied by excitation of strong HF-induced plasma and ion lines. Thus experimental results obtained points to the strong magnetic zenith effect due to self-focusing powerful HF radio wave with X-mode polarization.

  11. Satellite measurements of the backscattered ultraviolet to determine ozone trends, volcanic SO2, and nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeters, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the atmospheric backscattered UV albedo have been used from satellites for more than 20 years to measure ozone. The longest continuous record has been from the Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet instrument (SBUV) and TOMS on the Nimbus 7 satellite, which have been in operation since November of 1978. Because of degradation in space of the diffuser plate used to measure extraterrestrial solar flux, it has been necessary to develop new techniques to maintain the calibration of these instruments. Calibration is maintained by requiring that ozone measured by different wavelength pairs be consistent, and by requiring that ozone measured at different solar zenith angles be consistent. This technique of using a geophysical quantity, ozone, as a transfer standard for wavelength calibration is very powerful. The recalibrated data have been used to measure total ozone trends to an accuracy of +/- 1.3 percent 2(sigma) error over ten years. No significant trends are found near the equator, but significant trends larger than predicted by homogeneous chemistry are found at middle to high latitudes in both hemispheres. In addition, UV albedo data have been used to measure SO2 using band structure in the 300-310 nm range, and to measure nitric oxide in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere using the (10) and (02) NO gamma band fluorescence features.

  12. Attenuation by clouds of UV radiation for low stratospheric ozone conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orte, Facundo; Wolfram, Elian; Salvador, Jacobo; D'Elia, Raúl; Quiroga, Jonathan; Quel, Eduardo; Mizuno, Akira

    2017-02-01

    Stratospheric poor ozone air masses related to the polar ozone hole overpass subpolar regions in the Southern Hemisphere during spring and summer seasons, resulting in increases of surface Ultraviolet Index (UVI). The impact of these abnormal increases in the ultraviolet radiation could be overestimated if clouds are not taking into account. The aim of this work is to determine the percentage of cases in which cloudiness attenuates the high UV radiation that would reach the surface in low total ozone column situations and in clear sky hypothetical condition for Río Gallegos, Argentina. For this purpose, we analysed UVI data obtained from a multiband filter radiometer GUV-541 (Biospherical Inc.) installed in the Observatorio Atmosférico de la Patagonia Austral (OAPA-UNIDEF (MINDEF - CONICET)) (51 ° 33' S, 69 ° 19' W), Río Gallegos, since 2005. The database used covers the period 2005-2012 for spring seasons. Measured UVI values are compared with UVI calculated using a parametric UV model proposed by Madronich (2007), which is an approximation for the UVI for clear sky, unpolluted atmosphere and low surface albedo condition, using the total ozone column amount, obtained from the OMI database for our case, and the solar zenith angle. It is observed that ˜76% of the total low ozone amount cases, which would result in high and very high UVI categories for a hypothetical (modeled) clear sky condition, are attenuated by clouds, while 91% of hypothetical extremely high UVI category are also attenuated.

  13. A Comparison of TOMS Version 8 Total Column Ozone Data with Data from Groundstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labow, G. J.; McPeters, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    The Nimbus-7 and Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data have been reprocessed with a new retrieval algorithm, (Version 8) and an updated calibration procedure. These data have been systematically compared to total ozone data from Brewer and Dobson spectrophotometers for 73 individual ground stations. The comparisons were made as a function of latitude, solar zenith angle, reflectivity and total ozone. Results show that the accuracy of the TOMS retrieval'is much improved when aerosols are present in the atmosphere, when snow/ice and sea glint are present, and when ozone in the northern hemisphere is extremely low. TOMS overpass data are derived from the single TOMS best match measurement, almost always located within one degree of the ground station and usually made within an hour of local noon. The version 8 Earth Probe TOMS ozone values have decreased by an average of about 1% due to a much better understanding of the calibration of the instrument. The remaining differences between TOMS and ground stations suggest that there are still small errors in the TOMS retrievals. But if TOMS is used as a transfer standard to compare ground stations, the large station-to-station differences suggest the possibility of significant instrument errors at some ground stations.

  14. Zenith Movie showing Phoenix's Lidar Beam (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    A laser beam from the Canadian-built lidar instrument on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander can be seen in this contrast-enhanced sequence of 10 images taken by Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager on July 26, 2008, during early Martian morning hours of the mission's 61st Martian day after landing.

    The view is almost straight up and includes about 1.5 kilometer (about 1 mile) of the length of the beam. The camera, from its position close to the lidar on the lander deck, took the images through a green filter centered on light with wavelength 532 nanometers, the same wavelength of the laser beam. The movie has been artificially colored to to approximately match the color that would be seen looking through this filter on Mars. Contrast is enhanced to make the beam more visible.

    The lidar beam can be seen extending from the lower right to the upper right, near the zenith, as it reflects off particles suspended in the atmosphere. Particles that scatter the beam directly into the camera can be seen to produce brief sparkles of light. In the background, dust can be seen drifting across the sky pushed by winds aloft.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Systematic oxidation of polystyrene by ultraviolet-ozone, characterized by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure and contact angle.

    PubMed

    Klein, Robert J; Fischer, Daniel A; Lenhart, Joseph L

    2008-08-05

    The process of implanting oxygen in polystyrene (PS) via exposure to ultraviolet-ozone (UV-O) was systematically investigated using the characterization technique of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Samples of PS exposed to UV-O for 10-300 s and washed with isopropanol were analyzed using the carbon and oxygen K-edge NEXAFS partial electron yields, using various retarding bias voltages to depth-profile the oxygen penetration into the surface. Evaluation of reference polymers provided a scale to quantify the oxygen concentration implanted by UV-O treatment. We find that ozone initially reacts with the double bonds on the phenyl rings, forming carbonyl groups, but within 1 min of exposure, the ratio of double to single oxygen bonds stabilizes at a lower value. Oxygen penetrates the film with relative ease, creating a fairly uniform distribution of oxygen within at least the first 4 nm (the effective depth probed by NEXAFS here). Before oxygen accumulates in large concentrations, however, it preferentially degrades the uppermost layer of the film by removing oxygenated low-molecular-weight oligomers. The failure to accumulate high concentrations of oxygen is seen in the nearly constant carbon edge jump, the low concentration of oxygen even at 5 min exposure (58% of that in poly(4-acetoxystyrene), the polymer with the most similarities to UV-O-treated PS), and the relatively high contact angles. At 5 min exposure the oxygen concentration contains ca. 7 atomic % oxygen. The oxygen species that are implanted consist predominantly of single O-C bonds and double O=C bonds but also include a small fraction of O-H. UV-O treatment leads a plateau after 2 min exposure in the water contact angle hysteresis, at a value of 67 +/- 2 degrees , due primarily to chemical heterogeneity. Annealing above T(g) allows oxygenated species to move short distances away from the surface but not diffuse further than 1-2 nm.

  16. A measurement/model comparison of ozone photochemical loss in the Antarctic ozone hole using Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement observations and the Match technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppel, Karl; Bevilacqua, Richard; Canty, Timothy; Salawitch, Ross; Santee, Michelle

    2005-10-01

    The Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III) instrument has provided 6 years (1998 to present) of Antarctic ozone profile measurements, which detail the annual formation of the ozone hole. During the period of ozone hole formation the measurement latitude follows the edge of the polar night and presents a unique challenge for comparing with model simulations. The formation of the ozone hole has been simulated by using a photochemical box model with an ensemble of trajectories, and the results were sampled at the measurement latitude for comparison with the measured ozone. The agreement is generally good but very sensitive to the model dynamics and less sensitive to changes in the model chemistry. In order to better isolate the chemical ozone loss the Match technique was applied to 5 years of data to directly calculate ozone photochemical loss rates. The measured loss rates are specific to the high solar zenith angle conditions of the POAM-Match trajectories and are found to increase slowly from July to early August and then increase rapidly until mid-September. The Match results are sensitive to the choice of meteorological analysis used for the trajectory calculations. The ECMWF trajectories yield the smallest, and perhaps most accurate, peak loss rates that can be reproduced by a photochemical model using standard JPL 2002 kinetics, assuming reactive bromine (BrOx) of 14 pptv based solely on contributions from CH3Br and halons, and without requiring ClOx to exceed the upper limit for available inorganic chlorine of 3.7 ppbv. Larger Match ozone loss rates are found for the late August and early September period if trajectories based on UKMO and NCEP analyses are employed. Such loss rates require higher values for ClO and/or BrO than can be simulated using JPL 2002 chemical kinetics and complete activation of chlorine. In these cases, the agreement between modeled and measured loss rates is significantly improved if the model employs larger ClOOCl cross

  17. Combined Ozone Retrieval From METOP Sensors Using META-Training Of Deep Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, Martin; Sehnke, Frank; Kaifel, Anton

    2013-12-01

    The newest installment of our well-proven Neural Net- work Ozone Retrieval System (NNORSY) combines the METOP sensors GOME-2 and IASI with cloud information from AVHRR. Through the use of advanced meta- learning techniques like automatic feature selection and automatic architecture search applied to a set of deep neural networks, having at least two or three hidden layers, we have been able to avoid many technical issues normally encountered during the construction of such a joint retrieval system. This has been made possible by harnessing the processing power of modern consumer graphics cards with high performance graphic processors (GPU), which decreases training times by about two orders of magnitude. The system was trained on data from 2009 and 2010, including target ozone profiles from ozone sondes, ACE- FTS and MLS-AURA. To make maximum use of tropospheric information in the spectra, the data were partitioned into several sets of different cloud fraction ranges with the GOME-2 FOV, on which specialized retrieval networks are being trained. For the final ozone retrieval processing the different specialized networks are combined. The resulting retrieval system is very stable and does not show any systematic dependence on solar zenith angle, scan angle or sensor degradation. We present several sensitivity studies with regard to cloud fraction and target sensor type, as well as the performance in several latitude bands and with respect to independent validation stations. A visual cross-comparison against high-resolution ozone profiles from the KNMI EUMETSAT Ozone SAF product has also been performed and shows some distinctive features which we will briefly discuss. Overall, we demonstrate that a complex retrieval system can now be constructed with a minimum of ma- chine learning knowledge, using automated algorithms for many design decisions previously requiring expert knowledge. Provided sufficient training data and computation power of GPUs is available, the

  18. Reconstruction of daily erythemal UV radiation values for the last century - The benefit of modelled ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junk, J.; Feister, U.; Rozanov, E.; Krzyścin, J. W.

    2013-05-01

    Solar erythemal UV radiation (UVER) is highly relevant for numerous biological processes that affect plants, animals, and human health. Nevertheless, long-term UVER records are scarce. As significant declines in the column ozone concentration were observed in the past and a recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer is anticipated by the middle of the 21st century, there is a strong interest in the temporal variation of UVER time series. Therefore, we combined groundbased measurements of different meteorological variables with modeled ozone data sets to reconstruct time series of daily totals of UVER at the Meteorological Observatory Potsdam, Germany. Artificial neural networks were trained with measured UVER, sunshine duration, the day of year, measured and modeled total column ozone, as well as the minimum solar zenith angle. This allows for the reconstruction of daily totals of UVER for the period from 1901 to 1999. Additionally, analyses of the long-term variations from 1901 until 1999 of the reconstructed, new UVER data set are presented. The time series of monthly and annual totals of UVER provide a long-term meteorological basis for epidemiological investigations in human health and occupational medicine for the region of Potsdam and Berlin. A strong benefit of our ANN-approach is the fact that it can be easily adapted to different geographical locations, as successfully tested in the framework of the COSTAction 726.

  19. Multivariate Regression Analysis of Winter Ozone Events in the Uinta Basin of Eastern Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    I report on a regression analysis of a number of variables that are involved in the formation of winter ozone in the Uinta Basin of Eastern Utah. One goal of the analysis is to develop a mathematical model capable of predicting the daily maximum ozone concentration from values of a number of independent variables. The dependent variable is the daily maximum ozone concentration at a particular site in the basin. Independent variables are (1) daily lapse rate, (2) daily "basin temperature" (defined below), (3) snow cover, (4) midday solar zenith angle, (5) monthly oil production, (6) monthly gas production, and (7) the number of days since the beginning of a multi-day inversion event. Daily maximum temperature and daily snow cover data are available at ten or fifteen different sites throughout the basin. The daily lapse rate is defined operationally as the slope of the linear least-squares fit to the temperature-altitude plot, and the "basin temperature" is defined as the value assumed by the same least-squares line at an altitude of 1400 m. A multi-day inversion event is defined as a set of consecutive days for which the lapse rate remains positive. The standard deviation in the accuracy of the model is about 10 ppb. The model has been combined with historical climate and oil & gas production data to estimate historical ozone levels.

  20. Four years of ground-based total ozone measurements by visible spectrometry in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goutail, F.; Pommereau, J. P.; Sarkissian, A.

    1994-01-01

    Visible spectrometers SAOZ have been developed at Service d'Aeronomie for permanent ground-based ozone monitoring at all latitudes up to the polar circle in winter. Observations are made by looking at the sunlight scattered at zenith in the visible range, twice a day, at sunrise and sunset. Compared to ozone observations in the UV generally in use, visible observations in the small Chappuis bands at twilight have the advantages of being independent of stratospheric temperature, little contaminated by tropospheric ozone and multiple scattering, and of permitting observations even in winter at the polar circle. SAOZ instruments have been installed since 1988 at several stations in the Antarctic and the Arctic. More than four years data at Dumont d'Urville in Terre Adelie (67 deg S) are now available. The station is generally located at the edge of the vortex in spring and therefore the ozone hole is seen there only occasionally. The lowest values (140 DU) were reported in early October 1991. According to these first regular observations throughout the whole winter ozone seems to increase in late autumn and winter. Its decay does not start before the end of August. Although of smaller amplitude than with the previous version five data, the ratio between the groundbased and satellite/TOMS measurements displays a systematic seasonal variation correlated partly to the sun zenith angle of observations from orbit and partly to the temperature of the stratosphere. Since ground-based measurements are always made at 90 deg SZA, the SZA dependence must come from the satellite data interpretation (TOMS observations are between 43 to 88 deg SZA). The temperature dependence could be partly due to variations of ozone absorption cross-sections in the ultraviolet used by the satellite spectrometer, and partly to a systematic seasonal cycle of the air mass factor use in the interpretation of the ground based observations. However, the last contribution appears to be too small to

  1. The interaction of ozone and nitrogen dioxide in the stratosphere of East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruchkouski, Ilya; Krasouski, Aliaksandr; Dziomin, Victar; Svetashev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    At the Russian Antarctic station "Progress" (S69°23´, E76°23´) simultaneous measurements of trace gases using the MARS-B (Multi-Axis Recorder of Spectra) instrument and PION-UV spectro-radiometer for the time period from 05.01.2014 to 28.02.2014 have been performed. Both instruments were located outdoors. The aim of the measurements was to retrieve the vertical distribution of ozone and nitrogen dioxide in the atmosphere and to study their variability during the period of measurements. The MARS-B instrument, developed at the National Ozone Monitoring Research and Education Centre of the Belarusian State University (NOMREC BSU), successfully passed the procedure of international inter-comparison campaign MAD-CAT 2013 in Mainz, Germany. The instrument is able to record the spectra of scattered sunlight at different elevation angles within a maximum aperture of 1.3°. 12 elevation angles have been used in this study, including the zenith direction. Approximately 7000 spectra per day were registered in the range of 403-486 nm, which were then processed by DOAS technique aiming to retrieve differential slant columns of ozone, nitrogen dioxide and oxygen dimer. Furthermore, total nitrogen dioxide column values have been retrieved employing the Libradtran radiative transfer model. The PION-UV spectro-radiometer, also developed at NOMREC BSU, is able to record the spectra of scattered sunlight from the hemisphere in the range of 280-430 nm. The registered spectra have been used to retrieve the total ozone column values employing the Stamnes method. In this study observational data from both instruments is presented and analyzed. Furthermore, by combining analysis of this data with model simulations it is shown that decreases in nitrogen dioxide content in the upper atmosphere can be associated with increases in total ozone column values and rising of the ozone layer upper boundary. Finally, the time delay between changes in nitrogen dioxide and ozone values is

  2. Extending the NOAA SBUV(/2) Ozone Profile Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frith, S. M.; Wild, J.; Long, C. S.

    2017-12-01

    Since the signing of the Montreal Protocol in 1987 and its subsequent agreements banning anthropogenic ozone depleting substances (ODS) the climate community has been anticipating the ability to detect the recovery of the ozone layer. This recovery is complicated by climate changes associated with the increase of CO2 in the both the troposphere and stratosphere. The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) has generated a long term total column and profile ozone climate data record (CDR) based on the SBUV and SBUV/2 on Nimbus 7 and the NOAA Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES): NOAA-9, -11, -14, -16, -17, -18 and -19 spanning 38 years from 1978 to 2016. This dataset uses observations from a single instrument for each time period and an adjustment scheme to remove inter-satellite differences. The last of these SBUV/2 instruments resides on NOAA-19 launched in 2009, and with drifting equatorial crossing time will soon loose latitudinal coverage, and be impacted by an increasing solar zenith angle. The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) instrument has replaced the SBUV/2 as the primary ozone monitoring instrument at NOAA. It is taking observations on the Suomi-NPOESS Preparatory Project (S-NPP) satellite which was launched in 2011 and will be on future JPSS satellites. JPSS-1 is expected to be launched in late 2017, and later JPSS satellites will additionally carry the OMPS instrument. Reprocessed OMPS Nadir Profile (NP) and Nadir Mapper (NM) level 2 data has been made available by NESDIS/STAR covering the period from 2012 through 2016. The OMPS NP has been characterized and calibrated to be very similar to the SBUV/2. Results of extending the SBUV(/2) dataset with ozone profile data from OMPS will be reviewed. Stability of ozone recovery trend estimates using these datasets will be explored using the Hockey Stick approach of Reinsel (2002) near-globally (50N-50S), tropically and at mid-latitudes. Seasonality of the trend results will be examined. Reinsel, G

  3. Cloud Ozone Dust Imager (CODI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, R. Todd; Dusenbery, Paul; Wolff, Michael; James, Phil; Allen, Mark; Goguen, Jay; Kahn, Ralph; Gladstone, Rany; Murphy, Jim

    1995-01-01

    The Cloud Ozone Dust Imager (CODI) is proposed to investigate the current climatic balance of the Mars atmosphere, with particular emphasis on the important but poorly understood roles which dust and water ice aerosols play in this balance. The large atmospheric heating (20-50 K) resulting from global dust storms around Mars perihelion is well recognized. However, groundbased observations of Mars atmospheric temperatures, water vapor, and clouds since the Viking missions have identified a much colder, cloudier atmosphere around Mars aphelion that may prove as important as global dust storms in determining the interannual and long-term behavior of the Mars climate. The key climate issues CODI is designed to investigate are: 1) the degree to which non-linear interactions between atmospheric dust heating, water vapor saturation, and cloud nucleation influence the seasonal and interannual variability of the Mars atmosphere, and 2) whether the strong orbital forcing of atmospheric dust loading, temperatures and water vapor saturation determines the long-term balance of Mars water, as reflected in the north-south hemispheric asymmetries of atmospheric water vapor and polar water ice abundances. The CODI experiment will measure the daily, seasonal and (potentially) interannual variability of atmospheric dust and cloud opacities, and the key physical properties of these aerosols which determine their role in the climate cycles of Mars. CODI is a small (1.2 kg), fixed pointing camera, in which four wide-angle (+/- 70 deg) lenses illuminate fixed filters and CCD arrays. Simultaneous sky/surface imaging of Mars is obtained at an angular resolution of 0.28 deg/pixel for wavelengths of 255, 336, 502, and 673 nm (similar to Hubble Space Telescope filters). These wavelengths serve to measure atmospheric ozone (255 and 336 nm), discriminate ice and dust aerosols (336 and 673 nm), and construct color images (336, 502, and 673 nm). The CODI images are detected on four 512 x 512

  4. The benefit of modeled ozone data for the reconstruction of a 99-year UV radiation time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junk, J.; Feister, U.; Helbig, A.; GöRgen, K.; Rozanov, E.; KrzyśCin, J. W.; Hoffmann, L.

    2012-08-01

    Solar erythemal UV radiation (UVER) is highly relevant for numerous biological processes that affect plants, animals, and human health. Nevertheless, long-term UVER records are scarce. As significant declines in the column ozone concentration were observed in the past and a recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer is anticipated by the middle of the 21st century, there is a strong interest in the temporal variation of UVERtime series. Therefore, we combined ground-based measurements of different meteorological variables with modeled ozone data sets to reconstruct time series of daily totals of UVER at the Meteorological Observatory, Potsdam, Germany. Artificial neural networks were trained with measured UVER, sunshine duration, the day of year, measured and modeled total column ozone, as well as the minimum solar zenith angle. This allows for the reconstruction of daily totals of UVERfor the period from 1901 to 1999. Additionally, analyses of the long-term variations from 1901 until 1999 of the reconstructed, new UVER data set are presented. The time series of monthly and annual totals of UVERprovide a long-term meteorological basis for epidemiological investigations in human health and occupational medicine for the region of Potsdam and Berlin. A strong benefit of our ANN-approach is the fact that it can be easily adapted to different geographical locations, as successfully tested in the framework of the COSTAction 726.

  5. Plan of Time Management of Satellite Positioning System using Quasi-zenith Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Fujieda, Miho; Amagai, Jun; Yokota, Shoichiro; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Ito, Hiroyuki; Hama, Shin'ichi; Morikawa, Takao; Kawano, Isao; Kogure, Satoshi

    The Quasi-Zenith satellites System (QZSS) is developed as an integrated satellite service system of communication, broadcasting and positioning for mobile users in specified regions of Japan from high elevation angle. Purposes of the satellite positioning system using Quasi-Zenith satellite (QZS) are to complement and augment the GPS. The national institutes concerned have been developing the positioning system using QZS since 2003 and will carry out experiments and researches in three years after the launch. In this system, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) is mainly in charge of timing system for the satellite positioning system using QZS, such as onboard hydrogen maser atomic clock and precise time management system of the QZSS. We started to develop the engineering model of the time management system for the QZSS. The time management system for the QZSS will be used to compare time differences between QZS and earth station as well as to compare between three onboard atomic clocks. This paper introduces time management of satellite positioning system using the QZSS.

  6. Comparison of Eight Years Total Column Ozone Retrievals form Brewer and Dobson Spectrophotometers in South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, K. H.; Moeini, O.; McElroy, C. T.; Evans, R. D.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    Total column ozone measured by a Brewer Mark III spectrophotometer (#85) from 2008 to 2015 is compared to the data obtained from three different Dobson spectrophotometers (#80, #82 and #42) that have been operating in parallel with the Brewer at the Amundsen-Scott Station near the South Pole. Measurements are made using either direct sunlight or light from the moon (up to 2 weeks per month). The result of the comparison was used to assess the performance of the two instrument types and determine the stability of the measurement systems. Both instruments suffer from non-linearity due to the presence of instrumental stray light caused by the out-off-band radiations scattered from the optics within the instrument. Stray light results in an underestimated ozone column at large ozone path lengths. Since measurements made at the location of the station (Latitude 89.99o, Longitude -24.80o) have solar zenith angles of 66.5 degrees or greater, the issue of stray light is a particular concern.

  7. Merged Long-Term Data Sets from TOMS and SBUV Total Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard; McPeters, Richard; Labow, Gordon J.; Hollandsworth, Stacey; Flynn, Larry; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Total ozone has been measured by a series of nadir-viewing satellite instruments. These measurements begin with the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Solar Backscatter UltraViolet (SBUV) instruments on Nimbus 7, launched in late 1978. The measurements have continued with the Meteor 3 TOMS, Earth Probe TOMS, and NOAA 9,11,14 SBUV/2 instruments. The problem for producing a long-term data set is establishing the relative calibration of the various instruments to better than 1%. There was a nearly two year gap between the Meteor 3 TOMS and the Earth Probe TOMS. This gap is filled by the NOAA 9 and 11 SBUV/2 instruments, but they were in drifting orbits that result in effective gaps in the record when the equator crossing time occurs at large solar zenith angle. We have used recently re-derived calibrations of the SBUV instruments using the D-pair (306/313 nm wavelengths) data at the equator. These equatorial D-pair measurements should maintain the internal calibration of each instrument better than previous approaches. We then use the comparisons between instruments during their overlap periods to establish a consistent calibration over the entire data set. The resulting merged ozone data set is independent of the ground-based Dobson/Brewer network.

  8. Highlights of TOMS Version 9 Total Ozone Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, Pawan; Haffner, David

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental basis of TOMS total ozone algorithm was developed some 45 years ago by Dave and Mateer. It was designed to estimate total ozone from satellite measurements of the backscattered UV radiances at few discrete wavelengths in the Huggins ozone absorption band (310-340 nm). Over the years, as the need for higher accuracy in measuring total ozone from space has increased, several improvements to the basic algorithms have been made. They include: better correction for the effects of aerosols and clouds, an improved method to account for the variation in shape of ozone profiles with season, latitude, and total ozone, and a multi-wavelength correction for remaining profile shape errors. These improvements have made it possible to retrieve total ozone with just 3 spectral channels of moderate spectral resolution (approx. 1 nm) with accuracy comparable to state-of-the-art spectral fitting algorithms like DOAS that require high spectral resolution measurements at large number of wavelengths. One of the deficiencies of the TOMS algorithm has been that it doesn't provide an error estimate. This is a particular problem in high latitudes when the profile shape errors become significant and vary with latitude, season, total ozone, and instrument viewing geometry. The primary objective of the TOMS V9 algorithm is to account for these effects in estimating the error bars. This is done by a straightforward implementation of the Rodgers optimum estimation method using a priori ozone profiles and their error covariances matrices constructed using Aura MLS and ozonesonde data. The algorithm produces a vertical ozone profile that contains 1-2.5 pieces of information (degrees of freedom of signal) depending upon solar zenith angle (SZA). The profile is integrated to obtain the total column. We provide information that shows the altitude range in which the profile is best determined by the measurements. One can use this information in data assimilation and analysis. A side

  9. Analysis of zenith tropospheric delay in tropical latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablotskyj, Fedir; Zablotska, Alexandra

    2010-05-01

    The paper studies some peculiarities of the nature of zenith tropospheric delay in tropical latitudes. There are shown the values of dry and wet components of zenith tropospheric delay obtained by an integration of the radiosonde data at 9 stations: Guam, Seyshelles, Singapore, Pago Pago, Hilo, Koror, San Cristobal, San Juan and Belem. There were made 350 atmospheric models for the period from 11th to 20th of January, April, July and October 2008 at 0h and 12h UT (Universal Time). The quantities of the dry dd(aer) and wet dw(aer) components of zenith tropospheric delay were determined by means of the integration for each atmospheric model. Then the quantities of the dry dd(SA), dd(HO) and wet dw(SA), dw(HO) components of zenith tropospheric delay (Saastamoinen and Hopfield analytical models) were calculated by the surface values of the pressure P0, temperature t0, relative air humidity U0 on the height H0 and by the geographic latitude φ. It must be point out the following from the analysis of the averaged quantities and differences δdd(SA), δdd(HO), δdw(SA), δdw(HO) between the correspondent components of zenith tropospheric delay obtained by the radiosonde data and by the analytical models: zenith tropospheric delay obtained by the radiosonde data amounts to considerably larger value in the equatorial zone, especially, at the expense of the wet component, in contrast to high and middle latitudes. Thus, the dry component of zenith tropospheric delay is equal at the average 2290 mm and the wet component is 290 mm; by the results of the analysis of Saastamoinen and Hopfield models the dry component differences δdd(SA) and δdd(HO) are negative in all cases and average -20 mm. It is not typical neither for high latitudes nor for middle ones; the differences between the values of the wet components obtained from radiosonde data and of Saastamoinen and Hopfield models are positive in general. Therewith the δdw(HO) values are larger than the correspondent

  10. Periodontics, Implantology, and Prosthodontics Integrated: The Zenith-Driven Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Guilherme

    2017-01-01

    A customized treatment plan is important to reach results that will satisfy the patient providing esthetics, function, and long-term stability. This type of oral rehabilitation requires professionals from different dental specialties where communication is a major key point. Digital Smile Design allows the practitioners to plan and discuss the patient's condition to establish the proper treatment plan, which must be driven by the desired zenith position. The ideal gingival position will guide the professionals and determine the need to perform surgical procedures or orthodontic movement before placing the final restorations. In this article, the zenith-driven concept is discussed and a challenging case is presented with 4-year follow-up where tooth extraction, immediate implant placement, bone regeneration, and a connective tissue graft were performed. PMID:28713600

  11. Meteoroid stream flux densities and the zenith exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molau, Sirko; Barentsen, Geert

    2013-01-01

    The MetRec software was recently extended to measure the limiting magnitude in real-time, and to determine meteoroid stream flux densities. This paper gives a short overview of the applied algorithms. We introduce the MetRec Flux Viewer, a web tool to visualize activity profiles on- line. Starting from the Lyrids 2011, high-quality flux density profiles were derived from IMO Video Network observations for every major meteor shower. They are often in good agreement with visual data. Analyzing the 2011 Perseids, we found systematic daily variations in the flux density profile, which can be attributed to a zenith exponent gamma > 1.0. We analyzed a number of meteor showers in detail and found zenith exponent variations from shower to shower in the range between 1.55 and 2.0. The average value over all analyzed showers is gamma = 1.75. In order to determine the zenith exponent precisely, the observations must cover a large altitude range (at least 45 degrees).

  12. Gingival Zenith Positions and Levels of Maxillary Anterior Dentition in Cases of Bimaxillary Protrusion: A Morphometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gowd, Snigdha; Shankar, T; Chatterjee, Suravi; Mohanty, Pritam; Sahoo, Nivedita; Baratam, Srinivas

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the two clinical parameters, such as gingival zenith positions (GZPs) and gingival zenith levels (GZLs), of maxillary anterior dentition in bimaxillary protrusion cases and collate it with severiety of crown inclination. Gingival zenith position and GZL in 40 healthy patients (29 females and 11 males) with an average age of 21.5 years were assessed. Inclusion criteria involved absence of periodontal diseases, Angle's class I molar relationship, and upper anterior proclination within 25 to 45° based on Steiner's analysis; exclusion criteria included spacing, crowding, anterior restoration and teeth with incisor attrition or rotation. The GZP was evaluated using digital calipers from voxel-based morphometry (VBM), and GZL was assessed from the tangent drawn from GZP of central incisor and canines to the linear vertical distance of GZP of lateral incisor. All the central incisors showed a GZP distal to VBM with a mean average of 1 mm. Severe proclination between 40 and 45° showed a statistically significant variation. Lateral incisors displayed a mean of 0.5 mm deviation of GZP from the vertically bisected midline. In 80% of canine population, GZP was centralized. We conclude that the degree of proclination of maxillary anterior dentition was correlated to the gingival contour in bimaxillary cases. The investigation revealed that there is a variation in the location of GZP as the severity of proclination increases. This study highlights the importance of microesthetics in fixed orthodontic treatment. The gingival contour should be unaltered while retraction during management of bimaxillary protrusion.

  13. Global validation of empirically corrected EP-Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) total ozone columns using Brewer and Dobson ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, M.; Koukouli, M. E.; Kroon, M.; McPeters, R. D.; Labow, G. J.; Balis, D.; Serrano, A.

    2010-10-01

    This article focuses on the global-scale validation of the empirically corrected Version 8 total ozone column data set acquired by the NASA Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) during the period 1996-2004 when this instrument was flying aboard the Earth Probe (EP) satellite platform. This analysis is based on the use of spatially co-located, ground-based measurements from Dobson and Brewer spectrophotometers. The original EP-TOMS V8 total ozone column data set was also validated with these ground-based measurements to quantify the improvements made by the empirical correction that was necessary as a result of instrumental degradation issues occurring from the year 2000 onward that were uncorrectable by normal calibration techniques. EP-TOMS V8-corrected total ozone data present a remarkable improvement concerning the significant negative bias of around ˜3% detected in the original EP-TOMS V8 observations after the year 2000. Neither the original nor the corrected EP-TOMS satellite total ozone data sets show a significant dependence on latitude. In addition, both EP-TOMS satellite data sets overestimate the Brewer measurements for small solar zenith angles (SZA) and underestimate for large SZA, explaining a significant seasonality (˜1.5%) for cloud-free and cloudy conditions. Conversely, relative differences between EP-TOMS and Dobson present almost no dependence on SZA for cloud-free conditions and a strong dependence for cloudy conditions (from +2% for small SZA to -1% for high SZA). The dependence of the satellite ground-based relative differences on total ozone shows good agreement for column values above 250 Dobson units. Our main conclusion is that the upgrade to TOMS V8-corrected total ozone data presents a remarkable improvement. Nevertheless, despite its quality, the EP-TOMS data for the period 2000-2004 should not be used as a source for trend analysis since EP-TOMS ozone trends are empirically corrected using NOAA-16 and NOAA-17 solar backscatter

  14. Gingival zenith positions and levels of the maxillary anterior dentition.

    PubMed

    Chu, Stephen J; Tan, Jocelyn H-P; Stappert, Christian F J; Tarnow, Dennis P

    2009-01-01

    The location of the gingival zenith in a medial-lateral position relative to the vertical tooth axis of the maxillary anterior teeth remains to be clearly defined. In addition, the apex of the free gingival margin of the lateral incisor teeth relative to the gingival zeniths of the adjacent proximal teeth remains undetermined. Therefore, this investigation evaluated two clinical parameters: (1) the gingival zenith position (GZP) from the vertical bisected midline (VBM) along the long axis of each individual maxillary anterior tooth; and (2) the gingival zenith level (GZL) of the lateral incisors in an apical-coronal direction relative to the gingival line joining the tangents of the GZP of the adjacent central incisor and canine teeth under healthy conditions. A total of 240 sites in 20 healthy patients (13 females, 7 males) with an average age of 27.7 years were evaluated. The inclusion patient criteria were absence of periodontal disease, gingival recession, or gingival hypertrophy as well as teeth without loss of interdental papillae, spacing, crowding, existing restorations, and incisal attrition. GZP dimensions were measured with calibrated digital calipers for each individual tooth and within each tooth group in a medial-lateral direction from the VBM. GZLs were measured in an apical-coronal direction from a tangent line drawn on the diagnostic casts from the GZPs of the adjacent teeth. This study demonstrated that all central incisors displayed a distal GZP from the VBM, with a mean average of 1 mm. Lateral incisors showed a deviation of the gingival zenith by a mean of 0.4 mm. In 97.5% of the canine population, the GZP was centralized along the long axis of the canine. The mean distance of the contour of the gingival margin in an apical-coronal direction of the lateral incisors (GZL) relative to gingival line joining the tangent of the adjacent central and canine GZPs was approximately 1 mm. This investigation revealed a GZP mean value of 1 mm distal from

  15. Ship-borne measurements of erythemal UV irradiance and ozone content in various climate zones.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Sigrid; El Naggar, Saad; Bluszcz, Thaddäus; Schrems, Otto

    2007-10-01

    Ship-borne measurements of spectral as well as biologically effective UV irradiance have been performed on the German research vessel Polarstern during the Atlantic transect from Bremerhaven, Germany (53.5 degrees N, 8.5 degrees E), to Cape Town, South Africa (33.6 degrees S, 18.3 degrees E), from 13 October to 17 November 2005. Such measurements are required to study UV effects on marine organisms. They are also necessary to validate satellite-derived surface UV irradiance. Cloud free radiative transfer calculations support the investigation of this latitudinal dependence. Input parameters, such as total ozone column and aerosol optical depth have been measured on board as well. Using these measured parameters, the modelled cloudless noontime UVA irradiance (320-400 nm) shows the expected dependence on varying minimum solar zenith angles (SZA) at different latitudes. The modelled cloudless noontime UVB irradiance (290-320 nm) does not show this clear dependence on SZA due to the strong influence of ozone absorption in this spectral range. The maximum daily dose of erythemal irradiance of 5420 J m(-1) was observed on 14 November 2005, when the ship was in the tropical Atlantic south of the equator. The expected UV maximum should have been observed with the sun in the zenith during local noon (11 November). Stratiform clouds reduced the dose to 3835 J m(-1). In comparison, the daily erythemal doses in the mid-latitudinal Bay of Biscay only reached values between 410 and 980 J m(-1) depending on cloud conditions. The deviation in daily erythemal dose derived from different instruments is around 5%. The feasibility to perform ship-borne measurements of spectral UV irradiance is demonstrated.

  16. Validation of OMPS Ozone Profile Data with Expanded Dataset from Brewer and Automated Dobson Network.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropavlovskikh, I.; Weatherhead, E.; Cede, A.; Oltmans, S. J.; Kireev, S.; Maillard, E.; Bhartia, P. K.; Flynn, L. E.

    2005-12-01

    The first NPOESS satellite is scheduled to be launched in 2010 and will carry the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) instruments for ozone monitoring. Prior this, the OMPS instruments and algorithms will be tested by flight on the NPOESS/NPP satellite, scheduled for launch in 2008. Pre-launch planning for validation, post launch data validation and verification of the nadir and limb profile algorithm are key components for insuring that the NPOESS will produce a high quality, reliable ozone profile data set. The heritage of satellite instrument validation (TOMS, SBUV, GOME, SCIAMACHY, SAGE, HALOE, ATMOS, etc) has always relied upon surface-based observations. While the global coverage of satellite observations is appealing for validating another satellite, there is no substitute for the hard reference point of a ground-based system such as the Dobson or Brewer network, whose instruments are routinely calibrated and intercompared to standard references. The standard solar occultation instruments, SAGE II and HALOE are well beyond their planned lifetimes and might be inoperative during the OMPS period. The Umkehr network has been one of the key data sets for stratospheric ozone trend calculations and has earned its place as a benchmark network for stratospheric ozone profile observations. The normalization of measurements at different solar zenith angle (SZAs) to the measurement at the smallest SZA cancels out many calibration parameters, including the extra-terrestrial solar flux and instrumental constant, thus providing a "self-calibrating" technique in the same manner relied upon by the occultation sensors on satellites. Moreover, the ground-based Umkehr measurement is the only technique that provides data with the same altitude resolution and in the same units (DU) as do the UV-nadir instruments (SBUV-2, GOME-2, OMPS-nadir), i.e., as ozone amount in pressure layers, whereas, occultation instruments measure ozone density with height. A new Umkehr algorithm

  17. CIMEL Measurements of Zenith Radiances at the ARM Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Wiscombe, Warren; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Starting from October 1, 2001, Cimel at the ARM Central Facility in Oklahoma has been switched to a new "cloud mode." This mode allows taking measurements of zenith radiance when the Sun in blocked by clouds. In this case, every 13 min. Cimel points straight up and takes 10 measurements with 9 sec. time interval. The new Cimel's mode has four filters at 440, 670, 870 and 1020 nm. For cloudy conditions, the spectral contrast in surface albedo dominates over Rayleigh and aerosol effects; this makes normalized zenith radiances at 440 and 670 as well as for 870 and 1020 almost indistinguishable. We compare Cimel measurements with other ARM cart site instruments: Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), Narrow Field of View (NFOV) sensor, and MicroWave Radiometer(MWR). Based on Cimel and MFRSR 670 and 870 nm channels, we build a normalized difference cloud index (NDCI) for radiances and fluxes, respectively. Radiance NDCI from Cimel and flux NDCI from MFRSR are compared between themselves as well as with cloud Liquid Water Path (LWP) retrieved from MWR. Based on our theoretical calculations and preliminary data analysis,there is a good correlation between NDCIs and LWP for cloudy sky above green vegetation. Based on this correlation, an algorithm to retrieve cloud optical depth from NDCI is proposed.

  18. Calibration and Testing of Digital Zenith Camera System Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulug, Rasit; Halicioglu, Kerem; Tevfik Ozludemir, M.; Albayrak, Muge; Basoglu, Burak; Deniz, Rasim

    2017-04-01

    Starting from the beginning of the new millennium, thanks to the Charged-Coupled Device (CCD) technology, fully or partly automatic zenith camera systems are designed and used in order to determine astro-geodetic deflections of the vertical components in several countries, including Germany, Switzerland, Serbia, Latvia, Poland, Austria, China and Turkey. The Digital Zenith Camera System (DZCS) of Turkey performed successful observations yet it needs to be improved in terms of automating the system and increasing observation accuracy. In order to optimize the observation time and improve the system, some modifications have been implemented. Through the modification process that started at the beginning of 2016, some DZCS components have been replaced with the new ones and some new additional components have been installed. In this presentation, the ongoing calibration and testing process of the DZCS are summarized in general. In particular, one of the tested system components is the High Resolution Tiltmeter (HRTM), which enable orthogonal orientation of DZCS to the direction of plump line, is discussed. For the calibration of these components, two tiltmeters with different accuracies (1 nrad and 0.001 mrad) were observed nearly 30 days. The data recorded under different environmental conditions were divided into hourly, daily, and weekly subsets. In addition to the effects of temperature and humidity, interoperability of two tiltmeters were also investigated. Results show that with the integration of HRTM and the other implementations, the modified DZCS provides higher accuracy for the determination of vertical deflections.

  19. The Effects of Volcano-Induced Ozone Depletion on Short-lived Climate Forcing in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, P. L.

    2012-12-01

    Antarctic snow and decreasing solar zenith angles at higher latitudes. The second largest ozone depletion was in the Arctic at the times and places of greatest winter warming. Average ozone at four stations in Canada (43-59°N) compared to the 1961-1970 mean were 6% lower in December 2010 after the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull and 11% lower in December 2011 after the eruption of Grímsvötn. In 2012, ozone levels were still 10% lower in March and 7% lower in July. The regions and timing of this depletion are the regions and times of unusually warm temperatures and drought in North America during 2011-2012. The Dust Bowl droughts in 1934 and 1936 show a similar temporal relationship to a highly unusual sequence of five VEI=4-5 eruptions around the Pacific in 1931-1933. Major increases in global pollution were from 1950-1970 while ozone-destroying tropospheric chlorine rose from 1970 to 1994, along with ocean heat content and mean temperature. Pollution does not seem to cause an increase in warming until ozone depletion allows more UV into the lower troposphere. Pollutants decrease surface solar radiation but also reduce Arctic-snow albedo. Widespread observations imply that ozone depletion and associated photodissociation cause substantial warming. Several issues regarding the microphysics of absorption and radiation by greenhouse gases must be resolved before we can quantify their relative importance.

  20. Evaluating a New Homogeneous Total Ozone Climate Data Record from GOME/ERS-2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koukouli, M.E.; Lerot, C.; Granville, J.; Goutail, F.; Lambert, J.-C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Balis, D.; Zyrichidou, I.; Van Roozendael, M.; Coldewey-Egbers, M.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The European Space Agency's Ozone Climate Change Initiative (O3-CCI) project aims at producing and validating a number of high-quality ozone data products generated from different satellite sensors. For total ozone, the O3-CCI approach consists of minimizing sources of bias and systematic uncertainties by applying a common retrieval algorithm to all level 1 data sets, in order to enhance the consistency between the level 2 data sets from individual sensors. Here we present the evaluation of the total ozone products from the European sensors Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME)/ERS-2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A produced with the GOME-type Direct FITting (GODFIT) algorithm v3. Measurements from the three sensors span more than 16 years, from 1996 to 2012. In this work, we present the latest O3-CCI total ozone validation results using as reference ground-based measurements from Brewer and Dobson spectrophotometers archived at the World Ozone and UV Data Centre of the World Meteorological Organization as well as from UV-visible differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS)/Système D'Analyse par Observations Zénithales (SAOZ) instruments from the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. In particular, we investigate possible dependencies in these new GODFIT v3 total ozone data sets with respect to latitude, season, solar zenith angle, and different cloud parameters, using the most adequate type of ground-based instrument. We show that these three O3-CCI total ozone data products behave very similarly and are less sensitive to instrumental degradation, mainly as a result of the new reflectance soft-calibration scheme. The mean bias to the ground-based observations is found to be within the 1 plus or minus 1 percent level for all three sensors while the near-zero decadal stability of the total ozone columns (TOCs) provided by the three European instruments falls well within the 1-3 percent requirement of the European Space

  1. Bidirectional measurements of surface reflectance for view angle corrections of oblique imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Teillet, P. M.; Slater, P. N.; Fedosejevs, G.; Jasinski, Michael F.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring bidirectional reflectance-factor data was constructed and used over four surface types. Data sets were obtained over a headed wheat canopy, bare soil having several different roughness conditions, playa (dry lake bed), and gypsum sand. Results are presented in terms of relative bidirectional reflectance factors (BRFs) as a function of view angle at a number of solar zenith angles, nadir BRFs as a function of solar zenith angles, and, for wheat, vegetation indices as related to view and solar zenith angles. The wheat canopy exhibited the largest BRF changes with view angle. BRFs for the red and the NIR bands measured over wheat did not have the same relationship with view angle. NIR/Red ratios calculated from nadir BRFs changed by nearly a factor of 2 when the solar zenith angle changed from 20 to 50 degs. BRF versus view angle relationships were similar for soils having smooth and intermediate rough surfaces but were considerably different for the roughest surface. Nadir BRF versus solar-zenith angle relationships were distinctly different for the three soil roughness levels. Of the various surfaces, BRFs for gypsum sand changed the least with view angle (10 percent at 30 degs).

  2. Narrow-band multi-filter radiometer for total ozone content measurements: Mario Zucchelli Station (Antarctica) campaign.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, Salvatore; Zola, Danilo; Menchini, Francesca; Sarcina, Ilaria Di

    2017-02-01

    The importance of ground-based measurements of ultraviolet radiation has increased since the discovery of the stratospheric ozone layer depletion. Spectroradiometers are the most widely used class of instruments, although the requirement to work in attended stations is sometimes limiting. In this work we present a filter radiometer, named F-RAD, with good optical stability, very short sampling time (1 min), and proven reliability. The instrument is based on a stand-alone functioning, making it suitable for operation in hostile environments. The total ozone column (TOC) was estimated by the irradiance ratio at wavelengths where the ozone absorbs the solar radiation and where the radiation is not absorbed. Direct correlation between the TOC values estimated by F-RAD and by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) was found, and the standard deviations of the ratios between such values were calculated. Three wavelength ratios were identified to take into account the dependence of the measurements from the Solar Zenith Angle, AF-RAD (306.0 nm/325.3 nm) for SZA<50°, BF-RAD (309.9 nm/325.3 nm) and CF-RAD (317.5 nm/325.3 nm) for SZA>50°. Considering the OMI ozone data as the reference values, the accuracy of the filter radiometer is estimated to be ±4%. The data collected during the calibration campaign in Lampedusa (June-July 2009, Italy) and during the first Antarctica winter of the 2009-2013 measurement campaign at Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS) are reported. The TOC measured by the F-RAD instrument, by the OMI on board of EOS-Aura satellite (NASA), and by the NOAA UV Monitoring Station in McMurdo (USA) are compared to assess the appropriateness of F-RAD for a long-term measurement campaign.

  3. Total ozone column, aerosol optical depth and precipitable water effects on solar erythemal ultraviolet radiation recorded in Malta.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Julia; Román, Roberto; Yousif, Charles; Mateos, David; Miguel, Argimiro

    2013-04-01

    The Universities of Malta and Valladolid (Spain) developed a measurement campaign, which took place in the Institute for Energy Technology in Marsaxlokk (Southern Malta) between May and October 2012, and it was supported by the Spanish government through the Project titled "Measurement campaign about Solar Radiation, Ozone, and Aerosol in the Mediterranean area" (with reference CGL2010-12140-E). This campaign provided the first ground-based measurements in Malta of erythemal radiation and UV index, which indicate the effectiveness of the sun exposure to produce sunburn on human skin. A wide variety of instruments was involved in the campaign, providing a complete atmospheric characterization. Data of erythemal radiation and UV index (from UVB-1 pyranometer), total shortwave radiaton (global and diffuse components from CM-6B pyranometers), and total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness, and precitable water column (from a Microtops-II sunphotometer) were available in the campaign. Ground-based and satellite instruments were used in the analysis, and several intercomparisons were carried out to validate remote sensing data. OMI, GOME, GOME-2, and MODIS instruments, which provide data of ozone, aerosol load and optical properties, were used to this end. The effects on solar radiation, ultraviolet and total shortwave ranges, of total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness and precipitable water column were obtained using radiation measurements at different fixed solar zenith angles. The empirical results shown a determinant role of the solar position, a negligible effect of ozone on total shortwave radiation, and a stronger attenuation provided by aerosol particles in the erythemal radiation. A variety of aerosol types from different sources (desert dust, biomass burning, continental, and maritime) reach Malta, in this campaign several dust events from the Sahara desert occurred and were analyzed establishing the air mass back-trajectories ending at Malta at

  4. The Re-Analysis of Ozone Profile Data from a 41-Year Series of SBUV Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramarova, Natalya; Frith, Stacey; Bhartia, Pawan K.; McPeters, Richard; Labow, Gordon; Taylor, Steven; Fisher, Bradford

    2012-01-01

    In this study we present the validation of ozone profiles from a number of Solar Back Scattered Ultra Violet (SBUV) and SBUV/2 instruments that were recently reprocessed using an updated (Version 8.6) algorithm. The SBUV dataset provides the longest available record of global ozone profiles, spanning a 41-year period from 1970 to 2011 (except a 5-year gap in the 1970s) and includes ozone profile records obtained from the Nimbus-4 BUV and Nimbus-7 SBUV instruments, and a series of SBUV(/2) instruments launched on NOAA operational satellites (NOAA 09, 11, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19). Although modifications in instrument design were made in the evolution from the BUV instrument to the modern SBUV(/2) model, the basic principles of the measurement technique and retrieval algorithm remain the same. The long term SBUV data record allows us to create a consistent, calibrated dataset of ozone profiles that can be used for climate studies and trend analyses. In particular, we focus on estimating the various sources of error in the SBUV profile ozone retrievals using independent observations and analysis of the algorithm itself. For the first time we include in the metadata a quantitative estimate of the smoothing error, defined as the error due to profile variability that the SBUV observing system cannot inherently measure. The magnitude of the smoothing error varies with altitude, latitude, season and solar zenith angle. Between 10 and 1 hPa the smoothing errors for the SBUV monthly zonal mean retrievals are of the order of 1 %, but start to increase above and below this layer. The largest smoothing errors, as large as 15-20%, were detected in in the troposphere. The SBUV averaging kernels, provided with the ozone profiles in version 8.6, help to eliminate the smoothing effect when comparing the SBUV profiles with high vertical resolution measurements, and make it convenient to use the SBUV ozone profiles for data assimilation and model validation purposes. The smoothing error can

  5. Ozone bioindicator

    John W. Coulston; Mark J. Ambrose

    2007-01-01

    Why Is Ozone Important? Ground-level ozone occurs at phytotoxic levels in the United States (Lefohn and Pinkerton 1988). Elevated levels of ozone can cause foliar injury to several tree species, may cause growth loss, and can make trees more susceptible to insects and pathogens (Chappelka and Samuelson 1998). However, tree species have varying degrees of sensitivity to...

  6. Constraints on a Broadcast Innovation: Zenith's Phonevision System, 1931-1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellamy, Robert V., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates that the reason for Zenith's Phonevision's failure was the interweaving of such individual factors as the actions of the regulatory system and the opposition of the broadcast and film industries, along with the internal activities of Zenith and prevailing market conditions. (MS)

  7. OMI Total Ozone Column Product Validated Against UVMFR Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannis, Raptis Panagiotis; Kazadziz, Stelios; Eleftherantos, Kostas; Kosmopoulos, Panagiotis; Amiridis, Vassilis

    2015-11-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is a spectroradiometer on board NASA Aura, providing Total Ozone Column (TOC), almost globally, every day, with a spatial resolution of 13kmX24 km, since July 2004. In the next few months Sentinel-5P will be launched, and carry TROPOMI, a spaceborne nadir viewing spectrometer which will cover tha same spectral range, narrowing the spatial resolution to 7 km X 7 km and extending current data record. Studies have evaluated OMI's product using Brewer spectroradiometer measurements and found average biases to be less than 3%.UVMFR (Ultraviolet Multifilter Radiometer) is an instrument designed to measure total and diffuse and calculate Direct solar Irradiance at 7 wavelengths in the UV spectrum, with high accuracy and very high frequency. Main advantages of this instrument is the portability, the automatic calibration procedure, simple operational use, unattended functionality and the relatively low cost. In that frame it could become a very effective solution to validate satellite products.A method was developed to retrieve TOC, from UVMFR measurements combined with radiative transfer model calculations. Lookup tables of ratios of direct solar irradiance at 305nm and 325nm in respect to TOC, Solar Zenith Angle and Aerosol Optical Depth have been constructed and compared with UVMFR irradiance measurements in order to retrieve TOC.We used UVMFR measurements in Athens, Greece during the period July 2009 to May 2014 to create a TOC time series with high temporal frequency (1 minute for cloudless conditions).The validation of the method have been assessed using a Brewer spectroradiometer operating in parallel for the whole period. In order to compare OMI-based and ground-based TOC measurements we have calculated UVMFR daily values of TOC averaging measurements in a 2 hour window around OMI overpass. This comparison revealed differences up to 7%, with mean differences at 4.2 DU and standard deviation of 8.7%. Same seasonal cycle was

  8. Thromboembolic Complications after Zenith{sup ®} Low Profile Endovascular Graft for Infrarenal Abdominal Aneurysms

    SciT

    Urlings, T. A. J., E-mail: t-urlings@hotmail.com; Vries, A. C. de, E-mail: a.de.vries@mchaaglanden.nl; Mol van Otterloo, J. C. A. de, E-mail: a.de.molvanotterloo@mchaaglanden.nl

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to objectify and evaluate risk factors for thromboembolic complications after treatment with a Zenith{sup ®} Low Profile Endovascular Graft (Zenith LP). Results were compared with those in the recent literature on endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) and with the thromboembolic complications in the patient group treated with a Zenith Flex Endovascular Graft in our institute in the period before the use of the Zenith LP.Materials and MethodsAll consecutive patients who were suitable for treatment with a Zenith LP endograft between October 2010 and December 2011 were included. The preprocedural computed tomography scan (CT), procedural angiographicmore » images, and the postprocedural CT scans were evaluated for risk factors for and signs of thromboembolic complications. All patients treated between December 2007 and November 2012 with a Zenith Flex endograft were retrospectively evaluated for thromboembolic complications.ResultsIn the study period 17 patients were treated with a LP Zenith endograft. Limb occlusion occurred in 35 % of the patients. Limb occlusions occurred in 24 % of the limbs at risk (one limb occluded twice). In one patient two risk factors for limb occlusion were identified. Between December 2007 and November 2012, a total of 43 patients were treated with a Zenith Flex endograft. No limb occlusion or distal embolization occurred.ConclusionDespite that this was a small retrospective study, the Zenith LP endograft seems to be associated with more frequent thromboembolic complications compared with the known limb occlusion rates in the literature and those of the patients treated with a Zenith Flex endograft in our institute.« less

  9. Muon tomography imaging improvement using optimized limited angle data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chuanyong; Simon, Sean; Kindem, Joel; Luo, Weidong; Sossong, Michael J.; Steiger, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Image resolution of muon tomography is limited by the range of zenith angles of cosmic ray muons and the flux rate at sea level. Low flux rate limits the use of advanced data rebinning and processing techniques to improve image quality. By optimizing the limited angle data, however, image resolution can be improved. To demonstrate the idea, physical data of tungsten blocks were acquired on a muon tomography system. The angular distribution and energy spectrum of muons measured on the system was also used to generate simulation data of tungsten blocks of different arrangement (geometry). The data were grouped into subsets using the zenith angle and volume images were reconstructed from the data subsets using two algorithms. One was a distributed PoCA (point of closest approach) algorithm and the other was an accelerated iterative maximal likelihood/expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm. Image resolution was compared for different subsets. Results showed that image resolution was better in the vertical direction for subsets with greater zenith angles and better in the horizontal plane for subsets with smaller zenith angles. The overall image resolution appeared to be the compromise of that of different subsets. This work suggests that the acquired data can be grouped into different limited angle data subsets for optimized image resolution in desired directions. Use of multiple images with resolution optimized in different directions can improve overall imaging fidelity and the intended applications.

  10. Use of an improved radiation amplification factor to estimate the effect of total ozone changes on action spectrum weighted irradiances and an instrument response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Jay R.

    2010-12-01

    Multiple scattering radiative transfer results are used to calculate action spectrum weighted irradiances and fractional irradiance changes in terms of a power law in ozone Ω, U(Ω/200)-RAF, where the new radiation amplification factor (RAF) is just a function of solar zenith angle. Including Rayleigh scattering caused small differences in the estimated 30 year changes in action spectrum-weighted irradiances compared to estimates that neglect multiple scattering. The radiative transfer results are applied to several action spectra and to an instrument response function corresponding to the Solar Light 501 meter. The effect of changing ozone on two plant damage action spectra are shown for plants with high sensitivity to UVB (280-315 nm) and those with lower sensitivity, showing that the probability for plant damage for the latter has increased since 1979, especially at middle to high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Similarly, there has been an increase in rates of erythemal skin damage and pre-vitamin D3 production corresponding to measured ozone decreases. An example conversion function is derived to obtain erythemal irradiances and the UV index from measurements with the Solar Light 501 instrument response function. An analytic expressions is given to convert changes in erythemal irradiances to changes in CIE vitamin-D action spectrum weighted irradiances.

  11. Use of an Improved Radiation Amplification Factor to Estimate the Effect of Total Ozone Changes on Action Spectrum Weighted Irradiances and an Instrument Response Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Jay R.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple scattering radiative transfer results are used to calculate action spectrum weighted irradiances and fractional irradiance changes in terms of a power law in ozone OMEGA, U(OMEGA/200)(sup -RAF), where the new radiation amplification factor (RAF) is just a function of solar zenith angle. Including Rayleigh scattering caused small differences in the estimated 30 year changes in action spectrum-weighted irradiances compared to estimates that neglect multiple scattering. The radiative transfer results are applied to several action spectra and to an instrument response function corresponding to the Solar Light 501 meter. The effect of changing ozone on two plant damage action spectra are shown for plants with high sensitivity to UVB (280-315 run) and those with lower sensitivity, showing that the probability for plant damage for the latter has increased since 1979, especially at middle to high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Similarly, there has been an increase in rates of erythemal skin damage and pre-vitamin D3 production corresponding to measured ozone decreases. An example conversion function is derived to obtain erythemal irradiances and the UV index from measurements with the Solar Light 501 instrument response function. An analytic expressions is given to convert changes in erythemal irradiances to changes in CIE vitamin-D action spectrum weighted irradiances.

  12. A long term study of the relations between erythemal UV-B irradiance, total ozone column, and aerosol optical depth at central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palancar, Gustavo G.; Olcese, Luis E.; Achad, Mariana; López, María Laura; Toselli, Beatriz M.

    2017-09-01

    Global ultraviolet-B irradiance (UV-B, 280-315 nm) measurements made at the campus of the University of Córdoba, Argentina were analyzed to quantify the effects of ozone and aerosols on surface UV-B erythemal irradiance (UVER). The measurements have been carried out with a YES Pyranometer during the period 2000-2013. The effect of ozone and aerosols has been quantified by means of the Radiation Amplification Factor (RAF) and by an aerosol factor (AF, analogous to RAF), respectively. The overall mean RAF under cloudless conditions was (1.2 ± 0.3) %, ranging from 0.67 to 2.10% depending on solar zenith angle (SZA) and on Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). The RAF increased with the SZA with a clear trend. Similarly, the aerosol effect under almost-constant ozone and SZA showed that, on average, a 1% increase in AOD forced a decrease of (0.15 ± 0.04) % in the UVER, with a range of 0.06 to 0.27 and no defined trend as a function of the SZA. To analyze the effect of absorbing aerosols, an effective single scattering albedo (SSA) was determined by comparing the experimental UVER with calculations carried out with the TUV radiative transfer model.

  13. Midterm outcomes of the Zenith Renu AAA Ancillary Graft.

    PubMed

    Jim, Jeffrey; Rubin, Brian G; Geraghty, Patrick J; Money, Samuel R; Sanchez, Luis A

    2011-08-01

    The Zenith Renu abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) Ancillary Graft (Cook Medical Inc, Bloomington, Ind) provides active proximal fixation for treatment of pre-existing endografts with failed or failing proximal fixation or seal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the midterm outcomes of treatment with this device. From September 2005 to November 2006, a prospective, nonrandomized, multicenter, postmarket registry was utilized to collect physician experiences from 151 cases (89 converters and 62 main body extensions) at 95 institutions. Preoperative indications and procedural and postimplantation outcomes were collected and analyzed. Technical success and clinical success were determined as defined by the Society of Vascular Surgery reporting standards. Patients were predominantly male (87%) with a mean age of 77 years. The interval between the original endograft implantation to Renu treatment was 43.4 ± 18.7 months. The indications for treatment were endoleak (n = 111), migration (n = 136), or both (n = 94). Technical success was 98.0% with two cases of intraoperative conversion and one case of persistent type IA endoleak. The median follow-up for the cohort was 45.0 months (range, 0-56 months; interquartile range, 25.0 months). Overall, 32 cases had treatment failures that included at least one of the following: death (n = 5), type I/III endoleak (n = 18), graft infection (n = 1), thrombosis (n = 1), aneurysm enlargement >5 mm (n = 9), rupture (n = 4), conversion (n = 9, with 7 after 30 days), and migration (n = 1). Overall, the clinical success for the entire cohort during the follow-up period was 78.8% (119/151). The postmarket registry data confirm that the Zenith Renu AAA Ancillary Graft can be used to treat endovascular repairs that failed due to proximal attachment failures. The salvage treatment with the Renu device had high technical success rate and resulted in clinical success in a majority of patients (78.8%). While failed endovascular repairs can

  14. Ozone Layer Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Offices Labs and Research Centers Contact Us Share Ozone Layer Protection The stratospheric ozone layer is Earth’s “ ... to ozone-depleting substances, and sun safety. Stratospheric Ozone Layer Basic Ozone Layer Science Health and Environmental ...

  15. Monitoring stratospheric chlorine activation from time series of OClO DSCDs above Kiruna using ground-based zenith sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Myojeong; Enell, Carl-Fredrik; Pukite, Janis; Platt, Ulrich; Raffalski, Uwe; Wagner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    After to the Montreal protocol and amendments, the production of CFCs was strongly reduced. Since then scientists have steadily made efforts to monitor the amount of chlorine compounds which are responsible for the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. Although very recent research of stratospheric ozone indicates an ozone recovery, ozone depletion is still observed in the polar spring and is expected to last for about another 70 years according to the WMO. Therefore, continuous observation and analysis of the stratospheric ozone as well as other stratospheric trace gases are highly demanded. Several previous studies have investigated OClO which is an indicator for stratospheric chlorine activation using satellite, ground-based, and balloon remote sensing measurements. In this work, we investigate long-term time series of OClO DSCDs (Differential Slant Column densities) above Kiruna, Sweden (67.84°N, 20.41°E) which is located inside the Arctic Circle by using the ground-based zenith sky DOAS measurements. Since our measurements are performed at the fixed site, for the interpretation also the relative position of the polar vortex has to be considered. Our long-term data obtained during about 15 years allows us to classify the dependence of the OClO amount on the various meteorological conditions. Our data show a large variability with high OClO SCDs in cold, and low OClO SCDs in warm winters. Our measurements also allow to investigate the effect of the chlorine activation and its duration on the strength of the ozone destruction.

  16. Brewer spectrometer total ozone column measurements in Sodankylä

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karppinen, Tomi; Lakkala, Kaisa; Karhu, Juha M.; Heikkinen, Pauli; Kivi, Rigel; Kyrö, Esko

    2016-06-01

    Brewer total ozone column measurements started in Sodankylä in May 1988, 9 months after the signing of The Montreal Protocol. The Brewer instrument has been well maintained and frequently calibrated since then to produce a high-quality ozone time series now spanning more than 25 years. The data have now been uniformly reprocessed between 1988 and 2014. The quality of the data has been assured by automatic data rejection rules as well as by manual checking. Daily mean values calculated from the highest-quality direct sun measurements are available 77 % of time with up to 75 measurements per day on clear days. Zenith sky measurements fill another 14 % of the time series and winter months are sparsely covered by moon measurements. The time series provides information to survey the evolution of Arctic ozone layer and can be used as a reference point for assessing other total ozone column measurement practices.

  17. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  18. Ozone decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  19. Ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randhawa, J.

    1978-01-01

    The chemiluminescent ozonesonde to be flown with the STRATCOM balloon flight consisted of two main parts: (1) A constant-volume sampling pump made from TEFLON was used for the intake of the air sample. Sample was drawn at a rate of 200 millimeters per minute. (2) Ozone was detected by the chemiluminescent process (Rhodamine - B). Ozone molecules in the air sample flowed over the detector and the photons produced by the destruction of ozone molecules on the chemiluminescent material were monitored by the photomultiplier tube, the output signal from which was transmitted to the ground receiver.

  20. Ozone Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Known as tropospheric or ground-level ozone, this gas is harmful to human heath and the environment. Since it forms from emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx), these pollutants are regulated under air quality standards.

  1. Ozone, Tropospheric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack

    1995-01-01

    In the early part of the 20th century, ground-based and balloon-borne measurements discovered that most of atmosphere's ozone is located in the stratosphere with highest concentrations located between 15 and 30 km (9,3 and 18.6 miles). For a long time, it was believed that tropospheric ozone originated from the stratosphere and that most of it was destroyed by contact with the earth's surface. Ozone, O3, was known to be produced by the photo-dissociation of molecular oxygen, O2, a process that can only occur at wavelengths shorter than 242 nm. Because such short-wave-length radiation is present only in the stratosphere, no tropospheric ozone production is possible by this mechanism. In the 1940s, however, it became obvious that production of ozone was also taking place in the troposphere. The overall reaction mechanism was eventually identified by Arie Haagen-Smit of the California Institute of Technology, in highly polluted southern California. The copious emissions from the numerous cars driven there as a result of the mass migration to Los Angeles after World War 2 created the new unpleasant phenomenon of photochemical smog, the primary component of which is ozone. These high levels of ozone were injuring vegetable crops, causing women's nylons to run, and generating increasing respiratory and eye-irritation problems for the populace. Our knowledge of tropospheric ozone increased dramatically in the early 1950s as monitoring stations and search centers were established throughout southern California to see what could be done to combat this threat to human health and the environment.

  2. High Precision, Absolute Total Column Ozone Measurements from the Pandora Spectrometer System: Comparisons with Data from a Brewer Double Monochromator and Aura OMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzortziou, Maria A.; Herman, Jay R.; Cede, Alexander; Abuhassan, Nader

    2012-01-01

    We present new, high precision, high temporal resolution measurements of total column ozone (TCO) amounts derived from ground-based direct-sun irradiance measurements using our recently deployed Pandora single-grating spectrometers. Pandora's small size and portability allow deployment at multiple sites within an urban air-shed and development of a ground-based monitoring network for studying small-scale atmospheric dynamics, spatial heterogeneities in trace gas distribution, local pollution conditions, photochemical processes and interdependencies of ozone and its major precursors. Results are shown for four mid- to high-latitude sites where different Pandora instruments were used. Comparisons with a well calibrated double-grating Brewer spectrometer over a period of more than a year in Greenbelt MD showed excellent agreement and a small bias of approximately 2 DU (or, 0.6%). This was constant with slant column ozone amount over the full range of observed solar zenith angles (15-80), indicating adequate Pandora stray light correction. A small (1-2%) seasonal difference was found, consistent with sensitivity studies showing that the Pandora spectral fitting TCO retrieval has a temperature dependence of 1% per 3K, with an underestimation in temperature (e.g., during summer) resulting in an underestimation of TCO. Pandora agreed well with Aura-OMI (Ozone Measuring Instrument) satellite data, with average residuals of <1% at the different sites when the OMI view was within 50 km from the Pandora location and OMI-measured cloud fraction was <0.2. The frequent and continuous measurements by Pandora revealed significant short-term (hourly) temporal changes in TCO, not possible to capture by sun-synchronous satellites, such as OMI, alone.

  3. Nitrogen oxides in the arctic stratosphere: Implications for ozone abundances. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciT

    Slusser, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    In the high latitude winter stratosphere, NO2 sequesters chlorine compounds which are extremely efficient at destroying ozone. During the nighttime, NO2 reacts with ozone to form N2O5 which acts as a reservoir of NO2. Under heavy aerosol loading, N2O5 may react with water on aerosol surfaces to form HNO3, a reservoir more resistant to photolysis. This heterogeneous reaction results in reduced NO2 concentration when the sun returns at the end of the winter. A spectrograph system has been developed to measure scattered zenith skylight and thereby determine stratospheric NO2 slant column abundance. Conversion of the measured slant column abundance tomore » vertical column abundance requires dividing by the air mass. The air mass is the enhancement in the optical path for the scattered twilight as compared to a vertical path. Air mass values determined using a multiple scattering radiative transfer code have been compared to those derived using a Monte Carlo code and were found to agree to within 6% at a 90 deg solar zenith angle for a stratospheric absorber. Six months of NO2 vertical column abundance measured over Fairbanks during the winter 1992-93 exhibited the daylight diminished and increased as the sunlight hours lengthened. The overall seasonal behavior was similar to high-latitude measurements made in the Southern Hemisphere. The ratios of morning to evening column abundance were consistent with predictions based on gas-phase chemistry. The possible heterogeneous reaction of N2O5 on sulfate aerosols was investigated using FTIR Spectrometer measurements of HNO3 column abundance and lidar determinations of the aerosol profile. Using an estimated N2O5 column abundance and aerosol profile as input to a simple model, significant HNO3 production was expected. No increase in HNO3 column abundance was measured. From this set of data, it was not possible to determine whether significant amounts of N2O5 were converted to HNO3 by this heterogeneous reaction.« less

  4. Evaluation of the impact of atmospheric ozone and aerosols on the horizontal global/diffuse UV Index at Livorno (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaglione, Daniele; Giulietti, Danilo; Morelli, Marco

    2016-08-01

    A study was conducted at Livorno (Italy) to evaluate the impact of atmospheric aerosols and ozone on the solar UV radiation and its diffuse component at ground in clear sky conditions. Solar UV radiation has been quantified in terms of UV Index (UVI), following the ISO 17166:1999/CIE S007/E-1998 international standard. UVI has been calculated by exploiting the libRadtran radiative transfer modelling software as a function of both the Aerosols Optical Depth (AOD) and the Total Ozone Column (TOC). In particular AOD and TOC values have been remotely sensed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the NASA's EOS (Earth Observing System) satellites constellation. An experimental confirmation was also obtained by exploiting global UVI ground-based measurements from the 26/9/14 to 12/8/15 and diffuse UVI ground-based measurements from the 17/5/15 to 12/8/15. For every considered value of Solar Zenith Angle (SZA) and atmospheric condition, estimates and measurements confirm that the diffuse component contributes for more than 50% on the global UV radiation. Therefore an exposure of human skin also to diffuse solar UV radiation can be potentially harmful for health and need to be accurately monitored, e.g. by exploiting innovative applications such as a mobile app with a satellite-based UV dosimeter that has been developed. Global and diffuse UVI variations due to the atmosphere are primarily caused by the TOC variations (typically cyclic): the maximum TOC variation detected by OMI in the area under study leads to a corresponding variation in global and diffuse UVI of about 50%. Aerosols in the area concerned, mainly of maritime nature, have instead weaker effects causing a maximum variation of the global and diffuse UVI respectively of 9% and 35% with an SZA of 20° and respectively of 13% and 10% with an SZA of 60°.

  5. Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed by ARM SWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2009-01-01

    The ARM Shortwave Spectrometer (SWS) measures zenith radiance at 418 wavelengths between 350 and 2170 nm. Because of its 1-sec sampling resolution, the SWS provides a unique capability to study the transition zone between cloudy and clear sky areas. A spectral invariant behavior is found between ratios of zenith radiance spectra during the transition from cloudy to cloud-free. This behavior suggests that the spectral signature of the transition zone is a linear mixture between the two extremes (definitely cloudy and definitely clear). The weighting function of the linear mixture is a wavelength-independent characteristic of the transition zone. It is shown that the transition zone spectrum is fully determined by this function and zenith radiance spectra of clear and cloudy regions. An important result of these discoveries is that high temporal resolution radiance measurements in the clear-to-cloud transition zone can be well approximated by lower temporal resolution measurements plus linear interpolation.

  6. Validation of Copernicus Height-resolved Ozone data Products from Sentinel-5P TROPOMI using global sonde and lidar networks (CHEOPS-5P)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, Arno; Lambert, Jean-Christopher; Hubert, Daan; Verhoelst, Tijl; Granville, José; Ancellet, Gérard; Balis, Dimitris; Delcloo, Andy; Duflot, Valentin; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Koukouli, Marilisa; Leblanc, Thierry; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Steinbrecht, Wolfgang; Stübi, Réné; Thompson, Anne

    2017-04-01

    ; (2) traceable preparation of the S5P data and correlative measurements in view of data comparisons (co-location studies, unit and representation conversions, handling of smoothing and sampling issues, independent estimate of tropopause altitude, (sub-)column integration...), with associated error propagation; (3) data comparisons leading to statistical estimates of the systematic bias and random difference between S5P and reference network data as a function of latitude, their cycles, their long-term evolution, and their dependences on influence quantities (e.g., clouds, solar zenith angle, and slant column density); (4) and finally the assessment of compliance with user requirements as formulated, e.g., by Copernicus Atmosphere and Climate services and by GCOS.

  7. Inclined Zenith Aurora over Kyoto on 17 September 1770: Graphical Evidence of Extreme Magnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Ryuho; Iwahashi, Kiyomi

    2017-10-01

    Red auroras were observed in Japan during an extreme magnetic storm that occurred on 17 September 1770. We show new evidence that the red aurora extended toward the zenith of Kyoto around midnight. The basic appearance of the historical painting of the red aurora is geometrically reproduced based on the inclination of the local magnetic field and a detailed description in a newly discovered diary. The presence of the inclined zenith aurora over Kyoto suggests that the intensity of the September 1770 magnetic storm is comparable to, or slightly larger than that of the September 1859 Carrington storm.

  8. Recalculated values of the total ozone amount over Oslo, 60 deg N, for the period 1979-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Soren H. H.; Svendby, Tove; Tonnessen, Finn; Dahlback, Arne

    1994-01-01

    The total ozone amount over Oslo has been measured with the Dobson spectrophotometer No 56. The instrument was modified, calibrated, and intercompared in 1977 in Boulder. A new intercomparison was made in 1986 in Arosa. Much work has been done to make the zenith charts reliable. A new method has been introduced where one takes into account the change in the shape of the zenith chart curves which is caused by a change of the ozone profile when the ozone amount changes. According to the conclusion derived from the intercomparison in Arosa 1986, the instrument has not been stable. The R-N tables had to be altered, but not the Q-tables. We have tried to account for this change in our handling of the observation data. No statistical analyses of these data has yet been made, but the monthly averages of the raw data show a negative linear trend of about 4 percent for the whole period.

  9. The Antarctic Ozone Hole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anna E.

    2008-01-01

    Since the mid 1970s, the ozone layer over Antarctica has experienced massive destruction during every spring. In this article, we will consider the atmosphere, and what ozone and the ozone layer actually are. We explore the chemistry responsible for the ozone destruction, and learn about why conditions favour ozone destruction over Antarctica. For…

  10. Zenith: A Radiosonde Detector for Rapid-Response Ionizing Atmospheric Radiation Measurements During Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, A. C. R.; Ryden, K. A.; Hands, A. D. P.; Dyer, C.; Burnett, C.; Gibbs, M.

    2018-03-01

    Solar energetic particle events create radiation risks for aircraft, notably single-event effects in microelectronics along with increased dose to crew and passengers. In response to this, some airlines modify their flight routes after automatic alerts are issued. At present these alerts are based on proton flux measurements from instruments onboard satellites, so it is important that contemporary atmospheric radiation measurements are made and compared. This paper presents the development of a rapid-response system built around the use of radiosondes equipped with a radiation detector, Zenith, which can be launched from a Met Office weather station after significant solar proton level alerts are issued. Zenith is a compact, battery-powered solid-state radiation monitor designed to be connected to a Vaisala RS-92 radiosonde, which transmits all data to a ground station as it ascends to an altitude of 33 km. Zenith can also be operated as a stand-alone detector when connected to a laptop, providing real-time count rates. It can also be adapted for use on unmanned aerial vehicles. Zenith has been flown on the Met Office Civil Contingency Aircraft, taken to the European Organization for Nuclear Research-EU high energy Reference Field facility for calibration and launched on a meteorological balloon at the Met Office's weather station in Camborne, Cornwall, UK. During this sounding, Zenith measured the Pfotzer-Regener maximum to be at an altitude of 18-20 km where the count rate was measured to be 1.15 c s-1 cm-2 compared to 0.02 c s-1 cm-2 at ground level.

  11. Earth's Endangered Ozone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panofsky, Hans A.

    1978-01-01

    Included are (1) a discussion of ozone chemistry; (2) the effects of nitrogen fertilizers, fluorocarbons, and high level aircraft on the ozone layer; and (3) the possible results of a decreasing ozone layer. (MR)

  12. Measurements of tropospheric NO2 in Romania using a zenith-sky mobile DOAS system and comparisons with satellite observations.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Merlaud, Alexis; Van Roozendael, Michel; Voiculescu, Mirela; Fayt, Caroline; Hendrick, François; Pinardi, Gaia; Georgescu, Lucian

    2013-03-20

    In this paper we present a new method for retrieving tropospheric NO2 Vertical Column Density (VCD) from zenith-sky Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements using mobile observations. This method was used during three days in the summer of 2011 in Romania, being to our knowledge the first mobile DOAS measurements peformed in this country. The measurements were carried out over large and different areas using a mobile DOAS system installed in a car. We present here a step-by-step retrieval of tropospheric VCD using complementary observations from ground and space which take into account the stratospheric contribution, which is a step forward compared to other similar studies. The detailed error budget indicates that the typical uncertainty on the retrieved NO2tropospheric VCD is less than 25%. The resulting ground-based data set is compared to satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2). For instance, on 18 July 2011, in an industrial area located at 47.03°N, 22.45°E, GOME-2 observes a tropospheric VCD value of (3.4 ± 1.9) × 1015 molec./cm2, while average mobile measurements in the same area give a value of (3.4 ± 0.7) × 10(15) molec./cm2. On 22 August 2011, around Ploiesti city (44.99°N, 26.1°E), the tropospheric VCD observed by satellites is (3.3 ± 1.9) × 10(15) molec./cm2 (GOME-2) and (3.2 ± 3.2) × 10(15) molec./cm2 (OMI), while average mobile measurements give (3.8 ± 0.8) × 10(15) molec./cm2. Average ground measurements over "clean areas", on 18 July 2011, give (2.5 ± 0.6) × 10(15) molec./cm2 while the satellite observes a value of (1.8 ± 1.3) × 10(15) molec./cm2.

  13. Measurements of Tropospheric NO2 in Romania Using a Zenith-Sky Mobile DOAS System and Comparisons with Satellite Observations

    PubMed Central

    Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Merlaud, Alexis; Van Roozendael, Michel; Voiculescu, Mirela; Fayt, Caroline; Hendrick, François; Pinardi, Gaia; Georgescu, Lucian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method for retrieving tropospheric NO2 Vertical Column Density (VCD) from zenith-sky Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements using mobile observations. This method was used during three days in the summer of 2011 in Romania, being to our knowledge the first mobile DOAS measurements peformed in this country. The measurements were carried out over large and different areas using a mobile DOAS system installed in a car. We present here a step-by-step retrieval of tropospheric VCD using complementary observations from ground and space which take into account the stratospheric contribution, which is a step forward compared to other similar studies. The detailed error budget indicates that the typical uncertainty on the retrieved NO2tropospheric VCD is less than 25%. The resulting ground-based data set is compared to satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2). For instance, on 18 July 2011, in an industrial area located at 47.03°N, 22.45°E, GOME-2 observes a tropospheric VCD value of (3.4 ± 1.9) × 1015 molec./cm2, while average mobile measurements in the same area give a value of (3.4 ± 0.7) × 1015 molec./cm2. On 22 August 2011, around Ploiesti city (44.99°N, 26.1°E), the tropospheric VCD observed by satellites is (3.3 ± 1.9) × 1015 molec./cm2 (GOME-2) and (3.2 ± 3.2) × 1015 molec./cm2 (OMI), while average mobile measurements give (3.8 ± 0.8) × 1015 molec./cm2. Average ground measurements over “clean areas”, on 18 July 2011, give (2.5 ± 0.6) × 1015 molec./cm2 while the satellite observes a value of (1.8 ± 1.3) × 1015 molec./cm2. PMID:23519349

  14. The prediction of zenith range refraction from surface measurements of meteorological parameters. [mathematical models of atmospheric refraction used to improve spacecraft tracking space navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    In the last two decades, increasingly sophisticated deep space missions have placed correspondingly stringent requirements on navigational accuracy. As part of the effort to increase navigational accuracy, and hence the quality of radiometric data, much effort has been expended in an attempt to understand and compute the tropospheric effect on range (and hence range rate) data. The general approach adopted has been that of computing a zenith range refraction, and then mapping this refraction to any arbitrary elevation angle via an empirically derived function of elevation. The prediction of zenith range refraction derived from surface measurements of meteorological parameters is presented. Refractivity is separated into wet (water vapor pressure) and dry (atmospheric pressure) components. The integration of dry refractivity is shown to be exact. Attempts to integrate wet refractivity directly prove ineffective; however, several empirical models developed by the author and other researchers at JPL are discussed. The best current wet refraction model is here considered to be a separate day/night model, which is proportional to surface water vapor pressure and inversely proportional to surface temperature. Methods are suggested that might improve the accuracy of the wet range refraction model.

  15. Comparison of recalculated Dobson and TOMS total ozone at Hradec Kralove, Czechoslovakia, 1978-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanek, Martin; Vanicek, Karel

    1994-01-01

    The reevaluated Dobson total ozone data from Hradec Kralove, Czechoslovakia were compared with independent Total Ozone Mapping Spectrophotometer (TOMS) 'version 6' data set. The comparison was performed by means of the parallel daily averages of ground-based and satellite total ozone pairs of the period November 1978 to December 1990. The comparison showed slight differences between both data series. Their average relative difference is 0.48 percent. The similar results have been reached for subsets of direct sun and zenith types of measurements as well. Their relative differences are 0.61 percent and 0.11 percent respectively. These facts indicate not only good mutual relation of both data sources but also reliability and accuracy of the zenith charts of the spectrophotometer No. 74 used at Hradec Kralove. Preliminary assessment of seasonal MU-dependence of the differences between Dobson and TOMS data was made while using total ozones of winter and summer months representing values of MU=2.70-5.20 and MU = 1.12-1.30 respectively. The results did not show systematic underestimation or overestimation of total ozone due to MU-dependence of the instrument at Hradec Kralove in both seasons.

  16. Estimating Real-Time Zenith Tropospheric Delay over Africa Using IGS-RTS Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelazeem, M.

    2017-12-01

    Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) is a crucial parameter for atmospheric modeling, severe weather monitoring and forecasting applications. Currently, the international global navigation satellite system (GNSS) real-time service (IGS-RTS) products are used extensively in real-time atmospheric modeling applications. The objective of this study is to develop a real time zenith tropospheric delay estimation model over Africa using the IGS-RTS products. The real-time ZTDs are estimated based on the real-time precise point positioning (PPP) solution. GNSS observations from a number of reference stations are processed over a period of 7 days. Then, the estimated real-time ZTDs are compared with the IGS tropospheric products counterparts. The findings indicate that the estimated real-time ZTDs have millimeter level accuracy in comparison with the IGS counterparts.

  17. Evidence of L-mode electromagnetic wave pumping of ionospheric plasma near geomagnetic zenith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyser, Thomas B.; James, H. Gordon; Gustavsson, Björn; Rietveld, Michael T.

    2018-02-01

    The response of ionospheric plasma to pumping by powerful HF (high frequency) electromagnetic waves transmitted from the ground into the ionosphere is the strongest in the direction of geomagnetic zenith. We present experimental results from transmitting a left-handed circularly polarized HF beam from the EISCAT (European Incoherent SCATter association) Heating facility in magnetic zenith. The CASSIOPE (CAScade, Smallsat and IOnospheric Polar Explorer) spacecraft in the topside ionosphere above the F-region density peak detected transionospheric pump radiation, although the pump frequency was below the maximum ionospheric plasma frequency. The pump wave is deduced to arrive at CASSIOPE through L-mode propagation and associated double (O to Z, Z to O) conversion in pump-induced radio windows. L-mode propagation allows the pump wave to reach higher plasma densities and higher ionospheric altitudes than O-mode propagation so that a pump wave in the L-mode can facilitate excitation of upper hybrid phenomena localized in density depletions in a larger altitude range. L-mode propagation is therefore suggested to be important in explaining the magnetic zenith effect.

  18. Improving the estimation of zenith dry tropospheric delays using regional surface meteorological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.; Heck, B.; Awange, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are emerging as possible tools for remote sensing high-resolution atmospheric water vapour that improves weather forecasting through numerical weather prediction models. Nowadays, the GNSS-derived tropospheric zenith total delay (ZTD), comprising zenith dry delay (ZDD) and zenith wet delay (ZWD), is achievable with sub-centimetre accuracy. However, if no representative near-site meteorological information is available, the quality of the ZDD derived from tropospheric models is degraded, leading to inaccurate estimation of the water vapour component ZWD as difference between ZTD and ZDD. On the basis of freely accessible regional surface meteorological data, this paper proposes a height-dependent linear correction model for a priori ZDD. By applying the ordinary least-squares estimation (OLSE), bootstrapping (BOOT), and leave-one-out cross-validation (CROS) methods, the model parameters are estimated and analysed with respect to outlier detection. The model validation is carried out using GNSS stations with near-site meteorological measurements. The results verify the efficiency of the proposed ZDD correction model, showing a significant reduction in the mean bias from several centimetres to about 5 mm. The OLSE method enables a fast computation, while the CROS procedure allows for outlier detection. All the three methods produce consistent results after outlier elimination, which improves the regression quality by about 20% and the model accuracy by up to 30%.

  19. The TOMS V9 Algorithm for OMPS Nadir Mapper Total Ozone: An Enhanced Design That Ensures Data Continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffner, D. P.; McPeters, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K.; Labow, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    The TOMS V9 total ozone algorithm will be applied to the OMPS Nadir Mapper instrument to supersede the exisiting V8.6 data product in operational processing and re-processing for public release. Becuase the quality of the V8.6 data is already quite high, enchancements in V9 are mainly with information provided by the retrieval and simplifcations to the algorithm. The design of the V9 algorithm has been influenced by improvements both in our knowledge of atmospheric effects, such as those of clouds made possible by studies with OMI, and also limitations in the V8 algorithms applied to both OMI and OMPS. But the namesake instruments of the TOMS algorithm are substantially more limited in their spectral and noise characterisitics, and a requirement of our algorithm is to also apply the algorithm to these discrete band spectrometers which date back to 1978. To achieve continuity for all these instruments, the TOMS V9 algorithm continues to use radiances in discrete bands, but now uses Rodgers optimal estimation to retrieve a coarse profile and provide uncertainties for each retrieval. The algorithm remains capable of achieving high accuracy results with a small number of discrete wavelengths, and in extreme cases, such as unusual profile shapes and high solar zenith angles, the quality of the retrievals is improved. Despite the intended design to use limited wavlenegths, the algorithm can also utilitze additional wavelengths from hyperspectral sensors like OMPS to augment the retreival's error detection and information content; for example SO2 detection and correction of Ring effect on atmospheric radiances. We discuss these and other aspects of the V9 algorithm as it will be applied to OMPS, and will mention potential improvements which aim to take advantage of a synergy with OMPS Limb Profiler and Nadir Mapper to further improve the quality of total ozone from the OMPS instrument.

  20. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  1. Tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column retrieval based on ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, F. M.; Hendrick, F.; Pinardi, G.; Fayt, C.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2013-12-01

    A retrieval approach has been developed to derive tropospheric NO2 vertical column amounts from ground-based zenith-sky measurements of scattered sunlight. Zenith radiance spectra are observed in the visible range by the BIRA-IASB Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) instrument and analyzed by the DOAS technique, based on a least-squares spectral fitting. In recent years, this technique has shown to be a well-suited remote sensing tool for monitoring atmospheric trace gases. The retrieval algorithm is developed and validated based on a two month dataset acquired from June to July 2009 in the framework of the Cabauw (51.97° N, 4.93° E) Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI). Once fully operational, the retrieval approach can be applied to observations from stations of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The obtained tropospheric vertical column amounts are compared with the multi-axis retrieval from the BIRA-IASB MAX-DOAS instrument and the retrieval from a zenith-viewing only SAOZ instrument (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales), owned by Laboratoire Atmosphères, Milieux, Observations Spatiales (LATMOS). First results show a good agreement for the whole time series with the multi-axis retrieval (R = 0.82; y = 0.88x + 0.30) as well as with the SAOZ retrieval (R = 0.85; y = 0.76x + 0.28 ). Main error sources arise from the uncertainties in the determination of tropospheric and stratospheric air mass factors, the stratospheric NO2 abundances and the residual amount in the reference spectrum. However zenith-sky measurements have been commonly used over the last decades for stratospheric monitoring, this study also illustrates the suitability for retrieval of tropospheric column amounts. As there are long time series of zenith-sky acquisitions available, the developed approach offers new perspectives with regard to the use of observations from the NDACC

  2. Validation of 10-year SAO OMI ozone profile (PROFOZ) product using Aura MLS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guanyu; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Yang, Kai; Cai, Zhaonan

    2018-01-01

    We validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) ozone profile (PROFOZ v0.9.3) product including ozone profiles between 0.22 and 261 hPa and stratospheric ozone columns (SOCs) down to 100, 215, and 261 hPa from October 2004 through December 2014 retrieved by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) algorithm against the latest Microwave Limb Sound (MLS) v4.2x data. We also evaluate the effects of OMI row anomaly (RA) on the retrieval by dividing the data set into before and after the occurrence of serious RA, i.e., pre-RA (2004-2008) and post-RA (2009-2014). During the pre-RA period, OMI ozone profiles agree very well with MLS data. After applying OMI averaging kernels to MLS data, the global mean biases (MBs) are within 3 % between 0.22 and 100 hPa, negative biases are within 3-9 % for lower layers, and the standard deviations (SDs) are 3.5-5 % from 1 to 40 hPa, 6-10 % for upper layers, and 5-20 % for lower layers. OMI shows biases dependent on latitude and solar zenith angle (SZA), but MBs and SDs are mostly within 10 % except for low and high altitudes of high latitudes and SZAs. Compared to the retrievals during the pre-RA period, OMI retrievals during the post-RA period degrade slightly between 5 and 261 hPa with MBs and SDs typically larger by 2-5 %, and degrade much more for pressure less than ˜ 5 hPa, with larger MBs by up to 8 % and SDs by up to 15 %, where the MBs are larger by 10-15 % south of 40° N due to the blockage effect of RA and smaller by 15-20 % north of 40° N due to the solar contamination effect of RA. The much worse comparisons at high altitudes indicate the UV1 channel of pixels that are not flagged as RA is still affected by the RA. During the pre-RA period, OMI SOCs show very good agreement with MLS data with global mean MBs within 0.6 % and SDs of 1.9 % for SOCs down to 215 and 261 hPa and of 2.30 % for SOC down to 100 hPa. Despite clearly worse ozone profile comparisons during the post-RA period, OMI SOCs only slightly degrade

  3. Antarctic Ozone Hole, 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Each spring the ozone layer over Antarctica nearly disappears, forming a 'hole' over the entire continent. The hole is created by the interaction of some man-made chemicals-freon, for example-with Antarctica's unique weather patterns and extremely cold temperatures. Ozone in the stratosphere absorbs ultraviolet radiation from the sun, thereby protecting living things. Since the ozone hole was discovered many of the chemicals that destroy ozone have been banned, but they will remain in the atmosphere for decades. In 2000, the ozone hole grew quicker than usual and exceptionally large. By the first week in September the hole was the largest ever-11.4 million square miles. The top image shows the average total column ozone values over Antarctica for September 2000. (Total column ozone is the amount of ozone from the ground to the top of the atmosphere. A relatively typical measurement of 300 Dobson Units is equivalent to a layer of ozone 0.12 inches thick on the Earth's surface. Levels below 220 Dobson Units are considered to be significant ozone depletion.) The record-breaking hole is likely the result of lower than average ozone levels during the Antarctic fall and winter, and exceptionally cold temperatures. In October, however (bottom image), the hole shrank dramatically, much more quickly than usual. By the end of October, the hole was only one-third of it's previous size. In a typical year, the ozone hole does not collapse until the end of November. NASA scientists were surprised by this early shrinking and speculate it is related to the region's weather. Global ozone levels are measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). For more information about ozone, read the Earth Observatory's ozone fact sheet, view global ozone data and see these ozone images. Images by Greg Shirah, NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio.

  4. 2009 Antarctic Ozone Hole

    2009-09-16

    The annual ozone hole has started developing over the South Pole, and it appears that it will be comparable to ozone depletions over the past decade. This composite image from September 10 depicts ozone concentrations in Dobson units, with purple and blues depicting severe deficits of ozone. "We have observed the ozone hole again in 2009, and it appears to be pretty average so far," said ozone researcher Paul Newman of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "However, we won't know for another four weeks how this year's ozone hole will fully develop." Scientists are tracking the size and depth of the ozone hole with observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument on NASA's Aura spacecraft, the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment on the European Space Agency's ERS-2 spacecraft, and the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet instrument on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's NOAA-16 satellite. The depth and area of the ozone hole are governed by the amount of chlorine and bromine in the Antarctic stratosphere. Over the southern winter, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) form in the extreme cold of the atmosphere, and chlorine gases react on the cloud particles to release chlorine into a form that can easily destroy ozone. When the sun rises in August after months of seasonal polar darkness, the sunlight heats the clouds and catalyzes the chemical reactions that deplete the ozone layer. The ozone hole begins to grow in August and reaches its largest area in late September to early October. Recent observations and several studies have shown that the size of the annual ozone hole has stabilized and the level of ozone-depleting substances has decreased by 4 percent since 2001. But since chlorine and bromine compounds have long lifetimes in the atmosphere, a recovery of atmospheric ozone is not likely to be noticeable until 2020 or later. Visit NASA's Ozone Watch page for current imagery and data: ozonewatch.gsfc.nasa.gov/index.html

  5. Augmentation of Quasi-Zenith Satellite Positioning System Using High Altitude Platforms Systems (HAPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, Toshiaki; Harigae, Masatoshi

    Recently, some feasibility studies on a regional positioning system using the quasi-zenith satellites and the geostationary satellites have been conducted in Japan. However, the geometry of this system seems to be unsatisfactory in terms of the positioning accuracy in north-south direction. In this paper, an augmented satellite positioning system by the High Altitude Platform Systems (HAPS) is proposed since the flexibility of the HAPS location is effective to improve the geometry of satellite positioning system. The improved positioning performance of the augmented system is also demonstrated.

  6. Retrieving vertical ozone profiles from measurements of global spectral irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Germar; Petropavlovskikh, Irina; Mayer, Bernhard

    2017-12-01

    A new method is presented to determine vertical ozone profiles from measurements of spectral global (direct Sun plus upper hemisphere) irradiance in the ultraviolet. The method is similar to the widely used Umkehr technique, which inverts measurements of zenith sky radiance. The procedure was applied to measurements of a high-resolution spectroradiometer installed near the centre of the Greenland ice sheet. Retrieved profiles were validated with balloon-sonde observations and ozone profiles from the space-borne Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). Depending on altitude, the bias between retrieval results presented in this paper and MLS observations ranges between -5 and +3 %. The magnitude of this bias is comparable, if not smaller, to values reported in the literature for the standard Dobson Umkehr method. Total ozone columns (TOCs) calculated from the retrieved profiles agree to within 0.7±2.0 % (±1σ) with TOCs measured by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument on board the Aura satellite. The new method is called the Global-Umkehr method.

  7. Basic Ozone Layer Science

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about the ozone layer and how human activities deplete it. This page provides information on the chemical processes that lead to ozone layer depletion, and scientists' efforts to understand them.

  8. Basic Information about Ozone

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn the difference between good (stratospheric) and bad (tropospheric) ozone, how bad ozone affects our air quality, health, and environment, and what EPA is doing about it through regulations and standards.

  9. Impact of Biomass Burning Plumes on Photolysis Rates and Ozone Formation at the Mount Bachelor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylon, P.; Jaffe, D. A.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Alvarado, M. J.; Lefer, B. L.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we examine biomass burning (BB) events at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (MBO) during the summer of 2015. We explored the photochemical environment in these BB plumes, which remains poorly understood. Because we are interested in understanding the effect of aerosols only (as opposed to the combined effect of aerosols and clouds), we carefully selected three cloud-free days in August and investigate the photochemistry in these plumes. At local midday (solar zenith angle (SZA) = 35°), j(NO2) values were slightly higher (0.2-1.8%) in the smoky days compared to the smoke-free day, presumably due to enhanced scattering by the smoke aerosols. At higher SZA (70°), BB aerosols decrease j(NO2) by 14-21%. We also observe a greater decrease in the actinic flux at 310-350 nm, compared to 360-420 nm, presumably due to absorption in the UV by brown carbon. We compare our measurements with results from the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible v.5.2 model. As expected, we find a good agreement (to within 6%) during cloud-free conditions. Finally, we use the extended Leighton relationship and a photochemical model (Aerosol Simulation Program v.2.1) to estimate midday HO2 and RO2 concentrations and ozone production rates (P(O3)) in the fire plumes. We observe that Leighton-derived HO2 and RO2 values (49-185 pptv) and instantaneous P(O3) (2.0-3.6 ppbv/h) are higher than the results from the photochemical model.

  10. Ozone Layer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been monitoring the ozone layer from space using optical remote sensing techniques since 1970. With concern over catalytic destruction of ozone (mid-1970s) and the development of the Antarctic ozone hole (mid-1980s), long term ozone monitoring has become the primary focus of NASA's series of ozone measuring instruments. A series of TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) instruments has produced a nearly continuous record of global ozone from 1979 to the present. These instruments infer ozone by measuring sunlight backscattered from the atmosphere in the ultraviolet through differential absorption. These measurements have documented a 15 Dobson Unit drop in global average ozone since 1980, and the declines in ozone in the antarctic each October have been far more dramatic. Instruments that measure the ozone vertical distribution, the SBUV and SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) instruments for example, show that the largest changes are occurring in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. The goal of ozone measurement in the next decades will be to document the predicted recovery of the ozone layer as CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) levels decline. This will require a continuation of global measurements of total column ozone on a global basis, but using data from successor instruments to TOMS. Hyperspectral instruments capable of measuring in the UV will be needed for this purpose. Establishing the relative roles of chemistry and dynamics will require instruments to measure ozone in the troposphere and in the stratosphere with good vertical resolution. Instruments that can measure other chemicals important to ozone formation and destruction will also be needed.

  11. Ozone Trend Detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The detection of anthropogenic disturbances in the Earth's ozone layer was studied. Two topics were addressed: (1) the level at which a trend in total ozoning is detected by existing data sources; and (2) empirical evidence in the prediction of the depletion in total ozone. Error sources are identified. The predictability of climatological series, whether empirical models can be trusted, and how errors in the Dobson total ozone data impact trend detectability, are discussed.

  12. Ozone Antimicrobial Efficacy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is a potent germicide that has been used extensively for water purification. In Europe, 90 percent of the municipal water systems are treated with ozone, and in France, ozone has been used to treat drinking water since 1903. However, there is limited information on the bioc...

  13. OZONE BYPRODUCT FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of ozone for water treatment has been increasing as ozone has great potential for degrading water pollutants and inactivating viruses, Giardia cysts, and Cryptosporidium oocysts. Although it appears that ozone generates less undesirable disinfection by-products (DBPs) th...

  14. Remote Sensing of Cloud Properties using Ground-based Measurements of Zenith Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, J. Christine; Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Barker, Howard W.; Barnard, James C.; Luo, Yi

    2006-01-01

    An extensive verification of cloud property retrievals has been conducted for two algorithms using zenith radiances measured by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program ground-based passive two-channel (673 and 870 nm) Narrow Field-Of-View Radiometer. The underlying principle of these algorithms is that clouds have nearly identical optical properties at these wavelengths, but corresponding spectral surface reflectances (for vegetated surfaces) differ significantly. The first algorithm, the RED vs. NIR, works for a fully three-dimensional cloud situation. It retrieves not only cloud optical depth, but also an effective radiative cloud fraction. Importantly, due to one-second time resolution of radiance measurements, we are able, for the first time, to capture detailed changes in cloud structure at the natural time scale of cloud evolution. The cloud optical depths tau retrieved by this algorithm are comparable to those inferred from both downward fluxes in overcast situations and microwave brightness temperatures for broken clouds. Moreover, it can retrieve tau for thin patchy clouds, where flux and microwave observations fail to detect them. The second algorithm, referred to as COUPLED, couples zenith radiances with simultaneous fluxes to infer 2. In general, the COUPLED and RED vs. NIR algorithms retrieve consistent values of tau. However, the COUPLED algorithm is more sensitive to the accuracies of measured radiance, flux, and surface reflectance than the RED vs. NIR algorithm. This is especially true for thick overcast clouds where it may substantially overestimate z.

  15. Effect of Ram and Zenith Exposure on the Optical Properties of Polymers in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yuachun; de Groh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Leneghan, Halle; Asmar, Olivia

    2017-01-01

    The temperature of spacecraft is influenced by the solar absorptance and thermal emittance of the external spacecraft materials. Optical and thermal properties can degrade over time in the harsh low Earth orbital (LEO) space environment where spacecraft external materials are exposed to various forms of radiation, thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen. Therefore, it is important to test the durability of spacecraft materials in the space environment. One objective of the Polymers and Zenith Polymers Experiments was to determine the effect of LEO space exposure on the optical properties of various spacecraft polymers. These experiments were flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 7 (MISSE 7) mission on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) for 1.5 years. Samples were flown in ram, wake or zenith directions, receiving varying amounts of atomic oxygen and solar radiation exposure. Total and diffuse reflectance and transmittance of flight and corresponding control samples were obtained post-flight using a Cary 5000 UV-Vis-NIR Spectrophotometer. Integrated air mass zero solar absorptance (s) of the flight and control samples were computed from the total transmittance and reflectance, and compared. The optical data are compared with similar polymers exposed to space for four years as part of MISSE 2, and with atomic oxygen erosion data, to help understand the degradation of these polymers in the space environment. Results show that prolonged space exposure increases the solar absorptance of some materials. Knowing which polymers remain stable will benefit future spacecraft design.

  16. Overview of the MISSE 7 Polymers and Zenith Polymers Experiments After 1.5 Years of Space Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Grace T.; de Groh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Haloua, Athena; Imka, Emily C.; Mitchell, Gianna G.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 7 (MISSE 7), two experiments called the Polymers Experiment and the Zenith Polymers Experiment were flown on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) and exposed to the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment for 1.5 years. The Polymers Experiment contained 47 samples, which were flown in a ram or wake flight orientation. The objectives of the Polymers Experiment were to determine the LEO atomic oxygen erosion yield (Ey, volume loss per incident oxygen atoms, given in cu cm/atom) of the polymers, and to determine if atomic oxygen erosion of high and low ash containing polymers is dependent on fluence. The Zenith Polymers Experiment was flown in a zenith flight orientation. The primary objective of the Zenith Polymers Experiment was to determine the effect of solar exposure on the erosion of fluoropolymers. Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) was flown in each experiment for atomic oxygen fluence determination. This paper provides an introduction to both the MISSE 7 Polymers Experiment and the MISSE 7 Zenith Polymers Experiment, and provides initial erosion yield results.

  17. Cloud Ozone Dust Imager (CODI). Volume 1; Investigation and Technical Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, R. Todd; Dusenbery, Paul; Wolff, Michael; James, Phil; Allen, Mark; Goguen, Jay; Kahn, Ralph; Gladstone, Rany; Murphy, Jim

    1995-01-01

    The Cloud Ozone Dust Imager (CODI) is proposed to investigate the current climatic balance of the Mars atmosphere, with particular emphasis on the important but poorly understood roles which dust and water ice aerosols play in this balance. The large atmospheric heating (20-50 K) resulting from global dust storms around Mars perihelion is well recognized. However, groundbased observations of Mars atmospheric temperatures, water vapor, and clouds since the Viking missions have identified a much colder, cloudier atmosphere around Mars aphelion that may prove as important as global dust storms in determining the interannual and long-term behavior of the Mars climate. The key climate issues CODI is designed to investigate are: 1) the degree to which non-linear interactions between atmospheric dust heating, water vapor saturation, and cloud nucleation influence the seasonal and interannual variability of the Mars atmosphere, and 2) whether the strong orbital forcing of atmospheric dust loading, temperatures and water vapor saturation determines the long-term balance of Mars water, as reflected in the north-south hemispheric asymmetries of atmospheric water vapor and polar water ice abundances. The CODI experiment will measure the daily, seasonal and (potentially) interannual variability of atmospheric dust and cloud opacities, and the key physical properties of these aerosols which determine their role in the climate cycles of Mars. CODI is a small (1.2 kg), fixed pointing camera, in which four wide-angle (+/- 70 deg) lenses illuminate fixed filters and CCD arrays. Simultaneous sky/surface imaging of Mars is obtained at an angular resolution of 0.28 deg/pixel for wavelengths of 255, 336, 502, and 673 nm (similar to Hubble Space Telescope filters). These wavelengths serve to measure atmospheric ozone (255 and 336 nm), discriminate ice and dust aerosols (336 and 673 nm), and construct color images (336, 502, and 673 nm). The CODI images are detected on four 512 x 512

  18. Validation of 10-year SAO OMI Ozone Profile (PROFOZ) product using ozonesonde observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guanyu; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Yang, Kai; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Cai, Zhaonan; Allaart, Marc; Ancellet, Gérard; Calpini, Bertrand; Coetzee, Gerrie J. R.; Cuevas-Agulló, Emilio; Cupeiro, Manuel; De Backer, Hugo; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Fuelberg, Henry E.; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Hall, Tristan J.; Johnson, Bryan; Joseph, Everette; Kivi, Rigel; Kois, Bogumil; Komala, Ninong; König-Langlo, Gert; Laneve, Giovanni; Leblanc, Thierry; Marchand, Marion; Minschwaner, Kenneth R.; Morris, Gary; Newchurch, Michael J.; Ogino, Shin-Ya; Ohkawara, Nozomu; Piters, Ankie J. M.; Posny, Françoise; Querel, Richard; Scheele, Rinus; Schmidlin, Frank J.; Schnell, Russell C.; Schrems, Otto; Selkirk, Henry; Shiotani, Masato; Skrivánková, Pavla; Stübi, René; Taha, Ghassan; Tarasick, David W.; Thompson, Anne M.; Thouret, Valérie; Tully, Matthew B.; Van Malderen, Roeland; Vömel, Holger; von der Gathen, Peter; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Yela, Margarita

    2017-07-01

    We validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Ozone Profile (PROFOZ) product from October 2004 through December 2014 retrieved by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) algorithm against ozonesonde observations. We also evaluate the effects of OMI row anomaly (RA) on the retrieval by dividing the dataset into before and after the occurrence of serious OMI RA, i.e., pre-RA (2004-2008) and post-RA (2009-2014). The retrieval shows good agreement with ozonesondes in the tropics and midlatitudes and for pressure < ˜ 50 hPa in the high latitudes. It demonstrates clear improvement over the a priori down to the lower troposphere in the tropics and down to an average of ˜ 550 (300) hPa at middle (high) latitudes. In the tropics and midlatitudes, the profile mean biases (MBs) are less than 6 %, and the standard deviations (SDs) range from 5 to 10 % for pressure < ˜ 50 hPa to less than 18 % (27 %) in the tropics (midlatitudes) for pressure > ˜ 50 hPa after applying OMI averaging kernels to ozonesonde data. The MBs of the stratospheric ozone column (SOC, the ozone column from the tropopause pressure to the ozonesonde burst pressure) are within 2 % with SDs of < 5 % and the MBs of the tropospheric ozone column (TOC) are within 6 % with SDs of 15 %. In the high latitudes, the profile MBs are within 10 % with SDs of 5-15 % for pressure < ˜ 50 hPa but increase to 30 % with SDs as great as 40 % for pressure > ˜ 50 hPa. The SOC MBs increase up to 3 % with SDs as great as 6 % and the TOC SDs increase up to 30 %. The comparison generally degrades at larger solar zenith angles (SZA) due to weaker signals and additional sources of error, leading to worse performance at high latitudes and during the midlatitude winter. Agreement also degrades with increasing cloudiness for pressure > ˜ 100 hPa and varies with cross-track position, especially with large MBs and SDs at extreme off-nadir positions. In the tropics and midlatitudes, the post-RA comparison is considerably

  19. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  20. Ozone and the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimazaki, Tatsuo

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that the stratospheric ozone is effective in absorbing almost all radiation below 300 nm at heights below 300 km. The distribution of global ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere, and the latitudinal variations of the total ozone column over four seasons are considered. The theory of the ozone layer production is discussed together with catalytic reactions for ozone loss and the mechanisms of ozone transport. Special attention is given to the anthropogenic perturbations, such as SST exhaust gases and freon gas from aerosol cans and refrigerators, that may cause an extensive destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer and thus have a profound impact on the world climate and on life.

  1. Characteristics of skylight at the zenith during twilight as indicators of atmospheric turbidity. 1: Degree of polarization.

    PubMed

    Coulson, K L

    1980-10-15

    An extensive series of measurements of the intensity and polarization of the light from the zenith sky during periods of twilight was made at an altitude of 3400 m on the island of Hawaii during a 5-month period in 1977. This first of two papers is on the twilight polarization; the second will deal with intensity. The measurements were made in eight narrow spectral ranges between 0.32 and 0.90 microm under clear sky conditions. The data show that the degree of polarization at the zenith is a sensitive indicator of the existence of turbid layers at high levels in the atmosphere, and by monitoring the zenith skylight as a function of time during the twilight, it is possible to obtain qualitative information on both the altitude and relative density of the layers.

  2. Comparison of Kalman filter estimates of zenith atmospheric path delays using the global positioning system and very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tralli, David M.; Lichten, Stephen M.; Herring, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Kalman filter estimates of zenith nondispersive atmospheric path delays at Westford, Massachusetts, Fort Davis, Texas, and Mojave, California, were obtained from independent analyses of data collected during January and February 1988 using the GPS and VLBI. The apparent accuracy of the path delays is inferred by examining the estimates and covariances from both sets of data. The ability of the geodetic data to resolve zenith path delay fluctuations is determined by comparing further the GPS Kalman filter estimates with corresponding wet path delays derived from water vapor radiometric data available at Mojave over two 8-hour data spans within the comparison period. GPS and VLBI zenith path delay estimates agree well within one standard deviation formal uncertainties (from 10-20 mm for GPS and 3-15 mm for VLBI) in four out of the five possible comparisons, with maximum differences of 5 and 21 mm over 8- to 12-hour data spans.

  3. Zenith skylight intensity and color during the total solar eclipse of 20 July 1963.

    PubMed

    Sharp, W E; Lloyd, J W; Silverman, S M

    1966-05-01

    The zenith skylight intensity was measured, with a resolution of 10 A, over the wavelength range from 5200 A to 6400 A during a total solar eclipse at Hermon, Maine. The intensity was found to change by about two orders of magnitude in the 2-min period before totality and reached a minimum during totality of 19.5 kR/A at 5200 A. The spectral distribution remained that of the day sky until the sun was more than 99.8% obscured. During totality, the shorter wavelengths were enhanced, indicating a shift to the blue in sky color. Comparisons with an independent measurement from an aircraft show that the intensity scale height of the secondary scattered component, predominating at totality, is significantly less than that of the day sky. The measurements are compared with the day and twilight sky.

  4. Beam-splitter switches based on zenithal bistable liquid-crystal gratings.

    PubMed

    Zografopoulos, Dimitrios C; Beccherelli, Romeo; Kriezis, Emmanouil E

    2014-10-01

    The tunable optical diffractive properties of zenithal bistable nematic liquid-crystal gratings are theoretically investigated. The liquid-crystal orientation is rigorously solved via a tensorial formulation of the Landau-de Gennes theory and the optical transmission properties of the gratings are investigated via full-wave finite-element frequency-domain simulations. It is demonstrated that by proper design the two stable states of the grating can provide nondiffracting and diffracting operation, the latter with equal power splitting among different diffraction orders. An electro-optic switching mechanism, based on dual-frequency nematic materials, and its temporal dynamics are further discussed. Such gratings provide a solution towards tunable beam-steering and beam-splitting components with extremely low power consumption.

  5. Comparison of SBUV and SAGE II ozone profiles: Implications for ozone trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeters, R. D.; Miles, T.; Flynn, L. E.; Wellemeyer, C. G.; Zawodny, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) ozone profiles have been compared with Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II profiles over the period October 1984 through June 1990, when data are available from both instruments. SBUV measurements were selected to closely match the SAGE II latitude/longitude measurement pattern. There are significant differences between the SAGE II sunrise and the sunset zonal mean ozone profiles in the equatorial zone, particularly in the upper stratosphere, that may be connected with extreme SAGE II solar azimuth angles for tropical sunrise measurements. Calculation of the average sunset bias between SBUV and SAGE II ozone profiles shows that allowing for diurnal variation in Umkehr layer 10, SBUV and SAGE II agree to within +/- 5% for the entire stratosphere in the northern midlatitude zone. The worst agreement is seen at southern midlatitudes near the ozone peak (disagreements of +/- 10%), apparently the result of the SBUV ozone profile peaking at a lower altitude than SAGE. The integrated ozone columns (cumulative above 15 km) agree very well, to within +/- 2.3% in all zones for both sunset and sunrise measurements. A comparison of the time dependence of SBUV and SAGE II shows that there was less than +/- 5% relative drift over the 5.5 years for all altitudes except below 25 km, where the SBUV vertical resolution is poor. The best agreement with SAGE is seen in the integrated column ozone (cumulative above 15 km), where SAGE II has a 1% negative trend relative to SBUV over the comparison period. There is a persistent disagreement of the two instruments in Umkehr layers 9 and 10 of +/- 4% over the 5.5-year comparison period. In the equatorial zone this disagreement may be caused in part by a large positive trend (0.8 K per year) in the National Meteorologica Center temperatures used to convert the SAGE II measurement of ozone density versus altitude to a pressure scale for comparison with SBUV. In the middle stratosphere (30

  6. Ozone therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-01-01

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics. PMID:22574088

  7. Ozone therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-02-22

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics.

  8. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Processes that may be responsible for the thinning in the ozone layer above the South Pole are described. The chlorine catalytic cycle which destroys ozone is described, as are the major types of reactions that are believed to interfere with this cycle by forming chlorine reservoirs. The suspected contributions of polar stratospheric clouds to these processes are examined. Finally, the possibility that the ozone hole may be due more to a shift in atmospheric dynamics than to chemical destruction is addressed.

  9. Characterizing the zenithal night sky brightness in large territories: how many samples per square kilometre are needed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bará, Salvador

    2018-01-01

    A recurring question arises when trying to characterize, by means of measurements or theoretical calculations, the zenithal night sky brightness throughout a large territory: how many samples per square kilometre are needed? The optimum sampling distance should allow reconstructing, with sufficient accuracy, the continuous zenithal brightness map across the whole region, whilst at the same time avoiding unnecessary and redundant oversampling. This paper attempts to provide some tentative answers to this issue, using two complementary tools: the luminance structure function and the Nyquist-Shannon spatial sampling theorem. The analysis of several regions of the world, based on the data from the New world atlas of artificial night sky brightness, suggests that, as a rule of thumb, about one measurement per square kilometre could be sufficient for determining the zenithal night sky brightness of artificial origin at any point in a region to within ±0.1 magV arcsec-2 (in the root-mean-square sense) of its true value in the Johnson-Cousins V band. The exact reconstruction of the zenithal night sky brightness maps from samples taken at the Nyquist rate seems to be considerably more demanding.

  10. Project Zenith: Multicultural/Multimedia/Emphasis in Speech-Language Pathology, 1997-2001. Grant Performance Report--Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Jose State Univ., CA.

    This report discusses the activities and outcomes of Project Zenith, which was designed to recruit two cohorts of bilingual graduate students to complete a graduate program with specialized skills in the diagnosis and treatment of communicative disorders in multicultural populations in the public schools. Included in the specialized training is…

  11. SMM mesospheric ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    The main objective was to understand the secular and seasonal behavior of ozone in the lower mesosphere, 50 to 70 km. This altitude region is important in understanding the factors which determine ozone behavior. A secondary objective is the study of stratospheric ozone in the polar regions. Use is made of results from the SBUV satellite borne instrument. In the Arctic the interaction between chlorine compounds and low molecular weight hydrocarbons is studied. More than 30,000 profiles were obtained using the UVSP instrument on the SMM spacecraft. Several orbits of ozone data per day were obtained allowing study of the current rise in solar activity from the minimum until the present. Analysis of Nimbus 7 SBUV data in Antarctic spring indicates that ozone is depleted within the polar vortex relative to ozone outside the vortex. This depletion confirms the picture of ozone loss at altitudes where polar stratospheric clouds exist. In addition, there is ozone loss above the cloud level indicating that there is another mechanism in addition to ozone loss initiated by heterogeneous chlorine reactions on cloud particles.

  12. Simultaneous Multi-angle Observations of Strong Langmuir Turbulence at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Naomi; Golkowski, Mark; Sheerin, James P.; Watkins, Brenton J.

    2015-10-01

    We report results from a recent series of experiments employing the HF transmitter of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. The Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) located at the HAARP facility is used as the primary diagnostic. Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments are used to avoid generation of artificial field-aligned irregularities and isolate ponderomotive plasma turbulence effects. The HF pump frequency is close to the 3rd gyro-harmonic frequency and the HF pointing angle and MUIR look angle are between the HF Spitze angle and Magnetic Zenith angle. Plasma line spectra measured simultaneously in different spots of the interaction region display differences dependent on the aspect angle of the HF pump beam in the boresight direction and the pointing angle of the MUIR diagnostic radar. Outshifted Plasma Lines, cascade, collapse, coexistence, spectra are observed in agreement with existing theory and simulation results of Strong Langmuir Turbulence in ionospheric interaction experiments. It is found that SLT at HAARP is most readily observed at a HF pointing angle of 11° and UHF observation angle of 15°, which is consistent with the magnetic zenith effect as documented in previous works and optimal orientation of the refracted HF electric field vector.

  13. Fourteen-year outcomes of abdominal aortic endovascular repair with the Zenith stent graft.

    PubMed

    Verzini, Fabio; Romano, Lydia; Parlani, Gianbattista; Isernia, Giacomo; Simonte, Gioele; Loschi, Diletta; Lenti, Massimo; Cao, Piergiorgio

    2017-02-01

    Long-term results of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endovascular repair are affected by graft design renewals that tend to improve the performance of older generation prostheses but usually reset the follow-up times to zero. The present study investigated the long-term outcomes of endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) using the Zenith graft, still in use without major modification, in a single center experience. Between 2000 and 2011, 610 patients underwent elective EVAR using the Zenith endograft (Cook Inc, Bloomington, Ind) and represent the study group. Primary outcomes were overall survival, freedom from AAA rupture, and freedom from AAA-related death. Secondary outcomes included freedom from late (>30 days) reintervention, freedom from late (>30 days) conversion to open repair, freedom from aneurysm sac enlargement >5.0 mm and freedom from EVAR failure, defined as a composite of AAA-related death, AAA rupture, AAA growth >5 mm, and any reintervention. Mean age was 73.2 years. Mean aneurysm diameter was 55.3 mm. There were five perioperative deaths (0.8%) and three intraoperative conversions. At a mean follow-up of 99.2 (range, 0-175) months, seven AAA ruptures occurred, all fatal except one. Overall survival was 92.8% ± 1.1% at 1 year, 70.1% ± 1.9% at 5 years, 37.8% ± 2.9% at 10 years, and 24 ± 4% at 14 years. Freedom from AAA-rupture was 99.8% ± 0.02 at 1 year (one case), 99.4% ± 0.04 at 5 years (three cases), and 98.1% ± 0.07 at 10 and 14 years. Freedom from late reintervention and conversion was 98% ± 0.6 at 1 year, 87.7% ± 1.5 at 5 years, 75.7% ± 3.2 at 10 years, and 69.9% ± 5.2 at 14 years. Freedom from aneurysm sac growth >5.0 mm was 99.8% at 1 year, 96.6% ± 0.7 at 5 years, 81.0% ± 3.4 at 10 years, and 74.1% ± 5.8% at 14 years. EVAR failure occurred in 132 (21.6%) patients at 14 years. At multivariate analysis, independent predictors of EVAR failure resulted type I and III endoleak (hazard ratio [HR], 6.7; 95

  14. The Antarctic Ozone Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (1987) and the findings of the British Antarctic Survey (1985). Proposes two theories for the appearance of the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica which appears each spring; air pollution and natural atmospheric shifts. Illustrates the mechanics of both. Supports worldwide chlorofluorocarbon…

  15. Polar Ozone Workshop. Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the proceedings of the Polar Ozone Workshop held in Snowmass, CO, on May 9 to 13, 1988 are given. Topics covered include ozone depletion, ozonometry, polar meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, remote sensing of trace gases, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical simulations.

  16. Ozone and temperature trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Fioletov, Vitali; Bishop, Lane; Godin, Sophie; Bojkov, Rumen D.; Kirchhoff, Volker; Chanin, Marie-Lise; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Zerefos, Christos S.; Chu, William

    1991-01-01

    An update of the extensive reviews of the state of knowledge of measured ozone trends published in the Report of the International Ozone Trends Panel is presented. The update contains a review of progress since these reports, including reviewing of the ozone records, in most cases through March 1991. Also included are some new, unpublished reanalyses of these records including a complete reevaluation of 29 stations located in the former Soviet Union. The major new advance in knowledge of the measured ozone trend is the existence of independently calibrated satellite data records from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAG) instruments. These confirm many of the findings, originally derived from the Dobson record, concerning northern mid-latitude changes in ozone. We now have results from several instruments, whereas the previously reported changes were dependent on the calibration of a single instrument. This update will compare the ozone records from many different instruments to determine whether or not they provide a consistent picture of the ozone change that has occurred in the atmosphere. The update also briefly considers the problem of stratospheric temperature change. As in previous reports, this problem received significantly less attention, and the report is not nearly as complete. This area needs more attention in the future.

  17. Concerns for Ozone Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Qing; Strahan, Susan E.; Fleming, Eric L.

    2017-01-01

    Reactive halogen gases containing chlorine (Cl) or bromine (Br) can destroy stratospheric ozone via catalytic cycles. The main sources of atmospheric reactive halogen are the long-lived synthetic chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), methyl chloroform (CH3CCl3), and bromine-containing halons, all of which persist in the atmosphere for years. These ozone-depleting substances are now controlled under the Montreal Protocol and its amendments. Natural methyl bromide (CH3Br) and methyl chloride (CH3Cl) emissions are also important long-lived sources of atmospheric reactive halogen. Rising concentrations of very-short-lived substances (VSLSs) with atmospheric lifetimes of less than half a year may also contribute to future stratospheric ozone depletion. A greater concern for ozone layer recovery is incomplete compliance with the Montreal Protocol, which will impact stratospheric ozone for many decades, as well as rising natural emissions as a result of climate change.

  18. The zenithal 4-m International Liquid Mirror Telescope: a unique facility for supernova studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Brajesh; Pandey, Kanhaiya L.; Pandey, S. B.; Hickson, P.; Borra, E. F.; Anupama, G. C.; Surdej, J.

    2018-05-01

    The 4-m International Liquid Mirror Telescope (ILMT) will soon become operational at the newly developed Devasthal observatory near Nainital (Uttarakhand, India). Coupled with a 4k × 4k pixels CCD detector and TDI optical corrector, it will reach approximately 22.8, 22.3, and 21.4 mag in the g΄, r΄, and i΄ spectral bands, respectively, in a single scan. The limiting magnitudes can be further improved by co-adding the consecutive night images in particular filters. The uniqueness to observe the same sky region by looking towards the zenith direction every night makes the ILMT a unique instrument to detect new supernovae (SNe) by applying the image subtraction technique. High cadence (˜24 h) observations will help to construct dense sampling multi-band SNe light curves. We discuss the importance of the ILMT facility in the context of SNe studies. Considering the various plausible cosmological parameters and observational constraints, we perform detailed calculations of the expected SNe rate that can be detected with the ILMT in different spectral bands.

  19. A New Zenith Tropospheric Delay Grid Product for Real-Time PPP Applications over China.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yidong; Huang, Jinfang; Zhang, Weixing; Liang, Hong; Zheng, Fu; Liu, Jingnan

    2017-12-27

    Tropospheric delay is one of the major factors affecting the accuracy of electromagnetic distance measurements. To provide wide-area real-time high precision zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD), the temporal and spatial variations of ZTD with altitude were analyzed on the bases of the latest meteorological reanalysis product (ERA-Interim) provided by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). An inverse scale height model at given locations taking latitude, longitude and day of year as inputs was then developed and used to convert real-time ZTD at GPS stations in Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC) from station height to mean sea level (MSL). The real-time ZTD grid product (RtZTD) over China was then generated with a time interval of 5 min. Compared with ZTD estimated in post-processing mode, the bias and error RMS of ZTD at test GPS stations derived from RtZTD are 0.39 and 1.56 cm, which is significantly more accurate than commonly used empirical models. In addition, simulated real-time kinematic Precise Point Positioning (PPP) tests show that using RtZTD could accelerate the BDS-PPP convergence time by up to 32% and 65% in the horizontal and vertical components (set coordinate error thresholds to 0.4 m), respectively. For GPS-PPP, the convergence time using RtZTD can be accelerated by up to 29% in the vertical component (0.2 m).

  20. Temporal and spatial characterization of zenith total delay (ZTD) in North Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoew, B.; Elgered, G.

    2003-04-01

    The estimates of ZTD are often treated as realizations of random walk stochastic processes. We derive the corresponding process parameters for 34 different locations in North Europe using two measurement techniques - Global Positioning System (GPS) and Water Vapor Radiometer (WVR). GPS-estimated ZTD is an excellent candidate for data assimilation in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models in terms of both spatial and temporal resolution. We characterize the long term behavior of the ZTD as a function of site latitude and height. The spatial characteristics of the ZTD are studied as a function of site separation and season. We investigate the influence of the time-interpolated atmospheric pressure data used for the estimation of zenith wet delay (ZWD) from ZTD. Characterization of extreme atmospheric events can aid the development of an early warning system. We consider two types of extreme meteorological phenomena with regard to their spatial scales. The first type concerns larger regions (including several GPS sites); the extreme weather is characterized by intense precipitation which may result in a flood. The second type is related to local variations in the ZWD/ZTD and can be used for detection/monitoring of passing atmospheric fronts.

  1. Retrieval and Validation of Zenith and Slant Path Delays From the Irish GPS Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanafin, Jennifer; Jennings, S. Gerard; O'Dowd, Colin; McGrath, Ray; Whelan, Eoin

    2010-05-01

    Retrieval of atmospheric integrated water vapour (IWV) from ground-based GPS receivers and provision of this data product for meteorological applications has been the focus of a number of Europe-wide networks and projects, most recently the EUMETNET GPS water vapour programme. The results presented here are from a project to provide such information about the state of the atmosphere around Ireland for climate monitoring and improved numerical weather prediction. Two geodetic reference GPS receivers have been deployed at Valentia Observatory in Co. Kerry and Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station in Co. Galway, Ireland. These two receivers supplement the existing Ordnance Survey Ireland active network of 17 permanent ground-based receivers. A system to retrieve column-integrated atmospheric water vapour from the data provided by this network has been developed, based on the GPS Analysis at MIT (GAMIT) software package. The data quality of the zenith retrievals has been assessed using co-located radiosondes at the Valentia site and observations from a microwave profiling radiometer at the Mace Head site. Validation of the slant path retrievals requires a numerical weather prediction model and HIRLAM (High-Resolution Limited Area Model) version 7.2, the current operational forecast model in use at Met Éireann for the region, has been used for this validation work. Results from the data processing and comparisons with the independent observations and model will be presented.

  2. Data assimilation of GNSS zenith total delays from a Nordic processing centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindskog, Magnus; Ridal, Martin; Thorsteinsson, Sigurdur; Ning, Tong

    2017-11-01

    Atmospheric moisture-related information estimated from Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) ground-based receiver stations by the Nordic GNSS Analysis Centre (NGAA) have been used within a state-of-the-art kilometre-scale numerical weather prediction system. Different processing techniques have been implemented to derive the moisture-related GNSS information in the form of zenith total delays (ZTDs) and these are described and compared. In addition full-scale data assimilation and modelling experiments have been carried out to investigate the impact of utilizing moisture-related GNSS data from the NGAA processing centre on a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model initial state and on the ensuing forecast quality. The sensitivity of results to aspects of the data processing, station density, bias-correction and data assimilation have been investigated. Results show benefits to forecast quality when using GNSS ZTD as an additional observation type. The results also show a sensitivity to thinning distance applied for GNSS ZTD observations but not to modifications to the number of predictors used in the variational bias correction applied. In addition, it is demonstrated that the assimilation of GNSS ZTD can benefit from more general data assimilation enhancements and that there is an interaction of GNSS ZTD with other types of observations used in the data assimilation. Future plans include further investigation of optimal thinning distances and application of more advanced data assimilation techniques.

  3. The Hole in the Ozone Layer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamers, Jeanne S.; Jacob, Anthony T.

    This document contains information on the hole in the ozone layer. Topics discussed include properties of ozone, ozone in the atmosphere, chlorofluorocarbons, stratospheric ozone depletion, effects of ozone depletion on life, regulation of substances that deplete the ozone layer, alternatives to CFCs and Halons, and the future of the ozone layer.…

  4. The Two Faces of Ozone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Provides answers to questions regarding the ozone problem: (1) nature of ozone in the troposphere and stratosphere; (2) possibility of sending the excess ozone at ground level to the stratosphere; (3) possibility of producing pure ozone and carrying it to the stratosphere; and (4) banning chlorofluorocarbons. (YP)

  5. Fundamentals of ISCO Using Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using ozone involves the introduction of ozone gas (O3) into the subsurface to degrade organic contaminants of concern. Ozone is tri-molecular oxygen (O2) that is a gas under atmospheric conditions and is a strong oxidant. Ozone may react with ...

  6. [Influence of surface roughness on degree of polarization of biotite plagioclase gneiss varying with viewing angle].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yun; Yan, Lei; Zhao, Yun-sheng; Gou, Zhi-yang; Chen, Wei

    2011-12-01

    Polarized reflectance is influenced by such factors as its physical and chemical properties, the viewing geometry composed of light incident zenith, viewing zenith and viewing azimuth relative to light incidence, surface roughness and texture, surface density, detection wavelengths, polarization phase angle and so on. In the present paper, the influence of surface roughness on the degree of polarization (DOP) of biotite plagioclase gneiss varying with viewing angle was inquired and analyzed quantitatively. The polarized spectra were measured by ASD FS3 spectrometer on the goniometer located in Northeast Normal University. When the incident zenith angle was fixed at 50 degrees, it was showed that on the rock surfaces with different roughness, in the specular reflection direction, the DOP spectrum within 350-2500 nm increased to the highest value first, and then began to decline varying with viewing zenith angle from 0 degree to 80 degrees. The characterized band (520 +/- 10) nm was picked out for further analysis. The correlation analysis between the peak DOP value of zenith and surface roughness showed that they are in a power function relationship, with the regression equation: y = 0.604x(-0.297), R2 = 0.985 4. The correlation model of the angle where the peak is in and the surface roughness is y = 3.4194x + 51.584, y < 90 degrees , R2 = 0.8177. With the detecting azimuth farther away from 180 degrees azimuth where the maximum DOP exists, the DOP lowers gradually and tends to 0. In the detection azimuth 180 dgrees , the correlation analysis between the peak values of DOP on the (520 =/- 10) nm band for five rocks and their surface roughness indicates a power function, with the regression equation being y = 0.5822x(-0.333), R2 = 0.9843. F tests of the above regression models indicate that the peak value and its corresponding viewing angle correlate much with surface roughness. The study provides a theoretical base for polarization remote sensing, and impels the

  7. Characteristics of skylight at the zenith during twilight as indicators of atmospheric turbidity. 2: Intensity and color ratio.

    PubMed

    Coulson, K L

    1981-05-01

    This is the second of two papers based on an extensive series of measurements of the intensity and polarization of light from the zenith sky during periods of twilight made at an altitude of 3400 m on the island of Hawaii. Part 1 dealt with the skylight polarization; part 2 is on the measured intensity and quantities derived from the intensity. The principal results are that (1) the polarization and intensity of light from the zenith during twilight are sensitive indicators of the existence of turbid layers in the stratosphere and upper troposphere, and (2) at least at Mauna Loa primary scattering of the sunlight incident on the upper atmosphere during twilight is strongly dominant over secondary or multiple scattering at wavelengths beyond ~0.60microm, whereas this is much less true at shorter wavelengths. It is suggested that the development and general use of a simple twilight polarimeter would greatly facilitate determinations of turbidity in the upper layers of the atmosphere.

  8. Stratospheric ozone depletion

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2006-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290–320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime—the ‘Antarctic ozone hole’. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  9. A Total Ozone Dependent Ozone Profile Climatology Based on Ozone-Sondes and Aura MLS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labow, G. J.; McPeters, R. D.; Ziemke, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    A new total ozone-based ozone profile climatology has been created for use in satellite and/or ground based ozone retrievals. This climatology was formed by combining data from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) with data from balloon sondes and binned by zone and total ozone. Because profile shape varies with total column ozone, this climatology better captures the ozone variations than the previously used seasonal climatologies, especially near the tropopause. This is significantly different than ozone climatologies used in the past as there is no time component. The MLS instrument on Aura has excellent latitude coverage and measures ozone profiles daily from the upper troposphere to the lower mesosphere at ~3.5 km resolution. Almost a million individual MLS ozone measurements are merged with data from over 55,000 ozonesondes which are then binned as a function of total ozone. The climatology consists of average ozone profiles as a function of total ozone for six 30 degree latitude bands covering altitudes from 0-75 km (in Z* pressure altitude coordinates). This new climatology better represents the profile shape as a function of total ozone than previous climatologies and shows some remarkable and somewhat unexpected correlations between total ozone and ozone in the lower altitudes, particularly in the lower and middle troposphere. These data can also be used to infer biases and errors in either the MLS retrievals or ozone sondes.

  10. Ozone Profiles and Tropospheric Ozone from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Sioris, C. E.; Sparr, R. J. D.; Kuregm, T. P.; Martin, R. V.; Newchurch, M. J.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2003-01-01

    Ozone profiles are derived from backscattered radiances in the ultraviolet spectra (290-340 nm) measured by the nadir-viewing Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment using optimal estimation. Tropospheric O3 is directly retrieved with the tropopause as one of the retrieval levels. To optimize the retrieval and improve the fitting precision needed for tropospheric O3, we perform extensive wavelength and radiometric calibrations and improve forward model inputs. Retrieved O3 profiles and tropospheric O3 agree well with coincident ozonesonde measurements, and the integrated total O3 agrees very well with Earth Probe TOMS and Dobson/Brewer total O3. The global distribution of tropospheric O3 clearly shows the influences of biomass burning, convection, and air pollution, and is generally consistent with our current understanding.

  11. Erosion Results of the MISSE 7 Polymers Experiment and Zenith Polymers Experiment After 1.5 Years of Space Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Groh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Yi, Grace T.; Haloua, Athena; Imka, Emily C.; Mitchell, Gianna G.; Asmar, Olivia C.; Leneghan, Halle A.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Polymers and other oxidizable materials on the exterior of spacecraft in the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment can be eroded due to reaction with atomic oxygen (AO). Therefore, in order to design durable spacecraft it is important to know the LEO AO erosion yield (E(sub y), volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of materials susceptible to AO reaction. Two spaceflight experiments, the Polymers Experiment and the Zenith Polymers Experiment, were developed to determine the AO E(sub y) of various polymers flown in ram, wake or zenith orientations in LEO. These experiments were flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 7 (MISSE 7) mission for 1.5 years on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). The experiments included Kapton H(TradeMark) witness samples for AO fluence determination in ram and zenith orientations. The Polymers Experiment also included samples to determine whether AO erosion of high and low ash containing polymers is dependent on fluence. This paper provides an overview of the MISSE 7 mission, a description of the flight experiments with details on the polymers flown, the characterization techniques used, the AO fluence for each exposure orientation, and the LEO E(sub y) results. The E(sub y) values ranged from 7.99x10(exp -28)cu cm/atom for TiO2/Al2O3 coated Teflon(TradeMark) fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) flown in the ram orientation to 1.22x10(exp -23cu cm/atom for polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) flown in the zenith orientation. The E(sub y) of similar samples flown in different orientations has been compared to help determine solar exposure and associated heating effects on AO erosion. The E(sub y) data from these ISS spaceflight experiments provides valuable information for LEO spacecraft design purposes.

  12. Observed Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance in the Transition Zone Between Cloud-Free and Cloudy Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, C.; Wiscombe, W.

    2010-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (ARM) new Shortwave Spectrometer (SWS) looks straight up and measures zenith radiance at 418 wavelengths between 350 and 2200 nm. Because of its 1-sec sampling resolution, the SWS provides a unique capability to study the transition zone between cloudy and clear sky areas. A surprising spectral invariant behavior is found between ratios of zenith radiance spectra during the transition from cloudy to cloud-free atmosphere. This behavior suggests that the spectral signature of the transition zone is a linear mixture between the two extremes (definitely cloudy and definitely clear). The weighting function of the linear mixture is found to be a wavelength-independent characteristic of the transition zone. It is shown that the transition zone spectrum is fully determined by this function and zenith radiance spectra of clear and cloudy regions. This new finding may help us to better understand and quantify such physical phenomena as humidification of aerosols in the relatively moist cloud environment and evaporation and activation of cloud droplets.

  13. Estimating Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) regional map distribution using METEOSAT satellite data and GPS Zenith Wet Delay (ZWD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuveni, Y.; Leontiev, A.

    2016-12-01

    Using GPS satellites signals, we can study atmospheric processes and coupling mechanisms, which can help us understand the physical conditions in the upper atmosphere that might lead or act as proxies for severe weather events such as extreme storms and flooding. GPS signals received by geodetic stations on the ground are multi-purpose and can also provide estimates of tropospheric zenith delays, which can be converted into mm-accuracy Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) using collocated pressure and temperature measurements on the ground. Here, we present the use of Israel's geodetic GPS receivers network for extracting tropospheric zenith path delays combined with near Real Time (RT) METEOSAT-10 Water Vapor (WV) and surface temperature pixel intensity values (7.3 and 12.1 channels, respectively) in order to obtain absolute IWV (kg/m2) or PWV (mm) map distribution. The results show good agreement between the absolute values obtained from our triangulation strategy based solely on GPS Zenith Total Delays (ZTD) and METEOSAT-10 surface temperature data compared with available radiosonde Precipitable IWV/PWV absolute values. The presented strategy can provide unprecedented temporal and special IWV/PWV distribution, which is needed as part of the accurate and comprehensive initial conditions pro­vided by upper-air observation systems at temporal and spatial resolutions consistent with the models assimilating them.

  14. Chinese Digital Zenith Telescope (DZT) used for Astro-geodetic Deflection of the Vertical Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, L.; Wang, B.; Wang, Z.; Yin, Z.; Hu, H.; Wang, H.; Han, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Classical optical astrometry can be used to measure and study variations of plumb line. For the earth gravity filed related researches, it is irreplaceable by technologies like GNSS、VLBI、SLR, etc. However, classical astrometric instruments have some major drawback, such as low efficiency, low automation, more operating observers, and individual error in some visual instruments. In 2011, The National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) successfully developed the new digital zenith telescope prototype (DZT-1), which has the ability of highly automatic observation and data processing, even allowing unattended observation by remote control. By utilizing CCD camera as imaging terminal and high-accuracy tiltmeter to replace mercurial plate, observation efficiency of DZT is improved greatly. According to the results of data obtained from test observations, single-observation accuracy of DZT-1 is 0.15-0.3″ and one night observation accuracy up to 0.07-0.08″, which is better than the observation accuracy of classical astrometric instruments. The observations of DZT can be used to obtain the plumb line variations and the vertical deflections, which can be used for carrying out seismic, geodetic and other related geo-scientific researches. Especially the collocated observations with gravimeters and the conjoint analysis of the observation data will be helpful to recognize the anomalous motion and variation of underground mass over time, and maybe provide significant information for estimating the scale of underground anomalous mass. The information is valuable for determining the three key factors of earthquake possibly. Moreover, the project team is carrying out the development of new DZT with better performance and studying the key techniques for new instrument to make DZT play a more significant role in the astronomy and geoscience fields.

  15. Tropospheric Correction for InSAR Using Interpolated ECMWF Data and GPS Zenith Total Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Frank H.; Fishbein, Evan F.; Moore, Angelyn W.; Owen, Susan E.; Fielding, Eric J.; Granger, Stephanie L.; Bjorndahl, Fredrik; Lofgren Johan

    2011-01-01

    To mitigate atmospheric errors caused by the troposphere, which is a limiting error source for spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imaging, a tropospheric correction method has been developed using data from the European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and the Global Positioning System (GPS). The ECMWF data was interpolated using a Stretched Boundary Layer Model (SBLM), and ground-based GPS estimates of the tropospheric delay from the Southern California Integrated GPS Network were interpolated using modified Gaussian and inverse distance weighted interpolations. The resulting Zenith Total Delay (ZTD) correction maps have been evaluated, both separately and using a combination of the two data sets, for three short-interval InSAR pairs from Envisat during 2006 on an area stretching from northeast from the Los Angeles basin towards Death Valley. Results show that the root mean square (rms) in the InSAR images was greatly reduced, meaning a significant reduction in the atmospheric noise of up to 32 percent. However, for some of the images, the rms increased and large errors remained after applying the tropospheric correction. The residuals showed a constant gradient over the area, suggesting that a remaining orbit error from Envisat was present. The orbit reprocessing in ROI_pac and the plane fitting both require that the only remaining error in the InSAR image be the orbit error. If this is not fulfilled, the correction can be made anyway, but it will be done using all remaining errors assuming them to be orbit errors. By correcting for tropospheric noise, the biggest error source is removed, and the orbit error becomes apparent and can be corrected for

  16. Computing differential refraction at all heliolatitudes and zenithal distances: a historical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, C.; Boscardin, S.

    2014-10-01

    Ptolemy (about 150 AC) modeled atmospheric refraction influencing Al Farghani (831), Alhazen (1020), Sacrobosco (1256) and Witelo (1278): the Sun was supposed bigger at horizon like a coin appears under water in a curved bottle. The correct work of Ibn Sahl (984) remained forgotten. Tycho measured the refraction on the 1572 supernova at various altitudes. Harriot, Kepler, Snell and Descartes found independently the refraction law after 1600. A modern formulation of vertical (0.5" zenithal to 35' at horizon) and horizontal (0.5" at all altitudes) differential refraction of solar diameter appears in Du Séjour (1786). Laplace's formula (1805) computes the vertical deformation of the solar disk, while the horizontal reduction of 0.5" is proportional to the chord's length. Dicke (1967) measured the solar oblateness to determine dynamical constraints to alternative theories of General Relativity. The Astrolabe of Rio de Janeiro measured in 1998-2009 the solar diameter at all heliolatitudes, by timing solar transits across fixed altitude circles: an equatorial excess larger than RHESSI (2008) and SDS (1992-2011) data remains after refraction's corrections. Meridian transits series measured at Rome Campidoglio (1877-1937) and Greenwich (1850-1940) behave as Rio data: the scatters between annual averages were larger than statistical dispersions of each value (Gething, 1955). Anomalous refractions measured with Rio Heliometer (2013) are low frequency seeing (0.01 Hz) acting to scales of the solar diameter (32'): they affect transits measurements with random perturbations hundreds times larger than the expected values calculated from the timing accuracy. These perturbations enlarge the differences between averages values binned either in time or heliolatitude: they are larger than statistical dispersions, suggesting a wider binning. The ``adiabatic" approach of Rio Heliometer with high frequency measurements ``freezes" the slow seeing image motion component.

  17. Global model of zenith tropospheric delay proposed based on EOF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Langlang; Chen, Peng; Wei, Erhu; Li, Qinzheng

    2017-07-01

    Tropospheric delay is one of the main error budgets in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) measurements. Many empirical correction models have been developed to compensate this delay, and models which do not require meteorological parameters have received the most attention. This study established a global troposphere zenith total delay (ZTD) model, called Global Empirical Orthogonal Function Troposphere (GEOFT), based on the empirical orthogonal function (EOF, also known as geographically weighted PCAs) analysis method and the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) Atmosphere data from 2012 to 2015. The results showed that ZTD variation could be well represented by the characteristics of the EOF base function Ek and associated coefficients Pk. Here, E1 mainly signifies the equatorial anomaly; E2 represents north-south asymmetry, and E3 and E4 reflects regional variation. Moreover, P1 mainly reflects annual and semiannual variation components; P2 and P3 mainly contains annual variation components, and P4 displays semiannual variation components. We validated the proposed GEOFT model using tropospheric delay data of GGOS ZTD grid data and the tropospheric product of the International GNSS Service (IGS) over the year 2016. The results showed that GEOFT model has high accuracy with bias and RMS of -0.3 and 3.9 cm, respectively, with respect to the GGOS ZTD data, and of -0.8 and 4.1 cm, respectively, with respect to the global IGS tropospheric product. The accuracy of GEOFT demonstrating that the use of the EOF analysis method to characterize ZTD variation is reasonable.

  18. Light pollution offshore: Zenithal sky glow measurements in the mediterranean coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ges, Xavier; Bará, Salvador; García-Gil, Manuel; Zamorano, Jaime; Ribas, Salvador J.; Masana, Eduard

    2018-05-01

    Light pollution is a worldwide phenomenon whose consequences for the natural environment and the human health are being intensively studied nowadays. Most published studies address issues related to light pollution inland. Coastal waters, however, are spaces of high environmental interest, due to their biodiversity richness and their economical significance. The elevated population density in coastal regions is accompanied by correspondingly large emissions of artificial light at night, whose role as an environmental stressor is increasingly being recognized. Characterizing the light pollution levels in coastal waters is a necessary step for protecting these areas. At the same time, the marine surface environment provides a stage free from obstacles for measuring the dependence of the skyglow on the distance to the light polluting sources, and validating (or rejecting) atmospheric light propagation models. In this work we present a proof-of-concept of a gimbal measurement system that can be used for zenithal skyglow measurements on board both small boats and large vessels under actual navigation conditions. We report the results obtained in the summer of 2016 along two measurement routes in the Mediterranean waters offshore Barcelona, travelling 9 and 31.7 km away from the coast. The atmospheric conditions in both routes were different from the ones assumed for the calculation of recently published models of the anthropogenic sky brightness. They were closer in the first route, whose results approach better the theoretical predictions. The results obtained in the second route, conducted under a clearer atmosphere, showed systematic differences that can be traced back to two expected phenomena, which are a consequence of the smaller aerosol content: the reduction of the anthropogenic sky glow at short distances from the sources, and the slower decay rate of brightness with distance, which gives rise to a relative excess of brightness at large distances from the

  19. Year-round measurements of ozone at 66 deg S with a visible spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roscoe, Howard K.; Oldham, Derek J.; Squires, James A. C.; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Goutail, Florence; Sarkissian, Alain

    1994-01-01

    In March 1990, a zenith-sky UV-visible spectrometer of the design 'Systeme Automatique d'Obervation Zenithal' (SAOZ) was installed at Faraday in Antarctica (66.3 deg S, 64.3 deg W). SAOZ records spectra between 290 and 600 nm during daylight. Its analysis program fits laboratory spectra of constituents, at various wavelengths, to the differential of the ratio of the observed spectrum and a reference spectrum. The least-squares fitting procedure minimizes the sum-of-squares of residuals. Ozone is deduced from absorption in its visible bands between 500 and 560 nm. The fortunate colocation of this SAOZ with the well-calibrated Dobson at Faraday has allowed us to examine the calibration of the zero of the SAOZ, difficult at visible wavelengths because of the small depth of absorption. Here we describe recent improvements and limitations to this calibration, and discuss SAOZ measurements of ozone during winter in this important location at the edge of the Antarctic vortex.

  20. Ozone Therapy in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Domb, William C

    2014-01-01

    Summary The 21st century dental practice is quite dynamic. New treatment protocols and new materials are being developed at a rapid pace. Ozone dental therapy falls into the category of new treatment protocols in dentistry, yet ozone is not new at all. Ozone therapy is already a major treatment modality in Europe, South America and a number of other countries. What is provided here will not be an exhaustive scientific treatise so much as a brief general introduction into what dentists are now doing with ozone therapies and the numerous oral/systemic links that make this subject so important for physicians so that, ultimately, they may serve their patients more effectively and productively. PMID:25363268

  1. Ozone Correlative Measurements Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the necessary parameters for the correlation of data on Earth ozone. Topics considered were: (1) measurement accuracy; (2) equipment considerations (SBUV); and (3) ground based measurements to support satellite data.

  2. Ozone curbs crown rust

    SciT

    Not Available

    1970-01-01

    Crown rust, the most destructive disease of oats, was suppressed in laboratory fumigation chambers by ozone air pollution levels commonly surpassed in many areas. Whether the effects of air pollution on crown rust are of economic importance under field conditions is yet to be determined. Crown rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia coronata, is particularly destructive in Southern and North Central States, often reducing yields 20 percent or more. Rust pustules on oats were significantly smaller when plants were exposed to 10 parts per hundred million ozone for 6 hours in the light on the 10 days after infection. Aboutmore » half as many rust spores were produced in the ozone chamber as in one protected by carbon filters. Exposure to 10 pphm ozone did not affect viability of spores. Spores produced on exposed plants germinated and penetrated stomates of oat leaves as well as spores produced on unexposed leaves.« less

  3. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion through regulations, collaborations with stakeholders, international treaties, partnerships with the private sector, and enforcement actions under Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

  4. NOAA Stratospheric Ozone Webpage

    Stratospheric Ozone Banner Home Data Science NOAA in Action In the Press FAQ NOAA Homepage In the Action In the Press FAQ Earth System Research Laboratory - CSD Homepage Earth System Research Laboratory

  5. Total ozone changes over Eurasia since 1973 based on reevaluated filter ozonometer data

    SciT

    Bojkov, R.D.; Fioletov, V.E.; Shalamjansky, A.M.

    1994-11-01

    Since the early 1960s, on the vast territory of the former USSR, 45 stations have been in continuous operation, utilizing the broadband filter M-83 ozonometer. The quality of the ozone data during the first decade was unsatisfactory. After 1972 an improved version of the ozonometer was introduced together with improved quality control practices, including methodology of observations. The more reliable data of 1973 through March 1994 have been rigorously reexamined by applying variability analysis, comparison with lower-stratosphere temperatures and/or nearby Dobson stations, and overpassing Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) for identifying concurrence or discrepancies. These control procedures together with themore » information on instrument relocation and calibrations made it possible to reevaluate the record of all 45 stations. The accuracy of the improved ozonometer data is about 3% for direct Sun measurements and approximately 5% for zenith sky observations; although not so good as that of the Dobson, in the long run it provides consistent ozone data sets. This data set is now made available to the World Ozone Data Center (WO3DC), Toronto. Thus for the first time, based on a 21-year long record, information is deduced on the differences in the ozone annual cycle between Eastern Siberia and the European part, on the strong appearance of quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) signals especially pronounced as ozone deficiency during the western phase of the QBO, on the ozone variability, and on the long-term changes over the huge territory from Central Europe to the Far East.« less

  6. Multi-azimuthal-angle effects in self-induced supernova neutrino flavor conversions without axial symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirizzi, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    The flavor evolution of neutrinos emitted by a supernova (SN) core is strongly affected by the refractive effects associated with the neutrino-neutrino interactions in the deepest stellar regions. Till now, all numerical studies have assumed the axial symmetry for the “multi-angle effects” associated with the neutrino-neutrino interactions. Recently, it has been pointed out in Raffelt, Sarikas, and Seixas [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 091101 (2013)] that if this assumption is removed, a new multi-azimuthal-angle (MAA) instability emerges in the flavor evolution of the dense SN neutrino gas, in addition to the one caused by multi-zenith-angle effects. Inspired by this result, for the first time we numerically solve the nonlinear neutrino propagation equations in SN, introducing the azimuthal angle as an angular variable in addition to the usual zenith angle. We consider simple energy spectra with an excess of νe over ν¯e. We find that even starting with a complete axial symmetric neutrino emission, the MAA effects would lead to significant flavor conversions in normal mass hierarchy, in cases otherwise stable under the only multi-zenith-angle effects. The final outcome of the flavor conversions, triggered by the MAA instability, depends on the initial asymmetry between νe and ν¯e spectra. If it is sufficiently large, final spectra would show an ordered behavior with spectral swaps and splits. Conversely, for small flavor asymmetries flavor decoherence among angular modes develops, also affecting the flavor evolution in the inverted mass hierarchy.

  7. Ozone: Good Up High, Bad Nearby

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Does the Depletion of “Good” Ozone Affect Human Health and the Environment? Ozone depletion can cause increased ... their original sources. How Does “Bad” Ozone Affect Human Health and the Environment? Breathing ozone can trigger a ...

  8. MULTIPOLLUTANT METHODS - METHODS FOR OZONE AND OZONE PRECURSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task involves the development and testing of methods for monitoring ozone and compounds associated with the atmospheric chemistry of ozone production both as precursors and reaction products. Although atmospheric gases are the primary interest, separation of gas and particl...

  9. The Ozone Problem | Ground-level Ozone | New England | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-04-10

    Many factors impact ground-level ozone development, including temperature, wind speed and direction, time of day, and driving patterns. Due to its dependence on weather conditions, ozone is typically a summertime pollutant and a chief component of summertime smog.

  10. Ozonation of Canadian Athabasca asphaltene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Zhixiong

    Application of ozonation in the petrochemical industry for heavy hydrocarbon upgrading has not been sufficiently explored. Among heavy hydrocarbons, asphaltenes are the heaviest and the most difficult fractions for analysis and treatment. Therefore, ozonation of asphaltenes presents an interesting application in the petrochemical industry. Commercial application of ozonation in the petrochemical industry has three obstacles: availability of an ozone-resistant and environmentally friendly solvent, the precipitation of ozonation intermediates during reaction, and recovery of the solvent and separation of the ozonation products. Preliminary ozonation of Athabasca oil sands asphaltene in nonparticipating solvents encountered serious precipitation of the ozonation intermediates. The precipitated intermediates could be polymeric ozonides and intermolecular ozonides or polymeric peroxides. Because the inhomogeneous reaction medium caused low ozone efficiency, various participating solvents such as methanol and acetic acid were added to form more soluble hydroperoxides. The mass balance results showed that on average, one asphaltene molecule reacted with 12 ozone molecules through the electrophilic reaction and the subsequent decomposition of ozonation intermediates generated acetone extractable products. GC/MS analysis of these compounds indicated that the free radical reactions could be important for generation of volatile products. The extensively ozonated asphaltene in the presence of participating solvents were refluxed with methanol to generate more volatile products. GC/MS analysis of the methanol-esterified ozonation products indicated that most volatile products were aliphatic carboxylic acid esters generated through cleavage of substituents. Reaction kinetics study showed that asphaltene ozonation was initially a diffusion rate-controlled reaction and later developed to a chemical reaction rate-controlled reaction after depletion of the reactive aromatic sites

  11. Estimates of Zenith Total Delay trends from GPS reprocessing with autoregressive process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klos, Anna; Hunegnaw, Addisu; Teferle, Felix Norman; Ebuy Abraha, Kibrom; Ahmed, Furqan; Bogusz, Janusz

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays, near real-time Zenith Total Delay (ZTD) estimates from Global Positioning System (GPS) observations are routinely assimilated into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models to improve the reliability of forecasts. On the other hand, ZTD time series derived from homogeneously re-processed GPS observations over long periods have the potential to improve our understanding of climate change on various temporal and spatial scales. With such time series only recently reaching somewhat adequate time spans, the application of GPS-derived ZTD estimates to climate monitoring is still to be developed further. In this research, we examine the character of noise in ZTD time series for 1995-2015 in order to estimate more realistic magnitudes of trend and its uncertainty than would be the case if the stochastic properties are not taken into account. Furthermore, the hourly sampled, homogeneously re-processed and carefully homogenized ZTD time series from over 700 globally distributed stations were classified into five major climate zones. We found that the amplitudes of annual signals reach values of 10-150 mm with minimum values for the polar and Alpine zones. The amplitudes of daily signals were estimated to be 0-12 mm with maximum values found for the dry zone. We examined seven different noise models for the residual ZTD time series after modelling all known periodicities. This identified a combination of white plus autoregressive process of fourth order to be optimal to match all changes in power of the ZTD data. When the stochastic properties are neglected, ie. a pure white noise model is employed, only 11 from 120 trends were insignificant. Using the optimum noise model more than half of the 120 examined trends became insignificant. We show that the uncertainty of ZTD trends is underestimated by a factor of 3-12 when the stochastic properties of the ZTD time series are ignored and we conclude that it is essential to properly model the noise characteristics of

  12. Tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column retrieval from ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, F.; Hendrick, F.; Goutail, F.; Fayt, C.; Merlaud, A.; Pinardi, G.; Hermans, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present an algorithm for retrieving tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical column densities (VCDs) from ground-based zenith-sky (ZS) measurements of scattered sunlight. The method is based on a four-step approach consisting of (1) the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) analysis of ZS radiance spectra using a fixed reference spectrum corresponding to low NO2 absorption, (2) the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum using a Langley-plot-type method, (3) the removal of the stratospheric content from the daytime total measured slant column based on stratospheric VCDs measured at sunrise and sunset, and simulation of the rapid NO2 diurnal variation, (4) the retrieval of tropospheric VCDs by dividing the resulting tropospheric slant columns by appropriate air mass factors (AMFs). These steps are fully characterized and recommendations are given for each of them. The retrieval algorithm is applied on a ZS dataset acquired with a Multi-AXis (MAX-) DOAS instrument during the Cabauw (51.97° N, 4.93° E, sea level) Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) held from the 10 June to the 21 July 2009 in the Netherlands. A median value of 7.9 × 1015 molec cm-2 is found for the retrieved tropospheric NO2 VCDs, with maxima up to 6.0 × 1016 molec cm-2. The error budget assessment indicates that the overall error σTVCD on the column values is less than 28%. In case of low tropospheric contribution, σTVCD is estimated to be around 39% and is dominated by uncertainties in the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum. For strong tropospheric pollution events, σTVCD drops to approximately 22% with the largest uncertainties on the determination of the stratospheric NO2 abundance and tropospheric AMFs. The tropospheric VCD amounts derived from ZS observations are compared to VCDs retrieved from off-axis and direct-sun measurements of the same MAX-DOAS instrument as well as to

  13. Tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column retrieval from ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, F.; Hendrick, F.; Goutail, F.; Fayt, C.; Merlaud, A.; Pinardi, G.; Hermans, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2015-06-01

    We present an algorithm for retrieving tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical column densities (VCDs) from ground-based zenith-sky (ZS) measurements of scattered sunlight. The method is based on a four-step approach consisting of (1) the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) analysis of ZS radiance spectra using a fixed reference spectrum corresponding to low NO2 absorption, (2) the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum using a Langley-plot-type method, (3) the removal of the stratospheric content from the daytime total measured slant column based on stratospheric VCDs measured at sunrise and sunset, and simulation of the rapid NO2 diurnal variation, (4) the retrieval of tropospheric VCDs by dividing the resulting tropospheric slant columns by appropriate air mass factors (AMFs). These steps are fully characterized and recommendations are given for each of them. The retrieval algorithm is applied on a ZS data set acquired with a multi-axis (MAX-) DOAS instrument during the Cabauw (51.97° N, 4.93° E, sea level) Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) held from 10 June to 21 July 2009 in the Netherlands. A median value of 7.9 × 1015 molec cm-2 is found for the retrieved tropospheric NO2 VCDs, with maxima up to 6.0 × 1016 molec cm-2. The error budget assessment indicates that the overall error σTVCD on the column values is less than 28%. In the case of low tropospheric contribution, σTVCD is estimated to be around 39% and is dominated by uncertainties in the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum. For strong tropospheric pollution events, σTVCD drops to approximately 22% with the largest uncertainties on the determination of the stratospheric NO2 abundance and tropospheric AMFs. The tropospheric VCD amounts derived from ZS observations are compared to VCDs retrieved from off-axis and direct-sun measurements of the same MAX-DOAS instrument as well as to data

  14. Multi-technique comparison of troposphere zenith delays and gradients during CONT08

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teke, Kamil; Böhm, Johannes; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald; Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Heinkelmann, Robert; Willis, Pascal; Haas, Rüdiger; García-Espada, Susana; Hobiger, Thomas; Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Shimizu, Shingo

    2011-07-01

    CONT08 was a 15 days campaign of continuous Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions during the second half of August 2008 carried out by the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). In this study, VLBI estimates of troposphere zenith total delays (ZTD) and gradients during CONT08 were compared with those derived from observations with the Global Positioning System (GPS), Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS), and water vapor radiometers (WVR) co-located with the VLBI radio telescopes. Similar geophysical models were used for the analysis of the space geodetic data, whereas the parameterization for the least-squares adjustment of the space geodetic techniques was optimized for each technique. In addition to space geodetic techniques and WVR, ZTD and gradients from numerical weather models (NWM) were used from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) (all sites), the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) and Cloud Resolving Storm Simulator (CReSS) (Tsukuba), and the High Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM) (European sites). Biases, standard deviations, and correlation coefficients were computed between the troposphere estimates of the various techniques for all eleven CONT08 co-located sites. ZTD from space geodetic techniques generally agree at the sub-centimetre level during CONT08, and—as expected—the best agreement is found for intra-technique comparisons: between the Vienna VLBI Software and the combined IVS solutions as well as between the Center for Orbit Determination (CODE) solution and an IGS PPP time series; both intra-technique comparisons are with standard deviations of about 3-6 mm. The best inter space geodetic technique agreement of ZTD during CONT08 is found between the combined IVS and the IGS solutions with a mean standard deviation of about 6 mm over all sites, whereas the agreement with numerical weather models is between 6 and 20 mm. The standard

  15. Children's Models of the Ozone Layer and Ozone Depletion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christidou, Vasilia; Koulaidis, Vasilis

    1996-01-01

    The views of 40 primary students on ozone and its depletion were recorded through individual, semi-structured interviews. The data analysis resulted in the formation of a limited number of models concerning the distribution and role of ozone in the atmosphere, the depletion process, and the consequences of ozone depletion. Identifies five target…

  16. CONTRIBUTION TO INDOOR OZONE LEVELS OF AN OZONE GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report gives results of a study of a commonly used commercially available ozone generator, undertaken to determine its impact on indoor ozone levels. xperiment were conducted in a typical mechanically ventilated office and in a test house. he generated ozone and the in-room ...

  17. Health Effects of Ozone Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Inhaling ozone can cause coughing, shortness of breath, worse asthma or bronchitis symptoms, and irritation and damage to airways.You can reduce your exposure to ozone pollution by checking air quality where you live.

  18. "OZONE SOURCE APPORTIONMENT IN CMAQ'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone source attribution has been used to support various policy purposes including interstate transport (Cross State Air Pollution Rule) by U.S. EPA and ozone nonattainment area designations by State agencies. Common scientific applications include tracking intercontinental tran...

  19. Achievements in Stratospheric Ozone Protection

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report describes achievements in protecting the ozone layer, the benefits of these achievements, and strategies involved (e.g., using alternatives to ozone-depleting substances, phasing out harmful substances, and creating partnerships).

  20. Ozone (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Environmental Protection Agency) - Describes ozone depletion effects on human health, plants, marine ecosystems, and biogeochemical cycles. Ozone (Tox ... Medicine National Institutes of Health U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  1. Ozone bioindicator sampling and estimation

    Gretchen C, Smith; William D. Smith; John W. Coulston

    2007-01-01

    Ozone is an important forest stressor that has been measured at known phytotoxic levels at forest locations across the United States. The percent forest exhibiting negative impacts from ozone air pollution is one of the Montreal Process indicators of forest health and vitality. The ozone bioindicator data of the U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis Program...

  2. Mars ozone: Mariner 9 revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy of the UV spectroscopy technique used by Mariner 9 to remotely measure ozone abundance at Mars is discussed. Previously-inferred ozone abundances could be underestimated by as much as a factor of 3, and much of the observed variability in the ozone abundance could be due to temporal and spatial variability in cloud and dust amount.

  3. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  4. Determination of zenith hydrostatic delay and its impact on GNSS-derived integrated water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Kefei; Wu, Suqin; He, Changyong; Cheng, Yingyan; Li, Xingxing

    2017-08-01

    Surface pressure is a necessary meteorological variable for the accurate determination of integrated water vapor (IWV) using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). The lack of pressure observations is a big issue for the conversion of historical GNSS observations, which is a relatively new area of GNSS applications in climatology. Hence the use of the surface pressure derived from either a blind model (e.g., Global Pressure and Temperature 2 wet, GPT2w) or a global atmospheric reanalysis (e.g., ERA-Interim) becomes an important alternative solution. In this study, pressure derived from these two methods is compared against the pressure observed at 108 global GNSS stations at four epochs (00:00, 06:00, 12:00 and 18:00 UTC) each day for the period 2000-2013. Results show that a good accuracy is achieved from the GPT2w-derived pressure in the latitude band between -30 and 30° and the average value of 6 h root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) across all the stations in this region is 2.5 hPa. Correspondingly, an error of 5.8 mm and 0.9 kg m-2 in its resultant zenith hydrostatic delay (ZHD) and IWV is expected. However, for the stations located in the mid-latitude bands between -30 and -60° and between 30 and 60°, the mean value of the RMSEs is 7.3 hPa, and for the stations located in the high-latitude bands from -60 to -90° and from 60 to 90°, the mean value of the RMSEs is 9.9 hPa. The mean of the RMSEs of the ERA-Interim-derived pressure across at the selected 100 stations is 0.9 hPa, which will lead to an equivalent error of 2.1 mm and 0.3 kg m-2 in the ZHD and IWV, respectively, determined from this ERA-Interim-derived pressure. Results also show that the monthly IWV determined using pressure from ERA-Interim has a good accuracy - with a relative error of better than 3 % on a global scale; thus, the monthly IWV resulting from ERA-Interim-derived pressure has the potential to be used for climate studies, whilst the monthly IWV resulting from GPT2w

  5. Physicochemical patterns of ozone absorption by wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    Results from studying aspen and pine wood ozonation are presented. The effect the concentration of ozone, the reagent residence time, and the content of water in a sample of wood has on ozone consumption rate and ozone demand are analyzed. The residence time is shown to determine the degree of ozone conversion degree and the depth of substrate destruction. The main patterns of ozone absorption by wood with different moisture content are found. Ways of optimizing the ozonation of plant biomass are outlined.

  6. Tropospheric ozone in east Asia

    SciT

    Phadnis, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    An analysis of the observed data for the tropospheric ozone at mid latitudes in east Asia is done. There are three ways by which the tropospheric ozone is calculated, namely: (1) Ozonesonde measurements, (2) Fishman`s method of Residual Ozone and (3) TOMS measurements - an indirect method of calculating tropospheric ozone. In addition the surface ozone values at the network sites in Japan is also considered. The analysis of data is carried out for a period of twelve years from 1979 to 1991. In general it is observed that the tropospheric ozone is more in summer than winter, obviously becausemore » of the larger tropopause height in summer. On an average for the period of the analysis, the ozone values are at a high of about 60 DU (dobson units). While in winter the values go down to around 30 DU. Also a time series analysis shows an increasing trend in the values over the years. The ozonesonde values are correlated more to the TOMS tropospheric ozone values. For the stations analyzed in Japan, the TOMS tropospheric ozone values are generally greater than the ozonesonde values. The analysis of the average monthly surface ozone in Japan shows highs in spring and lows in summer. This can be attributed to movement of pollutant laden fronts towards Japan during spring. The highs for surface ozone are about 50 DU while the lows are around 20 DU.« less

  7. Assimilation of Satellite Ozone Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, I.; Winslow, N.; Wargan, K.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Rood, R.

    2003-01-01

    This talk will discuss assimilation of ozone data from satellite-borne instruments. Satellite observations of ozone total columns and profiles have been measured by a series of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) instruments, and more recently by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment. Additional profile data are provided by instruments on NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and by occultation instruments on other platforms. Instruments on Envisat' and future EOS Aura satellite will supply even more comprehensive data about the ozone distribution. Satellite data contain a wealth of information, but they do not provide synoptic global maps of ozone fields. These maps can be obtained through assimilation of satellite data into global chemistry and transport models. In the ozone system at NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO) any combination of TOMS, SBUV, and Microwave Limb sounder (MLS) data can be assimilated. We found that the addition of MLS to SBUV and TOMS data in the system helps to constrain the ozone distribution, especially in the polar night region and in the tropics. The assimilated ozone distribution in the troposphere and lower stratosphere is sensitive also to finer changes in the SBUV and TOMS data selection and to changes in error covariance models. All results are established by comparisons of assimilated ozone with independent profiles from ozone sondes and occultation instruments.

  8. Comparative analysis of positioning and zenith total delay retrieval using GPS-, GLONASS-only, and GPS/GLONASS combined precise point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feng; Li, Xingxing; Cai, Miaomiao; Chen, Wen; Dong, Danan; Schuh, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Since October 2011, the Russian GLONASS has been revitalized and is now fully operational with 24 satellites in orbit. It is critical to assess the benefits and problems of using GLONASS observations (i.e. GLONASS-only or combined GPS/GLONASS) for precise positioning and zenith total delay (ZTD) retrieval on a global scale using the precise point positioning (PPP) technique. In this contribution, extensive evaluations are conducted with GNSS data sets collected from 251 globally distributed stations of the International GNSS Service (IGS) network in July 2016. The stations are divided into 30 groups by antenna/radome types to investigate whether there are antenna/radome-dependent biases in position and ZTD results derived from GLONASS-only PPP. The positioning results do not show obvious antenna/radome-dependent biases except the stations with JAV_RINGANT_G3T/NONE. The averaged biases of the stations with JAV_RINGANT_G3T/NONE in horizontal component especially in north component can even achieve -9.0 mm. The standard deviation (STD) and root mean square (RMS) are used as indicators of positioning repeatability and accuracy, respectively. Compared with GPS-only PPP, smaller averaged STD and RMS values of GLONASS-only PPP are achieved in horizontal component, while larger ones in vertical component. Furthermore, the STD and RMS values of GPS/GLONASS combined PPP solutions are the smallest in horizontal and vertical components, indicating that adding GLONASS observations can achieve better positioning performance than GPS-only PPP. Meanwhile, better positioning repeatability and accuracy are found in north component than that in east component, which may be caused by the configuration of GNSS satellite orbit. With respect to GPS-only PPP-derived ZTD, the ZTD biases, accuracy, and correlation derived from GLONASS-only and GPS/GLONASS PPP solutions are antenna/radome-independent, while the biases and accuracy are slightly latitude- or Geometric Dilution of Precisions

  9. Dobson ozone spectrophotometer modification.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a modified version of the Dobson ozone spectrophotometer in which several outdated electronic design features have been replaced by circuitry embodying more modern design concepts. The resulting improvement in performance characteristics has been obtained without changing the principle of operation of the original instrument.

  10. Ozone Layer Educator's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This guide has been developed through a collaborative effort involving the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It is part of an ongoing commitment to ensure that the results of scientific research on ozone depletion are…

  11. Revisiting Antarctic Ozone Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Tritscher, Ines; Müller, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Antarctic ozone depletion is known for almost three decades and it has been well settled that it is caused by chlorine catalysed ozone depletion inside the polar vortex. However, there are still some details, which need to be clarified. In particular, there is a current debate on the relative importance of liquid aerosol and crystalline NAT and ice particles for chlorine activation. Particles have a threefold impact on polar chlorine chemistry, temporary removal of HNO3 from the gas-phase (uptake), permanent removal of HNO3 from the atmosphere (denitrification), and chlorine activation through heterogeneous reactions. We have performed simulations with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) employing a recently developed algorithm for saturation-dependent NAT nucleation for the Antarctic winters 2011 and 2012. The simulation results are compared with different satellite observations. With the help of these simulations, we investigate the role of the different processes responsible for chlorine activation and ozone depletion. Especially the sensitivity with respect to the particle type has been investigated. If temperatures are artificially forced to only allow cold binary liquid aerosol, the simulation still shows significant chlorine activation and ozone depletion. The results of the 3-D Chemical Transport Model CLaMS simulations differ from purely Lagrangian longtime trajectory box model simulations which indicates the importance of mixing processes.

  12. Ozone decomposing filter

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy L.

    1999-01-01

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  13. Multi-angle Spectra Evolution of Ionospheric Turbulence Excited by RF Interactions at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Rayyan, N.; Watkins, B. J.; Watanabe, N.; Golkowski, M.; Bristow, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Briczinski, S. J., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    The high power HAARP HF transmitter is employed to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Diagnostics included the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, and HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). Dependence of diagnostic signals on HAARP HF parameters, including pulselength, duty-cycle, aspect angle, and frequency were recorded. Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments demonstrate control of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI) and isolation of ponderomotive effects. For the first time, simultaneous multi-angle radar measurements of plasma line spectra are recorded demonstrating marked dependence on aspect angle with the strongest interaction region observed displaced southward of the HF zenith pointing angle. For a narrow range of HF pointing between Spitze and magnetic zenith, a reduced threshold for AFAI is observed. High time resolution studies of the temporal evolution of the plasma line reveal the appearance of an overshoot effect on ponderomotive timescales. Numerous measurements of the outshifted plasma line are observed. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts

  14. View angle dependence of cloud optical thicknesses retrieved by MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    This study examines whether cloud inhomogeneity influences the view angle dependence of MODIS cloud optical thickness (tau) retrieval results. The degree of cloud inhomogeneity is characterized through the local gradient in 11 microns brightness temperature. The analysis of liquid phase clouds in a one year long global dataset of Collection 4 MODIS data reveals that while optical thickness retrievals give remarkably consistent results for all view directions if clouds are homogeneous, they give much higher tau-values for oblique views than for overhead views if clouds are inhomogeneous and the sun is fairly oblique. For solar zenith angles larger than 55deg, the mean optical thickness retrieved for the most inhomogeneous third of cloudy pixels is more than 30% higher for oblique views than for overhead views. After considering a variety of possible scenarios, the paper concludes that the most likely reason for the increase lies in three-dimensional radiative interactions that are not considered in current, one-dimensional retrieval algorithms. Namely, the radiative effect of cloud sides viewed at oblique angles seems to contribute most to the enhanced tau-values. The results presented here will help understand cloud retrieval uncertainties related to cloud inhomogeneity. They complement the uncertainty estimates that will start accompanying MODIS cloud products in Collection 5 and may eventually help correct for the observed view angle dependent biases.

  15. Airliner cabin ozone : an updated review.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1989-12-01

    The recent literature pertaining to ozone contamination of airliner cabins is reviewed. Measurements in airliner cabins without filters showed that ozone levels were about 50 percent of atmospheric ozone. Filters were about 90 percent effective in de...

  16. Stratospheric column NO2 anomalies over Russia related to the 2011 Arctic ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aheyeva, Viktoryia; Gruzdev, Aleksandr; Elokhov, Aleksandr; Grishaev, Mikhail; Salnikova, Natalia

    2013-04-01

    We analyze data of spectrometric measurements of stratospheric column NO2 contents at mid- and high-latitude stations of Zvenigorod (55.7°N, Moscow region), Tomsk (56.5°N, West Siberia), and Zhigansk (66.8°N, East Siberia). Measurements are done in visual spectral range with zenith-viewing spectrometers during morning and evening twilights. Alongside column NO2 contents, vertical profiles of NO2 are retrieved at the Zvenigorod station. Zvenigorod and Zhigansk are the measurement stations within the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). For interpretation of results of analysis of NO2 data, data of Ozone Monitoring Instrument measurements of total column ozone and rawinsonde data are also analyzed and back trajectories calculated with the help of HYSPLIT trajectory model are used. Significant negative anomalies in stratospheric NO2 columns accompanied by episodes of significant cooling of the stratosphere and decrease in total ozone were observed at the three stations in the winter-spring period of 2011. Trajectory analysis shows that the anomalies were caused by the transport of stratospheric air from the region of the ozone hole observed that season in the Arctic. Although negative NO2 anomalies due to the transport from the Arctic were also observed in some other years, the anomalies in 2011 have had record magnitudes. Analysis of NO2 vertical profiles at Zvenigorod shows that the NO2 anomaly in 2011 compared to other years anomalies was additionally contributed by the denitrification of the Arctic lower stratosphere. NO2 profiles show that a certain degree of the denitrification probably survived even after the ozone hole.

  17. Protecting the ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Munasinghe, M; King, K

    1992-06-01

    Stratospheric ozone layer depletion has been recognized as a problem by the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the 1987 Montreal Protocol (MP). The ozone layer shields the earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV-B), which is more pronounced at the poles and around the equator. Industrialized countries have contributed significantly to the problem by releasing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons into the atmosphere. The effect of these chemicals, which were known for their inertness, nonflammability, and nontoxicity, was discovered in 1874. Action to deal with the effects of CFCs and halons was initiated in 1985 in a 49-nation UN meeting. 21 nations signed a protocol limiting ozone depleting substances (ODS): CFCs and halons. Schedules were set based on each country's use in 1986; the target phaseout was set for the year 2000. The MP restricts trade in ODSs and weights the impact of substances to reflect the extent of damage; i.e., halons are 10 times more damaging than CFCs. ODS requirements for developing countries were eased to accommodate scarce resources and the small fraction of ODS emissions. An Interim Multilateral Fund under the Montreal Protocol (IMFMP) was established to provide loans to finance the costs to developing countries in meeting global environmental requirements. The IMFMP is administered by the World Bank, the UN Environmental Program, and the UN Development Program. Financing is available to eligible countries who use .3 kg of ODS/person/year. Rapid phaseout in developed countries has occurred due to strong support from industry and a lower than expected cost. Although there are clear advantages to rapid phaseout, there were no incentives included in the MP for rapid phaseout. Some of the difficulties occur because the schedules set minimum targets at the lowest possible cost. Also, costs cannot be minimized by a country-specific and ODS-specific process. The ways to improve implementation in scheduling and

  18. Contribution of corner reflections from oriented ice crystals to backscattering and depolarization characteristics for off-zenith lidar profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovoi, Anatoli G.; Konoshonkin, Alexander V.; Kustova, Natalia V.; Veselovskii, Igor A.

    2018-06-01

    Backscattering Mueller matrix and the depolarization and color ratios for quasi-horizontally oriented hexagonal ice plates have been calculated within the framework of the physical optics approximation. In the case of a tilted lidar, the dependence of the color and depolarization ratios on polarization of the incident light has been analyzed. It is shown that the corner reflection effect inherent to the pristine hexagonal ice crystals results in sharp peaks of both the backscattering cross section and depolarization ratio at the lidar tilts of about 30° off zenith. The experimental results obtained recently by Veselovskii et al. [13] at the lidar tilt of 43° have been interpreted as a partial manifestation of the corner reflection effect. The retrieval of the vertical profile of the ice crystal fraction consisting of quasi-horizontally oriented hexagonal plates has been demonstrated.

  19. Ozone measurement systems improvements studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. W.; Guard, K.; Holland, A. C.; Spurling, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Results are summarized of an initial study of techniques for measuring atmospheric ozone, carried out as the first phase of a program to improve ozone measurement techniques. The study concentrated on two measurement systems, the electro chemical cell (ECC) ozonesonde and the Dobson ozone spectrophotometer, and consisted of two tasks. The first task consisted of error modeling and system error analysis of the two measurement systems. Under the second task a Monte-Carlo model of the Dobson ozone measurement technique was developed and programmed for computer operation.

  20. Ozone ground-based measurements by the GASCOD near-UV and visible DOAS system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanelli, G.; Bonasoni, P.; Cervino, M.; Evangelisti, F.; Ravegnani, F.

    1994-01-01

    GASCOD, a near-ultraviolet and visible differential optical spectrometer, was developed at CNR's FISBAT Institute in Bologna, Italy, and first tested at Terra Nova Bay station in Antarctica (74.6 deg S, 164.6 deg E) during the summer expeditions 1988-1990 of PNRA (PNRA is the national research program in Antarctica, 'Programma Nazionale di Ricerche in Atartide'). A comparison with coincident O3 total column measurements taken in the same Antarctic area is presented, as is another comparison performed in Italy. Also introduced is an updated model for solar zenith measurements taken from a ground-based, upward-looking GASCOD spectrometer, which was employed for the 1991-92 winter campaign at Aer-Ostersund in Sweden (63.3 deg N, 13.1 deg E) during AESOE (European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment). The GASCOD can examine the spectra from 300 to 700 nm, in 50 nm steps, by moving the spectrometer's grating. At present, it takes measurements of solar zenith radiation in the 310-342 nm range for O3 and in the 405-463 nm range for NO2.

  1. Is Ozone Going Up Now?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrecht, W.; Froidevaux, L.; Davis, S. M.; Degenstein, D. A.; Wild, J.; Roth, C.; Kaempfer, N.; Leblanc, T.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Vigouroux, C.; Swart, D. P. J.; Querel, R.; Harris, N.; Nedoluha, G. E.

    2016-12-01

    The last WMO ozone assessment (WMO, 2014) concluded that observations show significant ozone increase, 3% per decade (±2% per decade, 2σ), in the upper stratosphere since 2000. At other levels, or for total ozone, increases were not found or not significant. Overall, this is consistent with expectations from model simulations, (e.g. CCMVal2, Eyring et al., 2010). These simulations indicate that declining chlorine levels and stratospheric cooling due to CO2 increase should contribute roughly equal parts to ozone increase in the upper stratosphere. Shortly after the assessment, results from the SI2N initiative (Harris et al., 2015) confirmed increasing ozone in the upper stratosphere. However, the SI2N results indicated smaller increases (+1.5% per decade) than the WMO assessment, and substantially larger uncertainties (±5% per decade, 2σ). Differences can be attributed to time period, 1998 to 2012, compared to 2000 to 2013/14 for the assessment, and to larger assumed instrumental drift uncertainties, 6% per decade, (only 1 to 2% per decade in WMO 2014, see also Hubert et al., 2016). Here, we explore how additional ground-based and satellite data since 2013, as well as new and improved records, affect ozone trends and uncertainties. The focus will be on ozone in the upper stratosphere, because this is the region where the earliest signs of beginning ozone recovery are expected. ReferencesEyring, V., et al.: Multi-model assessment of stratospheric ozone return dates and ozone recovery in CCMVal-2 models, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 9451-9472, doi:10.5194/acp-10-9451-2010, 2010. Harris, N. R. P., et al.: Past changes in the vertical distribution of ozone - Part 3: Analysis and interpretation of trends, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 9965-9982, doi:10.5194/acp-15-9965-2015, 2015. Hubert, D., et al.: Ground-based assessment of the bias and long-term stability of fourteen limb and occultation ozone profile data records, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 9, 2497-2534, doi:10.5194/amt-9

  2. Ground Experiments of Remote Synchronization for Onboard Crystal Oscillator of Quasi-Zenith Satellites - Use of Multiple Positioning Signals for Feedback Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Iwata, A. Iwasaki, Y. Fukuyama, F. Tappero, K. Hagimoto, T. Ikegami , and H. Murakami, 2004, “Ground Testbed for Quasi-Zenith Satellite Remote...JSASS, Tokyo), ISTS 2004-f-16. [7] T. Iwata, F. Tappero, M. Imae, Y. Fukuyama, K. Hagimoto, H. Murakami, T. Ikegami , A. Iwasaki, K. Nakajima, and Y

  3. Unequivocal detection of ozone recovery in the Antarctic Ozone Hole through significant increases in atmospheric layers with minimum ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, Jos; van Weele, Michiel; van der A, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    An important new landmark in present day ozone research is presented through MLS satellite observations of significant ozone increases during the ozone hole season that are attributed unequivocally to declining ozone depleting substances. For many decades the Antarctic ozone hole has been the prime example of both the detrimental effects of human activities on our environment as well as how to construct effective and successful environmental policies. Nowadays atmospheric concentrations of ozone depleting substances are on the decline and first signs of recovery of stratospheric ozone and ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole have been observed. The claimed detection of significant recovery, however, is still subject of debate. In this talk we will discuss first current uncertainties in the assessment of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone hole by using multi-variate regression methods, and, secondly present an alternative approach to identify ozone hole recovery unequivocally. Even though multi-variate regression methods help to reduce uncertainties in estimates of ozone recovery, great care has to be taken in their application due to the existence of uncertainties and degrees of freedom in the choice of independent variables. We show that taking all uncertainties into account in the regressions the formal recovery of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole cannot be established yet, though is likely before the end of the decade (before 2020). Rather than focusing on time and area averages of total ozone columns or ozone profiles, we argue that the time evolution of the probability distribution of vertically resolved ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole contains a better fingerprint for the detection of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone hole. The advantages of this method over more tradition methods of trend analyses based on spatio-temporal average ozone are discussed. The 10-year record of MLS satellite measurements of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole shows a

  4. Air Quality Guide for Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    ... outdoors. Note: If you don't have an air conditioner, staying inside with the windows closed may be dangerous in extremely hot weather. In these cases, seek alternative shelter. Key Facts to Know About Ozone: Ozone in the air we breathe can cause serious health problems, including ...

  5. Simplified ozone detection by chemiluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.; Rogowski, R. S.; Richards, R. R.

    1977-01-01

    Ozone is detected by film coated with solid, such as rubrene, that reacts with ozone to degree proportional to concentration in sample gas. Gas flow is stopped, and film is heated to produce light (chemiluminescence) in proportion to amount of reacted material on sensor.

  6. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    During the period December 1976 through February 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center, two special soundings were taken at Antigua, West Indies, and at the Churchill Research Range, monthly activities were initiated to establish stratospheric ozone climatology. This report presents the data results and flight profiles for the period covered.

  7. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    DOEpatents

    Serkiz, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  8. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    During the period March 1977 through May 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center and three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at the Churchill Research Range. One additional flight was conducted at Wallops Flight Center in support of Nimbus 4 SBUV. Data results and flight profiles for the period covered are presented.

  9. Plant responses to tropospheric ozone

    Tropospheric ozone is the second most abundant air pollutant and an important component of the global climate change. Over five decades of research on the phytotoxicity of ozone in model plants systems, crop plants and forest trees have provided some insight into the physiological, biochemical and m...

  10. Software development and its description for Geoid determination based on Spherical-Cap-Harmonics Modelling using digital-zenith camera and gravimetric measurements hybrid data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, K.; Jaeger, R.; Balodis, J.; Kaminskis, J.

    2017-10-01

    Over several years the Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformatics (GGI) was engaged in the design and development of a digital zenith camera. At the moment the camera developments are finished and tests by field measurements are done. In order to check these data and to use them for geoid model determination DFHRS (Digital Finite element Height reference surface (HRS)) v4.3. software is used. It is based on parametric modelling of the HRS as a continous polynomial surface. The HRS, providing the local Geoid height N, is a necessary geodetic infrastructure for a GNSS-based determination of physcial heights H from ellipsoidal GNSS heights h, by H=h-N. The research and this publication is dealing with the inclusion of the data of observed vertical deflections from digital zenith camera into the mathematical model of the DFHRS approach and software v4.3. A first target was to test out and validate the mathematical model and software, using additionally real data of the above mentioned zenith camera observations of deflections of the vertical. A second concern of the research was to analyze the results and the improvement of the Latvian quasi-geoid computation compared to the previous version HRS computed without zenith camera based deflections of the vertical. The further development of the mathematical model and software concerns the use of spherical-cap-harmonics as the designed carrier function for the DFHRS v.5. It enables - in the sense of the strict integrated geodesy approach, holding also for geodetic network adjustment - both a full gravity field and a geoid and quasi-geoid determination. In addition, it allows the inclusion of gravimetric measurements, together with deflections of the vertical from digital-zenith cameras, and all other types of observations. The theoretical description of the updated version of DFHRS software and methods are discussed in this publication.

  11. Source attribution of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a harmful pollutant with adverse effects on human health and ecosystems. As well as these effects, tropospheric ozone is also a powerful greenhouse gas, with an anthropogenic radiative forcing one quarter of that of CO2. Along with methane and atmospheric aerosol, tropospheric ozone belongs to the so-called Short Lived Climate forcing Pollutants, or SLCP. Recent work has shown that efforts to reduce concentrations of SLCP in the atmosphere have the potential to slow the rate of near-term climate change, while simultaneously improving public health and reducing crop losses. Unlike many other SLCP, tropospehric ozone is not directly emitted, but is instead influenced by two distinct sources: transport of air from the ozone-rich stratosphere; and photochemical production in the troposphere from the emitted precursors NOx (oxides of nitrogen), CO (Carbon Monoxide), and VOC (volatile organic compounds, including methane). Better understanding of the relationship between ozone production and the emissions of its precursors is essential for the development of targeted emission reduction strategies. Several modeling methods have been employed to relate the production of tropospheric ozone to emissions of its precursors; emissions perturbation, tagging, and adjoint sensitivity methods all deliver complementary information about modelled ozone production. Most studies using tagging methods have focused on attribution of tropospheric ozone production to emissions of NOx, even though perturbation methods have suggested that tropospheric ozone is also sensitive to VOC, particularly methane. In this study we describe the implementation into a global chemistry-climate model of a scheme for tagging emissions of NOx and VOC with an arbitrary number of labels, which are followed through the chemical reactions of tropospheric ozone production in order to perform attribution of tropospehric ozone to its emitted precursors. Attribution is performed to both

  12. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles < 50 nm), under magnetic stirring. The aerosol was then mixed with ozone in an aerosol flow tube. Ozone uptake experiments were performed with different particles concentrations with a fixed ozone concentration. The influence of several factors on kinetics was examined: initial ozone concentration, particle size (50 nm ≤ Dp ≤ 200 nm) and competitive adsorption (with probe molecule and water). The effect of initial ozone concentration was first studied. Accordingly to literature, it has been observed that the number of gas-phase ozone molecules lost per unit particle surface area tends towards a plateau for high ozone concentration suggesting a reversible ozone adsorption according to a Langmuir mechanism. We calculated the initial reaction probability between O3 and carbon particles.An initial uptake coefficient of 1.10-4 was obtained. Similar experiments were

  13. View Angle Effects on MODIS Snow Mapping in Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xin, Qinchuan; Woodcock, Curtis E.; Liu, Jicheng; Tan, Bin; Melloh, Rae A.; Davis, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Binary snow maps and fractional snow cover data are provided routinely from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). This paper investigates how the wide observation angles of MODIS influence the current snow mapping algorithm in forested areas. Theoretical modeling results indicate that large view zenith angles (VZA) can lead to underestimation of fractional snow cover (FSC) by reducing the amount of the ground surface that is viewable through forest canopies, and by increasing uncertainties during the gridding of MODIS data. At the end of the MODIS scan line, the total modeled error can be as much as 50% for FSC. Empirical analysis of MODIS/Terra snow products in four forest sites shows high fluctuation in FSC estimates on consecutive days. In addition, the normalized difference snow index (NDSI) values, which are the primary input to the MODIS snow mapping algorithms, decrease as VZA increases at the site level. At the pixel level, NDSI values have higher variances, and are correlated with the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in snow covered forests. These findings are consistent with our modeled results, and imply that consideration of view angle effects could improve MODIS snow monitoring in forested areas.

  14. Reading Angles in Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  15. Ozone Contamination in Aircraft Cabins. Appendix B: Overview papers. Flight 8 planning to avoid high ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belmont, A. D.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of preventing cabin ozone from exceeding a given standard was investigated. Statistical analysis of vertical distribution of ozone is summarized. The cost, logistics, maintenance, ability to forecast ozone, and avoiding high ozone concentrations are presented. Filtering approaches and the requirements to remove ozone toxicity are discussed.

  16. Optimal reconstruction angles

    SciT

    Cook, G.O. Jr.; Knight, L.

    1979-07-01

    The question of optimal projection angles has recently become of interest in the field of reconstruction from projections. Here, studies are concentrated on the n x n pixel space, where literative algorithms such as ART and direct matrix techniques due to Katz are considered. The best angles are determined in a Gauss--Markov statistical sense as well as with respect to a function-theoretical error bound. The possibility of making photon intensity a function of angle is also examined. Finally, the best angles to use in an ART-like algorithm are studied. A certain set of unequally spaced angles was found to bemore » preferred in several contexts. 15 figures, 6 tables.« less

  17. Total ozone changes in the 1987 Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Doiron, Scott D.; Sechrist, Frank; Galimore, Reginald

    1988-01-01

    The development of the Antarctic ozone minimum was observed in 1987 with the Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument. In the first half of August the near-polar (60 and 70 deg S) ozone levels were similar to those of recent years. By September, however, the ozone at 70 and 80 deg S was clearly lower than any previous year including 1985, the prior record low year. The levels continued to decrease throughout September until October 5 when a new record low of 109 DU was established at a point near the South Pole. This value is 29 DU less than the lowest observed in 1985 and 48 DU less than the 1986 low. The zonal mean total ozone at 60 deg S remained constant throughout the time of ozone hole formation. The ozone decline was punctuated by local minima formed away from the polar night boundary at about 75 deg S. The first of these, on August 15 to 17, formed just east of the Palmer Peninsula and appears to be a mountain wave. The second major minimum formed on September 5 to 7 again downwind of the Palmer Peninsula. This event was larger in scale than the August minimum and initiated the decline of ozone across the polar region. The 1987 ozone hole was nearly circular and pole centered for its entire life. In previous years the hole was perturbed by intrusions of the circumpolar maximum into the polar regions, thus causing the hole to be elliptical. The 1987 hole also remained in place until the end of November, a few days longer than in 1985, and this persistence resulted in the latest time for recovery to normal values yet observed.

  18. Is the Ozone Hole over Your Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordero, Eugene C.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a survey of first year university science students regarding their understanding of the ozone layer, ozone depletion, and the effect of ozone depletion on Australia. Suggests that better teaching resources for environmental issues such as ozone depletion and global warming are needed before improvements in student understanding can be…

  19. Global distribution of ozone for various seasons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koprova, L. I.

    1979-01-01

    A technique which was used to obtain a catalog of the seasonal global distribution of ozone is presented. The technique is based on the simultaneous use of 1964-1975 data on the total ozone content from a worldwide network of ozonometric stations and on the vertical ozone profile from ozone sounding stations.

  20. A new zenith-looking narrow-band radiometer-based system (ZEN) for dust aerosol optical depth monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almansa, A. Fernando; Cuevas, Emilio; Torres, Benjamín; Barreto, África; García, Rosa D.; Cachorro, Victoria E.; de Frutos, Ángel M.; López, César; Ramos, Ramón

    2017-02-01

    A new zenith-looking narrow-band radiometer based system (ZEN), conceived for dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) monitoring, is presented in this paper. The ZEN system comprises a new radiometer (ZEN-R41) and a methodology for AOD retrieval (ZEN-LUT). ZEN-R41 has been designed to be stand alone and without moving parts, making it a low-cost and robust instrument with low maintenance, appropriate for deployment in remote and unpopulated desert areas. The ZEN-LUT method is based on the comparison of the measured zenith sky radiance (ZSR) with a look-up table (LUT) of computed ZSRs. The LUT is generated with the LibRadtran radiative transfer code. The sensitivity study proved that the ZEN-LUT method is appropriate for inferring AOD from ZSR measurements with an AOD standard uncertainty up to 0.06 for AOD500 nm ˜ 0.5 and up to 0.15 for AOD500 nm ˜ 1.0, considering instrumental errors of 5 %. The validation of the ZEN-LUT technique was performed using data from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) Cimel Electronique 318 photometers (CE318). A comparison between AOD obtained by applying the ZEN-LUT method on ZSRs (inferred from CE318 diffuse-sky measurements) and AOD provided by AERONET (derived from CE318 direct-sun measurements) was carried out at three sites characterized by a regular presence of desert mineral dust aerosols: Izaña and Santa Cruz in the Canary Islands and Tamanrasset in Algeria. The results show a coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.99 to 0.97, and root mean square errors (RMSE) ranging from 0.010 at Izaña to 0.032 at Tamanrasset. The comparison of ZSR values from ZEN-R41 and the CE318 showed absolute relative mean bias (RMB) < 10 %. ZEN-R41 AOD values inferred from ZEN-LUT methodology were compared with AOD provided by AERONET, showing a fairly good agreement in all wavelengths, with mean absolute AOD differences < 0.030 and R2 higher than 0.97.

  1. Seasonal Variability Study of the Tropospheric Zenithal Delay in the South America using regional Numerical Weather Prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapucci, L. F.; Monico, J. G.; Machado, L. T.

    2007-05-01

    In 2010 a new navigation and administration system of the air traffic, denominated CNS-ATM (Communication Navigation Surveillance - Air Traffic Management) should be running operationally in South America. This new system will basically employ the positioning techniques by satellites to the management and air traffic control. However, the efficiency of this new system demands the knowledge of the behavior of the atmosphere, consequently, an appropriated Zenithal Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) modeling in a regional scale. The predictions of ZTD values from Numeric Weather Prediction (NWP), denominated here dynamic modeling, is an alternative to model the atmospheric gases effects in the radio-frequency signals in real time. Brazilian Center for Weather Forecasting and Climate Studies (CPTEC) of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE), jointly with researchers from UNESP (Sao Paulo State University), has generated operationally prediction of ZTD values to South America Continent (available in the electronic address http:satelite.cptec.inpe.br/htmldocs/ztd/zenithal.htm). The available regional version is obtained using ETA model (NWP model with horizontal resolution of 20 km and 42 levels in the vertical). The application of NWP permit assess the temporal and spatial variation of ZTD values, which is an important characteristic of this techniques. The aim of the present paper is to investigate the ZTD seasonal variability over South America continent. A variability analysis of the ZTD components [hydrostatic(ZHD) and wet(ZWD)] is also presented, as such as discussion of main factors that influence this variation in this region. The hydrostatic component variation is related with atmospheric pressure oscillation, which is influenced by relief and high pressure centers that prevail over different region of the South America continent. The wet component oscillation is due to the temperature and humidity variability, which is also influenced by relief and by synoptic

  2. Effects of stratospheric ozone recovery on photochemistry and ozone air quality in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Wu, S.; Huang, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2014-04-01

    There has been significant stratospheric ozone depletion since the late 1970s due to ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). With the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments, stratospheric ozone is expected to recover towards its pre-1980 level in the coming decades. In this study, we examine the implications of stratospheric ozone recovery for the tropospheric chemistry and ozone air quality with a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). With a full recovery of the stratospheric ozone, the projected increases in ozone column range from 1% over the low latitudes to more than 10% over the polar regions. The sensitivity factor of troposphere ozone photolysis rate, defined as the percentage changes in surface ozone photolysis rate for 1% increase in stratospheric ozone column, shows significant seasonal variation but is always negative with absolute value larger than one. The expected stratospheric ozone recovery is found to affect the tropospheric ozone destruction rates much more than the ozone production rates. Significant decreases in surface ozone photolysis rates due to stratospheric ozone recovery are simulated. The global average tropospheric OH decreases by 1.7%, and the global average lifetime of tropospheric ozone increases by 1.5%. The perturbations to tropospheric ozone and surface ozone show large seasonal and spatial variations. General increases in surface ozone are calculated for each season, with increases by up to 0.8 ppbv in the remote areas. Increases in ozone lifetime by up to 13% are found in the troposphere. The increased lifetimes of tropospheric ozone in response to stratospheric ozone recovery enhance the intercontinental transport of ozone and global pollution, in particular for the summertime. The global background ozone attributable to Asian emissions is calculated to increase by up to 15% or 0.3 ppbv in the Northern Hemisphere in response to the projected stratospheric ozone recovery.

  3. Trends in ozone profile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, H.; Aikin, A.; Barnes, R.; Chandra, S.; Cunnold, D.; Deluisi, J.; Gille, J. C.; Hudson, R.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L.

    1989-01-01

    From an examination of the agreements and differences between different satellite instruments, it is difficult to believe that existing satellite instruments determine upper stratospheric ozone much better than 4 pct.; by extension, it probably would require at least a 4 pct. change to be reliably detected as a change. The best estimates of the vertical profiles of ozone change in the upper stratosphere between 1979 and 1986 are judged to be those given by the two SAGE satellite instruments. SAGE-2 minus SAGE-1 gives a much lower ozone reduction than that given by the archived Solar Backscatter UV data. The average SAGE profiles of ozone changes between 20 and 50 degs north and between 20 and 50 degs south are given. The SAGE-1 and SAGE-2 comparison gives an ozone reduction of about 4 pct. at 25 km over temperate latitudes. Five ground based Umkehr stations between 36 and 52 degs north, corrected for the effects of volcanic aerosols, report an ozone reduction between 1979 and 1987 at Umkehr layer 8 of 9 + or - 5 pct. The central estimate of upper stratospheric ozone reduction given by SAGE at 40 km is less than the central value estimated by the Umkehr method at layer 8.

  4. Total ozone trend over Cairo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, G. K. Y.

    1994-01-01

    A world wide interest in protecting ozone layer against manmade effects is now increasing. Assessment of the ozone depletion due to these activities depends on how successfully we can separate the natural variabilities from the data. The monthly mean values of total ozone over Cairo (30 05N) for the period 1968-1988, have been analyzed using the power spectral analysis technique. The technique used in this analysis does not depend on a pre-understanding of the natural fluctuations in the ozone data. The method depends on increasing the resolution of the spectral peaks in order to obtain the more accurate sinusoidal fluctuations with wavelength equal to or less than record length. Also it handles the possible sinusoidal fluctuations with wavelength equal to or less than record length. The results show that it is possible to detect some of the well known national fluctuations in the ozone record such as annual, semiannual, quasi-biennial and quasi-quadrennial oscillations. After separating the natural fluctuations from the ozone record, the trend analysis of total ozone over Cairo showed that a decrease of about -1.2% per decade has occurred since 1979.

  5. Photoelectric angle converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podzharenko, Volodymyr A.; Kulakov, Pavlo I.

    2001-06-01

    The photo-electric angle transmitter of rotation is offered, at which the output voltage is linear function of entering magnitude. In a transmitter the linear phototransducer is used on the basis of pair photo diode -- operating amplifier, which output voltage is linear function of the area of an illuminated photosensitive stratum, and modulator of a light stream of the special shape, which ensures a linear dependence of this area from an angle of rotation. The transmitter has good frequent properties and can be used for dynamic measurements of an angular velocity and angle of rotation, in systems of exact drives and systems of autocontrol.

  6. Improved model for correcting the ionospheric impact on bending angle in radio occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angling, Matthew J.; Elvidge, Sean; Healy, Sean B.

    2018-04-01

    The standard approach to remove the effects of the ionosphere from neutral atmosphere GPS radio occultation measurements is to estimate a corrected bending angle from a combination of the L1 and L2 bending angles. This approach is known to result in systematic errors and an extension has been proposed to the standard ionospheric correction that is dependent on the squared L1 / L2 bending angle difference and a scaling term (κ). The variation of κ with height, time, season, location and solar activity (i.e. the F10.7 flux) has been investigated by applying a 1-D bending angle operator to electron density profiles provided by a monthly median ionospheric climatology model. As expected, the residual bending angle is well correlated (negatively) with the vertical total electron content (TEC). κ is more strongly dependent on the solar zenith angle, indicating that the TEC-dependent component of the residual error is effectively modelled by the squared L1 / L2 bending angle difference term in the correction. The residual error from the ionospheric correction is likely to be a major contributor to the overall error budget of neutral atmosphere retrievals between 40 and 80 km. Over this height range κ is approximately linear with height. A simple κ model has also been developed. It is independent of ionospheric measurements, but incorporates geophysical dependencies (i.e. solar zenith angle, solar flux, altitude). The global mean error (i.e. bias) and the standard deviation of the residual errors are reduced from -1.3×10-8 and 2.2×10-8 for the uncorrected case to -2.2×10-10 rad and 2.0×10-9 rad, respectively, for the corrections using the κ model. Although a fixed scalar κ also reduces bias for the global average, the selected value of κ (14 rad-1) is only appropriate for a small band of locations around the solar terminator. In the daytime, the scalar κ is consistently too high and this results in an overcorrection of the bending angles and a positive bending

  7. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE PAGES

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; ...

    2015-02-16

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer cloud using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievals using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulusmore » under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m −2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent 3-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10–20 g m −2.« less

  8. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE PAGES

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; ...

    2015-07-02

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer clouds using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances under conditions when precipitation does not reach the surface. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievalsmore » using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulus under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m -2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the Northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent three-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10–20 g m -2.« less

  9. Comparison of Magnetospheric Magnetic Field Variations at Quasi-Zenith Orbit Based on Michibiki Observation and REPPU Global MHD Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Y.; Nagatsuma, T.; Den, M.; Nakamizo, A.; Matsumoto, H.; Tanaka, T.

    2017-12-01

    We are developing a numerical simulator for future space weather forecast using magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling global MHD simulation called REPPU (REProduce Plasma Universe) code. We investigate the validity of the MHD simulation result as compared with observation. In this study we simulate some events including both quiet and disturbed geomagnetic conditions using OMNIWeb solar wind data. The simulation results are compared with magnetic field observations from Michibiki satellite, which is on the quasi-zenith orbit (QZO). In quiet geomagnetic condition, magnetic field variations at QZO obtained from simulation results have good consistency as compared correspondence with those from Michibiki observation. In disturbed geomagnetic condition in which the Dst < -20 nT, however, V component of magnetic field variations from simulation results tend to deviate from observations especially at the night side. We consider that this deviation during disturbed geomagnetic condition might be due to tail and/or ring current enhancement which is already suggested by many other MHD simulation studies as compared with the magnetic field observation at geosynchronous orbit. In this presentation, we will discuss the cause of this discrepancy in more detail with studying the relationship between the magnetic field deviation and some parameters such as Dst and solar wind.

  10. Dobson spectrophotometer ozone measurements during international ozone rocketsonde intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the total ozone content of the atmosphere, made with seven ground based instruments at a site near Wallops Island, Virginia, are discussed in terms for serving as control values with which the rocketborne sensor data products can be compared. These products are profiles of O3 concentration with altitude. By integrating over the range of altitudes from the surface to the rocket apogee and by appropriately estimating the residual ozone amount from apogee to the top of the atmosphere, a total ozone amount can be computed from the profiles that can be directly compared with the ground based instrumentation results. Dobson spectrophotometers were used for two of the ground-based instruments. Preliminary data collected during the IORI from Dobson spectrophotometers 72 and 38 are presented. The agreement between the two and the variability of total ozone overburden through the experiment period are discussed.

  11. Ozone and Ozonated Oils in Skin Diseases: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Travagli, V.; Zanardi, I.; Valacchi, G.; Bocci, V.

    2010-01-01

    Although orthodox medicine has provided a variety of topical anti-infective agents, some of them have become scarcely effective owing to antibiotic- and chemotherapeutic-resistant pathogens. For more than a century, ozone has been known to be an excellent disinfectant that nevertheless had to be used with caution for its oxidizing properties. Only during the last decade it has been learned how to tame its great reactivity by precisely dosing its concentration and permanently incorporating the gas into triglycerides where gaseous ozone chemically reacts with unsaturated substrates leading to therapeutically active ozonated derivatives. Today the stability and efficacy of the ozonated oils have been already demonstrated, but owing to a plethora of commercial products, the present paper aims to analyze these derivatives suggesting the strategy to obtain products with the best characteristics. PMID:20671923

  12. Tropospheric ozone toxicity vs. usefulness of ozone therapy.

    PubMed

    Bocci, Velio Alvaro

    2007-02-01

    There is a general consensus that continuous inhalation of air polluted with ozone is detrimental for the lungs and vital organs. Even if the concentration of tropospheric ozone is slightly above the tolerated dose, toxicity ensues owing to the cumulative dose inhaled for months. However, in medicine ozone is used as a real drug and a precise concentration and therapeutic dosage must be calibrated against the antioxidant capacity of blood. As ozone reacts with blood, it generates pharmacological messengers such as H(2)O(2) and lipid oxidation products (LOPs). These activate several biochemical pathways in blood cells, which after reinfusion are responsible for therapeutic activities lasting several days. Neither acute nor chronic toxicity has been registered.

  13. 16 CFR 260.11 - Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. 260.11... THE USE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING CLAIMS § 260.11 Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. It is... friendly to, the ozone layer or the atmosphere. Example 1: A product is labeled “ozone-friendly.” The claim...

  14. 16 CFR 260.11 - Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. 260.11... THE USE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING CLAIMS § 260.11 Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. It is... friendly to, the ozone layer or the atmosphere. Example 1: A product is labeled “ozone-friendly.” The claim...

  15. Reading angles in maps.

    PubMed

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections appeared without any relevant length or distance information. Children were able to read these map fragments and compare two-dimensional to three-dimensional angles. However, this ability appeared both variable and fragile among the youngest children of the sample. These findings suggest that 4-year-old children begin to form an abstract concept of angle that applies both to two-dimensional and three-dimensional displays and that serves to interpret novel spatial symbols. © 2013 The Authors. Child Development © 2013 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  16. Angle-Ply Weaving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    Bias-direction or angle-ply weaving is proposed new process for weaving fibers along bias in conventional planar fabric or in complicated three-dimensional multilayer fabric preform of fiber-reinforced composite structure. Based upon movement of racks of needles and corresponding angle yarns across fabric as fabric being formed. Fibers woven along bias increases shear stiffness and shear strength of preform, increasing value of preform as structural member.

  17. The photolysis of ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissi, E.; Heicklen, J.

    1972-01-01

    Ozone was photolyzed at 25 C with steady illumination at several wavelengths from 2288 to 2850 A, at O3 pressures from 0.1 to 2.7 torr, and at absorbed intensities from 0.15 to 65 microns/min. Experiments were done in pure dry O3, and in the presence of He, CO2, N2, H2O, H2, N2O, He-CO2, He-H2O, CO2-H2O, O2-N2O, CO2-O2, and N2O5-O2-CO2 mixtures. The results show that in the absence of added gases or in the presence of He, the quantum yield of O3 consumption is 5.5 independent of conditions, except at pressures below 0.4 torr. In the presence of CO2 or N2, ozone consumption falls toward 4.0. The primary photolytic act produces O(1 D) and siglet O2, presumably O2(1 delta), at all wavelengths below 3000 A. Relative quenching constants O(1 D) removal by various gases were measured at 2288, 2537, and 2800 A. For O3, CO2, and N2, the relative rates are 1.0/0.4 to 0.5/0.08 to 0.11 at all wavelengths. For H2O the constant at 2537 A is 1.5 relative to that for O3. With N2O, a noticeable wavelength effect is observed and the relative rate constants are 1.5, 2 to 3, 4.0 for O3 compared to N2O at 2800, 2537, and 2288 A, respectively.

  18. Measurements of constituents of interest in the photochemistry of the ozone layer using infrared techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murcray, D. G.; Williams, J. W.; Barker, D. B.; Goldman, A.; Bradford, C.; Cook, G.

    1978-01-01

    Infrared solar spectra and infrared atmospheric emission spectra were obtained from the ground, from aircraft and from balloons. The initial detection of most stratospheric molecules was achieved by the solar spectral technique because better resolution helps remove interference from other molecules. Because the sun is an intense source of radiation, the resolution which can be obtained with good signal-to-noise, is greater than with atmospheric emission spectroscopy. Data are generally taken using a method that enhances the number of molecules in the optical path i.e. at large solar zenith angles for solar spectra and at low elevation angles for atmospheric emission spectra. The search for molecules which are predicted to be present but which, the detection of a molecule known to be present from other measurement techniques but observed for the first time in infrared solar spectra, and some further data on the variability of HNO3 are discussed.

  19. Ozonation of cooling tower waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.; French, K. R.; Howe, R. D. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Continuous ozone injection into water circulating between a cooling tower and heat exchanger with heavy scale deposits inhibits formation of further deposits, promotes flaking of existing deposits, inhibits chemical corrosion and controls algae and bacteria.

  20. Ecosystem Effects of Ozone Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ground level ozone is absorbed by the leaves of plants, where it can reduce photosynthesis, damage leaves and slow growth. It can also make sensitive plants more susceptible to certain diseases, insects, harsh weather and other pollutants.

  1. Ozone - Current Air Quality Index

    MedlinePlus

    GO! Local Air Quality Conditions Zip Code: State : My Current Location Current AQI Forecast AQI Loop More Maps AQI: Good (0 - 50) ... resources for Hawaii residents and visitors more announcements Air Quality Basics Air Quality Index | Ozone | Particle Pollution | Smoke ...

  2. Method of sterilization using ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Methods of using ozone have been developed which sterilize instruments and medical wastes, oxidize, organics found in wastewater, clean laundry, break down contaminants in soil into a form more readily digested by microbes, kill microorganisms present in food products, and destroy toxins present in food products. The preferred methods for killing microorganism and destroying toxins use pressurized, humidified, and concentrated ozone produced by an electrochemical cell.

  3. Ozonation of Common Textile Auxiliaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskender, Gulen; Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Koyunluoglu, Sebnem; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Germirli Babuna, Fatos

    2016-10-01

    The treatability of four different commonly applied textile auxiliary chemicals, namely two tannin formulations (Tannin 1: a condensation product of aryl sulphonate; Tannin 2: natural tannic acid) and two biocidal finishing agents (Biocide 1: 2,4,4’-trichloro-2’- hydroxydiphenyl ether; Biocide 2: a nonionic diphenyl alkane derivative) with ozone was investigated. Increasing the ozone dose yielded higher COD removals for the natural tannin. Optimum ozone doses of 485 and 662 mg/h were obtained at a pH of 3.5 for natural and synthetic tannin carrying textile bath discharges, respectively. When the reaction pH was increased from 3.5 to 7.0, a slight decrease in COD removal was observed for the natural tannin due to ozone selectivity towards its polyaromatic structure. The same increase in ozonation pH enhanced COD removals for the synthetic tannin as a result of enhanced ozone decomposition rendering free radical chain reactions dominant. Optimum ozone doses of 499 and 563 mg/h were established for Biocide 1 and 2, respectively. With the increase of ozonation, pH exhibited a positive influence on COD removals for both textile tannins. A substantial improvement in terms of TOC removals was observed as the reaction pH was increased from 3.5 to 7.0 for the synthetic tannin, and from 7 to 12 for both textile biocides. Higher AOX removals were evident at pH 7 than at pH 12 for Biocide 1 as a result of the higher selectivity of the dehalogenation reaction at neutral pH.

  4. Ozone Treatment For Cooling Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwelder, Rick; Baldwin, Leroy V.; Feeney, Ellen S.

    1990-01-01

    Report presents results of study of cooling tower in which water treated with ozone instead of usual chemical agents. Bacteria and scale reduced without pollution and at low cost. Operating and maintenance costs with treatment about 30 percent of those of treatment by other chemicals. Corrosion rates no greater than with other chemicals. Advantage of ozone, even though poisonous, quickly detected by smell in very low concentrations.

  5. Examining view angle effects on leaf N estimation in wheat using field reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiao; Feng, Wei; He, Li; Xu, Duanyang; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Li, Xiao; Wang, Zhi-Jie; Coburn, Craig A.; Wang, Chen-Yang; Guo, Tian-Cai

    2016-12-01

    Real-time, nondestructive monitoring of crop nitrogen (N) status is a critical factor for precision N management during wheat production. Over a 3-year period, we analyzed different wheat cultivars grown under different experimental conditions in China and Canada and studied the effects of viewing angle on the relationships between various vegetation indices (VIs) and leaf nitrogen concentration (LNC) using hyperspectral data from 11 field experiments. The objective was to improve the prediction accuracy by minimizing the effects of viewing angle on LNC estimation to construct a novel vegetation index (VI) for use under different experimental conditions. We examined the stability of previously reported optimum VIs obtained from 13 traditional indices for estimating LNC at 13 viewing zenith angles (VZAs) in the solar principal plane (SPP). Backscattering direction showed better index performance than forward scattering direction. Red-edge VIs including modified normalized difference vegetation index (mND705), ratio index within the red edge region (RI-1dB) and normalized difference red edge index (NDRE) were highly correlated with LNC, as confirmed by high R2 determination coefficients. However, these common VIs tended to saturation, as the relationships strongly depended on experimental conditions. To overcome the influence of VZA on VIs, the chlorophyll- and LNC-sensitive NDRE index was divided by the floating-position water band index (FWBI) to generate the integrated narrow-band vegetation index. The highest correlation between the novel NDRE/FWBI parameter and LNC (R2 = 0.852) occurred at -10°, while the lowest correlation (R2 = 0.745) occurred at 60°. NDRE/FWBI was more highly correlated with LNC than existing commonly used VIs at an identical viewing zenith angle. Upon further analysis of angle combinations, our novel VI exhibited the best performance, with the best prediction accuracy at 0° to -20° (R2 = 0.838, RMSE = 0.360) and relatively good accuracy

  6. Tropical tropospheric ozone and biomass burning.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A M; Witte, J C; Hudson, R D; Guo, H; Herman, J R; Fujiwara, M

    2001-03-16

    New methods for retrieving tropospheric ozone column depth and absorbing aerosol (smoke and dust) from the Earth Probe-Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP/TOMS) are used to follow pollution and to determine interannual variability and trends. During intense fires over Indonesia (August to November 1997), ozone plumes, decoupled from the smoke below, extended as far as India. This ozone overlay a regional ozone increase triggered by atmospheric responses to the El Niño and Indian Ocean Dipole. Tropospheric ozone and smoke aerosol measurements from the Nimbus 7 TOMS instrument show El Niño signals but no tropospheric ozone trend in the 1980s. Offsets between smoke and ozone seasonal maxima point to multiple factors determining tropical tropospheric ozone variability.

  7. The 2002 Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Nash, E. R.; Douglass, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1979, the ozone hole has grown from near zero size to over 24 Million km2. This area is most strongly controlled by levels of inorganic chlorine and bromine oncentrations. In addition, dynamical variations modulate the size of the ozone hole by either cooling or warming the polar vortex collar region. We will review the size observations, the size trends, and the interannual variability of the size. Using a simple trajectory model, we will demonstrate the sensitivity of the ozone hole to dynamical forcing, and we will use these observations to discuss the size of the ozone hole during the 2002 Austral spring. We will further show how the Cly decreases in the stratosphere will cause the ozone hole to decrease by 1-1.5% per year. We will also show results from a 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) that has been continuously run since 1999. These CTM results directly show how strong dynamics acts to reduce the size of the ozone hole.

  8. Information content of sky intensity and polarization measurements at right angles to the solar direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, A. C.; Thomas, R. W. L.; Pearce, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a Monte Carlo simulation study of the brightness and polarization at right angles to the solar direction both for ground-based observations (looking up) and for satellite-based systems (looking down). Calculations have been made for a solar zenith angle whose cosine was 0.6 and wavelengths ranging from 3500 A to 9500 A. A sensitivity of signatures to total aerosol loading, aerosol particle size distribution and refractive index, and the surface reflectance albedo has been demonstrated. For Lambertian-type surface reflection the albedo effects enter solely through the intensity sensitivity, and very high correlations have been found between the polarization term signatures for the ground-based and satellite-based systems. Potential applications of these results for local albedo predictions and satellite imaging systems recalibrations are discussed.

  9. On the Impact of Multi-GNSS Observations on Real-Time Precise Point Positioning Zenith Total Delay Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wenwu; Teferle, Norman; Kaźmierski, Kamil; Laurichesse, Denis; Yuan, Yunbin

    2017-04-01

    Observations from multiple Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) can improve the performance of real-time (RT) GNSS meteorology, in particular of the Zenith Total Delay (ZTD) estimates. RT ZTD estimates in combination with derived precipitable water vapour estimates can be used for weather now-casting and the tracking of severe weather events. While a number of published literature has already highlighted this positive development, in this study we describe an operational RT system for extracting ZTD using a modified version of the PPP-wizard (with PPP denoting Precise Point Positioning). Multi-GNSS, including GPS, GLONASS and Galileo, observation streams are processed using a RT PPP strategy based on RT satellite orbit and clock products from the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). A continuous experiment for 30 days was conducted, in which the RT observation streams of 20 globally distributed stations were processed. The initialization time and accuracy of the RT troposphere products using single and/or multi-system observations were evaluated. The effect of RT PPP ambiguity resolution was also evaluated. The results revealed that the RT troposphere products based on single system observations can fulfill the requirements of the meteorological application in now-casting systems. We noted that the GPS-only solution is better than the GLONASS-only solution in both initialization and accuracy. While the ZTD performance can be improved by applying RT PPP ambiguity resolution, the inclusion of observations from multiple GNSS has a more profound effect. Specifically, we saw that the ambiguity resolution is more effective in improving the accuracy, whereas the initialization process can be better accelerated by multi-GNSS observations. Combining all systems, RT troposphere products with an average accuracy of about 8 mm in ZTD were achieved after an initialization process of approximately 9 minutes, which supports the application of multi-GNSS observations

  10. A small CCD zenith camera (ZC-G1) - developed for rapid geoid monitoring in difficult projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstbach, G.; Pichler, H.

    2003-10-01

    Modern Geodesy by terrestrial or space methods is accurate to millimetres or even better. This requires very exact system definitions, together with Astronomy & Physics - and a geoid of cm level. To reach this precision, astrogeodetic vertical deflections are more effective than gravimetry or other methods - as shown by the 1st author 1996 at many projects in different European countries and landscapes. While classical Astrogeodesy is rather complicated (time consuming, heavy instruments and observer's experience) new electro-optical methods are semi-automatic and fill our "geoid gap" between satellite resolution (150 km) and local requirements (2-10 km): With CCD we can speed up and achieve high accuracy almost without observer's experience. In Vienna we construct a mobile zenith camera guided by notebook and GPS: made of Dur-Al, f=20 cm with a Starlite MX-sensor (752×580 pixels à 11μm). Accuracy ±1" within 10 min, mounted at a usual survey tripod. Weight only 4 kg for a special vertical axis, controlled by springs (4×90°) and 2 levels (2002) or sensor (2003). Applications 2003: Improving parts of Austrian geoid (±4 cm→2 cm); automatic astro-points in alpine surveys (vertical deflection effects 3-15 cm per km). Transform of GPS heights to ±1 cm. Tunneling study: heighting up to ±0.1 mm without external control; combining astro-topographic and geological data. Plans 2004: Astro control of polygons and networks - to raise accuracy and economy by ~40% (Sun azimuths of ±3"; additional effort only 10-20%). Planned with servo theodolites and open co-operation groups.

  11. Analysing the Zenith Tropospheric Delay Estimates in On-line Precise Point Positioning (PPP) Services and PPP Software Packages.

    PubMed

    Mendez Astudillo, Jorge; Lau, Lawrence; Tang, Yu-Ting; Moore, Terry

    2018-02-14

    As Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals travel through the troposphere, a tropospheric delay occurs due to a change in the refractive index of the medium. The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technique can achieve centimeter/millimeter positioning accuracy with only one GNSS receiver. The Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) is estimated alongside with the position unknowns in PPP. Estimated ZTD can be very useful for meteorological applications, an example is the estimation of water vapor content in the atmosphere from the estimated ZTD. PPP is implemented with different algorithms and models in online services and software packages. In this study, a performance assessment with analysis of ZTD estimates from three PPP online services and three software packages is presented. The main contribution of this paper is to show the accuracy of ZTD estimation achievable in PPP. The analysis also provides the GNSS users and researchers the insight of the processing algorithm dependence and impact on PPP ZTD estimation. Observation data of eight whole days from a total of nine International GNSS Service (IGS) tracking stations spread in the northern hemisphere, the equatorial region and the southern hemisphere is used in this analysis. The PPP ZTD estimates are compared with the ZTD obtained from the IGS tropospheric product of the same days. The estimates of two of the three online PPP services show good agreement (<1 cm) with the IGS ZTD values at the northern and southern hemisphere stations. The results also show that the online PPP services perform better than the selected PPP software packages at all stations.

  12. Scientific assessment of ozone depletion: 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Over the past few years, there have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer and the influence of changes in chemical composition of the radiative balance of the climate system. Specifically, since the last international scientific review (1989), there have been five major advances: (1) global ozone decreases; (2) polar ozone; (3) ozone and industrial halocarbons; (4) ozone and climate relations; and (5) ozone depletion potentials (ODP's) and global warming potentials (GWP's). These topics and others are discussed.

  13. Simulating climate change with interactive stratospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, P.; Ming, Y.

    2017-12-01

    We compare the simulated climate changes with and without interactive ozone in GFDL AM4. We also compare the simulations with a fully interactive stratospheric chemistry scheme versus those with a simplified scheme in which ozone is treated as a passive tracer. Despite its simplicity, the ozone tracer is sufficient to represent the ozone changes in response to changes in the stratospheric circulation as well as the zonally asymmetric distribution of ozone concentration. With interactive ozone, the model simulates a stronger cooling in the tropical lower stratosphere and less stratospheric moistening in response to surface warming. We further investigate how the different stratospheric response translate into different responses in the tropospheric circulations.

  14. Impact of downward-mixing ozone on surface ozone accumulation in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ho

    2008-04-01

    The ozone that initially presents in the previous day's afternoon mixing layer can remain in the nighttime atmosphere and then be carried over to the next morning. Finally, this ozone can be brought to the ground by downward mixing as mixing depth increases during the daytime, thereby increasing surface ozone concentrations. Variation of ozone concentration during each of these periods is investigated in this work. First, ozone concentrations existing in the daily early morning atmosphere at the altitude range of the daily maximum mixing depth (residual ozone concentrations) were measured using tethered ozonesondes on 52 experimental days during 2004-2005 in southern Taiwan. Daily downward-mixing ozone concentrations were calculated by a box model coupling the measured daily residual ozone concentrations and daily mixing depth variations. The ozone concentrations upwind in the previous day's afternoon mixing layer were estimated by the combination of back air trajectory analysis and known previous day's surface ozone distributions. Additionally, the relationship between daily downward-mixing ozone concentration and daily photochemically produced ozone concentration was examined. The latter was calculated by removing the former from daily surface maximum ozone concentration. The measured daily residual ozone concentrations distributed at 12-74 parts per billion (ppb) with an average of 42 +/- 17 ppb are well correlated with the previous upwind ozone concentration (R2 = 0.54-0.65). Approximately 60% of the previous upwind ozone was estimated to be carried over to the next morning and became the observed residual ozone. The daily downward-mixing ozone contributes 48 +/- 18% of the daily surface maximum ozone concentration, indicating that the downward-mixing ozone is as important as daily photochemically produced ozone to daily surface maximum ozone accumulation. The daily downward-mixing ozone is poorly correlated with the daily photochemically produced ozone and

  15. Vertical-angle control system in the LLMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Binhua; Yang, Lei; Tie, Qiongxian; Mao, Wei

    2000-10-01

    A control system of the vertical angle transmission used in the Lower Latitude Meridian Circle (LLMC) is described in this paper. The transmission system can change the zenith distance of the tube quickly and precisely. It works in three modes: fast motion, slow motion and lock mode. The fast motion mode and the slow motion mode are that the tube of the instrument is driven by a fast motion stepper motor and a slow motion one separately. The lock mode is running for lock mechanism that is driven by a lock stepper motor. These three motors are controlled together by a single chip microcontroller, which is controlled in turn by a host personal computer. The slow motion mechanism and its rotational step angle are fully discussed because the mechanism is not used before. Then the hardware structure of this control system based on a microcontroller is described. Control process of the system is introduced during a normal observation, which is divided into eleven steps. All the steps are programmed in our control software in C++ and/or in ASM. The C++ control program is set up in the host PC, while the ASM control program is in the microcontroller system. Structures and functions of these rprograms are presented. Some details and skills for programming are discussed in the paper too.

  16. Tropospheric Ozone Over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Thompson, A. M.; Cooper, O. R.; Merrill, J. T.; Tarasick, D. W.; Newchurch, M. J.

    2007-05-01

    Ozone in the troposphere plays a significant role as an absorber of infrared radiation (greenhouse gas), in the cleansing capacity of the atmosphere as a precursor of hydroxol radical formation, and a regulated air pollutant capable of deleterious health and ecosystem effects. Knowledge of the ozone budget in the troposphere over North America (NA) is required to properly understand the various mechanisms that contribute to the measured distribution and to develop and test models capable of simulating and predicting this key player in atmospheric chemical and physical processes. Recent field campaigns including the 2004 and 2006 INTEX Ozone Network Studies (IONS) http:croc.gsfc.nasa.gov/intexb/ions06.html that have included intensive ozone profile measurements from ozonesondes provide a unique data set for describing tropospheric ozone over a significant portion of the North American continent. These campaigns have focused on the spring and summer seasons when tropospheric ozone over NA is particularly influenced by long-range transport processes, significant photochemical ozone production resulting from both anthropogenic and natural (lightning) precursor emissions, and exchange with the stratosphere. This study uses ozone profiles measured over NA in the latitude band from approximately 12-60N, extending from the tropics to the high mid latitudes, to describe the seasonal behavior of tropospheric ozone over NA with an emphasis on the spring and summer. This includes the variability within seasons at a particular site as well as the contrasts between the seasons. Emphasis is placed on the variations among the sites including latitudinal and longitudinal gradients and how these differ through the seasons and with altitude in the troposphere. Regional differences are most pronounced during the summer season likely reflecting the influence of a wider variation in processes influencing the tropospheric ozone distribution including lightning NOX production in the upper

  17. Exploitation of the UV Aerosol Index scattering angle dependence: Properties of Siberian smoke plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, Marloes; Beirle, Steffen; Sihler, Holger; Wagner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The UV Aerosol Index (UVAI) is a simple measure of aerosols from satellite that is particularly sensitive to elevated layers of absorbing particles. It has been determined from a range of instruments including TOMS, GOME-2, and OMI, for almost four decades and will be continued in the upcoming Sentinel missions S5-precursor, S4, and S5. Despite its apparent simplicity, the interpretation of UVAI is not straightforward, as it depends on aerosol abundance, absorption, and altitude in a non-linear way. In addition, UVAI depends on the geometry of the measurement (viewing angle, solar zenith and relative azimuth angles), particularly if viewing angles exceed 45 degrees, as is the case for OMI and TROPOMI (on S5-precursor). The dependence on scattering angle complicates the interpretation and further processing (e.g., averaging) of UVAI. In certain favorable cases, however, independent information on aerosol altitude and absorption may become available. We present a detailed study of the scatter angle dependence using SCIATRAN radiative transfer calculations. The model results were compared to observations of an extensive Siberian smoke plume, of which parts reached 10-12 km altitude. Due to its large extent and the high latitude, OMI observed the complete plume in five consecutive orbits under a wide range of scattering angles. This allowed us to deduce aerosol characteristics (absorption and layer height) that were compared with collocated CALIOP lidar measurements.

  18. Issues in Stratospheric Ozone Depletion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Steven Andrew

    Following the announcement of the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985 there have arisen a multitude of questions pertaining to the nature and consequences of polar ozone depletion. This thesis addresses several of these specific questions, using both computer models of chemical kinetics and the Earth's radiation field as well as laboratory kinetic experiments. A coupled chemical kinetic-radiative numerical model was developed to assist in the analysis of in situ field measurements of several radical and neutral species in the polar and mid-latitude lower stratosphere. Modeling was used in the analysis of enhanced polar ClO, mid-latitude diurnal variation of ClO, and simultaneous measurements of OH, HO_2, H_2 O and O_3. Most importantly, such modeling was instrumental in establishing the link between the observed ClO and BrO concentrations in the Antarctic polar vortex and the observed rate of ozone depletion. The principal medical concern of stratospheric ozone depletion is that ozone loss will lead to the enhancement of ground-level UV-B radiation. Global ozone climatology (40^circS to 50^ circN latitude) was incorporated into a radiation field model to calculate the biologically accumulated dosage (BAD) of UV-B radiation, integrated over days, months, and years. The slope of the annual BAD as a function of latitude was found to correspond to epidemiological data for non-melanoma skin cancers for 30^circ -50^circN. Various ozone loss scenarios were investigated. It was found that a small ozone loss in the tropics can provide as much additional biologically effective UV-B as a much larger ozone loss at higher latitudes. Also, for ozone depletions of > 5%, the BAD of UV-B increases exponentially with decreasing ozone levels. An important key player in determining whether polar ozone depletion can propagate into the populated mid-latitudes is chlorine nitrate, ClONO_2 . As yet this molecule is only indirectly accounted for in computer models and field

  19. Northwest Angle, Minnesota

    2017-10-02

    Minnesota's Northwest Angle is the northernmost point of the continental United States. The Angle became part of the US due to a map error during the 1783 Treaty of Paris. Located in the Lake of the Woods, driving there requires crossing the US-Canada border twice. The image was acquired September 22, 2013, covers an area of 40 by 55 km, and is located at 49.2 degrees north, 95.1 degrees west. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21997

  20. Assimilation of MLS and OMI Ozone Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, I.; Wargan, K.; Chang, L.-P.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N.

    2005-01-01

    Ozone data from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were assimilated into the ozone model at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). This assimilation produces ozone fields that are superior to those from the operational GMAO assimilation of Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV/2) instrument data. Assimilation of Aura data improves the representation of the "ozone hole" and the agreement with independent Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III and ozone sonde data. Ozone in the lower stratosphere is captured better: mean state, vertical gradients, spatial and temporal variability are all improved. Inclusion of OMI and MLS data together, or separately, in the assimilation system provides a way of checking how consistent OMI and MLS data are with each other, and with the ozone model. We found that differences between OMI total ozone column data and model forecasts decrease after MLS data are assimilated. This indicates that MLS stratospheric ozone profiles are consistent with OMI total ozone columns. The evaluation of error characteristics of OMI and MLS ozone will continue as data from newer versions of retrievals becomes available. We report on the initial step in obtaining global assimilated ozone fields that combine measurements from different Aura instruments, the ozone model at the GMAO, and their respective error characteristics. We plan to use assimilated ozone fields in estimation of tropospheric ozone. We also plan to investigate impacts of assimilated ozone fields on numerical weather prediction through their use in radiative models and in the assimilation of infrared nadir radiance data from NASA's Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS).

  1. A Study on Generation Ice Containing Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Kenji; Koyama, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Hiromi

    Ozone has the capability of sterilization and deodorization due to high oxidation power. It is also effective for the conservation of perishable foods and purification of water. However, ozone has a disadvantage, that is, conservation of ozone is difficult because it changes back into oxygen. Recently, ice containing ozone is taken attention for the purpose of its conservation. The use of ice containing ozone seems to keep food fresher when we conserve and transport perishable foods due to effects of cooling and sterilization of ice containing ozone. In the present study, we investigated the influence of temperatures of water dissolving ozone on the timewise attenuations of ozone concentration in water. We also investigated the influence of cooling temperature, ice diameter, initial temperatures of water dissolving ozone and container internal pressure of the water dissolving ozone on ozone concentration in the ice. In addition, we investigated the influence of the ice diameter on the timewise attenuations of ozone concentration in the ice. It was confirmed that the solidification experimental data can be adjusted by a correlation between ozone concentration in the ice and solidification time.

  2. Observing Tropospheric Ozone From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack

    2000-01-01

    The importance of tropospheric ozone embraces a spectrum of relevant scientific issues ranging from local environmental concerns, such as damage to the biosphere and human health, to those that impact global change questions, Such is climate warming. From an observational perspective, the challenge is to determine the tropospheric ozone global distribution. Because its lifetime is short compared with other important greenhouse gases that have been monitored over the past several decades, the distribution of tropospheric ozone cannot be inferred from a relatively small set of monitoring stations. Therefore, the best way to obtain a true global picture is from the use of space-based instrumentation where important spatial gradients over vast ocean expanses and other uninhabited areas can be properly characterized. In this paper, the development of the capability to measure tropospheric ozone from space over the past 15 years is summarized. Research in the late 1980s successfully led to the determination of the climatology of tropospheric ozone as a function of season; more recently, the methodology has improved to the extent where regional air pollution episodes can be characterized. The most recent modifications now provide quasi-global (50 N) to 50 S) maps on a daily basis. Such a data set would allow for the study of long-range (intercontinental) transport of air pollution and the quantification of how regional emissions feed into the global tropospheric ozone budget. Future measurement capabilities within this decade promise to offer the ability to provide Concurrent maps of the precursors to the in situ formation of tropospheric ozone from which the scientific community will gain unprecedented insight into the processes that control global tropospheric chemistry

  3. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mildred J.; Bunting, Camille

    The self-contained packet contains background information, lesson plans, 15 transparency and student handout masters, drills and games, 2 objective examinations, and references for teaching a 15-day unit on casting and angling to junior high and senior high school students, either as part of a regular physical education program or as a club…

  4. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  5. Angle selective fiber coupler.

    PubMed

    Barnoski, M K; Morrison, R J

    1976-01-01

    Angle selective input coupling through the side of a slightly tapered section of Corning highly multimode fiber has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. This coupling technique allows the possibility of fabricating bidirectional (duplex) couplers for systems employing single strands of multimode, low loss fiber.

  6. When Will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole demonstrates large-scale, man-made affects on our atmosphere. Surface observations now show that human produced ozone depleting substances (ODSs) are declining. The ozone hole should soon start to diminish because of this decline. In this talk we will demonstrate an ozone hole parametric model. This model is based upon: 1) a new algorithm for estimating 61 and Br levels over Antarctica and 2) late-spring Antarctic stratospheric temperatures. This parametric model explains 95% of the ozone hole area's variance. We use future ODS levels to predict ozone hole recovery. Full recovery to 1980 levels will occur in approximately 2068. The ozone hole area will very slowly decline over the next 2 decades. Detection of a statistically significant decrease of area will not occur until approximately 2024. We further show that nominal Antarctic stratospheric greenhouse gas forced temperature change should have a small impact on the ozone hole.

  7. When Will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Stephen A.; Schauffler, Sue

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole demonstrates large-scale, man-made affects on our atmosphere. Surface observations now show that human produced ozone depleting substances (ODSs) are declining. The ozone hole should soon start to diminish because of this decline. Herein we demonstrate an ozone hole parametric model. This model is based upon: 1) a new algorithm for estimating C1 and Br levels over Antarctica and 2) late-spring Antarctic stratospheric temperatures. This parametric model explains 95% of the ozone hole area s variance. We use future ODS levels to predict ozone hole recovery. Full recovery to 1980 levels will occur in approximately 2068. The ozone hole area will very slowly decline over the next 2 decades. Detection of a statistically significant decrease of area will not occur until approximately 2024. We further show that nominal Antarctic stratospheric greenhouse gas forced temperature change should have a small impact on the ozone hole.

  8. Cryptosporidiosis associated with ozonated apple cider.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Brian G; Mazurek, Jacek M; Hlavsa, Michele; Park, Jean; Tillapaw, Matt; Parrish, MaryKay; Salehi, Ellen; Franks, William; Koch, Elizabeth; Smith, Forrest; Xiao, Lihua; Arrowood, Michael; Hill, Vince; da Silva, Alex; Johnston, Stephanie; Jones, Jeffrey L

    2006-04-01

    We linked an outbreak of cryptosporidiosis to ozonated apple cider by using molecular and epidemiologic methods. Because ozonation was insufficient in preventing this outbreak, its use in rendering apple cider safe for drinking is questioned.

  9. Inheritance of ozone resistance in tall fescue

    SciT

    Johnston, W.J.; Haaland, R.L.; Dickens, R.

    Ozone is considered the most important air pollutant affecting vegetation. With progressive urbanization, ozone levels have steadily escalated. Reports suggest that ozone tolerance is a highly heritable characteristic and that the selection of resistant plants and breeding for ozone resistance should be possible. This study was undertaken to gain information on the inheritance of ozone resistance in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.).Progenies from a diallel among six tall fescue genotypes of diverse origin were evaluated for ozone resistance in a fumigation-chamber. Sixteen-day-old seedlings were exposed to 0.5 ppm ozone for 3 hours and scored for injury after 3 days. Generalmore » combining ability (GCA) and reciprocal effects were both highly significant; however, GCA constituted a major portion of the genotypic variation. Specific combining ability was not significant. The predominance of additive genetic variance observed indicates that breeding for ozone resistance in this tall fescue population should be possible.« less

  10. Unprecedented Arctic Ozone Loss in 2011

    2011-10-02

    In mid-March 2011, NASA Aura spacecraft observed ozone in Earth stratosphere -- low ozone amounts are shown in purple and grey colors, large amounts of chlorine monoxide are shown in dark blue colors.

  11. NODA for EPA's Updated Ozone Transport Modeling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find EPA's NODA for the Updated Ozone Transport Modeling Data for the 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) along with the ExitExtension of Public Comment Period on CSAPR for the 2008 NAAQS.

  12. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  13. NASA satellite helps airliners avoid ozone concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Results from a test to determine the effectiveness of satellite data for helping airlines avoid heavy concentrations of ozone are reported. Information from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, aboard the Nimbus-7 was transmitted, for use in meteorological forecast activities. The results show: (1) Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer profile of total ozone in the atmosphere accurately represents upper air patterns and can be used to locate meteorological activity; (2) route forecasting of highly concentrated ozone is feasible; (3) five research aircraft flights were flown in jet stream regions located by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer to determine winds, temperatures, and air composition. It is shown that the jet stream is coincides with the area of highest total ozone gradient, and low total ozone amounts are found where tropospheric air has been carried along above the tropopause on the anticyclonic side of the subtropical jet stream.

  14. OZONE GENERATORS IN INDOOR AIR SETTINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives information on home/office ozone generators. It discusses their current uses as amelioratives for environmental tobacco smoke, biocontaminants, volatile organic compounds, and odors and details the advantages and disadvantages of each. Ozone appears to work well ...

  15. Estimates of leaf area index from spectral reflectance of wheat under different cultural practices and solar angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asrar, G.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Yoshida, M.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of management practices and solar illumination angle on the leaf area index (LAI) was estimated from measurements of wheat canopy reflectance evaluated by two methods, a regression formula and an indirect technique. The date of planting and the time of irrigation in relation to the stage of plant growth were found to have significant effects on the development of leaves in spring wheat. A reduction in soil moisture adversely affected both the duration and magnitude of the maximum LAI for late planting dates. In general, water stress during vegetative stages resulted in a reduction in maximum LAI, while water stress during the reproductive period shortened the duration of green LAI in spring wheat. Canopy geometry and solar angle also affected the spectral properties of the canopies, and hence the estimated LAI. Increase in solar zenith angles resulted in a general increase in estimated LAI obtained from both methods.

  16. Tropospheric Ozone from the TOMS TDOT (TOMS-Direct-Ozone-in-Troposphere) Technique During SAFARI-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. B.; Thompson, A. M.; Frolov, A. D.; Hudson, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    There are a number of published residual-type methods for deriving tropospheric ozone from TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer). The basic concept of these methods is that within a zone of constant stratospheric ozone, the tropospheric ozone column can be computed by subtracting stratospheric ozone from the TOMS Level 2 total ozone column, We used the modified-residual method for retrieving tropospheric ozone during SAFARI-2000 and found disagreements with in-situ ozone data over Africa in September 2000. Using the newly developed TDOT (TOMS-Direct-Ozone-in-Troposphere) method that uses TOMS radiances and a modified lookup table based on actual profiles during high ozone pollution periods, new maps were prepared and found to compare better to soundings over Lusaka, Zambia (15.5 S, 28 E), Nairobi and several African cities where MOZAIC aircraft operated in September 2000. The TDOT technique and comparisons are described in detail.

  17. 21 CFR 173.368 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ozone. 173.368 Section 173.368 Food and Drugs FOOD... Additives § 173.368 Ozone. Ozone (CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) may be safely used in the treatment, storage, and... specifications for ozone in the Food Chemicals Codex, 4th ed. (1996), p. 277, which is incorporated by reference...

  18. 21 CFR 173.368 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ozone. 173.368 Section 173.368 Food and Drugs FOOD... Additives § 173.368 Ozone. Ozone (CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) may be safely used in the treatment, storage, and... specifications for ozone in the Food Chemicals Codex, 4th ed. (1996), p. 277, which is incorporated by reference...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1563 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ozone. 184.1563 Section 184.1563 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1563 Ozone. (a) Ozone (O3, CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) is an unstable blue gas... manufacturing practice results in a maximum residual level at the time of bottling of 0.4 milligram of ozone per...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1563 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ozone. 184.1563 Section 184.1563 Food and Drugs....1563 Ozone. (a) Ozone (O3, CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) is an unstable blue gas with a pungent... maximum residual level at the time of bottling of 0.4 milligram of ozone per liter of bottled water...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1563 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ozone. 184.1563 Section 184.1563 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1563 Ozone. (a) Ozone (O3, CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) is an unstable blue gas... manufacturing practice results in a maximum residual level at the time of bottling of 0.4 milligram of ozone per...

  2. 21 CFR 173.368 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ozone. 173.368 Section 173.368 Food and Drugs FOOD... ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.368 Ozone. Ozone (CAS Reg... defined in § 170.3(o)(2) of this chapter. (c) The additive meets the specifications for ozone in the Food...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1563 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ozone. 184.1563 Section 184.1563 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1563 Ozone. (a) Ozone (O3, CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) is an unstable blue gas... manufacturing practice results in a maximum residual level at the time of bottling of 0.4 milligram of ozone per...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1563 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ozone. 184.1563 Section 184.1563 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1563 Ozone. (a) Ozone (O3, CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) is an unstable blue gas... manufacturing practice results in a maximum residual level at the time of bottling of 0.4 milligram of ozone per...

  5. 21 CFR 173.368 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ozone. 173.368 Section 173.368 Food and Drugs FOOD... Additives § 173.368 Ozone. Ozone (CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) may be safely used in the treatment, storage, and... specifications for ozone in the Food Chemicals Codex, 4th ed. (1996), p. 277, which is incorporated by reference...

  6. 21 CFR 173.368 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ozone. 173.368 Section 173.368 Food and Drugs FOOD... Additives § 173.368 Ozone. Ozone (CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) may be safely used in the treatment, storage, and... specifications for ozone in the Food Chemicals Codex, 4th ed. (1996), p. 277, which is incorporated by reference...

  7. Airliner Cabin Ozone: An Updated Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    authorized Airliner Cabin Ozone: An Updated Review INTRODUCTION Prior to 1980 , there was a great deal of concern about the adverse effects of ozone on the...and by flight planning to avoid known areas of high atmospheric ozone concentration. Since the final rule was published in 1980 , few reports have...pointed out in 1980 (4), that ozone concentration is the predominant factor in determining the effective dose. These latter studies indicate that

  8. A Different Angle on Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Marc

    2012-01-01

    When a plane figure is photographed from different viewpoints, lengths and angles appear distorted. Hence it is often assumed that lengths, angles, protractors, and compasses have no place in projective geometry. Here we describe a sense in which certain angles are preserved by projective transformations. These angles can be constructed with…

  9. A Review of Atmospheric Ozone and Current Thinking on the Antarctic Ozone Hole.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 0 A Review of Atmospheric ozone and Current Thinking on the Antartic Ozone Hole A thesis submitted in partial satisfaction of the...4. TI TLE (Pit 5,1tlfie) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PFRIOO COVERED A Review of Atmospheric Ozone and Current THESIS/DA/;J.At1AAU00 Thinking on the Antartic ...THESIS A Review of Atmospheric Ozone and Current Thinking on the Antartic Ozone Hole by Randolph Antoine Fix Master of Science in Atmospheric Science

  10. Tropospheric Ozone and Photochemical Smog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillman, S.

    2003-12-01

    The question of air quality in polluted regions represents one of the issues of geochemistry with direct implications for human well-being. Human health and well-being, along with the well-being of plants, animals, and agricultural crops, are dependent on the quality of air we breathe. Since the start of the industrial era, air quality has become a matter of major importance, especially in large cities or urbanized regions with heavy automobile traffic and industrial activity.Concern over air quality existed as far back as the 1600s. Originally, polluted air in cities resulted from the burning of wood or coal, largely as a source of heat. The industrial revolution in England saw a great increase in the use of coal in rapidly growing cities, both for industrial use and domestic heating. London suffered from devastating pollution events during the late 1800s and early 1900s, with thousands of excess deaths attributed to air pollution (Brimblecombe, 1987). With increasing use of coal, other instances also occurred in continental Europe and the USA. These events were caused by directly emitted pollutants (primary pollutants), including sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and particulates. They were especially acute in cities with northerly locations during fall and winter when sunlight is at a minimum. These original pollution events gave rise to the term "smog" (a combination of smoke and fog). Events of this type have become much less severe since the 1950s in Western Europe and the US, as natural gas replaced coal as the primary source of home heating, industrial smokestacks were designed to emit at higher altitudes (where dispersion is more rapid), and industries were required to install pollution control equipment.Beginning in the 1950s, a new type of pollution, photochemical smog, became a major concern. Photochemical smog consists of ozone (O3) and other closely related species ("secondary pollutants") that are produced photochemically from directly

  11. Cloud parameters from zenith transmittances measured by sky radiometer at surface: Method development and satellite product validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Pradeep; Hayasaka, Tadahiro; Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Takamura, Tamio; Irie, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Takashi Y.; Letu, Husi; Kai, Qin

    2017-04-01

    data of a narrow field of view radiometer of collocated observation in one SKYNET site. Though the method is developed for the sky radiometer of SKYNET, it can be still used for the sky radiometer of AERONET and other instruments observing spectral zenith transmittances. The proposed retrieval method is then applied to retrieve cloud parameters at key sites of SKYNET within Japan, which are then used to validate cloud products obtained from space observations by MODIS sensors onboard TERRA/AQUA satellites and Himawari 8, a Japanese geostationary satellite. Our analyses suggest the underestimation (overestimation) of COD (Re) from space observations.

  12. Analysis of Zenith Tropospheric Delay above Europe based on long time series derived from the EPN data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldysz, Zofia; Nykiel, Grzegorz; Figurski, Mariusz; Szafranek, Karolina; Kroszczynski, Krzysztof; Araszkiewicz, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the GNSS system began to play an increasingly important role in the research related to the climate monitoring. Based on the GPS system, which has the longest operational capability in comparison with other systems, and a common computational strategy applied to all observations, long and homogeneous ZTD (Zenith Tropospheric Delay) time series were derived. This paper presents results of analysis of 16-year ZTD time series obtained from the EPN (EUREF Permanent Network) reprocessing performed by the Military University of Technology. To maintain the uniformity of data, analyzed period of time (1998-2013) is exactly the same for all stations - observations carried out before 1998 were removed from time series and observations processed using different strategy were recalculated according to the MUT LAC approach. For all 16-year time series (59 stations) Lomb-Scargle periodograms were created to obtain information about the oscillations in ZTD time series. Due to strong annual oscillations which disturb the character of oscillations with smaller amplitude and thus hinder their investigation, Lomb-Scargle periodograms for time series with the deleted annual oscillations were created in order to verify presence of semi-annual, ter-annual and quarto-annual oscillations. Linear trend and seasonal components were estimated using LSE (Least Square Estimation) and Mann-Kendall trend test were used to confirm the presence of linear trend designated by LSE method. In order to verify the effect of the length of time series on the estimated size of the linear trend, comparison between two different length of ZTD time series was performed. To carry out a comparative analysis, 30 stations which have been operating since 1996 were selected. For these stations two periods of time were analyzed: shortened 16-year (1998-2013) and full 18-year (1996-2013). For some stations an additional two years of observations have significant impact on changing the size of linear

  13. Future heat waves and surface ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehl, Gerald A.; Tebaldi, Claudia; Tilmes, Simone; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Bates, Susan; Pendergrass, Angeline; Lombardozzi, Danica

    2018-06-01

    A global Earth system model is used to study the relationship between heat waves and surface ozone levels over land areas around the world that could experience either large decreases or little change in future ozone precursor emissions. The model is driven by emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone precursors from a medium-high emission scenario (Representative Concentration Pathway 6.0–RCP6.0) and is compared to an experiment with anthropogenic ozone precursor emissions fixed at 2005 levels. With ongoing increases in greenhouse gases and corresponding increases in average temperature in both experiments, heat waves are projected to become more intense over most global land areas (greater maximum temperatures during heat waves). However, surface ozone concentrations on future heat wave days decrease proportionately more than on non-heat wave days in areas where ozone precursors are prescribed to decrease in RCP6.0 (e.g. most of North America and Europe), while surface ozone concentrations in heat waves increase in areas where ozone precursors either increase or have little change (e.g. central Asia, the Mideast, northern Africa). In the stabilized ozone precursor experiment, surface ozone concentrations increase on future heat wave days compared to non-heat wave days in most regions except in areas where there is ozone suppression that contributes to decreases in ozone in future heat waves. This is likely associated with effects of changes in isoprene emissions at high temperatures (e.g. west coast and southeastern North America, eastern Europe).

  14. A Chemiluminescence Detector for Ozone Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, H.; And Others

    An ozone detector was built and evaluated for its applicability in smog chamber studies. The detection method is based on reaction of ozone with ethylene and measurement of resultant chemiluminescence. In the first phase of evaluation, the detector's response to ozone was studied as a function of several instrument parameters, and optimum…

  15. Ozone, Climate, and Global Atmospheric Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Joel S.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of global atmospheric problems relating to ozone depletion and global warming. Provides background information on the composition of the earth's atmosphere and origin of atmospheric ozone. Describes causes, effects, and evidence of ozone depletion and the greenhouse effect. A vignette provides a summary of a 1991 assessment of…

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF BROMOHYDRINS IN OZONATED WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because ozonation is becoming a popular alternative to chlorination for disinfection of drinking water and because little is known about the potential adverse effects of ozonation disinfection by-products (DBPs), we have sought to identify ozone DBPs, particularly brominated orga...

  17. Generation and delivery device for ozone gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Craig C. (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides an ozone generation and delivery system that lends itself to small scale applications and requires very low maintenance. The system preferably includes an anode reservoir and a cathode phase separator each having a hydrophobic membrane to allow phase separation of produced gases from water. The hydrogen gas, ozone gas and water containing ozone may be delivered under pressure.

  18. Tracking Continental Scale Background Ozone with CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone become more stringent, there has been growing attention on characterizing the contributions and the uncertainties in ozone from outside the US to the ozone concentrations within the US. Modeling techniques readily av...

  19. Tracing the fate of ozone in leaves

    Ozone is a greenhouse gas and considered the most damaging air pollutant to plants. Ozone enters leaves through the stomata, and once in the apoplast, it reacts to produce other reactive oxygen species (ROS) initiating a cellular response. The specific ROS initially formed after ozone exposure and t...

  20. Do trees smart from ozone

    SciT

    Not Available

    Douglas-firs near Eatonville, Washington - 70 miles south of Seattle - are getting doses of ozone pollution at levels regularly found in Los Angeles. Ozone levels of 220 parts per billion (ppb) can make your eyes smart and give your Aunt Edna a doozy of a headache. University of Washington researchers are now trying to find if Douglas-fir is adversely affected by 220 ppb of ozone. They are also studying whether individual branches can reveal how whole trees respond to pollutants. Studying entire trees is tough so researchers hope to take the pulse of a tree by examining its branches.more » At the university's experimental forest, researchers have placed 12-foot-tall plastic-covered corrals around six Douglas-firs, each nine or 10 years old and up to 15 feet tall. Three of the trees receive filtered air while three others are blasted with 220 ppb of ozone for eight hours each day. Four individual branches on each tree are encased in their own plastic chambers. Two are dosed with filtered air and two with ozone. To date, the UW research is the only study in the US combining branch chambers with whole tree measurements. Now in its second year, the experiment is expected to yield information about growth and foliage health by measuring respiration, chlorophyll, photosynthesis, and nutrient uptake. Loss of tree vigor could lead to increased problems with pathogens and insects. In the summer of '88, surprisingly high levels of ozone - up to 196 ppb - were detected in forests downwind from Seattle, worse than the urban areas themselves.« less

  1. Energetic electrons and their effects on upper stratospheric and mesospheric ozone in May 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesnell, W. Dean; Goldberg, Richard A.; Chenette, D. L.; Gaines, E. E.; Jackman, Charles H.

    The increased fluxes of precipitating energetic electrons (E>1 MeV) during highly relativistic electron events (HREs) produce ion concentrations in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere that exceed the background concentrations. Coupled ion-neutral chemistry models predict that this increased ionization should drive HOχ reactions and deplete mesospheric ozone by up to roughly 25%. As HREs become more intense and frequent during the declining phase of the solar cycle, it was also predicted that mesospheric ozone would show a solar cycle modulation as a result of these events. To calibrate the effect HREs have on mesospheric ozone, we have studied the May 1992 HRE with several instruments on the UARS. Electron fluxes measured with HEPS give the duration and spatial coverage of the HRE. Ozone data from MLS, CLAES, and HRDI were examined for the chemical signature of the HRE, ozone depletions within the magnetic L-shell limits of 3≤L<4. Using the multiple viewing angles of HRDI, we can compare mesospheric ozone at similar local solar times before, during, and after the HRE. This removes some of the ambiguity caused by progressive sampling of the diurnal cycle over a yaw cycle of the satellite. Although we analyzed one of the most intense HREs in the UARS database, we did not find HRE-induced changes in the ozone mixing ratio between altitudes of 55-75 km. Detecting a long-term trend in the ozone driven by precipitating electrons appears to require a substantial increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of the satellite measurements.

  2. Angles in the Sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Bradford

    2005-09-01

    Tycho Brahe lived and worked in the late 1500s before the telescope was invented. He made highly accurate observations of the positions of planets, stars, and comets using large angle-measuring devices of his own design. You can use his techniques to observe the sky as well. For example, the degree, a common unit of measurement in astronomy, can be measured by holding your fist at arm's length up to the sky. Open your fist and observe the distance across the sky covered by the width of your pinky fingernail. That is, roughly, a degree! After some practice, and knowing that one degree equals four minutes, you can measure elapsed time by measuring the angle of the distance that the Moon appears to have moved and multiplying that number by four. You can also figure distances and sizes of things. These are not precise measurements, but rough estimates that can give you a "close-enough" answer.

  3. Laser angle sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    A laser angle measurement system was designed and fabricated for NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the model. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. This report includes optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures.

  4. Why are angles misperceived?

    PubMed Central

    Nundy, Surajit; Lotto, Beau; Coppola, David; Shimpi, Amita; Purves, Dale

    2000-01-01

    Although it has long been apparent that observers tend to overestimate the magnitude of acute angles and underestimate obtuse ones, there is no consensus about why such distortions are seen. Geometrical modeling combined with psychophysical testing of human subjects indicates that these misperceptions are the result of an empirical strategy that resolves the inherent ambiguity of angular stimuli by generating percepts of the past significance of the stimulus rather than the geometry of its retinal projection. PMID:10805814

  5. Polarization-based index of refraction and reflection angle estimation for remote sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Thilak, Vimal; Voelz, David G; Creusere, Charles D

    2007-10-20

    A passive-polarization-based imaging system records the polarization state of light reflected by objects that are illuminated with an unpolarized and generally uncontrolled source. Such systems can be useful in many remote sensing applications including target detection, object segmentation, and material classification. We present a method to jointly estimate the complex index of refraction and the reflection angle (reflected zenith angle) of a target from multiple measurements collected by a passive polarimeter. An expression for the degree of polarization is derived from the microfacet polarimetric bidirectional reflectance model for the case of scattering in the plane of incidence. Using this expression, we develop a nonlinear least-squares estimation algorithm for extracting an apparent index of refraction and the reflection angle from a set of polarization measurements collected from multiple source positions. Computer simulation results show that the estimation accuracy generally improves with an increasing number of source position measurements. Laboratory results indicate that the proposed method is effective for recovering the reflection angle and that the estimated index of refraction provides a feature vector that is robust to the reflection angle.

  6. Polarization-based index of refraction and reflection angle estimation for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilak, Vimal; Voelz, David G.; Creusere, Charles D.

    2007-10-01

    A passive-polarization-based imaging system records the polarization state of light reflected by objects that are illuminated with an unpolarized and generally uncontrolled source. Such systems can be useful in many remote sensing applications including target detection, object segmentation, and material classification. We present a method to jointly estimate the complex index of refraction and the reflection angle (reflected zenith angle) of a target from multiple measurements collected by a passive polarimeter. An expression for the degree of polarization is derived from the microfacet polarimetric bidirectional reflectance model for the case of scattering in the plane of incidence. Using this expression, we develop a nonlinear least-squares estimation algorithm for extracting an apparent index of refraction and the reflection angle from a set of polarization measurements collected from multiple source positions. Computer simulation results show that the estimation accuracy generally improves with an increasing number of source position measurements. Laboratory results indicate that the proposed method is effective for recovering the reflection angle and that the estimated index of refraction provides a feature vector that is robust to the reflection angle.

  7. Mid- and long-term device migration after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparison of AneuRx and Zenith endografts.

    PubMed

    Tonnessen, Britt H; Sternbergh, W Charles; Money, Samuel R

    2005-09-01

    Freedom from migration is key to the durability of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). This study evaluates the mid- and long-term incidence of migration with two different endografts. Between September 1997 and June 2004, 235 patients were scheduled for EVAR with an AneuRx (Medtronic/AVE Inc.) or Zenith (Cook) endograft. Patients with fusiform, infrarenal aneurysms and a minimum 12 months of follow-up were analyzed, for a final cohort of 130 patients. Migration was assessed on axial computed tomography (CT) (2.5 to 3 mm cuts) as the distance from the most caudal renal artery to the first slice containing endograft (AneuRx) or to the top of the bare suprarenal stent (Zenith). Aortic neck diameters were measured at the most caudal renal artery. The initial postoperative CT scan was the baseline. Migration was defined by caudal movement of the endograft at two thresholds, > or =5 mm and > or =10 mm, or any migration with a related clinical event. Life-table analysis demonstrated AneuRx freedom from migration (> or =10 mm or clinical event) was 96.1%, 89.5%, 78.0%, and 72.0% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 years, respectively. Zenith freedom from migration was 100%, 97.6%, 97.6%, and 97.6% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 years, respectively (P = .01, log-rank test). The stricter 5-mm migration threshold found 67.4% of AneuRx and 90.1% of Zenith patients free from migration at 4 years of follow-up. Twelve out of 14 (85.7%) AneuRx patients (12/14) with migration (> or =10 mm or clinical event) underwent 14 related secondary procedures (13 endovascular, 1 open conversion). The single Zenith patient with migration (> or =10 mm) has not required adjuvant treatment. Mean follow-up was 39.0 +/- 2.3 months (AneuRx) and 30.8 +/- 1.9 months (Zenith, P = .01). Patients with and without migration did not differ in age, gender ratio, aneurysm diameter, and neck diameter. However, initial neck length was shorter in patients with migration (22.1 +/- 2.1 mm vs 31.2 +/- 1.2 mm, P = .02). A subset of patients

  8. Options to Accelerate Ozone Recovery: Ozone and Climate Benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, E. L.; Daniel, J. S.; Portmann, R. W.; Velders, G. J. M.; Jackman, C. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    The humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone primarily originated from the chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine). Representatives from governments have met periodically over the years to establish international regulations starting with the Montreal Protocol in 1987, which greatly limited the release of these ozone-depleting substances (DDSs). Two global models have been used to investigate the impact of hypothetical reductions in future emissions of ODSs on total column ozone. The investigations primarily focused on chlorine- and bromine-containing gases, but some computations also included nitrous oxide (N2O). The Montreal Protocol with ODS controls have been so successful that further regulations of chlorine- and bromine-containing gases could have only a fraction of the impact that regulations already in force have had. if all anthropogenic ODS emissions were halted beginning in 2011, ozone is calculated to be higher by about 1-2% during the period 2030-2100 compared to a case of no additional ODS restrictions. Chlorine- and bromine-containing gases and nitrous oxide are also greenhouse gases and lead to warming of the troposphere. Elimination of N 20 emissions would result in a reduction of radiative forcing of 0.23 W/sq m in 2100 than presently computed and destruction of the CFC bank would produce a reduction in radiative forcing of 0.005 W/sq m in 2100. This paper provides a quantitative way to consider future regulations of the CFC bank and N 20 emissions

  9. Ozone Control Strategies | Ground-level Ozone | New ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-09-05

    The Air Quality Planning Unit's primary goal is to protect your right to breathe clean air. Guided by the Clean Air Act, we work collaboratively with states, communities, and businesses to develop and implement strategies to reduce air pollution from a variety of sources that contribute to the ground-level ozone or smog problem.

  10. Detecting recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Chipperfield, Martyn P; Bekki, Slimane; Dhomse, Sandip; Harris, Neil R P; Hassler, Birgit; Hossaini, Ryan; Steinbrecht, Wolfgang; Thiéblemont, Rémi; Weber, Mark

    2017-09-13

    As a result of the 1987 Montreal Protocol and its amendments, the atmospheric loading of anthropogenic ozone-depleting substances is decreasing. Accordingly, the stratospheric ozone layer is expected to recover. However, short data records and atmospheric variability confound the search for early signs of recovery, and climate change is masking ozone recovery from ozone-depleting substances in some regions and will increasingly affect the extent of recovery. Here we discuss the nature and timescales of ozone recovery, and explore the extent to which it can be currently detected in different atmospheric regions.

  11. Detecting recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Bekki, Slimane; Dhomse, Sandip; Harris, Neil R. P.; Hassler, Birgit; Hossaini, Ryan; Steinbrecht, Wolfgang; Thiéblemont, Rémi; Weber, Mark

    2017-09-01

    As a result of the 1987 Montreal Protocol and its amendments, the atmospheric loading of anthropogenic ozone-depleting substances is decreasing. Accordingly, the stratospheric ozone layer is expected to recover. However, short data records and atmospheric variability confound the search for early signs of recovery, and climate change is masking ozone recovery from ozone-depleting substances in some regions and will increasingly affect the extent of recovery. Here we discuss the nature and timescales of ozone recovery, and explore the extent to which it can be currently detected in different atmospheric regions.

  12. SSTs, nitrogen fertiliser and stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.; Poppoff, I. G.; Capone, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A recently revised model of the stratosphere is used to show that a substantial enhancement in the ozone layer could accompany worldwide SST fleet operations and that water vapor may be an important factor in SST assessments. Revised rate coefficients for various ozone-destroying reactions are employed in calculations which indicate a slight increase in the total content of stratospheric ozone for modest-sized fleets of SSTs flying below about 25 km. It is found that water-vapor chemical reactions can negate in large part the NOx-induced ozone gains computed below 25 km and that increased use of nitrogen fertilizer might also enhance the ozone layer.

  13. "OZONE SOURCE APPORTIONMENT IN CMAQ' | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ozone source attribution has been used to support various policy purposes including interstate transport (Cross State Air Pollution Rule) by U.S. EPA and ozone nonattainment area designations by State agencies. Common scientific applications include tracking intercontinental transport of ozone and ozone precursors and delineating anthropogenic and non-anthropogenic contribution to ozone in North America. As in the public release due in September 2013, CMAQ’s Integrated Source Apportionment Method (ISAM) attributes PM EC/OC, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, ozone and its precursors NOx and VOC, to sectors/regions of users’ interest. Although the peroxide-to-nitric acid productions ratio has been the most common indicator to distinguish NOx-limited ozone production from VOC-limited one, other indicators are implemented in addition to allowing for an ensemble decision based on a total of 9 available indicator ratios. Moreover, an alternative approach of ozone attribution based on the idea of chemical sensitivity in a linearized system that has formed the basis of chemical treatment in forward DDM/backward adjoint tools has been implemented in CMAQ. This method does not require categorization into either ozone regime. In this study, ISAM will simulate the 2010 North America ozone using all of the above gas-phase attribution methods. The results are to be compared with zero-out difference out of those sectors in the host model runs. In addition, ozone contribution wil

  14. Tropospheric Enhancement of Ozone over the UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Naveed Ali; Majeed, Tariq; Iqbal, Mazhar; Kaminski, Jacek; Struzewska, Joanna; Durka, Pawel; Tarasick, David; Davies, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    We use the Global Environmental Multiscale - Air Quality (GEM-AQ) model to interpret the vertical profiles of ozone acquired with ozone sounding experiments at the meteorological site located at the Abu Dhabi airport. The purpose of this study is to gain insight into the chemical and dynamical structures in the atmosphere of this unique subtropical location (latitude 24.45N; longitude 54.22E). Ozone observations for years 2012 - 2013 reveal elevated ozone abundances in the range from 70 ppbv to 120 ppbv near 500-400 hPa during summer. The ozone abundances in other seasons are much lower than these values. The preliminary results indicate that summertime enhancement in ozone is associated with the Arabian anticyclones centered over the Zagros Mountains in Iran and the Asir and Hijaz Mountain ranges in Saudi Arabia, and is consistent with TES observations of deuterated water. The model also shows considerable seasonal variation in the tropospheric ozone which is transported from the stratosphere by dynamical processes. The domestic production of ozone in the middle troposphere is estimated and compared GEM-AQ model. It is estimated that about 40-50% of ozone in the UAE is transported from the neighbouring petrochemical industries in the Gulf region. We will present ozone sounding data and GEM-AQ results including a discussion on the high levels of the tropospheric ozone responsible for contaminating the air quality in the UAE. This work is supported by National Research Foundation, UAE.

  15. Trends in total column ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, F. S.; Angell, J.; Attmannspacher, W.; Bloomfield, P.; Bojkov, R. D.; Harris, N.; Komhyr, W.; Mcfarland, M.; Mcpeters, R.; Stolarski, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    It is important to ensure the best available data are used in any determination of possible trends in total ozone in order to have the most accurate estimates of any trends and the associated uncertainties. Accordingly, the existing total ozone records were examined in considerable detail. Once the best data set has been produced, the statistical analysis must examine the data for any effects that might indicate changes in the behavior of global total ozone. The changes at any individual measuring station could be local in nature, and herein, particular attention was paid to the seasonal and latitudinal variations of total ozone, because two dimensional photochemical models indicate that any changes in total ozone would be most pronounced at high latitudes during the winter months. The conclusions derived from this detailed examination of available total ozone can be split into two categories, one concerning the quality and the other the statistical analysis of the total ozone record.

  16. Ozone depletion following future volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eric Klobas, J.; Wilmouth, David M.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Anderson, James G.; Salawitch, Ross J.

    2017-07-01

    While explosive volcanic eruptions cause ozone loss in the current atmosphere due to an enhancement in the availability of reactive chlorine following the stratospheric injection of sulfur, future eruptions are expected to increase total column ozone as halogen loading approaches preindustrial levels. The timing of this shift in the impact of major volcanic eruptions on the thickness of the ozone layer is poorly known. Modeling four possible climate futures, we show that scenarios with the smallest increase in greenhouse gas concentrations lead to the greatest risk to ozone from heterogeneous chemical processing following future eruptions. We also show that the presence in the stratosphere of bromine from natural, very short-lived biogenic compounds is critically important for determining whether future eruptions will lead to ozone depletion. If volcanic eruptions inject hydrogen halides into the stratosphere, an effect not considered in current ozone assessments, potentially profound reductions in column ozone would result.

  17. Ozone Depletion, UVB and Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    The primary constituents of the Earth's atmosphere are molecular nitrogen and molecular oxygen. Ozone is created when ultraviolet light from the sun photodissociates molecular oxygen into two oxygen atoms. The oxygen atoms undergo many collisions but eventually combine with a molecular oxygen to form ozone (O3). The ozone molecules absorb ultraviolet solar radiation, primarily in the wavelength region between 200 and 300 nanometers, resulting in the dissociation of ozone back into atomic oxygen and molecular oxygen. The oxygen atom reattaches to an O2 molecule, reforming ozone which can then absorb another ultraviolet photon. This sequence goes back and forth between atomic oxygen and ozone, each time absorbing a uv photon, until the oxygen atom collides with and ozone molecule to reform two oxygen molecules.

  18. Natural hydrocarbons, urbanization, and urban ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, C. A.; Chameides, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    The combined effects of emission control and urbanization, with its concomitant intensification of the urban heat island, on urban ozone concentrations are studied. The effect of temperature on ozone is considered, and attention is given to the temperature effect on ozone photochemistry. Model calculations suggest that ozone concentration enhancements are caused by the effect of temperature on the atmospheric chemistry of peroxyacetyl nitrate, as well as the temperature dependence of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions. It is pointed out that, because of the sensitivity of urban ozone to local climatic conditions and the ability of trees to moderate summertime temperatures, the inadvertent removal of trees from urbanization can have an adverse effect on urban ozone concentration, while a temperature increase in the urban heat island caused by urbanization can essentially cancel out the ozone-reducing benefits obtained from a 50-percent reduction in anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions.

  19. Biomedical consequences of ozone depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coohill, Thomas P.

    1994-07-01

    It is widely agreed that a portion of the earth's protective stratospheric ozone layer is being depleted. The major effect of this ozone loss will be an increase in the amount of ultraviolet radiation (UV reaching the biosphere. This increase will be completely contained within the UVB (290nm - 320nm). It is imperative that assessments be made of the effects of this additional UVB on living organisms. This requires a detailed knowledge of the UVB photobiology of these life forms. One analytical technique to aid in the approximations is the construction of UV action spectra for such important biological end-points as human skin cancer, cataracts, immune suppression; plant photosynthesis and crop yields; and aquatic organism responses to UVB, especially the phytoplankton. Combining these action spectra with the known solar spectrum (and estimates for various ozone depletion scenarios) can give rise to a series of effectiveness spectra for these parameters. This manuscript gives a first approximation, rough estimate, for the effectiveness spectra for some of these bioresponses, and a series of crude temporary values for how a 10% ozone loss would affect the above end-points. These are not intended to masquerade as final answers, but rather, to serve as beginning attempts for a process which should be continually refined. It is hoped that these estimates will be of some limited use to agencies, such as government and industry, that have to plan now for changes in human activities that might alter future atmospheric chemistry in a beneficial manner.

  20. Ozone: Does It Affect Me?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Karla G.

    This curriculum unit on the ozone is intended for high school students and contains sections on environmental science and chemistry. It has been structured according to a learning cycle model and contains numerous activities, some of which are in a cooperative learning format. Skills emphasized include laboratory procedures, experimental design,…

  1. Ozone NAAQS Review: Policy Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is one of the six major air pollutants for which EPA has issued air quality criteria and established national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) based on those criteria. The Clean Air Act (CAA) requires EPA to periodically review and revise, as appropriate, existing air...

  2. Effects of a modular two-step ozone-water and annealing process on silicon carbide graphene

    SciT

    Webb, Matthew J., E-mail: matthew.webb@cantab.net; Lundstedt, Anna; Grennberg, Helena

    By combining ozone and water, the effect of exposing epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide to an aggressive wet-chemical process has been evaluated after high temperature annealing in ultra high vacuum. The decomposition of ozone in water produces a number of oxidizing species, however, despite long exposure times to the aqueous-ozone environment, no graphene oxide was observed after the two-step process. The systems were comprehensively characterized before and after processing using Raman spectroscopy, core level photoemission spectroscopy, and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy together with low energy electron diffraction, low energy electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. In spite of the chemicalmore » potential of the aqueous-ozone reaction environment, the graphene domains were largely unaffected raising the prospect of employing such simple chemical and annealing protocols to clean or prepare epitaxial graphene surfaces.« less

  3. Wide Angle Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief movie illustrates the passage of the Moon through the Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera field of view as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. From beginning to end of the sequence, 25 wide-angle images (with a spatial image scale of about 14 miles per pixel (about 23 kilometers)were taken over the course of 7 and 1/2 minutes through a series of narrow and broadband spectral filters and polarizers, ranging from the violet to the near-infrared regions of the spectrum, to calibrate the spectral response of the wide-angle camera. The exposure times range from 5 milliseconds to 1.5 seconds. Two of the exposures were smeared and have been discarded and replaced with nearby images to make a smooth movie sequence. All images were scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is approximately the same in every image. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS)at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  4. Effect of calcium-ozone treatment on chemical and biological properties of polyethylene terephthalate.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Ahmed Nafis; Tsuru, Kanji; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2015-05-01

    Ozone (O3 ) treatment of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) in distilled water was performed in the presence and absence of calcium (Ca(2+) ). PET was oxidized and thus carboxylic and hydroxyl functional groups were introduced on its surface after O3 treatment, regardless of the presence or absence of Ca(2+) . In the case of O3 treatment with Ca(2+) , PET surface was modified with Ca(2+) . Ca(2+) immobilization was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectrometric analysis. Hydrophilicity was investigated by measuring contact angles (CA). CA of PET decreased significantly after ozonation. Surface topography of PET before and after ozone treatment was observed by scanning electron microscopy, and showed no morphological changes. In vitro studies showed enhanced rat bone marrow cell responses on the O3 -treated PET surface. Ca(2+) -O3 oxidation at 37°C for 6 h is expected to be an effective method to fabricate PET with good biocompatibility. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Laser angle measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.; Wilbert, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a laser angle measurement system is described. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the mode. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. Optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures are included, and the results of a demonstration test are given.

  6. Glancing angle RF sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries. The sheath plays an important role in determining the efficiency of ICRF heating, the impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and the plasma-facing component damage. An important parameter in sheath theory is the angle θ between the equilibrium B field and the wall. Recent work with 1D and 2D sheath models has shown that the rapid variation of θ around a typical limiter can lead to enhanced sheath potentials and localized power deposition (hot spots) when the B field is near glancing incidence. The physics model used to obtain these results does not include some glancing-angle effects, e.g. possible modification of the angular dependence of the Child-Langmuir law and the role of the magnetic pre-sheath. Here, we report on calculations which explore these effects, with the goal of improving the fidelity of the rf sheath BC used in analytical and numerical calculations. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  7. Ozone in the Atmosphere: II. The Lower Atmosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Paul; Pickering, Pam

    1991-01-01

    Described are the problems caused by the increased concentration of ozone in the lower atmosphere. Photochemical pollution, mechanisms of ozone production, ozone levels in the troposphere, effects of ozone on human health and vegetation, ozone standards, and control measures are discussed. (KR)

  8. Use of the ARM Measurement of Spectral Zenith Radiance For Better Understanding Of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciT

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan

    2010-10-19

    Our proposal focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general 3D cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. We also focus on zenith radiance measurements, both active and passive. The proposal has three main parts. Part One exploits the "solar-background" mode of ARM lidars to allow them to retrieve cloud optical depth not just for thin clouds but for all clouds. This also enables the study of aerosol cloud interactions with a single instrument. Part Two exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by ARM's zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), especially during CLASIC, to developmore » better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also propose to take advantage of the SWS's 1 Hz sampling to study the "twilight zone" around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part Three involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM's 2NFOV instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the AMF-COPS/CLOWD deployment, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM's operational data processing.« less

  9. Angle performance on optima MDxt

    SciT

    David, Jonathan; Kamenitsa, Dennis

    2012-11-06

    Angle control on medium current implanters is important due to the high angle-sensitivity of typical medium current implants, such as halo implants. On the Optima MDxt, beam-to-wafer angles are controlled in both the horizontal and vertical directions. In the horizontal direction, the beam angle is measured through six narrow slits, and any angle adjustment is made by electrostatically steering the beam, while cross-wafer beam parallelism is adjusted by changing the focus of the electrostatic parallelizing lens (P-lens). In the vertical direction, the beam angle is measured through a high aspect ratio mask, and any angle adjustment is made by slightlymore » tilting the wafer platen prior to implant. A variety of tests were run to measure the accuracy and repeatability of Optima MDxt's angle control. SIMS profiles of a high energy, channeling sensitive condition show both the cross-wafer angle uniformity, along with the small-angle resolution of the system. Angle repeatability was quantified by running a channeling sensitive implant as a regular monitor over a seven month period and measuring the sheet resistance-to-angle sensitivity. Even though crystal cut error was not controlled for in this case, when attributing all Rs variation to angle changes, the overall angle repeatability was measured as 0.16 Degree-Sign (1{sigma}). A separate angle repeatability test involved running a series of V-curves tests over a four month period using low crystal cut wafers selected from the same boule. The results of this test showed the angle repeatability to be <0.1 Degree-Sign (1{sigma}).« less

  10. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Vasco; Marinov, Daniil; Guaitella, Olivier; Rousseau, Antoine

    2012-10-01

    Ozone kinetics is quite well established at atmospheric pressure, due to the importance of ozone in atmospheric chemistry and to the development of industrial ozone reactors. However, as the pressure is decreased and the dominant three-body reactions lose importance, the main mechanisms involved in the creation and destruction of ozone are still surrounded by important uncertainties. In this work we develop a self-consistent model for a pulsed discharge and its afterglow operating in a Pyrex reactor with inner radius 1 cm, at pressures in the range 1-5 Torr and discharge currents of 40-120 mA. The model couples the electron Boltzmann equation with a system of equations for the time evolution of the heavy particles. The calculations are compared with time-dependent measurements of ozone and atomic oxygen. Parametric studies are performed in order to clarify the role of vibrationally excited ozone in the overall kinetics and to establish the conditions where ozone production on the surface may become important. It is shown that vibrationally excited ozone does play a significant role, by increasing the time constants of ozone formation. Moreover, an upper limit for the ozone formation at the wall in these conditions is set at 10(-4).

  11. Quantitative characterization of the Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, T.; Sakoda, Y.; Matsubara, K.; Takao, T.; Akagi, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Shibata, S.; Naganuma, H.

    1994-01-01

    The long-term evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole is studied based on the TOMS data and the JMA data-set of stratospheric temperature in relation with the possible role of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's). The effective mass of depleted ozone in the ozone hole at its annual mature stage reached a historical maximum of 55 Mt in 1991, 4.3 times larger than in 1981. The ozone depletion rate during 30 days before the mature ozone hole does not show any appreciable long-term trend but the interannual fluctuations do, ranging from 0.169 to 0.689 Mt/day with the average of 0.419 Mt/day for the period of 1979 - 1991. The depleted ozone mass has the highest correlation with the region below 195 K on the 30 mb surface in June, whereas the ozone depletion rate correlates most strongly with that in August. The present result strongly suggests that the long-term evolution of the mature ozone hole is caused both by the interannual change of the latitudinal coverage of the early PSC's, which may control the latitude and date of initiation of ozone decrease, and by that of the spatial coverage of the mature PSC's which may control the ozone depletion rate in the Antarctic spring.

  12. Sterilization of Microorganisms by Ozone and Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnyj, V. V.; Klosovskij, A. V.; Panasko, T. A.; Shvets, O. M.; Semenova, O. T.; Taran, V. S.; Tereshin, V. I.

    2008-03-01

    The results of recent experimental methods of sterilization of microorganisms with the use of ozone and ultrasound are presented. The main aim was to optimize the process of sterilization in water solution taking into account the ozone concentration, the power of ultrasonic emitter and the temperature of water. In the present work, the ultrasonic cavitation with simultaneous ozone generation has been used. The high ozone concentration in water solution was achieved by two-barrier glow discharge generated at atmospheric pressure and a cooling thermo-electric module. Such a sterilizer consists of ozone generator in a shape of flat electrodes covered with dielectric material and a high-voltage pulsed power supply of 250 W. The sterilization camera was equipped with ultrasonic source operated at 100 W. The experiments on the inactivation of bacteria of the Bacillus Cereus type were carried out in the distilled water saturated by ozone. The ozone concentration in the aqueous solution was 10 mg/1, whereas the ozone concentration at the output of ozone generator was 30 mg/1. The complete inactivation of spores took 15 min. Selection of the temperature of water, the ozone concentrations and ultrasonic power allowed to determine the time necessary for destroying the row of microorganisms.

  13. CANOZE measurements of the Arctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, W. F. J.; Kerr, J. B.; Fast, H.

    1988-01-01

    In CANOZE 1 (Canadian Ozone Experiment), a series of 20 ozone profile measurements were made in April, 1986 from Alert at 82.5 N. CANOZE is the Canadian program for study of the Arctic winter ozone layer. In CANOZE 2, ozone profile measurements were made at Saskatoon, Edmonton, Churchill and Resolute during February and March, 1987 with ECC ozonesondes. Ground based measurements of column ozone, nitrogen dioxide and hydrochloric acid were conducted at Saskatoon. Two STRATOPROBE balloon flights were conducted on February 26 and March 19, 1987. Two aerosol flights were conducted by the University of Wyoming. The overall results of this study will be reported and compared with the NOZE findings. The results from CANOZE 3 in 1988, are also discussed. In 1988, as part of CANOZE 3, STRATOPROBE balloon flights were conducted from Saskatchewan on January 27 and February 13. A new lightweight infrared instrument was developed and test flown. A science flight was successfully conducted from Alert (82.5 N) on March 9, 1988 when the vortex was close to Alert; a good measurement of the profile of nitric acid was obtained. Overall, the Arctic spring ozone layer exhibits many of the features of the Antarctic ozone phenomenon, although there is obviously not a hole present every year. The Arctic ozone field in March, 1986 demonstrated many similarities to the Antarctic ozone hole. The TOMS imagery showed a crater structure in the ozone field similar to the Antarctic crater in October. Depleted layers of ozone were found in the profiles around 15 km, very similar to those reported from McMurdo. Enhanced levels of nitric acid were measured in air which had earlier been in the vortex. The TOMS imagery for March 1987 did not show an ozone crater, but will be examined for an ozone crater in February and March, 1988, the target date for the CANOZE 3 project.

  14. Multi-angle Spectra Evolution of Langmuir Turbulence Excited by RF Ionospheric Interactions at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Rayyan, N.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Spaleta, J.; Watanabe, N.; Golkowski, M.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    The high power HAARP HF transmitter is employed to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Diagnostics included the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, and HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). Dependence of diagnostic signals on HAARP HF parameters, including pulselength, duty-cycle, aspect angle, and frequency were recorded. Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments demonstrate control of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI) and isolation of ponderomotive effects. Among the effects observed and studied are: SLT spectra including cascade, collapse, and co-existence spectra and an outshifted plasma line under certain ionospheric conditions. High time resolution studies of the temporal evolution of the plasma line reveal the appearance of an overshoot effect on ponderomotive timescales. Bursty turbulence is observed in the collapse and cascade lines. For the first time, simultaneous multi-angle radar measurements of plasma line spectra are recorded demonstrating marked dependence on aspect angle with the strongest interaction region observed displaced southward of the HF zenith pointing angle. Numerous measurements of the outshifted plasma line are observed. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  15. Ozone Contamination in Aircraft Cabins: Appendix B: Overview papers. Ozone destruction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, R.

    1979-01-01

    Ozone filter test program and ozone instrumentation are presented. Tables on the flight tests, samll scale lab tests, and full scale lab tests were reviewed. Design verification, flammability, vibration, accelerated contamination, life cycle, and cabin air quality are described.

  16. Ozone, ozone production rates and NO observations on the outskirts of Quito, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla, M.

    2014-12-01

    Air quality measurements of ambient ozone, ozone production rates and nitrogen oxides, in addition to baseline meterology observations, are being taken at a recently built roof-top facility on the campus of Universidad San Francisco de Quito, in Ecuador. The measurement site is located in Cumbayá, a densely populated valley adjacent to the city of Quito. Time series of ozone and NO are being obtained with commercial air quality monitors. Rush-hour peaks of NO, above 100 ppb, have been observed, while daytime ozone levels are low. In addition, ozone production rates are being measured with the Ecuadorian version of the MOPS, Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor, originally built at Penn State University in 2010. NO and ozone observations and test results of measured ozone production rates will be presented.

  17. Narrow Angle movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief three-frame movie of the Moon was made from three Cassini narrow-angle images as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. The purpose of this particular set of images was to calibrate the spectral response of the narrow-angle camera and to test its 'on-chip summing mode' data compression technique in flight. From left to right, they show the Moon in the green, blue and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum in 40, 60 and 80 millisecond exposures, respectively. All three images have been scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is the same in each image. The spatial scale in the blue and ultraviolet images is 1.4 miles per pixel (2.3 kilometers). The original scale in the green image (which was captured in the usual manner and then reduced in size by 2x2 pixel summing within the camera system) was 2.8 miles per pixel (4.6 kilometers). It has been enlarged for display to the same scale as the other two. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  18. Equilibrium contact angle or the most-stable contact angle?

    PubMed

    Montes Ruiz-Cabello, F J; Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M A

    2014-04-01

    It is well-established that the equilibrium contact angle in a thermodynamic framework is an "unattainable" contact angle. Instead, the most-stable contact angle obtained from mechanical stimuli of the system is indeed experimentally accessible. Monitoring the susceptibility of a sessile drop to a mechanical stimulus enables to identify the most stable drop configuration within the practical range of contact angle hysteresis. Two different stimuli may be used with sessile drops: mechanical vibration and tilting. The most stable drop against vibration should reveal the changeless contact angle but against the gravity force, it should reveal the highest resistance to slide down. After the corresponding mechanical stimulus, once the excited drop configuration is examined, the focus will be on the contact angle of the initial drop configuration. This methodology needs to map significantly the static drop configurations with different stable contact angles. The most-stable contact angle, together with the advancing and receding contact angles, completes the description of physically realizable configurations of a solid-liquid system. Since the most-stable contact angle is energetically significant, it may be used in the Wenzel, Cassie or Cassie-Baxter equations accordingly or for the surface energy evaluation. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ozone damage detection in cantaloupe plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Escobar, D. E.; Rodriguez, R. R.; Thomas, C. E.; Bowen, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Ozone causes up to 90 percent of air pollution injury to vegetation in the United States; excess ozone affects plant growth and development and can cause undetected decrease in yields. Laboratory and field reflectance measurements showed that ozone-damaged cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L.) leaves had lower water contents and higher reflectance than did nondamaged leaves. Cantaloupe plants which were lightly, severely, and very severely ozone-damaged were distinguishable from nondamaged plants by reflectance measurements in the 1.35- to 2.5 micron near-infrared water absorption waveband. Ozone-damaged leaf areas were detected photographically 16 h before the damage was visible. Sensors are available for use with aircraft and spacecraft that possibly could be used routinely to detect ozone-damaged crops.

  20. Bioassaying for ozone with pollen systems

    SciT

    Feder, W.A.

    Sensitivity to ozone of pollen germinating in vitro is closely correlated with ozone sensitivity of the pollen parent. Ozone-sensitive and tolerant pollen populations have been identified in tobacco, petunia, and tomato cultivars. The rate of tube elongation can be reversibly slowed or stopped by exposure to low concentrations of ozone. The performance of selected pollen populations can then be used to bioassay ozone in ambient air by introducing the air sample into a growth chamber where ozone-sensitive pollen in growing. Year-round pollen producion can be achieved in the greenhouse. Harvested pollen can be tested, packaged, and transported to user facilitiesmore » without loss of vigor. Pollen populations are inexpensive to produce, respond reliably, and are simple to use as a bioassay for air quality.« less

  1. Observed and theoretical variations of atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, J.

    1976-01-01

    Results are summarized from three areas of ozone research: (1) continued analysis of the global distribution of total ozone to extend the global ozone atlas to summarize 15 years (1957-72) of ground based observations; (2) analysis of balloon borne ozonesonde observations for Arosa, Switzerland, and Hohenpeissenberg, Germany (GFR); (3) contined processing of the (Orbiting Geophysical Observatory-4) satellite data to complete the analysis of the stratospheric ozone distribution from the available OGO-4 data. Results of the analysis of the total ozone observations indicated that the long term ozone variation have marked regional patterns and tend to alternate with season and hemisphere. It is becoming increasingly clear that these long period changes are associated with large scale variations in the general upper atmosphere circulation patterns.

  2. Ambient ozone and pulmonary innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hegelan, Mashael; Tighe, Robert M.; Castillo, Christian; Hollingsworth, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient ozone is a criteria air pollutant that impacts both human morbidity and mortality. The effect of ozone inhalation includes both toxicity to lung tissue and alteration of the host immunologic response. The innate immune system facilitates immediate recognition of both foreign pathogens and tissue damage. Emerging evidence supports that ozone can modify the host innate immune response and that this response to inhaled ozone is dependent on genes of innate immunity. Improved understanding of the complex interaction between environmental ozone and host innate immunity will provide fundamental insight into the pathogenesis of inflammatory airways disease. We review the current evidence supporting that environmental ozone inhalation: (1) modifies cell types required for intact innate immunity, (2) is partially dependent on genes of innate immunity, (3) primes pulmonary innate immune responses to LPS, and (4) contributes to innate-adaptive immune system cross-talk. PMID:21132467

  3. The signs of Antarctic ozone hole recovery.

    PubMed

    Kuttippurath, Jayanarayanan; Nair, Prijitha J

    2017-04-03

    Absorption of solar radiation by stratospheric ozone affects atmospheric dynamics and chemistry, and sustains life on Earth by preventing harmful radiation from reaching the surface. Significant ozone losses due to increases in the abundances of ozone depleting substances (ODSs) were first observed in Antarctica in the 1980s. Losses deepened in following years but became nearly flat by around 2000, reflecting changes in global ODS emissions. Here we show robust evidence that Antarctic ozone has started to recover in both spring and summer, with a recovery signal identified in springtime ozone profile and total column measurements at 99% confidence for the first time. Continuing recovery is expected to impact the future climate of that region. Our results demonstrate that the Montreal Protocol has indeed begun to save the Antarctic ozone layer.

  4. Discharge cell for ozone generator

    DOEpatents

    Nakatsuka, Suguru

    2000-01-01

    A discharge cell for use in an ozone generator is provided which can suppress a time-related reduction in ozone concentration without adding a catalytic gas such as nitrogen gas to oxygen gas as a raw material gas. The discharge cell includes a pair of electrodes disposed in an opposed spaced relation with a discharge space therebetween, and a dielectric layer of a three-layer structure consisting of three ceramic dielectric layers successively stacked on at least one of the electrodes, wherein a first dielectric layer of the dielectric layer contacting the one electrode contains no titanium dioxide, wherein a second dielectric layer of the dielectric layer exposed to the discharge space contains titanium dioxide in a metal element ratio of not lower than 10 wt %.

  5. Ozone in the Atmosphere: I. The Upper Atmosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Paul S.

    1990-01-01

    Research concerning the role of stratospheric ozone and the effect of chlorofluorocarbons on stratospheric ozone are discussed. The consequences of global ozone depletion are projected. The Montreal Protocol is reviewed. (CW)

  6. Report of the International Ozone Trends Panel 1988, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Chapters on the following topics are presented: spacecraft instrument calibration and stability; information content of ozone retrieval algorithms; trends in total column ozone measurements; and trends in ozone profile measurement.

  7. Tropospheric Ozone and Biomass Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, S.; Ziemke, J. R.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2001-05-01

    This paper studies the significance of pyrogenic (e.g., biomass burning) emissions in the production of tropospheric ozone in the tropics associated with the forest and savanna fires in the African, South American, and Indonesian regions. Using aerosol index (AI) and tropospheric column ozone (TCO) time series from 1979 to 2000 derived from the Nimbus-7 and Earth Probe TOMS measurements, our study shows significant differences in the seasonal and spatial characteristics of pyrogenic emissions north and south of the equator in the African region and Brazil in South America. In general, they are not related to the seasonal and spatial characteristics of tropospheric ozone in these regions. In the Indonesian region, the most significant increase in TCO occurred during September and October 1997, following large-scale forest and savanna fires associated with the El Niño-induced dry condition. However, the increase in TCO extended over most of the western Pacific well outside the burning region and was accompanied by a decrease in the eastern Pacific resembling a west-to-east dipole about the dateline. The net increase in TCO integrated over the tropical region between 15N and 15S was about 6-8 Tg (terragram) over the mean climatological value of about 72 Tg. This increase is within the range of interannual variability of TCO in the tropical region and does not necessarily suggest a photochemical source related to biomass burning. The interannual variability in TCO appears to be out of phase with the interannual variability of stratospheric column ozone (SCO). These variabilities seem to be manifestations of solar cycle and quasi-biennial oscillations.

  8. Tropospheric Ozone and Biomass Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Sushil; Ziemke, J. R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies the significance of pyrogenic (e.g., biomass burning) emissions in the production of tropospheric ozone in the tropics associated with the forest and savanna fires in the African, South American, and Indonesian regions. Using aerosol index (Al) and tropospheric column ozone (TCO) time series from 1979 to 2000 derived from the Nimbus-7 and Earth Probe TOMS measurements, our study shows significant differences in the seasonal and spatial characteristics of pyrogenic emissions north and south of the equator in the African region and Brazil in South America. In general, they are not related to the seasonal and spatial characteristics of tropospheric ozone in these regions. In the Indonesian region, the most significant increase in TCO occurred during September and October 1997, following large-scale forest and savanna fires associated with the El Nino-induced dry season. However, the increase in TCO extended over most of the western Pacific well outside the burning region and was accompanied by a decrease in the eastern Pacific resembling a west-to-east dipole about the date-line. The net increase in TCO integrated over the tropical region between 15 deg N and 15 deg S was about 6-8 Tg (1 Tg = 10(exp 12) gm) over the mean climatological value of about 72 Tg. This increase is well within the range of interannual variability of TCO in the tropical region and does not necessarily suggest a photochemical source related to biomass burning. The interannual variability in TCO appears to be out of phase with the interannual variability of stratospheric column ozone (SCO). These variabilities seem to be manifestations of solar cycle and quasibiennial oscillations.

  9. On vertical profile of ozone at Syowa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubachi, Shigeru

    1994-01-01

    The difference in the vertical ozone profile at Syowa between 1966-1981 and 1982-1988 is shown. The month-height cross section of the slope of the linear regressions between ozone partial pressure and 100-mb temperature is also shown. The vertically integrated values of the slopes are in close agreement with the slopes calculated by linear regression of Dobson total ozone on 100-mb temperature in the period of 1982-1988.

  10. Multi-azimuthal-angle instability for different supernova neutrino fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sovan; Mirizzi, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    It has been recently discovered that removing the axial symmetry in the "multiangle effects" associated with the neutrino-neutrino interactions for supernova (SN) neutrinos, a new multi-azimuthal-angle (MAA) instability will trigger flavor conversions in addition to the ones caused by the bimodal and multi-zenith-angle (MZA) instabilities. We investigate the dependence of the MAA instability on the original SN neutrino fluxes, performing a stability analysis of the linearized neutrino equations of motion. We compare these results with the numerical evolution of the SN neutrino nonlinear equations, looking at a local solution along a specific line of sight, under the assumption that the transverse variations of the global solution are small. We also assume that self-induced conversions are not suppressed by large matter effects. We show that the pattern of the spectral crossings (energies where Fνe=Fνx and Fν¯e=Fν¯x) is crucial in determining the impact of MAA effects on the flavor evolution. For neutrino spectra with a strong excess of νe over ν¯e, presenting only a single crossing, MAA instabilities will trigger new flavor conversions in normal mass hierarchy. In our simplified flavor evolution scheme, these will lead to spectral swaps and splits analogous to what is produced in inverted hierarchy by the bimodal instability. Conversely, in the presence of spectra with a moderate flavor hierarchy, having multiple crossing energies, MZA effects will produce a sizable delay in the onset of the flavor conversions, inhibiting the growth of the MAA instability. In this case, the splitting features for the oscillated spectra in both the mass hierarchies are the ones induced by the only bimodal and MZA effects.

  11. Ozone climatology series. Volume 1: Atlas of total ozone, April 1970 - December 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.; Fleig, A. J.; Miller, A. J.; Rogers, T. G.; Nagatani, R. M.; Bowman, H. D., II; Kaveeshwar, V. G.; Klenk, K. F.; Bhartia, P. K.; Lee, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Contours and gridded values are given for seven years of monthly mean total ozone data derived from observations with the Backscattered Ultraviolet instrument on Nimbus-4 for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The instrument, algorithm, uncertainties in derived ozone and systematic changes in the bias with respect to the international groundbased ozone network of Dobson instruments, are discussed.

  12. Efficient ozone generator for ozone layer enrichment from high altitude balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filiouguine, Igor V.; Kostiouchenko, Sergey V.; Koudriavtsev, Nikolay N.; Starikovskaya, Svetlana M.

    1994-01-01

    The possibilities of ozone production at low gas pressures by nanosecond high voltage discharge has been investigated. The measurements of ozone synthesis in N2-O2 mixtures have been performed. The explanation of experimental results is suggested. The possible ways of ozone yield growth are analyzed.

  13. Generation and delivery device for ozone gas and ozone dissolved in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Craig C. (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides an ozone generation and delivery system that lends itself to small scale applications and requires very low maintenance. The system preferably includes an anode reservoir and a cathode phase separator each having a hydrophobic membrane to allow phase separation of produced gases from water. The hydrogen gas, ozone gas and water containing ozone may be delivered under pressure.

  14. Seasonal Changes in Tropospheric Ozone Concentrations over South Korea and Its Link to Ozone Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H. C.; Moon, B. K.; Wie, J.

    2017-12-01

    Concentration of tropospheric ozone over South Korea has steadily been on the rise in the last decades, mainly due to rapid industrializing and urbanizing in the Eastern Asia. To identify the characteristics of tropospheric ozone in South Korea, we fitted a sine function to the surface ozone concentration data from 2005 to 2014. Based on fitted sine curves, we analyzed the shifts in the dates on which ozone concentration reached its peak in the calendar year. Ozone monitoring sites can be classified into type types: where the highest annual ozone concentration kept occurring sooner (Esites) and those that kept occurring later (Lsites). The seasonal analysis shows that the surface ozone had increased more rapidly in Esites than in Lsites in the past decade during springtime and vice-versa during summertime. We tried to find the reason for the different seasonal trends with the relationship between ozone and ozone precursors. As a result, it was found that the changes in the ground-level ozone concentration in the spring and summer times are considerably influenced by changes in nitrogen dioxide concentration, and this is closely linked to the destruction (production) process of ozone by nitrogen dioxide in spring (summer). The link between tropospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide discussed in this study will have to be thoroughly examined through climate-chemistry modeling in the future. Acknowledgements This research was supported by the Korea Ministry of Environment (MOE) as "Climate Change Correspondence Program."

  15. [Phospholipids under combined ozone-oxygen administration].

    PubMed

    Müller-Tyl, E; Hernuss, P; Salzer, H; Reisinger, L; Washüttl, J; Wurst, F

    1975-01-01

    The parenterally application of oxygen-ozone gas mixture gives good resultats in the treatment of various deseases. Ozone seems to influence the metabolic process of fat, so it was of interest to analyse this influence especially to phospholipids. 40 women with gynaecological cancer got 10 ml oxygen-ozone gas mixture with a content of 450 gamma ozone into the cubital vene. Venous blood was removed before and 10 minutes after application and the level of lecithin, lysolecithin, cephalin and spingomyelin was determined by the method of Randerath. A decrease of all four substances was obvious, although all values remained in normal range.

  16. Extracellular polymers of ozonized waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Liu, J C; Lee, C H; Lai, J Y; Wang, K C; Hsu, Y C; Chang, B V

    2001-01-01

    Effect of ozonation on characteristics of waste activated sludge was investigated in the current study. Concentrations of cell-bound extracellular polymers (washed ECPs) did not change much upon ozonation, whereas the sum of cell-bound and soluble extracellular polymers (unwashed ECPs) increased with increasing ozone dose. Washed ECPs in original sludge as divided by molecular weight distribution was 39% < 1,000 Da (low MW), 30% from 1,000 to 10,000 Da (medium MW), and 31% > 10,000 Da (high MW). It was observed that the low-MW fraction decreased, and the high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The unwashed ECPs were characterized as 44% in low MW, 30% in medium MW, and 26% in high MW. Both low-MW and medium-MW fractions of unwashed ECPs decreased while high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The dewaterability of ozonized sludge, assessed by capillary suction time (CST) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF), deteriorated with ozone dose. The optimal dose of cationic polyelectrolyte increased with increasing ozone dose. The production rate and the accumulated amount of methane gas of ozonized sludge were also higher.

  17. Tropospheric ozone as a fungal elicitor.

    PubMed

    Zuccarini, Paolo

    2009-03-01

    Tropospheric ozone has been proven to trigger biochemical plant responses that are similar to the ones induced by an attack of fungal pathogens,i.e. it resembles fungal elicitors.This suggests that ozone can represent a valid tool for the study of stress responses and induction of resistance to pathogens. This review provides an overview of the implications of such a phenomenon for basic and applied research. After an introduction about the environmental implications of tropospheric ozone and plant responses to biotic stresses, the biochemistry of ozone stress is analysed, pointing out its similarities with plant responses to pathogens and its possible applications.

  18. Treatment of soft drink process wastewater by ozonation, ozonation-H₂O₂ and ozonation-coagulation processes.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, M A; Roa-Morales, G; Barrera-Díaz, C; Balderas-Hernández, P

    2012-01-01

    In this research, we studied the treatment of wastewater from the soft drink process using oxidation with ozone. A scheme composed of sequential ozonation-peroxide, ozonation-coagulation and coagulation-ozonation treatments to reduce the organic matter from the soft drink process was also used. The samples were taken from the conventional activated sludge treatment of the soft drink process, and the experiments using chemical oxidation with ozone were performed in a laboratory using a reactor through a porous plate glass diffuser with air as a feedstock for the generation of ozone. Once the sample was ozonated, the treatments were evaluated by considering the contact time, leading to greater efficiency in removing colour, turbidity and chemical oxygen demand (COD). The effect of ozonation and coagulant coupled with treatment efficiency was assessed under optimal conditions, and substantial colour and turbidity removal were found (90.52% and 93.33%, respectively). This was accompanied by a 16.78% reduction in COD (initial COD was 3410 mg/L). The absorbance spectra of the oxidised products were compared using UV-VIS spectroscopy to indicate the level of oxidation of the wastewater. We also determined the kinetics of decolouration and the removal of turbidity with the best treatment. The same treatment was applied to the sample taken from the final effluent of the activated sludge system, and a COD removal efficiency of 100% during the first minute of the reaction with ozone was achieved. As a general conclusion, we believe that the coagulant polyaluminum chloride - ozone (PAC- ozone) treatment of wastewater from the manufacturing of soft drinks is the most efficient for removing turbidity and colour and represents an advantageous option to remove these contaminants because their removal was performed in minutes compared to the duration of traditional physical, chemical and biological processes that require hours or days.

  19. Selected Measurements of Total Arctic Column Ozone Amounts from Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument, 2004-2005 Arctic Winter

    2005-06-02

    Images from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument onboard NASA Aura spacecraft shows the average total column ozone during the months of January and March, and the total column ozone on the single day of 11 March, 2005.

  20. Exponential approximation for daily average solar heating or photolysis. [of stratospheric ozone layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogley, A. C.; Borucki, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    When incorporating formulations of instantaneous solar heating or photolytic rates as functions of altitude and sun angle into long range forecasting models, it may be desirable to replace the time integrals by daily average rates that are simple functions of latitude and season. This replacement is accomplished by approximating the integral over the solar day by a pure exponential. This gives a daily average rate as a multiplication factor times the instantaneous rate evaluated at an appropriate sun angle. The accuracy of the exponential approximation is investigated by a sample calculation using an instantaneous ozone heating formulation available in the literature.

  1. Reconciliation of Halogen-Induced Ozone Loss with the Total-Column Ozone Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, T. G.; Plummer, D. A.; Scinocca, J. F.; Hegglin, M. I.; Fioletov, V. E.; Reader, M. C.; Remsberg, E.; von Clarmann, T.; Wang, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    The observed depletion of the ozone layer from the 1980s onwards is attributed to halogen source gases emitted by human activities. However, the precision of this attribution is complicated by year-to-year variations in meteorology, that is, dynamical variability, and by changes in tropospheric ozone concentrations. As such, key aspects of the total-column ozone record, which combines changes in both tropospheric and stratospheric ozone, remain unexplained, such as the apparent absence of a decline in total-column ozone levels before 1980, and of any long-term decline in total-column ozone levels in the tropics. Here we use a chemistry-climate model to estimate changes in halogen-induced ozone loss between 1960 and 2010; the model is constrained by observed meteorology to remove the eects of dynamical variability, and driven by emissions of tropospheric ozone precursors to separate out changes in tropospheric ozone. We show that halogen-induced ozone loss closely followed stratospheric halogen loading over the studied period. Pronounced enhancements in ozone loss were apparent in both hemispheres following the volcanic eruptions of El Chichon and, in particular, Mount Pinatubo, which significantly enhanced stratospheric aerosol loads. We further show that approximately 40% of the long-term non-volcanic ozone loss occurred before 1980, and that long-term ozone loss also occurred in the tropical stratosphere. Finally, we show that halogeninduced ozone loss has declined by over 10% since stratospheric halogen loading peaked in the late 1990s, indicating that the recovery of the ozone layer is well underway.

  2. Effect of UV-ozone treatment on poly(dimethylsiloxane) membranes: surface characterization and gas separation performance.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ywu-Jang; Qui, Hsuan-zhi; Liao, Kuo-Sung; Lue, Shingjiang Jessie; Hu, Chien-Chieh; Lee, Kueir-Rarn; Lai, Juin-Yih

    2010-03-16

    A thin SiO(x) selective surface layer was formed on a series of cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membranes by exposure to ultraviolet light at room temperature in the presence of ozone. The conversion of the cross-linked polysiloxane to SiO(x) was monitored by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis, contact angle analysis, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The conversion of the cross-linked polysiloxane to SiO(x) increased with UV-ozone exposure time and cross-linking agent content, and the surface possesses highest conversion. The formation of a SiO(x) layer increased surface roughness, but it decreased water contact angle. Gas permeation measurements on the UV-ozone exposure PDMS membranes documented interesting gas separation properties: the O(2) permeability of the cross-linked PDMS membrane before UV-ozone exposure was 777 barrer, and the O(2)/N(2) selectivity was 1.9; after UV-ozone exposure, the permeability decreased to 127 barrer while the selectivity increased to 5.4. The free volume depth profile of the SiO(x) layer was investigated by novel slow positron beam. The results show that free volume size increased with the depth, yet the degree of siloxane conversion to SiO(x) does not affect the amount of free volume.

  3. Largest-ever Ozone Hole over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA instrument has detected an Antarctic ozone 'hole' (what scientists call an 'ozone depletion area') that is three times larger than the entire land mass of the United States-the largest such area ever observed. The 'hole' expanded to a record size of approximately 11 million square miles (28.3 million square kilometers) on Sept. 3, 2000. The previous record was approximately 10.5 million square miles (27.2 million square km) on Sept. 19, 1998. The ozone hole's size currently has stabilized, but the low levels in its interior continue to fall. The lowest readings in the ozone hole are typically observed in late September or early October each year. 'These observations reinforce concerns about the frailty of Earth's ozone layer. Although production of ozone-destroying gases has been curtailed under international agreements, concentrations of the gases in the stratosphere are only now reaching their peak. Due to their long persistence in the atmosphere, it will be many decades before the ozone hole is no longer an annual occurrence,' said Dr. Michael J. Kurylo, manager of the Upper Atmosphere Research Program, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. Ozone molecules, made up of three atoms of oxygen, comprise a thin layer of the atmosphere that absorbs harmful ultraviolet radiation from the Sun. Most atmospheric ozone is found between approximately six miles (9.5 km) and 18 miles (29 km) above the Earth's surface. Scientists continuing to investigate this enormous hole are somewhat surprised by its size. The reasons behind the dimensions involve both early-spring conditions, and an extremely intense Antarctic vortex. The Antarctic vortex is an upper-altitude stratospheric air current that sweeps around the Antarctic continent, confining the Antarctic ozone hole. 'Variations in the size of the ozone hole and of ozone depletion accompanying it from one year to the next are not unexpected,' said Dr. Jack Kaye, Office of Earth Sciences Research Director, NASA Headquarters

  4. Snapshot of the Antarctic Ozone Hole 2010

    2017-12-08

    Image acquired September 12, 2010 The yearly depletion of stratospheric ozone over Antarctica – more commonly referred to as the “ozone hole” – started in early August 2010 and is now expanding toward its annual maximum. The hole in the ozone layer typically reaches its maximum area in late September or early October, though atmospheric scientists must wait a few weeks after the maximum to pinpoint when the trend of ozone depletion has slowed down and reversed. The hole isn’t literal; no part of the stratosphere — the second layer of the atmosphere, between 8 and 50 km (5 and 31 miles) — is empty of ozone. Scientists use "hole" as a metaphor for the area in which ozone concentrations drop below the historical threshold of 220 Dobson Units. Historical levels of ozone were much higher than 220 Dobson Units, according to NASA atmospheric scientist Paul Newman, so this value shows a very large ozone loss. Earth's ozone layer protects life by absorbing ultraviolet light, which damages DNA in plants and animals (including humans) and leads to skin cancer. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA’s Aura satellite acquired data for this map of ozone concentrations over Antarctica on September 12, 2010. OMI is a spectrometer that measures the amount of sunlight scattered by Earth’s atmosphere and surface, allowing scientists to assess how much ozone is present at various altitudes — particularly the stratosphere — and near the ground. So far in 2010, the size and depth of the ozone hole has been slightly below the average for 1979 to 2009, likely because of warmer temperatures in the stratosphere over the far southern hemisphere. However, even slight changes in the meteorology of the region this month could affect the rate of depletion of ozone and how large an area the ozone hole might span. You can follow the progress of the ozone hole by visiting NASA’s Ozone Hole Watch page. September 16 is the International Day for the Preservation of the

  5. A comparative study of ozonation, iron coated zeolite catalyzed ozonation and granular activated carbon catalyzed ozonation of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Gümüş, Dilek; Akbal, Feryal

    2017-05-01

    This study compares ozonation (O 3 ), iron coated zeolite catalyzed ozonation (ICZ-O 3 ) and granular activated carbon catalyzed ozonation (GAC-O 3 ) for removal of humic acid from an aqueous solution. The results were evaluated by the removal of DOC that specifies organic matter, UV 254 absorbance, SUVA (Specific Ultraviolet Absorbance at 254 nm) and absorbance at 436 nm. When ozonation was used alone, DOC removal was 21.4% at an ozone concentration of 10 mg/L, pH 6.50 and oxidation time of 60 min. The results showed that the use of ICZ or GAC as a catalyst increased the decomposition of humic acid compared to ozonation alone. DOC removal efficiencies were 62% and 48.1% at pH 6.5, at a catalyst loading of 0.75 g/L, and oxidation time of 60 min for ICZ and GAC, respectively. The oxidation experiments were also carried out using <100 kDa and <50 kDa molecular size fractions of humic acid in the presence of ICZ or GAC. Catalytic ozonation also yielded better DOC and UV 254 reduction in both <50 kDa and <100 kDa fractions of HA compared to ozonation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Angle Performance on Optima XE

    SciT

    David, Jonathan; Satoh, Shu

    2011-01-07

    Angle control on high energy implanters is important due to shrinking device dimensions, and sensitivity to channeling at high beam energies. On Optima XE, beam-to-wafer angles are controlled in both the horizontal and vertical directions. In the horizontal direction, the beam angle is measured through a series of narrow slits, and any angle adjustment is made by steering the beam with the corrector magnet. In the vertical direction, the beam angle is measured through a high aspect ratio mask, and any angle adjustment is made by slightly tilting the wafer platen during implant.Using a sensitive channeling condition, we were ablemore » to quantify the angle repeatability of Optima XE. By quantifying the sheet resistance sensitivity to both horizontal and vertical angle variation, the total angle variation was calculated as 0.04 deg. (1{sigma}). Implants were run over a five week period, with all of the wafers selected from a single boule, in order to control for any crystal cut variation.« less

  7. Compact Ozone Lidar for Atmospheric Ozone and Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcia, Joel; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2007-01-01

    A small compact ozone differential absorption lidar capable of being deployed on a small aircraft or unpiloted atmospheric vehicle (UAV) has been tested. The Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser is pumped by a quadrupled Nd:YLF laser. Test results on the laser transmitter demonstrated 1.4 W in the IR and 240 mW in the green at 1000 Hz. The receiver consists of three photon-counting channels, which are a far field PMT, a near field UV PMT, and a green PMT. Each channel was tested for their saturation characteristics.

  8. Tropospheric Ozone Near-Nadir-Viewing IR Spectral Sensitivity and Ozone Measurements from NAST-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Larar, Allen M.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared ozone spectra from near nadir observations have provided atmospheric ozone information from the sensor to the Earth's surface. Simulations of the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I) from the NASA ER-2 aircraft (approximately 20 km altitude) with a spectral resolution of 0.25/cm were used for sensitivity analysis. The spectral sensitivity of ozone retrievals to uncertainties in atmospheric temperature and water vapor is assessed in order to understand the relationship between the IR emissions and the atmospheric state. In addition, ozone spectral radiance sensitivity to its ozone layer densities and radiance weighting functions reveals the limit of the ozone profile retrieval accuracy from NAST-I measurements. Statistical retrievals of ozone with temperature and moisture retrievals from NAST-I spectra have been investigated and the preliminary results from NAST-I field campaigns are presented.

  9. Development of Compact Ozonizer with High Ozone Output by Pulsed Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Fumiaki; Ueda, Satoru; Kouno, Kanako; Sakugawa, Takashi; Akiyama, Hidenori; Kinoshita, Youhei

    Conventional ozonizer with a high ozone output using silent or surface discharges needs a cooling system and a dielectric barrier, and therefore becomes a large machine. A compact ozonizer without the cooling system and the dielectric barrier has been developed by using a pulsed power generated discharge. The wire to plane electrodes made of metal have been used. However, the ozone output was low. Here, a compact and high repetition rate pulsed power generator is used as an electric source of a compact ozonizer. The ozone output of 6.1 g/h and the ozone yield of 86 g/kWh are achieved at 500 pulses per second, input average power of 280 W and an air flow rate of 20 L/min.

  10. The Critical Angle Can Override the Brewster Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehle, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    As a culminating activity in their study of optics, my students investigate polarized light and the Brewster angle. In this exercise they encounter a situation in which it is impossible to measure the Brewster angle for light reflecting from a particular surface. This paper describes the activity and explains the students' observations.

  11. The changing oxidizing environment in London - trends in ozone precursors and their contribution to ozone production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schneidemesser, E.; Vieno, M.; Monks, P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Ground-level ozone is recognized to be a threat to human health (WHO, 2003), have a deleterious impact on vegetation (Fowler et al., 2009), is also an important greenhouse gas (IPCC, 2007) and key to the oxidative ability of the atmosphere (Monks et al., 2009). Owing to its harmful effect on health, much policy and mitigation effort has been put into reducing its precursors - the nitrogen oxides (NOx) and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs). The non-linear chemistry of tropospheric ozone formation, dependent mainly on NOx and NMVOC concentrations in the atmosphere, makes controlling tropospheric ozone complex. Furthermore, the concentration of ozone at any given point is a complex superimposition of in-situ produced or destroyed ozone and transported ozone on the regional and hemispheric-scale. In order to effectively address ozone, a more detailed understanding of its origins is needed. Here we show that roughly half (5 μg m-3) of the observed increase in urban (London) ozone (10 μg m-3) in the UK from 1998 to 2008 is owing to factors of local origin, in particular, the change in NO : NO2 ratio, NMVOC : NOx balance, NMVOC speciation, and emission reductions (including NOx titration). In areas with previously higher large concentrations of nitrogen oxides, ozone that was previously suppressed by high concentrations of NO has now been "unmasked", as in London and other urban areas of the UK. The remaining half (approximately 5 μg m-3) of the observed ozone increase is attributed to non-local factors such as long-term transport of ozone, changes in background ozone, and meteorological variability. These results show that a two-pronged approach, local action and regional-to-hemispheric cooperation, is needed to reduce ozone and thereby population exposure, which is especially important for urban ozone.

  12. The characteristics of tropospheric ozone seasonality observed from ozone soundings at Pohang, Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae H; Lee, H J; Lee, S H

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents the first analysis of vertical ozone sounding measurements over Pohang, Korea. The main focus is to analyze the seasonal variation of vertical ozone profiles and determine the mechanisms controlling ozone seasonality. The maxima ozone at the surface and in the free troposphere are observed in May and June, respectively. In comparison with the ozone seasonality at Oki (near sea level) and Happo (altitude of 1840 m) in Japan, which are located at the same latitude as of Pohang, we have found that the time of the ozone maximum at the Japanese sites is always a month earlier than at Pohang. Analysis of the wind flow at the surface shows that the wind shifts from westerly to southerly in May over Japan, but in June over Pohang. However, this wind shift above boundary layer occurs a month later. This wind shift results in significantly smaller amounts of ozone because the southerly wind brings clean wet tropical air. It has been suggested that the spring ozone maximum in the lower troposphere is due to polluted air transported from China. However, an enhanced ozone amount over the free troposphere in June appears to have a different origin. A tongue-like structure in the time-height cross-section of ozone concentrations, which starts from the stratosphere and extends to the middle troposphere, suggests that the ozone enhancement occurs due to a gradual migration of ozone from the stratosphere. The high frequency of dry air with elevated ozone concentrations in the upper troposphere in June suggests that the air is transported from the stratosphere. HYSPLIT trajectory analysis supports the hypothesis that enhanced ozone in the free troposphere is not likely due to transport from sources of anthropogenic activity.

  13. Effects of ozone-vegetation coupling on surface ozone air quality via biogeochemical and meteorological feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Mehliyar; Tai, Amos P. K.; Lombardozzi, Danica; Martin, Maria Val

    2017-02-01

    Tropospheric ozone is one of the most hazardous air pollutants as it harms both human health and plant productivity. Foliage uptake of ozone via dry deposition damages photosynthesis and causes stomatal closure. These foliage changes could lead to a cascade of biogeochemical and biogeophysical effects that not only modulate the carbon cycle, regional hydrometeorology and climate, but also cause feedbacks onto surface ozone concentration itself. In this study, we implement a semi-empirical parameterization of ozone damage on vegetation in the Community Earth System Model to enable online ozone-vegetation coupling, so that for the first time ecosystem structure and ozone concentration can coevolve in fully coupled land-atmosphere simulations. With ozone-vegetation coupling, present-day surface ozone is simulated to be higher by up to 4-6 ppbv over Europe, North America and China. Reduced dry deposition velocity following ozone damage contributes to ˜ 40-100 % of those increases, constituting a significant positive biogeochemical feedback on ozone air quality. Enhanced biogenic isoprene emission is found to contribute to most of the remaining increases, and is driven mainly by higher vegetation temperature that results from lower transpiration rate. This isoprene-driven pathway represents an indirect, positive meteorological feedback. The reduction in both dry deposition and transpiration is mostly associated with reduced stomatal conductance following ozone damage, whereas the modification of photosynthesis and further changes in ecosystem productivity are found to play a smaller role in contributing to the ozone-vegetation feedbacks. Our results highlight the need to consider two-way ozone-vegetation coupling in Earth system models to derive a more complete understanding and yield more reliable future predictions of ozone air quality.

  14. College Students' Understanding of Atmospheric Ozone Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Kristen E.; Brown, Shane A.; Chung, Serena H.; Jobson, B. Thomas; VanReken, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that high school and college students have a lack of conceptual understanding of global warming, ozone, and the greenhouse effect. Most research in this area used survey methodologies and did not include concepts of atmospheric chemistry and ozone formation. This study investigates college students' understandings of atmospheric…

  15. Ozone processing of foods and beverages

    Ozone has a long history of use as a disinfectant in food and beverage processing. In the United States, the application of ozone to disinfect bottled water was approved as Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) in 1982. Later it was approved as a sanitizing agent for bottled water treatment lines. Ozo...

  16. Validation of UARS MLS Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Lungu, T. A; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. f.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; hide

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the validation of ozone data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The MLS ozone retrievals are obtained from the calibrated microwave radiances (emission spectra) in two separate bands, at frequencies near 205 and 183 GHz.

  17. Statistical estimation of ozone exposure metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankenship, Erin E.; Stefanski, L. A.

    Data from recent experiments at North Carolina State University and other locations provide a unique opportunity to study the effect of ambient ozone on the growth of clover. The data consist of hourly ozone measurements over a 140 day growing season at eight sites in the US, coupled with clover growth response data measured every 28 days. The objective is to model an indicator of clover growth as a function of ozone exposure. A common strategy for dealing with the numerous hourly ozone measurements is to reduce these to a single summary measurement, a so-called exposure metric, for the growth period of interest. However, the mean ozone value is not necessarily the best summarization, as it is widely believed that low levels of ozone have a negligible effect on growth, whereas peak ozone values are deleterious to plant growth. There are also suspected interactions with available sunlight, temperature and humidity. A number of exposure metrics have been proposed that reflect these beliefs by assigning different weights to ozone values according to magnitude, time of day, temperature and humidity. These weighting schemes generally depend on parameters that have, to date, been subjectively determined. We propose a statistical approach based on profile likelihoods to estimate the parameters in these exposure metrics.

  18. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2010-01-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of…

  19. UNDERSTANDING ECOSYSTEM RESPONSE TO OZONE STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological risk assessment of ozone impact requires consideration of many factors that, perhaps, are not of concern in human health risk assessment. The episodic nature of ozone exposure, functional complexity of species, and broad spatial and temporal scales characteristic of n...

  20. Stable ozone layer in Norway and USSR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, K.; Svenoe, T.; Terez, E. I.; Terez, G. A.; Roldugin, V.; Larsen, S. H. H.

    1994-01-01

    Long-term column ozone density measurements have been carried out in Norway and USSR. Data from Tromso and two meridional chains in USSR are analyzed, and most of the stations show that no significant decreasing trend in ozone has occurred during the last two decades.

  1. Processes Affecting Tropospheric Ozone over Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diab, Roseanne D.; Thompson, Anne M.

    2004-01-01

    This is a Workshop Report prepared for Eos, the weekly AGU magazine, The workshop took place between 26-28 January 2004 at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in Durban, South Africa and was attended by 26 participants (http//www.geography.und.ac.za). Considerable progress has been made in ozone observations except for northern Africa (large data gaps) and west Africa (to be covered by the French-sponsored AMMA program). The present-day ozone findings were evaluated and reviewed by speakers using Aircraft data (MOZAIC program), NASA satellites (MOPITT, TRMM, TOMS) and ozone soundings (SHADOZ). Besides some ozone gaps, there are challenges posed by the need to assess the relative strengths of photochemical and dynamic influences on the tropospheric ozone budget. Biogenic, biofuels, biomass burning sources of ozone precursors remain highly uncertain. Recent findings (by NASA's Chatfield and Thompson, using satellite and sounding data) show significant impact of Indian Ocean pollution on African ozone. European research on pollutants over the Mediterranean and the middle east, that suggests that ozone may be exported to Africa from these areas, also needs to be considered.

  2. Recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Steve; Schauffler, Sue; Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Pawson, Steven; Nielsen, J. Eric

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early Spring. Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the TOMS and OMI instruments. The severity of the hole has been assessed using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole), the average size during the September-October period, and the ozone mass deficit. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this presentation, we show the relationships of halogens and temperature to both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. We use two methods to estimate ozone hole recovery. First, we use projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates in a parametric model. Second, we use a coupled chemistry climate model to assess recovery. We find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. Furthermore, full recovery to 1980 levels will not occur until approximately 2068. We will also show some error estimates of these dates and the impact of climate change on the recovery.

  3. Biochemical reactions of ozone in plants

    J. Brian Mudd

    1998-01-01

    Plants react biochemically to ozone in three phases: with constitutive chemicals in the apoplastic fluid and cell membranes; by forming messenger molecules by the affected constitutive materials (ethylene); and by responding to the messenger molecules with pathogenic RNAs and proteins. For instance, plant reactions with ozone result in constitutive molecules such as...

  4. Automated analysis of angle closure from anterior chamber angle images.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Mani; Cheng, Jun; Perera, Shamira A; Tun, Tin A; Liu, Jiang; Aung, Tin

    2014-10-21

    To evaluate a novel software capable of automatically grading angle closure on EyeCam angle images in comparison with manual grading of images, with gonioscopy as the reference standard. In this hospital-based, prospective study, subjects underwent gonioscopy by a single observer, and EyeCam imaging by a different operator. The anterior chamber angle in a quadrant was classified as closed if the posterior trabecular meshwork could not be seen. An eye was classified as having angle closure if there were two or more quadrants of closure. Automated grading of the angle images was performed using customized software. Agreement between the methods was ascertained by κ statistic and comparison of area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). One hundred forty subjects (140 eyes) were included, most of whom were Chinese (102/140, 72.9%) and women (72/140, 51.5%). Angle closure was detected in 61 eyes (43.6%) with gonioscopy in comparison with 59 eyes (42.1%, P = 0.73) using manual grading, and 67 eyes (47.9%, P = 0.24) with automated grading of EyeCam images. The agreement for angle closure diagnosis between gonioscopy and both manual (κ = 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI), 0.81-0.96) and automated grading of EyeCam images was good (κ = 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63-0.85). The AUC for detecting eyes with gonioscopic angle closure was comparable for manual and automated grading (AUC 0.974 vs. 0.954, P = 0.31) of EyeCam images. Customized software for automated grading of EyeCam angle images was found to have good agreement with gonioscopy. Human observation of the EyeCam images may still be needed to avoid gross misclassification, especially in eyes with extensive angle closure. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  5. The Case of Ozone Depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambright, W. Henry

    2005-01-01

    While the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is widely perceived as a space agency, since its inception NASA has had a mission dedicated to the home planet. Initially, this mission involved using space to better observe and predict weather and to enable worldwide communication. Meteorological and communication satellites showed the value of space for earthly endeavors in the 1960s. In 1972, NASA launched Landsat, and the era of earth-resource monitoring began. At the same time, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the environmental movement swept throughout the United States and most industrialized countries. The first Earth Day event took place in 1970, and the government generally began to pay much more attention to issues of environmental quality. Mitigating pollution became an overriding objective for many agencies. NASA's existing mission to observe planet Earth was augmented in these years and directed more toward environmental quality. In the 1980s, NASA sought to plan and establish a new environmental effort that eventuated in the 1990s with the Earth Observing System (EOS). The Agency was able to make its initial mark via atmospheric monitoring, specifically ozone depletion. An important policy stimulus in many respects, ozone depletion spawned the Montreal Protocol of 1987 (the most significant international environmental treaty then in existence). It also was an issue critical to NASA's history that served as a bridge linking NASA's weather and land-resource satellites to NASA s concern for the global changes affecting the home planet. Significantly, as a global environmental problem, ozone depletion underscored the importance of NASA's ability to observe Earth from space. Moreover, the NASA management team's ability to apply large-scale research efforts and mobilize the talents of other agencies and the private sector illuminated its role as a lead agency capable of crossing organizational boundaries as well as the science-policy divide.

  6. Improved reference models for middle atmosphere ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, G. M.; Pitts, M. C.; Chen, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the improvements introduced into the original version of ozone reference model of Keating and Young (1985, 1987) which is to be incorporated in the next COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA). The ozone reference model will provide information on the global ozone distribution (including the ozone vertical structure as a function of month and latitude from 25 to 90 km) combining data from five recent satellite experiments: the Nimbus 7 LIMS, Nimbus 7 SBUV, AE-2 Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE), Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) UV Spectrometer, and SME 1.27 Micron Airglow. The improved version of the reference model uses reprocessed AE-2 SAGE data (sunset) and extends the use of SAGE data from 1981 to the 1981-1983 time period. Comparisons are presented between the results of this ozone model and various nonsatellite measurements at different levels in the middle atmosphere.

  7. On the Identification of Ozone Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Kane A.; Solomon, Susan; Kinnison, Douglas E.

    2018-05-01

    As ozone depleting substances decline, stratospheric ozone is displaying signs of healing in the Antarctic lower stratosphere. Here we focus on higher altitudes and the global stratosphere. Two key processes that can influence ozone recovery are evaluated: dynamical variability and solar proton events (SPEs). A nine-member ensemble of free-running simulations indicates that dynamical variability dominates the relatively small ozone recovery signal over 1998-2016 in the subpolar lower stratosphere, particularly near the tropical tropopause. The absence of observed recovery there to date is therefore not unexpected. For the upper stratosphere, high latitudes (50-80°N/S) during autumn and winter show the largest recovery. Large halogen-induced odd oxygen loss there provides a fingerprint of seasonal sensitivity to chlorine trends. However, we show that SPEs also have a profound effect on ozone trends within this region since 2000. Thus, accounting for SPEs is important for detection of recovery in the upper stratosphere.

  8. Influence of Mountains on Arctic Tropospheric Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteway, J. A.; Seabrook, J.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone was measured above Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic during spring using a differential absorption lidar (DIAL). Analysis of the observations revealed that mountains had a significant effect on the vertical distribution of ozone. Ozone depletion events were observed when air that had spent significant time near to the frozen surface of the Arctic Ocean reached Eureka. This air arrived at Eureka by flowing over the surrounding mountains. Surface level ozone depletion events were not observed during periods when mountains blocked the flow of air from over the sea ice. In the case of blocking there was an enhancement in the amount of ozone near the surface as air from the mid troposphere descended in the lee of the mountains. Three case studies will be presented.

  9. Influence of mountains on Arctic tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabrook, Jeffrey; Whiteway, James

    2016-02-01

    Tropospheric ozone was measured above Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic during spring of 2008 using a differential absorption lidar. The observations were carried out at Eureka Weather Station, which is located between various mountain ranges. Analysis of the observations revealed that mountains had a significant effect on the vertical distribution of ozone. Ozone depletion events were observed when air that had spent significant time near to the frozen surface of the Arctic Ocean reached Eureka. This air arrived at Eureka by flowing over the surrounding mountains. Surface level ozone depletions were not observed during periods when mountains blocked the flow of air from over the sea ice. In the case of blocking there was an enhancement in the amount of ozone near the surface as air from the midtroposphere descended in the lee of the mountains. Three case studies from spring of 2008 are described.

  10. Ozone vertical profile changes over South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Hofmann, D. J.; Komhyr, W. D.; Lathrop, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Important changes in the ozone vertical profile over South Pole, Antarctica have occurred both during the recent period of measurements, 1986-1991, and since an earlier set of soundings was carried out from 1967-1971. From the onset of the 'ozone hole' over Antarctica in the early 1980s, there has been a tendency for years with lower spring ozone amounts to alternate with years with somewhat higher (although still depleted) ozone amounts. Beginning in 1989 there have been three consecutive years of strong depletion although the timing of the breakdown of the vortex has varied from year to year. Comparison of the vertical profiles between the two periods of study reveals the dramatic decreases in the ozone amounts in the stratosphere between 15-21 km during the spring. In addition, it appears that summer values are also now much lower in this altitude region.

  11. Information content of ozone retrieval algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, C.; Bhartia, P. K.; Chu, W. P.; Curran, R.; Deluisi, J.; Gille, J. C.; Hudson, R.; Mateer, C.; Rusch, D.; Thomas, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    The algorithms are characterized that were used for production processing by the major suppliers of ozone data to show quantitatively: how the retrieved profile is related to the actual profile (This characterizes the altitude range and vertical resolution of the data); the nature of systematic errors in the retrieved profiles, including their vertical structure and relation to uncertain instrumental parameters; how trends in the real ozone are reflected in trends in the retrieved ozone profile; and how trends in other quantities (both instrumental and atmospheric) might appear as trends in the ozone profile. No serious deficiencies were found in the algorithms used in generating the major available ozone data sets. As the measurements are all indirect in someway, and the retrieved profiles have different characteristics, data from different instruments are not directly comparable.

  12. Ozone depletion and chlorine loading potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, John A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Solomon, Susan; Zvenigorodsky, Sergei; Connell, Peter; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Fisher, Donald A.; Stordal, Frode; Weisenstein, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The recognition of the roles of chlorine and bromine compounds in ozone depletion has led to the regulation or their source gases. Some source gases are expected to be more damaging to the ozone layer than others, so that scientific guidance regarding their relative impacts is needed for regulatory purposes. Parameters used for this purpose include the steady-state and time-dependent chlorine loading potential (CLP) and the ozone depletion potential (ODP). Chlorine loading potentials depend upon the estimated value and accuracy of atmospheric lifetimes and are subject to significant (approximately 20-50 percent) uncertainties for many gases. Ozone depletion potentials depend on the same factors, as well as the evaluation of the release of reactive chlorine and bromine from each source gas and corresponding ozone destruction within the stratosphere.

  13. Ozone Gardens for the Citizen Scientist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, Margaret; Reilly, Gay; Rodjom, Abbey; Malick, Emily

    2016-01-01

    NASA Langley partnered with the Virginia Living Museum and two schools to create ozone bio-indicator gardens for citizen scientists of all ages. The garden at the Marshall Learning Center is part of a community vegetable garden designed to teach young children where food comes from and pollution in their area, since most of the children have asthma. The Mt. Carmel garden is located at a K-8 school. Different ozone sensitive and ozone tolerant species are growing and being monitored for leaf injury. In addition, CairClip ozone monitors were placed in the gardens and data are compared to ozone levels at the NASA Langley Chemistry and Physics Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (CAPABLE) site in Hampton, VA. Leaf observations and plant measurements are made two to three times a week throughout the growing season.

  14. Improved reference models for middle atmosphere ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, G. M.; Pitts, M. C.; Chen, C.

    1989-01-01

    Improvements are provided for the ozone reference model which is to be incorporated in the COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA). The ozone reference model will provide considerable information on the global ozone distribution, including ozone vertical structure as a function of month and latitude from approximately 25 to 90 km, combining data from five recent satellite experiments (Nimbus 7 LIMS, Nimbus 7 SBUV, AE-2 SAGE, Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) UVS, and SME IR). The improved models are described and use reprocessed AE-2 SAGE data (sunset) and extend the use of SAGE data from 1981 to the period 1981-1983. Comparisons are shown between the ozone reference model and various nonsatellite measurements at different levels in the middle atmosphere.

  15. Ozone decomposition in aqueous acetate solutions

    SciT

    Sehested, K.; Holcman, J.; Bjergbakke, E.

    1987-01-01

    The acetate radical ion reacts with ozone with a rate constant of k = (1.5 +/- 0.5) x 10Z dmT mol s . The products from this reaction are CO2, HCHO, and O2 . By subsequent reaction of the peroxy radical with ozone the acetate radical ion is regenerated through the OH radical. A chain decomposition of ozone takes place. It terminates when the acetate radical ion reacts with oxygen forming the unreactive peroxy acetate radical. The chain is rather short as oxygen is developed, as a result of the ozone consumption. The inhibiting effect of acetate on the ozonemore » decay is rationalized by OH scavenging by acetate and successive reaction of the acetate radical ion with oxygen. Some products from the bimolecular disappearance of the peroxy acetate radicals, however, react further with ozone, reducing the effectiveness of the stabilization.« less

  16. Mechanisms of Stratospheric Ozone Transport.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-03

    amounts orcur too fat south and about 1 month too late. 92 CHANGE IN (740) (PPM) DIABATIC. cos ( LAT ) 70 50 ~40 (D 30_ _ _ _ _ ) 1 5 Ŗ 2.5 Z. 20 10 0 D...AD-A122 609 MECHANISMS OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE BRANSPOR(U) NAVAL RESEARCH LAB WASHINGTON DC R B ROOD ET AL 03 DEC 82 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 4/ 1 ...NLIEIIIIEIIII EIIIIIIIIIIIIl IIIEIIIIIEEEEE IIIIIIIIIIIIIl EIIIIIIIIIIIIl EIIIIIIIIIIIIl 1111.0 112 M *0 MIt ROCLt RLS’OLU7ION TLST CHART - - - ,T 1 m -N ;’ V

  17. Fuel neutralization by ozone oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, A. B.; Agthe, R. E.; Smith, I. D.; Mulholland, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    The viability of a hazardous waste disposal system based on ozone oxidation of hydrazine fuels at low aqueous concentrations in the presence of ultraviolet light (UV at 2.537 x 10(exp -7) m or 8.324 x 10(exp -7) ft) excitation was investigated. Important parameters investigated include temperature, solution pH, and ultraviolet light power. Statistically relevant experimentation was done to estimate main factor effects on performance. The best available chemical analysis technology was used to evaluate the performance of the system.

  18. Growth Angle - a Microscopic View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazurak, K.; Volz, M. P.; Croll, A.

    2017-01-01

    The growth angle that is formed between the side of the growing crystal and the melt meniscus is an important parameter in the detached Bridgman crystal growth method, where it determines the extent of the crystal-crucible wall gap, and in the Czochralski and float zone methods, where it influences the size and stability of the crystals. The growth angle is a non-equilibrium parameter, defined for the crystal growth process only. For a melt-crystal interface translating towards the crystal (melting), there is no specific angle defined between the melt and the sidewall of the solid. In this case, the corner at the triple line becomes rounded, and the angle between the sidewall and the incipience of meniscus can take a number of values, depending on the position of the triple line. In this work, a microscopic model is developed in which the fluid interacts with the solid surface through long range van der Waals or Casimir dispersive forces. This growth angle model is applied to Si and Ge and compared with the macroscopic approach of Herring. In the limit of a rounded corner with a large radius of curvature, the wetting of the melt on the crystal is defined by the contact angle. The proposed microscopic approach addresses the interesting issue of the transition from a contact angle to a growth angle as the radius of curvature decreases.

  19. Antarctic Ozone Hole on September 17, 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Satellite data show the area of this year's Antarctic ozone hole peaked at about 26 million square kilometers-roughly the size of North America-making the hole similar in size to those of the past three years, according to scientists from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Researchers have observed a leveling-off of the hole size and predict a slow recovery. Over the past several years the annual ozone hole over Antarctica has remained about the same in both its size and in the thickness of the ozone layer. 'This is consistent with human-produced chlorine compounds that destroy ozone reaching their peak concentrations in the atmosphere, leveling off, and now beginning a very slow decline,' said Samuel Oltmans of NOAA's Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory, Boulder, Colo. In the near future-barring unusual events such as explosive volcanic eruptions-the severity of the ozone hole will likely remain similar to what has been seen in recent years, with year-to-year differences associated with meteorological variability. Over the longer term (30-50 years) the severity of the ozone hole in Antarctica is expected to decrease as chlorine levels in the atmosphere decline. The image above shows ozone levels on Spetember 17, 2001-the lowest levels observed this year. Dark blue colors correspond to the thinnest ozone, while light blue, green, and yellow pixels indicate progressively thicker ozone. For more information read: 2001 Ozone Hole About the Same Size as Past Three Years. Image courtesy Greg Shirah, GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio, based on data from the TOMS science team

  20. SAGE III solar ozone measurements: Initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hsiang-Jui; Cunnold, Derek M.; Trepte, Chip; Thomason, Larry W.; Zawodny, Joseph M.

    2006-01-01

    Results from two retrieval algorithms, o3-aer and o3-mlr , used for SAGE III solar occultation ozone measurements in the stratosphere and upper troposphere are compared. The main differences between these two retrieved (version 3.0) ozone are found at altitudes above 40 km and below 15 km. Compared to correlative measurements, the SAGE II type ozone retrievals (o3-aer) provide better precisions above 40 km and do not induce artificial hemispheric differences in upper stratospheric ozone. The multiple linear regression technique (o3_mlr), however, can yield slightly more accurate ozone (by a few percent) in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. By using SAGE III (version 3.0) ozone from both algorithms and in their preferred regions, the agreement between SAGE III and correlative measurements is shown to be approx.5% down to 17 km. Below 17 km SAGE III ozone values are systematically higher, by 10% at 13 km, and a small hemispheric difference (a few percent) appears. Compared to SAGE III and HALOE, SAGE II ozone has the best accuracy in the lowest few kilometers of the stratosphere. Estimated precision in SAGE III ozone is about 5% or better between 20 and 40 km and approx.10% at 50 km. The precision below 20 km is difficult to evaluate because of limited coincidences between SAGE III and sondes. SAGE III ozone values are systematically slightly larger (2-3%) than those from SAGE II but the profile shapes are remarkably similar for altitudes above 15 km. There is no evidence of any relative drift or time dependent differences between these two instruments for altitudes above 15-20 km.

  1. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    SciT

    Beer, S.K.; Pratt, H.R. II.

    1989-09-12

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting and accurate reproducing of spinning magic angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the magic angle of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation ormore » graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning magic angle of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position. 2 figs.« less

  2. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Stephen K.; Pratt, II, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

  3. Growth Angle: A Microscopic View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Croll, Arne; Volz, Martin P.

    2017-01-01

    A microscopic continuum mechanical model of the growth angle is proposed. It is based on the van der Waals type framework that is used for surface force phenomena. The obtained augmented Laplace type integro-differential equations are, in general, difficult to analyze. Here we focused primarily on the particular case of equal melt and crystal surface energies. We derived an approximate equation for the meniscus shape, and obtained an analytical relationship between the contact and the growth angle. Interestingly, the same result can be obtained using the macroscopic model of Herring. The case of a macroscopically sharp corner is also considered. For this case, the macroscopic angle is not defined and it can be any angle between the contact angles of both flat surfaces. The microscopic model yields the smooth shape for the meniscus that also is not unique, but depends on the initial position of the meniscus.

  4. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges: vibrationally excited ozone and molecule formation on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Guerra, Vasco; Guaitella, Olivier; Booth, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Antoine

    2013-10-01

    A combined experimental and modeling investigation of the ozone kinetics in the afterglow of pulsed direct current discharges in oxygen is carried out. The discharge is generated in a cylindrical silica tube of radius 1 cm, with short pulse durations between 0.5 and 2 ms, pressures in the range 1-5 Torr and discharge currents ˜40-120 mA. Time-resolved absolute concentrations of ground-state atoms and ozone molecules were measured simultaneously in situ, by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence and ultraviolet absorption, respectively. The experiments were complemented by a self-consistent model developed to interpret the results and, in particular, to evaluate the roles of vibrationally excited ozone and of ozone formation on surfaces. It is found that vibrationally excited ozone, O_3^{*} , plays an important role in the ozone kinetics, leading to a decrease in the ozone concentration and an increase in its formation time. In turn, the kinetics of O_3^{*} is strongly coupled with those of atomic oxygen and O2(a 1Δg) metastables. Ozone formation at the wall does not contribute significantly to the total ozone production under the present conditions. Upper limits for the effective heterogeneous recombination probability of O atoms into ozone are established.

  5. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Determination of Attainment. Effective March 12, 2010 EPA has determined the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air...

  6. 40 CFR 52.930 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.930 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Kentucky § 52.930 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) The VOC..., Campbell and Kenton Counties) ozone nonattainment area. The demonstration of attainment of the ozone...

  7. 40 CFR 52.1885 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1885...: Ozone. (a) Part D—Approval. The following portions of the Ohio plan are approved: (1) The ozone portions...: Akron, Canton, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Toledo and Youngstown. (4) The ozone...

  8. 40 CFR 52.2332 - Control Strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control Strategy: Ozone. 52.2332...: Ozone. Determinations—EPA is determining that, as of July 18, 1995, the Salt Lake and Davis Counties ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard based on air quality monitoring data from 1992...

  9. 14 CFR 25.832 - Cabin ozone concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cabin ozone concentration. 25.832 Section... Cabin ozone concentration. (a) The airplane cabin ozone concentration during flight must be shown not to... demonstrate that either— (1) The airplane cannot be operated at an altitude which would result in cabin ozone...

  10. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and attainment...

  11. 40 CFR 52.1885 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1885...: Ozone. (a) Part D—Approval. The following portions of the Ohio plan are approved: (1) The ozone portions...: Akron, Canton, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Toledo and Youngstown. (4) The ozone...

  12. 40 CFR 52.1885 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1885...: Ozone. (a) Part D—Approval. The following portions of the Ohio plan are approved: (1) The ozone portions...: Akron, Canton, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Toledo and Youngstown. (4) The ozone...

  13. 40 CFR 52.1885 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1885...: Ozone. (a) Part D—Approval. The following portions of the Ohio plan are approved: (1) The ozone portions...: Akron, Canton, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Toledo and Youngstown. (4) The ozone...

  14. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Determination of Attainment. Effective March 12, 2010 EPA has determined the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air...

  15. 40 CFR 52.930 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.930 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Kentucky § 52.930 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) The VOC..., Campbell and Kenton Counties) ozone nonattainment area. The demonstration of attainment of the ozone...

  16. 40 CFR 52.1683 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1683...: Ozone. (a) The State of New York has certified to the satisfaction of the EPA that no sources are... ozone nonattainment areas in New York listed below have attained the 1-hour ozone standard on the date...

  17. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and attainment...

  18. 40 CFR 52.930 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.930 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Kentucky § 52.930 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) The VOC..., Campbell and Kenton Counties) ozone nonattainment area. The demonstration of attainment of the ozone...

  19. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Determination of Attainment. Effective March 12, 2010 EPA has determined the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air...

  20. 14 CFR 25.832 - Cabin ozone concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cabin ozone concentration. 25.832 Section... Cabin ozone concentration. (a) The airplane cabin ozone concentration during flight must be shown not to... demonstrate that either— (1) The airplane cannot be operated at an altitude which would result in cabin ozone...

  1. 40 CFR 52.1885 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1885...: Ozone. (a) Part D—Approval. The following portions of the Ohio plan are approved: (1) The ozone portions...: Akron, Canton, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Toledo and Youngstown. (4) The ozone...

  2. 40 CFR 52.1023 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1023...: Ozone. (a) Determination. EPA is determining that, as of July 21, 1995, the Lewiston-Auburn ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and attainment...

  3. 40 CFR 52.1023 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1023...: Ozone. (a) Determination. EPA is determining that, as of July 21, 1995, the Lewiston-Auburn ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and attainment...

  4. 40 CFR 52.1023 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1023...: Ozone. (a) Determination. EPA is determining that, as of July 21, 1995, the Lewiston-Auburn ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and attainment...

  5. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and attainment...

  6. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. Determination of Attainment. Effective March 12, 2010 EPA has determined the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality...

  7. 40 CFR 52.930 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.930 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Kentucky § 52.930 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) The VOC..., Campbell and Kenton Counties) ozone nonattainment area. The demonstration of attainment of the ozone...

  8. 40 CFR 52.282 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Attainment determination. EPA has determined that the Ventura County severe 1-hour ozone nonattainment area attained the 1-hour ozone NAAQS by the applicable attainment date...

  9. 48 CFR 52.223-11 - Ozone-Depleting Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ozone-Depleting Substances....223-11 Ozone-Depleting Substances. As prescribed in 23.804(a), insert the following clause: Ozone-Depleting Substances (MAY 2001) (a) Definition. Ozone-depleting substance, as used in this clause, means any...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1683 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1683...: Ozone. (a) The State of New York has certified to the satisfaction of the EPA that no sources are... ozone nonattainment areas in New York listed below have attained the 1-hour ozone standard on the date...

  11. 48 CFR 52.223-11 - Ozone-Depleting Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ozone-Depleting Substances....223-11 Ozone-Depleting Substances. As prescribed in 23.804(a), insert the following clause: Ozone-Depleting Substances (MAY 2001) (a) Definition. Ozone-depleting substance, as used in this clause, means any...

  12. 48 CFR 52.223-11 - Ozone-Depleting Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ozone-Depleting Substances....223-11 Ozone-Depleting Substances. As prescribed in 23.804(a), insert the following clause: Ozone-Depleting Substances (MAY 2001) (a) Definition. Ozone-depleting substance, as used in this clause, means any...

  13. 40 CFR 52.1683 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1683...: Ozone. (a) The State of New York has certified to the satisfaction of the EPA that no sources are... that the 1-hour ozone nonattainment areas in New York listed below have attained the 1-hour ozone...

  14. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and attainment...

  15. 40 CFR 52.2332 - Control Strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control Strategy: Ozone. 52.2332...: Ozone. Determinations—EPA is determining that, as of July 18, 1995, the Salt Lake and Davis Counties ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard based on air quality monitoring data from 1992...

  16. 40 CFR 52.282 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Attainment determination. EPA has determined that the Ventura County severe 1-hour ozone nonattainment area attained the 1-hour ozone NAAQS by the applicable attainment date...

  17. 14 CFR 25.832 - Cabin ozone concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cabin ozone concentration. 25.832 Section... Cabin ozone concentration. (a) The airplane cabin ozone concentration during flight must be shown not to... demonstrate that either— (1) The airplane cannot be operated at an altitude which would result in cabin ozone...

  18. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and attainment...

  19. 48 CFR 52.223-11 - Ozone-Depleting Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ozone-Depleting Substances....223-11 Ozone-Depleting Substances. As prescribed in 23.804(a), insert the following clause: Ozone-Depleting Substances (MAY 2001) (a) Definition. Ozone-depleting substance, as used in this clause, means any...

  20. 14 CFR 25.832 - Cabin ozone concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cabin ozone concentration. 25.832 Section... Cabin ozone concentration. (a) The airplane cabin ozone concentration during flight must be shown not to... demonstrate that either— (1) The airplane cannot be operated at an altitude which would result in cabin ozone...

  1. 40 CFR 52.2332 - Control Strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control Strategy: Ozone. 52.2332...: Ozone. Determinations—EPA is determining that, as of July 18, 1995, the Salt Lake and Davis Counties ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard based on air quality monitoring data from 1992...

  2. 40 CFR 52.282 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Attainment determination. EPA has determined that the Ventura County severe 1-hour ozone nonattainment area attained the 1-hour ozone NAAQS by the applicable attainment date...

  3. 40 CFR 52.282 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Attainment determination. EPA has determined that the Ventura County severe 1-hour ozone nonattainment area attained the 1-hour ozone NAAQS by the applicable attainment date...

  4. 48 CFR 52.223-11 - Ozone-Depleting Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ozone-Depleting Substances....223-11 Ozone-Depleting Substances. As prescribed in 23.804(a), insert the following clause: Ozone-Depleting Substances (MAY 2001) (a) Definition. Ozone-depleting substance, as used in this clause, means any...

  5. 40 CFR 52.1023 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1023...: Ozone. (a) Determination. EPA is determining that, as of July 21, 1995, the Lewiston-Auburn ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and attainment...

  6. 14 CFR 25.832 - Cabin ozone concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cabin ozone concentration. 25.832 Section... Cabin ozone concentration. (a) The airplane cabin ozone concentration during flight must be shown not to... demonstrate that either— (1) The airplane cannot be operated at an altitude which would result in cabin ozone...

  7. 40 CFR 52.282 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Attainment determination. EPA has determined that the Ventura County severe 1-hour ozone nonattainment area attained the 1-hour ozone NAAQS by the applicable attainment date...

  8. 40 CFR 52.930 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.930 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Kentucky § 52.930 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) The VOC..., Campbell and Kenton Counties) ozone nonattainment area. The demonstration of attainment of the ozone...

  9. 40 CFR 52.1023 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1023...: Ozone. (a) Determination. EPA is determining that, as of July 21, 1995, the Lewiston-Auburn ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and attainment...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1683 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1683...: Ozone. (a) The State of New York has certified to the satisfaction of the EPA that no sources are... ozone nonattainment areas in New York listed below have attained the 1-hour ozone standard on the date...

  11. 40 CFR 52.1342 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1342...: Ozone. (a) Determination of attainment. EPA has determined, as of June 9, 2011, that the St. Louis (MO-IL) metropolitan 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This...

  12. 40 CFR 52.2332 - Control Strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control Strategy: Ozone. 52.2332...: Ozone. Determinations—EPA is determining that, as of July 18, 1995, the Salt Lake and Davis Counties ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard based on air quality monitoring data from 1992...

  13. 40 CFR 52.1342 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1342...: Ozone. Determination of Attainment. EPA has determined, as of June 9, 2011, that the St. Louis (MO-IL) metropolitan 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination...

  14. 40 CFR 52.1342 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1342...: Ozone. (a) Determination of attainment. EPA has determined, as of June 9, 2011, that the St. Louis (MO-IL) metropolitan 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This...

  15. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. (a) Determination of Attainment. Effective March 12, 2010 EPA has determined the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air...

  16. 40 CFR 52.1342 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1342...: Ozone. (a) Determination of attainment. EPA has determined, as of June 9, 2011, that the St. Louis (MO-IL) metropolitan 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This...

  17. 40 CFR 52.2332 - Control Strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control Strategy: Ozone. 52.2332...: Ozone. Determinations—EPA is determining that, as of July 18, 1995, the Salt Lake and Davis Counties ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard based on air quality monitoring data from 1992...

  18. Evildoer or Do-Gooder: Getting the Goods on Ozone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Diane K.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the differences of good ozone and bad ozone. Good ozone, which is found in the stratosphere, protects people and other living things from the bad things UV can do, such skin cancer, cataracts, and other problems. However, lower in the atmosphere, at the top of the troposphere (around 12 miles up), ozone acts like a…

  19. Evidence for a Continuous Decline in Lower Stratospheric Ozone Offsetting Ozone Layer Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, William T.; Alsing, Justin; Mortlock, Daniel J.; Staehelin, Johannes; Haigh, Joanna D.; Peter, Thomas; Tummon, Fiona; Stuebi, Rene; Stenke, Andrea; Anderson, John; hide

    2018-01-01

    Ozone forms in the Earth's atmosphere from the photodissociation of molecular oxygen, primarily in the tropical stratosphere. It is then transported to the extratropics by the Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC), forming a protective "ozone layer" around the globe. Human emissions of halogen-containing ozone-depleting substances (hODSs) led to a decline in stratospheric ozone until they were banned by the Montreal Protocol, and since 1998 ozone in the upper stratosphere is rising again, likely the recovery from halogen-induced losses. Total column measurements of ozone between the Earth's surface and the top of the atmosphere indicate that the ozone layer has stopped declining across the globe, but no clear increase has been observed at latitudes between 60degS and 60degN outside the polar regions (60-90deg). Here we report evidence from multiple satellite measurements that ozone in the lower stratosphere between 60degS and 60degN has indeed continued to decline since 1998. We find that, even though upper stratospheric ozone is recovering, the continuing downward trend in the lower stratosphere prevails, resulting in a downward trend in stratospheric column ozone between 60degS and 60degN. We find that total column ozone between 60degS and 60degN appears not to have decreased only because of increases in tropospheric column ozone that compensate for the stratospheric decreases. The reasons for the continued reduction of lower stratospheric ozone are not clear; models do not reproduce these trends, and thus the causes now urgently need to be established.

  20. Evidence for a continuous decline in lower stratospheric ozone offsetting ozone layer recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, William T.; Alsing, Justin; Mortlock, Daniel J.; Staehelin, Johannes; Haigh, Joanna D.; Peter, Thomas; Tummon, Fiona; Stübi, Rene; Stenke, Andrea; Anderson, John; Bourassa, Adam; Davis, Sean M.; Degenstein, Doug; Frith, Stacey; Froidevaux, Lucien; Roth, Chris; Sofieva, Viktoria; Wang, Ray; Wild, Jeannette; Yu, Pengfei; Ziemke, Jerald R.; Rozanov, Eugene V.

    2018-02-01

    Ozone forms in the Earth's atmosphere from the photodissociation of molecular oxygen, primarily in the tropical stratosphere. It is then transported to the extratropics by the Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC), forming a protective ozone layer around the globe. Human emissions of halogen-containing ozone-depleting substances (hODSs) led to a decline in stratospheric ozone until they were banned by the Montreal Protocol, and since 1998 ozone in the upper stratosphere is rising again, likely the recovery from halogen-induced losses. Total column measurements of ozone between the Earth's surface and the top of the atmosphere indicate that the ozone layer has stopped declining across the globe, but no clear increase has been observed at latitudes between 60° S and 60° N outside the polar regions (60-90°). Here we report evidence from multiple satellite measurements that ozone in the lower stratosphere between 60° S and 60° N has indeed continued to decline since 1998. We find that, even though upper stratospheric ozone is recovering, the continuing downward trend in the lower stratosphere prevails, resulting in a downward trend in stratospheric column ozone between 60° S and 60° N. We find that total column ozone between 60° S and 60° N appears not to have decreased only because of increases in tropospheric column ozone that compensate for the stratospheric decreases. The reasons for the continued reduction of lower stratospheric ozone are not clear; models do not reproduce these trends, and thus the causes now urgently need to be established.