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Sample records for zenseki join ni

  1. New local joining technique for metal materials using exothermic heat of Al/Ni multilayer powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Taisei; Kametani, Nagamasa; Miyake, Shugo; Kanetsuki, Shunsuke; Namazu, Takahiro

    2018-06-01

    The use of Al/Ni multilayer powders as a new heat source has been expected for metal joining technique owing to their instantaneous reaction and enormous amount of exothermic heat. In this study, the effects of the amount of Al/Ni multilayer powders on the electrical and mechanical properties of the joining part of Al strip specimens were examined. These electrical and mechanical properties were estimated by electric resistivity measurement using the four-terminal method and shear test, respectively. Experimental results show that Al specimens are successful joined under a limited condition and exhibit low electrical resistance and sufficiently high strength to maintain the joined state. However, overheating increases the amount of Al/Ni multilayer powder in the joined part, which causes considerable damage such as voids and dissolved loss. It is found that optimization of the amount of Al/Ni multilayer powder enables us to realize reliable joining of Al foils in electronics fields in the future.

  2. State-of-technology for joining TD-NiCr sheet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H.; Moore, T. J.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    At the current state-of-technology there are many joining processes that can be used to make sound welds in TD-NiCr sheet. Some of these that are described in this report are electron beam welding (EBW), gas-tungsten arc welding (GTAW), diffusion welding (DFW), resistance spot welding (RSW), resistance seam welding (RSEW), and brazing. Roll welding (RW) and explosion welding (EXW) have not been developed to the point where they can be used to make sound welds in TD-NiCr. Joining work that has previously been done on TD-NiCr by various organizations, both privately supported and under Air Force and NASA contracts, is described in this summary. Current work is also described that is being done at General Dynamics/Convair (under NASA contract) and at NASA/Lewis to develop and evaluate DFW, RSW, RSEW, and brazing. Preliminary comparisons of joining processes are made for typical applications. A brief description of the manufacture of TD-NiCr sheet by a recently standardized process (under NASA contract) also is given.

  3. Development of forming and joining technology for TD-NiCr sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgerson, R. T.

    1973-01-01

    Forming joining techniques and properties data were developed for thin-gage TD-NiCr sheet in the recrystallized and unrecrystallized conditions. Theoretical and actual forming limit data are presented for several gages of each type of material for five forming processes: brake forming, corrugation forming, joggling, dimpling and beading. Recrystallized sheet can be best formed at room temperature, but unrecrystallized sheet requires forming at elevated temperature. Formability is satisfactory with most processes for the longitudinal orientation but poor for the transverse orientation. Dimpling techniques require further development for both material conditions. Data on joining techniques and joint properties are presented for four joining processes: resistance seam welding (solid-state), resistance spot welding (solid-state), resistance spot welding (fusion) and brazing. Resistance seam welded (solid-state) joints with 5t overlap were stronger than parent material for both material conditions when tested in tensile-shear and stress-rupture. Brazing studies resulted in development of NASA 18 braze alloy (Ni-16Cr-15Mo-8Al-4Si) with several properties superior to baseline TD-6 braze alloy, including lower brazing temperture, reduced reaction with Td-Ni-Cr, and higher stress-rupture properties.

  4. Phase transformation and deformation behavior of NiTi-Nb eutectic joined NiTi wires

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqiang; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Lai-Chang; Chen, Liangyu; Lu, Weijie; Zhang, Di

    2016-01-01

    NiTi wires were brazed together via eutectic reaction between NiTi and Nb powder deposited at the wire contact region. Phase transformation and deformation behavior of the NiTi-Nb eutectic microstructure were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cyclic loading-unloading tests. Results show that R phase and B19′ martensite transformation are induced by plastic deformation. R phase transformation, which significantly contributes to superelasticity, preferentially occurs at the interfaces between NiTi and eutectic region. Round-shaped Nb-rich phase with rod-like and lamellar-type eutectics are observed in eutectic regions. These phases appear to affect the deformation behavior of the brazed NiTi-Nb region via five distinct stages in stress-strain curves: (I) R phase reorientation, (II) R phase transformation from parent phase, (III) elastic deformation of reoriented martensite accompanied by the plastic deformation of Nb-rich phase and lamellar NiTi-Nb eutectic, (IV) B19′ martensitic transformation, and (V) plastic deformation of the specimen. PMID:27049025

  5. State-of-technology for joining TD-NiCr sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H.; Moore, T. J.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    At the current state-of-technology there are many joining processes that can be used to make sound welds in TD-NiCr sheet. Some of these that are described in this report are electron beam welding, gas-tungsten arc welding, diffusion welding, resistance spot welding, resistance seam welding, and brazing. The strengths of the welds made by the various processes show considerable variation, especially at elevated temperatures. Most of the fusion welding processes tend to give weak welds at elevated temperatures (with the exception of fusion-type resistance spotwelds). However, solid-state welds have been made with parent metal properties. The process used for a specific application will be dictated by the specific joint requirements. In highly stressed joints at elevated temperatures, one of the solid-state processes, such as DFW, RSW (solid-state or fusion), and RSEW, offer the most promise.

  6. Preliminary Investigations of Joining Technologies for Attaching Refractory Metals to Ni-Based Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Jerry E.; Ritzert, Frank J.; Loewenthal, William S.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a range of joining technologies has been investigated for creating attachments between refractory metal and Ni-based superalloys. Refractory materials of interest include Mo-47%Re, T-111, and Ta-10%W. The Ni-based superalloys include Hastelloy X and MarM 247. During joining with conventional processes, these materials have potential for a range of solidification and intermetallic formation-related defects. For this study, three non-conventional joining technologies were evaluated. These included inertia welding, electro-spark deposition (ESD) welding, and magnetic pulse welding (MPW). The developed inertia welding practice closely paralleled that typically used for the refractory metals alloys. Metallographic investigations showed that forging during inertia welding occurred predominantly on the nickel base alloy side. It was also noted that at least some degree of forging on the refractory metal side of the joint was necessary to achieve consistent bonding. Both refractory metals were readily weldable to the Hastelloy X material. When bonding to the MarM 247, results were inconsistent. This was related to the higher forging temperatures of the MarM 247, and subsequent reduced deformation on that material during welding. ESD trials using a Hastelloy X filler were successful for all material combinations. ESD places down very thin (5- to 10- m) layers per pass, and interactions between the substrates and the fill were limited (at most) to that layer. For the refractory metals, the fill only appeared to wet the surface, with minimal dilution effects. Microstructures of the deposits showed high weld metal integrity with maximum porosity on the order of a few percent. Some limited success was also obtained with MPW. In these trials, only the T-111 tubes were used. Joints were possible for the T-111 tube to the Hastelloy X bar stock, but the stiffness of the tube (resisting collapse) necessitated the use of very high power levels. These power levels

  7. Corrosion in artificial saliva of a Ni-Cr-based dental alloy joined by TIG welding and conventional brazing.

    PubMed

    Matos, Irma C; Bastos, Ivan N; Diniz, Marília G; de Miranda, Mauro S

    2015-08-01

    Fixed prosthesis and partial dental prosthesis frameworks are usually made from welded Ni-Cr-based alloys. These structures can corrode in saliva and have to be investigated to establish their safety. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the corrosion behavior of joints joined by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and conventional brazing in specimens made of commercial Ni-Cr alloy in Fusayama artificial saliva at 37°C (pH 2.5 and 5.5). Eighteen Ni-Cr base metal specimens were cast and welded by brazing or tungsten inert gas methods. The specimens were divided into 3 groups (base metal, 2 welded specimens), and the composition and microstructure were qualitatively evaluated. The results of potential corrosion and corrosion current density were analyzed with a 1-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test for pairwise comparisons (α=.05). Base metal and tungsten inert gas welded material showed equivalent results in electrochemical corrosion tests, while the air-torched specimens exhibited low corrosion resistance. The performance was worst at pH 2.5. These results suggest that tungsten inert gas is a suitable welding process for use in dentistry, because the final microstructure does not reduce the corrosion resistance in artificial saliva at 37°C, even in a corrosion-testing medium that facilitates galvanic corrosion processes. Moreover, the corrosion current density of brazed Ni-Cr alloy joints was significantly higher (P<.001) than the base metal and tungsten inert gas welded joints. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Microstructure evolution of a dissimilar junction interface between an Al sheet and a Ni-coated Cu sheet joined by magnetic pulse welding

    SciT

    Itoi, Takaomi, E-mail: itoi@faculty.chiba-u.jp

    An Al sheet and a Ni-coated Cu sheet were lap joined by using magnetic pulse welding (MPW). Tensile tests were performed on the joined sheets, and a good lap joint was achieved at a discharge energy of > 0.9 kJ. The weld interface exhibited a wavy morphology and an intermediate layer along the weld interface. Microstructure observations of the intermediate layer revealed that the Ni coating region consisted of a Ni–Al binary amorphous alloy and that the Al sheet region contained very fine Al nanograins. Ni fragments indicative of unmelted residual Ni from the coating were also observed in partsmore » of the intermediate layer. Formation of these features can be attributed to localize melting and a subsequent high rate cooling of molten Al and Ni confined to the interface during the MPW process. In the absence of an oxide film, atomic-scale bonding was also achieved between the intermediate layer and the sheet surfaces after the collision. MPW utilises impact energy, which affects the sheet surfaces. From the obtained results, good lap joint is attributed to an increased contact area, the anchor effect, work hardening, the absence of an oxide film, and suppressed formation of intermetallic compounds at the interface. - Highlights: •Good lap joint of an Al sheet and a Ni-coated Cu sheet was achieved by using magnetic pulse welding. •A Ni–Al binary amorphous alloy was formed as an intermediate layer at weld interface. •Atomic-scale bonding was achieved between the intermediate layer and the sheet surfaces.« less

  9. Joining by plating: optimization of occluded angle

    SciT

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.; Kan, Y.R.

    1978-11-01

    An empirical method has been developed for predicting the minimum angle required for maximum joint strength for materials joined by plating. This is done through a proposed power law failure function, whose coefficients are taken from ring shear and conical head tensile data for plating/substrate combinations and whose exponent is determined from one set of plated-joint data. Experimental results are presented for Al-Ni-Al (7075-T6) and AM363-Ni-AM363 joints, and the failure function is used to predict joint strengths for Al-Ni-Al (2024-T6), UTi-Ni-UTi, and Be-Ti-Be.

  10. Precision Joining Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J. W.; Westphal, D. A.

    1991-08-01

    A workshop to obtain input from industry on the establishment of the Precision Joining Center (PJC) was held on July 10-12, 1991. The PJC is a center for training Joining Technologists in advanced joining techniques and concepts in order to promote the competitiveness of U.S. industry. The center will be established as part of the DOE Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Initiative, and operated by EG&G Rocky Flats in cooperation with the American Welding Society and the Colorado School of Mines Center for Welding and Joining Research. The overall objectives of the workshop were to validate the need for a Joining Technologists to fill the gap between the welding operator and the welding engineer, and to assure that the PJC will train individuals to satisfy that need. The consensus of the workshop participants was that the Joining Technologist is a necessary position in industry, and is currently used, with some variation, by many companies. It was agreed that the PJC core curriculum, as presented, would produce a Joining Technologist of value to industries that use precision joining techniques. The advantage of the PJC would be to train the Joining Technologist much more quickly and more completely. The proposed emphasis of the PJC curriculum on equipment intensive and hands-on training was judged to be essential.

  11. Joining of dissimilar materials

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Michael C; Lau, Grace Y; Jacobson, Craig P

    2012-10-16

    A method of joining dissimilar materials having different ductility, involves two principal steps: Decoration of the more ductile material's surface with particles of a less ductile material to produce a composite; and, sinter-bonding the composite produced to a joining member of a less ductile material. The joining method is suitable for joining dissimilar materials that are chemically inert towards each other (e.g., metal and ceramic), while resulting in a strong bond with a sharp interface between the two materials. The joining materials may differ greatly in form or particle size. The method is applicable to various types of materials including ceramic, metal, glass, glass-ceramic, polymer, cermet, semiconductor, etc., and the materials can be in various geometrical forms, such as powders, fibers, or bulk bodies (foil, wire, plate, etc.). Composites and devices with a decorated/sintered interface are also provided.

  12. Pulse joining cartridges

    SciT

    Golovashchenko, Sergey Fedorovich; Bonnen, John Joseph Francis

    A pulsed joining tool includes a tool body that defines a cavity that receives an inner tubular member and an outer tubular member and a pulse joining cartridge. The tubular members are nested together with the cartridge being disposed around the outer tubular member. The cartridge includes a conductor, such as a wire or foil, that extends around the outer tubular member and is insulated to separate a supply segment from a return segment. A source of stored electrical energy is discharged through the conductor to join the tubular members with an electromagnetic force pulse.

  13. Pulse joining cartridges

    DOEpatents

    Golovashchenko, Sergey Fedorovich; Bonnen, John Joseph Francis

    2016-08-23

    A pulsed joining tool includes a tool body that defines a cavity that receives an inner tubular member and an outer tubular member and a pulse joining cartridge. The tubular members are nested together with the cartridge being disposed around the outer tubular member. The cartridge includes a conductor, such as a wire or foil, that extends around the outer tubular member and is insulated to separate a supply segment from a return segment. A source of stored electrical energy is discharged through the conductor to join the tubular members with an electromagnetic force pulse.

  14. Joined concentric tubes

    DOEpatents

    DeJonghe, Lutgard; Jacobson, Craig; Tucker, Michael; Visco, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Tubular objects having two or more concentric layers that have different properties are joined to one another during their manufacture primarily by compressive and friction forces generated by shrinkage during sintering and possibly mechanical interlocking. It is not necessary for the concentric tubes to display adhesive-, chemical- or sinter-bonding to each other in order to achieve a strong bond. This facilitates joining of dissimilar materials, such as ceramics and metals.

  15. Live neighbor-joining.

    PubMed

    Telles, Guilherme P; Araújo, Graziela S; Walter, Maria E M T; Brigido, Marcelo M; Almeida, Nalvo F

    2018-05-16

    In phylogenetic reconstruction the result is a tree where all taxa are leaves and internal nodes are hypothetical ancestors. In a live phylogeny, both ancestral and living taxa may coexist, leading to a tree where internal nodes may be living taxa. The well-known Neighbor-Joining heuristic is largely used for phylogenetic reconstruction. We present Live Neighbor-Joining, a heuristic for building a live phylogeny. We have investigated Live Neighbor-Joining on datasets of viral genomes, a plausible scenario for its application, which allowed the construction of alternative hypothesis for the relationships among virus that embrace both ancestral and descending taxa. We also applied Live Neighbor-Joining on a set of bacterial genomes and to sets of images and texts. Non-biological data may be better explored visually when their relationship in terms of content similarity is represented by means of a phylogeny. Our experiments have shown interesting alternative phylogenetic hypothesis for RNA virus genomes, bacterial genomes and alternative relationships among images and texts, illustrating a wide range of scenarios where Live Neighbor-Joining may be used.

  16. Duct Joining System

    DOEpatents

    Proctor, John P.

    2001-02-27

    A duct joining system for providing an air-tight seal and mechanical connection for ducts and fittings is disclosed. The duct joining system includes a flexible gasket affixed to a male end of a duct or fitting. The flexible gasket is affixed at an angle relative to normal of the male end of the duct. The female end of the other duct includes a raised bead in which the flexible gasket is seated when the ducts are properly joined. The angled flexible gasket seated in the raised bead forms an air-tight seal as well as fastens or locks the male end to the female end. Alternatively, when a flexible duct is used, a band clamp with a raised bead is clamped over the female end of the flexible duct and over the male end of a fitting to provide an air tight seal and fastened connection.

  17. Duct joining system

    DOEpatents

    Proctor, John P.; deKieffer, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    A duct joining system for providing an air-tight seal and mechanical connection for ducts and fittings is disclosed. The duct joining system includes a flexible gasket affixed to a male end of a duct or fitting. The flexible gasket is affixed at an angle relative to normal of the male end of the duct. The female end of the other duct includes a raised bead in which the flexible gasket is seated when the ducts are properly joined. The angled flexible gasket seated in the raised bead forms an air-tight seal as well as fastens or locks the male end to the female end. Alternatively, when a flexible duct is used, a band clamp with a raised bead is clamped over the female end of the flexible duct and over the male end of a fitting to provide an air tight seal and fastened connection.

  18. Joining engineering ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loehman, Ronald E.

    Methods for joining ceramics are outlined with attention given to their fundamental properties, and some examples of ceramic bonding in engineering ceramic systems are presented. Ceramic-ceramic bonds using no filler material include diffusion and electric-field bonding and ceramic welding, and bonds with filler materials can be provided by Mo-Mn brazing, microwave joining, and reactive nonmetallic liquid bonding. Ceramic-metal joints can be effected with filler material by means of the same ceramic-ceramic processes and without filler material by means of use of molten glass or diffusion bonding. Key properties of the bonding processes include: bonds with discontinuous material properties, energies that are positive relative to the bulk material, and unique chemical and mechanical properties. The processes and properties are outlined for ceramic-metal joints and for joining silicon nitride, and the factors that control wetting, adhesion, and reaction on the atomic scale are critical for establishing successful joints.

  19. Come Join the Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of students in Blue Springs, Missouri, are joining the band, drawn by a band director who emphasizes caring and inclusiveness. In the four years since Melissia Goff arrived at Blue Springs High School, the school's extensive band program has swelled. The marching band alone has gone from 100 to 185 participants. Also under Goff's…

  20. Joining a Gym

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trade Commission Consumer Information consumer.ftc.gov español Search form Search Vea esta página en español Joining ... rate ends.  Find Out What Other People Think Search for reviews online Do a search online to ...

  1. Joining Tubes With Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateman, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    Cylindrical tubes joined together, end to end, by method employing adhesive, tapered ends, and spacing wires. Tapered joint between tubular structural elements provides pressure between bonding surfaces during adhesive curing. Spacing wires prevent adhesive from being scraped away when one element inserted in other. Method developed for assembling structural elements made of composite materials.

  2. Multicolor printing plate joining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An upper plate having ink flow channels and a lower plate having a multicolored pattern are joined. The joining is accomplished without clogging any ink flow paths. A pattern having different colored parts and apertures is formed in a lower plate. Ink flow channels each having respective ink input ports are formed in an upper plate. The ink flow channels are coated with solder mask and the bottom of the upper plate is then coated with solder. The upper and lower plates are pressed together at from 2 to 5 psi and heated to a temperature of from 295 F to 750 F or enough to melt the solder. After the plates have cooled and the pressure is released, the solder mask is removed from the interior passageways by means of a liquid solvent.

  3. Technological Advances in Joining

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    automotive industry, and similar robots are being equipped to perform many arc welding functions in areas where high production rates must be...nonvacuum electron-beam welding favor the use of this process by the automotive industry. For example, this process has been used to join the component...metal additions were not needed. This process has been also used to weld various assemblies for automotive transmissions (e.g., annulus gear assemblies

  4. Joined ceramic product

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr., Charles W [Kennewick, WA; Brimhall, John L [West Richland, WA

    2001-08-21

    According to the present invention, a joined product is at least two ceramic parts, specifically bi-element carbide parts with a bond joint therebetween, wherein the bond joint has a metal silicon phase. The bi-element carbide refers to compounds of MC, M.sub.2 C, M.sub.4 C and combinations thereof, where M is a first element and C is carbon. The metal silicon phase may be a metal silicon carbide ternary phase, or a metal silicide.

  5. Welding and joining: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation is presented of NASA-developed technology in welding and joining. Topics discussed include welding equipment, techniques in welding, general bonding, joining techniques, and clamps and holding fixtures.

  6. Liquid-solid joining of bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongjiang; Xue, Peng; Guo, Shu; Wu, Yang; Cheng, Xiang; Fan, Hongbo; Ning, Zhiliang; Cao, Fuyang; Xing, Dawei; Sun, Jianfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-07-01

    Here, we successfully welded two bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials, Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 and Zr50.7Cu28Ni9Al12.3 (at. %), using a liquid-solid joining process. An atomic-scale metallurgical bonding between two BMGs can be achieved. The interface has a transition layer of ~50 μm thick. The liquid-solid joining of BMGs can shed more insights on overcoming their size limitation resulting from their limited glass-forming ability and then promoting their applications in structural components.

  7. Liquid-solid joining of bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongjiang; Xue, Peng; Guo, Shu; Wu, Yang; Cheng, Xiang; Fan, Hongbo; Ning, Zhiliang; Cao, Fuyang; Xing, Dawei; Sun, Jianfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we successfully welded two bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials, Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 and Zr50.7Cu28Ni9Al12.3 (at. %), using a liquid-solid joining process. An atomic-scale metallurgical bonding between two BMGs can be achieved. The interface has a transition layer of ~50 μm thick. The liquid-solid joining of BMGs can shed more insights on overcoming their size limitation resulting from their limited glass-forming ability and then promoting their applications in structural components. PMID:27471073

  8. Liquid-solid joining of bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongjiang; Xue, Peng; Guo, Shu; Wu, Yang; Cheng, Xiang; Fan, Hongbo; Ning, Zhiliang; Cao, Fuyang; Xing, Dawei; Sun, Jianfei; Liaw, Peter K

    2016-07-29

    Here, we successfully welded two bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials, Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 and Zr50.7Cu28Ni9Al12.3 (at. %), using a liquid-solid joining process. An atomic-scale metallurgical bonding between two BMGs can be achieved. The interface has a transition layer of ~50 μm thick. The liquid-solid joining of BMGs can shed more insights on overcoming their size limitation resulting from their limited glass-forming ability and then promoting their applications in structural components.

  9. Liquid-solid joining of bulk metallic glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Yongjiang; Xue, Peng; Guo, Shu; ...

    2016-07-29

    Here, we successfully welded two bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials, Zr 51Ti 5Ni 10Cu 25Al 9 and Zr 50.7Cu 28Ni 9Al 12.3 (at. %), using a liquid-solid joining process. An atomic-scale metallurgical bonding between two BMGs can be achieved. The interface has a transition layer of ~50 μm thick. In conclusion, the liquid-solid joining of BMGs can shed more insights on overcoming their size limitation resulting from their limited glass-forming ability and then promoting their applications in structural components.

  10. Method of joining ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.; Brimhall, John L.

    2000-01-01

    According to the method of the present invention, joining a first bi-element carbide to a second bi-element carbide, has the steps of: (a) forming a bond agent containing a metal carbide and silicon; (b) placing the bond agent between the first and second bi-element carbides to form a pre-assembly; and (c) pressing and heating the pre-assembly in a non-oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature effective to induce a displacement reaction creating a metal silicon phase bonding the first and second bi-element carbides.

  11. Silicon Nitride Joining.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    and alkaline earth species present in Si3 N or In the glass were found to be deleterious to joint integrity. The results of all ttanamission electron...of Si3 94 ,’ Bulietin, of The American Ceramic Society 58 58-486 (1979). 2 ~ ~ %$ - ~ ~ ’WIN TECHNICAL PROGRESS ’Progress during the third year of the...at temperatures up to 1300*C on Si3 N4 joined with a IaO-Al 2 O3 -Si0 2 glass, -5-9M, and with an yttrium oxynLtrLde glass, SG-14. However, the

  12. Finland to Join ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-02-01

    Finland will become the eleventh member state of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) [1]. Today, during a ceremony at the ESO Headquarters in Garching (Germany), a corresponding Agreement was signed by the Finnish Minister of Education and Science, Ms. Tuula Haatainen and the ESO Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky, in the presence of other high officials from Finland and the ESO member states (see Video Clip 02/04 below). Following subsequent ratification by the Finnish Parliament of the ESO Convention and the associated protocols [2], it is foreseen that Finland will formally join ESO on July 1, 2004. Uniting European Astronomy ESO PR Photo 03/04 ESO PR Photo 03/04 Caption : Signing of the Finland-ESO Agreement on February 9, 2004, at the ESO Headquarters in Garching (Germany). At the table, the ESO Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky, and the Finnish Minister of Education and Science, Ms. Tuula Haatainen . [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 499 pix - 52k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 997 pix - 720k] [Full Res - JPEG: 2126 x 2649 pix - 2.9M] The Finnish Minister of Education and Science, Ms. Tuula Haatainen, began her speech with these words: "On behalf of Finland, I am happy and proud that we are now joining the European Southern Observatory, one of the most successful megaprojects of European science. ESO is an excellent example of the potential of European cooperation in science, and along with the ALMA project, more and more of global cooperation as well." She also mentioned that besides science ESO offers many technological challenges and opportunities. And she added: "In Finland we will try to promote also technological and industrial cooperation with ESO, and we hope that the ESO side will help us to create good working relations. I am confident that Finland's membership in ESO will be beneficial to both sides." Dr. Catherine Cesarsky, ESO Director General, warmly welcomed the Finnish intention to join ESO. "With the accession of their country to ESO, Finnish

  13. Spain to Join ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-02-01

    /infrared astronomical observing site in Europe and site of the Spanish 10m GranTeCan telescope now nearing completion. With the high quality of Spanish astronomical research as well as the technological competence of Spanish industry, it is only fitting that Spain should join ESO, world-leader in ground-based astronomy. Through ESO Spain will enjoy full access both to all of ESO's current facilities and to unrestricted participation in the great projects that ESO is planning for the future. Spain is already an active partner of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), whose construction and operations are led on behalf of Europe by ESO. ESO's Council approved the admission of Spain at its 107th meeting held in Garching on 7 and 8 December 2005. High resolution images and their captions are available on this page.

  14. Joining of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    AFRL-ML-WP-TR-2003-4036 JOINING OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES LTC William A. Baeslack, III Metals Branch (AFRL/MLLM) Metals, Ceramics, and...GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 5d. PROJECT NUMBER MO2R 5e. TASK NUMBER 10 6. AUTHOR(S) LTC William A...comparatively discusses the results of research and development performed on the joining of gamma titanium aluminides during the past two decades. Although

  15. A Review of Similar and Dissimilar Micro-joining of Nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepan Bharathi Kannan, T.; Ramesh, T.; Sathiya, P.

    2016-04-01

    NiTinol belongs to a class of smart materials which has a wide range of applications in the field of automotive, aerospace, biomedical, robotics, etc., owing to the growing trend in miniaturization of components. Micro-joining is becoming one of the important and familiar processes in the fabrication of miniaturized components. Recently, effective micro-joining of thin sheets has been gaining a lot of interest among researchers. In this article, the research and progress in micro-joining of NiTinol to itself and other metals are reviewed at different aspects. To date, laser welding, tungsten inert gas welding, and resistance welding have been used to a large extent in investigating the weldability of NiTinol alloys. Some important welding parameters used in micro joining by various researchers and their effects on weld qualities are detailed in this review. Metallurgical aspects, mechanical properties and corrosion aspects of micro-joined NiTinol sheets/wires are discussed. The aim of this report is to review the recent progress in micro-joining of NiTinol and to provide a basis for follow-on research.

  16. Explosive Spot Joining of Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J. (Inventor); Perry, Ronnie B. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for wire splicing using an explosive joining process. The apparatus consists of a prebend, U-shaped strap of metal that slides over prepositioned wires. A standoff means separates the wires from the strap before joining. An adhesive means holds two ribbon explosives in position centered over the U-shaped strap. A detonating means connects to the ribbon explosives. The process involves spreading strands of each wire to be joined into a flat plane. The process then requires alternating each strand in alignment to form a mesh-like arrangement with an overlapped area. The strap slides over the strands of the wires. and the standoff means is positioned between the two surfaces. The detonating means then initiates the ribbon explosives that drive the strap to accomplish a high velocity. angular collision between the mating surfaces. This collision creates surface melts and collision bonding resulting in electron-sharing linkups.

  17. The Join-Up Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, W. Scott

    2002-01-01

    I recently took on a new assignment and, as is my norm, I scheduled a series of one-hour, 1:1 join-up meetings with the various lead personnel on the team and their hierarchy. During one of these meetings, the person I was meeting with informed me how pleasantly surprised she was that I had scheduled this meeting as very few individuals took the time anymore to have them. I was shocked. I was taught that establishing a 1:1 relationship with the people on your team is critical to the project's success. This was the first time I'd heard anything like this about join-up meetings. I filed this feedback away. Later I was talking to my project manager-mentor, and he indicated he had finished his join-up meetings with every person in his new organization. He also indicated his predecessor had conducted few, if any, join-up meetings. Again, I was shocked. When I reflected on these two experiences, I realized a very negative trend might be emerging in our fast-paced, schedule-driven, 500-e-mail-per-day, cell-phone -ringing, 24/7 -communication, multi-tasking work lives: NO FACE TIME! Face time is what you spend with people to talk about the project you are working on, their expectations of you, your expectations of them, your hierarchy's expectations about each of you, and/or-last but certainly not least-what each of you plans on achieving during the project. A 1:1, face-to-face, join-up meeting is the only way I know to build solid trust between the project manager and the team members and their hierarchy.

  18. Chrysler Upset Protrusion Joining Techniques for Joining Dissimilar Metals

    SciT

    Logan, Stephen

    The project goal was to develop and demonstrate a robust, cost effective, and versatile joining technique, known as Upset Protrusion Joining (UPJ), for joining challenging dissimilar metal com-binations, especially those where one of the metals is a die cast magnesium (Mg) component. Since two of the key obstacles preventing more widespread use of light metals (especially in high volume automotive applications) are 1) a lack of robust joining techniques and 2) susceptibility to galvanic corrosion, and since the majority of the joint combinations evaluated in this project include die cast Mg (the lightest structural metal) as one of the twomore » materials being joined, and since die casting is the most common and cost effective process for producing Mg components, then successful project completion provides a key enabler to high volume application of lightweight materials, thus potentially leading to reduced costs, and encouraging implementation of lightweight multi-material vehicles for significant reductions in energy consumption and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Eco-nomic benefits to end-use consumers are achieved primarily via the reduction in fuel consumption. Unlike currently available commercial processes, the UPJ process relies on a very robust mechanical joint rather than intermetallic bonding, so the more cathodic material can be coated prior to joining, thus creating a robust isolation against galvanic attack on the more anodic material. Additionally, since the UPJ protrusion is going through a hole that can be pre-drilled or pre-punched prior to coating, the UPJ process is less likely to damage the coating when the joint is being made. Further-more, since there is no additional cathodic material (such as a steel fastener) used to create the joint, there is no joining induced galvanic activity beyond that of the two parent materials. In accordance with its originally proposed plan, this project has successfully developed process variants of UPJ to

  19. Universal connectors for joining stringers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Jr., Ernest (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    This invention is a lightweight, universal connector that joins stringers at various angles. The connectors 10 are fabricated from fiber-epoxy resin strips that wrap around stringers 30 and have ends, tabs 16 and 18, which extend in one general direction. The inside surface of the first tab 16 lies on a plane defined by the stringers being joined, and the second tab 18 is separated from the first tab 16 by a distance equal to their thickness. Stringers 30 of different shapes and sizes are joined by alternately bonding the first tab 16 of one connector between the first 16 and second 18 tabs of another connector. Tee-joints are formed by using web elements 41 and 42 which each partially wrap around a stringer 3010 and have tabs 411 and 421 which are offset, and are bonded between tabs 16 and 18 of universal connectors 109 and 1010 bonded to another stringer 309. Sharp corners are trimmed from the tabs so that a gusset area remains between the stringers for support. Acute angle through obtuse angle joints are formed by trimming those edges of the tabs which lie against the stringers. A specific application of the invention is a Walker 60, utilized by handicapped individuals, fabricated from composite materials that is 40% lighter than similar metallic structures.

  20. All-round joining method with carbon fiber reinforced interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Noriyoshi; Tanaka, Kazunori; Kamiya, Yoshiko; Nishi, Yoshitake

    2008-08-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) has been recently applied to not only wing, but also fan blades of turbo fan engines. To prevent impact force, leading edge of titanium was often mounted on the CFRP fan blades with adhesive force. In order to enhance the joining strength, a joining method with carbon fiber reinforced interface has been developed. By using nickel-coated carbon fibers, a joining sample with carbon fiber-reinforced interface between CFRP and CFRM has been successfully developed. The joining sample with nickel-coated carbon fiber interface exhibits the high tensile strength, which was about 10 times higher than that with conventional adhesion. On the other hand, Al-welding methods to steel, Cu and Ti with carbon fiber reinforced interface have been successfully developed to lighten the parts of machines of racing car and airplane. Carbon fibers in felt are covered with metals to protect the interfacial reaction. The first step of the welding method is that the Al coated felt is contacted and wrapped with molten aluminum solidified under gravity pressure, whereas the second step is that the felt with double layer of Ni and Al is contacted and wrapped with molten steel (Cu or Ti) solidified under gravity pressure. Tensile strength of Al-Fe (Cu or Ti) welded sample with carbon fiber reinforced interface is higher than those of Al-Fe (Cu or Ti) welded sample.

  1. Several braze filler metals for joining an oxide-dispersion-strengthened nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyorgak, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation was made of five braze filler metals for joining an aluminum-containing oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy, TD-NiCrAl. All five braze filler metals evaluated are considered suitable for joining TD-NiCrAl in terms of wettability and flow. Also, the braze alloys appear to be tolerant of slight variations in brazing procedures since joints prepared by three sources using three of the braze filler metals exhibited similar brazing characteristics and essentially equivalent 1100 C stress-rupture properties in a brazed butt-joint configuration. Recommendations are provided for brazing the aluminum-containing ODS alloys.

  2. Combustion Joining for Composite Fabrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-25

    Inert preheating Process beginning T e m p e r a t u r e , o C Time, s I = 600 Amps D = 10 mm Joule preheating only up to Tig UNCLASSIFIED • C...Honeywell Corp (South Bend, IN) • Currently build aircraft brake disks from carbon fibers • use a long (~ 100 day) CVD process to densify • Brake wear...oxidation with every landing A380 -rejected take off test C-C brakes UNCLASSIFIED Joining C-Based Materials • Difficult task – Carbon cannot be welded

  3. Joining of polymer composite materials

    SciT

    Magness, F.H.

    1990-11-01

    Under ideal conditions load bearing structures would be designed without joints, thus eliminating a source of added weight, complexity and weakness. In reality the need for accessibility, repair, and inspectability, added to the size limitations imposed by the manufacturing process and transportation/assembly requirements mean that some minimum number of joints will be required in most structures. The designer generally has two methods for joining fiber composite materials, adhesive bonding and mechanical fastening. As the use of thermoplastic materials increases, a third joining technique -- welding -- will become more common. It is the purpose of this document to provide amore » review of the available sources pertinent to the design of joints in fiber composites. The primary emphasis is given to adhesive bonding and mechanical fastening with information coming from documentary sources as old as 1961 and as recent as 1989. A third, shorter section on composite welding is included in order to provide a relatively comprehensive treatment of the subject.« less

  4. Flexible Friction Stir Joining Technology

    SciT

    Feng, Zhili; Lim, Yong Chae; Mahoney, Murray

    2015-07-23

    Reported herein is the final report on a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) project with industry cost-share that was jointly carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company (ExxonMobil), and MegaStir Technologies (MegaStir). The project was aimed to advance the state of the art of friction stir welding (FSW) technology, a highly energy-efficient solid-state joining process, for field deployable, on-site fabrications of large, complex and thick-sectioned structures of high-performance and high-temperature materials. The technology innovations developed herein attempted to address two fundamental shortcomings of FSW: 1) the inability for on-site welding andmore » 2) the inability to weld thick section steels, both of which have impeded widespread use of FSW in manufacturing. Through this work, major advance has been made toward transforming FSW technology from a “specialty” process to a mainstream materials joining technology to realize its pervasive energy, environmental, and economic benefits across industry.« less

  5. Infrared transient-liquid-phase joining of SCS-6/ β21S titanium matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, Craig A.; Sikka, Vinod K.; Blue, Randall A.; Lin, Ray Y.

    1996-12-01

    Fiber-reinforced titanium matrix composites (TMCs) are among the advanced materials being considered for use in the aerospace industry due to their light weight, high strength, and high modulus. A rapid infrared joining process has been developed for the joining of composites and advanced materials. Rapid infrared joining has been shown not to have many of the problems associated with conventional joining methods. Two models were utilized to predict the joint evolution and fiber reaction zone growth. Titanium matrix composite, 16-ply SCS-6/ β21S, has been successfully joined with total processing times of approximately 2 minutes, utilizing the rapid infrared joining technique. The process utilizes a 50 °C/s ramping rate, 17- µm Ti-15Cu-15Ni wt pct filler material between the faying surfaces; a joining temperature of 1100 °C; and 120 seconds of time to join the composite material. Joint shear-strength testing of the rapid infrared joints at temperatures as high as 800 °C has revealed no joint failures. Also, due to the rapid cooling of the process, no poststabilization of the matrix material is necessary to prevent the formation of a brittle omega phase during subsequent use of the TMC at intermediate temperatures, 270 °C to 430 °C, for up to 20 hours.

  6. Georneys joins AGU's blog network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viñas, Maria-José

    2011-07-01

    A blog on geological musings, wanderings, and adventures, called Georneys, has joined AGU's network of Earth and space science blogs. With the addition of Georneys, on 11 July, the AGU Blogosphere (http://blogs.agu.org), as the network is known, has grown to showcase eight independent blogs since its launch last fall. “One reason I write this blog is to maintain my sanity as I finish up my Ph.D. In the midst of much stress, long days in lab, and long nights writing thesis chapters, I write to remind myself of why I love geology,” says Georneys blogger Evelyn Mervine. “I also write to document some of my geological adventures and to share my love of geology with others.”

  7. Affordable, Robust Ceramic Joining Technology (ARCJoint) Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Gynelle C.

    2001-01-01

    Affordable, Robust Ceramic Joining Technology (ARCJoint) is a method for joining high temperature- resistant ceramic pieces together, establishing joints that are strong, and allowing joining to be done in the field. This new way of joining allows complex shapes to be formed by joining together geometrically simple shapes. The joining technology at NASA is one of the enabling technologies for the application of silicon-carbide-based ceramic and composite components in demanding and high-temperature applications. The technology is being developed and tested for high-temperature propulsion parts for aerospace use. Commercially, it can be used for joining ceramic pieces used for high temperature applications in the power-generating and chemical industries, as well as in the microelectronics industry. This innovation could yield big payoffs for not only the power-generating industry but also the Silicon Valley chipmakers. This technology, which was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center by Dr. Mrityunjay Singh, is a two-step process involving first using a paste to join together ceramic pieces and bonding them by heating the joint to 110 to 120 C for between 10 and 20 min. This makes the joint strong enough to be handled for the final joining. Then, a silicon-based substance is applied to the joint and heated to 1400 C for 10 to 15 min. The resulting joint is as strong as the original ceramic material and can withstand the same high temperatures.

  8. Fermilab Friends for Science Education | Join Us

    Fermilab Friends for Science Education FFSE Home About Us Join Us Support Us Contact Us Join Us photo Fermilab Friends for Science Education (FFSE) needs you now! More than ever our society and improving science (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education. Your donation allows us to

  9. Joining of advanced materials by superplastic deformation

    DOEpatents

    Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.; Gutierrez-Mora, Felipe

    2008-08-19

    A method for utilizing superplastic deformation with or without a novel joint compound that leads to the joining of advanced ceramic materials, intermetallics, and cermets. A joint formed by this approach is as strong as or stronger than the materials joined. The method does not require elaborate surface preparation or application techniques.

  10. Joining of advanced materials by superplastic deformation

    DOEpatents

    Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.; Gutierrez-Mora, Felipe

    2005-12-13

    A method for utilizing superplastic deformation with or without a novel joint compound that leads to the joining of advanced ceramic materials, intermetallics, and cermets. A joint formed by this approach is as strong as or stronger than the materials joined. The method does not require elaborate surface preparation or application techniques.

  11. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jian; Qi, Junlei; Song, Xiaoguo; Feng, Jicai

    2014-01-01

    Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials. PMID:28788113

  12. Willmore energy for joining of carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sripaturad, P.; Alshammari, N. A.; Thamwattana, N.; McCoy, J. A.; Baowan, D.

    2018-06-01

    Numerous types of carbon nanostructure have been found experimentally, including nanotubes, fullerenes and nanocones. These structures have applications in various nanoscale devices and the joining of these structures may lead to further new configurations with more remarkable properties and applications. The join profile between different carbon nanostructures in a symmetric configuration may be modelled using the calculus of variations. In previous studies, carbon nanostructures were assumed to deform according to perfect elasticity, thus the elastic energy, depending only on the axial curvature, was used to determine the join profile consisting of a finite number of discrete bonds. However, one could argue that the relevant energy should also involve the rotational curvature, especially when its size is comparable to the axial curvature. In this paper, we use the Willmore energy, a natural generalisation of the elastic energy that depends on both the axial and rotational curvatures. Catenoids are absolute minimisers of this energy and pieces of these may be used to join various nanostructures. We focus on the cases of joining a fullerene to a nanotube and joining two fullerenes along a common axis. By comparing our results with the earlier work, we find that both energies give similar joining profiles. Further work on other configurations may reveal which energy provides a better model.

  13. Advanced concepts in joining by conventional processes

    SciT

    Edwards, G.R.; Fasching-James, A.A.; Onsoien, M.I.

    1994-12-31

    Innovations which can be made to conventional arc welding processes so that advanced materials can be more efficiently joined are considered. Three examples are discussed: (1) GTA welding of iron aluminides, (2) GMA welding of advanced steels, and (3) SMA welding of structural steels. Advanced materials present new challenges for the materials joining specialist. The three examples discussed in this paper demonstrate, however, that modest but creative alterations of conventional GTAW, GMAW, or SMAW processes can provide new and better controls for solving advanced materials joining problems.

  14. Method of joining metallic and composite components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmes, Edmund B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method is provided for joining a metallic member to a structure made of a composite matrix material. One or more surfaces of a portion of the metallic member that is to be joined to the composite matrix structure is provided with a plurality of outwardly projecting studs. The surface including the studs is brought into engagement with a portion of an uncured composite matrix material so that fibers of the composite matrix material intertwine with the studs, and the metallic member and composite structure form an assembly. The assembly is then companion cured so as to join the metallic member to the composite matrix material structure.

  15. Prospects of joining multi-material structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, R.; Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss

    2018-05-01

    Spring up trends and necessities make the pipelines for the brand new Technologies. The same way, Multimaterial structures emerging as fruitful alternatives for the conventional structures in the manufacturing sector. Especially manufacturing of transport vehicles is placing a perfect platform for these new structures. Bonding or joining technology plays a crucial role in the field of manufacturing for sustainability. These latest structures are purely depending on such joining technologies so that multi-material structuring can be possible practically. The real challenge lies on joining dissimilar materials of different properties and nature. Escalation of thermoplastic usage in large structural components also faces similar ambiguity for joining multi-material structures. Adhesive bonding, mechanical fastening and are the answering technologies for multi-material structures. This current paper analysis the prospects of these bonding technologies to meet the challenges of tomorrow.

  16. Steps to Join Green Power Partnership

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary partnership program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. This page details steps organizations should take to join the Partnership.

  17. Joining of porous silicon carbide bodies

    DOEpatents

    Bates, Carl H.; Couhig, John T.; Pelletier, Paul J.

    1990-05-01

    A method of joining two porous bodies of silicon carbide is disclosed. It entails utilizing an aqueous slip of a similar silicon carbide as was used to form the porous bodies, including the sintering aids, and a binder to initially join the porous bodies together. Then the composite structure is subjected to cold isostatic pressing to form a joint having good handling strength. Then the composite structure is subjected to pressureless sintering to form the final strong bond. Optionally, after the sintering the structure is subjected to hot isostatic pressing to further improve the joint and densify the structure. The result is a composite structure in which the joint is almost indistinguishable from the silicon carbide pieces which it joins.

  18. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Anderson, Iver E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina; Nosrati, Mohammad; Unal, Ozer

    1999-01-12

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  19. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Anderson, Iver E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina; Nosrati, Mohammad; Unal, Ozer

    1999-07-13

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  20. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Anderson, Iver E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina; Nosrati, Mohammad; Unal, Ozer

    2001-04-10

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  1. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-07-13

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 C to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  2. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-01-12

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  3. Fluxing agent for metal cast joining

    DOEpatents

    Gunkel, Ronald W.; Podey, Larry L.; Meyer, Thomas N.

    2002-11-05

    A method of joining an aluminum cast member to an aluminum component. The method includes the steps of coating a surface of an aluminum component with flux comprising cesium fluoride, placing the flux coated component in a mold, filling the mold with molten aluminum alloy, and allowing the molten aluminum alloy to solidify thereby joining a cast member to the aluminum component. The flux preferably includes aluminum fluoride and alumina. A particularly preferred flux includes about 60 wt. % CsF, about 30 wt. % AlF.sub.3, and about 10 wt. % Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.

  4. Deformation and Forming of Joined Materials

    SciT

    Carsley, John; Hovanski, Yuri; Clarke, Kester D.

    2014-09-23

    Introductory article to a set of invited papers from the TMS committee on shaping and forming. This paper introduces a set of papers that were prepared to discussing the deformation and forming of joined materials, and to announce an upcoming symposium at the 2015 MS&T meeting in Columbus Ohio.

  5. Joined-wing research airplane feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolkovitch, J.

    1984-01-01

    The joined wing is a new type of aircraft configuration which employs tandem wings arranged to form diamond shapes in plan view and front view. Wind-tunnel tests and finite-element structural analyses have shown that the joined wing provides the following advantages over a comparable wing-plus-tail system; lighter weight and higher stiffness, higher span-efficiency factor, higher trimmed maximum lift coefficient, lower wave drag, plus built-in direct lift and direct sideforce control capability. To verify these advantages at full scale a manned research airplane is required. A study has therefore been performed of the feasibility of constructing such an airplane, using the fuselage and engines of the existing NAA AD-1 oblique-wing airplane. Cost and schedule constraints favored converting the AD-1 rather than constructing a totally new airframe. By removing the outboard wing panels the configuration can simulate wings joined at 60, 80, or 100 percent of span. For maximum versatility the aircraft has alternative control surfaces (such as ailerons and elevators on the front and/or rear wings), and a removeable canard to explore canard/joined-wing interactions at high-lift conditions. Design, performance, and flying qualities are discussed.

  6. METHOD FOR JOINING ALUMINUM TO STAINLESS STEEL

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, L.C.

    1960-05-24

    Aluminum may be joined to stainless steel without the use of flux by tinning the aluminum with a tin solder containing 1% silver and 1% lead, tinning the stainless steel with a 50% lead 50% tin solder, and then sweating the tinned surfaces together.

  7. Explosive Joining for Nuclear-Reactor Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Bailey, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    In explosive joining technique, adapter flange from fuel channel machined to incorporate a V-notch interface. Ribbon explosive, 1/2 inch (1.3 cm) in width, drives V-notched wall of adapter into bellows assembly, producing atomic-level metallurgical bond. Ribbon charge yields joint with double parent metal strength.

  8. Structural optimization for joined-wing synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallman, John W.; Kroo, Ilan M.

    1992-01-01

    The differences between fully stressed and minimum-weight joined-wing structures are identified, and these differences are quantified in terms of weight, stress, and direct operating cost. A numerical optimization method and a fully stressed design method are used to design joined-wing structures. Both methods determine the sizes of 204 structural members, satisfying 1020 stress constraints and five buckling constraints. Monotonic splines are shown to be a very effective way of linking spanwise distributions of material to a few design variables. Both linear and nonlinear analyses are employed to formulate the buckling constraints. With a constraint on buckling, the fully stressed design is shown to be very similar to the minimum-weight structure. It is suggested that a fully stressed design method based on nonlinear analysis is adequate for an aircraft optimization study.

  9. Toroid Joining Gun For Fittings And Couplings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L.; Swaim, Robert J.; Johnson, Samuel D.; Buckley, John D.; Copeland, Carl E.; Coultrip, Robert H.; Johnston, David F.; Phillips, William M.

    1992-01-01

    Hand-held gun used to join metal heat-to-shrink couplings. Uses magnetic induction (eddy currents) to produce heat in metal coupling, and thermocouple to measure temperature and signals end of process. Gun, called "toroid joining gun" concentrates high levels of heat in localized areas. Reconfigured for use on metal heat-to-shrink fitting and coupling applications. Provides rapid heating, operates on low power, lightweight and portable. Safe for use around aircraft fuel and has no detrimental effects on surrounding surfaces or objects. Reliable in any environment and under all weather conditions. Gun logical device for taking full advantage of capabilities of new metal heat-to-shrink couplings and fittings.

  10. Rhenium Mechanical Properties and Joining Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Biaglow, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) provides thermal margin for high performance and long life radiation cooled rockets. Two issues that have arisen in the development of flight Ir/Re engines are the sparsity of rhenium (Re) mechanical property data (particularly at high temperatures) required for engineering design, and the inability to directly electron beam weld Re chambers to C103 nozzle skirts. To address these issues, a Re mechanical property database is being established and techniques for creating Re/C103 transition joints are being investigated. This paper discusses the tensile testing results of powder metallurgy Re samples at temperatures from 1370 to 2090 C. Also discussed is the evaluation of Re/C103 transition pieces joined by both, explosive and diffusion bonding. Finally, the evaluation of full size Re transition pieces, joined by inertia welding, as well as explosive and diffusion bonding, is detailed.

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    Fermilab Prairie photo Saturday, September 17, 2011; 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM Have you ever walked through a native tallgrass forbs and grasses. As a member of FFSE, you are invited to a members-only tour of this rare ecosystem. Join prairie experts on a tour of the Margaret Pearson Interpretive Trail and the

  12. Joining of materials using laser heating

    DOEpatents

    Cockeram, Brian V.; Hicks, Trevor G.; Schmid, Glenn C.

    2003-07-01

    A method for diffusion bonding ceramic layers such as boron carbide, zirconium carbide, or silicon carbide uses a defocused laser beam to heat and to join ceramics with the use of a thin metal foil insert. The metal foil preferably is rhenium, molybdenum or titanium. The rapid, intense heating of the ceramic/metal/ceramic sandwiches using the defocused laser beam results in diffusive conversion of the refractory metal foil into the ceramic and in turn creates a strong bond therein.

  13. CFRTP and stainless steel laser joining: Thermal defects analysis and joining parameters optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Junke; Xu, Zifa; Wang, Qiang; Sheng, Liyuan; Zhang, Wenwu

    2018-07-01

    Experiments with different joining parameters were carried out on fiber laser welding system to explore the mechanism of CFRTP/stainless steel joining and the influence of the parameters on the joining quality. The thermal defect and the microstructure of the joint was tested by SEM, EDS. The joint strength and the thermal defect zone width was measured by the tensile tester and the laser confocal microscope, respectively. The influence of parameters such as the laser power, the joining speed and the clamper pressure on the stainless steel surface thermal defect and the joint strength was analyzed. The result showed that the thermal defect on the stainless steel surface would change metal's mechanical properties and reduce its service life. A chemical bonding was found between the CFRTP and the stainless steel besides the physical bonding and the mechanical bonding. The highest shear stress was obtained as the laser power, the joining speed and the clamper pressure is 280 W, 4 mm/s and 0.15 MPa, respectively.

  14. Solid State Joining of Magnesium to Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Pilli, Siva P.; Field, David P.; Yu, Hao; Pan, Tsung-Yu; Santella, M. L.

    Friction stir welding and ultrasonic welding techniques were applied to join automotive magnesium alloys to steel sheet. The effect of tooling and process parameters on the post-weld microstructure, texture and mechanical properties was investigated. Static and dynamic loading were utilized to investigate the joint strength of both cast and wrought magnesium alloys including their susceptibility and degradation under corrosive media. The conditions required to produce joint strengths in excess of 75% of the base metal strength were determined, and the effects of surface coatings, tooling and weld parameters on weld properties are presented.

  15. METHOD OF JOINING CARBIDES TO BASE METALS

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, N.H.; Farr, J.D.; Witteman, W.G.

    1962-02-13

    A method is described for joining a refractory metal carbide such as UC or ZrC to a refractory metal base such as Ta or Nb. The method comprises carburizing the surface of the metal base and then sintering the base and carbide at temperatures of about 2000 deg C in a non-oxidizing atmosphere, the base and carbide being held in contact during the sintering step. To reduce the sintering temperature and time, a sintering aid such as iron, nickel, or cobait is added to the carbide, not to exceed 5 wt%. (AEC)

  16. Evaluating the Upset Protrusion Joining (UPJ) Method to Join magnesium Castings to Dissimilar Metals

    SciT

    Logan, Stephen D.

    2015-08-19

    This presentation discusses advantages and best practices for incorporating magnesium in automotive component applications to achieve substantial mass reduction, as well as some of the key challenges with respect to joining, coating, and galvanic corrosion, before providing an introduction and status update of the U.S. Department of Energy and Department of Defense jointly sponsored Upset Protrusion Joining (UPJ) process development and evaluation project. This update includes sharing performance results of a benchmark evaluation of the self-pierce riveting (SPR) process for joining dissimilar magnesium (Mg) to aluminum (Al) materials in four unique coating configurations before introducing the UPJ concept and comparingmore » performance results of the joints made with the UPJ process to those made with the SPR process.« less

  17. Risky business: Microhomology-mediated end joining.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Supriya; Villarreal, Diana; Shim, Eun Yong; Lee, Sang Eun

    2016-06-01

    Prevalence of microhomology (MH) at the breakpoint junctions in somatic and germ-line chromosomal rearrangements and in the programmed immune receptor rearrangements from cells deficient in classical end joining reveals an enigmatic process called MH-mediated end joining (MMEJ). MMEJ repairs DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by annealing flanking MH and deleting genetic information at the repair junctions from yeast to humans. Being genetically distinct from canonical DNA DSB pathways, MMEJ is involved with the fusions of eroded/uncapped telomeres as well as with the assembly of chromosome fragments in chromothripsis. In this review article, we will discuss an up-to-date model representing the MMEJ process and the mechanism by which cells regulate MMEJ to limit repair-associated mutagenesis. We will also describe the possible therapeutic gains resulting from the inhibition of MMEJ in recombination deficient cancers. Lastly, we will embark on two contentious issues associated with MMEJ such as the significance of MH at the repair junction to be the hallmark of MMEJ and the relationship of MMEJ to other mechanistically related DSB repair pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Joining of thermoplastic substrates by microwaves

    DOEpatents

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Meek, Thomas T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for joining two or more items having surfaces of thermoplastic material includes the steps of depositing an electrically-conductive material upon the thermoplastic surface of at least one of the items, and then placing the other of the two items adjacent the one item so that the deposited material is in intimate contact with the surfaces of both the one and the other items. The deposited material and the thermoplastic surfaces contacted thereby are then exposed to microwave radiation so that the thermoplastic surfaces in contact with the deposited material melt, and then pressure is applied to the two items so that the melted thermoplastic surfaces fuse to one another. Upon discontinuance of the exposure to the microwave energy, and after permitting the thermoplastic surfaces to cool from the melted condition, the two items are joined together by the fused thermoplastic surfaces. The deposited material has a thickness which is preferably no greater than a skin depth, .delta..sub.s, which is related to the frequency of the microwave radiation and characteristics of the deposited material in accordance with an equation.

  19. Joining Dental Ceramic Layers With Glass

    PubMed Central

    Saied, MA; Lloyd, IK; Haller, WK; Lawn, BR

    2011-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that glass-bonding of free-form veneer and core ceramic layers can produce robust interfaces, chemically durable and aesthetic in appearance and, above all, resistant to delamination. Methods Layers of independently produced porcelains (NobelRondo™ Press porcelain, Nobel BioCare AB and Sagkura Interaction porcelain, Elephant Dental) and matching alumina or zirconia core ceramics (Procera alumina, Nobel BioCare AB, BioZyram yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal, Cyrtina Dental) were joined with designed glasses, tailored to match thermal expansion coefficients of the components and free of toxic elements. Scanning electron microprobe analysis was used to characterize the chemistry of the joined interfaces, specifically to confirm interdiffusion of ions. Vickers indentations were used to drive controlled corner cracks into the glass interlayers to evaluate the toughness of the interfaces. Results The glass-bonded interfaces were found to have robust integrity relative to interfaces fused without glass, or those fused with a resin-based adhesive. Significance The structural integrity of the interfaces between porcelain veneers and alumina or zirconia cores is a critical factor in the longevity of all-ceramic dental crowns and fixed dental prostheses. PMID:21802131

  20. In-network processing of joins in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyunchul

    2013-03-11

    The join or correlated filtering of sensor readings is one of the fundamental query operations in wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Although the join in centralized or distributed databases is a well-researched problem, join processing in WSNs has quite different characteristics and is much more difficult to perform due to the lack of statistics on sensor readings and the resource constraints of sensor nodes. Since data transmission is orders of magnitude more costly than processing at a sensor node, in-network processing of joins is essential. In this paper, the state-of-the-art techniques for join implementation in WSNs are surveyed. The requirements and challenges, join types, and components of join implementation are described. The open issues for further research are identified.

  1. In-Network Processing of Joins in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyunchul

    2013-01-01

    The join or correlated filtering of sensor readings is one of the fundamental query operations in wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Although the join in centralized or distributed databases is a well-researched problem, join processing in WSNs has quite different characteristics and is much more difficult to perform due to the lack of statistics on sensor readings and the resource constraints of sensor nodes. Since data transmission is orders of magnitude more costly than processing at a sensor node, in-network processing of joins is essential. In this paper, the state-of-the-art techniques for join implementation in WSNs are surveyed. The requirements and challenges, join types, and components of join implementation are described. The open issues for further research are identified. PMID:23478603

  2. Conjoint Forming - Technologies for Simultaneous Forming and Joining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groche, P.; Wohletz, S.; Mann, A.; Krech, M.; Monnerjahn, V.

    2016-03-01

    The market demand for new products optimized for e. g. lightweight applications or smart components leads to new challenges in production engineering. Hybrid structures represent one promising approach. They aim at higher product performance by using a suitable combination of different materials. The developments of hybrid structures stimulate the research on joining of dissimilar materials. Since they allow for joining dissimilar materials without external heating technologies based on joining by plastic deformation seem to be of special attractiveness. The paper at hand discusses the conjoint forming approach. This approach combines forming and joining in one process. Two or more workpieces are joined while at least one workpiece is plastically deformed. After presenting the fundamental joining mechanisms, the conjoint forming approach is discussed comprehensively. Examples of conjoint processes demonstrate the effectiveness and reveal the underlying phenomena.

  3. Study of Electromigration-Induced Failures on Cu Pillar Bumps Joined to OSP and ENEPIG Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Kwang-Lung; Lee, Chiu-Wen; Shao, Yu-Hsiu; Lai, Yi-Shao

    2012-12-01

    This work studies electromigration (EM)-induced failures on Cu pillar bumps joined to organic solderability preservative (OSP) on Cu substrates (OSP-bumps) and electroless Ni(P)/electroless Pd/immersion Au (ENEPIG) under bump metallurgy (UBM) on Cu substrates (ENEPIG-bumps). Two failure modes (Cu pad consumption and gap formation) were found with OSP-bumps, but only one failure mode (gap formation) was found with ENEPIG-bumps. The main interfacial compound layer was the Cu6Sn5 compound, which suffered significant EM-induced dissolution, eventually resulting in severe Cu pad consumption at the cathode side for OSP-bumps. A (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 layer with strong resistance to EM-induced dissolution exists at the joint interface when a nickel barrier layer is incorporated at the cathode side (Ni or ENEPIG), and these imbalanced atomic fluxes result in the voids and gap formation. OSP-bumps showed better lifetime results than ENEPIG-bumps for several current stressing conditions. The inverse Cu atomic flux ( J Cu,chem) which diffuses from the Cu pad to cathode side retards the formation of voids. The driving force for J Cu,chem comes from the difference in chemical potential between the (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 and Cu6Sn5 phases.

  4. Join or be excluded from biomedicine? JOINS and Post-colonial Korea.

    PubMed

    Ma, Eunjeong

    2015-04-01

    This paper discusses re-emergence of Korean medicine(s) in the global context with a focus on a natural drug JOINS, a highly contentious drug regarding its legal status. By following through its life world, the paper contends that the drug is the embodiment of the postcolonial anxiety that crosses the intersections between the aspiring nation and globalizing strategies of the bio-pharmaceutical industry. JOINS is a natural drug prescribed to alleviate the symptoms of degenerative arthritis. SK Chemicals, Ltd., a giant domestic pharmaceutical company developed the drug by utilizing the knowledge of traditional pharmacopeia and put it on the market in 2001. In the domestic market, the drug is treated as a prescription drug, implying that Western medicine-trained doctors (as opposed to Korean medicine doctors) are entitled to prescribe drugs. It also indicates that the drug has undergone a series of lab tests such as toxicity, efficacy, and clinical trials in compliance with regulatory guidelines. However, the domestic standards are not rigorous enough to satisfy international standards, so that it is exported as a nutritional supplement abroad. The government, the pharmaceutical industry, and the Western medicine profession are happy with how the drug stands domestically and internationally. Rather, it is Korean doctors who try to disrupt the status quo and reclaim their rights to traditional knowledge, who have been alienated from the pharmaceuticalization of traditional knowledge. Thus, the JOINS tablet embodies the complex web of modern Korean society, professional interests, the pharmaceutical industry, and globalization.

  5. Austria Declares Intent To Join ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    At a press conference today at the University of Vienna's Observatory, the Austrian Science Minister Johannes Hahn announced the decision by the Austrian Government to seek membership of ESO from 1 July this year. ESO PR Photo 11/08 ESO PR Photo 11/08 Announcing Austria's Intent to Join ESO Said Minister Hahn: "With membership of ESO, Austria's scientists will receive direct access to the world's leading infrastructure in astronomy. This strengthens Austria as a place for research and provides an opportunity for young researchers to continue their work from here. With this move, Austria takes an important step in the reinforcement of Europe's science and research infrastructure." The decision constitutes a major breakthrough for Austrian scientists who have argued for membership of ESO for many years. Seeking membership in ESO also marks a step towards the further development of the European Research and Innovation Area, an important element of Europe's so-called Lisbon Strategy. "ESO welcomes the Austrian bid to join our organisation. I salute the Austrian Government for taking this important step and look forward to working closely with our Austrian friends and colleagues in the years to come," commented the ESO Director General, Tim de Zeeuw. For Austrian astronomers, ESO membership means not only unrestricted access to ESO's world-leading observational facilities including the world's most advanced optical telescope, the Very Large Telescope, and full participation in the quasi-global ALMA project, but also the possibility to participate on a par with their European colleagues in the future projects of ESO, including the realisation of ESO's Extremely Large Telescope project (E-ELT), which is currently in the design phase. All these projects require some of the most advanced technologies in key areas such as optics, detectors, lightweight structures, etc. Austrian participation in ESO opens the door for Austrian industry and major research institutes of the

  6. Aerodynamic and structural studies of joined-wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, Ilan; Smith, Stephen; Gallman, John

    1991-01-01

    A method for rapidly evaluating the structural and aerodynamic characteristics of joined-wing aircraft was developed and used to study the fundamental advantages attributed to this concept. The technique involves a rapid turnaround aerodynamic analysis method for computing minimum trimmed drag combined with a simple structural optimization. A variety of joined-wing designs are compared on the basis of trimmed drag, structural weight, and, finally, trimmed drag with fixed structural weight. The range of joined-wing design parameters resulting in best cruise performance is identified. Structural weight savings and net drag reductions are predicted for certain joined-wing configurations compared with conventional cantilever-wing configurations.

  7. Evaluating the Upset Protrusion Joining (UPJ) Method to Join Magnesium Castings to Dissimilar Metals

    SciT

    Logan, Stephen

    2016-02-24

    This presentation discusses advantages and best practices for incorporating magnesium in automotive component applications to achieve substantial mass reduction, as well as some of the key challenges with respect to joining, coating, and galvanic corrosion, before providing an introduction and status update of the U.S. Department of Energy and Department of Defense jointly sponsored Upset Protrusion Joining (UPJ) process development and evaluation project. This update includes sharing performance results of a benchmark evaluation of the self-pierce riveting (SPR) process for joining dissimilar magnesium (Mg) to aluminum (Al) materials in four unique coating configurations before introducing the UPJ concept and comparingmore » performance results of the joints made with the UPJ process to those made with the SPR process. Key results presented include: The benchmark SPR process can produce good joints in the MgAM60B-Al 6013 joint configuration with minimal cracking in the Mg coupons if the rivet is inserted from the Mg side into the Al side; Numerous bare Mg to bare Al joints made with the SPR process separated after only 6-wks of accelerated corrosion testing due to fracture of the rivet as a result of hydrogen embrittlement; For the same joint configurations, UPJ demonstrated substantially higher pre-corrosion joint strengths and post-corrosion joint strengths, primarily because of the larger diameter protrusion compared to smaller SPR rivet diameter and reduced degradation due to accelerated corrosion exposure; As with the SPR process, numerous bare Mg to bare Al joints made with the UPJ process also separated after 6-wks of accelerated corrosion testing, but unlike the SPR experience, the UPJ joints experienced degradation of the boss and head because of galvanic corrosion of the Mg casting, not hydrogen embrittlement of the steel rivet; In the configuration where both the Mg and Al were pretreated with Alodine 5200 prior to joining and the complete assembly

  8. Modeling non-homologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2011-08-21

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is an important DNA repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks. Several proteins, including Ku, DNA-PKcs, Artemis, XRCC4/Ligase IV and XLF, are involved in the NHEJ for the DNA damage detection, DNA free end processing and ligation. The classical model of NHEJ is a sequential model in which DNA-PKcs is first recruited by the Ku bound DNA prior to any other repair proteins. Recent experimental study (McElhinny et al., 2000; Costantini et al., 2007; Mari et al., 2006; Yano and Chen, 2008) suggested that the recruitment ordering is not crucial. In this work, by proposing a mathematical model in terms of biochemical reaction network and performing stability and related analysis, we demonstrate theoretically that if DSB repair pathway independent of DNA-PKcs exists, then the classical sequential model and new two-phase model are essentially indistinguishable in the sense that DSB can be repaired thoroughly in both models when the repair proteins are sufficient. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Refractory metal joining for first wall applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadden, C. H.; Odegard, B. C.

    2000-12-01

    The potential use of high temperature coolant (e.g. 900°C He) in first wall structures would preclude the applicability of copper alloy heat sink materials and refractory metals would be potential replacements. Brazing trials were conducted in order to examine techniques to join tungsten armor to high tungsten (90-95 wt%) or molybdenum TZM heat sink materials. Palladium-, nickel- and zirconium-based filler metals were investigated using brazing temperatures ranging from 1000°C to 1275°C. Palladium-nickel and palladium-cobalt braze alloys were successful in producing generally sound metallurgical joints in tungsten alloy/tungsten couples, although there was an observed tendency for the pure tungsten armor material to exhibit grain boundary cracking after bonding. The zirconium- and nickel-based filler metals produced defect-containing joints, specifically cracking and porosity, respectively. The palladium-nickel braze alloy produced sound joints in the Mo TZM/tungsten couple. Substitution of a lanthanum oxide-containing, fine-grained tungsten material (for the pure tungsten) eliminated the observed tungsten grain boundary cracking.

  10. UK Announces Intention to Join ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-11-01

    Summary The Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC) , the UK's strategic science investment agency, today announced that the government of the United Kingdom is making funds available that provide a baseline for this country to join the European Southern Observatory (ESO) . The ESO Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky , and the ESO Community warmly welcome this move towards fuller integration in European astronomy. "With the UK as a potential member country of ESO, our joint opportunities for front-line research and technology will grow significantly", she said. "This announcement is a clear sign of confidence in ESO's abilities, most recently demonstrated with the construction and operation of the unique Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Paranal. Together we will look forward with confidence towards new, exciting projects in ground-based astronomy." It was decided earlier this year to place the 4-m UK Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope (VISTA) at Paranal, cf. ESO Press Release 03/00. Following negotiations between ESO and PPARC, a detailed proposal for the associated UK/ESO Agreement with the various entry modalities will now be presented to the ESO Council for approval. Before this Agreement can enter into force, the ESO Convention and associated protocols must also be ratified by the UK Parliament. Research and key technologies According to the PPARC press release, increased funding for science, announced by the UK government today, will enable UK astronomers to prepare for the next generation of telescopes and expand their current telescope portfolio through membership of the European Southern Observatory (ESO). The uplift to its baseline budget will enable PPARC to enter into final negotiations for UK membership of the ESO. This will ensure that UK astronomers, together with their colleagues in the ESO member states, are actively involved in global scale preparations for the next generation of astronomy facilities. among these are ALMA

  11. Joining the immunological dots in recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Amolak Singh

    2010-11-01

    While raised cellular immunity mediated by T helper (Th) 1 type cells may be harmful for the developing embryo/foetus, it is likely that Th2 type immunity may be helpful. The role of natural killer (NK) cells is presently underestimated, although they are clearly important in angiogenesis and the coordinated invasion of the decidua by the trophoblast. Deficient T regulatory cell (Treg) function is evident in women with recurrent miscarriage particularly when this occurs in early pregnancy. The role of the pro-inflammatory Th17 cells is presently unclear. However, early evidence suggests that excessive Th17 activity may promote miscarriage and preterm delivery. This may relate to the ability of these cells to produce those cytokines that encourage Th1 and NK cell activity. As such recurrent miscarriage may be caused not only by chromosomal abnormalities, autoimmunity and uterine abnormalities but also by subclinical uterine infection and inflammation which by stimulating interleukin 6 favours Th17 development over Tregs. This review examines the role of these different cells in early pregnancy and suggests a schema that may join the dots of the immunological puzzle called pregnancy. Finally, suggestions are made as to how inappropriate immunity in recurrent miscarriage may be down-regulated using currently available therapies. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Joining Forces. A Team Approach to Secondary School Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rima; Corcoran, Thomas B.

    This manual is designed to guide the implementation of the Joining Forces Program, a comprehensive improvement process for secondary schools. Implementation of the program requires the cooperative effort of the local school district, state and local education associations, and the administration and staff of participating schools. Joining Forces…

  13. Newly Branded Energy Systems Integration Group Joins International

    research fellow at NREL. Likewise, UVIG sees opportunity in partnering with iiESI. The international Group Joins International Institute for Energy Systems Integration Newly Branded Energy Systems Integration Group Joins International Institute for Energy Systems Integration March 22, 2018 The world of

  14. Brazil to Join the European Southern Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-12-01

    The Federative Republic of Brazil has yesterday signed the formal accession agreement paving the way for it to become a Member State of the European Southern Observatory (ESO). Following government ratification Brazil will become the fifteenth Member State and the first from outside Europe. On 29 December 2010, at a ceremony in Brasilia, the Brazilian Minister of Science and Technology, Sergio Machado Rezende and the ESO Director General, Tim de Zeeuw signed the formal accession agreement aiming to make Brazil a Member State of the European Southern Observatory. Brazil will become the fifteen Member State and the first from outside Europe. Since the agreement means accession to an international convention, the agreement must now be submitted to the Brazilian Parliament for ratification [1]. The signing of the agreement followed the unanimous approval by the ESO Council during an extraordinary meeting on 21 December 2010. "Joining ESO will give new impetus to the development of science, technology and innovation in Brazil as part of the considerable efforts our government is making to keep the country advancing in these strategic areas," says Rezende. The European Southern Observatory has a long history of successful involvement with South America, ever since Chile was selected as the best site for its observatories in 1963. Until now, however, no non-European country has joined ESO as a Member State. "The membership of Brazil will give the vibrant Brazilian astronomical community full access to the most productive observatory in the world and open up opportunities for Brazilian high-tech industry to contribute to the European Extremely Large Telescope project. It will also bring new resources and skills to the organisation at the right time for them to make a major contribution to this exciting project," adds ESO Director General, Tim de Zeeuw. The European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) telescope design phase was recently completed and a major review was

  15. Modeling Non-homologous End Joining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the dominant DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway and involves several NHEJ proteins such as Ku, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4, Ligase IV and so on. Once DSBs are generated, Ku is first recruited to the DNA end, followed by other NHEJ proteins for DNA end processing and ligation. Because of the direct ligation of break ends without the need for a homologous template, NHEJ turns out to be an error-prone but efficient repair pathway. Some mechanisms have been proposed of how the efficiency of NHEJ repair is affected. The type of DNA damage is an important factor of NHEJ repair. For instance, the length of DNA fragment may determine the recruitment efficiency of NHEJ protein such as Ku [1], or the complexity of the DNA breaks [2] is accounted for the choice of NHEJ proteins and subpathway of NHEJ repair. On the other hand, the chromatin structure also plays a role of the accessibility of NHEJ protein to the DNA damage site. In this talk, some mathematical models of NHEJ, that consist of series of biochemical reactions complying with the laws of chemical reaction (e.g. mass action, etc.), will be introduced. By mathematical and numerical analysis and parameter estimation, the models are able to capture the qualitative biological features and show good agreement with experimental data. As conclusions, from the viewpoint of modeling, how the NHEJ proteins are recruited will be first discussed for connection between the classical sequential model [4] and recently proposed two-phase model [5]. Then how the NHEJ repair pathway is affected, by the length of DNA fragment [6], the complexity of DNA damage [7] and the chromatin structure [8], will be addressed

  16. Enabling Dissimilar Material Joining Using Friction Stir Scribe Technology

    SciT

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadyay, Piyush; Kleinbaum, Sarah

    2017-04-05

    One challenge in adapting welding processes to dissimilar material joining is the diversity of melting temperatures of the different materials. Although the use of mechanical fasteners and adhesives have mostly paved the way for near-term implementation of dissimilar material systems, these processes only accentuate the need for low-cost welding processes capable of joining dissimilar material components regardless of alloy, properties, or melting temperature. Friction stir scribe technology was developed to overcome the challenges of joining dissimilar material components where melting temperatures vary greatly, and properties and/or chemistry are not compatible with more traditional welding processes. Although the friction stir scribemore » process is capable of joining dissimilar metals and metal/polymer systems, a more detailed evaluation of several aluminum/steel joints is presented herein to demonstrate the ability to both chemically and mechanically join dissimilar materials.« less

  17. Design synthesis and optimization of joined-wing transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallman, John W.; Smith, Stephen C.; Kroo, Ilan M.

    1990-01-01

    A computer program for aircraft synthesis using a numerical optimizer was developed to study the application of the joined-wing configuration to transport aircraft. The structural design algorithm included the effects of secondary bending moments to investigate the possibility of tail buckling and to design joined wings resistant to buckling. The structural weight computed using this method was combined with a statistically-based method to obtain realistic estimates of total lifting surface weight and aircraft empty weight. A variety of 'optimum' joined-wing and conventional aircraft designs were compared on the basis of direct operating cost, gross weight, and cruise drag. The most promising joined-wing designs were found to have a joint location at about 70 percent of the wing semispan. The optimum joined-wing transport is shown to save 1.7 percent in direct operating cost and 11 percent in drag for a 2000 nautical mile transport mission.

  18. Enabling Dissimilar Material Joining Using Friction Stir Scribe Technology

    DOE PAGES

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadyay, Piyush; Kleinbaum, Sarah; ...

    2017-04-05

    One challenge in adapting welding processes to dissimilar material joining is the diversity of melting temperatures of the different materials. Although the use of mechanical fasteners and adhesives have mostly paved the way for near-term implementation of dissimilar material systems, these processes only accentuate the need for low-cost welding processes capable of impartially joining dissimilar material components regardless of alloy, properties, or melting temperature. Friction stir scribe technology was developed to overcome the challenges of joining dissimilar material components where melting temperatures vary greatly, and properties and/or chemistry are not compatible with more traditional welding processes. Finally, although the frictionmore » stir scribe process is capable of joining dissimilar metals and metal/polymer systems, a more detailed evaluation of several aluminum/steel joints is presented herein to demonstrate the ability to both chemically and mechanically join dissimilar materials.« less

  19. Toroid Joining Gun. [thermoplastic welding system using induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D.; Fox, R. L.; Swaim, R J.

    1985-01-01

    The Toroid Joining Gun is a low cost, self-contained, portable low powered (100-400 watts) thermoplastic welding system developed at Langley Research Center for joining plastic and composite parts using an induction heating technique. The device developed for use in the fabrication of large space sructures (LSST Program) can be used in any atmosphere or in a vacuum. Components can be joined in situ, whether on earth or on a space platform. The expanded application of this welding gun is in the joining of thermoplastic composites, thermosetting composites, metals, and combinations of these materials. Its low-power requirements, light weight, rapid response, low cost, portability, and effective joining make it a candidate for solving many varied and unique bonding tasks.

  20. Solid State Joining of Dissimilar Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Todd W.

    Solid state joining of titanium via friction stir welding and diffusion bonding have emerged as enablers of efficient monolithic structural designs by the eliminations fasteners for the aerospace industry. As design complexity and service demands increase, the need for joints of dissimilar alloys has emerged. Complex thermomechanical conditions in friction stir weld joints and high temperature deformation behavior differences between alloys used in dissimilar joints gives rise to a highly variable flow pattern within a stir zone. Experiments performed welding Ti-6Al-4V to beta21S show that mechanical intermixing of the two alloys is the primary mechanism for the generation of the localized chemistry and microstructure, the magnitude of which can be directly related to pin rotation and travel speed weld parameters. Mechanical mixing of the two alloys is heavily influenced by strain rate softening phenomena, and can be used to manipulate weld nugget structure by switching which alloy is subjected to the advancing side of the pin. Turbulent mixing of a weld nugget and a significant reduction in defects and weld forces are observed when the beta21S is put on the advancing side of the weld where higher strain rates are present. Chemical diffusion driven by the heat of weld parameters is characterized using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and is shown to be a secondary process responsible for generating short-range chemical gradients that lead to a gradient of alpha particle structures. Diffusion calculations are inconsistent with an assumption of steady-state diffusion and show that material interfaces in the weld nugget evolve through the break-down of turbulent interface features generated by material flows. A high degree of recrystallization is seen throughout the welds, with unique, hybrid chemistry grains that are generated at material interfaces in the weld nugget that help to unify the crystal structure of dissimilar alloys. The degree of

  1. A Modeling Approach for Plastic-Metal Laser Direct Joining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutey, Adrian H. A.; Fortunato, Alessandro; Ascari, Alessandro; Romoli, Luca

    2017-09-01

    Laser processing has been identified as a feasible approach to direct joining of metal and plastic components without the need for adhesives or mechanical fasteners. The present work sees development of a modeling approach for conduction and transmission laser direct joining of these materials based on multi-layer optical propagation theory and numerical heat flow simulation. The scope of this methodology is to predict process outcomes based on the calculated joint interface and upper surface temperatures. Three representative cases are considered for model verification, including conduction joining of PBT and aluminum alloy, transmission joining of optically transparent PET and stainless steel, and transmission joining of semi-transparent PA 66 and stainless steel. Conduction direct laser joining experiments are performed on black PBT and 6082 anticorodal aluminum alloy, achieving shear loads of over 2000 N with specimens of 2 mm thickness and 25 mm width. Comparison with simulation results shows that consistently high strength is achieved where the peak interface temperature is above the plastic degradation temperature. Comparison of transmission joining simulations and published experimental results confirms these findings and highlights the influence of plastic layer optical absorption on process feasibility.

  2. [Early prenatal diagnosis of diprosopic syncephalic joined twins].

    PubMed

    Picaud, A; Nlome-Nze, A R; Engongha-Beka, T; Ogowet-Igumu, N

    1990-06-01

    The authors summarize the case of diprosopic syncephalic joined twins diagnosed at 22 weeks of pregnancy by ultrasonography performed because of hydramnios. The rate of separation anomalies of monozygotic twins is assessed by a review of the literature: from 1 to twenty to fifty thousands for joined twins to 1 per cent fifty thousand to fifteen millions for diprosopus. The etiology is the result of a late division of the egg between D12 and D16. Often an encephalic diprosopic joined twins cause elevated levels of maternal serum alpha protein. Early ultrasonography permits to consider a vaginal therapeutic abortion.

  3. Joining of parts via magnetic heating of metal aluminum powders

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Ian

    2013-05-21

    A method of joining at least two parts includes steps of dispersing a joining material comprising a multi-phase magnetic metal-aluminum powder at an interface between the at least two parts to be joined and applying an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The AMF has a magnetic field strength and frequency suitable for inducing magnetic hysteresis losses in the metal-aluminum powder and is applied for a period that raises temperature of the metal-aluminum powder to an exothermic transformation temperature. At the exothermic transformation temperature, the metal-aluminum powder melts and resolidifies as a metal aluminide solid having a non-magnetic configuration.

  4. Little Brother Joins the Large Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    On the night of 15 December 2006, the fourth and last-to-be-installed VLTI Auxiliary Telescope (AT4) obtained its 'First Light'. The first images demonstrate that AT4 will be able to deliver the excellent image quality already delivered by the first three ATs. It will soon join its siblings to perform routinely interferometric measurements. ESO PR Photo 51a/06 ESO PR Photo 51a/06 VLT Auxiliary Telescope The VLT is composed of four 8.2-m Unit Telescope (Antu, Kueyen, Melipal and Yepun). They have been progressively put into service together with a vast suite of the most advanced astronomical instruments and are operated every night in the year. Contrary to other large astronomical telescopes, the VLT was designed from the beginning with the use of interferometry as a major goal. The VLT Interferometer (VLTI) combines starlight captured by two or three 8.2- VLT Unit Telescopes, dramatically increasing the spatial resolution and showing fine details of a large variety of celestial objects. ESO PR Photo 51b/06 ESO PR Photo 51b/06 One AT Under the Sky However, most of the time the large telescopes are used for other research purposes. They are therefore only available for interferometric observations during a limited number of nights every year. Thus, in order to exploit the VLTI each night and to achieve the full potential of this unique setup, some other (smaller), dedicated telescopes were included into the overall VLT concept. These telescopes, known as the VLTI Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs), are mounted on tracks and can be placed at precisely defined "parking" observing positions on the observatory platform. From these positions, their light beams are fed into the same common focal point via a complex system of reflecting mirrors mounted in an underground system of tunnels. The Auxiliary Telescopes are real technological jewels. They are placed in ultra-compact enclosures, complete with all necessary electronics, an air conditioning system and cooling liquid for

  5. ASKAP Joins the Hunt for Mysterious Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    A new telescope, the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), has joined the search for energetic and elusive fast radio bursts. And in just a few days of looking, its already had success!Elusive TransientsThe Parkes radio telescope, which has detected all but five of the fast radio bursts published to date, has a very narrow field of view. [CSIRO]Fast radio bursts are mysterious millisecond-duration radio pulses that were first discovered around a decade ago. Since that time particularly in recent years weve made some progress toward the goal of localizing them. Were now fairly convinced that fast radio bursts come from outside of the galaxy, and yet theyre enormously bright orders of magnitude more luminous than any pulse seen from the Milky Way.Better identification of where these mysterious bursts come from would help us to determine what they are. But so far, weve discovered only around 30 such bursts, despite the fact that theyre estimated to occur at a rate of 3,000 events per day across the whole sky.Why are they so hard to find? Due to their short duration, effective detection would require instantaneous coverage of a very large fraction of the sky. The Parkes radio telescope which has detected all but five of the fast radio bursts published to date has a field of view spanning less than a square degree,significantly limiting our ability to rapidly survey for these transients.FRB 170107s band-averaged pulse (top) and dynamic spectrum (bottom). [Bannister et al. 2017]A New Array in TownA new player is now on the scene, however, and its already had huge success. ASKAP is a wide-field radio telescope made up of an array of 12-meter antennas. Using phased-array-feed technology, ASKAP is able to instantaneously observe an effective area of 160 square degrees an enormous field compared to Parkes 0.6 square degrees! This capability significantly increases our chances of being able to detect fast radio bursts.In a new study led by Keith Bannister

  6. 46 CFR 56.15-1 - Pipe joining fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... subpart 50.25 of this subchapter are acceptable for use in piping systems. (b) Threaded, flanged, socket-welding, buttwelding, and socket-brazing pipe joining fittings, made in accordance with the applicable...

  7. 46 CFR 56.15-1 - Pipe joining fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... subpart 50.25 of this subchapter are acceptable for use in piping systems. (b) Threaded, flanged, socket-welding, buttwelding, and socket-brazing pipe joining fittings, made in accordance with the applicable...

  8. 46 CFR 56.15-1 - Pipe joining fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... subpart 50.25 of this subchapter are acceptable for use in piping systems. (b) Threaded, flanged, socket-welding, buttwelding, and socket-brazing pipe joining fittings, made in accordance with the applicable...

  9. 46 CFR 56.15-1 - Pipe joining fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... subpart 50.25 of this subchapter are acceptable for use in piping systems. (b) Threaded, flanged, socket-welding, buttwelding, and socket-brazing pipe joining fittings, made in accordance with the applicable...

  10. Holographic optical assembly and photopolymerized joining of planar microspheres

    DOE PAGES

    Shaw, L. A.; Chizari, S.; Panas, R. M.; ...

    2016-07-27

    The aim of this research is to demonstrate a holographically driven photopolymerization process for joining colloidal particles to create planar microstructures fixed to a substrate, which can be monitored with real-time measurement. Holographic optical tweezers (HOT) have been used to arrange arrays of microparticles prior to this work; here we introduce a new photopolymerization process for rapidly joining simultaneously handled microspheres in a plane. Additionally, we demonstrate a new process control technique for efficiently identifying when particles have been successfully joined by measuring a sufficient reduction in the particles’ Brownian motion. Furthermore, this technique and our demonstrated joining approach enablemore » HOT technology to take critical steps toward automated additive fabrication of microstructures.« less

  11. TRANSFORMER FOR JOINING UNBALANCED TO BALANCED TRANSMISSION MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Bittner, B.J.; Opperman, R.H.

    1960-06-28

    An improved transformer is invented for joining an unbalanced transmission means to a balanced transmission means and is useful, for example, in transmitting an electromagnetic signal from a coaxial cable to a balanced dipole antenna.

  12. Explosive Joining for the Mars Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Sanok, Joseph T.

    2000-01-01

    A unique, small-scale, ribbon explosive joining process is being developed as an option for closing and sealing a metal canister to allow the return of a pristine sample of the Martian surface and atmosphere to Earth. This joining process is accomplished by an explosively driven, high-velocity, angular collision of the metal, which melts and effaces the oxide films from the surfaces to allow valence electron sharing to bond the interface. Significant progress has been made through more than 100 experimental tests to meet the goals of this ongoing developmental effort. The metal of choice, aluminum alloy 6061, has been joined in multiple interface configurations and in complete cylinders. This process can accommodate dust and debris on the surfaces to be joined. It can both create and sever a joint at its midpoint with one explosive input. Finally, an approach has been demonstrated that can capture the back blast from the explosive.

  13. Conventional and Microwave Joining of Silicon Carbide Using Displacement Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsley, J.; Yiin, T.; Barmatz, M.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave heating was used to join Silicon Carbide rods using a thin TiC /Si tape interlayer . Microwaves quickly heated the rods and tape to temperatures where solid-state displacement reactions between TiC and Si occurred.

  14. Who Should Join the Environmental Response Laboratory Network

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Laboratories that analyze biological samples, chemical warfare agents, radiological, or toxic industrial chemical samples can join the ERLN. Members make up a critical infrastructure that delivers data necessary for responses to large scale emergencies.

  15. 4. Close view of the logs joining of the north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Close view of the logs joining of the north and south rooms, with scale (Note: hole with remains of peg SITU as seen in the east cabin) - The Hermitage, Alfred's Cabin, 4580 Rachel's Lane, Hermitage, Davidson County, TN

  16. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....283 Section 192.283 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Joining of...

  17. Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & CrossBracing Joint Details; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & Cross-Bracing Joint Details; Cross Bracing Center Joint Detail; Chord & Diagonal Joint Detail - Vermont Covered Bridge, Highland Park, spanning Kokomo Creek at West end of Deffenbaugh Street (moved to), Kokomo, Howard County, IN

  18. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the procedure...

  19. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the procedure...

  20. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the procedure...

  1. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the procedure...

  2. Parametric weight evaluation of joined wings by structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, Hirokazu; Shyu, Albert T.; Wolkovitch, Julian

    1988-01-01

    Joined-wing aircraft employ tandem wings having positive and negative sweep and dihedral, arranged to form diamond shapes in both plan and front views. An optimization method was applied to study the effects of joined-wing geometry parameters on structural weight. The lightest wings were obtained by increasing dihedral and taper ratio, decreasing sweep and span, increasing fraction of airfoil chord occupied by structural box, and locating the joint inboard of the front wing tip.

  3. Joining of SiC parts by polishing and hipping

    DOEpatents

    Rossi, Guilio A.; Pelletier, Paul J.

    1990-05-15

    A method of joining two pre-sintered pieces of silicon carbide is disclosed. It entails polishing the surfaces to be joined to a mirror-finish, fitting the polished surfaces together to form a composite structure, and then subjecting the composite structure to hot isostatic pressing under conditions which are sufficient to form a joint which is essentially indistinguishable from the original silicon carbide pieces.

  4. Individual Factors Motivating People to Join Organized Violent Movements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-09

    INDIVIDUAL FACTORS MOTIVATING PEOPLE TO JOIN ORGANIZED VIOLENT MOVEMENTS A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S...2016 – JUN 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Individual Factors Motivating People to Join Organized Violent Movements 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Command and General Staff College ATTN: ATZL-SWD-GD Fort Leavenworth, KS 66027

  5. Top scientists join Stephen Hawking at Perimeter Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Nine leading researchers are to join Stephen Hawking as visiting fellows at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Ontario, Canada. The researchers, who include string theorists Leonard Susskind from Stanford University and Asoka Sen from the Harisch-Chandra Research Institute in India, will each spend a few months of the year at the institute as "distinguished research chairs". They will be joined by another 30 scientists to be announced at a later date.

  6. JOINING DISSIMILAR MATERIALS USING FRICTION STIR SCRIBE TECHNIQUE

    SciT

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Jana, Saumyadeep

    2016-09-01

    Development of robust and cost effective method of joining dissimilar materials can provide a critical pathway to enable widespread use of multi-material design and components in mainstream industrial applications. The use of multi-material components such as Steel-Aluminum, Aluminum-Polymer allows design engineers to optimize material utilization based on service requirements and often lead weight and cost reductions. However producing an effective joint between materials with vastly different thermal, microstructural and deformation response is highly problematic using conventional joining and /or fastening methods. This is especially challenging in cost sensitive high volume markets that largely rely on low–cost joining solutions. Friction Stirmore » Scribe technology was developed to meet the demands of joining materials with drastically different properties and melting regimes. The process enables joining of light metals like Magnesium and Aluminum to high temperature materials like Steels and Titanium. Additionally viable joints between polymer composites and metal can also be made using this method. This paper will present state of the art, progress made and challenges associated with this innovative derivative of Friction Stir welding in reference to joining dissimilar metals and polymer/metal combinations.« less

  7. Joining Dissimilar Materials Using Friction Stir Scribe Technique

    SciT

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Jana, Saumyadeep

    2016-10-03

    Development of a robust and cost-effective method of joining dissimilar materials could provide a critical pathway to enable widespread use of multi-material designs and components in mainstream industrial applications. The use of multi-material components such as steel-aluminum and aluminum-polymer would allow design engineers to optimize material utilization based on service requirements and could often lead to weight and cost reductions. However, producing an effective joint between materials with vastly different thermal, microstructural, and deformation responses is highly problematic using conventional joining and/or fastening methods. This is especially challenging in cost sensitive, high volume markets that largely rely on low costmore » joining solutions. Friction stir scribe technology was developed to meet the demands of joining materials with drastically different properties and melting regimes. The process enables joining of light metals like magnesium and aluminum to high temperature materials like steel and titanium. Viable joints between polymer composites and metal can also be made using this method. This paper will present the state of the art, progress made, and challenges associated with this innovative derivative of friction stir welding in reference to joining dissimilar metals and polymer/metal combinations.« less

  8. Aeroelastic tailoring and structural optimization of joined-wing configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Hwan

    2002-08-01

    Methodology for integrated aero-structural design was developed using formal optimization. ASTROS (Automated STRuctural Optimization System) was used as an analyzer and an optimizer for performing joined-wing weight optimization with stress, displacement, cantilever or body-freedom flutter constraints. As a pre/post processor, MATLAB was used for generating input file of ASTROS and for displaying the results of the ASTROS. The effects of the aeroelastic constraints on the isotropic and composite joined-wing weight were examined using this developed methodology. The aeroelastic features of a joined-wing aircraft were examined using both the Rayleigh-Ritz method and a finite element based aeroelastic stability and weight optimization procedure. Aircraft rigid-body modes are included to analyze of body-freedom flutter of the joined-wing aircraft. Several parametric studies were performed to determine the most important parameters that affect the aeroelastic behavior of a joined-wing aircraft. The special feature of a joined-wing aircraft is body-freedom flutter involving frequency interaction of the first elastic mode and the aircraft short period mode. In most parametric study cases, the body-freedom flutter speed was less than the cantilever flutter speed that is independent of fuselage inertia. As fuselage pitching moment of inertia was increased, the body-freedom flutter speed increased. When the pitching moment of inertia reaches a critical value, transition from body-freedom flutter to cantilever flutter occurred. The effects of composite laminate orientation on the front and rear wings of a joined-wing configuration were studied. An aircraft pitch divergence mode, which occurred because of forward movement of center of pressure due to wing deformation, was found. Body-freedom flutter and cantilever-like flutter were also found depending on combination of front and rear wing ply orientations. Optimized wing weight behaviors of the planar and non

  9. Laser beam joining of material combinations for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Emil; Zerner, Ingo; Sepold, Gerd

    1997-08-01

    An ideal material for automotive applications would combine the following properties: high corrosion resistance, high strength, high stiffness and not at least a low material price. Today a single material is not able to meet all these requirements. Therefore, in the future different materials will be placed where they meet the requirements best. The result of this consideration is a car body with many different alloys and metals, which have to be joined to one another. BIAS is working on the development of laser based joining technologies for different material combinations, especially for thin sheets used in automotive applications. One result of the research is a joining technology for an aluminum-steel-joint. Using a Nd:YAG laser the problem of brittle intermetallic phases between these materials was overcome. Using suitable temperature-time cycles, elected by a FEM-simulation, the thickness of intermetallic phases was kept below 10 micrometers . This technology was also applied to coated steels, which were joined with different aluminum alloys. Further it is demonstrated that titanium alloys, e.g. used for racing cars, can also be joined with aluminum alloys.

  10. Permanent wire splicing by an explosive joining process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J. (Inventor); Kushnick, Anne C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for wire splicing using an explosive joining process. The apparatus consists of a prebent, U-shaped strap of metal that slides over prepositioned wires. A standoff means separates the wires from the strap before joining. An adhesive means holds two ribbon explosives in position centered over the U-shaped strap. A detonating means connects to the ribbon explosives. The process involves spreading strands of each wire to be joined into a flat plane. The process then requires alternating each strand in alignment to form a mesh-like arrangement with an overlapped area. The strap slides over the strands of the wires, and the standoff means is positioned between the two surfaces. The detonating means then initiates the ribbon explosives that drive the strap to accomplish a high velocity, angular collision between the mating surfaces. This collision creates surface melts and collision bonding results in electron sharing linkups.

  11. Advances in Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff; Schneider, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Many of the metals used in the oil and gas industry are difficult to fusion weld including Titanium and its alloys. Solid state joining processes are being pursued as an alternative process to produce robust structures more amenable to high pressure applications. Various solid state joining processes include friction stir welding (FSW) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSW). The configuration of TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material minimizing the burden on the weld tool extending its life. This provides the ability to precisely select and control the temperature to avoid detrimental changes to the microstructure. The work presented in this presentation investigates the feasibility of joining various titanium alloys using the solid state welding processes of FSW and TSW. Process descriptions and attributes of each weld process will be presented. Weld process set ]up and welding techniques will be discussed leading to the challenges experienced. Mechanical property data will also be presented.

  12. Preliminary design optimization of joined-wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallman, John W.; Kroo, Ilan M.; Smith, Stephen C.

    1990-01-01

    The joined wing is an innovative aircraft configuration that has a its tail connected to the wing forming a diamond shape in both top and plan view. This geometric arrangement utilizes the tail for both pitch control and as a structural support for the wing. Several researchers have studied this configuration and predicted significant reductions in trimmed drag or structural weight when compared with a conventional T-tail configuration. Kroo et al. compared the cruise drag of joined wings with conventional designs of the same lifting-surface area and structural weight. This study showed an 11 percent reduction in cruise drag for the lifting system of a joined wing. Although this reduction in cruise drag is significant, a complete design study is needed before any economic savings can be claimed for a joined-wing transport. Mission constraints, such as runway length, could increase the wing area and eliminate potential drag savings. Since other design codes do not accurately represent the interaction between structures and aerodynamics for joined wings, we developed a new design code for this study. The aerodynamic and structural analyses in this study are significantly more sophisticated than those used in most conventional design codes. This sophistication was needed to predict the aerodynamic interference between the wing and tail and the stresses in the truss-like structure. This paper describes these analysis methods, discusses some problems encountered when applying the numerical optimizer NPSOL, and compares optimum joined wings with conventional aircraft on the basis of cruise drag, lifting surface weight, and direct operating cost (DOC).

  13. Process optimization of joining by upset bulging with local heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusch, Michael; Almohallami, Amer; Sviridov, Alexander; Bonk, Christian; Behrens, Bernd-Arno; Bambach, Markus

    2017-10-01

    Joining by upset bulging is a mechanical joining method where axial load is applied to a tube to form two revolving bulges, which clamp the parts to be joined and create a force and form fit. It can be used to join tubes with other structures such as sheets, plates, tubes or profiles of the same or different materials. Other processes such as welding are often limited in joining multi-material assemblies or high-strength materials. With joining by upset bulging at room temperature, the main drawback is the possible initiation of damage (cracks) in the inner buckling zone because of high local stresses and strains. In this paper, a method to avoid the formation of cracks is introduced. Before forming the bulge the tube is locally heated by an induction coil. For the construction steel (E235+N) a maximum temperature of 700 °C was used to avoid phase transformation. For the numerical study of the process the mechanical properties of the tube material were examined at different temperatures and strain rates to determine its flow curves. A parametrical FE model was developed to simulate the bulging process with local heating. Experiments with local heating were executed and metallographic studies of the bulging area were conducted. While specimens heated to 500 °C showed small cracks left, damage-free flanges could be created at 600 and 700 °C. Static testing of damage-free bulges showed improvements in tensile strength and torsion strength compared to bulges formed at room-temperature, while bending and compression behavior remained nearly unchanged. In cyclic testing the locally heated specimens underwent about 3.7 times as many cycles before failure as the specimens formed at room temperature.

  14. Tool and process for miniature explosive joining of tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J. (Inventor); Bailey, James W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A tool and process to be used in the explosive joining of tubes is disclosed. The tool consists of an initiator, a tool form, and a ribbon explosive. The assembled tool is a compact, storable, and safe device suitable for explosive joining of small, lightweight tubes down to 0.20 inch in diameter. The invention is inserted into either another tube or a tube plate. A shim or standoff between the two surfaces to be welded is necessary. Initiation of the explosive inside the tube results in a high velocity, angular collision between the mating surfaces. This collision creates surface melts and collision bonding wherein electron-sharing linkups are formed.

  15. Astronaut Sullivan prepares to join crew in training

    1984-09-04

    41D-3188 (2 September 1984) --- Astronaut Kathryn D. Sullivan, 41-G mission specialist, joins with other members of the seven-person crew prior to a training session in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory at the Johnson Space Center. Dr. Sullivan will be the first American woman to perform an extravehicular activity (EVA) in space when she joins Astronaut David C. Leestma for some outside-the-Challenger duty on October 9. The mission is scheduled for an October 5, 1984 launch.

  16. Torsional Shear Strength Tests for Glass-Ceramic Joined Silicon Carbide

    SciT

    Ferraris, Monica; Ventrella, Andrea; Salvo, Milena

    2014-03-17

    A torsion test on hour-glass-shaped samples with a full joined or a ring-shaped joined area was chosen in this study to measure shear strength of glass-ceramic joined silicon carbide. Shear strength of about 100 MPa was measured for full joined SiC with fracture completely inside their joined area. Attempts to obtain this shear strength with a ring-shaped joined area failed due to mixed mode fractures. However, full joined and ring-shaped steel hour-glasses joined by a glass-ceramic gave the same shear strength, thus suggesting that this test measures shear strength of joined components only when their fracture is completely inside theirmore » joined area.« less

  17. 46 CFR 56.75-30 - Pipe joining details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... be either of the socket or butt type. When butt joints are employed the edges to be joined shall be.... Circumferential joints may be either of the butt or socket type. Where butt joints are employed, the included... annular clearance of socket joints shall be held to small clearances which experience indicates is...

  18. 46 CFR 56.75-30 - Pipe joining details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... be either of the socket or butt type. When butt joints are employed the edges to be joined shall be.... Circumferential joints may be either of the butt or socket type. Where butt joints are employed, the included... annular clearance of socket joints shall be held to small clearances which experience indicates is...

  19. 46 CFR 56.75-30 - Pipe joining details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... be either of the socket or butt type. When butt joints are employed the edges to be joined shall be.... Circumferential joints may be either of the butt or socket type. Where butt joints are employed, the included... annular clearance of socket joints shall be held to small clearances which experience indicates is...

  20. 46 CFR 56.75-30 - Pipe joining details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... be either of the socket or butt type. When butt joints are employed the edges to be joined shall be.... Circumferential joints may be either of the butt or socket type. Where butt joints are employed, the included... annular clearance of socket joints shall be held to small clearances which experience indicates is...

  1. Joining Forces: The Case of Alliant International University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Mergers and acquisitions are a prevalent force in higher education as more colleges and universities are joining forces to expand resources, enhance missions, or prevent closures. This study examines the merger of Alliant University (formerly California School of Professional Psychology) with United States International University to create what…

  2. 46 CFR 56.75-30 - Pipe joining details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... be either of the socket or butt type. When butt joints are employed the edges to be joined shall be.... Circumferential joints may be either of the butt or socket type. Where butt joints are employed, the included... annular clearance of socket joints shall be held to small clearances which experience indicates is...

  3. Efficient and Scalable Graph Similarity Joins in MapReduce

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yifan; Zhang, Weiming; Tang, Jiuyang

    2014-01-01

    Along with the emergence of massive graph-modeled data, it is of great importance to investigate graph similarity joins due to their wide applications for multiple purposes, including data cleaning, and near duplicate detection. This paper considers graph similarity joins with edit distance constraints, which return pairs of graphs such that their edit distances are no larger than a given threshold. Leveraging the MapReduce programming model, we propose MGSJoin, a scalable algorithm following the filtering-verification framework for efficient graph similarity joins. It relies on counting overlapping graph signatures for filtering out nonpromising candidates. With the potential issue of too many key-value pairs in the filtering phase, spectral Bloom filters are introduced to reduce the number of key-value pairs. Furthermore, we integrate the multiway join strategy to boost the verification, where a MapReduce-based method is proposed for GED calculation. The superior efficiency and scalability of the proposed algorithms are demonstrated by extensive experimental results. PMID:25121135

  4. Efficient and scalable graph similarity joins in MapReduce.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifan; Zhao, Xiang; Xiao, Chuan; Zhang, Weiming; Tang, Jiuyang

    2014-01-01

    Along with the emergence of massive graph-modeled data, it is of great importance to investigate graph similarity joins due to their wide applications for multiple purposes, including data cleaning, and near duplicate detection. This paper considers graph similarity joins with edit distance constraints, which return pairs of graphs such that their edit distances are no larger than a given threshold. Leveraging the MapReduce programming model, we propose MGSJoin, a scalable algorithm following the filtering-verification framework for efficient graph similarity joins. It relies on counting overlapping graph signatures for filtering out nonpromising candidates. With the potential issue of too many key-value pairs in the filtering phase, spectral Bloom filters are introduced to reduce the number of key-value pairs. Furthermore, we integrate the multiway join strategy to boost the verification, where a MapReduce-based method is proposed for GED calculation. The superior efficiency and scalability of the proposed algorithms are demonstrated by extensive experimental results.

  5. Astronaut Crippen prepares to join crew in training

    1984-09-04

    41D-3186 (4 Sept 1984) --- Astronaut Robert L. Crippen, 41-G crew commander, prepares to join his six fellow crewmembers for some training in the mockup and integration laboratory at the Johnson Space Center. Astronaut David C. Leestma, 41-G mission specialist, left, will participate in a scheduled extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Challenger's next mission. Today's training is for launch phase procedures.

  6. Embedded Heaters for Joining or Separating Plastic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Melvin A., III

    2004-01-01

    A proposed thermal-bonding technique would make it possible to join or separate thermoplastic parts quickly and efficiently. The technique would eliminate the need for conventional welding or for such conventional fastening components as bolted flanges or interlocking hooks. The technique could be particularly useful in the sign industry (in which large quantities of thermoplastics are used) or could be used to join plastic pipes. A thin sheet of a suitable electrically conductive material would be formed to fit between two thermoplastic parts to be joined (see figure). The electrically conductive sheet and the two parts would be put together tightly, then an electrical current would be sent through the conductor to heat the thermoplastic locally. The magnitude of the current and the heating time would be chosen to generate just enough heat to cause the thermoplastic to adhere to both sides of the electrically conductive sheet. Optionally, the electrically conductive sheet could contain many small holes to provide purchase or to increase electrical resistance to facilitate the generation of heat. After thermal bonding, the electrically conductive sheet remains as an integral part of the structure. If necessary, the electrically conductive sheet can be reheated later to separate the joined thermoplastic parts.

  7. Women's Heart Disease: Join the Heart Truth Community

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Join The Heart Truth Community Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents National Symbol The centerpiece of The Heart Truth ® is The Red Dress ® which was introduced ...

  8. 5 CFR 1201.36 - Consolidating and joining appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... subsequent dismissal if the same appellant filed both appeals. (b) Action by judge. A judge may consolidate or join cases on his or her own motion or on the motion of a party if doing so would: (1) Expedite... motion for consolidation or joinder must be filed within 10 days of the date of service of the motion. ...

  9. 5 CFR 1201.36 - Consolidating and joining appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... subsequent dismissal if the same appellant filed both appeals. (b) Action by judge. A judge may consolidate or join cases on his or her own motion or on the motion of a party if doing so would: (1) Expedite... motion for consolidation or joinder must be filed within 10 days of the date of service of the motion. ...

  10. Personal Influence on the Decision to Join Voluntary Associations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan James

    A longitudinal study (1961-1965) was planned to obtain information on the pervasiveness of personal influence with respect to decisions to join formal voluntary associations; examine the characteristics of opinion leaders and the individuals they influence; discover the differential patterns of joiners' exposure to mass communicated messages about…

  11. 91. VIEW OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER WHERE THE TOWER JOINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. VIEW OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER WHERE THE TOWER JOINS THE WEST GABLE & THE BRICK STEPS LEAD UP TO A SMALL VERANDAH (DUPLICATE OF HABS No. AL-765-34) - Kenworthy Hall, State Highway 14 (Greensboro Road), Marion, Perry County, AL

  12. Joining the Circle: Circle Banking on the Rosebud Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haase, Eric

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Sicangu Enterprise Center which provides training in business management and small loans to help Rosebud Sioux tribal members join with peers to start small businesses within their communities. Explains the center's innovative revolving loan fund. Highlights the businesses of an automechanic, a seamstress, and a sculptor. (DMM)

  13. Improved Joining of Metal Components to Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmes, Edmund

    2009-01-01

    Systems requirements for complex spacecraft drive design requirements that lead to structures, components, and/or enclosures of a multi-material and multifunctional design. The varying physical properties of aluminum, tungsten, Invar, or other high-grade aerospace metals when utilized in conjunction with lightweight composites multiply system level solutions. These multi-material designs are largely dependent upon effective joining techAn improved method of joining metal components to matrix/fiber composite material structures has been invented. The method is particularly applicable to equipping such thin-wall polymer-matrix composite (PMC) structures as tanks with flanges, ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liners for high heat engine nozzles, and other metallic-to-composite attachments. The method is oriented toward new architectures and distributing mechanical loads as widely as possible in the vicinities of attachment locations to prevent excessive concentrations of stresses that could give rise to delaminations, debonds, leaks, and other failures. The method in its most basic form can be summarized as follows: A metal component is to be joined to a designated attachment area on a composite-material structure. In preparation for joining, the metal component is fabricated to include multiple studs projecting from the aforementioned face. Also in preparation for joining, holes just wide enough to accept the studs are molded into, drilled, or otherwise formed in the corresponding locations in the designated attachment area of the uncured ("wet') composite structure. The metal component is brought together with the uncured composite structure so that the studs become firmly seated in the holes, thereby causing the composite material to become intertwined with the metal component in the joining area. Alternately, it is proposed to utilize other mechanical attachment schemes whereby the uncured composite and metallic parts are joined with "z-direction" fasteners. The

  14. Application of the joined wing to tiltrotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolkovitch, Julian; Wainfan, Barnaby; Ben-Harush, Yitzhak; Johnson, Wayne

    1989-01-01

    A study was made to determine the potential speed improvements and other benefits resulting from the application of the joined wing concept to tiltrotor aircraft. Using the XV-15 as a baseline, the effect of replacing the cantilever wing by a joined-wing pair was studied. The baseline XV-15 cantilever wing has a thickness/chord ratio of 23 percent. It was found that this wing could be replaced by a joined-wing pair of the same span and total area employing airfoils of 12 percent thickness/chord ratio. The joined wing meets the same static strength requirements as the cantilever wing, but increases the limiting Mach Number of the aircraft from M=0.575 to M=0.75, equivalent to an increase of over 100 knots in maximum speed. The joined wing configuration studied is lighter than the cantilever and has approximately 11 percent less wing drag in cruise. Its flutter speed of 245 knots EAS is not high enough to allow the potential Mach number improvement to be attained at low altitude. The flutter speed can be raised either by employing rotors which can be stopped and folded in flight at speeds below 245 knots EAS, or by modifying the airframe to reduce adverse coupling with the rotor dynamics. Several modifications of wing geometry and nacelle mass distribution were investigated, but none produced a flutter speed above 260 knots EAS. It was concluded that additional research is required to achieve a more complete understanding of the mechanism of rotor/wing coupling.

  15. Recent Developments for Ultrasonic-Assisted Friction Stir Welding: Joining, Testing, Corrosion - an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomä, M.; Wagner, G.; Straß, B.; Conrad, C.; Wolter, B.; Benfer, S.; Fürbeth, W.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the steadily increasing demand on innovative manufacturing processes, modern lightweight construction concepts become more and more important. Especially joints of dissimilar metals offer a variety of advantages due to their high potential for lightweight construction. The focus of the investigations was Al/Mg-joints. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an efficient process to realize high strength joints between these materials in ductile condition. Furthermore, for a simultaneous transmission of power ultrasound during the FSW-process (US-FSW) a positive effect on the achievable tensile strength of the Al/Mg-joints was proven. In the present work the industrial used die cast alloys EN AC-48000 (AlSi12CuNiMg) and AZ80 (MgAl8Zn) were joined by a machining center modified especially for Ultrasound Supported Friction Stir Welding. The appearing welding zone and the formation of intermetallic phases under the influence of power ultrasound were examined in particular. In order to identify optimal process parameters extensive preliminary process analyzes have been carried out. Following this, an ultrasound-induced more intensive stirring of the joining zone and as a result of this a considerably modified intermetallic zone was detected. At the same time an increase of the tensile strength of about 25% for US-FSW-joints and for fatigue an up to three times higher number of cycles to failure in comparison to a conventional welding process was observed. Moreover, detailed corrosion analyzes have shown that especially the welding zone was influenced by the corrosive attack. To expand and deepen the knowledge of the US-FSW-process further material combinations such as Ti/Steel and Al/Steel will be considered in future.

  16. Joining dissimilar materials using Friction Stir scribe technique

    SciT

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Jana, Saumyadeep

    2016-10-03

    The ability to effectively join materials with vastly different melting points like Aluminum-Steel, Polymer composites - metals has been one of the road blocks in realizing multi-material components for light weighting efforts. Friction stir scribe (FSS) technique is a promising method that produces continuous overlap joint between materials with vastly different melting regimes and high temperature flow characteristics. FSS uses an offset cutting tool at the tip of the FSW pin to create an insitu mechanical interlock between material interfaces. With investments from Vehicle Technology office, US DOE and several automotive manufacturers and suppliers PNNL is developing the FSS processmore » and has demonstrated viability of joining several material combinations. Details of welding trails, unique challenges and mitigation strategies in different material combinations will be discussed. Joint characterization including mechanical tests and joint performances will also be presented.« less

  17. The design of a joined wing flight demonstrator aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. C.; Cliff, S. E.; Kroo, I. M.

    1987-01-01

    A joined-wing flight demonstrator aircraft has been developed at the NASA Ames Research Center in collaboration with ACA Industries. The aircraft is designed to utilize the fuselage, engines, and undercarriage of the existing NASA AD-1 flight demonstrator aircraft. The design objectives, methods, constraints, and the resulting aircraft design, called the JW-1, are presented. A wind-tunnel model of the JW-1 was tested in the NASA Ames 12-foot wind tunnel. The test results indicate that the JW-1 has satisfactory flying qualities for a flight demonstrator aircraft. Good agreement of test results with design predictions confirmed the validity of the design methods used for application to joined-wing configurations.

  18. Advances in Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeff; Schneider, Judy; Walker, Bryant

    2011-01-01

    Many of the metals used in the oil and gas industry are difficult to fusion weld including titanium and its alloys. Thus solid state joining processes, such as friction stir welding (FSWing) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSWing), are being pursued as alternatives to produce robust structures more amenable to high pressure applications. Unlike the FSWing process where the tool is used to heat the workpiece, TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material prior to stirring thus minimizing the burden on the weld tool and thereby extending its life. This study reports on the initial results of using a hybrid (H)-TSW process to join commercially pure, 1.3cm thick panels of titanium (CP Ti) Grade 2.

  19. Joining and Integration of Silicon Carbide for Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Coddington, Bryan; Asthana, Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    The critical need for ceramic joining and integration technologies is becoming better appreciated as the maturity level increases for turbine engine components fabricated from ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials. Ceramic components offer higher operating temperatures and reduced cooling requirements. This translates into higher efficiencies and lower emissions. For fabricating complex shapes, diffusion bonding of silicon carbide (SiC) to SiC is being developed. For the integration of ceramic parts to the surrounding metallic engine system, brazing of SiC to metals is being developed. Overcoming the chemical, thermal, and mechanical incompatibilities between dissimilar materials is very challenging. This presentation will discuss the types of ceramic components being developed by researchers and industry and the benefits of using ceramic components. Also, the development of strong, crack-free, stable bonds will be discussed. The challenges and progress in developing joining and integration approaches for a specific application, i.e. a SiC injector, will be presented.

  20. Joining of ceramics of different biofunction by hot isostatic pressing

    SciT

    Li, Jianguo; Harmansson, L.; Soeremark, R.

    1993-10-01

    Monolithic zirconia (Z) and zirconia-hydroxyapatite (Z/HA) composites were joined by cold isostatic pressing (CIP at 300 MPa) and subsequently by glass-encapsulated hot isostatic pressing (HIP at 1225 C, 1 h and 200 MPa). The physical and mechanical properties of the materials were measured. The fracture surface was studied using a light microscope. The results indicate a strength level of the joint similar to that of the corresponding composite material (Z/HA), 845 and 860 MPa, respectively. Similar experiments with monolithic alumina (A) and alumina-hydroxyapatite (A/HA) were carried out without success. Cracking occurred in the joint area during the cold isostatic pressingmore » process. It seems that ceramics with high green strength and similar green density are essential when joining ceramics by combined CIP and HIP processes.« less

  1. Joining of Silicon Carbide: Diffusion Bond Optimization and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2008-01-01

    Joining and integration methods are critically needed as enabling technologies for the full utilization of advanced ceramic components in aerospace and aeronautics applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. In the application, several SiC substrates with different hole patterns to form fuel and combustion air channels are bonded to form the injector. Diffusion bonding is a joining approach that offers uniform bonds with high temperature capability, chemical stability, and high strength. Diffusion bonding was investigated with the aid of titanium foils and coatings as the interlayer between SiC substrates to aid bonding. The influence of such variables as interlayer type, interlayer thickness, substrate finish, and processing time were investigated. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis were used to characterize the bonds and to identify the reaction formed phases.

  2. Repair of Double-Strand Breaks by End Joining

    PubMed Central

    Chiruvella, Kishore K.; Liang, Zhuobin; Wilson, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) refers to a set of genome maintenance pathways in which two DNA double-strand break (DSB) ends are (re)joined by apposition, processing, and ligation without the use of extended homology to guide repair. Canonical NHEJ (c-NHEJ) is a well-defined pathway with clear roles in protecting the integrity of chromosomes when DSBs arise. Recent advances have revealed much about the identity, structure, and function of c-NHEJ proteins, but many questions exist regarding their concerted action in the context of chromatin. Alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ) refers to more recently described mechanism(s) that repair DSBs in less-efficient backup reactions. There is great interest in defining alt-NHEJ more precisely, including its regulation relative to c-NHEJ, in light of evidence that alt-NHEJ can execute chromosome rearrangements. Progress toward these goals is reviewed. PMID:23637284

  3. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis of Joined-Wing Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Rauno

    Aeroelastic design of joined-wing configurations is yet a relatively unexplored topic which poses several difficulties. Due to the overconstrained nature of the system combined with structural geometric nonlinearities, the behavior of Joined Wings is often counterintuitive and presents challenges not seen in standard layouts. In particular, instability observed on detailed aircraft models but never thoroughly investigated, is here studied with the aid of a theoretical/computational framework. Snap-type of instabilities are shown for both pure structural and aeroelastic cases. The concept of snap-divergence is introduced to clearly identify the true aeroelastic instability, as opposed to the usual aeroelastic divergence evaluated through eigenvalue approach. Multi-stable regions and isola-type of bifurcations are possible characterizations of the nonlinear response of Joined Wings, and may lead to branch-jumping phenomena well below nominal critical load condition. Within this picture, sensitivity to (unavoidable) manufacturing defects could have potential catastrophic effects. The phenomena studied in this work suggest that the design process for Joined Wings needs to be revisited and should focus, when instability is concerned, on nonlinear post-critical analysis since linear methods may provide wrong trend indications and also hide potentially catastrophical situations. Dynamic aeroelastic analyses are also performed. Flutter occurrence is critically analyzed with frequency and time-domain capabilities. Sensitivity to different-fidelity aeroelastic modeling (fluid-structure interface algorithm, aerodynamic solvers) is assessed showing that, for some configurations, wake modeling (rigid versus free) has a strong impact on the results. Post-flutter regimes are also explored. Limit cycle oscillations are observed, followed, in some cases, by flip bifurcations (period doubling) and loss of periodicity of the solution. Aeroelastic analyses are then carried out on a

  4. International Symposium on Interfacial Joining and Surface Technology (IJST2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuo

    2014-08-01

    Interfacial joining (bonding) is a widely accepted welding process and one of the environmentally benign technologies used in industrial production. As the bonding temperature is lower than the melting point of the parent materials, melting of the latter is kept to a minimum. The process can be based on diffusion bonding, pressure welding, friction welding, ultrasonic bonding, or brazing-soldering, all of which offer many advantages over fusion welding. In addition, surface technologies such as surface modification, spraying, coating, plating, and thin-film formation are necessary for advanced manufacturing, fabrication, and electronics packaging. Together, interfacial joining and surface technology (IJST) will continue to be used in various industrial fields because IJST is a very significant form of environmentally conscious materials processing. The international symposium of IJST 2013 was held at Icho Kaikan, Osaka University, Japan from 27-29 November, 2013. A total of 138 participants came from around the world to attend 56 oral presentations and 36 posters presented at the symposium, and to discuss the latest research and developments on interfacial joining and surface technologies. This symposium was also held to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Technical Commission on Interfacial Joining of the Japan Welding Society. On behalf of the chair of the symposium, it is my great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE). Among the presentations, 43 papers are published here, and I believe all of the papers have provided the welding community with much useful information. I would like to thank the authors for their enthusiastic and excellent contributions. Finally, I would like to thank all members of the committees, secretariats, participants, and everyone who contributed to this symposium through their support and invaluable effort for the success of IJST 2013. Yasuo Takahashi Chair of IJST 2013

  5. Viet Cong Recruitment: Why and How Men Join

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1967-12-01

    have been subordinated to the demands of intensified warfare. Today, more and more youths in their early teens are performing nonmilitary, paramilitary...women, influenced by their noble example, or moved to join the movement to impress the girls of their village.) Though forcible recruitment, including...sisters who died heroically while leading Vietnamese forces in battle against the Chinese. The Viet Cong is skillful in exploiting the appeal of girls

  6. Electron Beam Welding to Join Gamma Titanium Aluminide Articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Thomas Joseph (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method is provided for welding two gamma titanium aluminide articles together. The method includes preheating the two articles to a welding temperature of from about 1700 F to about 2100 F, thereafter electron beam welding the two articles together at the welding temperature and in a welding vacuum to form a welded structure, and thereafter annealing the welded structure at an annealing temperature of from about 1800 F to about 2200 F, to form a joined structure.

  7. High-energy electron beams for ceramic joining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turman, Bob N.; Glass, S. J.; Halbleib, J. A.; Helmich, D. R.; Loehman, Ron E.; Clifford, Jerome R.

    1995-03-01

    Joining of structural ceramics is possible using high melting point metals such as Mo and Pt that are heated with a high energy electron beam, with the potential for high temperature joining. A 10 MeV electron beam can penetrate through 1 cm of ceramic, offering the possibility of buried interface joining. Because of transient heating and the lower heat capacity of the metal relative to the ceramic, a pulsed high power beam has the potential for melting the metal without decomposing or melting the ceramic. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the process with a series of 10 MeV, 1 kW electron beam experiments. Shear strengths up to 28 MPa have been measured. This strength is comparable to that reported in the literature for bonding silicon nitride (Si3N4) to molybdenum with copper-silver-titanium braze, but weaker than that reported for Si3N4 - Si3N4 with gold-nickel braze. The bonding mechanism appears to be formation of a thin silicide layer. Beam damage to the Si3N4 was also assessed.

  8. Aluminum and stainless steel tubes joined by simple ring and welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townhill, A.

    1967-01-01

    Duranel ring is used to join aluminum and stainless steel tubing. Duranel is a bimetal made up of roll-bonded aluminum and stainless steel. This method of joining the tubing requires only two welding operations.

  9. Advanced fusion welding processes, solid state joining and a successful marriage. [production of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, F. R.

    1972-01-01

    Joining processes for aerospace systems combine fusion welding and solid state joining during production of metal structures. Detailed characteristics of electron beam welding, plasma arc welding, diffusion welding, inertia welding and weldbond processes are discussed.

  10. Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of Ni-rich NiTi plates: functional behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. P.; Barbosa, D.; Braz Fernandes, F. M.; Miranda, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    It is often reported that, to successfully join NiTi shape memory alloys, fusion-based processes with reduced thermal affected regions (as in laser welding) are required. This paper describes an experimental study performed on the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of 1.5 mm thick plates of Ni-rich NiTi. The functional behavior of the joints was assessed. The superelasticity was analyzed by cycling tests at maximum imposed strains of 4, 8 and 12% and for a total of 600 cycles, without rupture. The superelastic plateau was observed, in the stress-strain curves, 30 MPa below that of the base material. Shape-memory effect was evidenced by bending tests with full recovery of the initial shape of the welded joints. In parallel, uniaxial tensile tests of the joints showed a tensile strength of 700 MPa and an elongation to rupture of 20%. The elongation is the highest reported for fusion-welding of NiTi, including laser welding. These results can be of great interest for the wide-spread inclusion of NiTi in complex shaped components requiring welding, since TIG is not an expensive process and is simple to operate and implement in industrial environments.

  11. Ceramic-to-Metal Joining for High Temperature, High Pressure Heat Exchangers

    SciT

    Mako, Frederick; Mako III, Frederick

    2016-12-05

    Designed and tested silicon carbide to metal joining and silicon carbide joining technology under high temperature and high pressure conditions. Determined that the joints maintained integrity and remained helium gas tight. These joined parts have been tested for mechanical strength, fracture toughness and hermeticity. A component testing chamber was designed and built and used for testing the joint integrity.

  12. Thermoplastic Joining and Assembly of Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Through Capacitive Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Scott N. (Inventor); Schramm, Joseph P. (Inventor); Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Johnson, William L. (Inventor); Kozachkov, Henry (Inventor); Demetriou, Marios D. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for joining BMG Composites are disclosed. Specifically, the joining of BMG Composites is implemented so as to preserve the amorphicity of their matrix phase and the microstructure of their particulate phase. Implementation of the joining method with respect to the construction of modular cellular structures that comprise BMG Composites is also discussed.

  13. 8. Several of the rental rooms are joined by doors, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Several of the rental rooms are joined by doors, and each room is accessed from the corridor. Originally, the transoms were glazed. When a central heating/cooling system was installed, the transoms were modified to accommodate air grilles that are supplied by a duct located in the corridor. The five-panel door and wood wainscot are original features. However, the wainscot does not occur in every room. The lath and plaster partitions and the wood flooring are typical of the original construction. Credit GADA/MRM. - Stroud Building, 31-33 North Central Avenue, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. A new active solder for joining electronic components

    SciT

    SMITH,RONALD W.; VIANCO,PAUL T.; HERNANDEZ,CYNTHIA L.

    Electronic components and micro-sensors utilize ceramic substrates, copper and aluminum interconnect and silicon. The joining of these combinations require pre-metallization such that solders with fluxes can wet such combinations of metals and ceramics. The paper will present a new solder alloy that can bond metals, ceramics and composites. The alloy directly wets and bonds in air without the use flux or premetallized layers. The paper will present typical processing steps and joint microstructures in copper, aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, and silicon joints.

  15. Ultrapulse welding: A new joining technique. [for automotive industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    The ultrapulse process is a resistance welding process that utilizes unidirectional current of high magnitude for a very short time with a precisely controlled dynamic force pulse. Peak currents of up to 220,000 amperes for two to ten milliseconds are used with synchronized force pulses of up to nine thousand pounds. The welding current passing through the relatively high resistance of the interface between the parts that are being joined results in highly localized heating. Described is the UPW process as it applies to the automotive industry.

  16. Method for joining metal by solid-state bonding

    DOEpatents

    Burkhart, L. Elkin; Fultz, Chester R.; Maulden, Kerry A.

    1979-01-01

    The present development is directed to a method for joining metal at relatively low temperatures by solid-state bonding. Planar surfaces of the metal workpieces are placed in a parallel abutting relationship with one another. A load is applied to at least one of the workpieces for forcing the workpieces together while one of the workpieces is relatively slowly oscillated in a rotary motion over a distance of about 1.degree.. After a preselected number of oscillations, the rotary motion is terminated and the bond between the abutting surfaces is effected. An additional load may be applied to facilitate the bond after terminating the rotary motion.

  17. Method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1997-01-01

    A method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals by brazing. Conventional brazing of recently developed carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) material to a metal substrate is limited by the tendency of the braze alloy to "wick" into the CBCF composite rather than to form a strong bond. The surface of the CBCF composite that is to be bonded is first sealed with a fairly dense carbonaceous layer achieved by any of several methods. The sealed surface is then brazed to the metal substrate by vacuum brazing with a Ti-Cu-Be alloy.

  18. Method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1997-07-15

    A method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals by brazing. Conventional brazing of recently developed carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) material to a metal substrate is limited by the tendency of the braze alloy to ``wick`` into the CBCF composite rather than to form a strong bond. The surface of the CBCF composite that is to be bonded is first sealed with a fairly dense carbonaceous layer achieved by any of several methods. The sealed surface is then brazed to the metal substrate by vacuum brazing with a Ti-Cu-Be alloy. 1 fig.

  19. Microstructure and mechanical properties of diffusion bonded W/steel joint using V/Ni composite interlayer

    SciT

    Liu, W.S.; Cai, Q.S., E-mail: cai2009pm@163.com; Ma, Y.Z.

    2013-12-15

    Diffusion bonding between W and steel using V/Ni composite interlayer was carried out in vacuum at 1050 °C and 10 MPa for 1 h. The microstructural examination and mechanical property evaluation of the joints show that the bonding of W to steel was successful. No intermetallic compound was observed at the steel/Ni and V/W interfaces for the joints bonded. The electron probe microanalysis and X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that Ni{sub 3}V, Ni{sub 2}V, Ni{sub 2}V{sub 3} and NiV{sub 3} were formed at the Ni/V interface. The tensile strength of about 362 MPa was obtained for as-bonded W/steel joint and themore » failure occurred at W near the V/W interface. The nano-indentation test across the joining interfaces demonstrated the effect of solid solution strengthening and intermetallic compound formation in the diffusion zone. - Highlights: • Diffusion bonding of W to steel was realized using V/Ni composite interlayer. • The interfacial microstructure of the joint was clarified. • Several V–Ni intermetallic compounds were formed in the interface region. • The application of V/Ni composite interlayer improved the joining quality.« less

  20. Joining of graphene flakes by low energy N ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xin; Zhao, Haiyan; Pei, Jiayun; Yan, Dong

    2017-03-01

    An approach utilizing low energy N ion beam irradiation is applied in joining two monolayer graphene flakes. Raman spectrometry and atomic force microscopy show the joining signal under 40 eV and 1 × 1014 cm-2 N ion irradiation. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the joining phenomenon is attributed to the punch-down effect and the subsequent chemical bond generation between the two sheets. The generated chemical bonds are made up of inserted ions (embedded joining) and knocked-out carbon atoms (saturation joining). The electronic transport properties of the joint are also calculated for its applications.

  1. Development of the weld-braze joining process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, was developed which combines resistance spot welding and brazing. Resistance spot welding is used to position and aline the parts, as well as to establish a suitable faying-surface gap for brazing. Fabrication is then completed at elevated temperature by capillary flow of the braze alloy into the joint. The process was used successfully to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V alloy joints by using 3003 aluminum braze alloy and should be applicable to other metal-braze systems. Test results obtained on single-overlap and hat-stiffened panel specimens show that weld-brazed joints were superior in tensile shear, stress rupture, fatigue, and buckling compared with joints fabricated by conventional means. Another attractive feature of the process is that the brazed joint is hermetically sealed by the braze material, which may eliminate many of the sealing problems encountered with riveted or spot welded structures. The relative ease of fabrication associated with the weld-brazing process may make it cost effective over conventional joining techniques.

  2. Glass-ceramic joint and method of joining

    DOEpatents

    Meinhardt, Kerry D [Richland, WA; Vienna, John D [West Richland, WA; Armstrong, Timothy R [Clinton, TN; Pederson, Larry R [Kennewick, WA

    2003-03-18

    The present invention is a glass-ceramic material and method of making useful for joining a solid ceramic component and at least one other solid component. The material is a blend of M1-M2-M3, wherein M1 is BaO, SrO, CaO, MgO, or combinations thereof, M2 is Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, present in the blend in an amount from 2 to 15 mol %, M3 is SiO.sub.2 with up to 50 mol % B.sub.2 O.sub.3 that substantially matches a coefficient of thermal expansion of the solid electrolyte. According to the present invention, a series of glass ceramics in the M1-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -M3 system can be used to join or seal both tubular and planar solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen electrolyzers, and membrane reactors for the production of syngas, commodity chemicals and other products.

  3. Positioning and joining of organic single-crystalline wires

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuchen; Feng, Jiangang; Jiang, Xiangyu; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Xuedong; Su, Bin; Jiang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Organic single-crystal, one-dimensional materials can effectively carry charges and/or excitons due to their highly ordered molecule packing, minimized defects and eliminated grain boundaries. Controlling the alignment/position of organic single-crystal one-dimensional architectures would allow on-demand photon/electron transport, which is a prerequisite in waveguides and other optoelectronic applications. Here we report a guided physical vapour transport technique to control the growth, alignment and positioning of organic single-crystal wires with the guidance of pillar-structured substrates. Submicrometre-wide, hundreds of micrometres long, highly aligned, organic single-crystal wire arrays are generated. Furthermore, these organic single-crystal wires can be joined within controlled angles by varying the pillar geometries. Owing to the controllable growth of organic single-crystal one-dimensional architectures, we can present proof-of-principle demonstrations utilizing joined wires to allow optical waveguide through small radii of curvature (internal angles of ~90–120°). Our methodology may open a route to control the growth of organic single-crystal one-dimensional materials with potential applications in optoelectronics. PMID:25814032

  4. High Temperature Joining and Characterization of Joint Properties in Silicon Carbide-Based Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    Advanced silicon carbide-based ceramics and composites are being developed for a wide variety of high temperature extreme environment applications. Robust high temperature joining and integration technologies are enabling for the fabrication and manufacturing of large and complex shaped components. The development of a new joining approach called SET (Single-step Elevated Temperature) joining will be described along with the overview of previously developed joining approaches including high temperature brazing, ARCJoinT (Affordable, Robust Ceramic Joining Technology), diffusion bonding, and REABOND (Refractory Eutectic Assisted Bonding). Unlike other approaches, SET joining does not have any lower temperature phases and will therefore have a use temperature above 1315C. Optimization of the composition for full conversion to silicon carbide will be discussed. The goal is to find a composition with no remaining carbon or free silicon. Green tape interlayers were developed for joining. Microstructural analysis and preliminary mechanical tests of the joints will be presented.

  5. Resistance Distances and Kirchhoff Index in Generalised Join Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haiyan

    2017-03-01

    The resistance distance between any two vertices of a connected graph is defined as the effective resistance between them in the electrical network constructed from the graph by replacing each edge with a unit resistor. The Kirchhoff index of a graph is defined as the sum of all the resistance distances between any pair of vertices of the graph. Let G=H[G1, G2, …, Gk ] be the generalised join graph of G1, G2, …, Gk determined by H. In this paper, we first give formulae for resistance distances and Kirchhoff index of G in terms of parameters of {G'_i}s and H. Then, we show that computing resistance distances and Kirchhoff index of G can be decomposed into simpler ones. Finally, we obtain explicit formulae for resistance distances and Kirchhoff index of G when {G'_i}s and H take some special graphs, such as the complete graph, the path, and the cycle.

  6. Localized Fault Recovery for Nested Fork-Join Programs

    SciT

    Kestor, Gokcen; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Ma, Wenjing

    Nested fork-join programs scheduled using work stealing can automatically balance load and adapt to changes in the execution environment. In this paper, we design an approach to efficiently recover from faults encountered by these programs. Specifically, we focus on localized recovery of the task space in the presence of fail-stop failures. We present an approach to efficiently track, under work stealing, the relationships between the work executed by various threads. This information is used to identify and schedule the tasks to be re-executed without interfering with normal task execution. The algorithm precisely computes the work lost, incurs minimal re-execution overhead,more » and can recover from an arbitrary number of failures. Experimental evaluation demonstrates low overheads in the absence of failures, recovery overheads on the same order as the lost work, and much lower recovery costs than alternative strategies.« less

  7. Joining the quantum state of two photons into one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, Chiara; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Aparo, Lorenzo; Sciarrino, Fabio; Santamato, Enrico; Marrucci, Lorenzo

    2013-07-01

    Photons are the ideal carriers of quantum information for communication. Each photon can have a single or multiple qubits encoded in its internal quantum state, as defined by optical degrees of freedom such as polarization, wavelength, transverse modes and so on. However, as photons do not interact, multiplexing and demultiplexing the quantum information across photons has not been possible hitherto. Here, we introduce and demonstrate experimentally a physical process, named `quantum joining', in which the two-dimensional quantum states (qubits) of two input photons are combined into a single output photon, within a four-dimensional Hilbert space. The inverse process is also proposed, in which the four-dimensional quantum state of a single photon is split into two photons, each carrying a qubit. Both processes can be iterated, and hence provide a flexible quantum interconnect to bridge multiparticle protocols of quantum information with multidegree-of-freedom ones, with possible applications in future quantum networking.

  8. Joining of Silicon Carbide Through the Diffusion Bonding Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael .; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2009-01-01

    In order for ceramics to be fully utilized as components for high-temperature and structural applications, joining and integration methods are needed. Such methods will allow for the fabrication the complex shapes and also allow for insertion of the ceramic component into a system that may have different adjacent materials. Monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) is a ceramic material of focus due to its high temperature strength and stability. Titanium foils were used as an interlayer to form diffusion bonds between chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC ceramics with the aid of hot pressing. The influence of such variables as interlayer thickness and processing time were investigated to see which conditions contributed to bonds that were well adhered and crack free. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis were used to characterize the bonds and to identify the reaction formed phases.

  9. Sorting by Cuts, Joins, and Whole Chromosome Duplications.

    PubMed

    Zeira, Ron; Shamir, Ron

    2017-02-01

    Genome rearrangement problems have been extensively studied due to their importance in biology. Most studied models assumed a single copy per gene. However, in reality, duplicated genes are common, most notably in cancer. In this study, we make a step toward handling duplicated genes by considering a model that allows the atomic operations of cut, join, and whole chromosome duplication. Given two linear genomes, [Formula: see text] with one copy per gene and [Formula: see text] with two copies per gene, we give a linear time algorithm for computing a shortest sequence of operations transforming [Formula: see text] into [Formula: see text] such that all intermediate genomes are linear. We also show that computing an optimal sequence with fewest duplications is NP-hard.

  10. Russia joins Kazakh/Omani pipeline venture group

    SciT

    Not Available

    1992-08-03

    Russia has agreed to become a founding partner in a joint venture pipeline project formed by Kazakhstan and Oman. The agreement, signed in Bermuda July 24, is related to Chevron Corp.'s further development of supergiant Tengiz and Korolev fields along the Caspian Sea coast in Kazakhstan. Azerbaijan last month signed an agreement to become a founding member of the group, accepting terms agreed to by original joint venturers Kazakhstan and Oman. Azerbaijan's new government still must formally ratify its agreement. In addition, Chevron in June signed a memorandum of understanding to join the group at a future date. This papermore » reports that each of the founding members holds an equal interest in Caspian Pipeline Consortium Ltd., which will operate as a limited liability company incorporated in Bermuda.« less

  11. Cut and join operator ring in tensor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoyama, H.; Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.

    2018-07-01

    Recent advancement of rainbow tensor models based on their superintegrability (manifesting itself as the existence of an explicit expression for a generic Gaussian correlator) has allowed us to bypass the long-standing problem seen as the lack of eigenvalue/determinant representation needed to establish the KP/Toda integrability. As the mandatory next step, we discuss in this paper how to provide an adequate designation to each of the connected gauge-invariant operators that form a double coset, which is required to cleverly formulate a tree-algebra generalization of the Virasoro constraints. This problem goes beyond the enumeration problem per se tied to the permutation group, forcing us to introduce a few gauge fixing procedures to the coset. We point out that the permutation-based labeling, which has proven to be relevant for the Gaussian averages is, via interesting complexity, related to the one based on the keystone trees, whose algebra will provide the tensor counterpart of the Virasoro algebra for matrix models. Moreover, our simple analysis reveals the existence of nontrivial kernels and co-kernels for the cut operation and for the join operation respectively that prevent a straightforward construction of the non-perturbative RG-complete partition function and the identification of truly independent time variables. We demonstrate these problems by the simplest non-trivial Aristotelian RGB model with one complex rank-3 tensor, studying its ring of gauge-invariant operators, generated by the keystone triple with the help of four operations: addition, multiplication, cut and join.

  12. The joined wing - An overview. [aircraft tandem wings in diamond configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolkovitch, J.

    1985-01-01

    The joined wing is a new type of aircraft configuration which employs tandem wings arranged to form diamond shapes in plan view and front view. Wind-tunnel tests and finite-element structural analyses have shown that the joined wing provides the following advantages over a comparable wing-plus-tail system; lighter weight and higher stiffness, higher span-efficiency factor, higher trimmed maximum lift coefficient, lower wave drag, plus built-in direct lift and direct sideforce control capability. A summary is given of research performed on the joined wing. Calculated joined wing weights are correlated with geometric parameters to provide simple weight estimation methods. The results of low-speed and transonic wind-tunnel tests are summarized, and guidelines for design of joined-wing aircraft are given. Some example joined-wing designs are presented and related configurations having connected wings are reviewed.

  13. Finite element thermal analysis for PMMA/st.st.304 laser direct joining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Furat I.; Salloomi, Kareem N.; Akman, E.; Hajim, K. I.; Demir, A.

    2017-01-01

    This work is concerned with building a three-dimensional (3D) ab-initio models that is capable of predicting the thermal distribution of laser direct joining processes between Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and stainless steel 304(st.st.304). ANSYS® simulation based on finite element analysis (FEA) was implemented for materials joining in two modes; laser transmission joining (LTJ) and conduction joining (CJ). ANSYS® simulator was used to explore the thermal environment of the joints during joining (heating time) and after joining (cooling time). For both modes, the investigation is carried out when the laser spot is at the middle of the joint width, at 15 mm from the commencement point (joint edge) at traveling time of 3.75 s. Process parameters involving peak power (Pp=3 kW), pulse duration (τ=5 ms), pulse repetition rate (PRR=20 Hz) and scanning speed (v=4 mm/s) are applied for both modes.

  14. Aerodynamic Analysis of a Hale Aircraft Joined-Wing Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaji, Rangarajan; Ghia, Urmila; Ghia, Karman; Thornburg, Hugh

    2003-11-01

    Aerodynamic analysis of a high-aspect ratio, joined wing of a High-Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) aircraft is performed. The requirement of high lift over extended flight periods for the HALE aircraft leads to high-aspect ratio wings experiencing significant deflections necessitating consideration of aeroelastic effects. The finite-volume solver COBALT, with Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) capabilities, is used for the flow simulations. Calculations are performed at á = 0° and 12° for M = 0.6, at an altitude of 30,000 feet, at a Re per unit length of 5.6x106. The wing cross sections are NACA 4421 airfoils. Because of the high lift-to-drag ratio wings, an inviscid flow analysis is also performed. The inviscid surface pressure coefficient (Cp) is compared with the corresponding viscous Cp to examine the feasibility of the use of the inviscid pressure loads as an estimate of the total fluid loads on the structure. The viscous and inviscid Cp results compare reasonably only at á = 0°. The viscous flow is examined in detail via surface and field velocity vectors, vorticity, density and pressure contours. For á = 12°, the unsteady DES solutions show a weak shock at the aft-wing trailing edge. Also, the flow near the joint exhibits a region of mild separation.

  15. University Students Join NASA on Trip to Hawaiian Volcano

    2015-08-06

    Full moon over lava lake The inspiring views at remote locations, such as Halema’uma’u Crater in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, are an extra reward for making the trip. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Kelsey Young In June, five student journalists from Stony Brook University packed their hiking boots and hydration packs and joined a NASA-funded science team for 10 days on the lava fields of Kilauea, an active Hawaiian volcano. Kilauea’s lava fields are an ideal place to test equipment designed for use on Earth’s moon or Mars, because volcanic activity shaped so much of those terrains. The trip was part of an interdisciplinary program called RIS4E – short for Remote, In Situ, and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration – which is designed to prepare for future exploration of the moon, near-Earth asteroids and the moons of Mars. To read reports from the RIS4E journalism students about their experiences in Hawaii, visit ReportingRIS4E.com NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  16. University Students Join NASA on Trip to Hawaiian Volcano

    2015-08-06

    Ready to roll The five student journalists and two faculty members are ready for a day in the field. NASA/GSFC/Andrea Jones In June, five student journalists from Stony Brook University packed their hiking boots and hydration packs and joined a NASA-funded science team for 10 days on the lava fields of Kilauea, an active Hawaiian volcano. Kilauea’s lava fields are an ideal place to test equipment designed for use on Earth’s moon or Mars, because volcanic activity shaped so much of those terrains. The trip was part of an interdisciplinary program called RIS4E – short for Remote, In Situ, and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration – which is designed to prepare for future exploration of the moon, near-Earth asteroids and the moons of Mars. To read reports from the RIS4E journalism students about their experiences in Hawaii, visit ReportingRIS4E.com NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  17. University Students Join NASA on Trip to Hawaiian Volcano

    2017-12-08

    Briefing Hiking a lava field demands good preparation. Here, the team leaders brief the crew, scientists and student journalists on the route they’ll take down a scarp to the site of Kilauea’s December 1974 eruption. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Lora Bleacher In June, five student journalists from Stony Brook University packed their hiking boots and hydration packs and joined a NASA-funded science team for 10 days on the lava fields of Kilauea, an active Hawaiian volcano. Kilauea’s lava fields are an ideal place to test equipment designed for use on Earth’s moon or Mars, because volcanic activity shaped so much of those terrains. The trip was part of an interdisciplinary program called RIS4E – short for Remote, In Situ, and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration – which is designed to prepare for future exploration of the moon, near-Earth asteroids and the moons of Mars. To read reports from the RIS4E journalism students about their experiences in Hawaii, visit ReportingRIS4E.com NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  18. University Students Join NASA on Trip to Hawaiian Volcano

    2015-08-06

    Prepared Everyone carried a respirator into the field, in case the plume from the volcano blew their way. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Andrea Jones In June, five student journalists from Stony Brook University packed their hiking boots and hydration packs and joined a NASA-funded science team for 10 days on the lava fields of Kilauea, an active Hawaiian volcano. Kilauea’s lava fields are an ideal place to test equipment designed for use on Earth’s moon or Mars, because volcanic activity shaped so much of those terrains. The trip was part of an interdisciplinary program called RIS4E – short for Remote, In Situ, and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration – which is designed to prepare for future exploration of the moon, near-Earth asteroids and the moons of Mars. To read reports from the RIS4E journalism students about their experiences in Hawaii, visit ReportingRIS4E.com NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  19. University Students Join NASA on Trip to Hawaiian Volcano

    2017-12-08

    Pele’s hair Greenish-gold strands of Pele’s hair form when bubbles in hot lava pop and throw droplets into the wind. The droplets can elongate into perfectly straight, glassy strands that are as thin as human hair. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Andrea Jones In June, five student journalists from Stony Brook University packed their hiking boots and hydration packs and joined a NASA-funded science team for 10 days on the lava fields of Kilauea, an active Hawaiian volcano. Kilauea’s lava fields are an ideal place to test equipment designed for use on Earth’s moon or Mars, because volcanic activity shaped so much of those terrains. The trip was part of an interdisciplinary program called RIS4E – short for Remote, In Situ, and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration – which is designed to prepare for future exploration of the moon, near-Earth asteroids and the moons of Mars. To read reports from the RIS4E journalism students about their experiences in Hawaii, visit ReportingRIS4E.com NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  20. University Students Join NASA on Trip to Hawaiian Volcano

    2017-12-08

    Lava formations The science and journalism teams make their way across the ropey, twisted, broken crust of the 1978 lava flow. These patterns formed as flowing lava exposed at the surface cooled and solidified, while hot lava continued to flow beneath. The dark cloud in the distance is the active volcanic plume. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Andrea Jones In June, five student journalists from Stony Brook University packed their hiking boots and hydration packs and joined a NASA-funded science team for 10 days on the lava fields of Kilauea, an active Hawaiian volcano. Kilauea’s lava fields are an ideal place to test equipment designed for use on Earth’s moon or Mars, because volcanic activity shaped so much of those terrains. The trip was part of an interdisciplinary program called RIS4E – short for Remote, In Situ, and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration – which is designed to prepare for future exploration of the moon, near-Earth asteroids and the moons of Mars. To read reports from the RIS4E journalism students about their experiences in Hawaii, visit ReportingRIS4E.com NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  1. University Students Join NASA on Trip to Hawaiian Volcano

    2017-12-08

    Team kite This kite was part of the scientific tool kit. It carried a camera that can be used to make high-resolution mosaics of the study site. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jacob Bleacher In June, five student journalists from Stony Brook University packed their hiking boots and hydration packs and joined a NASA-funded science team for 10 days on the lava fields of Kilauea, an active Hawaiian volcano. Kilauea’s lava fields are an ideal place to test equipment designed for use on Earth’s moon or Mars, because volcanic activity shaped so much of those terrains. The trip was part of an interdisciplinary program called RIS4E – short for Remote, In Situ, and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration – which is designed to prepare for future exploration of the moon, near-Earth asteroids and the moons of Mars. To read reports from the RIS4E journalism students about their experiences in Hawaii, visit ReportingRIS4E.com NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  2. University Students Join NASA on Trip to Hawaiian Volcano

    2017-12-08

    Smooth pahoehoe A member of the journalism team captures the alluring beauty of a pahoehoe flow. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Anthony Denicola In June, five student journalists from Stony Brook University packed their hiking boots and hydration packs and joined a NASA-funded science team for 10 days on the lava fields of Kilauea, an active Hawaiian volcano. Kilauea’s lava fields are an ideal place to test equipment designed for use on Earth’s moon or Mars, because volcanic activity shaped so much of those terrains. The trip was part of an interdisciplinary program called RIS4E – short for Remote, In Situ, and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration – which is designed to prepare for future exploration of the moon, near-Earth asteroids and the moons of Mars. To read reports from the RIS4E journalism students about their experiences in Hawaii, visit ReportingRIS4E.com NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  3. University Students Join NASA on Trip to Hawaiian Volcano

    2015-08-06

    Bunny suits Scientists put on “bunny suits” before they collect samples at one of the selected sites. The suits protect the area and collected samples from contamination when investigating biological processes. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Lora Bleacher In June, five student journalists from Stony Brook University packed their hiking boots and hydration packs and joined a NASA-funded science team for 10 days on the lava fields of Kilauea, an active Hawaiian volcano. Kilauea’s lava fields are an ideal place to test equipment designed for use on Earth’s moon or Mars, because volcanic activity shaped so much of those terrains. The trip was part of an interdisciplinary program called RIS4E – short for Remote, In Situ, and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration – which is designed to prepare for future exploration of the moon, near-Earth asteroids and the moons of Mars. To read reports from the RIS4E journalism students about their experiences in Hawaii, visit ReportingRIS4E.com NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  4. Indian oil company joins efforts to reduce methane emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    The Oil and Natural Gas Corp, Ltd. (ONGC), headquartered in Dehradun, India, has joined seven U.S. and Canadian oil and natural gas companies as a partner in a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. EPA's Natural Gas STAR International Program aims to reduce methane emissions from the oil and natural gas sector while delivering more gas to markets around the world. With this partnership, ONGC agrees to implement emissions reduction practices and to submit annual reports on progress achieved; EPA agrees to assist ONGC with training technicians in new cost-effective technologies that will help achieve target emissions. The Natural Gas STAR International Program is administered under the Methane to Markets Partnership, a group of 20 countries and 600 companies across the globe that since 2004 has volunteered to cut methane emissions. More information on EPA's agreement with ONGC can be found at http://www.epa.gov/gasstar/index.htm; information about the Methane to Markets Partnership can be found at http://www.methanetomarkets.org.

  5. Joining of alumina via copper/niobium/copper interlayers

    SciT

    Marks, Robert A.; Chapman, Daniel R.; Danielson, David T.

    2000-03-15

    Alumina has been joined at 1150 degrees C and 1400 degrees C using multilayer copper/niobium/copper interlayers. Four-point bend strengths are sensitive to processing temperature, bonding pressure, and furnace environment (ambient oxygen partial pressure). Under optimum conditions, joints with reproducibly high room temperature strengths (approximately equal 240 plus/minus 20 MPa) can be produced; most failures occur within the ceramic. Joints made with sapphire show that during bonding an initially continuous copper film undergoes a morphological instability, resulting in the formation of isolated copper-rich droplets/particles at the sapphire/interlayer interface, and extensive regions of direct bonding between sapphire and niobium. For optimized aluminamore » bonds, bend tests at 800 degrees C-1100 degrees C indicate significant strength is retained; even at the highest test temperature, ceramic failure is observed. Post-bonding anneals at 1000 degrees C in vacuum or in gettered argon were used to assess joint stability and to probe the effect of ambient oxygen partial pressure on joint characteristics. Annealing in vacuum for up to 200 h causes no significant decrease in room temperature bend strength or change in fracture path. With increasing anneal time in a lower oxygen partial pressure environment, the fracture strength decreases only slightly, but the fracture path shifts from the ceramic to the interface.« less

  6. Rival giant telescopes join to seek U.S. funding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, Eric

    2018-05-01

    Two U.S.-led giant telescope projects, rivals for nearly 2 decades, announced this week that they have agreed to join forces. The Giant Magellan Telescope, a 25-meter telescope under construction in Chile, and the Thirty Meter Telescope, which backers hope to build atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii, are still short of partners and money. They will now work together to win funding from the National Science Foundation, which could help the projects catch up to a third giant telescope, the 39-meter European Extremely Large Telescope, due to begin operations in 2024. It is a historic peace accord to end a conflict that has divided funders and delayed both projects. The partnership commits the two projects to developing a joint plan that would allow astronomers from any institution to use the telescopes; under previous plans observing time was available only to researchers from nations or institutions that had provided funding. The projects are discussing awarding at least 25% of each telescope's time to nonpartners through a competitive process to be administered by the National Center for Optical-Infrared Astronomy—an umbrella organization that will replace the National Optical Astronomy Observatory sometime in fiscal year 2019. Telescope backers hope the public access plan will help persuade the federal government to pay for at least 25% of the total cost of the two facilities, a share that could reach $1 billion.

  7. Social Pharmacy and Clinical Pharmacy—Joining Forces

    PubMed Central

    Almarsdottir, Anna Birna; Granas, Anne Gerd

    2015-01-01

    This commentary seeks to define the areas of social pharmacy and clinical pharmacy to uncover what they have in common and what still sets them apart. Common threats and challenges of the two areas are reviewed in order to understand the forces in play. Forces that still keep clinical and social pharmacy apart are university structures, research traditions, and the management of pharmacy services. There are key (but shrinking) differences between clinical and social pharmacy which entail the levels of study within pharmaceutical sciences, the location in which the research is carried out, the choice of research designs and methods, and the theoretical foundations. Common strengths and opportunities are important to know in order to join forces. Finding common ground can be developed in two areas: participating together in multi-disciplinary research, and uniting in a dialogue with internal and external key players in putting forth what is needed for the profession of pharmacy. At the end the question is posed, “What’s in a name?” and we argue that it is important to emphasize what unifies the families of clinical pharmacy and social pharmacy for the benefit of both fields, pharmacy in general, and society at large. PMID:28970374

  8. Microhomology-mediated end joining induces hypermutagenesis at breakpoint junctions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyang; Villarreal, Diana; Shim, Jae Hoon; Myung, Kyungjae; Shim, Eun Yong; Lee, Sang Eun

    2017-01-01

    Microhomology (MH) flanking a DNA double-strand break (DSB) drives chromosomal rearrangements but its role in mutagenesis has not yet been analyzed. Here we determined the mutation frequency of a URA3 reporter gene placed at multiple locations distal to a DSB, which is flanked by different sizes (15-, 18-, or 203-bp) of direct repeat sequences for efficient repair in budding yeast. Induction of a DSB accumulates mutations in the reporter gene situated up to 14-kb distal to the 15-bp MH, but more modestly to those carrying 18- and 203-bp or no homology. Increased mutagenesis in MH-mediated end joining (MMEJ) appears coupled to its slower repair kinetics and the extensive resection occurring at flanking DNA. Chromosomal translocations via MMEJ also elevate mutagenesis of the flanking DNA sequences 7.1 kb distal to the breakpoint junction as compared to those without MH. The results suggest that MMEJ could destabilize genomes by triggering structural alterations and increasing mutation burden. PMID:28419093

  9. Joining Forces: The Chemical Biology-Medicinal Chemistry Continuum.

    PubMed

    Plowright, Alleyn T; Ottmann, Christian; Arkin, Michelle; Auberson, Yves P; Timmerman, Henk; Waldmann, Herbert

    2017-09-21

    The scientific advances being made across all disciplines are creating ever-increasing opportunities to enhance our knowledge of biological systems and how they relate to human disease. One of the central driving forces in discovering new medicines is medicinal chemistry, where the design and synthesis of novel compounds has led to multiple drugs. Chemical biology, sitting at the interface of many disciplines, has now emerged as a major contributor to the understanding of biological systems and is becoming an integral part of drug discovery. Bringing chemistry and biology much closer and blurring the boundaries between disciplines is creating new opportunities to probe and understand biology; both disciplines play key roles and need to join forces and work together effectively to synergize their impact. The power of chemical biology will then reach its full potential and drive innovation, leading to the discovery of transformative medicines to treat patients. Advances in cancer biology and drug discovery highlight this potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Social Pharmacy and Clinical Pharmacy-Joining Forces.

    PubMed

    Almarsdottir, Anna Birna; Granas, Anne Gerd

    2015-12-22

    This commentary seeks to define the areas of social pharmacy and clinical pharmacy to uncover what they have in common and what still sets them apart. Common threats and challenges of the two areas are reviewed in order to understand the forces in play. Forces that still keep clinical and social pharmacy apart are university structures, research traditions, and the management of pharmacy services. There are key (but shrinking) differences between clinical and social pharmacy which entail the levels of study within pharmaceutical sciences, the location in which the research is carried out, the choice of research designs and methods, and the theoretical foundations. Common strengths and opportunities are important to know in order to join forces. Finding common ground can be developed in two areas: participating together in multi-disciplinary research, and uniting in a dialogue with internal and external key players in putting forth what is needed for the profession of pharmacy. At the end the question is posed, "What's in a name?" and we argue that it is important to emphasize what unifies the families of clinical pharmacy and social pharmacy for the benefit of both fields, pharmacy in general, and society at large.

  11. Thermal-stress-free fasteners for joining orthotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    Hot structures fabricated from orthotropic materials are an attractive design option for future high speed vehicles. Joining subassemblies of these materials with standard cylindrical fasteners can lead to loose joints or highly stressed joints due to thermal stress. A method has been developed to eliminate thermal stresses and maintain a tight joint by shaping the fastener and mating hole. This method allows both materials (fastener and structure), with different coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) in each of the three material directions, to expand freely with temperature yet remain in contact. For the assumptions made in the analysis, the joint will remain snug, yet free of thermal stress at any temperature. Finite element analysis was used to verify several thermal-stress-free fasteners and to show that conical fasteners, which are thermal-stress-free for isotropic materials, can reduce thermal stresses for transversely isotropic materials compared to a cylindrical fastener. Equations for thermal-stress-free shapes are presented and typical fastener shapes are shown.

  12. Ceramic-metal composite article and joining method

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Shinhoo; Selverian, John H.; Kim, Hans J.; Dunn, Edmund M.; Kim, Kyung S.

    1992-01-01

    A ceramic-metal article including a ceramic rod, a metal rod, and a braze joining the ceramic and metal rods at a braze area of a coaxial bore in the metal rod. The bore gradually decreases in diameter, having an inward seat area sized for close sliding fit about the ceramic, a larger brazing area near the joint end, and a void area intermediate the braze and seat areas. The ceramic is seated without brazing in the bore seat area. The side wall between the brazing area and the metal outer surface is about 0.030-0.080 inch. The braze includes an inner braze layer, an outer braze layer, and an interlayer about 0.030-0.090 inch thick. A shoulder between the brazing and void areas supports the interlayer during bonding while preventing bonding between the void area and the ceramic member, leaving a void space between the void area and the ceramic member. A venting orifice extends generally radially through the metal member from the outer surface to the void space. The braze layers are palladium, platinum, gold, silver, copper, nickel, indium, chromium, molybdenum, niobium, iron, aluminum, or alloys thereof. Preferred is a gold-palladium-nickel brazing alloy. The interlayer is nickel, molybdenum, copper, tantalum, tungsten, niobium, aluminum, cobalt, iron, or an alloy thereof.

  13. Ceramic-metal composite article and joining method

    DOEpatents

    Kang, S.; Selverian, J.H.; Kim, H.J.; Dunn, E.M.; Kim, K.S.

    1992-04-28

    A ceramic-metal article including a ceramic rod, a metal rod, and a braze joining the ceramic and metal rods at a braze area of a coaxial bore in the metal rod is described. The bore gradually decreases in diameter, having an inward seat area sized for close sliding fit about the ceramic, a larger brazing area near the joint end, and a void area intermediate the braze and seat areas. The ceramic is seated without brazing in the bore seat area. The side wall between the brazing area and the metal outer surface is about 0.030-0.080 inch. The braze includes an inner braze layer, an outer braze layer, and an interlayer about 0.030-0.090 inch thick. A shoulder between the brazing and void areas supports the interlayer during bonding while preventing bonding between the void area and the ceramic member, leaving a void space between the void area and the ceramic member. A venting orifice extends generally radially through the metal member from the outer surface to the void space. The braze layers are palladium, platinum, gold, silver, copper, nickel, indium, chromium, molybdenum, niobium, iron, aluminum, or alloys thereof. Preferred is a gold-palladium-nickel brazing alloy. The interlayer is nickel, molybdenum, copper, tantalum, tungsten, niobium, aluminum, cobalt, iron, or an alloy thereof. 4 figs.

  14. Can Joined-Up Data Lead to Joined-Up Thinking? The Western Australian Developmental Pathways Project

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Fiona; Glauert, Rebecca; McKenzie, Anne; O'Donnell, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Modern societies are challenged by “wicked problems” – by definition, those that are difficult to define, multi-causal and hard to treat. Problems such as low birth weight, obesity, mental ill health, teenage pregnancy, educational difficulties and juvenile crime fit this category. Given the complex nature of these problems, they require the best data in order to measure them, guide policy frameworks and evaluate whether the steps taken to address them are actually making a difference. What such problems really require are joined-up approaches to enable effective solutions. In this paper, we describe a unique initiative to encourage a more preventive, whole-of-government approach to these problems – the Developmental Pathways Project, which has enabled the linkage of a large number of de-identified administrative databases in order to explore the pathways into and out of the negative outcomes affecting our children and youth. This project has not only enabled the linkage of agency data, but also of agency personnel, in order to improve and promote cross-agency research, policy and preventive solutions. Through the use of these linkages we are attempting to shift the paradigm to encourage agencies to appreciate that these “wicked problems” demand a preventive approach, as well as the provision of effective services for those already affected. PMID:24933374

  15. The Joining-Up Process: Issues in Effective Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frohman, Alan L.; Kotter, John P.

    1975-01-01

    Four specific problems associated with ineffective and expensive joining-up which are examined in the article are: (1) mismatched expectations; (2) stifling creativity and challenge; (3) lack of managerial awareness and sensitivity to joining-up issues; and (4) using inappropriate or incomplete screening criteria. Solutions are suggested; a table…

  16. News Release: USDA Joins Fair Food Network, State and Local Partners to

    Promote Nutrition Resources for Lead-Affected Flint Residents - PHE You may be trying to access Joins Fair Food Network, State and Local Partners to Promote Nutrition Resources for Lead-Affected Flint Residents News Release: USDA Joins Fair Food Network, State and Local Partners to Promote Nutrition

  17. High-School Teams Joining Massive Pulsar Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    High school students and teachers will join astronomers on the cutting edge of science under a program to be operated by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University (WVU), and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The program, called the Pulsar Search Collaboratory, will engage West Virginia students and teachers in a massive search for new pulsars using data from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Sue Ann Heatherly Sue Ann Heatherly, NRAO Education Officer CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) The NSF announced a $892,838 grant to NRAO and WVU to conduct the three-year program. The project will involve 60 teachers and some 600 students in helping astronomers analyze data from 1500 hours of observing time on the GBT. The 120 terabytes of data produced by some 70,000 individual pointings of the giant, 17-million-pound telescope is expected to reveal dozens of previously-unknown pulsars. "The students in this program will be partners in frontier research, discovering new pulsars and measuring changes in pulsars already known," said Sue Ann Heatherly, the NRAO Education Officer in Green Bank and Principal Investigator in the project. Pulsars are superdense neutron stars, the corpses of massive stars that have exploded as supernovae. As the neutron star spins, lighthouse-like beams of radio waves, streaming from the poles of its powerful magnetic field, sweep through space. When one of these beams sweeps across the Earth, radio telescopes can capture the pulse of radio waves. Pulsars serve as exotic laboratories for studying the physics of extreme conditions. Scientists can learn valuable new information about the physics of subatomic particles, electromagnetics, and General Relativity by observing pulsars and the changes they undergo over time. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) combines the capabilities of NRAO and WVU to provide a unique opportunity for teachers and students

  18. Joining the conversation: newspaper journalists' views on working with researchers.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Charlotte; Lomas, Jonathan; Lavis, John N; Abelson, Julia; Shepherd, Cody A; Bird-Gayson, Twylla

    2005-09-01

    For health researchers who seek more research use in policy making to improve health and healthcare, working with the news media may represent an opportunity, given the media's pivotal role in public policy agenda-setting. Much literature on science and health journalism assumes a normative stance, focusing on improving the accuracy of news coverage. In this study, we investigated journalists' perspectives and experiences. We were particularly interested in learning how health researchers could work constructively with journalists as a means to increase research use in policy making. Qualitative methods were used to conduct and analyze interviews with experienced newspaper journalists across Canada, with children's mental health as a content example. In response, study participants emphasized journalistic processes more than the content of news coverage, whether children's mental health or other topics. Instead, they focused on what they thought researchers needed to know about journalists' roles, practices and views on working with researchers. Newspaper journalists balance business and social responsibilities according to their respective roles as editors, columnists and reporters. In practice, journalists must ensure newsworthiness, relevance to readers and access to sources in a context of daily deadlines. As generalists, journalists rely on researchers to be expert interpreters, although they find many researchers unavailable or unable to communicate with public audiences. While journalists are skeptical about such common organizational communications tools as news releases, they welcome the uncommon contributions of those researchers who cultivate relationships and invest time to synthesize and communicate research evidence on an ongoing basis. Some appealed for more researchers to join them in participating in public conversations. We conclude that there are opportunities for policy-oriented health researchers to work constructively with newspaper

  19. NASA Telescopes Join Forces To Observe Unprecedented Explosion

    2017-12-08

    NASA image release April 6, 2011 NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory completed this four-hour exposure of GRB 110328A on April 4. The center of the X-ray source corresponds to the very center of the host galaxy imaged by Hubble (red cross). Credit: NASA/CXC/ Warwick/A. Levan NASA's Swift, Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory have teamed up to study one of the most puzzling cosmic blasts yet observed. More than a week later, high-energy radiation continues to brighten and fade from its location. Astronomers say they have never seen anything this bright, long-lasting and variable before. Usually, gamma-ray bursts mark the destruction of a massive star, but flaring emission from these events never lasts more than a few hours. Although research is ongoing, astronomers say that the unusual blast likely arose when a star wandered too close to its galaxy's central black hole. Intense tidal forces tore the star apart, and the infalling gas continues to stream toward the hole. According to this model, the spinning black hole formed an outflowing jet along its spin axis. A powerful blast of X- and gamma rays is seen if this jet is pointed in our direction. To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/topics/universe/features/star-disintegration... NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  20. NASA Telescopes Join Forces To Observe Unprecedented Explosion

    2011-04-06

    NASA image releaes April 6, 2011 This is a visible-light image of GRB 110328A's host galaxy (arrow) taken on April 4 by the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3. The galaxy is 3.8 billion light-years away. Credit: NASA/ESA/A. Fruchter (STScI) NASA's Swift, Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory have teamed up to study one of the most puzzling cosmic blasts yet observed. More than a week later, high-energy radiation continues to brighten and fade from its location. Astronomers say they have never seen anything this bright, long-lasting and variable before. Usually, gamma-ray bursts mark the destruction of a massive star, but flaring emission from these events never lasts more than a few hours. Although research is ongoing, astronomers say that the unusual blast likely arose when a star wandered too close to its galaxy's central black hole. Intense tidal forces tore the star apart, and the infalling gas continues to stream toward the hole. According to this model, the spinning black hole formed an outflowing jet along its spin axis. A powerful blast of X- and gamma rays is seen if this jet is pointed in our direction. To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/topics/universe/features/star-disintegration... NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  1. NASA Telescopes Join Forces To Observe Unprecedented Explosion

    2017-12-08

    NASA image release April 6, 2011 Images from Swift's Ultraviolet/Optical (white, purple) and X-ray telescopes (yellow and red) were combined in this view of GRB 110328A. The blast was detected only in X-rays, which were collected over a 3.4-hour period on March 28. Credit: NASA/Swift/Stefan Immler NASA's Swift, Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory have teamed up to study one of the most puzzling cosmic blasts yet observed. More than a week later, high-energy radiation continues to brighten and fade from its location. Astronomers say they have never seen anything this bright, long-lasting and variable before. Usually, gamma-ray bursts mark the destruction of a massive star, but flaring emission from these events never lasts more than a few hours. Although research is ongoing, astronomers say that the unusual blast likely arose when a star wandered too close to its galaxy's central black hole. Intense tidal forces tore the star apart, and the infalling gas continues to stream toward the hole. According to this model, the spinning black hole formed an outflowing jet along its spin axis. A powerful blast of X- and gamma rays is seen if this jet is pointed in our direction. To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/topics/universe/features/star-disintegration... NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  2. University Students Join NASA on Trip to Hawaiian Volcano

    2015-08-06

    March across pahoehoe The team hikes across Kilauea’s lava fields to reach designated test sites. Several types of lava make up the fields, primarily smooth pahoehoe, which can harden into a ropy, shelly or slabby (pictured here) texture. Some of the most dangerous lava to walk on is a’a – unstable piles of jagged rock. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jasmine Blennau In June, five student journalists from Stony Brook University packed their hiking boots and hydration packs and joined a NASA-funded science team for 10 days on the lava fields of Kilauea, an active Hawaiian volcano. Kilauea’s lava fields are an ideal place to test equipment designed for use on Earth’s moon or Mars, because volcanic activity shaped so much of those terrains. The trip was part of an interdisciplinary program called RIS4E – short for Remote, In Situ, and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration – which is designed to prepare for future exploration of the moon, near-Earth asteroids and the moons of Mars. To read reports from the RIS4E journalism students about their experiences in Hawaii, visit ReportingRIS4E.com NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  3. Joining the Conversation: Newspaper Journalists’ Views on Working with Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Charlotte; Lomas, Jonathan; Lavis, John N; Abelson, Julia; Shepherd, Cody A; Bird-Gayson, Twylla

    2005-01-01

    For health researchers who seek more research use in policy making to improve health and healthcare, working with the news media may represent an opportunity, given the media’s pivotal role in public policy agenda-setting. Much literature on science and health journalism assumes a normative stance, focusing on improving the accuracy of news coverage. In this study, we investigated journalists’ perspectives and experiences. We were particularly interested in learning how health researchers could work constructively with journalists as a means to increase research use in policy making. Qualitative methods were used to conduct and analyze interviews with experienced newspaper journalists across Canada, with children’s mental health as a content example. In response, study participants emphasized journalistic processes more than the content of news coverage, whether children’s mental health or other topics. Instead, they focused on what they thought researchers needed to know about journalists’ roles, practices and views on working with researchers. Newspaper journalists balance business and social responsibilities according to their respective roles as editors, columnists and reporters. In practice, journalists must ensure newsworthiness, relevance to readers and access to sources in a context of daily deadlines. As generalists, journalists rely on researchers to be expert interpreters, although they find many researchers unavailable or unable to communicate with public audiences. While journalists are skeptical about such common organizational communications tools as news releases, they welcome the uncommon contributions of those researchers who cultivate relationships and invest time to synthesize and communicate research evidence on an ongoing basis. Some appealed for more researchers to join them in participating in public conversations. We conclude that there are opportunities for policy-oriented health researchers to work constructively with newspaper

  4. United Kingdom to Join ESO on July 1, 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-12-01

    ESO and PPARC Councils Endorse Terms of Accession [1] The Councils of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC) , at their respective meetings on December 3 and 5, 2001, have endorsed the terms for UK membership of ESO, as recently agreed by their Negotiating Teams. All members of the Councils - the governing bodies of the two organisations - welcomed the positive spirit in which the extensive negotiations had been conducted and expressed great satisfaction at the successful outcome of a complex process. The formal procedure of accession will now commence in the UK and is expected to be achieved in good time to allow accession from July 2002. The European Southern Observatory is the main European organisation for astronomy and the United Kingdom will become its tenth member state [2]. ESO operates two major observatories in the Chilean Atacama desert where the conditions for astronomical observations are second-to-none on earth and it has recently put into operation the world's foremost optical/infrared telescope, the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Paranal. With UK membership, British astronomers will join their European colleagues in preparing new projects now being planned on a global scale. They will also be able to pursue their research on some of the most powerful astronomical instruments available. The ESO Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky , is "delighted that we have come this far after the lengthy negotiations needed to prepare properly the admission of another major European country to our organisation. When ESO was created nearly 40 years ago, the UK was planning for its own facilities in the southern hemisphere, in collaboration with Australia, and decided not to join. However, the impressive scientific and technological advances since then and ESOs emergence as a prime player on the European research scene have convinced our UK colleagues of the great advantages of presenting a

  5. Joining of aluminum sheet and glass fiber reinforced polymer using extruded pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Romina; Buhl, Johannes; Ambrogio, Giuseppina; Bambach, Markus

    2018-05-01

    The present contribution proposes a new approach for joining sheet metal and fiber reinforced composites. The joining process draws upon a Friction Stir Forming (FSF) process, which is performed on the metal sheet to produce slender pins. These pins are used to pierce through the composite. Joining is complete by forming a locking head out of the part if the pin sticks out of the composite. Pins of different diameters and lengths were produced from EN AW-1050 material, which were joined to glass fiber reinforced polyamide-6. The strength of the joint has been experimentally tested in order to understand the effect of the process temperature on the pins strength and therefore on the joining. The results demonstrate the feasibility of this new technique, which uses no excess material.

  6. Numerical modelling in friction lap joining of aluminium alloy and carbon-fiber-reinforced-plastic sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A.; Bang, H. S.; Bang, H. S.

    2018-05-01

    Multi-material combinations of aluminium alloy and carbon-fiber-reinforced-plastics (CFRP) have gained attention in automotive and aerospace industries to enhance fuel efficiency and strength-to-weight ratio of components. Various limitations of laser beam welding, adhesive bonding and mechanical fasteners make these processes inefficient to join metal and CFRP sheets. Friction lap joining is an alternative choice for the same. Comprehensive studies in friction lap joining of aluminium to CFRP sheets are essential and scare in the literature. The present work reports a combined theoretical and experimental study in joining of AA5052 and CFRP sheets using friction lap joining process. A three-dimensional finite element based heat transfer model is developed to compute the temperature fields and thermal cycles. The computed results are validated extensively with the corresponding experimentally measured results.

  7. Resistance Distances and Kirchhoff Index in Generalised Join Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haiyan

    2017-03-01

    The resistance distance between any two vertices of a connected graph is defined as the effective resistance between them in the electrical network constructed from the graph by replacing each edge with a unit resistor. The Kirchhoff index of a graph is defined as the sum of all the resistance distances between any pair of vertices of the graph. Let G=H[G1, G2, …, Gk ] be the generalised join graph of G1, G2, …, Gk determined by H. In this paper, we first give formulae for resistance distances and Kirchhoff index of G in terms of parameters of G'is {G'_i}s and H. Then, we show that computing resistance distances and Kirchhoff index of G can be decomposed into simpler ones. Finally, we obtain explicit formulae for resistance distances and Kirchhoff index of G when G'is {G'_i}s and H take some special graphs, such as the complete graph, the path, and the cycle.

  8. Joining dissimilar stainless steels for pressure vessel components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zheng; Han, Huai-Yue

    1994-03-01

    A series of studies was carried out to examine the weldability and properties of dissimilar steel joints between martensitic and austenitic stainless steels - F6NM (OCr13Ni4Mo) and AISI 347, respectively. Such joints are important parts in, e.g. the primary circuit of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). This kind of joint requires both good mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and a stable magnetic permeability besides good weldability. The weldability tests included weld thermal simulation of the martensitic steel for investigating the influence of weld thermal cycles and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the mechanical properties of the heat-affected zone (HAZ); implant testing for examining the tendency for cold cracking of martensitic steel; rigid restraint testing for determining hot crack susceptibility of the multi-pass dissimilar steel joints. The joints were subjected to various mechanical tests including a tensile test, bending test and impact test at various temperatures, as well as slow strain-rate test for examining the stress corrosion cracking tendency in the simulated environment of a primary circuit of a PWR. The results of various tests indicated that the quality of the tube/tube joints is satisfactory for meeting all the design requirements.

  9. Development of a chromium-free consumable for joining stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowards, Jeffrey William

    effective weld strengtheners. Varestraint testing revealed that weld deposits have a higher solidification cracking susceptibility than stainless steel consumables used to join Type 304. Higher cracking susceptibility was attributed to austenitic solidification of the weld metal resulting in increased weld segregation and stabilization of a TiC eutectic reaction at the end of solidification. No solidification cracks were observed in actual weld deposits. Evaluation of weld microsegregation patterns showed higher dilutions of Type 304 increased segregation of Ti, promoting a TiC eutectic reaction at the end of solidification. Thermodynamic modeling techniques were used to describe the solidification the Ni-Cu weld deposits as a function of dilution with Type 304. Solidification cracking susceptibility was shown to increase with dilution during evaluation with the Cast Pin Tear Test indicating high dilution welds should be avoided to minimize solidification cracking during welding. The Strain-to-fracture test was used to examine DDC cracking susceptibility, and revealed that this alloy has a higher susceptibility to solid-state weld cracking than austenitic stainless alloys such as 304. Threshold strain levels necessary to initiate cracking in the weld deposits were in the range of 2 to 3%. These values are comparable to other Ni-base alloys with a moderate to high susceptibility to DDC. Fume generation rates (FGR) of the new consumable were measured and bulk fume phases were analyzed with X-ray diffraction. FGR values were found to be similar to current SMAW and flux cored arc welding consumables. No chromium bearing compounds were observed during X-ray diffraction measurements, and the bulk fume consisted primarily of halides and metallic-oxides. Fume generated by the new consumable was subjected to colorimetric testing showing hexavalent Cr content (0.02 wt-%) was reduced by two orders of magnitude compared to E308-16 (2.6 wt-%). The source of this hexavalent chromium was

  10. A Review on Inertia and Linear Friction Welding of Ni-Based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamanfar, Ahmad; Jahazi, Mohammad; Cormier, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Inertia and linear friction welding are being increasingly used for near-net-shape manufacturing of high-value materials in aerospace and power generation gas turbines because of providing a better quality joint and offering many advantages over conventional fusion welding and mechanical joining techniques. In this paper, the published works up-to-date on inertia and linear friction welding of Ni-based superalloys are reviewed with the objective to make clarifications on discrepancies and uncertainties reported in literature regarding issues related to these two friction welding processes as well as microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of the Ni-based superalloy weldments. Initially, the chemical composition and microstructure of Ni-based superalloys that contribute to the quality of the joint are reviewed briefly. Then, problems related to fusion welding of these alloys are addressed with due consideration of inertia and linear friction welding as alternative techniques. The fundamentals of inertia and linear friction welding processes are analyzed next with emphasis on the bonding mechanisms and evolution of temperature and strain rate across the weld interface. Microstructural features, texture development, residual stresses, and mechanical properties of similar and dissimilar polycrystalline and single crystal Ni-based superalloy weldments are discussed next. Then, application of inertia and linear friction welding for joining Ni-based superalloys and related advantages over fusion welding, mechanical joining, and machining are explained briefly. Finally, present scientific and technological challenges facing inertia and linear friction welding of Ni-based superalloys including those related to modeling of these processes are addressed.

  11. Development of a procedure for forming assisted thermal joining of tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Löbbe, Christian; Staupendahl, Daniel; Tekkaya, A. Erman

    2018-05-01

    With the demand of lightweight design in the automotive industry, not only the wall-thicknesses of tubular components of the chassis or spaceframe are continuously decreased. Also the thicknesses of exhaust system parts are reduced to save material and mass. However, thinner tubular parts bring about additional challenges in joining. Welding or brazing methods, which are utilized in joining tubes with specific requirements concerning leak tightness, are sensitive to the gap between the joining partners. Furthermore, a large joining area is required to ensure the durability of the joint. The introduction of a forming step in the assembled state prior to thermal joining can define and control the gap for subsequent brazing or welding. The mechanical pre-joint resulting from the previously described calibration step also results in easier handling of the tubes prior to thermal joining. In the presented investigation, a spinning process is utilized to produce force-fit joints of varying lengths and diameter reduction and form-fit joints with varying geometrical attributes. The spinning process facilitates a high formability and geometrical flexibility, while at the achievable precision is high and the process forces are low. The strength of the joints is used to evaluate the joint quality. Finally, a comparison between joints produced by forming with subsequent brazing and original tube is conducted, which presents the high performance of the developed procedure for forming assisted thermal joining.

  12. Oxygen potentials in Ni + NiO and Ni + Cr2O3 + NiCr2O4 systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, G. M.; Fray, D. J.

    1994-06-01

    The chemical potential of O for the coexistence of Ni + NiO and Ni + Cr2O3 + NiCr2O4 equilibria has been measured employing solid-state galvanic cells, (+) Pt, Cu + Cu2O // (Y2O3)ZrO2 // Ni + NiO, Pt (-) and (+) Pt, Ni + NiO // (Y2O3)ZrO2 // Ni + Cr2O3 + NiCr2O4, Pt (-) in the temperature range of 800 to 1300 K and 1100 to 1460 K, respectively. The electromotive force (emf) of both the cells was reversible, reproducible on thermal cycling, and varied linearly with temperature. For the coexistence of the two-phase mixture of Ni + NiO, δΜO 2(Ni + NiO) = -470,768 + 171.77T (±20) J mol-1 (800 ≤ T ≤ 1300 K) and for the coexistence of Ni + Cr2O3 + NiCr2O4, δΜO 2(Ni + Cr2O3 + NiCr2O4) = -523,190 + 191.07T (±100) J mol-1 (1100≤ T≤ 1460 K) The “third-law” analysis of the present results for Ni + NiO gives the value of ‡H{298/o} = -239.8 (±0.05) kJ mol-1, which is independent of temperature, for the formation of one mole of NiO from its elements. This is in excellent agreement with the calorimetric enthalpy of formation of NiO reported in the literature.

  13. Influence of Ni Interlayer on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Mg/Al Bimetallic Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Liu, Canchun; Liang, Chunyong; Zhang, Yongguang

    2018-05-01

    Dissimilar joining of magnesium and aluminum using a compound casting process was investigated in the present work. For the first time, a Ni interlayer prepared by plasma spraying was inserted between the two base metals to improve the interfacial characteristics. Examination of the interfacial regions using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction revealed the formation of a three-layered interface between Mg and Al without the interlayer. The thickness of the interface was approximately 600 μm when the casting was performed at 700 °C and increased with increasing casting temperature. However, with the addition of the Ni interlayer, the Al-Mg reaction was successfully prevented, and metallurgical bonding between the Ni interlayer and two base metals was achieved at a casting temperature of 700 °C. Upon increasing this temperature, Mg-Ni and Al-Ni intermetallics were generated at the separate interfaces. The shear strength of the Mg/Al bimetallic castings with the Ni interlayer was substantially improved compared with that of the direct Mg/Al joint, with a maximum value of 25.4 MPa achieved at 700 °C. Fracture occurred mainly along the Mg/Ni interface for the Mg/Ni/Al multilayer structure castings.

  14. Europlanet - Joining the European Planetary Research Information Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capria, M. T.; Chanteur, G.; Schmidt, W.

    2009-04-01

    The "Europlanet Research Infrastructure - Europlanet RI", supported by the European Commission's Framework Program 7, aims at integrating major parts of the distributed European Planetary Research infrastructure with as diverse components as space exploration, ground-based observations, laboratory experiments and numerical model-ling teams. A central part of Europlanet RI is the "Integrated and Distributed Information Service" or Europlanet-IDIS which intends to provide easy Web-based access to information about scientists and teams working in related fields, observatories or laboratories with capabilities possibly beneficial to planetary research, modelling expertise useful for planetary science and observations from space-based, ground-based or laboratory measurements. As far as the type of data and their access methods allow, IDIS will provide Virtual Observatory (VO) like access to a variety of data from distributed sources and tools to compare and integrate this information to further data analysis and re-search. IDIS itself is providing a platform for information and data sharing and for data mining. It is structured as a network of thematic nodes each concentrating on a sub-set of research areas in planetary sciences. But the most important elements of IDIS and the whole Europlanet RI are the single scientists, institutes, laboratories, observatories and mission project teams. Without them the whole effort would remain an empty shell. How can an interested individual or team join this activity and what are the benefits to be expected from the related effort? The poster gives detailed answers to these questions. Here some highlights: 1. Locate from the Europlanet web pages (addresses see below) the thematic node best related to the own field of expertise. This might be more than one. 2. Define which services you want to offer to the community: just the contact address, field of competence, off-line access to data on request or even on-line searchable access

  15. Combustion Synthesis Reaction Behavior of Cold-Rolled Ni/Al and Ti/Al Multilayers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    6   Figure 4 . Combustion synthesis process of the cold-rolled Ni/Al multilayer foils: (a) reaction front of the displacement of the reaction...Reactive Nanostructured Foil Used as a Heat Source for Joining Titanium . J. Appl. Phys. 2004, 96 ( 4 ), 2336–2342. 16. Wang, J.; Besnoin, E...2011 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) January 2006–January 2008 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE Combustion Synthesis Reaction Behavior of

  16. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications - Joining of tungsten foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, Jens; Rieth, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Jan; Mrotzek, Tobias; Hoffmann, Andreas; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Yi, Xiaoou

    2013-05-01

    This paper is the fourth in our series on tungsten laminates. The aim of this paper is to discuss laminate synthesis, meaning the joining of tungsten foils. It is obvious that the properties of the tungsten laminate strongly depend on the combination of (i) interlayer and (ii) joining technology, as this combination defines (i) the condition of the tungsten foil after joining (as-received or recrystallised) as well as (ii) the characteristics of the interface between the tungsten foil and the interlayer (wettability or diffusion leading to a solid solution or the formation of intermetallics). From the example of tungsten laminates joined by brazing with (i) an eutectic silver copper brazing filler, (ii) copper, (iii) titanium, and (iv) zirconium, the microstructure will be discussed, with special focus on the interface. Based on our assumptions of the mechanism of the extraordinary ductility of tungsten foil we present three syntheses strategies and make recommendations for the synthesis of high temperature tungsten laminates.

  17. Supercomputers Join the Fight against Cancer – U.S. Department of Energy

    SciT

    None

    The Department of Energy has some of the best supercomputers in the world. Now, they’re joining the fight against cancer. Learn about our new partnership with the National Cancer Institute and GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals.

  18. Joining Pipe with the Hybrid Laser-GMAW Process: Weld Test Results and Cost Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Recent work investigating the poten- tial benefit of applying this technology to a shipyard pipe shop suggests that signifi- cant cost savings may be...arc-based joining processes. With recent advances in com- mercial laser technology , laser suppliers can now deliver dramatically higher power systems...reasons, shipyards in the U.S. are showing growing interest in hybrid laser-GMA welding technology . Hybrid Laser-GMA for Joining Pipe Welding of pipe

  19. Friction stir lap joining of automotive aluminium alloy and carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, H. S.; Das, A.; Lee, S.; Bang, H. S.

    2018-05-01

    Multi-material combination such as aluminium alloys and carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) are increasingly used in the aircraft and automobile industries to enhance strength-to-weight ratio of the respective parts and components. Various processes such as adhesive bonding, mechanical fasteners and laser beam joining were employed to join metal alloy and CFRP sheets. However, long processing time of adhesive bonding, extra weight induced by mechanical fasteners and high operating cost of the laser is major limitations of these processes. Therefore, friction stir welding is an alternative choice to overcome those limitations in joining of CFRP and aluminium alloys. In the present work, an attempt is undertaken to join AA5052 alloy and polyamide 66 CFRP sheets by friction stir lap joining technique using pinned and pin-less tools. The joint qualities are investigated extensively at different joining conditions using two different types of tools and surface ground aluminium sheets. The results show that pin-less tool and surface ground aluminium alloy can provide the suitable joint with maximum joint strength around 8 MPa.

  20. Joining and Assembly of Silicon Carbide-based Advanced Ceramics and Composites for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.

    2004-01-01

    Silicon carbide based advanced ceramics and fiber reinforced composites are under active consideration for use in wide variety of high temperature applications within the aeronautics, space transportation, energy, and nuclear industries. The engineering designs of ceramic and composite component require fabrication and manufacturing of large and complex shaped parts of various thicknesses. In many instances, it is more economical to build up complex shapes by joining simple geometrical shapes. In addition these components have to be joined or assembled with metallic sub-components. Thus, joining and attachment have been recognized as enabling technologies for successful utilization of ceramic components in various demanding applications. In this presentation, various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing o high temperature joints in ceramic matrix composites will be presented. Silicon carbide based advanced ceramics (CVD and hot pressed), and C/SiC and SiC/SiC composites, in different shapes and sizes, have been joined using an affordable, robust ceramic joining technology (ARCJoinT). Microstructure and high temperature mechanical properties of joints in silicon carbide ceramics and CVI and melt infiltrated SiC matrix composites will,be reported. Various joint design philosophies and design issues in joining of ceramics and composites well be discussed.

  1. Robust Joining and Assembly Technologies for Ceramic Matrix Composites: Technical Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mrityunjay, Singh; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites are under active consideration for use in a wide variety of high temperature applications within the aeronautics, energy, process, and nuclear industries. The engineering designs require fabrication and manufacturing of complex shaped parts. In many instances, it is more economical to build up complex shapes by Joining simple geometrical shapes. Thus, joining and attachment have been recognized as enabling technologies for successful utilization of ceramic components in various demanding applications. In this presentation, various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of high temperature joints in ceramic matrix composites will be presented. Various joint design philosophies and design issues in joining of composites will be discussed along with an affordable, robust ceramic joining technology (ARCJoinT). A wide variety of ceramic composites, in different shapes and sizes, have been joined using this technology. Microstructure and mechanical properties of joints will be reported. Current status of various ceramic joining technologies and future prospects for their applications will also be discussed.

  2. Robust Joining and Integration of Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Challenges, Opportunities, and Realities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2006-01-01

    Advanced ceramics and fiber reinforced composites are under active consideration for use in a wide variety of high temperature applications within the aeronautics, space transportation, energy, and nuclear industries. The engineering designs of ceramic and composite components require fabrication and manufacturing of large and complex shaped parts of various thicknesses. In many instances, it is more economical to build up complex shapes by joining simple geometrical shapes. In addition, these components have to be joined or assembled with metallic sub-components. Thus, joining and attachment have been recognized as enabling technologies for successful utilization of ceramic components in various demanding applications. In this presentation, various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of high temperature joints in advanced ceramics and ceramic matrix composites will be presented. Silicon carbide based advanced ceramics and fiber reinforced composites in different shapes and sizes, have been joined using an affordable, robust ceramic joining technology. In addition, some examples of metal-ceramic brazing will also be presented. Microstructure and high temperature mechanical properties of joints in silicon carbide ceramics and composites will be reported. Various joint design philosophies and design issues in joining of ceramics and composites will be discussed.

  3. Laser beam joining of optical fibers in silicon V-grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Stefan; Otto, Andreas; Luz, Gerhard

    2000-06-01

    The increasing use of optical data transmission systems and the development of new optical components require adjustment-insensitive and reliable joining and assembling techniques. The state of the art includes the utilization of silicon submounts with anisotropically etched V-grooves. Several glass fibers are fixed in these V-grooves with adhesive. Adhesive bonds tend towards degradation under the influence of temperature and moisture. For this reason, the alternative joining processes laser beam welding and laser beam soldering are relevant. The goal is a reliable joining of optical fibers in V-grooves without damage to the fibers or the silicon submount. Because of the anomaly of silicon during phase transformation, a positive joining can be realized by laser beam welding. A melt pool is created through the energy of a Nd:YAG-laser pulse. During solidification, the volume of silicon increases and a bump is formed in the center. Experiments have shown that this phenomenon can be used for joining optical fibers in silicon-V-grooves. With suitable parameters the silicon flows half around the fiber during solidification. For each fiber, several welding points are necessary. Another promising joining method is laser bema soldering. In this case, a second silicon sheet with a solder deposit is placed on the fibers which lie in the V-grooves of the metallized silicon submount. The laser heats the upper silicon until the solder metals by heat conduction.

  4. Laser hybrid joining of plastic and metal components for lightweight components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauschenberger, J.; Cenigaonaindia, A.; Keseberg, J.; Vogler, D.; Gubler, U.; Liébana, F.

    2015-03-01

    Plastic-metal hybrids are replacing all-metal structures in the automotive, aerospace and other industries at an accelerated rate. The trend towards lightweight construction increasingly demands the usage of polymer components in drive trains, car bodies, gaskets and other applications. However, laser joining of polymers to metals presents significantly greater challenges compared with standard welding processes. We present recent advances in laser hybrid joining processes. Firstly, several metal pre-structuring methods, including selective laser melting (SLM) are characterized and their ability to provide undercut structures in the metal assessed. Secondly, process parameter ranges for hybrid joining of a number of metals (steel, stainless steel, etc.) and polymers (MABS, PA6.6-GF35, PC, PP) are given. Both transmission and direct laser joining processes are presented. Optical heads and clamping devices specifically tailored to the hybrid joining process are introduced. Extensive lap-shear test results are shown that demonstrate that joint strengths exceeding the base material strength (cohesive failure) can be reached with metal-polymer joining. Weathering test series prove that such joints are able to withstand environmental influences typical in targeted fields of application. The obtained results pave the way toward implementing metalpolymer joints in manufacturing processes.

  5. Comparative analysis of different joining techniques to improve the passive fit of cobalt-chromium superstructures.

    PubMed

    Barbi, Francisco C L; Camarini, Edevaldo T; Silva, Rafael S; Endo, Eliana H; Pereira, Jefferson R

    2012-12-01

    The influence of different joining techniques on passive fit at the interface structure/abutment of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) superstructures has not yet been clearly established. The purpose of this study was to compare 3 different techniques of joining Co-Cr superstructures by measuring the resulting marginal misfit in a simulated prosthetic assembly. A specially designed metal model was used for casting, sectioning, joining, and measuring marginal misfit. Forty-five cast bar-type superstructures were fabricated in a Co-Cr alloy and randomly assigned by drawing lots to 3 groups (n=15) according to the joining method used: conventional gas-torch brazing (G-TB), laser welding (LW), and tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). Joined specimens were assembled onto abutment analogs in the metal model with the 1-screw method. The resulting marginal misfit was measured with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at 3 different points: distal (D), central (C), and mesial (M) along the buccal aspect of both abutments: A (tightened) and B (without screw). The Levene test was used to evaluate variance homogeneity and then the Welsch ANOVA for heteroscedastic data (α=.05). Significant differences were found on abutment A between groups G-TB and LW (P=.013) measured mesially and between groups G-TB and TIG (P=.037) measured centrally. On abutment B, significant differences were found between groups G-TB and LW (P<.001) and groups LW and TIG (P<.001) measured mesially; groups G-TB and TIG (P=.007) measured distally; and groups G-TB and TIG (P=.001) and LW and TIG (P=.007) measured centrally. The method used for joining Co-Cr prosthetic structures had an influence on the level of resulting passive fit. Structures joined by the tungsten inert gas method produced better mean results than did the brazing or laser method. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, Hot-Die Forming, and Joining of 47XD Gamma TiAl Rolled Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, G.; Draper, S.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Bartolotta, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties, along with the hot-die forming and joining of Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Mn-0.8 vol% TiB, sheets (known as 47XD), produced by a low-cost rolling process, were evaluated. A near-gamma microstructure was obtained in the as-rolled condition. The microstructures of heat-treated sheets ranged from a recrystallized equiaxed near-gamma microstructure at 1,200 to 1,310 C, to a duplex microstructure at 1,350 C, to a fully lamellar microstructure at 1,376 C. Tensile behavior was determined for unidirectionally rolled and cross-rolled sheets for room temperature (RT) to 816 C. Yield stress decreased gradually with increasing deformation temperature up to 704 C; above 704 C, it declined rapidly. Ultimate tensile strength exhibited a gradual decrease up to 537 C before peaking at 704 C, followed by a rapid decline at 816 C. The modulus showed a gradual decrease with temperature, reaching approximately 72% of the RT value at 816 C. Strain to failure increased slowly from RT to 537 C; between 537 C and 704 C it exhibited a phenomenal increase, suggesting that the ductile-brittle transition temperature was below 704 C. Fracture mode changed from transgranular fracture at low temperature, to a mixture of transgranular and intergranular fracture at intermediate temperature, to ductile fracture at 816 C, coupled with dynamic recrystallization at large strains. Creep rupture response was evaluated between 649 and 816 C over the stress range of 69 to 276 MPa. Deformation parameters for steady-state creep rate and time-to-rupture were similar: activation energies of approximately 350 kJ/mol and stress exponents of approximately 4.5. Hot-die forming of sheets into corrugations was done at elevated temperatures in vacuum. The process parameters to join sheets by diffusion bonding and brazing with TiCuNi 70 filler alloy were optimized for test coupons and successfully used to fabricate large truss-core and honeycomb structures. Nondestructive evaluation

  7. Robust Joining and Integration Technologies for Advanced Metallic, Ceramic, and Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, Tarah; Morscher, Gregory N.; Halbig, Michael H.; Asthana, Rajiv

    2006-01-01

    Robust integration and assembly technologies are critical for the successful implementation of advanced metallic, ceramic, carbon-carbon, and ceramic matrix composite components in a wide variety of aerospace, space exploration, and ground based systems. Typically, the operating temperature of these components varies from few hundred to few thousand Kelvin with different working times (few minutes to years). The wide ranging system performance requirements necessitate the use of different integration technologies which includes adhesive bonding, low temperature soldering, active metal brazing, diffusion bonding, ARCJoinT, and ultra high temperature joining technologies. In this presentation, a number of joining examples and test results will be provided related to the adhesive bonding and active metal brazing of titanium to C/C composites, diffusion bonding of silicon carbide to silicon carbide using titanium interlayer, titanium and hastelloy brazing to silicon carbide matrix composites, and ARCJoinT joining of SiC ceramics and SiC matrix composites. Various issues in the joining of metal-ceramic systems including thermal expansion mismatch and resulting residual stresses generated during joining will be discussed. In addition, joint design and testing issues for a wide variety of joints will be presented.

  8. Affordable, Robust Ceramic Joining Technology (ARCJoinT) for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic joining is recognized as one of the enabling technologies for the successful utilization of silicon carbide-based monolithic ceramic and fiber reinforced composite components in a number of demanding and high temperature applications in aerospace and ground-based systems. An affordable, robust ceramic joining technology (ARCJoinT) for joining of silicon carbide-based ceramics and fiber reinforced composites has been developed. This technique is capable of producing joints with tailorable thickness and composition. A wide variety of silicon carbide-based ceramics and composites, in different shapes and sizes, have been joined using this technique. The room and high temperature mechanical properties and fractography of ceramic joints have been reported. In monolithic silicon carbide ceramics, these joints maintain their mechanical strength up to 1350 C in air. There is no change in the mechanical strength of joints in silicon carbide matrix composites up to 1200 C in air. In composites, simple butt joints yield only about 20% of the ultimate strength of the parent materials. This technology is suitable for the joining of large and complex shaped ceramic and composite components, and with certain modifications, can be applied to repair of ceramic components damaged in service.

  9. The Flying Diamond: A joined aircraft configuration design project, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Chris; Czech, Joe; Lentz, Bryan; Kobashigawa, Daryl; Oishi, Curtis; Poladian, David

    1988-01-01

    The results of the analysis conducted on the Joined Wing Configuration study are presented. The joined wing configuration employs a conventional fuselage and incorporates two wings joined together near their tips to form a diamond shape in both plan view and front view. The arrangement of the lifting surfaces uses the rear wing as a horizontal tail and as a forward wing strut. The rear wing has its root at the tip of the vertical stabilizer and is structurally attached to the trailing edge of the forward wing. This arrangement of the two wings forms a truss structure which is inherently resistant to the aerodynamic bending loads generated during flight. This allows for a considerable reduction in the weight of the lifting surfaces. With smaller internal wing structures needed, the Joined Wing may employ thinner wings which are more suitable for supersonic and hypersonic flight, having less induced drag than conventional cantilever winged aircraft. Inherent in the Joined Wing is the capability of the generation of direct lift and side force which enhance the performance parameters.

  10. Ni-Co laterite deposits

    Marsh, Erin E.; Anderson, Eric D.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel-cobalt (Ni-Co) laterite deposits are an important source of nickel (Ni). Currently, there is a decline in magmatic Ni-bearing sulfide lode deposit resources. New efforts to develop an alternative source of Ni, particularly with improved metallurgy processes, make the Ni-Co laterites an important exploration target in anticipation of the future demand for Ni. This deposit model provides a general description of the geology and mineralogy of Ni-Co laterite deposits, and contains discussion of the influences of climate, geomorphology (relief), drainage, tectonism, structure, and protolith on the development of favorable weathering profiles. This model of Ni-Co laterite deposits represents part of the U.S. Geological Survey Mineral Resources Program's effort to update the existing models to be used for an upcoming national mineral resource assessment.

  11. Dual Roles for DNA Polymerase Theta in Alternative End-Joining Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    McVey, Mitch

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks are repaired by multiple mechanisms that are roughly grouped into the categories of homology-directed repair and non-homologous end joining. End-joining repair can be further classified as either classical non-homologous end joining, which requires DNA ligase 4, or “alternative” end joining, which does not. Alternative end joining has been associated with genomic deletions and translocations, but its molecular mechanism(s) are largely uncharacterized. Here, we report that Drosophila melanogaster DNA polymerase theta (pol theta), encoded by the mus308 gene and previously implicated in DNA interstrand crosslink repair, plays a crucial role in DNA ligase 4-independent alternative end joining. In the absence of pol theta, end joining is impaired and residual repair often creates large deletions flanking the break site. Analysis of break repair junctions from flies with mus308 separation-of-function alleles suggests that pol theta promotes the use of long microhomologies during alternative end joining and increases the likelihood of complex insertion events. Our results establish pol theta as a key protein in alternative end joining in Drosophila and suggest a potential mechanistic link between alternative end joining and interstrand crosslink repair. PMID:20617203

  12. Two-sided friction stir riveting by extrusion: A process for joining dissimilar materials

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, William T.; Cox, Chase D.; Strauss, Alvin M.; ...

    2016-06-25

    Two-sided friction stir riveting (FSR) by extrusion is an innovative process developed to rapidly, efficiently, and securely join dissimilar materials. This process extends a previously developed one sided friction stir extrusion process to create a strong and robust joint by producing a continuous, rivet-like structure through a preformed hole in one of the materials with a simultaneous, two-sided friction stir spot weld. The two-sided FSR by extrusion process securely joins the dissimilar materials together and effectively locks them in place without the use of any separate materials or fasteners. Lastly, in this paper we demonstrate the process by joining aluminummore » to steel and illustrate its potential application to automotive and aerospace manufacturing processes.« less

  13. Influence of friction stir welding parameters on titanium-aluminum heterogeneous lap joining configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picot, Florent; Gueydan, Antoine; Hug, Éric

    2017-10-01

    Lap joining configuration for Friction Stir Welding process is a methodology mostly dedicated to heterogeneous bonding. This welding technology was applied to join pure titanium with pure aluminum by varying the rotation speed and the movement speed of the tool. Regardless of the process parameters, it was found that the maximum strength of the junction remains almost constant. Microstructural observations by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectrometry analysis enable to describe the interfacial join and reveal asymmetric Cold Lap Defects on the sides of the junction. Chemical analysis shows the presence of one exclusive intermetallic compound through the interface identified as TiAl3. This compound is responsible of the crack spreading of the junction during the mechanical loading. The original version of this article supplied to AIP Publishing contained an accidental inversion of the authors, names. An updated version of this article, with the authors names formatted correctly was published on 20 October 2017.

  14. Innovative and Highly Productive Joining Technologies for Multi-Material Lightweight Car Body Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschut, G.; Janzen, V.; Olfermann, T.

    2014-05-01

    Driven by increasing costs for energy and raw material and especially by the European CO2-emission laws, automotive industry faces the challenge to develop more lightweight and at the same time still rigid and crash-stable car bodies, that are affordable for large-scale production. The implementation of weight-reduced constructions depends not only on the availability of lightweight materials and related forming technologies, but also on cost-efficient and reliable joining technologies suitable for multi-material design. This article discusses the challenges and requirements for these technologies, based on the example of joining aluminium with press-hardened boron steels, what is considered as a very important material combination for affordable future lightweight mobility. Besides a presentation of recent developments for extending the process limits of conventional mechanical joining methods, new promising technologies such as resistance element welding are introduced. In addition, the performance, advantages, and disadvantages of the presented technologies are compared and discussed.

  15. Self-healing of cracks in Ag joining layer for die-attachment in power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuantong; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Jiu, Jinting; Zhang, Hao; Sugahara, Tohru; Iwashige, Tomohito; Sugiura, Kazuhiko; Tsuruta, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Sintered silver (Ag) joining has attracted significant interest in power devices modules for its ability to form stable joints with a porous interconnection layer. A function for the self-healing of cracks in sintered porous Ag interlayers at high temperatures is discovered and reported here. A crack which was prepared on a Ag joining layer was closed after heating at 200 °C in air. The tensile strength of pre-cracked Ag joining layer specimens recovers to the value of non-cracked specimens after heating treatment. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to probe the self-healing mechanism. TEM images and electron diffraction patterns show that a large quantity of Ag nanoparticles formed at the gap with the size less than 10 nm, which bridges the crack in the self-healing process. This discovery provides additional motivation for the application of Ag as an interconnection material for power devices at high temperature.

  16. Joining of Silicon Carbide-Based Ceramics by Reaction Forming Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Kiser, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the development and testing of silicon-based ceramics and composite components for a number of aerospace and ground based systems. The designs often require fabrication of complex shaped parts which can be quite expensive. One attractive way of achieving this goal is to build up complex shapes by joining together geometrically simple shapes. However, the joints should have good mechanical strength and environmental stability comparable to the bulk materials. These joints should also be able to maintain their structural integrity at high temperatures. In addition, the joining technique should be practical, reliable, and affordable. Thus, joining has been recognized as one of the enabling technologies for the successful utilization of silicon carbide based ceramic components in high temperature applications. Overviews of various joining techniques, i.e., mechanical fastening, adhesive bonding, welding, brazing, and soldering have been provided in recent publications. The majority of the techniques used today are based on the joining of monolithic ceramics with metals either by diffusion bonding, metal brazing, brazing with oxides and oxynitrides, or diffusion welding. These techniques need either very high temperatures for processing or hot pressing (high pressures). The joints produced by these techniques have different thermal expansion coefficients than the ceramic materials, which creates a stress concentration in the joint area. The use temperatures for these joints are around 700 C. Ceramic joint interlayers have been developed as a means of obtaining high temperature joints. These joint interlayers have been produced via pre-ceramic polymers, in-situ displacement reactions, and reaction bonding techniques. Joints produced by the pre-ceramic polymer approach exhibit a large amounts of porosity and poor mechanical properties. On the other hand, hot pressing or high pressures are needed for in-situ displacement

  17. Using Negotiated Joining to Construct and Fill Open-ended Roles in Elite Culinary Groups.

    PubMed

    Tan, Vaughn

    2015-03-01

    This qualitative study examines membership processes in groups operating in an uncertain environment that prevents them from fully predefining new members' roles. I describe how nine elite high-end, cutting-edge culinary groups in the U.S. and Europe, ranging from innovative restaurants to culinary R&D groups, use negotiated joining-a previously undocumented process-to systematically construct and fill these emergent, open-ended roles. I show that negotiated joining is a consistently patterned, iterative process that begins with a role that both aspirant and target group explicitly understand to be provisional. This provisional role is then jointly modified and constructed by the aspirant and target group through repeated iterations of proposition, validation through trial and evaluation, and selective integration of validated role components. The initially provisional role stabilizes and the aspirant achieves membership if enough role components are validated; otherwise the negotiated joining process is abandoned. Negotiated joining allows the aspirant and target group to learn if a mutually desirable role is likely and, if so, to construct such a role. In addition, the provisional roles in negotiated joining can support absorptive capacity by allowing novel role components to enter target groups through aspirants' efforts to construct stable roles for themselves, while the internal adjustment involved in integrating newly validated role components can have the unintended side effect of supporting adaptation by providing opportunities for the groups to use these novel role components to modify their role structure and goals to suit a changing and uncertain environment. Negotiated joining thus reveals role ambiguity's hitherto unexamined beneficial consequences and provides a foundation for a contingency theory of new-member acquisition.

  18. The oxidation of Ni-rich Ni-Al intermetallics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, Joseph; Smialek, James L.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    The oxidation of Ni-Al intermetallic alloys in the beta-NiAl phase field and in the two phase beta-NiAl/gamma'-Ni3Al phase field has been studied between 1000 and 1400 C. The stoichiometric beta-NiAl alloy doped with Zr was superior to other alloy compositions under cyclic and isothermal oxidation. The isothermal growth rates did not increase monotonically as the alloy Al content was decreased. The characteristically ridged alpha-Al2O3 scale morphology, consisting of cells of thin, textured oxide with thick growth ridges at cell boundaries, forms on oxidized beta-NiAl alloys. The correlation of scale features with isothermal growth rates indicates a predominant grain boundary diffusion growth mechanism. The 1200 C cyclic oxidation resistance decreases near the lower end of the beta-NiAl phase field.

  19. Explosive Tube-to-fitting Joining of Small-diameter Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    An effort is currently under way by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to upgrade the space shuttle main engine through the use of improved materials and processes. Under consideration is the use of the Langley Research Center explosive seam welding process. The objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of joining space shuttle main engine tube to fitting components in an oxygen heat exchanger, using the NASA LaRC explosive seam welding process. It was concluded that LaRC explosive joining is viable for this application; that there is no incompatability of materials; that ultrasonic inspection is the best nondestructive testing method; and that the .500 DIA joint experiences interface problems.

  20. [Joining WHO of Republic of Korea and the projects in the 1950s].

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Ho

    2014-04-01

    The Republic of Korea(ROK) and the World Health Organization(WHO) have done many projects successfully from 1949, in which the government of First Republic joined the WHO. However the relation between the ROK and the WHO have not been studied very much so far. The main purpose of this research, which could be done by the support of WHO, is connected with three questions. First research point would be "how could the ROK joined WHO in 1949 and what's the meaning of it? And the what's the difference in the process for the WHO between the ROK of 1949 and the DPRK(Democratic People's Republic of Korea) of 1973?" The first president of the ROK, Rhee Syngman, who had received his Ph. D.(about international politics) from Princeton University in 1910, was strongly interested in joining international institutes like UN, WHO. The ROK that could join WHO on 17 August 1949, with the approval of Assembly on 25 May 1949, was one of the founder members of the Western Pacific Region. By joining WHO, the ROK could get chance to increase the level of public health and its administration in 1950's. But the DPRK manage to became a member of WHO on 19 May 1973 and joined the South-East Asia Region. The joining of DPRK was influenced by the easing of the cold war after the Nixon Doctrine and the joining of the China(People's Republic of China). Second research point would be "What kind of roll did the WHO take in the First Republic?" Yet the public health administration of the First Republic that had been made in the period of US army military government was been strongly influenced by USA, the roll of WHO was also important in the 1950's. Last research point would be "What kind of the projects did the ROK and the WHO take part in during the period of he First Republic? How could evaluate the results?" The ROK and the WHO handled the projects including health services, communicable disease prevention and control, control of noncommunicable diseases, and protection of health. Specially

  1. Cytogenetic toxicity effects of inorganic nickel and organic Ni(II) complexes on Brassica oleracea L. root meristem.

    PubMed

    Molas, J

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on the effect of nickel as an inorganic compound (NiSO4.7H2O) and organic Ni(II) complexes (i.e. Ni(II)-Glu and Ni(II)-EDTA) in concentrations of 20, 40 and 85 ?M dm-3 on meristematic cells of root tips of Brassica oleracea L. cv. Sława from Enkhouizen. All three tested chemical forms of nickel had a mitodepressive effect and inhibited root elongation. With respect to the degree of root elongation inhibition and mitodepressive effect, the tested forms of nickel can be put in the following order: Ni(II)-Glu NiSO4.7H2O Ni(II)-EDTA. In all three tested forms, nickel caused disturbances in mitotic divisions, resulting in anaphase bridges and binuclear cells, whose nuclei were joined by a bridge of condensed chromatin or separated. Inorganic nickel and Ni(II)-Glu in higher concentrations damaged nuclei (the amount of condensed chromatin increased), nucleoli (their structure became more condensed and vacuolisation was observed), endoplasmic reticulum (fragmentation, swelling of cisternae) and mitochondria (structure condensation).

  2. Microstructure of Reaction Zone Formed During Diffusion Bonding of TiAl with Ni/Al Multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, Sónia; Viana, Filomena; Koçak, Mustafa; Ramos, A. Sofia; Vieira, M. Teresa; Vieira, Manuel F.

    2012-05-01

    In this article, the characterization of the interfacial structure of diffusion bonding a TiAl alloy is presented. The joining surfaces were modified by Ni/Al reactive multilayer deposition as an alternative approach to conventional diffusion bonding. TiAl substrates were coated with alternated Ni and Al nanolayers. The nanolayers were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering with 14 nm of period (bilayer thickness). Joining experiments were performed at 900 °C for 30 and 60 min with a pressure of 5 MPa. Cross sections of the joints were prepared for characterization of their interfaces by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), high resolution TEM (HRTEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Several intermetallic compounds form at the interface, assuring the bonding of the TiAl. The interface can be divided into three distinct zones: zone 1 exhibits elongated nanograins, very small equiaxed grains are observed in zone 2, while zone 3 has larger equiaxed grains. EBSD analysis reveals that zone 1 corresponds to the intermetallic Al2NiTi and AlNiTi, and zones 2 and 3 to NiAl.

  3. In-Network Processing of an Iceberg Join Query in Wireless Sensor Networks Based on 2-Way Fragment Semijoins

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyunchul

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the in-network processing of an iceberg join query in wireless sensor networks (WSNs). An iceberg join is a special type of join where only those joined tuples whose cardinality exceeds a certain threshold (called iceberg threshold) are qualified for the result. Processing such a join involves the value matching for the join predicate as well as the checking of the cardinality constraint for the iceberg threshold. In the previous scheme, the value matching is carried out as the main task for filtering non-joinable tuples while the iceberg threshold is treated as an additional constraint. We take an alternative approach, meeting the cardinality constraint first and matching values next. In this approach, with a logical fragmentation of the join operand relations on the aggregate counts of the joining attribute values, the optimal sequence of 2-way fragment semijoins is generated, where each fragment semijoin employs a Bloom filter as a synopsis of the joining attribute values. This sequence filters non-joinable tuples in an energy-efficient way in WSNs. Through implementation and a set of detailed experiments, we show that our alternative approach considerably outperforms the previous one. PMID:25774710

  4. Japanese and Korean Nursing Students' Motivation for Joining Disaster Relief Activities as Nurses in the Future.

    PubMed

    Choe, Myoung-Ae; Kuwano, Noriko; Bang, Kyung-Sook; Cho, Mi-Kyoung; Yatsushiro, Rika; Kawata, Yuki

    The purpose of this study was to identify differences in motivation for joining disaster relief activities as a nurse in the future between Japanese and Korean nursing students. A descriptive 2-group comparative study design was used. The participants were 721 first- to fourth-year nursing students (Japanese, n = 324; Korean, n = 397). From June to September 2014, data were collected through a researcher-administered questionnaire and self-reported answers. The collected data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, the χ test, and the t test.No significant difference was found between Japanese and Korean students in motivation to join domestic relief activities should a disaster occur in the area in which they lived. Compared with Korean students, Japanese students strongly agreed that it is necessary to carry out relief work across borders when disasters occur in foreign countries (p = .001). Meanwhile, Japanese students showed less motivation than Korean students to join relief activities in other domestic areas and foreign countries (p = .020).The results of this study suggest that the motivation of Japanese students to join disaster relief activities as nurses in the future should a disaster occur in other domestic areas and foreign countries needs to be increased. The results also suggest that undergraduate students should be well prepared for disasters through disaster nursing education, including practical training, disaster drills, and simulation.

  5. Joining and Integration of Silicon Carbide-Based Materials for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2016-01-01

    Advanced joining and integration technologies of silicon carbide-based ceramics and ceramic matrix composites are enabling for their implementation into wide scale aerospace and ground-based applications. The robust joining and integration technologies allow for large and complex shapes to be fabricated and integrated with the larger system. Potential aerospace applications include lean-direct fuel injectors, thermal actuators, turbine vanes, blades, shrouds, combustor liners and other hot section components. Ground based applications include components for energy and environmental systems. Performance requirements and processing challenges are identified for the successful implementation different joining technologies. An overview will be provided of several joining approaches which have been developed for high temperature applications. In addition, various characterization approaches were pursued to provide an understanding of the processing-microstructure-property relationships. Microstructural analysis of the joint interfaces was conducted using optical, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy to identify phases and evaluate the bond quality. Mechanical testing results will be presented along with the need for new standardized test methods. The critical need for tailoring interlayer compositions for optimum joint properties will also be highlighted.

  6. Increasing FSW join strength by optimizing feed rate, rotating speed and pin angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmadi, Djarot B.; Purnowidodo, Anindito; Siswanto, Eko

    2017-10-01

    Principally the join in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is formed due to mechanical bonding. At least there are two factors determines the quality of this join, first is the temperature in the area around the interface and secondly the intense of mixing forces in nugget zone to create the mechanical bonding. The adequate temperature creates good flowability of the nugget zone and an intensive mixing force produces homogeneous strong bonding. Based on those two factors in this research the effects of feed rate, rotating speed and pin angle of the FSW process to the tensile strength of resulted join are studied. The true experimental method was used. Feed rate was varied at 24, 42, 55 and 74 mm/minutes and from the experimental results, it can be concluded that the higher feed rate decreases the tensile strength of weld join and it is believed due to the lower heat embedded in the material. Inversely, the higher rotating speed increases the join’s tensile strength as a result of higher heat embedded in base metal and higher mixing force in the nugget zone. The rotating speed were 1842, 2257 and 2904 RPMs. The pin angle determines the direction of mixing force. With variation of pin angle: 0°, 4°, 8° and 12° the higher pin angle generally increases the tensile strength because of more intensive mixing force. For 12° pin angle the lower tensile strength is found since the force tends to push out the nugget area from the joint gap.

  7. Joining the Conversation: Twitter as a Tool for Student Political Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journell, Wayne; Ayers, Cheryl A.; Beeson, Melissa Walker

    2013-01-01

    This article describes possibilities afforded by using social media, specifically Twitter, as a way to encourage students to join political conversations across the United States and around the world. In this study, we describe a project in which students used Twitter to share commentary about the state of the 2012 presidential election. The…

  8. ETR, TRA642. WALL SECTION DETAILS. METAL SIDING JOINS TO ELECTRICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR, TRA-642. WALL SECTION DETAILS. METAL SIDING JOINS TO ELECTRICAL BUILDING, OFFICE BUILDING, AND ROOF. KAISER ETR-5528-MTR-A-13, 11/1955. INL INDEX NO. 532-0642-00-486-100920, REV. 4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. Why Universities Join Cross-Sector Social Partnerships: Theory and Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Cross-sector partnerships are an increasingly popular mode of organizing to address intractable social problems, yet theory and research have virtually ignored university involvement in such activity. This article attempts to ascertain the reasons universities join networks of other social actors to support a common cause. Theories on the…

  10. 12 CFR Appendix G to Part 360 - Deposit-Customer Join File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..._Code Relationship CodeThe code indicating how the customer is related to the account. Possible values... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Deposit-Customer Join File Structure G Appendix... GENERAL POLICY RESOLUTION AND RECEIVERSHIP RULES Pt. 360, App. G Appendix G to Part 360—Deposit-Customer...

  11. Experimental Investigation on the Joining of Aluminum Alloy Sheets Using Improved Clinching Process

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Zhao, Shengdun; Han, Xiaolan; Zhao, Xuzhe; Ishida, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum alloy sheets have been widely used to build the thin-walled structures by mechanical clinching technology in recent years. However, there is an exterior protrusion located on the lower sheet and a pit on the upper sheet, which may restrict the application of the clinching technology in visible areas. In the present study, an improved clinched joint used to join aluminum alloy sheets was investigated by experimental method. The improved clinching process used for joining aluminum alloy evolves through four phases: (a) localized deformation; (b) drawing; (c) backward extrusion; and (d) mechanical interlock forming. A flat surface can be produced using the improved clinching process. Shearing strength, tensile strength, material flow, main geometrical parameters, and failure mode of the improved clinched joint were investigated. The sheet material was compressed to flow radially and upward using a punch, which generated a mechanical interlock by producing severe localized plastic deformation. The neck thickness and interlock of the improved clinched joint were increased by increasing the forming force, which also contributed to increase the strength of the clinched joint. The improved clinched joint can get high shearing strength and tensile strength. Three main failure modes were observed in the failure process, which were neck fracture mode, button separation mode, and mixed failure mode. The improved clinched joint has better joining quality to join aluminum alloy sheets on the thin-walled structures. PMID:28763027

  12. Joining the On-Line Community. An Introduction for Adult Literacy. Practice Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rethemeyer, R. Karl

    This technology guide is intended to introduce adult literacy providers to the concepts,hardware, and procedures of online communication. The six-part guide explains the following: (1) what electronic networks are; (2) why adult literacy practitioners may want to join the Internet; (3) how adult literacy practitioners are already using the…

  13. Motives of Students' Joining Master Program at Princess Alia University College/Al Balqa Applied University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Habahbeh, Abdullah Eid

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at knowing the motives of students' joining master program at Princess Alia University College/Al Balqa Applied University by the graduate students and a degree of their importance and succession, and to know whether these motives differed according to the variables of gender, specialization, age, and marital status. To achieve…

  14. Spacecraft materials guide. [including: encapsulants and conformal coatings; optical materials; lubrication; and, bonding and joining processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staugaitis, C. L. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Materials which have demonstrated their suitability for space application are summarized. Common, recurring problems in encapsulants and conformal coatings, optical materials, lubrication, and bonding and joining are noted. The subjects discussed include: low density and syntactic foams, electrical encapsulants; optical glasses, interference filter, mirrors; oils, greases, lamillar lubricants; and, soldering and brazing processes.

  15. Joining precipitation-hardened nickel-base alloys by friction welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    Solid state deformation welding process, friction welding, has been developed for joining precipitation hardened nickel-base alloys and other gamma prime-strengthened materials which heretofore have been virtually unweldable. Method requires rotation of one of the parts to be welded, but where applicable, it is an ideal process for high volume production jobs.

  16. Coupling for joining a ball nut to a machine tool carriage

    DOEpatents

    Gerth, Howard L.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved coupling for joining a lead screw ball nut to a machine tool carriage. The ball nut is coupled to the machine tool carriage by a plurality of laterally flexible bolts which function as hinges during the rotation of the lead screw for substantially reducing lateral carriage movement due to wobble in the lead screw.

  17. Experimental Investigation on the Joining of Aluminum Alloy Sheets Using Improved Clinching Process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Zhao, Shengdun; Han, Xiaolan; Zhao, Xuzhe; Ishida, Tohru

    2017-08-01

    Aluminum alloy sheets have been widely used to build the thin-walled structures by mechanical clinching technology in recent years. However, there is an exterior protrusion located on the lower sheet and a pit on the upper sheet, which may restrict the application of the clinching technology in visible areas. In the present study, an improved clinched joint used to join aluminum alloy sheets was investigated by experimental method. The improved clinching process used for joining aluminum alloy evolves through four phases: (a) localized deformation; (b) drawing; (c) backward extrusion; and (d) mechanical interlock forming. A flat surface can be produced using the improved clinching process. Shearing strength, tensile strength, material flow, main geometrical parameters, and failure mode of the improved clinched joint were investigated. The sheet material was compressed to flow radially and upward using a punch, which generated a mechanical interlock by producing severe localized plastic deformation. The neck thickness and interlock of the improved clinched joint were increased by increasing the forming force, which also contributed to increase the strength of the clinched joint. The improved clinched joint can get high shearing strength and tensile strength. Three main failure modes were observed in the failure process, which were neck fracture mode, button separation mode, and mixed failure mode. The improved clinched joint has better joining quality to join aluminum alloy sheets on the thin-walled structures.

  18. Joining Forces: A Response to Kathy Rentz from the European Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louhiala-Salminen, Leena

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author responds to Kathy Rentz. She happily joins forces for pedagogically defensible teaching conditions and gives a brief "activist" account from the European perspective. However, rather than "European," she emphasizes that for the most part, this response looks at business communication teachers'…

  19. 12 CFR Appendix G to Part 360 - Deposit-Customer Join File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Deposit-Customer Join File Structure G Appendix G to Part 360 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY RESOLUTION AND RECEIVERSHIP RULES Pt. 360, App. G Appendix G to Part 360—Deposit-Customer...

  20. 12 CFR Appendix G to Part 360 - Deposit-Customer Join File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Deposit-Customer Join File Structure G Appendix G to Part 360 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY RESOLUTION AND RECEIVERSHIP RULES Pt. 360, App. G Appendix G to Part 360—Deposit-Customer...

  1. 12 CFR Appendix G to Part 360 - Deposit-Customer Join File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Deposit-Customer Join File Structure G Appendix G to Part 360 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY RESOLUTION AND RECEIVERSHIP RULES Pt. 360, App. G Appendix G to Part 360—Deposit-Customer...

  2. 12 CFR Appendix G to Part 360 - Deposit-Customer Join File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Deposit-Customer Join File Structure G Appendix G to Part 360 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY RESOLUTION AND RECEIVERSHIP RULES Pt. 360, App. G Appendix G to Part 360—Deposit-Customer...

  3. Characteristics of joining and hybrid composite forging of aluminum solid parts and galvanized steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesling, V.; Treutler, K.; Bick, T.; Stonis, M.; Langner, J.; Kriwall, M.

    2018-06-01

    In lightweight construction, light metals like aluminum are used in addition to high-strength steels. However, a welded joint of aluminum and steel leads to the precipitation of brittle, intermetallic phases and contact corrosion. Nevertheless, to use the advantages of this combination in terms of weight saving composite hybrid forging has been developed. In this process, an aluminum solid part and a steel sheet were formed in a single step and joined at the same time with zinc as brazing material. For this purpose, the zinc was applied by hot dipping on the aluminum in order to produce a connection via this layer in a forming process, under pressure and heat. Due to the formed intermediate layer of zinc, the formation of the Fe-Al intermetallic phases and the contact corrosion are excluded. By determining the mathematical relationships between joining parameters and the connection properties the strength of a specific joint geometry could be adjusted to reach the level of conventional joining techniques. In addition to the presentation of the joint properties, the influence of the joining process on the structure of the involved materials is also shown. Furthermore, the failure behavior under static tensile and shear stress will be shown.

  4. Gen Y Recruitment: Understanding Graduate Intentions to Join an Organisation Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warmerdam, Amanda; Lewis, Ioni; Banks, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) framework, the purpose of this paper is to explore whether the standard TPB constructs explained variance in Generation Y (Gen Y) individuals' intentions to join their ideal organisation. Design/methodology/approach: A mixed methods approach was used featuring qualitative and quantitative…

  5. Laser-induced Self-organizing Microstructures on Steel for Joining with Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Straeten, Kira; Burkhardt, Irmela; Olowinsky, Alexander; Gillner, Arnold

    The combination of different materials such as thermoplastic composites and metals is an important way to improve lightweight construction. As direct connections between these materials fail due to their physical and chemical properties, other joining techniques are required. A new joining approach besides fastening and adhesive joining is a laser-based two-step process. Within the first step the metal surface is modified by laser-microstructuring. In order to enlarge the boundary surface and create undercuts, random self-organizing microstructures are generated on stainless steel substrates. In a second process step both joining partners, metal and composite, are clamped together, the steel surface is heated up with laser radiation and through heat conduction the thermoplastic matrix is melted and flows into the structures. After cooling-down a firm joint between both materials is created. The presented work shows the influence of different laser parameters on the generation of the microstructures. The joint strength is investigated through tensile shear strength tests.

  6. Using Negotiated Joining to Construct and Fill Open-ended Roles in Elite Culinary Groups

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Vaughn

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study examines membership processes in groups operating in an uncertain environment that prevents them from fully predefining new members’ roles. I describe how nine elite high-end, cutting-edge culinary groups in the U.S. and Europe, ranging from innovative restaurants to culinary R&D groups, use negotiated joining—a previously undocumented process—to systematically construct and fill these emergent, open-ended roles. I show that negotiated joining is a consistently patterned, iterative process that begins with a role that both aspirant and target group explicitly understand to be provisional. This provisional role is then jointly modified and constructed by the aspirant and target group through repeated iterations of proposition, validation through trial and evaluation, and selective integration of validated role components. The initially provisional role stabilizes and the aspirant achieves membership if enough role components are validated; otherwise the negotiated joining process is abandoned. Negotiated joining allows the aspirant and target group to learn if a mutually desirable role is likely and, if so, to construct such a role. In addition, the provisional roles in negotiated joining can support absorptive capacity by allowing novel role components to enter target groups through aspirants’ efforts to construct stable roles for themselves, while the internal adjustment involved in integrating newly validated role components can have the unintended side effect of supporting adaptation by providing opportunities for the groups to use these novel role components to modify their role structure and goals to suit a changing and uncertain environment. Negotiated joining thus reveals role ambiguity’s hitherto unexamined beneficial consequences and provides a foundation for a contingency theory of new-member acquisition. PMID:26273105

  7. Joining Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsley, Danette; LaBounty, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Marzano (2003) identified 11 factors that positively influence student achievement. Those factors can be divided into three categories: school-level practices, teacher-level practices, and student-level characteristics. Interestingly, Marzano (2000) found that school- and teacher-level influences account for only 20% of the variance in student…

  8. Joining Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen; Sparks, Sarah D.; Cavanagh, Sean; Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    A mantra in recent years has been to blame the teachers' unions for many of the problems that beset public education. Americans only need look at Wisconsin, where the governor and lawmakers pushed through legislation curtailing the collective bargaining rights of teachers and other public employees. This special report examines the attempts by a…

  9. Joining Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2006-01-01

    As education institutions more readily pursue stronger connections with the entire community, joint-use programs allow them to forge those bonds more effectively--providing entire communities with more access to facilities and services, often critically needed in some areas, and more efficient use of tax funds. Through joint-use agreements,…

  10. Development of dispersion-strengthened Ni-Cr-ThOz alloys for the space shuttle thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, C. P.; Saunders, N. T.

    1972-01-01

    Manufacturing processes were developed for TD-NiCr providing small sheet (45 x 90 cm), and larger sheet (60 x 150 cm) and foil. The alternate alloy, DS-NiCr, was produced by pack-chromizing Ni-ThO2 sheet. Formability criteria are being established for basic sheet forming processes, which are brake forming, corrugation forming, joggling, dimpling, and beading. Resistance spot welding (fusion and solid state), resistance seam welding, solid state diffusion welding, and brazing are included in the joining programs. Major emphasis is centered on an Al-modified Ni-Cr-ThO2 alloy development. These alloys, containing 3 to 5% Al, form the protective Al2O3 scale. This enhances oxidation resistance under reentry conditions. Both TD-NiCrAl and DS-NiCrAl alloys are included. A tentative composition of Ni-16Cr-3.5Al-2ThO2 was selected based on oxidation resistance and fabricability.

  11. Affordable, Robust Ceramic Joining Technology (ARCJoinT) Given 1999 R and D 100 Award

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2000-01-01

    Advanced ceramics and fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with high strength and toughness, good thermal conductivity, thermal shock resistance, and oxidation resistance are needed for high-temperature structural applications in advanced high-efficiency and high-performance engines, space propulsion components, and land-based systems. The engineering designs of these systems require the manufacturing of large parts with complex shapes, which are either quite expensive or impossible to fabricate. In many instances, it is more economical to build complex shapes by joining together simple geometrical shapes. Thus, joining has been recognized as an enabling technology for the successful utilization of advanced ceramics and fiber-reinforced composite components in high-temperature applications. However, such joints must retain their structural integrity at high temperatures and must have mechanical strength and environmental stability comparable to those of the bulk materials. In addition, the joining technique should be robust, practical, and reliable. ARCJoinT, which is based on the reaction-forming approach, is unique in terms of producing joints with tailorable microstructures. The formation of joints by this approach is attractive since the thermomechanical properties of the joint interlayer can be tailored to be very close to those of the base materials. In addition, high-temperature fixturing is not needed to hold the parts at the infiltration temperature. The joining process begins with the application of a carbonaceous mixture in the joint area, holding the items to be joined in a fixture, and curing at 110 to 120 C for 10 to 20 min. This step fastens the pieces together. Then, silicon or a silicon alloy in tape, paste, or slurry form is applied around the joint region and heated to 1250 to 1425 C (depending on the type of infiltrant) for 10 to 15 min. The molten silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloy reacts with carbon to form silicon carbide with

  12. Joining of thin glass with semiconductors by ultra-fast high-repetition laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Alexander; Mingaeev, Ilja; Werth, Alexander; Kachel, Martin

    2008-02-01

    Lighting applications like OLED or on silicon for electro-optical applications need a reproducible sealing process. The joining has to be strong, the permeability for gasses and humidity very low and the process itself has to be very localized not affecting any organic or electronic parts inside the sealed region. The actual sealing process using glue does not fulfil these industrial needs. A new joining process using ultra-fast laser radiation offers a very precise joining with geometry dimensions smaller than 50 μm. Ultra-fast laser radiation is absorbed by multi-photon absorption in the glass. Due to the very definite threshold for melting and ablation the process of localized heating can be controlled without cracking. Repeating the irradiation at times smaller than the heat diffusion time the temperature in the focus is increased by heat accumulation reaching melting of the glass. Mowing the substrate relatively to the laser beam generates a seal of re-solidified glass. Joining of glass is achieved by positioning the laser focus at the interface. A similar approach is used for glass-silicon joining. The investigations presented will demonstrate the joining geometry by microscopy of cross-sections achieved by welding two glass plates (Schott D263 and AF45) with focused IR femtosecond laser radiation (wavelength λ = 1045nm, repetition rate f = 1 MHz, pulse duration t p = 500 fs, focus diameter w 0 = 4 μm, feeding velocity v= 1-10 mm/s). The strength of the welding seam is measured by tensile stress measurements and the gas and humidity is detected. A new diagnostic method for the on-line detection of the welding seam properties will be presented. Using a non-interferometric technique by quantitative phase microscopy the refractive index is measured during welding of glass in the time regime 0-2 μs. By calibration of the measured refractive index with a relation between refractive index and temperature a online-temperature detection can be achieved.

  13. Pulsed Laser Beam Welding of Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 Bulk Metallic Glass.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ling; Datye, Amit; Huang, Jiankang; Ketkaew, Jittisa; Woo Sohn, Sung; Zhao, Shaofan; Wu, Sujun; Zhang, Yuming; Schwarz, Udo D; Schroers, Jan

    2017-08-11

    We used pulsed laser beam welding method to join Pd 43 Cu 27 Ni 10 P 20 (at.%) bulk metallic glass and characterized the properties of the joint. Fusion zone and heat-affected zone in the weld joint can be maintained completely amorphous as confirmed by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. No visible defects were observed in the weld joint. Nanoindentation and bend tests were carried out to determine the mechanical properties of the weld joint. Fusion zone and heat-affected zone exhibit very similar elastic moduli and hardness when compared to the base material, and the weld joint shows high ductility in bending which is accomplished through the operation of multiple shear bands. Our results reveal that pulsed laser beam welding under appropriate processing parameters provides a practical viable method to join bulk metallic glasses.

  14. Applications of Materials Selection For Joining Composite/Alloy Piping Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosby, Karen E.; Smith, Brett H.; Mensah, Patrick F.; Stubblefield, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    A study in collaboration between investigators at Southern University and Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and NASA/MSFC is examining materials for modeling and analysis of heat-activated thermal coupling for joining composite to composite/alloy structures. The short-term objectives of this research are to develop a method for joining composite or alloy structures, as well as to study the effects of thermal stress on composite-to-alloy joints. This investigation will result in the selection of a suitable metallic alloy. Al-Li alloys have potential for this purpose in aerospace applications due to their excellent strength-to-weight ratio. The study of Al-Li and other alloys is of significant importance to this and other aerospace as well as offshore related interests. Further research will incorporate the use of computer aided design and rapid prototype hardware for conceptual design and verification of a potential composite piping delivery system.

  15. Optimum structural sizing of conventional cantilever and joined wing configurations using equivalent beam models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, P.; Chen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper describes an approach for the optimum sizing of single and joined wing structures that is based on representing the built-up finite element model of the structure by an equivalent beam model. The low order beam model is computationally more efficient in an environment that requires repetitive analysis of several trial designs. The design procedure is implemented in a computer program that requires geometry and loading data typically available from an aerodynamic synthesis program, to create the finite element model of the lifting surface and an equivalent beam model. A fully stressed design procedure is used to obtain rapid estimates of the optimum structural weight for the beam model for a given geometry, and a qualitative description of the material distribution over the wing structure. The synthesis procedure is demonstrated for representative single wing and joined wing structures.

  16. The Use of Explosive Forming for Fastening and Joining Structural and Pressure Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Explosive expansion of tubes into tubesheets has been used for over 20 years in the fabrication and repair of shell and tube heat exchangers. The use of explosives to perform these expansions has offered several distinct advantages over other methods. First, the process is fast and economical and can be performed with minimal training of personnel. Secondly, explosive forming does not cause the deleterious metallurgical effects which often result from other forming operations. In addition, the process can be performed remotely without the need for sophisticated handling equipment. The expansion of tubes into tubesheets is only one of many possible fastening and joining applications for which explosive forming can be used to achieve highly successful results. The explosive forming process and where it has been used are described. In addition, some possible adaptations to other joining applications are identified and discussed.

  17. Comparison of joining processes for Haynes 230 nickel based super alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williston, David Hugh

    Haynes 230 is a nickel based, solid-solution strengthened alloy that is used for high-temperature applications in the aero-engine and power generation industries. The alloy composition is balanced to avoid precipitation of undesirable topologically closed-packed (TCP) intermetallic phases, such as Sigma, Mu, or Laves-type, that are detrimental to mechanical and corrosion properties. This material is currently being used for the NASA's J2X upper stage rocket nozzle extension. Current fabrication procedures use fusion welding processes to join blanks that are subsequently formed. Cracks have been noted to occur in the fusion welded region during the forming operations. Use of solid state joining processes, such as friction stir welding are being proposed to eliminate the fusion weld cracks. Of interest is a modified friction stir welding process called thermal stir welding. Three welding process: Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Thermal Stir Welding (TSWing) are compared in this study.

  18. Characterisation of the joining zone of serially arranged hybrid semi-finished components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Chugreev, A.; Matthias, T.

    2018-05-01

    Forming of already joined semi-finished products is an innovative approach to manufacture components which are well-adapted to external loads. This approach results in an economically and ecologically improved production by the targeted use of high-quality materials in component areas, which undergo high stresses. One possible production method for hybrid semi-finished products is friction welding. This welding method allows for the production of hybrid semi-finished products made of aluminium and steel as well as steel and steel. In this paper, the thermomechanical tensile and shear stresses causing a failure of the joined zone are experimentally determined through tension tests. These tests are performed with specimens whose joint zones are aligned with different angles to the load direction.

  19. Feasibility of remotely manipulated welding in space: A step in the development of novel joining technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masubuchi, K.; Agapakis, J. E.; Debiccari, A.; Vonalt, C.

    1985-01-01

    A six month research program entitled Feasibility of Remotely Manipulated Welding in Space - A Step in the Development of Novel Joining Technologies is performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the Office of Space Science and Applications, NASA, under Contract No. NASW-3740. The work is performed as a part of the Innovative Utilization of the Space Station Program. The final report from M.I.T. was issued in September 1983. This paper presents a summary of the work performed under this contract. The objective of this research program is to initiate research for the development of packaged, remotely controlled welding systems for space construction and repair. The research effort includes the following tasks: (1) identification of probable joining tasks in space; (2) identification of required levels of automation in space welding tasks; (3) development of novel space welding concepts; (4) development of recommended future studies; and (5) preparation of the final report.

  20. Research and Development Opportunities for Joining Technologies in HVAC&R

    SciT

    Goetzler, William; Guernsey, Matt; Young, Jim

    The Building Technologies Office (BTO) works with researchers and industry partners to develop and deploy technologies that can substantially reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in residential and commercial buildings. This opportunity assessment aims to advance BTO’s energy savings, GHG reduction, and other program goals by identifying research and development (R&D) initiatives for joining technologies in heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) systems. Improving joining technologies for HVAC&R equipment has the potential to increase lifetime equipment operating efficiency, decrease equipment and project cost, and most importantly reduce hydroflourocarbon (HFC) refrigerant leakage to support HFC phasedown and GHG reductionmore » goals.« less

  1. Electron beam welding of aircraft structures. [joining of titanium alloy wing structures on F-14 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Requirements for advanced aircraft have led to more extensive use of titanium alloys and the resultant search for joining processes which can produce lightweight, high strength airframe structures efficiently. As a result, electron beam welding has been investigated. The following F-14A components are now being EB welded in production and are mainly annealed Ti-6Al-4V except for the upper wing cover which is annealed Ti-6Al-6V-2Sn: F-14A wing center section box, and F-14A lower and upper wing covers joined to wing pivot fitting assemblies. Criteria for selection of welding processes, the EB welding facility, development work on EB welding titanium alloys, and F-14A production and sliding seal electron beam welding are reported.

  2. A Combined Experimental and Numerical Approach to the Laser Joining of Hybrid Polymer - Metal Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Vidal, E.; Lambarri, J.; Soriano, C.; Sanz, C.; Verhaeghe, G.

    A two-step method for the joining of opaque polymer to metal is presented. Firstly, the metal is structured locally on a micro-scale level, to ensure adhesion with the polymeric counterpart. In a second step, the opposite side of the micro-structured metal is irradiated by means of a laser source. The heat thereby created is conducted by the metal and results in the melting of the polymer at the interface. The polymer thereby adheres to the metal and flows into the previously engraved structures, creating an additional mechanical interlock between the two materials. The welding parameters are fine-tuned with the assistance of a finite element model, to ensure the required interface temperature. The method is illustrated using a dual phase steel joined to a fiber-reinforced polyamide. The effect of different microstructures, in particular geometry and cavity aspect ratio, on the joint's tensile-shear mechanical performance is discussed.

  3. Who joins the network? Physicians' resistance to take budgetary co-responsibility.

    PubMed

    Rischatsch, Maurus

    2015-03-01

    Managed Care (MC) is expected to provide health care at a lower cost than conventional provision. Therefore, Switzerland intends to promote MC by forcing health insurers to write MC contracts and introducing budgetary co-responsibility for ambulatory care physicians. A discrete choice experiment conducted in 2011 including 872 physicians reveals a strong preference heterogeneity with respect to network participation and alternative remuneration schemes. The number of physicians working in networks is unlikely to rise on a voluntary basis, while general practitioners are more likely to join networks than specialists with surgical activities. For physicians considering joining networks, cost savings are predicted to be higher than the estimated willingness-to-accept payments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dissimilar material joining using laser (aluminum to steel using zinc-based filler wire)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Alexandre; Shabadi, Rajashekar; Deschamps, Alexis; Suery, Michel; Matteï, Simone; Grevey, Dominique; Cicala, Eugen

    2007-04-01

    Joining steel with aluminum involving the fusion of one or both materials is possible by laser beam welding technique. This paper describes a method, called laser braze welding, which is a suitable process to realize this structure. The main problem with thermal joining of steel/aluminum assembly with processes such as TIG or MIG is the formation of fragile intermetallic phases, which are detrimental to the mechanical performances of such joints. Braze welding permits a localized fusion of the materials resulting in a limitation on the growth of fragile phases. This article presents the results of a statistical approach for an overlap assembly configuration using a filler wire composed of 85% Zn and 15% Al. Tensile tests carried on these assemblies demonstrate a good performance of the joints. The fracture mechanisms of the joints are analyzed by a detailed characterization of the seams.

  5. Joining of Aluminium Alloy and Steel by Laser Assisted Reactive Wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedl, Gerhard; Vázquez, Rodrigo Gómez; Murzin, Serguei P.

    2018-03-01

    Compounds of dissimilar materials, like aluminium and steel offer an interesting opportunity for the automotive industry to reduce the weight of a car body. Thermal joining of aluminium and steel leads to the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds, which negatively affects the properties of the welded joint. Amongst others, growth of such intermetallic compounds depends on maximum temperature and on the time at certain temperatures. Laser welding with its narrow well seam and its fast heating and cooling cycles provides an excellent opportunity to obtain an ultrathin diffusion zone. Joining of sheet metal DC01 with aluminium alloy AW6016 has been chosen for research. The performed experimental studies showed that by a variation of the beam power and scanning speed it is possible to obtain an ultrathin diffusion zone with narrow intermetallic interlayers. With the aim of supporting further investigation of laser welding of the respective and other dissimilar pairings a multi-physical simulation model has been developed.

  6. Summary of Prior Work on Joining of Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloys

    SciT

    Wright, Ian G; Tatlock, Gordon J; Badairy, H.

    2009-08-01

    There is a range of joining techniques available for use with ODS alloys, but care should be exercised in matching the technique to the final duty requirements of the joint. The goal for joining ODS alloys is a joint with no local disruption of the distribution of the oxide dispersion, and no significant change in the size and orientation of the alloy microstructure. Not surprisingly, the fusion welding processes typically employed with wrought alloys produce the least satisfactory results with ODS alloys, but some versions, such as fusion spot welding, and the laser and electron-beam welding technologies, have demonstrated potentialmore » for producing sound joints. Welds made using solid-state spot welding reportedly have exhibited parent metal properties. Thus, it is possible to employ processes that result in significant disruption of the alloy microstructure, as long as the processing parameters are adjustment to minimize the extent of or influence of the changes in the alloy microstructure. Selection among these joining approaches largely depends on the particular application and component configuration, and an understanding of the relationships among processing, alloy microstructure, and final properties is key. Recent developments have resulted in friction welding evolving to be a prime method for joining ODS sheet products, and variants of brazing/diffusion bonding have shown excellent promise for use with tubes and pipes. The techniques that come closest to the goal defined above involve solid-state diffusion bonding and, in particular, it has been found that secondary recrystallization of joints made by pulsed plasma-assisted diffusion can produce the desired, continuous, large alloy grain structure through the joint. Such joints have exhibited creep rupture failure at >82% of the load needed to fail the monolithic parent alloy at 1000 C.« less

  7. Fracture resistance of inter-joined zirconia abutment of dental implant system with injection molding technique.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianjun; Wang, Ke; Liu, Guangyuan; Wang, Dashan

    2013-11-01

    Zirconia powder in nanometers can be fabricated into inter-joined abutment of dental implant system with the injection shaping technique. This study was to detect the resistance of inter-joined zirconia abutment with different angle loading for clinical applications. The inter-joined abutments were shaped with the technique of injection of zirconia powder in nanometers. Sixty Osstem GSII 5 × 10 mm implants were used with 30 zirconia abutments and 30 Osstem GSII titanium abutments for fixation using 40 N torque force. The loading applications included 90°, 30°, and 0° formed by the long axis of abutments and pressure head of universal test machine. The fracture resistances of zirconia and titanium abutments were documented and analyzed. The inter-joined zirconia abutments were assembled to the Osstem GSII implants successfully. In the 90° loading mode, the fracture resistance of zirconia abutment group and titanium abutment group were 301.5 ± 15.4 N and 736.4 ± 120.1 N, respectively. And those in the 30° groups were 434.7 ± 36.1 N and 1073.1 ± 74 N, correspondingly. Significant difference in the two groups was found using t-test and Wilcoxon test. No damage on the abutments of the two groups but S-shaped bending on the implants was found when the 0° loading was 1300-2000 N. Through the assembly of Zirconia abutments and implants, all the components presented sufficient resistance acquired for the clinical application under loadings with different angle. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Renew or Join R&W Club Frederick for 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer If you want to meet new people and participate in new activities in 2014, don’t forget to renew or join the Recreation and Welfare (R&W) Club Frederick. Membership is $9 for the calendar year. An R&W Club Frederick membership offers discounts at local businesses, the opportunity to participate in events and activities (which are often

  9. Experimental study on joining of AA6063 and AISI 1040 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Raja, S.

    2018-05-01

    Feasibility of joining of dissimilar metals with different physical, chemical and thermal properties such as AA6063 alloy and AISI 1040 steel is worthwhile study, since it has tremendous applications in all most of all engineering domains. The mechanism of bonding is studied using scanning electron microscopy. Impact strength of AA2024/AISI joints, axial shortening distance, micro hardness distribution and joint strength are determined. Micro hardness profile shows increased hardness value at the joint interface, due to grain refinement.

  10. They answered the call: Nebraska nurses join the ranks in World War II.

    PubMed

    Schmeiding, Verna E; Anderson, Mary L; Bradley, Eileen

    On December 7, 1941, there were fewer than 1,000 nurses in the Army Nurse Corps. That infamous day, 82 of those brave nurses were stationed in Hawaii. Their bravery, leadership and calmness under extreme duress foreshadowed the amazing role nurses would play in World War II. In the months and years that followed Japan's bombing of Pearl Harbor, over 59,000 American nurses would answer the call and join the Army Nurse Corps. Courageous Nebraskan women were among them.

  11. Slow Joining of Newly Replicated DNA Chains in DNA Polymerase I-Deficient Escherichia coli Mutants*

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Reiji; Arisawa, Mikio; Sugino, Akio

    1971-01-01

    In Escherichia coli mutants deficient in DNA polymerase I, newly replicated short DNA is joined at about 10% of the rate in the wild-type strains. It is postulated that DNA polymerase I normally functions in filling gaps between the nascent short segments synthesized by the replication complex. Possible implications of the finding are discussed in relation to other abnormal properties of these mutants. PMID:4943548

  12. Development of a double beam process for joining aluminum and steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Multi-material structures pose an attractive option for overcoming some of the central challenges in lightweight design. An exceptionally high potential for creating cost-effective lightweight solutions is attributed to the combination of steel and aluminum. However, these materials are also particularly difficult to join due to their tendency to form intermetallic compounds (IMCs). The growth of these compounds is facilitated by high temperatures and long process times. Due to their high brittleness, IMCs can severely weaken a joint. Thus, it is only possible to create durable steel-aluminum joints when the formation of IMCs can be limited to a non-critical level. To meet this goal, a new joining method has been designed. The method is based on the combination of a continuous wave (pw) and a pulsed laser (pw) source. Laser beams from both sources are superimposed in a common process zone. This makes it possible to apply the advantages of laser brazing to mixed-metal joints without requiring the use of chemical fluxes. The double beam technology was first tested in bead-on-plate experiments using different filler wire materials. Based on the results of these tests, a process for joining steel and aluminum in a double-flanged configuration is now being developed. The double flanged seams are joined using zinc- or aluminum-based filler wires. Microsections of selected seams show that it is possible to achieve good base material wetting while limiting the growth of IMCs to acceptable measures. In addition, the results of tensile tests show that high joint strengths can be achieved.

  13. Cosmonaut Aleksey Leonov joins belly dancer on stage at Folklife Festival

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov, in one of the lighter moments of activity involving Soviet Cosmonauts and American Astronauts, joins a belly dancer on stage as several visitors to weekend activity at the site of San Antonio's HemisFair look on. Leonov is commander of the Soviet Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) crew. The Lebanese dancing was just one feature among many during the Texas Folklife Festival.

  14. Gaussian Random Fields Methods for Fork-Join Network with Synchronization Constraints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-22

    substantial efforts were dedicated to the study of the max-plus recursions [21, 3, 12]. More recently, Atar et al. [2] have studied a fork-join...feedback and NES, Atar et al. [2] show that a dynamic priority discipline achieves throughput optimal- ity asymptotically in the conventional heavy...2011) Patient flow in hospitals: a data-based queueing-science perspective. Submitted to Stochastic Systems, 20. [2] R. Atar , A. Mandelbaum and A

  15. Contribution of canonical nonhomologous end joining to chromosomal rearrangements is enhanced by ATM kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Ragini; Carson, Caree R; Lee, Gabriella; Stark, Jeremy M

    2017-01-24

    A likely mechanism of chromosomal rearrangement formation involves joining the ends from two different chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs). These events could potentially be mediated by either of two end-joining (EJ) repair pathways [canonical nonhomologous end joining (C-NHEJ) or alternative end joining (ALT-EJ)], which cause distinct rearrangement junction patterns. The relative role of these EJ pathways during rearrangement formation has remained controversial. Along these lines, we have tested whether the DNA damage response mediated by the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) kinase may affect the relative influence of C-NHEJ vs. ALT-EJ on rearrangement formation. We developed a reporter in mouse cells for a 0.4-Mbp deletion rearrangement that is formed by EJ between two DSBs induced by the Cas9 endonuclease. We found that disruption of the ATM kinase causes an increase in the frequency of the rearrangement as well as a shift toward rearrangement junctions that show hallmarks of C-NHEJ. Furthermore, ATM suppresses rearrangement formation in an experimental condition, in which C-NHEJ is the predominant EJ repair event (i.e., expression of the 3' exonuclease Trex2). Finally, several C-NHEJ factors are required for the increase in rearrangement frequency caused by inhibition of the ATM kinase. We also examined ATM effectors and found that H2AX shows a similar influence as ATM, whereas the influence of ATM on this rearrangement seems independent of 53BP1. We suggest that the contribution of the C-NHEJ pathway to the formation of a 0.4-Mbp deletion rearrangement is enhanced in ATM-deficient cells.

  16. Parallel multi-join query optimization algorithm for distributed sensor network in the internet of things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yan

    2015-03-01

    Internet of things (IoT), focusing on providing users with information exchange and intelligent control, attracts a lot of attention of researchers from all over the world since the beginning of this century. IoT is consisted of large scale of sensor nodes and data processing units, and the most important features of IoT can be illustrated as energy confinement, efficient communication and high redundancy. With the sensor nodes increment, the communication efficiency and the available communication band width become bottle necks. Many research work is based on the instance which the number of joins is less. However, it is not proper to the increasing multi-join query in whole internet of things. To improve the communication efficiency between parallel units in the distributed sensor network, this paper proposed parallel query optimization algorithm based on distribution attributes cost graph. The storage information relations and the network communication cost are considered in this algorithm, and an optimized information changing rule is established. The experimental result shows that the algorithm has good performance, and it would effectively use the resource of each node in the distributed sensor network. Therefore, executive efficiency of multi-join query between different nodes could be improved.

  17. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining.

    PubMed

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Tainer, John A; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-08-18

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Joining and Integration of Silicon Nitride Ceramics for Aerospace and Energy Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.

    2009-01-01

    Light-weight, creep-resistant silicon nitride ceramics possess excellent high-temperature strength and are projected to significantly raise engine efficiency and performance when used as turbine components in the next-generation turbo-shaft engines without the extensive cooling that is needed for metallic parts. One key aspect of Si3N4 utilization in such applications is its joining response to diverse materials. In an ongoing research program, the joining and integration of Si3N4 ceramics with metallic, ceramic, and composite materials using braze interlayers with the liquidus temperature in the range 750-1240C is being explored. In this paper, the self-joining behavior of Kyocera Si3N4 and St. Gobain Si3N4 using a ductile Cu-based active braze (Cu-ABA) containing Ti will be presented. Joint microstructure, composition, hardness, and strength as revealed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Knoop microhardness test, and offset compression shear test will be presented. Additionally, microstructure, composition, and joint strength of Si3N4/Inconel 625 joints made using Cu-ABA, will be presented. The results will be discussed with reference to the role of chemical reactions, wetting behavior, and residual stresses in joints.

  19. Self-healing of cracks in Ag joining layer for die-attachment in power devices

    SciT

    Chen, Chuantong, E-mail: chenchuantong@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    Sintered silver (Ag) joining has attracted significant interest in power devices modules for its ability to form stable joints with a porous interconnection layer. A function for the self-healing of cracks in sintered porous Ag interlayers at high temperatures is discovered and reported here. A crack which was prepared on a Ag joining layer was closed after heating at 200 °C in air. The tensile strength of pre-cracked Ag joining layer specimens recovers to the value of non-cracked specimens after heating treatment. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to probe the self-healing mechanism. TEM images and electron diffraction patterns show thatmore » a large quantity of Ag nanoparticles formed at the gap with the size less than 10 nm, which bridges the crack in the self-healing process. This discovery provides additional motivation for the application of Ag as an interconnection material for power devices at high temperature.« less

  20. Using and joining a franchised private sector provider network in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Kathryn; Hom, Mo; Aung, Tin; Theuss, Marc; Huntington, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Quality is central to understanding provider motivations to join and remain within a social franchising network. Quality also appears as a key issue from the client's perspective, and may influence why a client chooses to use a franchised provider over another type of provider. The dynamic relationships between providers of social franchising clinics and clients who use these services have not been thoroughly investigated in the context of Myanmar, which has an established social franchising network. This study examines client motivations to use a Sun Quality Health network provider and provider motivations to join and remain in the Sun Quality Health network. Taken together, these two aims provide an opportunity to explore the symbiotic relationship between client satisfaction and provider incentives to increase the utilization of reproductive health care services. Results from a series of focus group discussions with clients of reproductive health services and franchised providers shows that women chose health services provided by franchised private sector general practitioners because of its perceived higher quality, associated with the availability of effective, affordable, drugs. A key finding of the study is associated with providers. Provider focus group discussions indicate that a principle determinate for joining and remaining in the Sun Quality Health Network was serving the poor.

  1. Using and Joining a Franchised Private Sector Provider Network in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Kathryn; Hom, Mo; Aung, Tin; Theuss, Marc; Huntington, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Background Quality is central to understanding provider motivations to join and remain within a social franchising network. Quality also appears as a key issue from the client's perspective, and may influence why a client chooses to use a franchised provider over another type of provider. The dynamic relationships between providers of social franchising clinics and clients who use these services have not been thoroughly investigated in the context of Myanmar, which has an established social franchising network. This study examines client motivations to use a Sun Quality Health network provider and provider motivations to join and remain in the Sun Quality Health network. Taken together, these two aims provide an opportunity to explore the symbiotic relationship between client satisfaction and provider incentives to increase the utilization of reproductive health care services. Methods and Findings Results from a series of focus group discussions with clients of reproductive health services and franchised providers shows that women chose health services provided by franchised private sector general practitioners because of its perceived higher quality, associated with the availability of effective, affordable, drugs. A key finding of the study is associated with providers. Provider focus group discussions indicate that a principle determinate for joining and remaining in the Sun Quality Health Network was serving the poor. PMID:22180781

  2. Mechanism of Microhomology-Mediated End-Joining Promoted by Human DNA Polymerase Theta

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Tatiana; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; McDevitt, Shane Michael; Ozdemir, Ahmet Y.; Pomerantz, Richard T.

    2014-01-01

    Microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ) is an error-prone alternative double-strand break repair pathway that utilizes sequence microhomology to recombine broken DNA. Although MMEJ is implicated in cancer development, the mechanism of this pathway is unknown. We demonstrate that purified human DNA polymerase θ (Polθ) performs MMEJ of DNA containing 3’ single-strand DNA overhangs with two or more base-pairs of homology, including DNA modeled after telomeres, and show that MMEJ is dependent on Polθ in human cells. Our data support a mechanism whereby Polθ facilitates end-joining and microhomology annealing then utilizes the opposing overhang as a template in trans which stabilizes the DNA synapse. Polθ exhibits a preference for DNA containing a 5’-terminal phosphate, similar to polymerases involved in non-homologous end-joining. Lastly, we identify a conserved loop domain that is essential for MMEJ and higher-order structures of Polθ which likely promote DNA synapse formation. PMID:25643323

  3. Fabrication and characterization of joined silicon carbide cylindrical components for nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, H. E.; Deck, C. P.; Gutierrez, O.; Jacobsen, G. M.; Back, C. A.

    2015-02-01

    The use of silicon carbide (SiC) composites as structural materials in nuclear applications necessitates the development of a viable joining method. One critical application for nuclear-grade joining is the sealing of fuel within a cylindrical cladding. This paper demonstrates cylindrical joint feasibility using a low activation nuclear-grade joint material comprised entirely of β-SiC. While many papers have considered joining material, this paper takes into consideration the joint geometry and component form factor, as well as the material performance. Work focused specifically on characterizing the strength and permeability performance of joints between cylindrical SiC-SiC composites and monolithic SiC endplugs. The effects of environment and neutron irradiation were not evaluated in this study. Joint test specimens of different geometries were evaluated in their as-fabricated state, as well as after being subjected to thermal cycling and partial mechanical loading. A butted scarf geometry supplied the best combination of high strength and low permeability. A leak rate performance of 2 × 10-9 mbar l s-1 was maintained after thermal cycling and partial mechanical loading and sustained applied force of 3.4 kN, or an apparent strength of 77 MPa. This work shows that a cylindrical SiC-SiC composite tube sealed with a butted scarf endplug provides out-of-pile strength and permeability performance that meets light water reactor design requirements.

  4. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    PubMed Central

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  5. Alternative end-joining pathway(s): bricolage at DNA breaks.

    PubMed

    Frit, Philippe; Barboule, Nadia; Yuan, Ying; Gomez, Dennis; Calsou, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    To cope with DNA double strand break (DSB) genotoxicity, cells have evolved two main repair pathways: homologous recombination which uses homologous DNA sequences as repair templates, and non-homologous Ku-dependent end-joining involving direct sealing of DSB ends by DNA ligase IV (Lig4). During the last two decades a third player most commonly named alternative end-joining (A-EJ) has emerged, which is defined as any Ku- or Lig4-independent end-joining process. A-EJ increasingly appears as a highly error-prone bricolage on DSBs and despite expanding exploration, it still escapes full characterization. In the present review, we discuss the mechanism and regulation of A-EJ as well as its biological relevance under physiological and pathological situations, with a particular emphasis on chromosomal instability and cancer. Whether or not it is a genuine DSB repair pathway, A-EJ is emerging as an important cellular process and understanding A-EJ will certainly be a major challenge for the coming years. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling and testing miniature torsion specimens for SiC joining development studies for fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Henager, Jr., C. H.; Nguyen, Ba N.; Kurtz, Richard J.; ...

    2015-08-05

    The international fusion community has designed a miniature torsion specimen for neutron irradiation studies of joined SiC and SiC/SiC composite materials. For this research, miniature torsion joints based on this specimen design were fabricated using displacement reactions between Si and TiC to produce Ti 3SiC 2 + SiC joints with SiC and tested in torsion-shear prior to and after neutron irradiation. However, many miniature torsion specimens fail out-of-plane within the SiC specimen body, which makes it problematic to assign a shear strength value to the joints and makes it difficult to compare unirradiated and irradiated strengths to determine irradiation effects.more » Finite element elastic damage and elastic–plastic damage models of miniature torsion joints are developed that indicate shear fracture is more likely to occur within the body of the joined sample and cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. The model results are compared and discussed with regard to unirradiated and irradiated test data for a variety of joint materials. The unirradiated data includes Ti 3SiC 2 + SiC/CVD-SiC joints with tailored joint moduli, and includes steel/epoxy and CVD-SiC/epoxy joints. Finally, the implications for joint data based on this sample design are discussed.« less

  7. In vitro non-homologous DNA end joining assays—The 20th anniversary

    PubMed Central

    Pastwa, Elzbieta; Somiari, Richard I.; Malinowski, Mariusz; Somiari, Stella B.; Winters, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most serious forms of DNA damage in cells. Unrepaired or misrepaired DSBs account for some of the genetic instabilities that lead to mutations or cell death, and consequently, to cancer predisposition. In human cells non-homologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) is the main repair mechanism of these breaks. Systems for DNA end joining study have been developing during the last 20 years. New assays have some advantages over earlier in vitro DSBs repair assays because they are less time-consuming, allow the use of clinical material and examination of the joining DNA ends produced physiologically in mammalian cells. Proteins involved in NHEJ repair pathway can serve as biomarkers or molecular targets for anticancer drugs. Results of studies on NHEJ in cancer could help to select potent repair inhibitors that may selectively sensitize tumor cells to ionizing radiation (IR) and chemotherapy. Here, we review the principles and practice of in vitro NHEJ assays and provide some insights into the future prospects of this assay in cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19110069

  8. Advances in Solid State Joining of Haynes 230 High Temperature Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Schneider, Judy; Walker, Bryant

    2010-01-01

    The J-2X engine is being designed for NASA s new class of crew and launch vehicles, the Ares I and Ares V. The J-2X is a LOX/Hydrogen upper stage engine with 294,000 lbs of thrust and a minimum Isp of 448 seconds. As part of the design criteria to meet the performance requirements a large film-cooled nozzle extension is being designed to further expand the hot gases and increases the specific impulse. The nozzle extension is designed using Haynes 230, a nickel-chromium-tungsten-molybdenum superalloy. The alloy was selected for its high strength at elevated temperatures and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement. The nozzle extension is manufactured from Haynes 230 plate spun-forged to form the contour and chemically-milled pockets for weight reduction. Currently fusion welding is being evaluated for joining the panels which are then mechanically etched and thinned to required dimensions for the nozzle extension blank. This blank is then spun formed into the parabolic geometry required for the nozzle. After forming the nozzle extension, weight reduction pockets are chemically milled into the nozzle. Fusion welding of Haynes results in columnar grains which are prone to hot cracking during forming processes. This restricts the ability to use spin forging to produce the nozzle contour. Solid state joining processes are being pursued as an alternative process to produce a structure more amenable to spin forming. Solid state processes have been shown to produce a refined grain structure within the joint regions as illustrated in Figure 1. Solid state joining processes include friction stir welding (FSW) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSW). The configuration of TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material minimizing the burden on the weld tool extending its life. This provides the ability to precisely select and control the temperature. The work presented in this presentation investigates the feasibility of joining the Haynes 230

  9. DNA double strand break repair in human bladder cancer is error prone and involves microhomology-associated end-joining

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Johanne; Diggle, Christine P.; Harnden, Patricia; Knowles, Margaret A.; Kiltie, Anne E.

    2004-01-01

    In human cells DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. In a background of NHEJ deficiency, DSBs with mismatched ends can be joined by an error-prone mechanism involving joining between regions of nucleotide microhomology. The majority of joins formed from a DSB with partially incompatible 3′ overhangs by cell-free extracts from human glioblastoma (MO59K) and urothelial (NHU) cell lines were accurate and produced by the overlap/fill-in of mismatched termini by NHEJ. However, repair of DSBs by extracts using tissue from four high-grade bladder carcinomas resulted in no accurate join formation. Junctions were formed by the non-random deletion of terminal nucleotides and showed a preference for annealing at a microhomology of 8 nt buried within the DNA substrate; this process was not dependent on functional Ku70, DNA-PK or XRCC4. Junctions were repaired in the same manner in MO59K extracts in which accurate NHEJ was inactivated by inhibition of Ku70 or DNA-PKcs. These data indicate that bladder tumour extracts are unable to perform accurate NHEJ such that error-prone joining predominates. Therefore, in high-grade tumours mismatched DSBs are repaired by a highly mutagenic, microhomology-mediated, alternative end-joining pathway, a process that may contribute to genomic instability observed in bladder cancer. PMID:15466592

  10. Studying the Issues in Laser Joining of Lightweight Materials in a Coach-Peel Joint Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang

    In the automotive industry, aluminum alloys have been widely used and partially replaced the conventional steel structures in order to decrease the weight of a car and improve its fuel efficiency. This Thesis focuses on the development of laser joining of light-weight materials, such as aluminum alloys and high-strength galvanized steels. Among different joint types, the coach-peel configuration is of a specific design that requires a heat source capable of heating up a large surface area of the joint. Coach-peel joints applied on the visible exterior of a car require a smooth transition from the weld surface to the panel surface and low surface roughness without any need for post-processing. Although these joints are used as non-load-bearing components, a desirable strength of the weld is also needed. A fusion-brazing process using a dual-beam laser allows the automotive components such as the roof and side member panels to be joined in a coach-peel configuration with a high surface quality as well as an acceptable strength of the weld. To improve the weld surface quality, processing parameters such as laser beam configuration, laser-wire position, and shielding gas parameters were optimized for joining of aluminum alloy to aluminum alloy. Laser power was optimized for dual-beam laser joining of aluminum alloy to galvanized steel at high speed. The feasibility of joining as-received panels with lubricant was also explored. The identification of strain hardening models of aluminum alloys was conducted for the mechanical finite element analysis of the joint. Control of the molten pool solidification through the selection of laser beam configuration is one approach to improve joint quality. Laser joining of aluminum alloy AA 6111-T4 coach peel panels with the addition of AA 4047 filler wire was investigated using three configurations of laser beam: a single beam, dual beams in-line with the weld bead, and dual beams aligned perpendicular to the weld bead (herein

  11. Interdiffusion in the Ni/TD-NiCr and Cr/TD-NiCr systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawar, A. V.; Tenney, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The diffusion of Ni and Cr into TD-NiCr has been studied over the 900 to 1100 C temperature range. The diffusion couples were prepared by electroplating Cr and Ni on polished TD-NiCr wafers. Concentration profiles produced as a result of isothermal diffusion at 905, 1000, and 1100 C were determined by electron microprobe analysis. The Boltzmann-Matano analysis was used to determine concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients which were found to compare favorably with previously reported values. These data suggest that 2 vol % ThO2 distribution has no appreciable effect on the rates of diffusion in TD-NiCr with a large grain size. This supports the view that an inert dispersoid in an alloy matrix will not in itself lead to enhanced diffusion unless a short-circuit diffusion structure is stabilized.

  12. Joining characteristics of titanium-based orthodontic wires connected by laser and electrical welding methods.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Junko; Watanabe, Ikuya; Nakao, Noriko; Watanabe, Etsuko; Elshahawy, Waleed; Yoshida, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the possibility of electrical and laser welding to connect titanium-based alloy (beta-titanium and nickel-titanium) wires and stainless-steel or cobalt-chromium alloy wires for fabrication of combination arch-wires. Four kinds of straight orthodontic rectangular wires (0.017 × 0.025 inch) were used: stainless-steel (S-S), cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr), beta-titanium alloy (β-Ti), and nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti). Homogeneous and heterogeneous end-to-end joints (15 mm long each) were made by electrical welding and laser welding. Non-welded wires (30 mm long) were also used as a control. Maximum loads at fracture (N) and elongation (%) were measured by conducting tensile test. The data (n = 10) were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance/Tukey test (P < 0.05).The S-S/S-S and Co-Cr/Co-Cr specimens showed significantly higher values of the maximum load (ML) at fracture and elongation (EL) than those of the Ni-Ti/Ni-Ti and β-Ti/β-Ti specimens for electrical welding and those of the S-S/S-S and Co-Cr/Co-Cr specimens welded by laser. On the other hand, the laser-welded Ni-Ti/Ni-Ti and β-Ti/β-Ti specimens exhibited higher values of the ML and EL compared to those of the corresponding specimens welded by electrical method. In the heterogeneously welded combinations, the electrically welded Ni-Ti/S-S, β-Ti/S-S and β-Ti/Co-Cr specimens showed significantly (P < 0.05) higher ML and EL than those of the corresponding specimens welded by laser. Electrical welding exhibited the higher values of maximum load at fracture and elongation for heterogeneously welded combinations than laser-welding.

  13. Etching Selectivity of Cr, Fe and Ni Masks on Si & SiO2 Wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Jorge; Lowndes, Douglas H.

    2000-10-01

    During this Summer 2000 I joined the Semiconductors and Thin Films group led by Dr. Douglas H. Lowndes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Solid State Division. Our objective was to evaluate the selectivity that Trifluoromethane (CHF3), and Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6) plasmas have for Si, SiO2 wafers and the Ni, Cr, and Fe masks; being this etching selectivity the ratio of the etching rates of the plasmas for each of the materials. We made use of Silicon and Silicon Dioxide-coated wafers that have Fe, Cr or Ni masks. In the semiconductor field, metal layers are often used as masks to protect layers underneath during processing steps; when these wafers are taken to the dry etching process, both the wafer and the mask layers’ thickness are reduced.

  14. A Simple Test to Determine the Effectiveness of Different Braze Compositions for Joining Ti-Tubes to C/C Composite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah; Asthana, Rajiv

    2006-01-01

    A simple tube-plate joint tensile test was implemented to compare the effectiveness of commercial brazes, namely, TiCuNi, TiCuSil, and Cu-ABA, used for bonding Ti-tubes joined to C-C composite plates. The different braze systems yielded different; yet, repeatable results. The Cu-ABA system proved to have about twice the load-carrying ability of the other two systems due to the fact that the bonded area between the braze material and the C-C plate was largest for this system. The orientation of the surface fiber tows also had a significant effect on load-carrying ability with tows oriented perpendicular to the tube axis displaying the highest failure loads. Increasing the process load and modifying the surface of the C-C plate by grooving out channels for the Ti-Tube to nest in resulted in increased load-carrying ability for the TiCuSil and Cu-ABA systems due to increased bonded area and better penetration of the braze material into the C-C composite.

  15. Laser welding of NiTi shape memory alloy: Comparison of the similar and dissimilar joints to AISI 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirshekari, G. R.; Saatchi, A.; Kermanpur, A.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    The unique properties of NiTi alloy, such as its shape memory effect, super-elasticity and biocompatibility, make it ideal material for various applications such as aerospace, micro-electronics and medical device. In order to meet the requirement of increasing applications, great attention has been given to joining of this material to itself and to other materials during past few years. Laser welding has been known as a suitable joining technique for NiTi shape memory alloy. Hence, in this work, a comparative study on laser welding of NiTi wire to itself and to AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel wire has been made. Microstructures, mechanical properties and fracture morphologies of the laser joints were investigated using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Vickers microhardness (HV0.2) and tensile testing techniques. The results showed that the NiTi-NiTi laser joint reached about 63% of the ultimate tensile strength of the as-received NiTi wire (i.e. 835 MPa) with rupture strain of about 16%. This joint also enabled the possibility to benefit from the pseudo-elastic properties of the NiTi component. However, tensile strength and ductility decreased significantly after dissimilar laser welding of NiTi to stainless steel due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds in the weld zone during laser welding. Therefore, a suitable modification process is required for improvement of the joint properties of the dissimilar welded wires.

  16. Challenges, Ideas, and Innovations of Joined-Wing Configurations: A Concept from the Past, an Opportunity for the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Rauno; Demasi, Luciano

    2016-11-01

    Diamond Wings, Strut- and Truss-Braced Wings, Box Wings, and PrandtlPlane, the so-called "JoinedWings", represent a dramatic departure from traditional configurations. Joined Wings are characterized by a structurally overconstrained layout which significantly increases the design space with multiple load paths and numerous solutions not available in classical wing systems. A tight link between the different disciplines (aerodynamics, flight mechanics, aeroelasticity, etc.) makes a Multidisciplinary Design and Optimization approach a necessity from the early design stages. Researchers showed potential in terms of aerodynamic efficiency, reduction of emissions and superior performances, strongly supporting the technical advantages of Joined Wings. This review will present these studies, with particular focus on the United States joined-wing SensorCraft, Strut- and Truss- Braced Wings, Box Wings and PrandtlPlane.

  17. Numerate Intends to Join ATOM Consortium to Rapidly Accelerate Preclinical Drug Development | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    SAN FRANCISCO – Computational drug design company Numerate has signed a letter of intent to join an open consortium of scientists staffed from two U.S. national laboratories, industry, and academia working to transform drug discovery and developmen

  18. Thermally Induced Interdiffusion and Precipitation in a Ni/Ni 3 Al System

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, C.; Martinez, E.; Aguiar, J. A.; ...

    2015-05-20

    Ordered Ni 3Al intermetallic precipitates constitute the main hardening sources of Ni-based superalloys. Here, we report the interdiffusion and precipitation behavior in a Ni/Ni3Al model system. The deposition of Ni3Al on a pure Ni layer at 500°C generated L12-structured γ' (Ni3Al) precipitates, preferentially at the interface. After annealing at 800°C for 1 h, interdiffusion between Ni and Ni3Al layers occurred, and the γ' precipitates that grew near the parent Ni/Ni 3Al interface are ~2.8 times larger in size than those formed in the matrix. In conclusion, Monte Carlo simulations indicate that vacancies preferentially diffuse along the Ni/Ni 3Al interface, increasingmore » the probability of precipitation.« less

  19. Highly precise and developmentally programmed genome assembly in Paramecium requires ligase IV-dependent end joining.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, Aurélie; Matsuda, Atsushi; Marmignon, Antoine; Ku, Michael; Silve, Aude; Meyer, Eric; Forney, James D; Malinsky, Sophie; Bétermier, Mireille

    2011-04-01

    During the sexual cycle of the ciliate Paramecium, assembly of the somatic genome includes the precise excision of tens of thousands of short, non-coding germline sequences (Internal Eliminated Sequences or IESs), each one flanked by two TA dinucleotides. It has been reported previously that these genome rearrangements are initiated by the introduction of developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which depend on the domesticated transposase PiggyMac. These DSBs all exhibit a characteristic geometry, with 4-base 5' overhangs centered on the conserved TA, and may readily align and undergo ligation with minimal processing. However, the molecular steps and actors involved in the final and precise assembly of somatic genes have remained unknown. We demonstrate here that Ligase IV and Xrcc4p, core components of the non-homologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ), are required both for the repair of IES excision sites and for the circularization of excised IESs. The transcription of LIG4 and XRCC4 is induced early during the sexual cycle and a Lig4p-GFP fusion protein accumulates in the developing somatic nucleus by the time IES excision takes place. RNAi-mediated silencing of either gene results in the persistence of free broken DNA ends, apparently protected against extensive resection. At the nucleotide level, controlled removal of the 5'-terminal nucleotide occurs normally in LIG4-silenced cells, while nucleotide addition to the 3' ends of the breaks is blocked, together with the final joining step, indicative of a coupling between NHEJ polymerase and ligase activities. Taken together, our data indicate that IES excision is a "cut-and-close" mechanism, which involves the introduction of initiating double-strand cleavages at both ends of each IES, followed by DSB repair via highly precise end joining. This work broadens our current view on how the cellular NHEJ pathway has cooperated with domesticated transposases for the emergence of new mechanisms

  20. Enabling lightweight designs by a new laser based approach for joining aluminum to steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockmann, Rüdiger; Kaufmann, Sebastian; Kirchhoff, Marc; Candel-Ruiz, Antonio; Müllerschön, Oliver; Havrilla, David

    2015-03-01

    As sustainability is an essential requirement, lightweight design becomes more and more important, especially for mobility. Reduced weight ensures more efficient vehicles and enables better environmental impact. Besides the design, new materials and material combinations are one major trend to achieve the required weight savings. The use of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (abbr. CFRP) is widely discussed, but so far high volume applications are rarely to be found. This is mainly due to the fact that parts made of CFRP are much more expensive than conventional parts. Furthermore, the proper technologies for high volume production are not yet ready. Another material with a large potential for lightweight design is aluminum. In comparison to CFRP, aluminum alloys are generally more affordable. As aluminum is a metallic material, production technologies for high volume standard cutting or joining applications are already developed. In addition, bending and deep-drawing can be applied. In automotive engineering, hybrid structures such as combining high-strength steels with lightweight aluminum alloys retain significant weight reduction but also have an advantage over monolithic aluminum - enhanced behavior in case of crash. Therefore, since the use of steel for applications requiring high mechanical properties is unavoidable, methods for joining aluminum with steel parts have to be further developed. Former studies showed that the use of a laser beam can be a possibility to join aluminum to steel parts. In this sense, the laser welding process represents a major challenge, since both materials have different thermal expansion coefficients and properties related to the behavior in corrosive media. Additionally, brittle intermetallic phases are formed during welding. A promising approach to welding aluminum to steel is based on the use of Laser Metal Deposition (abbr. LMD) with deposit materials in the form of powders. Within the present work, the advantages of this

  1. Collision Welding of Dissimilar Materials by Vaporizing Foil Actuator: A Breakthrough Technology for Dissimilar Metal Joining

    SciT

    Daehn, Glenn S.; Vivek, Anupam; Liu, Bert C.

    This work demonstrated and further developed Vaporizing Foil Actuator Welding (VFAW) as a viable technique for dissimilar-metal joining for automotive lightweighting applications. VFAW is a novel impact welding technology, which uses the pressure developed from electrically-assisted rapid vaporization of a thin aluminum foil (the consumable) to launch and ultimately collide two of more pieces of metal to create a solid-state bond between them. 18 dissimilar combinations of automotive alloys from the steel, aluminum and magnesium alloy classes were screened for weldability and characterized by metallography of weld cross sections, corrosion testing, and mechanical testing. Most combinations, especially a good numbermore » of Al/Fe pairs, were welded successfully. VFAW was even able to weld combinations of very high strength materials such as 5000 and 6000 series aluminum alloys to boron and dual phase steels, which is difficult to impossible by other joining techniques such as resistance spot welding, friction stir welding, or riveting. When mechanically tested, the samples routinely failed in a base metal rather than along the weld interface, showing that the weld was stronger than either of the base metals. As for corrosion performance, a polymer-based protective coating was used to successfully combat galvanic corrosion of 5 Al/Fe pairs through a month-long exposure to warm salt fog. In addition to the technical capabilities, VFAW also consumes little energy compared to conventional welding techniques and requires relatively light, flexible tooling. Given the technical and economic advantages, VFAW can be a very competitive joining technology for automotive lightweighting. The success of this project and related activities has resulted in substantial interest not only within the research community but also various levels of automotive supply chain, which are collaborating to bring this technology to commercial use.« less

  2. Group-living herbivores weigh up food availability and dominance status when making patch-joining decisions.

    PubMed

    Stears, Keenan; Kerley, Graham I H; Shrader, Adrian M

    2014-01-01

    Two key factors that influence the foraging behaviour of group-living herbivores are food availability and individual dominance status. Yet, how the combination of these factors influences the patch-joining decisions of individuals foraging within groups has scarcely been explored. To address this, we focused on the patch-joining decisions of group-living domestic goats (Capra hircus). When individuals were tested against the top four ranked goats of the herd, we found that at patches with low food availability they avoided these dominant patch-holders and only joined subordinates (i.e. costs outweighed benefits). However, as the amount of food increased, the avoidance of the top ranked individuals declined. Specifically, goats shifted and joined the patch of an individual one dominance rank higher than the previous dominant patch holder when the initial quantity of food in the new patch was twice that of the lower ranking individual's patch (i.e. benefits outweighed costs). In contrast, when individuals chose between patches held by dominant goats, other than the top four ranked goats, and subordinate individuals, we found that they equally joined the dominant and subordinate patch-holders. This joining was irrespective of the dominance gap, absolute rank of the dominant patch-holder, sex or food availability (i.e. benefits outweighed costs). Ultimately, our results highlight that herbivores weigh up the costs and benefits of both food availability and patch-holder dominance status when making patch-joining decisions. Furthermore, as the initial quantity of food increases, food availability becomes more important than dominance with regard to influencing patch-joining decisions.

  3. Evaluation of Simultaneous Multisine Excitation of the Joined Wing SensorCraft Aeroelastic Wind Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple mutually orthogonal signals comprise excitation data sets for aeroservoelastic system identification. A multisine signal is a sum of harmonic sinusoid components. A set of these signals is made orthogonal by distribution of the frequency content such that each signal contains unique frequencies. This research extends the range of application of an excitation method developed for stability and control flight testing to aeroservoelastic modeling from wind tunnel testing. Wind tunnel data for the Joined Wing SensorCraft model validates this method, demonstrating that these signals applied simultaneously reproduce the frequency response estimates achieved from one-at-a-time excitation.

  4. Mechanical joining of materials with limited ductility: Analysis of process-induced defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäckel, M.; Coppieters, S.; Hofmann, M.; Vandermeiren, N.; Landgrebe, D.; Debruyne, D.; Wallmersberger, T.; Faes, K.

    2017-10-01

    The paper shows experimental and numerical analyses of the clinching process of 6xxx series aluminum sheets in T6 condition and the self-pierce riveting process of an aluminum die casting. In the experimental investigations the damage behavior of the materials when using different tool parameters is analyzed. The focus of the numerical investigations is the damage prediction by a comparison of different damage criteria. Moreover, strength-and fatigue tests were carried out to investigate the influence of the joining process-induced damages on the strength properties of the joints.

  5. Joining forces: collaborating internationally to deliver high-quality, online postgraduate education in pain management.

    PubMed

    Devonshire, Elizabeth; Siddall, Philip

    2011-01-01

    The effective management of pain is a complex and costly global issue, requiring a range of innovative educational strategies to enable culturally appropriate and high-quality health care provision. In response to this issue, the Pain Management Research Institute at the University of Sydney (Sydney, Australia) has established several strategic alliances with other overseas universities to deliver online postgraduate education in pain management. The present article discusses the rationale for joining forces, and the approach adopted in creating and maintaining these alliances. It also provides insights into the benefits, challenges and opportunities associated with collaborative educational initiatives of this nature, from institutional, academic and student perspectives.

  6. How to make the rhetoric of joined-up government really work.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Jim

    2008-11-04

    "Joined-up' government and 'whole-of-government' approaches have evolved over the past two decades from the simple 'one-stop-shop' concept to much more formal organisational structures mandated at the highest levels. In many cases, the participants in these developments were learning on the job, as they responded to community and political demands for better service delivery and more accountability. This paper looks back at some of those developments and proposes a schema to assess and place policies, strategies and programs.

  7. Boeing technicians join Node 1 for ISS to PMA-1 in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Boeing technicians join Node 1 for the International Space Station (ISS) with the Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-1 in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility. This PMA, identifiable by its bright red ring, is a cone-shaped connector for the space station's structural building block, known as Node 1. Seen here surrounded by scaffolding, Node 1 will have two PMAs attached, the second of which is scheduled for mating to the node in January 1998. The node and PMAs, which will be the first element of the ISS, are scheduled to be launched aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 in July 1998.

  8. Joining forces: Collaborating internationally to deliver high-quality, online postgraduate education in pain management

    PubMed Central

    Devonshire, Elizabeth; Siddall, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    The effective management of pain is a complex and costly global issue, requiring a range of innovative educational strategies to enable culturally appropriate and high-quality health care provision. In response to this issue, the Pain Management Research Institute at the University of Sydney (Sydney, Australia) has established several strategic alliances with other overseas universities to deliver online postgraduate education in pain management. The present article discusses the rationale for joining forces, and the approach adopted in creating and maintaining these alliances. It also provides insights into the benefits, challenges and opportunities associated with collaborative educational initiatives of this nature, from institutional, academic and student perspectives. PMID:22184549

  9. Experimental Investigation on Thermal Effects in Ultrasonic Joining of Thin Poly(ethylene terephthalate) Films Using Torsional Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kazunari; Uchiyama, Kenta; Kuriyama, Takashi; Miyata, Ken; Hisamatsu, Tokuro

    2009-11-01

    The authors previously determined that thermal effects are not a dominant factor in the ultrasonic joining of very low density polyethylene (VLDPE) films using torsional vibration. Now, to confirm that the plastic materials are not “melted” by mechanically generated heat in the joining, they have conducted joining experiments for thin poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films. The temperature at the interface of two PET films of 0.1 mm thickness only increased to approximately 100 °C, and no trace of liquidation of the material was observed at the interface under a polarizing microscope. Investigation using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) revealed that the “melting point” of PET is about 260 °C, and an ultrasonically joined specimen showed no significant difference in thermal characteristics compared with an intact PET film. It was also determined that the PET films cannot be joined even after being pressed together for a period of 30 min or longer at approximately 150 °C. From the results obtained using the microscope and the DSC, the authors conclude that melting of the materials plays essentially no role in ultrasonic plastic joining.

  10. Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, T.K.; Novak, R.F.

    1991-05-07

    An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined. 3 figures.

  11. Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Thomas K.; Novak, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined.

  12. Nipah Virus (NiV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Given the relatedness of NiV to Hendra virus , bat species were quickly singled out for investigation and ... can become infected through direct contact with infected bats, infected pigs... Signs and Symptoms Symptoms may appear ...

  13. Personal characteristics and contextual factors that determine "helping," "joining in," and "doing nothing" when witnessing cyberbullying.

    PubMed

    Van Cleemput, Katrien; Vandebosch, Heidi; Pabian, Sara

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we investigated several determinants of bystanders' reactive behaviors when confronted with cyberbullying using self-reported data from 2,333 Flemish 9-16 year olds. Structural equation modeling showed that adolescents that had joined in on the cyberbullying were older, had lower levels of empathy and were more likely to have been involved in cyberbullying or traditional bullying as perpetrators. Adolescents who had helped the victim were younger, had higher levels of empathy and were more likely to have been a victim of cyberbullying or traditional bullying in the past months. Adolescents that did nothing when they witnessed cyberbullying, were also older, showed lower levels of empathy and were less likely to have been a victim of traditional bullying. Social anxiety was not related to joining in, helping and remaining passive. In the second part of the analysis, we found that bystanders' passive behavior could be explained in more detail by moral disengagement theory and other contextual factors. In the discussion, the implications of the findings for research on cyberbullying are addressed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. XRCC1 suppresses somatic hypermutation and promotes alternative nonhomologous end joining in Igh genes.

    PubMed

    Saribasak, Huseyin; Maul, Robert W; Cao, Zheng; McClure, Rhonda L; Yang, William; McNeill, Daniel R; Wilson, David M; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2011-10-24

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) deaminates cytosine to uracil in immunoglobulin genes. Uracils in DNA can be recognized by uracil DNA glycosylase and abasic endonuclease to produce single-strand breaks. The breaks are repaired either faithfully by DNA base excision repair (BER) or mutagenically to produce somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). To unravel the interplay between repair and mutagenesis, we decreased the level of x-ray cross-complementing 1 (XRCC1), a scaffold protein involved in BER. Mice heterozygous for XRCC1 showed a significant increase in the frequencies of SHM in Igh variable regions in Peyer's patch cells, and of double-strand breaks in the switch regions during CSR. Although the frequency of CSR was normal in Xrcc1(+/-) splenic B cells, the length of microhomology at the switch junctions decreased, suggesting that XRCC1 also participates in alternative nonhomologous end joining. Furthermore, Xrcc1(+/-) B cells had reduced Igh/c-myc translocations during CSR, supporting a role for XRCC1 in microhomology-mediated joining. Our results imply that AID-induced single-strand breaks in Igh variable and switch regions become substrates simultaneously for BER and mutagenesis pathways.

  15. CuPb rheocast alloy as joining material for CFC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvo, M.; Lemoine, P.; Ferraris, M.; Appendino Montorsi, M.; Matera, R.

    1995-10-01

    High heat flux components for future use in thermonuclear fusion reactors are designed as layered structures. The assembling of the different parts (armour, heat sink and external structure) requires a joint which could withstand large heat loads and thermal stresses. In this paper we examined a 50 wt% PbCu rheocast alloy (RCA) as joining material for the armour/heat sink joint. The alloy was prepared in vacuum in a rotational furnace and was characterized by SEM-EDS analysis and heating microscopy. The obtained microstructure was globular as foreseen and it remained after prolonged heating at 650°C. The alloy showed very good ductility: sheets of about 200 μm were rolled starting from about 1 × 1 × 1 cm 3 cubes. The alloy was successful in joining both the armour and the heat sink materials, respectively, carbon fibre reinforced composites and copper. Initial mechanical testing shows that the technique is viable for the foreseen applications in the field of thermonuclear fusion reactors.

  16. Joining and Integration of Advanced Carbon-Carbon Composites to Metallic Systems for Thermal Management Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research and development activities in joining and integration of carbon-carbon (C/C) composites to metals such as Ti and Cu-clad-Mo for thermal management applications are presented with focus on advanced brazing techniques. A wide variety of carbon-carbon composites with CVI and resin-derived matrices were joined to Ti and Cu-clad Mo using a number of active braze alloys. The brazed joints revealed good interfacial bonding, preferential precipitation of active elements (e.g., Ti) at the composite/braze interface. Extensive braze penetration of the inter-fiber channels in the CVI C/C composites was observed. The chemical and thermomechanical compatibility between C/C and metals at elevated temperatures is assessed. The role of residual stresses and thermal conduction in brazed C/C joints is discussed. Theoretical predictions of the effective thermal resistance suggest that composite-to-metal brazed joints may be promising for lightweight thermal management applications.

  17. Joining psychiatric care and faith healing in a prayer camp in Ghana: randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Ofori-Atta, A; Attafuah, J; Jack, H; Baning, F; Rosenheck, R

    2018-01-01

    Care of people with serious mental illness in prayer camps in low-income countries generates human rights concerns and ethical challenges for outcome researchers. Aims To ethically evaluate joining traditional faith healing with psychiatric care including medications (Clinical trials.gov identifier NCT02593734). Residents of a Ghana prayer camp were randomly assigned to receive either indicated medication for schizophrenia or mood disorders along with usual prayer camp activities (prayers, chain restraints and fasting) (n = 71); or the prayer camp activities alone (n = 68). Masked psychologists assessed Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) outcomes at 2, 4 and 6 weeks. Researchers discouraged use of chaining, but chaining decisions remained under the control of prayer camp staff. Total BPRS symptoms were significantly lower in the experimental group (P = 0.003, effect size -0.48). There was no significant difference in days in chains. Joining psychiatric and prayer camp care brought symptom benefits but, in the short-run, did not significantly reduce days spent in chains. Declaration of interest None.

  18. In vivo gene correction with targeted sequence substitution through microhomology-mediated end joining.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeong Hong; Jung, Soobin; Ramakrishna, Suresh; Kim, Hyongbum Henry; Lee, Junwon

    2018-07-07

    Genome editing technology using programmable nucleases has rapidly evolved in recent years. The primary mechanism to achieve precise integration of a transgene is mainly based on homology-directed repair (HDR). However, an HDR-based genome-editing approach is less efficient than non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Recently, a microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ)-based transgene integration approach was developed, showing feasibility both in vitro and in vivo. We expanded this method to achieve targeted sequence substitution (TSS) of mutated sequences with normal sequences using double-guide RNAs (gRNAs), and a donor template flanking the microhomologies and target sequence of the gRNAs in vitro and in vivo. Our method could realize more efficient sequence substitution than the HDR-based method in vitro using a reporter cell line, and led to the survival of a hereditary tyrosinemia mouse model in vivo. The proposed MMEJ-based TSS approach could provide a novel therapeutic strategy, in addition to HDR, to achieve gene correction from a mutated sequence to a normal sequence. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of different brazing and welding methods on the fracture load of various orthodontic joining configurations.

    PubMed

    Bock, Jens J; Bailly, Jacqueline; Fuhrmann, Robert A

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fracture load of different joints made by conventional brazing, tungston inert gas (TIG) and laser welding. Six standardized joining configurations of spring hard quality orthodontic wire were investigated: end-to-end, round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 6.5 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing with universal silver solder, two TIG and two laser welding devices. The fracture loads were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). Data were analysed with the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The significance level was set at P<0.05). In all cases brazed joints were ruptured at a low level of fracture load (186-407 N). Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (P<0.05) were found. The highest mean fracture loads were observed for laser welding (826 N). No differences between the various TIG or laser welding devices were demonstrated, although it was not possible to join an orthodontic wire to an orthodontic band using TIG welding. For orthodontic purposes laser and TIG welding are solder free alternatives. TIG welding and laser welding showed similar results. The laser technique is an expensive, but sophisticated and simple method.

  20. iNJclust: Iterative Neighbor-Joining Tree Clustering Framework for Inferring Population Structure.

    PubMed

    Limpiti, Tulaya; Amornbunchornvej, Chainarong; Intarapanich, Apichart; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Tongsima, Sissades

    2014-01-01

    Understanding genetic differences among populations is one of the most important issues in population genetics. Genetic variations, e.g., single nucleotide polymorphisms, are used to characterize commonality and difference of individuals from various populations. This paper presents an efficient graph-based clustering framework which operates iteratively on the Neighbor-Joining (NJ) tree called the iNJclust algorithm. The framework uses well-known genetic measurements, namely the allele-sharing distance, the neighbor-joining tree, and the fixation index. The behavior of the fixation index is utilized in the algorithm's stopping criterion. The algorithm provides an estimated number of populations, individual assignments, and relationships between populations as outputs. The clustering result is reported in the form of a binary tree, whose terminal nodes represent the final inferred populations and the tree structure preserves the genetic relationships among them. The clustering performance and the robustness of the proposed algorithm are tested extensively using simulated and real data sets from bovine, sheep, and human populations. The result indicates that the number of populations within each data set is reasonably estimated, the individual assignment is robust, and the structure of the inferred population tree corresponds to the intrinsic relationships among populations within the data.

  1. The Mechanism of Double-Strand DNA Break Repair by the Nonhomologous DNA End Joining Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Double-strand DNA breaks are common events in eukaryotic cells, and there are two major pathways for repairing them: homologous recombination and nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ). The diverse causes of DSBs result in a diverse chemistry of DNA ends that must be repaired. Across NHEJ evolution, the enzymes of the NHEJ pathway exhibit a remarkable degree of structural tolerance in the range of DNA end substrate configurations upon which they can act. In vertebrate cells, the nuclease, polymerases and ligase of NHEJ are the most mechanistically flexible and multifunctional enzymes in each of their classes. Unlike repair pathways for more defined lesions, NHEJ repair enzymes act iteratively, act in any order, and can function independently of one another at each of the two DNA ends being joined. NHEJ is critical not only for the repair of pathologic DSBs as in chromosomal translocations, but also for the repair of physiologic DSBs created during V(D)J recombination and class switch recombination. Therefore, patients lacking normal NHEJ are not only sensitive to ionizing radiation, but also severely immunodeficient. PMID:20192759

  2. 53BP1 promotes microhomology-mediated end-joining in G1-phase cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiahui; Du, Zhanwen; Wang, Ying; Feng, Zhihui; Fan, Pan; Yan, Chunhong; Willers, Henning; Zhang, Junran

    2015-01-01

    Alternative non-homologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) was originally identified as a backup repair mechanism in the absence of classical NHEJ (c-NHEJ) factors but recent studies have demonstrated that alt-NHEJ is active even when c-NHEJ as well as homologous recombination is available. The functions of 53BP1 in NHEJ processes are not well understood. Here, we report that 53BP1 promotes DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and genomic stability not only in c-NHEJ-proficient but also -deficient human G1-phase cells. Using an array of repair substrates we show that these effects of 53BP1 are correlated with a promotion of microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ), a subtype of alt-NHEJ, in G1-phase. Consistent with a specific role in MMEJ we confirm that 53BP1 status does not affect c-NHEJ. 53BP1 supports sequence deletion during MMEJ consistent with a putative role in facilitating end-resection. Interestingly, promotion of MMEJ by 53BP1 in G1-phase cells is only observed in the presence of functional BRCA1. Depletion of both 53BP1 and BRCA1 increases repair needing microhomology usage and augments loss of DNA sequence, suggesting that MMEJ is a highly regulated DSB repair process. Together, these findings significantly expand our understanding of the cell-cycle-dependent roles of 53BP1 in DSB repair. PMID:25586219

  3. Base Stock Policy in a Join-Type Production Line with Advanced Demand Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Mikihiko; Tsubouchi, Satoshi; Nakade, Koichi

    Production control such as the base stock policy, the kanban policy and the constant work-in-process policy in a serial production line has been studied by many researchers. Production lines, however, usually have fork-type, join-type or network-type figures. In addition, in most previous studies on production control, a finished product is required at the same time as arrival of demand at the system. Demand information is, however, informed before due date in practice. In this paper a join-type (assembly) production line under base stock control with advanced demand information in discrete time is analyzed. The recursive equations for the work-in-process are derived. The heuristic algorithm for finding appropriate base stock levels of all machines at short time is proposed and the effect of advanced demand information is examined by simulation with the proposed algorithm. It is shown that the inventory cost can decreases with little backlogs by using the appropriate amount of demand information and setting appropriate base stock levels.

  4. Measurement of 59Ni and 63Ni by accelerator mass spectrometry at CIAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoming; He, Ming; Ruan, Xiangdong; Xu, Yongning; Shen, Hongtao; Du, Liang; Xiao, Caijin; Dong, Kejun; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Xuran; Lan, Xiaoxi; Wu, Shaoyong; Zhao, Qingzhang; Cai, Li; Pang, Fangfang

    2015-10-01

    The long lived isotopes 59Ni and 63Ni can be used in many areas such as radioactive waste management, neutron dosimetry, cosmic radiation study, and so on. Based on the large accelerator and a big Q3D magnetic spectrometer, the measurement method for 59Ni and 63Ni is under development at the AMS facility at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). By using the ΔE-Q3D technique with the Q3D magnetic spectrometer, the isobaric interferences were greatly reduced in the measurements of 59Ni and 63Ni. A four anode gas ionization chamber was then used to further identify isobars. With these techniques, the abundance sensitivities of 59Ni and 63Ni measurements are determined as 59Ni/Ni = 1 × 10-13 and 63Ni/Ni = 2 × 10-12, respectively.

  5. Highly Precise and Developmentally Programmed Genome Assembly in Paramecium Requires Ligase IV–Dependent End Joining

    PubMed Central

    Marmignon, Antoine; Ku, Michael; Silve, Aude; Meyer, Eric; Forney, James D.; Malinsky, Sophie; Bétermier, Mireille

    2011-01-01

    During the sexual cycle of the ciliate Paramecium, assembly of the somatic genome includes the precise excision of tens of thousands of short, non-coding germline sequences (Internal Eliminated Sequences or IESs), each one flanked by two TA dinucleotides. It has been reported previously that these genome rearrangements are initiated by the introduction of developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which depend on the domesticated transposase PiggyMac. These DSBs all exhibit a characteristic geometry, with 4-base 5′ overhangs centered on the conserved TA, and may readily align and undergo ligation with minimal processing. However, the molecular steps and actors involved in the final and precise assembly of somatic genes have remained unknown. We demonstrate here that Ligase IV and Xrcc4p, core components of the non-homologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ), are required both for the repair of IES excision sites and for the circularization of excised IESs. The transcription of LIG4 and XRCC4 is induced early during the sexual cycle and a Lig4p-GFP fusion protein accumulates in the developing somatic nucleus by the time IES excision takes place. RNAi–mediated silencing of either gene results in the persistence of free broken DNA ends, apparently protected against extensive resection. At the nucleotide level, controlled removal of the 5′-terminal nucleotide occurs normally in LIG4-silenced cells, while nucleotide addition to the 3′ ends of the breaks is blocked, together with the final joining step, indicative of a coupling between NHEJ polymerase and ligase activities. Taken together, our data indicate that IES excision is a “cut-and-close” mechanism, which involves the introduction of initiating double-strand cleavages at both ends of each IES, followed by DSB repair via highly precise end joining. This work broadens our current view on how the cellular NHEJ pathway has cooperated with domesticated transposases for the emergence of new

  6. Joining of polypropylene/polypropylene and glass fiber reinforced polypropylene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguang

    Joining behavior of polypropylene (PP) to PP and long glass fiber reinforced polypropylene (LFT) to LFT were investigated. Adhesive bonding was used to join PP/PP. Both adhesive bonding and ultrasonic welding were used to join LFT/LFT. Single-lap shear testing and low velocity impact (LVI) testing were used to evaluate the performance of bonded structures. The two-part acrylic adhesive DP8005 was determined to be the best among the three adhesive candidates, which was attributed to its low surface energy. The impact resistance of LFT/LFT joints, normalized with respect to thickness, was higher than that of PP/PP joints because of higher stiffness of LFT/LFT joints. The stress states in the adhesive layer of adhesively bonded structures were analyzed using ANSYS and LS-DYNA to simulate the single-lap shear testing and LVI testing, respectively. The shear and peel stresses peaked at the edges of the adhesive layer. Compared to LFT/LFT joints, higher peel stress occurred in the adhesive layer in the PP/PP joints in tension. Impact response of adhesively bonded structures as evaluated by LS-DYNA showed good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of weld time and weld pressure on the shear strength of ultrasonically welded LFT/LFT was evaluated. With higher weld pressure, less time was required to obtain a complete weld. At longer weld times, lower weld pressure was required. From the 15 weld conditions studied, a weld map was obtained that provides conditions to achieve a complete weld. Nanoindentation was used to evaluate the effect of ultrasonic weld on the modulus and hardness of the PP matrix. Modulus and hardness of the PP matrix were slightly decreased by ultrasonic welding possibly due to the decrease in the molecular weight. The temperature profile in LFT/LFT in the transverse direction during ultrasonic welding was analyzed by two ANSYS-based thermal models: (a) one in which heat generated by interfacial friction was treated as a heat flux and (b

  7. Rigorous joining of advanced reduced-dimensional beam models to three-dimensional finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huimin

    In the aerospace and automotive industries, many finite element analyses use lower-dimensional finite elements such as beams, plates and shells, to simplify the modeling. These simplified models can greatly reduce the computation time and cost; however, reduced-dimensional models may introduce inaccuracies, particularly near boundaries and near portions of the structure where reduced-dimensional models may not apply. Another factor in creation of such models is that beam-like structures frequently have complex geometry, boundaries and loading conditions, which may make them unsuitable for modeling with single type of element. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a method that can accurately and efficiently capture the response of a structure by rigorous combination of a reduced-dimensional beam finite element model with a model based on full two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) finite elements. The first chapter of the thesis gives the background of the present work and some related previous work. The second chapter is focused on formulating a system of equations that govern the joining of a 2D model with a beam model for planar deformation. The essential aspect of this formulation is to find the transformation matrices to achieve deflection and load continuity on the interface. Three approaches are provided to obtain the transformation matrices. An example based on joining a beam to a 2D finite element model is examined, and the accuracy of the analysis is studied by comparing joint results with the full 2D analysis. The third chapter is focused on formulating the system of equations for joining a beam to a 3D finite element model for static and free-vibration problems. The transition between the 3D elements and beam elements is achieved by use of the stress recovery technique of the variational-asymptotic method as implemented in VABS (the Variational Asymptotic Beam Section analysis). The formulations for an interface transformation matrix and

  8. Excess heat capacity and entropy of mixing along the chlorapatite-fluorapatite binary join

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachs, Edgar; Harlov, Daniel; Benisek, Artur

    2010-10-01

    The heat capacity at constant pressure, C p, of chlorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3Cl - ClAp], and fluorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3F - FAp], as well as of 12 compositions along the chlorapatite-fluorapatite join have been measured using relaxation calorimetry [heat capacity option of the physical properties measurement system (PPMS)] and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in the temperature range 5-764 K. The chlor-fluorapatites were synthesized at 1,375-1,220°C from Ca3(PO4)2 using the CaF2-CaCl2 flux method. Most of the chlor-fluorapatite compositions could be measured directly as single crystals using the PPMS such that they were attached to the sample platform of the calorimeter by a crystal face. However, the crystals were too small for the crystal face to be polished. In such cases, where the sample coupling was not optimal, an empirical procedure was developed to smoothly connect the PPMS to the DSC heat capacities around ambient T. The heat capacity of the end-members above 298 K can be represented by the polynomials: C {p/ClAp} = 613.21 - 2,313.90 T -0.5 - 1.87964 × 107 T -2 + 2.79925 × 109 T -3 and C {p/FAp} = 681.24 - 4,621.73 × T -0.5 - 6.38134 × 106 T -2 + 7.38088 × 108 T -3 (units, J mol-1 K-1). Their standard third-law entropy, derived from the low-temperature heat capacity measurements, is S° = 400.6 ± 1.6 J mol-1 K-1 for chlorapatite and S° = 383.2 ± 1.5 J mol-1 K-1 for fluorapatite. Positive excess heat capacities of mixing, Δ C {p/ex}, occur in the chlorapatite-fluorapatite solid solution around 80 K (and to a lesser degree at 200 K) and are asymmetrically distributed over the join reaching a maximum of 1.3 ± 0.3 J mol-1 K-1 for F-rich compositions. They are significant at these conditions exceeding the 2 σ-uncertainty of the data. The excess entropy of mixing, Δ S ex, at 298 K reaches positive values of 3-4 J mol-1 K-1 in the F-rich portion of the binary, is, however, not significantly different from zero across the join within its 2 σ-uncertainty.

  9. Nickel (Ni) allergic patients with complications to Ni containing joint replacement show preferential IL-17 type reactivity to Ni.

    PubMed

    Summer, Burkhard; Paul, Carina; Mazoochian, Farhad; Rau, Christoph; Thomsen, Marc; Banke, Ingo; Gollwitzer, Hans; Dietrich, Karin-Almut; Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Ruzicka, Thomas; Thomas, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Some nickel (Ni) allergic patients develop complications following Ni-containing arthroplasty. In the peri-implant tissue of such patients, we had observed lymphocyte dominated inflammation together with IFN-gamma and IL-17 expression. To determine whether Ni stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of such patients would lead to a different cytokine pattern as compared to Ni-allergic patients with symptom-free arthroplasty. Based on history and patch testing in 15 Ni-allergic patients (five without implant, five with symptom-free arthroplasty, five with complicated arthroplasty) and five non-allergic individuals, lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) was performed using PBMC. In parallel in vitro cytokine response to Ni was assessed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). All 15 Ni-allergic individuals showed enhanced LTT reactivity to Ni (mean SI = 8.42 +/- 1.8) compared to the non-allergic control group. Predominant IFN-gamma expression to Ni was found both in the five allergic patients without arthroplasty and also in the five allergic, symptom-free arthroplasty patients. In contrast, in the five Ni-allergic patients with arthroplasty-linked complications a predominant, significant IL-17 expression to Ni was seen but not in patients with symptom-free arthroplasty. The predominant IL-17 type response to Ni may characterize a subgroup of Ni-allergic patients prone to develop lymphocytic peri-implant hyper-reactivity.

  10. Mutational signatures of non-homologous and polymerase theta-mediated end-joining in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, Joost; Kool, Hanneke; van Schendel, Robin; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2017-12-15

    Cells employ potentially mutagenic DNA repair mechanisms to avoid the detrimental effects of chromosome breaks on cell survival. While classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ) is largely error-free, alternative end-joining pathways have been described that are intrinsically mutagenic. Which end-joining mechanisms operate in germ and embryonic cells and thus contribute to heritable mutations found in congenital diseases is, however, still largely elusive. Here, we determined the genetic requirements for the repair of CRISPR/Cas9-induced chromosomal breaks of different configurations, and establish the mutational consequences. We find that cNHEJ and polymerase theta-mediated end-joining (TMEJ) act both parallel and redundant in mouse embryonic stem cells and account for virtually all end-joining activity. Surprisingly, mutagenic repair by polymerase theta (Pol θ, encoded by the Polq gene) is most prevalent for blunt double-strand breaks (DSBs), while cNHEJ dictates mutagenic repair of DSBs with protruding ends, in which the cNHEJ polymerases lambda and mu play minor roles. We conclude that cNHEJ-dependent repair of DSBs with protruding ends can explain de novo formation of tandem duplications in mammalian genomes. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  11. Mobile Real-time Tracking of Acute Stroke Patients and Instant, Secure Inter-team Communication - the Join App.

    PubMed

    Munich, Stephan A; Tan, Lee A; Nogueira, Danilo M; Keigher, Kiffon M; Chen, Michael; Crowley, R Webster; Conners, James J; Lopes, Demetrius K

    2017-09-01

    The primary correlate to survival and preservation of neurologic function in patients suffering from an acute ischemic stroke is time from symptom onset to initiation of therapy and reperfusion. Communication and coordination among members of the stroke team are essential to maximizing efficiency and subsequently early reperfusion. In this work, we aim to describe our preliminary experience using the Join mobile application as a means to improve interdisciplinary team communication and efficiency. We describe our pilot experience with the initiation of the Join mobile application between July 2015 and July 2016. With this application, a mobile beacon is transported with the patient on the ambulance. Transportation milestone timestamps and geographic coordinates are transmitted to the treating facility and instantly communicated to all treatment team members. The transport team / patient can be tracked en route to the treating facility. During our pilot study, 62 patients were triaged and managed using the Join application. Automated time-stamping of critical events, geographic tracking of patient transport and summary documents were obtained for all patients. Treatment team members had an overall favorable impression of the Join application and recommended its continued use. The Join application is one of several components of a multi-institutional, interdisciplinary effort to improve the treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke. The ability of the treatment team to track patient transport and communicate with the transporting team may improve reperfusion time and, therefore, improve neurologic outcomes.

  12. A review of recent developments in joining high-performance thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, K. C.

    1991-06-01

    There is currently a great deal of interest in the use of thermoplastic polymers as matrices in fiber reinforced composites for high performance applications, such as those encountered in the aerospace industry. These materials include polyether ether ketone (PEEK), polyphenylene sulphide (PPS), polyetherimide (PEI), polyamideimide (PAI), polyamides, polyimides, and polysulphones. A literature review is provided on the different ways of joining high performance thermoplastic composites by adhesive and fusion bonding. The discussion on adhesive bonding includes examination of the performance of specific adhesive/thermoplastic combinations and of techniques for the preparation of composite surfaces: abrasion, etching, flame, and plasma treatments. Thermoplastic composite welding techniques discussed in depth include the following: heated press welding, resistance welding, induction welding, and ultrasonic welding. Works which examine or compare applications for these bonding techniques are also reviewed.

  13. Welding methods for joining thermoplastic polymers for the hermetic enclosure of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Amanat, Negin; James, Natalie L; McKenzie, David R

    2010-09-01

    New high performance polymers have been developed that challenge traditional encapsulation materials for permanent active medical implants. The gold standard for hermetic encapsulation for implants is a titanium enclosure which is sealed using laser welding. Polymers may be an alternative encapsulation material. Although many polymers are biocompatible, and permeability of polymers may be reduced to acceptable levels, the ability to create a hermetic join with an extended life remains the barrier to widespread acceptance of polymers for this application. This article provides an overview of the current techniques used for direct bonding of polymers, with a focus on thermoplastics. Thermal bonding methods are feasible, but some take too long and/or require two stage processing. Some methods are not suitable because of excessive heat load which may be delivered to sensitive components within the capsule. Laser welding is presented as the method of choice; however the establishment of suitable laser process parameters will require significant research. 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Cosmonaut Aleksey Leonov joins belly dancer on stage at Folklife Festival

    1974-09-14

    S74-28666 (14 Sept. 1974) --- Cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov, in one of the lighter moments of activity involving Soviet cosmonauts and American astronauts, joins a belly dancer on stage as several visitors to weekend activity at the site of San Antonio?s HemisFair look on. Leonov is commander of the Soviet Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) crew. A group of cosmonauts is in this country training with American astronauts for the joint U.S.-USSR ASTP rendezvous and docking mission scheduled for the summer of 1975. The Lebanese dancing was just one feature among many during the Texas Folklife Festival, in which members of 26 ethnic groups participated.

  15. Method of joining ITM materials using a partially or fully-transient liquid phase

    DOEpatents

    Butt, Darryl Paul; Cutler, Raymond Ashton; Rynders, Steven Walton; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2006-03-14

    A method of forming a composite structure includes: (1) providing first and second sintered bodies containing first and second multicomponent metallic oxides having first and second identical crystal structures that are perovskitic or fluoritic; (2) providing a joint material containing at least one metal oxide: (a) containing (i) at least one metal of an identical IUPAC Group as at least one sintered body metal in one of the multicomponent metallic oxides, (ii) a first row D-Block transition metal not contained in the multicomponent metallic oxides, and/or (iii) a lanthanide not contained in the multicomponent metallic oxides; (b) free of metals contained in the multicomponent metallic oxides; (c) free of cations of boron, silicon, germanium, tin, lead, arsenic, antimony, phosphorus and tellurium; and (d) having a melting point below the sintering temperatures of the sintered bodies; and (3) heating to a joining temperature above the melting point and below the sintering temperatures.

  16. Florida Governor Jeb Bush joins Daniel Goldin at KSC for STS-97 launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Florida's Governor Jeb Bush (center) joins NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (right) for the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-97. They viewed the launch from the Banana Creek VIP Site. Liftoff of Endeavour occurred on time at 10:06:01 p.m. EST with a crew of five. The sixth construction flight to the International Space Station, Endeavour is transporting the P6 Integrated Truss Structure that comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to provide power to the Space Station. The 11-day mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. Endeavour is expected to land Dec. 11 at 6:19 p.m. EST.

  17. Florida Governor Jeb Bush joins Daniel Goldin at KSC for STS-97 launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Florida's Gov. Jeb Bush (left) joins NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (right) for the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-97. They viewed the launch from the Banana Creek VIP Site. Liftoff of Endeavour occurred on time at 10:06:01 p.m. EST with a crew of five. The sixth construction flight to the International Space Station, Endeavour is transporting the P6 Integrated Truss Structure that comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to provide power to the Space Station. The 11-day mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. Endeavour is expected to land Dec. 11 at 6:19 p.m. EST.

  18. Joining Carbon-Carbon Composites and High-Temperature Materials with High Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Daniel; Singler, Robert

    1998-01-01

    1. Program goals addressed during this period. Experimental work was directed at formation of a low-stress bond between carbon- carbon and aluminum, with the objective of minimizing the heating of the aluminum substrate, thereby minimizing stresses resulting from the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) difference between the aluminum and carbon-carbon. A second objective was to form a bond between carbon-carbon and aluminum with good thermal conductivity for electronic thermal management (SEM-E) application. 2. Substrates and joining materials selected during this period. Carbon-Carbon Composite (CCC) to Aluminum. CCC (Cu coated) to Aluminum. Soldering compounds based on Sn/Pb and Sn/Ag/Cu/Bi compositions. 3. Soldering experiments performed. Conventional techniques. High Energy Electron Beam (HEEB) process.

  19. An innovative platform for quick and flexible joining of assorted DNA fragments

    DOE PAGES

    De Paoli, Henrique Cestari; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Yang, Xiaohan

    2016-01-13

    Successful synthetic biology efforts rely on conceptual and experimental designs in combination with testing of multi-gene constructs. Despite recent progresses, several limitations still hinder the ability to flexibly assemble and collectively share different types of DNA segments. We describe an advanced system for joining DNA fragments from a universal library that automatically maintains open reading frames (ORFs) and does not require linkers, adaptors, sequence homology, amplification or mutation (domestication) of fragments in order to work properly. Moreover, we find that this system, which is enhanced by a unique buffer formulation, provides unforeseen capabilities for testing, and sharing, complex multi-gene circuitrymore » assembled from different DNA fragments.« less

  20. Scientific collaboration between 'old' and 'new' member states: Did joining the European Union make a difference?

    PubMed

    Makkonen, Teemu; Mitze, Timo

    This paper provides new insights on the effects of the enlargement of the European Union (EU) and European integration by investigating the issue of scientific collaboration within the new EU member states vis - à - vis the old EU member states. The question addressed is whether the EU membership following the two enlargement waves 2004 and 2007 has significantly increased the co-publication intensity of the new member states with other member countries. The empirical results based on data collected from the Web of Science database and Difference-in-Difference estimations point towards a conclusion that joining the EU indeed has had an additional positive impact on the co-publication intensity between the new and old member states and, in particular, within the new member states themselves. These results give tentative support for the successfulness of the EU's science policies in achieving a common 'internal market' in research. We also find evidence for early anticipation effects of the consecutive EU accession.

  1. Weld-brazing - a new joining process. [combination resistance spot welding and brazing of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A joining process designated weld brazing which combines resistance spot welding and brazing has been developed. Resistance spot welding is used to position and align the parts as well as to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing. Fabrication is then completed by capillary flow of the braze alloy into the joint. The process has been used successfully to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints using 3003 aluminum braze alloy. Test results obtained on single overlap and hat-stiffened structural specimens show that weld brazed joints are superior in tensile shear, stress rupture, fatigue, and buckling than joint fabricated by spotwelding or brazing. Another attractive feature of the process is that the brazed joints is hermetically sealed by the braze material.

  2. ATRX Loss Promotes Tumor Growth and Impairs Non-Homologous End Joining DNA Repair in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Nunez, Felipe J.; Mackay, Alan; Fazal-Salom, Janet; Thomas, Daniel; Mendez, Flor; Kamran, Neha; Dzaman, Marta; Mulpuri, Lakshman; Krasinkiewicz, Johnathon; Doherty, Robert; Lemons, Rosemary; Brosnan-Cashman, Jackie A.; Li, Youping; Roh, Soyeon; Zhao, Lili; Appelman, Henry; Ferguson, David; Gorbunova, Vera; Meeker, Alan; Jones, Chris; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2017-01-01

    Recent work in human glioblastoma (GBM) has documented recurrent mutations in the histone chaperone protein ATRX. We developed an animal model of ATRX-deficient GBM and show that loss of ATRX reduces median survival and increases genetic instability. Further, analysis of genome-wide data for human gliomas showed that ATRX mutation is associated with increased mutation rate at the single nucleotide variant (SNV) level. In mouse tumors, ATRX deficiency impairs non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and increases sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents that induce double-stranded DNA breaks. We propose that ATRX loss results in a genetically unstable tumor, which is more aggressive when left untreated, but is more responsive to double-stranded DNA-damaging agents, resulting in improved overall survival. PMID:26936505

  3. Feasibility of remotely manipulated welding in space. A step in the development of novel joining technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masubuchi, K.; Agapakis, J. E.; Debiccari, A.; Vonalt, C.

    1983-01-01

    In order to establish permanent human presence in space technologies of constructing and repairing space stations and other space structures must be developed. Most construction jobs are performed on earth and the fabricated modules will then be delivered to space by the Space Shuttle. Only limited final assembly jobs, which are primarily mechanical fastening, will be performed on site in space. Such fabrication plans, however, limit the designs of these structures, because each module must fit inside the transport vehicle and must withstand launching stresses which are considerably high. Large-scale utilization of space necessitates more extensive construction work on site. Furthermore, continuous operations of space stations and other structures require maintenance and repairs of structural components as well as of tools and equipment on these space structures. Metal joining technologies, and especially high-quality welding, in space need developing.

  4. The role of the non-homologous end-joining pathway in lymphocyte development.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Sean; Chaudhuri, Jayanta; Alt, Frederick W

    2004-08-01

    One of the most toxic insults a cell can incur is a disruption of its linear DNA in the form of a double-strand break (DSB). Left unrepaired, or repaired improperly, these lesions can result in cell death or neoplastic transformation. Despite these dangers, lymphoid cells purposely introduce DSBs into their genome to maximize the diversity and effector functions of their antigen receptor genes. While the generation of breaks requires distinct lymphoid-specific factors, their resolution requires various ubiquitously expressed DNA-repair proteins, known collectively as the non-homologous end-joining pathway. In this review, we discuss the factors that constitute this pathway as well as the evidence of their involvement in two lymphoid-specific DNA recombination events.

  5. Koffka's effect is mediated by figure thickness at the joining region.

    PubMed

    Huang, Abigail E; Hon, Alice J; Li, Xintong; McCormick, Meghan C; Patel, Dina A; Chubb, Charles; Altschuler, Eric L

    2011-01-01

    Three-quarters of a century ago Gestalt psychologist Kurt Koffka described a remarkable effect: when a contiguous gray ring is placed on a background half one shade of gray, half another, the ring appears homogeneous. However, if the ring is divided, the two halves of the ring appear different shades of gray, the half of the ring on the darker background appearing lighter than the half of the ring on the lighter background. The Gestalt principle of continuity is used to explain this effect. But what microscopic principles might be mediating this effect? Recently we found sufficiently thin rings (annuli) appear heterogeneous even when geometrically continuous. Here, using crescent-shaped figures instead of the circular annuli used for the traditional Koffka effect, we show that this effect of thickness of the ring is mediated by the thickness at the boundary of the region where the halves of the figure are joined.

  6. Workflow technology: the new frontier. How to overcome the barriers and join the future.

    PubMed

    Shefter, Susan M

    2006-01-01

    Hospitals are catching up to the business world in the introduction of technology systems that support professional practice and workflow. The field of case management is highly complex and interrelates with diverse groups in diverse locations. The last few years have seen the introduction of Workflow Technology Tools, which can improve the quality and efficiency of discharge planning by the case manager. Despite the availability of these wonderful new programs, many case managers are hesitant to adopt the new technology and workflow. For a myriad of reasons, a computer-based workflow system can seem like a brick wall. This article discusses, from a practitioner's point of view, how professionals can gain confidence and skill to get around the brick wall and join the future.

  7. Children with physical disability: gaps in service provision, problems joining in.

    PubMed

    Clark, Phillipa; Macarthur, Jude

    2008-01-01

    To describe the reported experiences of the estimated 14 500 New Zealand children with a physical disability and those of their families and whanau (extended families). We have used data from the Household Disability Survey conducted in 2002 to obtain this information. These children and their carers reported a number of perceived unmet needs in all areas covered in the survey: service and assistance, transport, accommodation and education. Thus an estimated 24% reported an unmet need for equipment, and 10% an unmet need for home modification. Around 9% reported having to fund respite care themselves. Of particular note was the proportion of children who had difficulties joining in games and sport at school (59%), going on school outings or camps (28%), playing at school (47%), and or making friends (35%). In all, an estimated 67% of children had one or more problems taking part at school. More could be done to help such families and to facilitate the full participation of these children.

  8. Enhancing project-oriented learning by joining communities of practice and opening spaces for relatedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual, R.

    2010-03-01

    This article describes an extension to project-oriented learning to increase social construction of knowledge and learning. The focus is on: (a) maximising opportunities for students to share their knowledge with practitioners by joining communities of practice, and (b) increasing their intrinsic motivation by creating conditions for student's relatedness. The case study considers a last year capstone course in Mechanical Engineering. The work addresses innovative practices of active learning and beyond project-oriented learning through: (a) the development of a web-based decision support system, (b) meetings between the communities of students, maintenance engineers and academics, and (c) new off-campus group instances. The author hypothesises that this multi-modal approach increases deep learning and social impact of the educational process. Surveys to the actors support a successful achievement of the educational goals. The methodology can easily be extended to further improve the learning process.

  9. Joining and interconnect formation of nanowires and carbon nanotubes for nanoelectronics and nanosystems.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qingzhou; Gao, Fan; Mukherjee, Subhadeep; Gu, Zhiyong

    2009-06-01

    Interconnect formation is critical for the assembly and integration of nanocomponents to enable nanoelectronics- and nanosystems-related applications. Recent progress on joining and interconnect formation of key nanomaterials, especially nanowires and carbon nanotubes, into functional circuits and/or prototype devices is reviewed. The nanosoldering technique through nanoscale lead-free solders is discussed in more detail in this Review. Various strategies of fabricating lead-free nanosolders and the utilization of the nanosoldering technique to form functional solder joints are reviewed, and related challenges facing the nanosoldering technique are discussed. A perspective is given for using lead-free nanosolders and the nanosoldering technique for the construction of complex and/or hybrid nanoelectronics and nanosystems.

  10. Environmental Stress Induces Trinucleotide Repeat Mutagenesis in Human Cells by Alt-Nonhomologous End Joining Repair.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H

    2016-07-31

    Multiple pathways modulate the dynamic mutability of trinucleotide repeats (TNRs), which are implicated in neurodegenerative disease and evolution. Recently, we reported that environmental stresses induce TNR mutagenesis via stress responses and rereplication, with more than 50% of mutants carrying deletions or insertions-molecular signatures of DNA double-strand break repair. We now show that knockdown of alt-nonhomologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) components-XRCC1, LIG3, and PARP1-suppresses stress-induced TNR mutagenesis, in contrast to the components of homologous recombination and NHEJ, which have no effect. Thus, alt-NHEJ, which contributes to genetic mutability in cancer cells, also plays a novel role in environmental stress-induced TNR mutagenesis. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material.

    PubMed

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05) and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05). In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N). Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test) were found in each joint configuration. The highest fracture strength means were observed for laser welding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N). Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test). In conclusion, the fracture strength of welded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band.

  12. DNA Damage Response Factors from Diverse Pathways, Including DNA Crosslink Repair, Mediate Alternative End Joining

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Sean M.; Yanez, Diana A.; Stark, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative end joining (Alt-EJ) chromosomal break repair involves bypassing classical non-homologous end joining (c-NHEJ), and such repair causes mutations often with microhomology at the repair junction. Since the mediators of Alt-EJ are not well understood, we have sought to identify DNA damage response (DDR) factors important for this repair event. Using chromosomal break reporter assays, we surveyed an RNAi library targeting known DDR factors for siRNAs that cause a specific decrease in Alt-EJ, relative to an EJ event that is a composite of Alt-EJ and c-NHEJ (Distal-EJ between two tandem breaks). From this analysis, we identified several DDR factors that are specifically important for Alt-EJ relative to Distal-EJ. While these factors are from diverse pathways, we also found that most of them also promote homologous recombination (HR), including factors important for DNA crosslink repair, such as the Fanconi Anemia factor, FANCA. Since bypass of c-NHEJ is likely important for both Alt-EJ and HR, we disrupted the c-NHEJ factor Ku70 in Fanca-deficient mouse cells and found that Ku70 loss significantly diminishes the influence of Fanca on Alt-EJ. In contrast, an inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) causes a decrease in Alt-EJ that is enhanced by Ku70 loss. Additionally, the helicase/nuclease DNA2 appears to have distinct effects from FANCA and PARP on both Alt-EJ, as well as end resection. Finally, we found that the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib, a cancer therapeutic that has been shown to disrupt FANC signaling, causes a significant reduction in both Alt-EJ and HR, relative to Distal-EJ, as well as a substantial loss of end resection. We suggest that several distinct DDR functions are important for Alt-EJ, which include promoting bypass of c-NHEJ and end resection. PMID:25629353

  13. Friction riveting as an alternative mechanical fastening to join engineering plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, Francesco; Conte, Romina; Bentrovato, Renato; Simeoli, Giorgio; Russo, Pietro; Ambrogio, Giuseppina

    2018-05-01

    Friction Rivecting is a quite new joining process to connect multi-material structures. In brief, a metallic rivet is dipped rotating inside matrixes, usually made of plastics, increasing its original diameter. The use of high-performance plastics is more suitable being their higher mechanical and thermal properties important to avoid material degradation and to allow strong part connections. High-speed friction welding system has been usually used to perform the process. In the work here proposed, the joints have been achieved by means of a traditional milling machine and the attention has been focused on a widely used engineering plastic, i.e. polyamide 6 (PA6) with and without glass fiber reinforcement. A specific speed multiplier has been attached into the mandrel of the used machine to increase the reachable rotational speed. Moreover, rivets made of Titanium Grade 2 and of an Aluminum Alloy, the AA-6060, are utilized. The influence that the heating and the forging length can have on the quality of the obtained junctions, considering a fixed joining depth, has been tested and investigated. The performed connections have been judged by tensile tests, which were set to quantify the maximum strength of the joints for a transverse speed of 1,0 mm/min. Barreling effect can be observed close to the tip, which loses the initial shape of a cylinder characterized by straight vertical walls. Finally, the possible degradation of the polymer, due to temperature increment, has been also evaluated close to the working zone. According to that, it has to be highlighted that the process needs a heating balance, which is necessary to get sound joints. The compromise has, on one side, to allow the rivet penetration and deformation, and on the other side, to avoid the degradation of the polymer, which would affect its properties and a proper rivet deformation.

  14. Joining of Zirconium Diboride-Based Ceramic Composites to Metallic Systems for High-Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Singh, M.

    2008-01-01

    Three types of hot-pressed zirconium diboride (ZrB2)-based ultra-high-temperature ceramic composites (UHTCC), ZrB2-SiC (ZS), ZrB2-SiC-C (ZSC), and ZrB2-SCS9-SiC (ZSS), were joined to Cu-clad-Mo using two Ag-Cu brazes (Cusil-ABA and Ticusil, T(sub L) approx.1073-1173 K) and two Pd-base brazes (Palco and Palni, T(sub L) approx.1493-1513 K). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) revealed greater chemical interaction in joints made using Pd-base brazes than in joints made using Ag-Cu based active brazes. The degree of densification achieved in hot pressed composites influenced the Knoop hardness of the UHTCC and the hardness distribution across the braze interlayer. The braze region in Pd-base system displayed higher hardness in joints made using fully-dense ZS composites than in joints made using partially-dense ZSS composites and the carbon-containing ZSC composites. Calculations indicate a small negative elastic strain energy and an increase in the UHTCC's fracture stress up to a critical clad layer thickness . Above this critical thickness, strain energy in the UHTCC is positive, and it increases with increasing clad layer thickness. Empirical projections show a reduction in the effective thermal resistance of the joints and highlight the potential benefits of joining the UHTCC to Cu-clad-Mo.

  15. Suppression of Non-Homologous End Joining Repair by Overexpression of HMGA2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Angela Y.J.; Boo, Lee Ming; Wang, Shih-Ya; Lin, H. Helen; Wang, Clay C.C.; Yen, Yun; Chen, Benjamin P.C.; Chen, David J.; Ann, David K.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the molecular details associated with aberrant high mobility group A2 (HMGA2) gene expression is key to establishing the mechanism(s) underlying its oncogenic potential and impact on the development of therapeutic strategies. Here, we report the involvement of HMGA2 in impairing DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) during the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) process. We demonstrated that HMGA2-expressing cells displayed deficiency in overall and precise DNA end-joining repair and accumulated more endogenous DNA damage. Proper and timely activation of DNA-PK, consisting of Ku70, Ku80 and DNA-PKcs subunits, is essential for the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) generated endogenously or by exposure to genotoxins. In cells overexpressing HMGA2, accumulation of histone 2A variant X phosphorylation at Ser-139 (γ-H2AX) was associated with hyper-phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at Thr-2609 and Ser-2056 before and after the induction of DSBs. Also, the steady-state complex of Ku and DNA ends was altered by HMGA2. Microirradiation and real-time imaging in living cells revealed that HMGA2 delayed the release of DNA-PKcs from DSB sites, similar to observations found in DNA-PKcs mutants. Moreover, HMGA2 alone was sufficient to induce chromosomal aberrations, a hallmark of deficiency in NHEJ-mediated DNA repair. In summary, a novel role for HMGA2 to interfere with NHEJ processes was uncovered, implicating HMGA2 in the promotion of genome instability and tumorigenesis. PMID:19549901

  16. FRACTURE STRENGTH OF DIFFERENT SOLDERED AND WELDED ORTHODONTIC JOINING CONFIGURATIONS WITH AND WITHOUT FILLING MATERIAL

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05) and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05). In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N). Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test) were found in each joint configuration. The highest fracture strength means were observed for laser welding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N). Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test). In conclusion, the fracture strength of welded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band. PMID:19089229

  17. Development of B2 Shape Memory Intermetallics Beyond NiAl, CoNiAl and CoNiGa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstein, G.; Firstov, G. S.; Kosorukova, T. A.; Koval, Yu. N.; Maier, H. J.

    2018-06-01

    The present study describes the development of shape memory alloys based on NiAl. Initially, this system was considered a promising but unsuccessful neighbour of NiTi. Later, however, shape memory alloys like CoNiAl or CoNiGa were developed that can be considered as NiAl derivatives and already demonstrated good mechanical properties. Yet, these alloys were still inferior to NiTi in most respects. Lately, using a multi-component approach, a CoNiCuAlGaIn high entropy intermetallic compound was developed from the NiAl prototype. This new alloy featured a B2 phase and a martensitic transformation along with a remarkable strength in the as-cast state. In the long-term, this new approach might led to a breakthrough for shape memory alloys in general.

  18. High Ni in Archean tholeiites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Nicholas T.

    1991-03-01

    Archean tholeiites generally have higher Ni, Co. Cr and Fe than most younger tholeiites with similar MgO contents. These characteristics cannot be attributed to high T or P batch melting in the Archean mantle, because, although such melts are enriched in siderophile elements, they have higher MgO than normal tholeiites. As primary melts fractionate to lower MgO, they lose Ni, Co and Cr. Nor can the differences between Archean and younger tholeiites be attributed to secular variation in mantle compositions because Archean komatiites have Ni, Co, Cr contents similar to modern (Gorgona) komatiites. It is suggested that the high siderophile element content of Archean tholeiites results from mixing of either komatiitic with basaltic magmas, as might occur in an ascending, melting mantle plume or column, or of komatiite and more evolved rocks, as may take place when komatiite encounters and assimilates crustal rocks.

  19. Thermal modeling of NiH2 batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponthus, Agnes-Marie; Alexandre, Alain

    1994-01-01

    The following are discussed: NiH2 battery mission and environment; NiH2 cell heat dissipation; Nodal software; model development general philosophy; NiH2 battery model development; and NiH2 experimental developments.

  20. One ring to bring them all--the role of Ku in mammalian non-homologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Gabrielle J; Moulding, Hayley A; Caldecott, Keith W; Rulten, Stuart L

    2014-05-01

    The repair of DNA double strand breaks is essential for cell survival and several conserved pathways have evolved to ensure their rapid and efficient repair. The non-homologous end joining pathway is initiated when Ku binds to the DNA break site. Ku is an abundant nuclear heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80 with a toroidal structure that allows the protein to slide over the broken DNA end and bind with high affinity. Once locked into placed, Ku acts as a tool-belt to recruit multiple interacting proteins, forming one or more non-homologous end joining complexes that act in a regulated manner to ensure efficient repair of DNA ends. Here we review the structure and functions of Ku and the proteins with which it interacts during non-homologous end joining. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Advances in joining newer structural materials; Proceedings of the International Conference, Montreal, Canada, July 23-25, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The present conference on advances in joining novel structural materials encompasses such material types as ceramics, plastics and composites, and new metallic materials. Specific issues addressed include the use of conductor electric explosion to join ceramics, the effects of brazing temperature on joint properties of SiC-fiber-reinforced Al-alloy-matrix composites, the in situ structure control of composite materials, and the weldability of polymeric materials that are heterogeneous as to chemical nature from the standpoint of morphology. Also addressed are the joining of the Al-Li alloy 8090, diffusion bonding of a creep-resistant Fe-ODS alloy, the adhesive bonding of zinc-coated steel sheets, welds in thermoplastic composite materials, and hot-melt joints for carbon-fiber-reinforced composites.

  2. A template for building global partnerships: The Joining Forces conference goes across the Atlantic from the US to the UK.

    PubMed

    Visovsky, Constance; Beedy, Dianne Morrison-

    2016-12-01

    Joining Forces is a comprehensive national initiative within the United States to mobilize all sectors of society to give service members and their families the opportunities and support they have earned. This national initiative begun in April 2012 was led by First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden. The Joining Forces initiative is charged with enhancing the well-being and psychological health of the military family by providing mental health care services, integrating community-based services to reduce homelessness, substance abuse for veterans and military families. This manuscript addresses how one university with its global partners joined together to host an innovative conference addressing the research, education, and practice needs of healthcare professionals caring for military, veterans, and their families. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Combustion Joining of Regolith Tiles for In-Situ Fabrication of Launch/Landing Pads on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Robert E.; Shafirovich, Evgeny; Mantovani, James G.

    2017-01-01

    To mitigate dust problems during launch/landing operations in lunar and Mars missions, it is desired to build solid pads on the surface. Recently, strong tiles have been fabricated from lunar regolith simulants using high-temperature sintering. The present work investigates combustion joining of these tiles through the use of exothermic intermetallic reactions. Specifically, nickel/aluminum (1:1 mole ratio) mixture was placed in a gap between the tiles sintered from JSC-1A lunar regolith simulant. Upon ignition by a laser, a self-sustained propagation of the combustion front over the mixture occurred. Joining was improved with increasing the tile thickness from 6.3 mm to 12.7 mm. The temperatures sufficient for melting the glass phase of JSC-1A were recorded for 12.7-mm tiles, which explains the observed better joining.

  4. Combustion Joining of Regolith Tiles for In-Situ Fabrication of Launch/Landing Pads on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Robert E.; Mantovani, James G.; Shafirovich, Evgeny

    2017-01-01

    To mitigate dust problems during launch-landing operations in lunar and Mars missions, it is desired to build solid pads on the surface. Recently, strong tiles have been fabricated from lunar regolith simulants using high-temperature sintering. The present work investigates combustion joining of these tiles through the use of exothermic intermetallic reactions. Specifically, nickel aluminum (1:1 mole ratio) mixture was placed in a gap between the tiles sintered from JSC-1A lunar regolith simulant. Upon ignition by a laser, a self-sustained propagation of the combustion front over the mixture occurred. Joining was improved with increasing the tile thickness from 6.3 mm to 12.7 mm. The temperatures sufficient for melting the glass phase of JSC-1A were recorded for 12.7-mm tiles, which explains the observed better joining.

  5. Joining of aluminum and stainless steel using AlSi10 brazing filler: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Vasilii; Uhlig, Thomas; Wagner, Guntram

    2017-07-01

    Joining of dissimilar materials like stainless steel and aluminum is of special interest for automotive applications. Due to the different properties of these materials, suitable joining techniques are required. Brazing offers the possibilities to manufacture high performance joints in one step and at low joining temperatures. However, these joints often need to withstand a high number of high cyclic loads during application. Therefore, in addition to the monotonic properties, the fatigue behavior of the produced joints must be considered and evaluated. In the present work, specimens are manufactured by induction brazing using an AlSi10 filler and a non-corrosive flux. The mechanical properties are determined by tensile shear tests as well as in fatigue tests at ambient and elevated temperatures. The microstructure of the brazed joints and the fracture surfaces of the tested samples are investigated by SEM.

  6. Users' guide on socket heat fusion joining of polyethylene gas pipes. Volume 1. Topical report, September 1989-September 1990

    SciT

    Pimputkar, S.M.; McCoy, J.K.; Stets, J.A.

    1991-03-01

    The integrity of a pipeline system is determined by its weakest links which may be the joints. Heat fusion is the most common method for joining gas distribution polyethylene (PE) piping. There are procedural, thermal, and mechanical aspects of making fusion joints. Acceptable procedural aspects, such as heater calibration and cleanliness, can be assured by rigorous training and certification of the operators. Thermal and mechanical aspects consist of specifying joining conditions such as the heater temperature, heating time, and joining pressure. In the absence of procedural errors, the strength of a fusion joint should depend on the pipe material, pipemore » dimensions, and the thermal and mechanical joining conditions. Socket heat fusion was studied both experimentally and analytically to determine how the strength of the joint varied with the conditions under which it was made. The standard tensile impact test was modified to test socket fusion joint samples in shear. The developed shear impact energy test data were found to be reliable measures of strength if the setups for conditions were meticulously identical. A parameter, termed the socket joining parameter, was found to characterize the joining conditions. It is a strong function of melt volume at the end of the heating phase, and physically, it is polyethylene transported parallel to the axis during insertion. The results for three resins are presented in the form of three nomographs. The nomographs may be used to select the required heater temperature or the heating time, for a given ambient temperature and a PE resin, to ensure a structurally sound socket heat fusion joint.« less

  7. Technical reference on socket heat fusion joining of polyethylene gas pipes. Volume 2. Topical Report, September 1989-September 1990

    SciT

    Pimputkar, S.M.; McCoy, J.K.; Stets, J.A.

    1991-03-01

    The integrity of a pipeline system is determined by its weakest links which may be the joints. Heat fusion is the most common method for joining gas distribution polyethylene (PE) piping. There are procedural, thermal, and mechanical aspects of making fusion joints. Acceptable procedural aspects, such as heater calibration and cleanliness, can be assured by rigorous training and certification of the operators. Thermal and mechanical aspects consist of specifying joining conditions such as the heater temperature, heating time, and joining pressure. In the absence of procedural errors, the strength of a fusion joint should depend on the pipe material, pipemore » dimensions, and the thermal and mechanical joining conditions. Socket heat fusion was studied both experimentally and analytically to determine how the strength of the joint varied with the conditions under which it was made. The standard tensile impact test was modified to test socket fusion joint samples in shear. The developed shear impact energy test data were found to be reliable measures of strength if the setup conditions were meticulously identical. A parameter, termed the socket joining parameter, was found to characterize the joining conditions. It is a strong function of melt volume at the end of the heating phase, and, physically, it is polyethylene transported parallel to the axis during insertion. The results for three resins are presented in the form of three nomographs. The nomographs may be used to select the required heater temperature or the heating time, for a given ambient temperature and a PE resin, to ensure a structurally sound socket heat fusion joint.« less

  8. Desperately seeking fusion: on 'joined-up thinking', 'holistic practice' and the new economy of welfare professional power.

    PubMed

    Allen, Chris

    2003-06-01

    This paper argues that social welfare research on joined-up thinking is underpinned by two theses. The 'systemic move' thesis suggests that joined-up thinking is needed to fill gaps in welfare service provision arising from a lack of interorganizational co-ordination. The 'epistemological move' thesis advises that joined-up thinking is needed to overcome deficiencies in the institutional division and distribution of welfare knowledge. Both theses macro-systematize blame for previous social welfare failures, and both are teleological because they present joined-up thinking as a progressive solution that results in a more effective (and thus less fallible) welfare system. In this paper, I argue thatjoined-up thinking can also create a new economy of welfare professional power. First, I show how some versions of 'joined-up' thinking manifest themselves in holistic practices that can 'see everything', 'know everything' and 'do anything', and thus a 'holistic power' to discipline and control every aspect of welfare recipients lives. Since holistic power is seen as infallible, its failure to produce 'active bodies' necessitates the creation of secondary 'joined-up powers' that individualize blame and exclude those to blame from welfare resources. These 'secondary powers' match the social disciplines enforced by one welfare agency (e.g. the responsibility to work enforced by the employment service) with legal rights under another agency (e.g. the right to housing from social landlords), so that breach of the former leads to exclusion from the latter. I conclude that this power strategy is primitive and punitive because it simply excludes welfare recipients. Exclusion is also uneconomic because it pushes welfare recipients into the shade of welfare institutional power.

  9. Smells familiar: group-joining decisions of predatory mites are mediated by olfactory cues of social familiarity.

    PubMed

    Muleta, Muluken G; Schausberger, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Group-living animals frequently have to trade off the costs and benefits of leaving an established group and joining another group. Owing to their high fitness relevance, group-joining decisions are commonly nonrandom and may be based on traits of both individual members and the group such as life stage, body size, social status and group density or size, respectively. Many group-living animals are able to recognize and to associate preferentially with familiar individuals, i.e. those encountered before. Hence, after dispersing from established groups, animals commonly have to decide whether to join a new familiar or unfamiliar group. Using binary choice situations we assessed the effects of social familiarity on group-joining behaviour of the plant-inhabiting predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis . Group living in P. persimilis is brought about by the patchy distribution of its spider mite prey and mutual conspecific attraction. In the first experiment, gravid predator females given a choice between spider mite patches occupied by unfamiliar and familiar groups of females strongly preferred to join familiar groups and to deposit their eggs in these patches. Preference for socially familiar groups was robust across biases of spider mite prey densities between choice options. The second experiment revealed that the predatory mite females can smell social familiarity from a distance. Females subjected to odour choice situations in artificial cages were more strongly attracted to the odour of familiar than unfamiliar groups. We argue that P. persimilis females preferentially join socially familiar groups because a familiar social environment relaxes competition and optimizes foraging and reproduction.

  10. Smells familiar: group-joining decisions of predatory mites are mediated by olfactory cues of social familiarity☆

    PubMed Central

    Muleta, Muluken G.; Schausberger, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Group-living animals frequently have to trade off the costs and benefits of leaving an established group and joining another group. Owing to their high fitness relevance, group-joining decisions are commonly nonrandom and may be based on traits of both individual members and the group such as life stage, body size, social status and group density or size, respectively. Many group-living animals are able to recognize and to associate preferentially with familiar individuals, i.e. those encountered before. Hence, after dispersing from established groups, animals commonly have to decide whether to join a new familiar or unfamiliar group. Using binary choice situations we assessed the effects of social familiarity on group-joining behaviour of the plant-inhabiting predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis. Group living in P. persimilis is brought about by the patchy distribution of its spider mite prey and mutual conspecific attraction. In the first experiment, gravid predator females given a choice between spider mite patches occupied by unfamiliar and familiar groups of females strongly preferred to join familiar groups and to deposit their eggs in these patches. Preference for socially familiar groups was robust across biases of spider mite prey densities between choice options. The second experiment revealed that the predatory mite females can smell social familiarity from a distance. Females subjected to odour choice situations in artificial cages were more strongly attracted to the odour of familiar than unfamiliar groups. We argue that P. persimilis females preferentially join socially familiar groups because a familiar social environment relaxes competition and optimizes foraging and reproduction. PMID:24027341

  11. Comprehensive theoretical studies on the low-lying electronic states of NiF, NiCl, NiBr, and NiI.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wenli; Liu, Wenjian

    2006-04-21

    The low-lying electronic states of the nickel monohalides, i.e., NiF, NiCl, NiBr, and NiI, are investigated by using multireference second-order perturbation theory with relativistic effects taken into account. For the energetically lowest 11 lambda-S states and 26 omega states there into, the potential energy curves and corresponding spectroscopic constants (vertical and adiabatic excitation energies, equilibrium bond lengths, vibrational frequencies, and rotational constants) are reported. The calculated results are grossly in very good agreement with those solid experimental data. In particular, the ground state of NiI is shown to be different from those of NiF, NiCl, and NiBr, being in line with the recent experimental observation. Detailed analyses are provided on those states that either have not been assigned or have been incorrectly assigned by previous experiments.

  12. Crystal structures of NiSO4·9H2O and NiSO4·8H2O: magnetic properties, stability with respect to morenosite (NiSO4·7H2O), the solid-solution series (Mg x Ni1-x )SO4·9H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, A. D.; Knight, K. S.; Gibbs, A. S.; Wood, I. G.

    2018-02-01

    Since being discovered initially in mixed-cation systems, a method of forming end-member NiSO4·9H2O and NiSO4·8H2O has been found. We have obtained powder diffraction data from protonated analogues (with X-rays) and deuterated analogues (using neutrons) of these compounds over a range of temperatures, allowing us to determine their crystal structures—including all H-atoms—and to characterise the transitions on warming from 220 to 278 K; glass → 9-hydrate → 8-hydrate + ice → 7-hydrate + ice → partial melt (7-hydrate + liquid). NiSO4·8D2O is triclinic, space-group P\\bar {1} , Z = 2, with unit cell parameters at 150 K, a = 6.12463(8) Å, b = 6.8401(1) Å, c = 12.5339(2) Å, α = 92.846(1)°, β = 97.822(1)°, γ = 96.627(1)° and V = 515.58(1) Å3. The structure consists of two symmetry-inequivalent Ni(D2O)6 octahedra on sites of \\bar {1} symmetry. These are directly joined by a water-water H-bond to form chains of octahedra parallel with the c-axis at x = 0. Two interstitial water molecules serve both to bridge the Ni(D2O)6 octahedral chains in the b-c plane and also to connect with the SO4 2- tetrahedral oxyanion. These tetrahedra are linked by the two interstitial water molecules in a reticular motif to form sheets perpendicular to c. NiSO4·9D2O is monoclinic, space-group P21/c, Z = 4, with unit-cell parameters at 150 K, a = 6.69739(6) Å, b = 11.8628(1) Å, c = 14.5667(1) Å, β = 94.9739(8)° and V = 1152.96(1) Å3. The structure is isotypic with the Mg analogue described elsewhere (Fortes et al., Acta Cryst B 73:47‒64, 2017b). It shares the motif of H-bonded octahedral chains with NiSO4·8D2O, although in the enneahydrate these run parallel with the b-axis at x = 0. Three interstitial water molecules bridge the Ni(D2O)6 octahedra to the SO4 2- tetrahedral oxyanion. The tetrahedra sit at x ≈ 0.5 and are linked by two of the three interstitial water molecules in a pentagonal motif to form ribbons parallel with b. A solid-solution series

  13. Joining thick section aluminum to steel with suppressed FeAl intermetallic formation via friction stir dovetailing

    SciT

    Reza-E-Rabby, Md.; Ross, Kenneth; Overman, Nicole R.

    A new solid-phase technique called friction stir dovetailing (FSD) has been developed for joining thick section aluminum to steel. In FSD, mechanical interlocks are formed at the aluminum-steel interface and are reinforced by metallurgical bonds where intermetallic growth has been uniquely suppressed. Lap shear testing shows superior strength and extension at failure compared to popular friction stir approaches where metallurgical bonding is the only joining mechanism. High resolution microscopy revealed the presence of a 40-70 nm interlayer having a composition of 76.4 at% Al, 18.4 at% Fe, and 5.2 at% Si, suggestive of limited FeAl3 intermetallic formation.

  14. Complete Status Report Documenting Development of Friction Stir Welding for Joining Thin Wall Tubing of ODS Alloys

    SciT

    Hoelzer, David T.; Bunn, Jeffrey R.; Gussev, Maxim N.

    The development of friction stir welding (FSW) for joining thin sections of the advanced oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) 14YWT ferritic alloy was initiated in Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD), now the Nuclear Technology Research and Development (NTRD), in 2015. The first FSW experiment was conducted in late FY15 and successfully produced a bead-on-plate stir zone (SZ) on a 1 mm thick plate of 14YWT (SM13 heat). The goal of this research task is to ultimately demonstrate that FSW is a feasible method for joining thin wall (0.5 mm thick) tubing of 14YWT.

  15. Ni-NiO core-shell inverse opal electrodes for supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Kang, Soon Hyung; Zhu, Kai; Kim, Jin Young; Neale, Nathan R; Frank, Arthur J

    2011-05-14

    A general template-assisted electrochemical approach was used to synthesize three-dimensional ordered Ni core-NiO shell inverse opals (IOs) as electrodes for supercapacitors. The Ni-NiO IO electrodes displayed pseudo-capacitor behavior, good rate capability and cycling performance. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  16. On the similarity of the bonding in NiS and NiO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The bonding in NiS is found to be quite similar to that in NiO, having an ionic contribution arising from the donation of the Ni 4s electron to the S atom and a covalent component arising from bonds between the Ni 3d and the S 3p. The one-electron d bonds are found to be of equal strength for NiO and NiS, but the two-electron d bonds are weaker for NiS.

  17. Fabrication of ordered Fe–Ni nitride film with equiatomic Fe/Ni ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Fumiya; Ito, Keita; Suemasu, Takashi

    2018-05-01

    We successfully grew a single-phase tetragonal FeNiN film with an equiatomic ratio of Fe, Ni, and N on a MgO(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. We then demonstrated the formation of Fe2Ni2N films by extracting N atoms from the FeNiN film. These results suggested that Fe and Ni atoms in the Fe2Ni2N film were L10-ordered along the film plane direction because of the a-axis orientation growth of the FeNiN film on the MgO(001) substrate.

  18. Joining and Assembly of Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Through Capacitive Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Roberts, Scott; Kozachkov, Henry; Demetriou, Marios D.; Schramm, Joseph P.; Johnson, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a class of amorphous metals defined as having a thickness greater than 1 mm, are being broadly investigated by NASA for use in spacecraft hardware. Their unique properties, attained from their non-crystalline structure, motivate several game-changing aerospace applications. BMGs have low melting temperatures so they can be cheaply and repeatedly cast into complex net shapes, such as mirrors or electronic casings. They are extremely strong and wear-resistant, which motivates their use in gears and bearings. Amorphous metal coatings are hard, corrosion-resistant, and have high reflectivity. BMG composites, reinforced with soft second phases, can be fabricated into energy-absorbing cellular panels for orbital debris shielding. One limitation of BMG materials is their inability to be welded, bonded, brazed, or fastened in a convenient method to form larger structures. Cellular structures (which can be classified as trusses, foams, honeycombs, egg boxes, etc.) are useful for many NASA, commercial, and military aerospace applications, including low-density paneling and shields. Although conventional cellular structures exhibit high specific strength, their porous structures make them challenging to fabricate. In particular, metal cellular structures are extremely difficult to fabricate due to their high processing temperatures. Aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels, for example, are used widely as spacecraft shields due to their low density and ease of fabrication, but suffer from low strength. A desirable metal cellular structure is one with high strength, combined with low density and simple fabrication. The thermoplastic joining process described here allows for the fabrication of monolithic BMG truss-like structures that are 90% porous and have no heat-affected zone, weld, bond, or braze. This is accomplished by welding the nodes of stacked BMG composite panels using a localized capacitor discharge, forming a single monolithic structure

  19. Facile synthesis of Ni/NiO@GO nanocomposites and its enhanced dielectric constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S.; Giri, N.; Mondal, A.; Ray, R.

    2018-05-01

    Ni/NiO embedded Graphene Oxide (GO): Ni/NiO@GO is synthesized by citric acid assisted Pechini-type method. Structural and morphological characterizations are performed by X-ray powdered diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and tunneling electron microscopy (TEM). Defects in GO sheets are probed by RAMAN spectroscopy. The temperature variation of dielectric constant (ɛR) and dielectric loss (tan δ) are investigated in the temperature range 300 - 400 K. Decoration of GO with Ni/NiO nanoparticles enhances its ɛR by˜55 times. Moreover, its dielectric constant measured at 5 MHz is found to be˜430 times to that of Ni/NiO along with the reduction of dielectric loss by a factor˜0.5. The enhanced dielectric constant makes the composite Ni/NiO@GO a potential candidate for using in ecologically friendly energy storage devices.

  20. Direct Experimental Probe of the Ni(II)/Ni(III)/Ni(IV) Redox Evolution in LiNi 0.5Mn 1.5O 4 Electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Qiao, Ruimin; Wray, L. Andrew; Kim, Jung -Hyun; ...

    2015-11-11

    The LiNi 0.5Mn 1.5O 4 spinel is an appealing cathode material for next generation rechargeable Li-ion batteries due to its high operating voltage of ~4.7 V (vs Li/Li +). Although it is widely believed that the full range of electrochemical cycling involves the redox of Ni(II)/(IV), it has not been experimentally clarified whether Ni(III) exists as the intermediate state or a double-electron transfer takes place. Here, combined with theoretical calculations, we show unambiguous spectroscopic evidence of the Ni(III) state when the LiNi 0.5Mn 1.5O 4 electrode is half charged. This provides a direct verification of single-electron-transfer reactions in LiNi 0.5Mnmore » 1.5O 4 upon cycling, namely, from Ni(II) to Ni(III), then to Ni(IV). Additionally, by virtue of its surface sensitivity, soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy also reveals the electrochemically inactive Ni 2+ and Mn 2+ phases on the electrode surface. Our work provides the long-awaited clarification of the single-electron transfer mechanism in LiNi 0.5Mn 1.5O 4 electrodes. Furthermore, the experimental results serve as a benchmark for further spectroscopic characterizations of Ni-based battery electrodes.« less

  1. Kinetics of Ni2Si growth from pure Ni and Ni(V) films on (111) and (100) Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harith, M. A.; Zhang, J. P.; Campisano, S. U.; Klaar, H.-J.

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of Ni2Si growth from pure Ni and from Ni0.93V0.07 films on (111) and (100) silicon has been studied by the combination of He+ backscattering, x-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The activation energies are 1.5 and 1.0 eV for pure Ni and Ni(V) films, respectively while the pre-exponential factors in Ni(V) are 4 5 orders of magnitude smaller than in the pure Ni case. The variations in the measured rates are related to the different grain size of the growing suicide layers. The vanadium is rejected from the silicide layer and piles up at the metalsilicide interface.

  2. Subordinate females in the cooperatively breeding Seychelles warbler obtain direct benefits by joining unrelated groups.

    PubMed

    Groenewoud, Frank; Kingma, Sjouke A; Hammers, Martijn; Dugdale, Hannah L; Burke, Terry; Richardson, David S; Komdeur, Jan

    2018-05-11

    1.In many cooperatively breeding animals, a combination of ecological constraints and benefits of philopatry favours offspring taking a subordinate position on the natal territory instead of dispersing to breed independently. However, in many species individuals disperse to a subordinate position in a non-natal group ("subordinate between-group" dispersal), despite losing the kin-selected and nepotistic benefits of remaining in the natal group. It is unclear which social, genetic and ecological factors drive between-group dispersal. 2.We aim to elucidate the adaptive significance of subordinate between-group dispersal by examining which factors promote such dispersal, whether subordinates gain improved ecological and social conditions by joining a non-natal group, and whether between-group dispersal results in increased lifetime reproductive success and survival. 3.Using a long-term dataset on the cooperatively-breeding Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis), we investigated 4.how a suite of proximate factors (food availability, group composition, age and sex of focal individuals, population density) promote subordinate between-group dispersal by comparing such dispersers with subordinates that dispersed to a dominant position or became floaters. We then analysed whether subordinates that moved to a dominant or non-natal subordinate position, or became floaters, gained improved conditions relative to the natal territory, and compared fitness components between the three dispersal strategies. 5.We show that individuals that joined another group as non-natal subordinates were mainly female and that, similar to floating, between-group dispersal was associated with social and demographic factors that constrained dispersal to an independent breeding position. Between-group dispersal was not driven by improved ecological or social conditions in the new territory and did not result in higher survival. Instead, between-group dispersing females often became co

  3. The Effect of Temperature and Rotational Speed on Structure and Mechanical Properties of Cast Cu Base Alloy (Cu-Al-Si-Fe) Welded by Semisolid Stir Joining Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferasat, Keyvan; Aashuri, Hossein; Kokabi, Amir Hossein; Shafizadeh, Mahdi; Nikzad, Siamak

    2015-12-01

    Semisolid stir joining has been under deliberation as a possible method for joining of copper alloys. In this study, the effect of temperature and rotational speed of stirrer on macrostructure evaluation and mechanical properties of samples were investigated. Optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction were performed for macro and microstructural analysis. A uniform micro-hardness profile was attained by semisolid stir joining method. The ultimate shear strength and bending strength of welded samples were improved in comparison with the cast sample. There is also lower area porosity in welded samples than the cast metal. The mechanical properties were improved by increasing temperature and rotational speed of the joining process.

  4. Synthesis and catalytic performance of SiO2@Ni and hollow Ni microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Liu, Yanhua; Shi, Xueting; Yu, Zhengyang; Feng, Libang

    2016-11-01

    Nickel (Ni) catalyst has been widely used in catalytic reducing reactions such as catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds and catalytic reduction of organic dyes. However, the catalytic efficiency of pure Ni is low. In order to improve the catalytic performance, Ni nanoparticle-loaded microspheres can be developed. In this study, we have prepared Ni nanoparticle-loaded microspheres (SiO2@Ni) and hollow Ni microspheres using two-step method. SiO2@Ni microspheres with raspberry-like morphology and core-shell structure are synthesized successfully using SiO2 microsphere as a template and Ni2+ ions are adsorbed onto SiO2 surfaces via electrostatic interaction and then reduced and deposited on surfaces of SiO2 microspheres. Next, the SiO2 cores are removed by NaOH etching and the hollow Ni microspheres are prepared. The NaOH etching time does no have much influence on the crystal structure, shape, and surface morphology of SiO2@Ni; however, it can change the phase composition evidently. The hollow Ni microspheres are obtained when the NaOH etching time reaches 10 h and above. The as-synthesized SiO2@Ni microspheres exhibit much higher catalytic performance than the hollow Ni microspheres and pure Ni nanoparticles in the catalytic reduction of methylene blue. Meanwhile, the SiO2@Ni catalyst has high stability and hence it can be recycled for reuse.

  5. Effects of Ni particle morphology on cell performance of Na/NiCl2 battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mangi; Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Hahn, Byung-Dong; Jung, Keeyoung; Park, Yoon-Cheol; Cho, Nam-ung; Lee, Heesoo; Choi, Joon-Hwan

    2017-11-01

    Electrochemical reaction of Ni particle, one of active cathode materials in the Na/NiCl2 battery, occurs on the particle surface. The NiCl2 layer formed on the Ni particle surface during charging can disconnect the electron conduction path through Ni particles because the NiCl2 layer has very low conductivity. The morphology and size of Ni particles, therefore, need to be controlled to obtain high charge capacity and excellent cyclic retention. Effects of the Ni particle size on the cell performance were investigated using spherical Ni particles with diameters of 0.5 μm, 6 μm, and 50 μm. The charge capacities of the cells with spherical Ni particles increased when the Ni particle size becomes smaller because of their higher surface area but their charge capacities were significantly decreased with increasing cyclic tests owing to the disconnection of electron conduction path. The inferior cyclic retention of charge capacity was improved using reticular Ni particles which maintained the reliable connection for the electron conduction in the Na/NiCl2 battery. The charge capacity of the cell with the reticular Ni particles was higher than the cell with the small-sized spherical Ni particles approximately by 26% at 30th cycle.

  6. Why Children Join and Stay in Sports Clubs: Case Studies in Australian, French and German Swimming Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Richard L.; Harvey, Stephen; Memmert, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article builds upon research on youth sport clubs conducted from a socio-cultural perspective by reporting on a study that inquired into the reasons why children aged 9-12 joined swimming clubs in France, Germany and Australia. Comprising three case studies it employed a mixed method approach with results considered within the framework of…

  7. Community Action Guide to Policies for Prevention: The Recommendations of the Join Together Policy Panel on Preventing Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    This guide accompanies Join Together's recommendations for drug and alcohol abuse prevention for policymakers and communities. It presents strategic examples of how major institutions and residents in communities have paid attention to substance abuse and worked to overcome its effects. Part 1 contains the recommendations and key policies…

  8. The Intentions of Men 23 to 29 Years Old to Join the Military: Results of a National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borack, Jules I.

    Since the population of 17-to-21-year-old males, the traditional source for military recruitment, will decline sharply during the 1980s, consideration is being given to recruiting males aged 23-29. A national survey was conducted to assess the interest of 23-to-29-year-old men in joining the military under present conditions and with monetary…

  9. Family Away from Home: Factors Influencing Undergraduate Women of Color's Decisions to Join a Cultural-Specific Sorority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado-Guerrero, Marla; Cherniack, Mayra A.; Gloria, Alberta M.

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to understand the reasons undergraduate women of color join a cultural-specific sorority. Through the use of an online survey, 159 narratives of women of color undergraduates attending predominately White institutions (PWIs) in the Midwest was conducted. LeCompte's (2000) 5-step analysis yielded four culturally focused…

  10. Treatment for Addiction: Advancing the Common Good. Recommendations from a Join Together Policy Panel on Treatment and Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    Join Together convened a panel of experts to review U.S. policies for addiction treatment and recovery. Although the panel reached an agreement on six recommendations for policy changes that can make help more accessible and expand treatment to more people. These recommendations are: (1) treatment for alcoholism and other drug addiction must be…

  11. Intentions of Women (18-25 Years Old) to Join the Military: Results of a National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borack, Jules I.

    In anticipation of the projected decline in the national population of young men and of expanding the role of women in the military, the Navy conducted a national telephone survey to gauge the interest of women and men in joining the military under present conditions and under three alternative options. The options related to expanding the role of…

  12. In the Middle: Factors Affecting a Black Male's Decision to Join a Traditionally White Fraternity at a Large Diverse Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study is to examine the pre-college factors, attitudes, and experiences of black men who joined traditionally white fraternities (TWFs) at large public predominantly white institutions (PWIs) over approximately the past four decades. These factors, with special emphasis on issues of identity, self- and group-esteem,…

  13. Corrosion behaviour of friction-bit-joined and weld-bonded AA7075-T6/galvannealed DP980

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu; ...

    2016-12-22

    Joining of aluminium alloys 7075-T6 and galvannealed dual phase 980 steel was achieved by friction bit joining (FBJ) and weld-bonding (FBJ + adhesive) processes. Accelerated laboratory-scale corrosion tests were performed on both FBJ only and weld-bonded specimens to study joint strength under a corrosive environment. Static lap shear tests showed that both FBJ only and weld-bonded cases generally retained more than 80% of the joint strength of non-corroded specimens at the end of corrosion testing. The presence of Zn/Fe coating on the steel substrate resulted in improved corrosion resistance for FBJ specimens, compared to joints produced with bare steel. Finally,more » an optical microscopy was used for cross-sectional analysis of corroded specimens. Some corrosion on the joining bit was observed near the bit head. However, the joining bit was still intact on the steel substrate, indicating that the primary bond was sound.« less

  14. How Students' Perceptions of the School Climate Influence Their Choice to Upstand, Bystand, or Join Perpetrators of Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferráns, Silvia Diazgranados; Selman, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The authors of this article, Silvia Diazgranados Ferráns and Robert Selman, use an emergent framework to explore how the rules of the school culture at different perceived school climates affect early adolescents' decisions to upstand, bystand, or join the perpetrators when they witness peer aggression and bullying. Through a grounded theory…

  15. Corrosion behaviour of friction-bit-joined and weld-bonded AA7075-T6/galvannealed DP980

    SciT

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu

    Joining of aluminium alloys 7075-T6 and galvannealed dual phase 980 steel was achieved by friction bit joining (FBJ) and weld-bonding (FBJ + adhesive) processes. Accelerated laboratory-scale corrosion tests were performed on both FBJ only and weld-bonded specimens to study joint strength under a corrosive environment. Static lap shear tests showed that both FBJ only and weld-bonded cases generally retained more than 80% of the joint strength of non-corroded specimens at the end of corrosion testing. The presence of Zn/Fe coating on the steel substrate resulted in improved corrosion resistance for FBJ specimens, compared to joints produced with bare steel. Finally,more » an optical microscopy was used for cross-sectional analysis of corroded specimens. Some corrosion on the joining bit was observed near the bit head. However, the joining bit was still intact on the steel substrate, indicating that the primary bond was sound.« less

  16. Metallic Contact between MoS2 and Ni via Au Nanoglue.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xinying; Posysaev, Sergei; Huttula, Marko; Pankratov, Vladimir; Hoszowska, Joanna; Dousse, Jean-Claude; Zeeshan, Faisal; Niu, Yuran; Zakharov, Alexei; Li, Taohai; Miroshnichenko, Olga; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Xiao; Huang, Zhongjia; Saukko, Sami; González, Diego López; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Alatalo, Matti; Cao, Wei

    2018-05-01

    A critical factor for electronics based on inorganic layered crystals stems from the electrical contact mode between the semiconducting crystals and the metal counterparts in the electric circuit. Here, a materials tailoring strategy via nanocomposite decoration is carried out to reach metallic contact between MoS 2 matrix and transition metal nanoparticles. Nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs) are successfully joined to the sides of a layered MoS 2 crystal through gold nanobuffers, forming semiconducting and magnetic NiNPs@MoS 2 complexes. The intrinsic semiconducting property of MoS 2 remains unchanged, and it can be lowered to only few layers. Chemical bonding of the Ni to the MoS 2 host is verified by synchrotron radiation based photoemission electron microscopy, and further proved by first-principles calculations. Following the system's band alignment, new electron migration channels between metal and the semiconducting side contribute to the metallic contact mechanism, while semiconductor-metal heterojunctions enhance the photocatalytic ability. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Effect of laser welding parameters on the austenite and martensite phase fractions of NiTi

    SciT

    Oliveira, J.P., E-mail: jp.oliveira@campus.fct.unl

    Although laser welding is probably the most used joining technique for NiTi shape memory alloys there is still a lack of understanding about the effects of laser welding parameters on the microstructural induced changes: in both the heat affected and fusion zones martensite may be present, while the base material is fully austenitic. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used for fine probing laser welded NiTi joints. Through Rietveld refinement the martensite and austenite phase fractions were determined and it was observed that the martensite content increases towards the weld centreline. This is related to a change of the local transformation temperaturesmore » on these regions, which occurs due to compositional variation in those regions. The martensite phase fraction in the thermally affected regions may have significant implications on functional properties on these joints. - Highlights: •Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used for fine probing of the microstructure in laser welded NiTi joints. •Rietveld refinement allowed to determine the content of martensite along the heat affected and fusion zones. •The martensite content increases from the base material towards the weld centreline.« less

  18. Interfacial Reaction During Dissimilar Joining of Aluminum Alloy to Magnesium and Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, J. D.; Panteli, A.; Zhang, C. Q.; Baptiste, D.; Cai, E.; Prangnell, P. B.

    Ultrasonic welding (USW), a solid state joining process, has been used to produce welds between AA6111 aluminum alloy and AZ31 magnesium alloys or titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The mechanical properties of the welds have been assessed and it has been shown that it is the nature and thickness of the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) at the joint line that are critical in determining joint strength and particularly fracture energy. Al-Mg welds suffer from a very low fracture energy, even when strength is comparable with that of similar metal Mg-Mg welds, due to a thick IMC layer always being formed. It is demonstrated that in USW of Al-Ti alloy the slow interdiffusion kinetics means that an IMC layer does not form during welding, and fracture energy is greater. A model has been developed to predict IMC formation during welding and provide an understanding of the critical factors that determine the IMC thickness. It is predicted that in Al-Mg welds, most of the lMC thickening occurs whilst the IMC regions grow as separate islands, prior to the formation of a continuous layer.

  19. Dynamic analysis of I cross beam section dissimilar plate joined by TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, M. S. M.; Nazri, N. A.; Rani, M. N. Abdul; Yunus, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, finite element (FE) joint modelling technique for prediction of dynamic properties of sheet metal jointed by tungsten inert gas (TTG) will be presented. I cross section dissimilar flat plate with different series of aluminium alloy; AA7075 and AA6061 joined by TTG are used. In order to find the most optimum set of TTG welding dissimilar plate, the finite element model with three types of joint modelling were engaged in this study; bar element (CBAR), beam element and spot weld element connector (CWELD). Experimental modal analysis (EMA) was carried out by impact hammer excitation on the dissimilar plates that welding by TTG method. Modal properties of FE model with joints were compared and validated with model testing. CWELD element was chosen to represent weld model for TTG joints due to its accurate prediction of mode shapes and contains an updating parameter for weld modelling compare to other weld modelling. Model updating was performed to improve correlation between EMA and FEA and before proceeds to updating, sensitivity analysis was done to select the most sensitive updating parameter. After perform model updating, average percentage of error of the natural frequencies for CWELD model is improved significantly.

  20. Joined-up Planetary Information, in the Cloud and on Devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. J.; Emmott, S.; Purves, D. W.; Joppa, L. N.; Lyutsarev, V.

    2014-12-01

    In scientific research and development, emphasis is placed on research over development. A significant cost is that the two-way interaction between scientific insights and societal needs does not function effectively to lead to impacts in the wider world. We simply must embrace new software and hardware approaches if we are to provide timely predictive information to address global problems, support businesses and inform governments and citizens. The Microsoft Research Computational Science Lab has been pioneering research into software and methodologies to provide useful and usable new environmental information. Our approach has been very joined-up: from accellerating data acquisition from the field with remote sensor technology, targetted data collection and citizen science, to enabling proces based modelling-using multiple heterogeneous data-sets in the cloud and enabling the resulting planetary information to be accessed from any device. This talk will demonstrate some of the specific research and development we are doing to accerate the pace in which important science has impact on the wider world and will emphasise the important insights gained from advancing the research and develoment together.

  1. Cross-Beam Laser Joining of AA 6111 to Galvanized Steel in a Coach Peel Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Mohammadpour, Masoud; Yazdian, Nima; Ma, Junjie; Carlson, Blair; Wang, Hui-Ping; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2017-06-01

    Cross-beam laser joining of aluminum alloy 6111 to hot-dip galvanized steel in the coach-peel configuration was investigated with the addition of AA 4047 filler wire. The filler material was not only brazed onto the galvanized steel but also partially fusion-welded with the aluminum panel. Through adjusting the laser power to 3.4 kW, a desirable wetting and spreading of filler wire on both panel surfaces could be achieved, and the thickness of intermetallic layer in the middle section of the interface between the weld bead and steel was less than 2 μm. To better understand the solid/liquid interfacial reaction at the brazing interface, two rotary Gaussian heat source models were introduced to simulate the temperature distribution in the molten pool by using the finite element method. Joint properties were examined in terms of microstructure and mechanical properties. During the tensile test, the fracture of coupons took place at the aluminum side rather than along the interface between the intermetallic layer and steel panel. No failure occurred during the three-point bending test.

  2. In college and in recovery: Reasons for joining a Collegiate Recovery Program

    PubMed Central

    Laudet, Alexandre B.; Harris, Kitty; Kimball, Thomas; Winters, Ken C.; Moberg, D. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective Collegiate Recovery Programs (CRPs), a campus-based peer support model for students recovering from substance abuse problems, grew exponentially in the past decade, yet remain unexplored. Methods This mixed methods study examines students’ reasons for CRP enrollment to guide academic institutions and referral sources. Students (N = 486) from the 29 CRPs nationwide operating in 2012 completed an online survey in 2013. Results Students were somewhat older than traditional age (mean age = 26). Now sober for three years (mean), they had experienced severe dependence on multiple substances. One third reported they would not be in college were it not for a CRP, and 20% would not be at their current institution. Top reasons for joining a CRP was the need for same age peer recovery support, and wanting to ‘do college sober’ recognizing that college life challenges sobriety. Conclusions CRPs appear to meet their mission of allowing recovering students to pursue educational goals in ‘an abstinence hostile environment’ and emphasize the need for more institutions to address the support needs of students in recovery. PMID:26731130

  3. Effect of Circuit Inductance on Ceramics Joining by Titanium Foil Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Yoshihiro; Takaki, Koichi; Itagaki, Minoru; Mukaigawa, Seiji; Fujiwara, Tamiya; Ohshima, Shuzo; Takahashi, Ikuo; Kuwashima, Takayuki

    This article describes the influences of circuit inductance on alumina (Al2O3) tile joining using explosive titanium foil. Several kAs pulse current was supplied from 8.28 µF storage capacitor to the 50 µm thickness titanium foil which was sandwiched between the Al2O3 tiles with pressure of 8.3 MPa. The temperature of the foil was rapidly increased owing to ohmic heating with the large current, and then the foil was liquefied and vaporized. The Al2O3 tiles were successfully bonded when the input energy to the titanium foil was higher than the energy required for the foil vaporization. The bonding strength increases with increasing the energy input to the foil. However, the foil explosion cracked the tiles when the input energy exceeds a critical value. Increasing the circuit inductance from 1.13 µH to 64.8 µH, the critical energy of tile cracking increase from 160 J to 507 J, respectively. the maximum bonding strength of 330 kg was obtained when the circuit inductance was 21.8 µH. An investigation of the interfacial structure of the joints using electron probe micro-analysis revealed that distinct reaction areas existed in the interlayer.

  4. What menu changes do restaurants make after joining a voluntary restaurant recognition program?

    PubMed

    Gase, Lauren N; Kaur, Mandip; Dunning, Lauren; Montes, Christine; Kuo, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Programs that recognize restaurants for offering healthful options have emerged as a popular strategy to address the obesity epidemic; however, program fidelity and business responses to such programs are rarely assessed. This study sought to examine how retail restaurants in Los Angeles County chose to comply with participation criteria required by the Choose Health LA Restaurants initiative in the region; the program recognizes restaurants for offering reduced-size portions and healthy children's meals. Menus of all restaurants that joined within 1 year of program launch (n = 17 restaurant brands) were assessed for changes. Nine of the 17 brands made changes to their menus to meet participation criteria for reduced-size portions while 8 of the 10 restaurant brands that offered children's menus made changes to improve the healthfulness of children's meals. Results of this comparative assessment lend support to restaurant compliance with program criteria and menu improvements, even though they are voluntary, representing an important step toward implementing this strategy in the retail environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Joined-wing Research Aircraft Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen C.; Stonum, Ronald K.

    1989-01-01

    A wind-tunnel test was conducted at Ames Research Center to measure the aerodynamic characteristics of a joined-wing research aircraft (JWRA). This aircraft was designed to utilize the fuselage and engines of the existing NASA AD-1 aircraft. The JWRA was designed to have removable outer wing panels to represent three different configurations with the interwing joint at different fractions of the wing span. A one-sixth-scale wind-tunnel model of all three configurations of the JWRA was tested in the Ames 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel to measure aerodynamic performance, stability, and control characteristics. The results of these tests are presented. Longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics were measured over an angle of attack range of -7 to 14 deg and over an angle of sideslip range of -5 to +2.5 deg at a Mach number of 0.35 and a Reynolds number of 2.2x10(6)/ft. Various combinations of deflected control surfaces were tested to measure the effectiveness and impact on stability of several control surface arrangements. In addition, the effects on stall and post-stall aerodynamic characteristics from small leading-edge devices called vortilons were measured. The results of these tests indicate that the JWRA had very good aerodynamic performance and acceptable stability and control throughout its flight envelope. The vortilons produced a profound improvement in the stall and post-stall characteristics with no measurable effects on cruise performance.

  6. TEM Analysis of Interfaces in Diffusion-Bonded Silicon Carbide Ceramics Joined Using Metallic Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozaki, T.; Tsuda, H.; Halbig, M. C.; Singh, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Mori, S.; Asthana R.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) is a promising material for thermo-structural applications due to its excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, oxidation resistance, and thermal stability. However, joining and integration technologies are indispensable for this material in order to fabricate large size and complex shape components with desired functionalities. Although diffusion bonding techniques using metallic interlayers have been commonly utilized to bond various SiC ceramics, detailed microstructural observation by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of the bonded area has not been carried out due to difficulty in preparing TEM samples. In this study, we tried to prepare TEM samples from joints of diffusion bonded SiC ceramics by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) system and carefully investigated the interfacial microstructure by TEM analysis. The samples used in this study were SiC fiber bonded ceramics (SA-Tyrannohex: SA-THX) diffusion bonded with metallic interlayers such as Ti, TiMo, and Mo-B. In this presentation, the result of microstructural analysis obtained by TEM observations and the influence of metallic interlayers and fiber orientation of SA-THX on the joint microstructure will be discussed.

  7. TEM Analysis of Diffusion-Bonded Silicon Carbide Ceramics Joined Using Metallic Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozaki, T.; Tsuda, H.; Halbig, M. C.; Singh, M.; Hasegawa, Y; Mori, S.; Asthana, R.

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) is a promising material for thermostructural applications due to its excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, oxidation resistance, and thermal stability. However, joining and integration technologies are indispensable for this material in order to fabricate large size and complex shape components with desired functionalities. Although diffusion bonding techniques using metallic interlayers have been commonly utilized to bond various SiC ceramics, detailed microstructural observation by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of the bonded area has not been carried out due to difficulty in preparing TEM samples. In this study, we tried to prepare TEM samples from joints of diffusion bonded SiC ceramics by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) system and carefully investigated the interfacial microstructure by TEM analysis. The samples used in this study were SiC fiber bonded ceramics (SA-Tyrannohex: SA-THX) diffusion bonded with metallic interlayers such as Ti, TiMo, Mo-B and TiCu. In this presentation, we report the microstructure of diffusion bonded SA-THX mainly with TiCu interlayers obtained by TEM observations, and the influence of metallic interlayers on the joint microstructure and microhardness will be discussed.

  8. Tungsten joining with copper alloy and its high heat load performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; Lian, Youyun; Chen, Lei; Cheng, Zengkui; Chen, Jiming; Duan, Xuru; Song, Jioupeng; Yu, Yang

    2014-12-01

    W-CuCrZr joining technology by using low activation Cu-Mn filler metal was developed at Southwestern Institute of Physics (SWIP) for the manufacturing of divertor components of fusion experiment devices. In addition, a fast W coating technology by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was also developed and CVD-W/CuCrZr and CVD-W/C mockups with a W coating thickness of 2 mm were prepared. In order to assess their high heat flux (HHF) performances, a 60 kW Electron-beam Material testing Scenario (EMS-60) equipped with a 150 keV electron beam welding gun was constructed at SWIP. Experimental results indicated that brazed W/CuCrZr mockups can withstand 8 MW/m2 heat flux for 1000 cycles without visible damages and CVD-W/CuCrZr mockups with W-Cu gradient interface can survive 1000 cycles under 11 MW/m2 heat flux. An ultrasonic inspection method for non-destructive tests (NDT) of brazed W/CuCrZr mockups was established and 2 mm defect can be detected. Infinite element analysis and heat load tests indicated that 5 mm defect had less noticeable influence on the heat transfer.

  9. ATM-independent, high-fidelity nonhomologous end joining predominates in human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Bret R.; Hawkins, Amy J.; Povirk, Lawrence F.; Valerie, Kristoffer

    2010-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) utilize homologous recombination repair (HRR) as primary means of double-strand break (DSB) repair. We now show that hESCs also use nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). NHEJ kinetics were several-fold slower in hESCs and neural progenitors (NPs) than in astrocytes derived from hESCs. ATM and DNA-PKcs inhibitors were ineffective or partially effective, respectively, at inhibiting NHEJ in hESCs, whereas progressively more inhibition was seen in NPs and astrocytes. The lack of any major involvement of DNA-PKcs in NHEJ in hESCs was supported by siRNA-mediated DNA-PKcs knockdown. Expression of a truncated XRCC4 decoy or XRCC4 knock-down reduced NHEJ by more than half suggesting that repair is primarily canonical NHEJ. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was dispensable for NHEJ suggesting that repair is largely independent of backup NHEJ. Furthermore, as hESCs differentiated a progressive decrease in the accuracy of NHEJ was observed. Altogether, we conclude that NHEJ in hESCs is largely independent of ATM, DNA-PKcs, and PARP but dependent on XRCC4 with repair fidelity several-fold greater than in astrocytes. PMID:20844317

  10. Childhood exposure to violence and lifelong health: Clinical intervention science and stress biology research join forces

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2013-01-01

    Many young people who are mistreated by an adult, victimized by bullies, criminally assaulted, or who witness domestic violence react to this violence exposure by developing behavioral, emotional, or learning problems. What is less well known is that adverse experiences like violence exposure can lead to hidden physical alterations inside a child’s body, alterations which may have adverse effects on life-long health. We discuss why this is important for the field of developmental psychopathology and for society, and we recommend that stress-biology research and intervention science join forces to tackle the problem. We examine the evidence base in relation to stress-sensitive measures for the body (inflammatory reactions, telomere erosion, epigenetic methylation, and gene expression) and brain (mental disorders, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological testing). We also review promising interventions for families, couples, and children that have been designed to reduce the effects of childhood violence exposure. We invite intervention scientists and stress-biology researchers to collaborate in adding stress-biology measures to randomized clinical trials of interventions intended to reduce effects of violence exposure and other traumas on young people. PMID:24342859

  11. Inhibition of nonhomologous end joining to increase the specificity of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing.

    PubMed

    Vartak, Supriya V; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2015-11-01

    DNA repair, one of the fundamental processes occurring in a cell, safeguards the genome and maintains its integrity. Among various DNA lesions, double-strand breaks are considered to be the most deleterious, as they can lead to potential loss of genetic information, if not repaired. Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination are two major double-strand break repair pathways. SCR7, a DNA ligase IV inhibitor, was recently identified and characterized as a potential anticancer compound. Interestingly, SCR7 was shown to have several applications, owing to its unique property as an NHEJ inhibitor. Here, we focus on three main areas of research in which SCR7 is actively being used, and discuss one of the applications, i.e. genome editing via CRISPR/Cas, in detail. In the past year, different studies have shown that SCR7 significantly increases the efficiency of precise genome editing by inhibiting NHEJ, and favouring the error-free homologous recombination pathway, both in vitro and in vivo. Overall, we discuss the current applications of SCR7 to shed light on the unique property of the small molecule of having distinct applications in normal and cancer cells, when used at different cellular concentrations. © 2015 FEBS.

  12. Ajinomoto joins GO and NGO in promoting RH / nutrition in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    2000-01-01

    The Integrated Project (IP) on Reproductive Health/Nutrition (RH/N) in Batangas Province in the Philippines was launched on December 2, 1999. This project is a new form of collaboration, joining government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and corporate forces to promote a RH/N project in six municipalities in Batangas. The Ajinomoto Company, one of the largest food companies in Japan, decided to support the project because of its emphasis on training of trainers such as local leaders, community health workers, and volunteers, which is the key to self-sustainability. Another reason for support was that nutrition education is considered an integral part of the IP in the Philippines, which in some way is in line with the company's mission to contribute to the improvement of the people's quality of life. The IP on RH/N is designed to expand the successful IP model achieved in villages in the municipalities of Malvar and Balayan during the past 6 years, while reinforcing the capacities of these model areas to lead in transferring their lessons and experience with successful IP to four other municipalities in Batangas. Attention will also be given to promoting the use of integrated information, education, and communication materials for RH/N.

  13. Joining technologies for the 1990s: Welding, brazing, soldering, mechanical, explosive, solid-state, adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D. (Editor); Stein, Bland A. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    A compilation of papers presented in a joint NASA, American Society for Metals, The George Washington University, American Welding Society, and Society of Manufacturing Engineers Conference on Welding, Bonding, and Fastening at Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, on October 23 to 25, 1984 is given. Papers were presented on technology developed in current research programs relevant to welding, bonding, and fastening of structural materials required in fabricating structures and mechanical systems used in the aerospace, hydrospace, and automotive industries. Topics covered in the conference included equipment, hardware and materials used when welding, brazing, and soldering, mechanical fastening, explosive welding, use of unique selected joining techniques, adhesives bonding, and nondestructive evaluation. A concept of the factory of the future was presented, followed by advanced welding techniques, automated equipment for welding, welding in a cryogenic atmosphere, blind fastening, stress corrosion resistant fasteners, fastening equipment, explosive welding of different configurations and materials, solid-state bonding, electron beam welding, new adhesives, effects of cryogenics on adhesives, and new techniques and equipment for adhesive bonding.

  14. Development of biocompatible glycodynameric hydrogels joining two natural motifs by dynamic constitutional chemistry.

    PubMed

    Marin, Luminita; Ailincai, Daniela; Morariu, Simona; Tartau-Mititelu, Liliana

    2017-08-15

    The paper focusses on the synthesis of novel hydrogels by joining natural biodegradable compounds with the aim to achieve biocompatible materials for bio related applications. The hydrogels were prepared from chitosan and citral by constitutional dynamic chemistry, incorporating both molecular and supramolecular dynamic features. The hydrophobic flexible citral has been reversible immobilized onto the hydrophilic chitosan backbone via imine bonds to form amphiphilic glycodynamers, which further self-ordered through supramolecular interactions into a 3D-network of biodynameric hydrogel. The synthetic pathway has been demonstrated by NMR and FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and polarized light microscopy. Studies of the hydrogel morphology revealed a 3D porous microstructure, whose pores size correlated with the crosslinking degree. Rheological investigations evidenced high elasticity, thermo-responsiveness and thixotropic behavior. As a proof of the concept, the hydrogels proved in vivo biocompatibility on laboratory mice. The paper successfully implements the constitutional dynamic chemistry in generation of chitosan high performance hydrogels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phonon Dispersion in Amorphous Ni-Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, A. M.

    2007-06-01

    The well-known model potential is used to investigate the longitudinal and transverse phonon dispersion curves for six Ni-based binary amorphous alloys, viz. Ni31Dy69, Ni33Y67, Ni36Zr64, Ni50Zr50, Ni60 Nb40, and Ni81B19. The thermodynamic and elastic properties are also computed from the elastic limits of the phonon dispersion curves. The theoretical approach given by Hubbard-Beeby is used in the present study to compute the phonon dispersion curves. Five local field correction functions proposed by Hartree, Taylor, Ichimaru-Utsumi, Farid et al. and Sarkar et al. are employed to see the effect of exchange and correlation in the aforesaid properties.

  16. Joining of polymer-metal lightweight structures using self-piercing riveting (SPR) technique: Numerical approach and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amro, Elias; Kouadri-Henni, Afia

    2018-05-01

    Restrictions in pollutant emissions dictated at the European Commission level in the past few years have urged mass production car manufacturers to engage rapidly several strategies in order to reduce significantly the energy consumption of their vehicles. One of the most relevant taken action is light-weighting of body in white (BIW) structures, concretely visible with the increased introduction of polymer-based composite materials reinforced by carbon/glass fibers. However, the design and manufacturing of such "hybrid" structures is limiting the use of conventional assembly techniques like resistance spot welding (RSW) which are not transferable as they are for polymer-metal joining. This research aims at developing a joining technique that would eventually enable the assembly of a sheet molding compound (SMC) polyester thermoset-made component on a structure composed of several high strength steel grades. The state of the art of polymer-metal joining techniques highlighted the few ones potentially able to respond to the industrial challenge, which are: structural bonding, self-piercing riveting (SPR), direct laser joining and friction spot welding (FSpW). In this study, the promising SPR technique is investigated. Modelling of SPR process in the case of polymer-metal joining was performed through the building of a 2D axisymmetric FE model using the commercial code Abaqus CAE 6.10-1. Details of the numerical approach are presented with a particular attention to the composite sheet for which Mori-Tanaka's homogenization method is used in order to estimate overall mechanical properties. Large deformations induced by the riveting process are enabled with the use of a mixed finite element formulation ALE (arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian). FE model predictions are compared with experimental data followed by a discussion.

  17. One dimensional motion of interstitial clusters and void growth in Ni and Ni alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Ishizaki, T.; Xu, Q.; Satoh, Y.; Kiritani, M.

    2002-12-01

    One dimensional (1-D) motion of interstitial clusters is important for the microstructural evolution in metals. In this paper, the effect of 2 at.% alloying with elements Si (volume size factor to Ni: -5.81%), Cu (7.18%), Ge (14.76%) and Sn (74.08%) in Ni on 1-D motion of interstitial clusters and void growth was studied. In neutron irradiated pure Ni, Ni-Cu and Ni-Ge, well developed dislocation networks and voids in the matrix, and no defects near grain boundaries were observed at 573 K to a dose of 0.4 dpa by transmission electron microscopy. No voids were formed and only interstitial type dislocation loops were observed near grain boundaries in Ni-Si and Ni-Sn. The reaction kinetics analysis which included the point defect flow into planar sink revealed the existence of 1-D motion of interstitial clusters in Ni, Ni-Cu and Ni-Ge, and lack of such motion in Ni-Si and Ni-Sn. In Ni-Sn and Ni-Si, the alloying elements will trap interstitial clusters and thereby reduce the cluster mobility, which lead to the reduction in void growth.

  18. Tuning Ni-catalyzed CO 2 hydrogenation selectivity via Ni-ceria support interactions and Ni-Fe bimetallic formation

    DOE PAGES

    Winter, Lea R.; Gomez, Elaine; Yan, Binhang; ...

    2017-10-16

    CO 2 hydrogenation over Fe-modified Ni/CeO 2 catalysts was investigated in a batch reactor using time-resolved in situ FTIR spectroscopy. Low loading of Ni/CeO 2 was associated with high selectivity to CO over CH 4, while higher Ni loading improved CO 2 hydrogenation activity with a reduced CO selectivity. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis revealed Ni to be metallic for all catalysts including the CO-selective low loading 0.5% Ni catalyst, suggesting that the selectivity trend is due to structural rather than oxidation state effects. The loading amount of 1.5% Ni was selected for co-impregnation with Fe, based on themore » significant shift in product selectivity towards CH 4 for that loading amount, in order to shift the selectivity towards CO while maintaining high activity. Temperature programmed reduction (TPR) results indicated bimetallic interactions between Ni and Fe, and XANES analysis showed that about 70% of Fe in the bimetallic catalysts was oxidized. The Ni-Fe catalysts demonstrated improved selectivity towards CO without significantly compromising activity, coupling the high activity of Ni catalysts and the high CO selectivity of Fe. The general trends in Ni loading and bimetallic modification should guide efforts to develop non-precious metal catalysts for the selective production of CO by CO 2 hydrogenation.« less

  19. Latest status of El Niño and La Niña

    Simplified Chinese El Niño and La Niña Latest status (May 2018) In the past month or so, the warming trend returned to normal in April 2018, indicating that the La Niña event had come to an end. Based on the ±o, La Niña, ENSO? The impact of El Niño and La Niña on the climate of Hong Kong Seasonal and

  20. Influence of laser power on microstructure and mechanical properties of laser welded-brazed Mg to Ni coated Ti alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Caiwang; Lu, Qingshuang; Chen, Bo; Song, Xiaoguo; Li, Liqun; Feng, Jicai; Wang, Yang

    2017-03-01

    AZ31B Magnesium (Mg) and Ti-6Al-4V titanium (Ti) alloys with Ni coating were joined by laser welding-brazing process using AZ92 Mg based filler. The influence of laser power on microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated. Ni coating was found to significantly promote good wetting-spreading ability of molten filler on the Ti sheet. Acceptable joints without obvious defects were obtained within a relatively wide processing window. In the process metallurgical bonding was achieved by the formation of Ti3Al phase at direct irradiation zone and Al-Ni phase followed by a layer of Mg-Al-Ni ternary compound adjacent to the fusion zone at the intermediate zone. The thickness of reaction layers increased slowly with the increasing laser power. The tensile-shear test indicated that joints produced at the laser power of 1300 W reached 2387 N fracture load, representing 88.5% joint efficiency with respect to the Mg base metal. The corresponding failure occurred in the fusion zone of the Mg base metal, while joints fractured at the interface at lower/higher laser power due to the crack or excessive intermetallic compound (IMC) formation along the interface.

  1. On the nature of Ni···Ni interaction in a model dimeric Ni complex.

    PubMed

    Kamiński, Radosław; Herbaczyńska, Beata; Srebro, Monika; Pietrzykowski, Antoni; Michalak, Artur; Jerzykiewicz, Lucjan B; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    2011-06-07

    A new dinuclear complex (NiC(5)H(4)SiMe(2)CHCH(2))(2) (2) was prepared by reacting nickelocene derivative [(C(5)H(4)SiMe(2)CH=CH(2))(2)Ni] (1) with methyllithium (MeLi). Good quality crystals were subjected to a high-resolution X-ray measurement. Subsequent multipole refinement yielded accurate description of electron density distribution. Detailed inspection of experimental electron density in Ni···Ni contact revealed that the nickel atoms are bonded and significant deformation of the metal valence shell is related to different populations of the d-orbitals. The existence of the Ni···Ni bond path explains the lack of unpaired electrons in the complex due to a possible exchange channel.

  2. Emergence and oscillation of cosmic space by joining M1-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Rahaman, Farook; Capozziello, Salvatore; Ali, Ahmed Farag; Pradhan, Anirudh

    2016-05-01

    Recently, it has been proposed by Padmanabhan that the difference between the number of degrees of freedom on the boundary surface and the number of degrees of freedom in a bulk region leads to the expansion of the universe. Now, a natural question arises; how could this model explain the oscillation of the universe between contraction and expansion branches? We try to address this issue in the framework of a BIonic system. In this model, M0-branes join to each other and give rise to a pair of M1-anti- M1-branes. The fields which live on these branes play the roles of massive gravitons that cause the emergence of a wormhole between them and formation of a BIon system. This wormhole dissolves into M1-branes and causes a divergence between the number of degrees of freedom on the boundary surface of M1 and the bulk leading to an expansion of M1-branes. When M1-branes become close to each other, the square energy of their system becomes negative and some tachyonic states emerge. To remove these states, M1-branes become compact, the sign of compacted gravity changes, causing anti-gravity to arise: in this case, branes get away from each other. By articulating M1-BIons, an M3-brane and an anti- M3-brane are created and connected by three wormholes forming an M3-BIon. This new system behaves like the initial system and by closing branes to each other, they become compact and, by getting away from each other, they open. Our universe is located on one of these M3-branes and, by compactifying the M3-brane, it contracts and, by opening it, it expands.

  3. Predictors of Rural Health Clinics Managers' Willingness to Join Accountable Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    T H Wan, Thomas; Masri, Maysoun Dimachkie; Ortiz, Judith

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has facilitated the development of an innovative and integrated delivery care system, Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). It is timely, to identify how health care managers in rural health clinics are responding to the ACO model. This research examines RHC managers' perceived benefits and barriers for implementing ACOs from an organizational ecology perspective. A survey was conducted in Spring of 2012 covering the present RHC network working infrastructures - 1) Organizational social network; 2) organizational care delivery structure; 3) ACO knowledge, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers; 4) quality and disease management programs; and 5) health information technology (HIT) infrastructure. One thousand one hundred sixty clinics were surveyed in the United States. They cover eight southeastern states (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee) and California. A total of ninety-one responses were received. RHC managers' personal perceptions on ACO's benefits and knowledge level explained the most variance in their willingness to join ACOs. Individual perceptions appear to be more influential than organizational and context factors in the predictive analysis. The study is primarily focused in the Southeastern region of the U.S. The generalizability is limited to this region. The predictors of rural health clinics' participation in ACOs are germane to guide the development of organizational strategies for enhancing the general knowledge about the innovativeness of delivering coordinated care and containing health care costs inspired by the Affordable Care Act. Rural health clinics are lagged behind the growth curve of ACO adoption. The diffusion of new knowledge about pros and cons of ACO is essential to reinforce the health care reform in the United States.

  4. Predictors of Rural Health Clinics Managers' Willingness to Join Accountable Care Organizations

    PubMed Central

    T.H.Wan, Thomas; Masri, Maysoun Dimachkie; Ortiz, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has facilitated the development of an innovative and integrated delivery care system, Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). It is timely, to identify how health care managers in rural health clinics are responding to the ACO model. This research examines RHC managers' perceived benefits and barriers for implementing ACOs from an organizational ecology perspective. Methodology/Approach A survey was conducted in Spring of 2012 covering the present RHC network working infrastructures – 1) Organizational social network; 2) organizational care delivery structure; 3) ACO knowledge, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers; 4) quality and disease management programs; and 5) health information technology (HIT) infrastructure. One thousand one hundred sixty clinics were surveyed in the United States. They cover eight southeastern states (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee) and California. A total of ninety-one responses were received. Findings RHC managers' personal perceptions on ACO's benefits and knowledge level explained the most variance in their willingness to join ACOs. Individual perceptions appear to be more influential than organizational and context factors in the predictive analysis. Research limitations/implications The study is primarily focused in the Southeastern region of the U.S. The generalizability is limited to this region. The predictors of rural health clinics' participation in ACOs are germane to guide the development of organizational strategies for enhancing the general knowledge about the innovativeness of delivering coordinated care and containing health care costs inspired by the Affordable Care Act. Originality/Value of Paper Rural health clinics are lagged behind the growth curve of ACO adoption. The diffusion of new knowledge about pros and cons of ACO is essential to reinforce the health care reform

  5. Sorting cancer karyotypes using double-cut-and-joins, duplications and deletions.

    PubMed

    Zeira, Ron; Shamir, Ron

    2018-05-03

    Problems of genome rearrangement are central in both evolution and cancer research. Most genome rearrangement models assume that the genome contains a single copy of each gene and the only changes in the genome are structural, i.e., reordering of segments. In contrast, tumor genomes also undergo numerical changes such as deletions and duplications, and thus the number of copies of genes varies. Dealing with unequal gene content is a very challenging task, addressed by few algorithms to date. More realistic models are needed to help trace genome evolution during tumorigenesis. Here we present a model for the evolution of genomes with multiple gene copies using the operation types double-cut-and-joins, duplications and deletions. The events supported by the model are reversals, translocations, tandem duplications, segmental deletions, and chromosomal amplifications and deletions, covering most types of structural and numerical changes observed in tumor samples. Our goal is to find a series of operations of minimum length that transform one karyotype into the other. We show that the problem is NP-hard and give an integer linear programming formulation that solves the problem exactly under some mild assumptions. We test our method on simulated genomes and on ovarian cancer genomes. Our study advances the state of the art in two ways: It allows a broader set of operations than extant models, thus being more realistic, and it is the first study attempting to reconstruct the full sequence of structural and numerical events during cancer evolution. Code and data are available in https://github.com/Shamir-Lab/Sorting-Cancer-Karyotypes. ronzeira@post.tau.ac.il, rshamir@tau.ac.il. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  6. Role of joined farmer groups in enhancing production and farmers income

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsyad, M.; Rahmadanih; Bulkis, S.; Hasnah; Sulili, A.; Darwis; Bustan, A.; Aswad, M.

    2018-05-01

    Production and farmers income still becomes a global issue in economic development. The study aims to (1) describe the implementation of the role of Joined farmer groups (called Gapoktan) in accordance its function and (2) to analyze the role of Gapoktan in increasing production and farming income. The study was conducted in Camba Sub District, Maros District, South Sulawesi, Indonesia in 2017 and choosing Aspana Gapoktan as Case Unit. Data collection is done by a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods. Qualitative data were collected by Focus Group Discussions method, indepth interview and document study while quantitative data was collected through survey method on 60 farmers respondents. The results showed that, (1) Aspana Gapoktan has implemented a role related to its function as a business unit in the provision of production facilities and farming as well as marketing but has not implemented roles related to its function as a processing business unit, and saving and loan (2) Gapoktan role in increasing production and income of farming is facilitating procurement of farm inputs and agricultural production tools for farmers and developing various commodities in farming activities, especially horticultural crops. More than 44.00% of farmers perceived that their production increased about 10.00% - 25.00% and more than 68.00% of farmers perceived that their income increased by about 10.00% - 25.00% for the last three years. It is necessary to increase the role of Gapoktan through (1) the procurement of horticultural product processing industry and (2) doing savings and loan activities by utilizing 40.00% of funds managed by Gapoktan or through the formation of cooperatives under the management of Gapoktan.

  7. Point defect evolution in Ni, NiFe and NiCr alloys from atomistic simulations and irradiation experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Lu, Chenyang; Jin, Ke; ...

    2015-08-08

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we elucidate irradiation-induced point defect evolution in fcc pure Ni, Ni 0.5Fe 0.5, and Ni 0.8Cr 0.2 solid solution alloys. We find that irradiation-induced interstitials form dislocation loops that are of 1/3 <111>{111}-type, consistent with our experimental results. While the loops are formed in all the three materials, the kinetics of formation is considerably slower in NiFe and NiCr than in pure Ni, indicating that defect migration barriers and extended defect formation energies could be higher in the alloys than pure Ni. As a result, while larger size clusters are formed in pure Ni, smaller andmore » more clusters are observed in the alloys. The vacancy diffusion occurs at relatively higher temperatures than interstitials, and their clustering leads to formation of stacking fault tetrahedra, also consistent with our experiments. The results also show that the surviving Frenkel pairs are composition-dependent and are largely Ni dominated.« less

  8. A Threonine Stabilizes the NiC and NiR Catalytic Intermediates of [NiFe]-hydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Hamdan, Abbas; Ceccaldi, Pierre; Lebrette, Hugo; Gutiérrez-Sanz, Oscar; Richaud, Pierre; Cournac, Laurent; Guigliarelli, Bruno; De Lacey, Antonio L.; Léger, Christophe; Volbeda, Anne; Burlat, Bénédicte; Dementin, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The heterodimeric [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans catalyzes the reversible oxidation of H2 into protons and electrons. The catalytic intermediates have been attributed to forms of the active site (NiSI, NiR, and NiC) detected using spectroscopic methods under potentiometric but non-catalytic conditions. Here, we produced variants by replacing the conserved Thr-18 residue in the small subunit with Ser, Val, Gln, Gly, or Asp, and we analyzed the effects of these mutations on the kinetic (H2 oxidation, H2 production, and H/D exchange), spectroscopic (IR, EPR), and structural properties of the enzyme. The mutations disrupt the H-bond network in the crystals and have a strong effect on H2 oxidation and H2 production turnover rates. However, the absence of correlation between activity and rate of H/D exchange in the series of variants suggests that the alcoholic group of Thr-18 is not necessarily a proton relay. Instead, the correlation between H2 oxidation and production activity and the detection of the NiC species in reduced samples confirms that NiC is a catalytic intermediate and suggests that Thr-18 is important to stabilize the local protein structure of the active site ensuring fast NiSI-NiC-NiR interconversions during H2 oxidation/production. PMID:25666617

  9. A threonine stabilizes the NiC and NiR catalytic intermediates of [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hamdan, Abbas; Ceccaldi, Pierre; Lebrette, Hugo; Gutiérrez-Sanz, Oscar; Richaud, Pierre; Cournac, Laurent; Guigliarelli, Bruno; De Lacey, Antonio L; Léger, Christophe; Volbeda, Anne; Burlat, Bénédicte; Dementin, Sébastien

    2015-03-27

    The heterodimeric [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans catalyzes the reversible oxidation of H2 into protons and electrons. The catalytic intermediates have been attributed to forms of the active site (NiSI, NiR, and NiC) detected using spectroscopic methods under potentiometric but non-catalytic conditions. Here, we produced variants by replacing the conserved Thr-18 residue in the small subunit with Ser, Val, Gln, Gly, or Asp, and we analyzed the effects of these mutations on the kinetic (H2 oxidation, H2 production, and H/D exchange), spectroscopic (IR, EPR), and structural properties of the enzyme. The mutations disrupt the H-bond network in the crystals and have a strong effect on H2 oxidation and H2 production turnover rates. However, the absence of correlation between activity and rate of H/D exchange in the series of variants suggests that the alcoholic group of Thr-18 is not necessarily a proton relay. Instead, the correlation between H2 oxidation and production activity and the detection of the NiC species in reduced samples confirms that NiC is a catalytic intermediate and suggests that Thr-18 is important to stabilize the local protein structure of the active site ensuring fast NiSI-NiC-NiR interconversions during H2 oxidation/production. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Anisotropic growth of NiO nanorods from Ni nanoparticles by rapid thermal oxidation.

    PubMed

    Koga, Kenji; Hirasawa, Makoto

    2013-09-20

    NiO nanorods with extremely high crystallinity were grown by rapid thermal oxidation through exposure of Ni nanoparticles (NPs) heated above 400° C to oxygen. Oxidation proceeds by nucleation of a NiO island on a Ni NP that grows anisotropically to produce a NiO nanorod. This process differs completely from that under mild oxidation conditions, where the surface of the NPs is completely covered with an oxide film during the early stage of oxidation. The observed novel behaviour strongly suggests an interfacial oxidation mechanism driven by the dissolution of adsorbed oxygen into the Ni NP sub-surface region, subsequent diffusion and reaction at the NiO/Ni interface. The early oxidation conditions of metal NPs impose a significant influence on the entire oxidation process at the nanoscale and are therefore inherently important for the precise morphological control of oxidized NPs to design functional nanomaterials.

  11. Mechanistic analysis of time-dependent failure of oxynitride glass-joined silicon nitride below 1000 degree C

    SciT

    O'Brien, M.H.; Coon, D.M.

    Time-dependent failure at elevated temperatures currently governs the service life of oxynitride glass-joined silicon nitride. Creep, devitrification, stress- aided oxidation-controlled slow crack growth, and viscous cabitation-controlled failure are examined as possible controlling mechanisms. Creep deformation failure is observed above 1000{degrees}C. Fractographic evidence indicates cavity formation and growth below 1000{degrees}C. Auger electron spectroscopy verified that the oxidation rate of the joining glass is governed by the oxygen supply rate. Time-to-failure data and those predicted using the Tsai and Raj, and Raj and Dang viscous cavitation models. It is concluded that viscous relaxation and isolated cavity growth control the rate of failuremore » in oxynitride glass-filled silicon nitride joints below 1000{degrees}C. Several possible methods are also proposed for increasing the service lives of these joints.« less

  12. Altered kinetics of nonhomologous end joining and class switch recombination in ligase IV-deficient B cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Yu, Kefei

    2008-11-24

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch recombination (CSR) is believed to occur through the generation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the long and repetitive switch regions. Although implied, the role of the major vertebrate DSB repair pathway, nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), in CSR has been controversial. By somatic gene targeting of DNA ligase IV (Lig4; a key component of NHEJ) in a B cell line (CH12F3) capable of highly efficient CSR in vitro, we found that NHEJ is required for efficient CSR. Disruption of the Lig4 gene in CH12F3 cells severely inhibits the initial rate of CSR and causes a late cell proliferation defect under cytokine stimulation. However, unlike V(D)J recombination, which absolutely requires NHEJ, CSR accumulates to a substantial level in Lig4-null cells. The data revealed a fast-acting NHEJ and a slow-acting alterative end joining of switch region breaks during CSR.

  13. Impact of Nonlinearity of The Contact Layer Between Elements Joined in a Multi-Bolted System on Its Preload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzejda, R.

    2017-12-01

    The paper deals with modelling and calculations of asymmetrical multi-bolted joints at the assembly stage. The physical model of the joint is based on a system composed of four subsystems, which are: a couple of joined elements, a contact layer between the elements, and a set of bolts. The contact layer is assumed as the Winkler model, which can be treated as a nonlinear or linear model. In contrast, the set of bolts are modelled using simplified beam models, known as spider bolt models. The theorem according to which nonlinearity of the contact layer has a negligible impact on the final preload of the joint in the case of its sequential tightening has been verified. Results of sample calculations for the selected multi-bolted system, in the form of diagrams of preloads in the bolts as well as normal contact pressure between the joined elements during the assembly process and at its end, are presented.

  14. Flexible ordering of antibody class switch and V(D)J joining during B-cell ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satyendra; Wuerffel, Robert; Achour, Ikbel; Lajoie, Bryan; Sen, Ranjan; Dekker, Job; Feeney, Ann J.; Kenter, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    V(D)J joining is mediated by RAG recombinase during early B-lymphocyte development in the bone marrow (BM). Activation-induced deaminase initiates isotype switching in mature B cells of secondary lymphoid structures. Previous studies questioned the strict ontological partitioning of these processes. We show that pro-B cells undergo robust switching to a subset of immunoglobulin H (IgH) isotypes. Chromatin studies reveal that in pro-B cells, the spatial organization of the Igh locus may restrict switching to this subset of isotypes. We demonstrate that in the BM, V(D)J joining and switching are interchangeably inducible, providing an explanation for the hyper-IgE phenotype of Omenn syndrome. PMID:24240234

  15. Effect of joining the sectioned implant-supported prosthesis on the peri-implant strain generated in simulated mandibular model.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ipsha; Nair, K Chandrasekharan; Shetty, Jayakar

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the strain developed in simulated mandibular model before and after the joining of an implant-supported screw-retained prosthesis by different joining techniques, namely, arc welding, laser welding, and soldering. A specimen simulating a mandibular edentulous ridge was fabricated in heat-cured acrylic resin. 4-mm holes were drilled in the following tooth positions; 36, 33, 43, 46. Implant analogs were placed in the holes. University of California, Los Angeles, abutment was attached to the implant fixture. Eight strain gauges were attached to the acrylic resin model. Six similar models were made. Implant-supported screw-retained fixed prosthesis was fabricated in nickel-chromium alloy. A load of 400 N was applied on the prosthesis using universal testing machine. Resultant strain was measured in each strain gauge. All the prostheses were sectioned at the area between 36 and 33, 33 and 43, and 43 and 46 using 35 micrometer carborundum disc, and strain was measured in each strain gauge after applying a load of 400 N on the prosthesis. Specimens were joined by arc welding, soldering, and laser welding. After joining, a load of 400 N was applied on each prosthesis and the resultant strain was measured in each strain gauge. Highest mean strain values were recorded before sectioning of the prostheses (889.9 microstrains). Lowest mean strain values were recorded after sectioning the prosthesis and before reuniting it (225.0 microstrains). Sectioning and reuniting the long-span implant prosthesis was found to be a significant factor in influencing the peri-implant strain.

  16. Investigation of the conditions affecting the joining of Hungarian hospitals to an accreditation programme: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Margitai, Barnabás; Dózsa, Csaba; Bárdos-Csenteri, Orsolya Karola; Sándor, János; Gáll, Tibor; Gődény, Sándor

    2018-01-01

    Objective Quantitative studies have shown the various benefits for having accreditation in hospitals. However, neither of these explored the general conditions before applying for an accreditation. To close this gap, this study aimed to investigate the possible association between joining an accreditation programme with various hospital characteristics. Design A cross-sectional study was implemented using the databases of the 2013 Hungarian hospital survey and of the Hungarian State Treasury. Setting Public general hospitals in Hungary. Participants The analysis involved 44 public general hospitals, 14 of which joined the preparatory project for a newly developed accreditation programme. Main outcome measures The outcomes included the percentage of compliance in quality management, patient information and identification, internal professional regulation, safe surgery, pressure sore prevention, infection control, the opinions of the heads of quality management regarding the usefulness of quality management and clinical audits, and finally, the total debt of the hospital per bed and per discharged patient. Results According to our findings, the general hospitals joining the preparatory project of the accreditation programme performed better in four of the six investigated activities, the head of quality management had a better opinion on the usefulness of quality management, and both the debt per bed number and the debt per discharged patient were lower than those who did not join. However, no statistically significant differences between the two groups were found in any of the examined outcomes. Conclusions The findings suggest that hospitals applying for an accreditation programme do not differ significantly in characteristics from those which did not apply. This means that if in the future the accredited hospitals become better than other hospitals, then the improvement could be solely contributed to the accreditation. PMID:29391381

  17. From antisocial behavior to violence: a model for the amplifying role of coercive joining in adolescent friendships.

    PubMed

    Van Ryzin, Mark J; Dishion, Thomas J

    2013-06-01

    Aggression is one of the more stable characteristics of child and adolescent development, and violent behavior in early adulthood is often foreshadowed by aggressive behavior in childhood and early adolescence. Considerable evidence has linked coercive family interactions to aggressive behavior in childhood, but less research has been conducted on the joint role of family and peer interaction in the escalation of aggression to violence in adulthood. We coded family interactions at age 12-13 and friendship interaction at age 16-17 in a multiethnic sample of youth and families. Violence in young adulthood (age 22-23) was measured using self-report, criminal records, and parent report. We tested the hypothesis that a process of 'coercive joining' in friendship interactions mediated the relationship between coercive family interactions and serious violence. We found that observed coercive joining in friendships at age 16-17 predicted early-adulthood violent behavior over and above an established tendency toward antisocial behavior. We also found that observed coercive family interactions at age 12 predicted early-adulthood violence, and that coercive joining with friends fully mediated this link. These results significantly extend coercion theory by suggesting that coercive joining in the context of peer groups is an additional mechanism by which coercive processes in the family are extended and amplified to violent behavior in early adulthood. Our findings suggest the importance of addressing both individual interpersonal skills and self-organizing peer groups when intervening to prevent violent behavior. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry © 2012 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  18. Morphology controlled synthesis of 2-D Ni-Ni3S2 and Ni3S2 nanostructures on Ni foam towards oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Nitin Kaduba; Oh, Aram; Sa, Young Jin; Jin, Haneul; Baik, Hionsuck; Kim, Sang Gu; Lee, Suk Joong; Joo, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kwangyeol

    2017-03-01

    Catalysts for oxygen evolution reactions (OER) are at the heart of key renewable energy technologies, and development of non-precious metal catalysts with high activity and stability remain a great challenge in this field. Among various material candidates, metal sulfides are receiving increasing attention. While morphology-dependent catalytic performances are well established in noble metal-based catalysts, relatively little is known for the morphology‒catalytic performance relationship in metal sulfide catalysts. In this study, uniform spider web-like Ni nanosheets-Ni3S2 and honeycomb-like Ni3S2 structures are deposited on nickel foam (Ni3S2/NF) by a facile one-step hydrothermal synthetic route. When used as an oxygen evolution electrode, the spider web-like Ni-Ni3S2/NF with the large exposed surface area shown excellent catalytic activity and stability with an overpotential of 310 mV to achieve at 10 mA/cm2 and a Tafel slope of 63 mV/dec in alkaline media, which is superior to the honeycomb-like structure without Ni nanosheet. The low Tafel slope of the spider web-like Ni-Ni3S2/NF represents one of the best OER kinetics among nickel sulfide-based OER catalysts. The results point to the fact that performance of the metal sulfide electrocatalysts might be fine-tuned and optimized with morphological controls.

  19. First principles exploration of NiO and its ions NiO+ and NiO-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakellaris, Constantine N.; Mavridis, Aristides

    2013-02-01

    We present a high level ab initio study of NiO and its ions, NiO+ and NiO-. Employing variational multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) and single reference coupled-cluster methods combined with basis sets of quintuple quality, 54, 20, and 10 bound states of NiO, NiO+, and NiO- have been studied. For all these states, complete potential energy curves have been constructed at the MRCI level of theory; in addition, for the ground states of the three species core subvalence (3s23p6/Ni) and scalar relativistic effects have been taken into account. We report energetics, spectroscopic parameters, dipole moments, and spin-orbit coupling constants. The agreement with experiment is in the case of NiO good, but certain discrepancies that need further investigation have arisen in the case of the anion whose ground state remains computationally a tantalizing matter. The cation is experimentally almost entirely unexplored, therefore, the study of many states shall prove valuable to further investigators. The ground state symmetry, bond distances, and binding energies of NiO and NiO+ are (existing experimental values in parenthesis), X3Σ-(X3Σ-), re = 1.606 (1.62712) Å, D0 = 88.5 (89.2 ± 0.7) kcal/mol, and X4Σ-(?), re = 1.60(?) Å, D0 = 55 (62.4 ± 2.4) kcal/mol, respectively. The ground state of NiO- is 4Σ- (but 2Π experimentally) with D0 = 85-87 (89.2 ± 0.7) kcal/mol.

  20. Low Activation Joining of SiC/SiC Composites for Fusion Applications: Modeling Miniature Torsion Tests

    SciT

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2014-06-30

    The use of SiC and SiC-composites in fission or fusion environments appears to require joining methods for assembling systems. The international fusion community has designed miniature torsion specimens for joint testing and for irradiation in HFIR. Therefore, miniature torsion joints were fabricated using displacement reactions between Si and TiC to produce Ti3SiC2 + SiC joints with CVD-SiC that were tested in shear prior to and after HFIR irradiation. However, these torsion specimens fail out-of-plane, which causes difficulties in determining a shear strength for the joints or for comparing unirradiated and irradiated joints. A finite element damage model has been developedmore » that indicates fracture is likely to occur within the joined pieces to cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. The implications for torsion shear joint data based on this sample design are discussed.« less

  1. Alleviation of whirl-flutter on a joined-wing tilt-rotor aircraft configuration using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanaken, Johannes M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using active controls to delay the onset of whirl-flutter on a joined-wing tilt rotor aircraft was investigated. The CAMRAD/JA code was used to obtain a set of linear differential equations which describe the motion of the joined-wing tilt-rotor aircraft. The hub motions due to wing/body motion is a standard input to CAMRAD/JA and were obtained from a structural dynamics model of a representative joined-wing tilt-rotor aircraft. The CAMRAD/JA output, consisting of the open-loop system matrices, and the airframe free vibration motion were input to a separate program which performed the closed-loop, active control calculations. An eigenvalue analysis was performed to determine the flutter stability of both open- and closed-loop systems. Sensor models, based upon the feedback of pure state variables and based upon hub-mounted sensors, providing physically measurable accelerations, were evaluated. It was shown that the onset of tilt-rotor whirl-flutter could be delayed from 240 to above 270 knots by feeding back vertical and span-wise accelerations, measured at the rotor hub, to the longitudinal cyclic pitch. Time response calculations at a 270-knot cruise condition showed an active cyclic pitch control level of 0.009 deg, which equates to a very acceptable 9 pound active-control force applied at the rotor hub.

  2. Biomimetic-inspired joining of composite with metal structures: A survey of natural joints and application to single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgoulas, Evangelos Ioannis; Sutcliffe, Michael P. F.

    2014-03-01

    Joining composites with metal parts leads, inevitably, to high stress concentrations because of the material property mismatch. Since joining composite to metal is required in many high performance structures, there is a need to develop a new multifunctional approach to meet this challenge. This paper uses the biomimetics approach to help develop solutions to this problem. Nature has found many ingenious ways of joining dissimilar materials and making robust attachments, alleviating potential stress concentrations. A literature survey of natural joint systems has been carried out, identifying and analysing different natural joint methods from a mechanical perspective. A taxonomy table was developed based on the different methods/functions that nature successfully uses to attach dissimilar tissues (materials). This table is used to understand common themes or approaches used in nature for different joint configurations and functionalities. One of the key characteristics that nature uses to joint dissimilar materials is a transitional zone of stiffness in the insertion site. Several biomimetic-inspired metal-to-composite (steel-to-CFRP), adhesively bonded, Single Lap Joints (SLJs) were numerically investigated using a finite element analysis. The proposed solutions offer a transitional zone of stiffness of one joint part to reduce the material stiffness mismatch at the joint. An optimisation procedure was used to identify the variation in material stiffness which minimises potential failure of the joint. It was found that the proposed biomimetic SLJs reduce the asymmetry of the stress distribution along the adhesive area.

  3. Perceptions of house officers working in hospitals of Lahore about joining the field of anaesthesiology as a career.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Sohail; Mahboob, Usman

    2016-10-01

    To determine the perceptions of house officers working in hospitals about joining anaesthesiology as a career. This quantitative, descriptive questionnaire-based study was carried out from September 2014 to February 2015 in 26 teaching hospitals of Lahore, Pakistan, and comprised house officers. Those with at least three months of working experience in anaesthesiology were included. They were approached in their respective departments and a validated self-reporting questionnaire was delivered to them and received back by hand. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis. Of the 73 house officers approached, 53(72.6%) responded; 35(66%) men and 18(33%) women. Overall, 25(47.16%) respondents refused to join anaesthesiology as a career and 27(50.94%) included it in their first three career choices. Moreover, 25(47.16%) cited minimal interaction with patient as a reason for not taking anaesthesia as a career choice; 29(56.6%) of the respondents believed an anaesthetist had no or little role in surgery. Change in attitude about anaesthesiology as a specialty after having an anaesthesia rotation was mentioned by 26(49.05%) respondents. House officers had reservations about joining anaesthesiology as a career. The findings are suggestive of a positive effect of anaesthesiology house job on house officers attitude about the specialty.

  4. Low joining efficiency and non-conservative repair of two distant double-strand breaks in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boubakour-Azzouz, Imenne; Ricchetti, Miria

    2008-02-01

    Efficient and faithful repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is critical for genome stability. To understand whether cells carrying a functional repair apparatus are able to efficiently heal two distant chromosome ends and whether this DNA lesion might result in genome rearrangements, we induced DSBs in genetically modified mouse embryonic stem cells carrying two I-SceI sites in cis separated by a distance of 9 kbp. We show that in this context non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) can repair using standard DNA pairing of the broken ends, but it also joins 3' non-complementary overhangs that require unusual joining intermediates. The repair efficiency of this lesion appears to be dramatically low and the extent of genome alterations was high in striking contrast with the spectra of repair events reported for two collinear DSBs in other experimental systems. The dramatic decline in accuracy suggests that significant constraints operate in the repair process of these distant DSBs, which may also control the low efficiency of this process. These findings provide important insights into the mechanism of repair by NHEJ and how this process may protect the genome from large rearrangements.

  5. Aeroelastic Analysis Of Joined Wing Of High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) Aircraft Based On The Sensor-Craft Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisarla, Soujanya; Ghia, Urmila; "Karman" Ghia, Kirti

    2002-11-01

    Towards a comprehensive aeroelastic analysis of a joined wing, fluid dynamics and structural analyses are initially performed separately. Steady flow calculations are currently performed using 3-D compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Flow analysis of M6-Onera wing served to validate the software for the fluid dynamics analysis. The complex flow field of the joined wing is analyzed and the prevailing fluid dynamic forces are computed using COBALT software. Currently, these forces are being transferred as fluid loads on the structure. For the structural analysis, several test cases were run considering the wing as a cantilever beam; these served as validation cases. A nonlinear structural analysis of the wing is being performed using ANSYS software to predict the deflections and stresses on the joined wing. Issues related to modeling, and selecting appropriate mesh for the structure were addressed by first performing a linear analysis. The frequencies and mode shapes of the deformed wing are obtained from modal analysis. Both static and dynamic analyses are carried out, and the results obtained are carefully analyzed. Loose coupling between the fluid and structural analyses is currently being examined.

  6. Characteristics of physicians and patients who join team-based primary care practices: evidence from Quebec's Family Medicine Groups.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Natalie; Strumpf, Erin; Fiset-Laniel, Julie; Tousignant, Pierre; Roy, Yves

    2014-06-01

    New models of delivering primary care are being implemented in various countries. In Quebec, Family Medicine Groups (FMGs) are a team-based approach to enhance access to, and coordination of, care. We examined whether physicians' and patients' characteristics predicted their participation in this new model of primary care. Using provincial administrative data, we created a population cohort of Quebec's vulnerable patients. We collected data before the advent of FMGs on patients' demographic characteristics, chronic illnesses and health service use, and their physicians' demographics, and practice characteristics. Multivariate regression was used to identify key predictors of joining a FMG among both patients and physicians. Patients who eventually enrolled in a FMG were more likely to be female, reside outside of an urban region, have a lower SES status, have diabetes and congestive heart failure, visit the emergency department for ambulatory sensitive conditions and be hospitalized for any cause. They were also less likely to have hypertension, visit an ambulatory clinic and have a usual provider of care. Physicians who joined a FMG were less likely to be located in urban locations, had fewer years in medical practice, saw more patients in hospital, and had patients with lower morbidity. Physicians' practice characteristics and patients' health status and health care service use were important predictors of joining a FMG. To avoid basing policy decisions on tenuous evidence, policymakers and researchers should account for differential selection into team-based primary health care models. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Electroplating of aluminium microparticles with nickel to synthesise reactive core-shell structures for thermal joining applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, S.; Zaeh, M. F.

    2018-06-01

    Reactive particles represent a promising alternative for effectively joining components with freeform surfaces and different material properties. While the primary application of reactive systems is combustion synthesis for the production of high-performance alloys, the highly exothermic reaction can also be used to firmly bond thermosensitive joining partners. Core-shell structures are of special interest, since they function as separate microreactors. In this paper, a method to synthesise reactive nickel-aluminium core-shell structures via a two-step plating process is described. Based on an electroless process, the natural oxide layer of the aluminium particles is removed and substituted with a thin layer of nickel. Subsequently, the pre-treated particles are electroplated with nickel. The high reactivity of aluminium and the oxide layer play a significant role in adjusting the process parameters of the Watts bath. Additionally, the developed experimental set-up is introduced and the importance of process control is shown. In order to achieve reproducible results, the electroplating process was automated. Ignition tests with electromagnetic waves demonstrated that the particles undergo an exothermic reaction. Therefore, they can be used as a heat source in thermal joining applications.

  8. Willingness to join and pay for the newly proposed social health insurance among teachers in Wolaita Sodo Town, South Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Agago, Tesfamichael Alaro; Woldie, Mirkuzie; Ololo, Shimeles

    2014-07-01

    Cost-sharing between beneficiaries and governments is critical to achieve universal health care coverage. To address this, Ethiopia is currently introducing Social Health Insurance. However, there has been limited evidence on willingness to join the newly proposed insurance scheme in the country. The purpose of this study is to assess willingness to join and pay for the scheme among teachers in Wolaita Sodo Town government educational institutions, South Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted from February 5 to March 10, 2012 on 335 teachers. Stratified simple random sampling technique was used and data were collected using structured interviewer administered questionnaire. Binary and multiple logistic regressions were used to estimate the crude and adjusted odds ratios for willingness to pay. Three hundred twenty-eight teachers participated in the study with response rate of 98%. About 55% of the teachers had never heard of any type of health insurance scheme. However, 74.4% of them were willing to pay for the suggested insurance scheme. About 47% of those who were willing to pay agreed to contribute greater than or equal to 4% of their monthly salaries. Willingness to pay was more likely among those who had heard about health insurance, had previous history of inability to pay for medical bills and achieved higher educational status. The majority of the teachers were willing to join social health insurance; however, adequate awareness creation and discussion should be made with all employees at various levels for the successful implementation of the scheme.

  9. Porous NiTi shape memory alloys produced by SHS: microstructure and biocompatibility in comparison with Ti2Ni and TiNi3.

    PubMed

    Bassani, Paola; Panseri, Silvia; Ruffini, Andrea; Montesi, Monica; Ghetti, Martina; Zanotti, Claudio; Tampieri, Anna; Tuissi, Ausonio

    2014-10-01

    Shape memory alloys based on NiTi have found their main applications in manufacturing of new biomedical devices mainly in surgery tools, stents and orthopedics. Porous NiTi can exhibit an engineering elastic modulus comparable to that of cortical bone (12-17 GPa). This condition, combined with proper pore size, allows good osteointegration. Open cells porous NiTi was produced by self propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS), starting from Ni and Ti mixed powders. The main NiTi phase is formed during SHS together with other Ni-Ti compounds. The biocompatibility of such material was investigated by single culture experiment and ionic release on small specimen. In particular, NiTi and porous NiTi were evaluated together with elemental Ti and Ni reference metals and the two intermetallic TiNi3, Ti2Ni phases. This approach permitted to clearly identify the influence of secondary phases in porous NiTi materials and relation with Ni-ion release. The results indicated, apart the well-known high toxicity of Ni, also toxicity of TiNi3, whilst phases with higher Ti content showed high biocompatibility. A slightly reduced biocompatibility of porous NiTi was ascribed to combined effect of TiNi3 presence and topography that requires higher effort for the cells to adapt to the surface.

  10. Ferromagnetic resonance investigation in as-prepared NiFe/FeMn/NiFe trilayer

    SciT

    Yuan, S. J.; Xu, K.; Yu, L. M.

    2007-06-01

    NiFe/FeMn/NiFe trilayer prepared by dc magnetron sputtering was systematically investigated by ferromagnetic resonance technique (FMR) at room temperature. For NiFe/FeMn/NiFe trilayer, there are two distinct resonance peaks both in in-plane and out-of-plane FMR spectra, which are attributed to the two NiFe layers, respectively. The isotropic in-plane resonance field shift is negative for the bottom NiFe layer, while positive for the top NiFe layer. And, such phenomena result from the negative interfacial perpendicular anisotropy at the bottom NiFe/FeMn interface and positive interfacial perpendicular anisotropy at the top FeMn/NiFe interface. The linewidth of the bottom NiFe layer is larger than that ofmore » the top NiFe layer, which might be related to the greater exchange coupling at the bottom NiFe/FeMn interface.« less

  11. Ni-P/Zn-Ni compositionally modulated multilayer coatings - Part 2: Corrosion and protection mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadormanesh, Behrouz; Ghorbani, Mohammad

    2018-06-01

    The Ni-P/Zn-Ni compositionally modulated multilayer coatings CMMCs were electrodeposited from a single bath by switching the deposition current density. The corrosion resistance of the deposits was studied and compared with that of monolayers of Ni-P and Zn-Ni alloys via Tafel polarization, EIS and salt spray tests. Characterization of corrosion products by means of EDS and XRD revealed more details from the corrosion mechanism of the monolayers and multilayers. The corrosion current density of Ni-P/Zn-Ni CMMCs were around one tenth of Zn-Ni monolayer. The CMMC with incomplete layers performed lower polarization resistance and higher corrosion current density compared to the CMMC with complete layers. The electrical circuit that was proposed for modeling the corrosion process based on the EIS spectrum, proved that layering reduces the porosity and consequently improves the barrier properties. Although, layering of Zn-Ni layers with Ni-P deposits increased the time to red rust in salt spray test, the time for white rust formation decreased. The corrosion mechanism of both Zn-Ni and Ni-P (containing small amount of Zn) was preferential dissolution of Zn and the corrosion products were comprised of mainly Zn hydroxychloride and Zn hydroxycarbonate. Also, Ni and P did not take part in the corrosion products. Based on the electrochemical character of the layers and the morphology of the corroded surface, the corrosion mechanism of multilayers was discussed.

  12. [Morita Therapy to Treat Depression: When and How to Encourage Patients to Join Activities].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kei

    2015-01-01

    The author discusses how Morita therapy is used to treat depression, illustrated with a clinical case, and makes comparisons between Morita therapy and behavioral activation (BA). The author further examines the issue of when and how to encourage patients to join activities in clinical practice in Japan. Both Morita therapy and BA share at least a common view that it is effective to activate patients' constructive behavior at a certain point in depression treatment. However, BA therapists, compared to Morita therapists, seem to pay less attention to the necessity of resting and the appropriate timing for introducing behavioral activation. There may be some contextual differences between depressive patients in Japan and those in North America. In the case of Japanese patients, exhaustion from overwork is often considered a factor triggering the development of depression. At the same time, the Morita-based pathogenic model of depression seems different from BA's model of the same disorder. BA's approach to understanding depression may be considered a psychological (behavioristic) model. In this model, the cause of depression lies in: (a) a lack of positive reinforcement, and (b) negative reinforcement resulting from avoidance of the experience of discomfort. Therefore, the basic strategy of BA is to release depressive patients from an avoidant lifestyle, which serves as a basis for negative reinforcement, and to redirect the patients toward activities which offer the experience of positive reinforcement BA is primarily practiced by clinical psychologists in the U. S. while psychiatrists prescribe medication as a medical service. On the other hand, the clinical practice of treating depression in Japan is based primarily on medical models of depression. This is also true of Morita therapy, but in a broad sense. While those who follow medical models in a narrow sense try to identify the cause of illness and then remove it, Morita therapists pay more attention to the

  13. Polymorphisms in nonhomologous end-joining genes associated with breast cancer risk and chromosomal radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Willems, Petra; Claes, Kathleen; Baeyens, Ans; Vandersickel, Veerle; Werbrouck, Joke; De Ruyck, Kim; Poppe, Bruce; Van den Broecke, Rudy; Makar, Amin; Marras, Emanuela; Perletti, Gianpaolo; Thierens, Hubert; Vral, Anne

    2008-02-01

    As enhanced chromosomal radiosensitivity (CRS) results from non- or misrepaired double strand breaks (DSBs) and is a hallmark for breast cancer and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DSB repair genes, such as non homologous end-joining (NHEJ) genes, could be involved in CRS and genetic predisposition to breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the association of five SNPs in three different NHEJ genes with breast cancer in a population-based case-control setting. The total patient population composed of a selected group of patients with a family history of the disease and an unselected group, consisting mainly of sporadic cases. SNP analysis showed that the c.2099-2408G>A SNP (XRCC5Ku80) [corrected] has a significant, positive odds ratio (OR) of 2.81 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.30-6.05) for the heterozygous (He) and homozygous variant (HV) genotypes in the selected patient group. For the c.-1310 C>G SNP (XRCC6Ku70)[corrected] a significant OR of 1.85 (95%CI: 1.01-3.41) was found for the He genotype in the unselected patient group. On the contrary, the HV genotype of c.1781G>T (XRCC6Ku70) [corrected] displays a significant, negative OR of 0.43 (95%CI: 0.18-0.99) in the total patient population. The He+HV genotypes of the c.2099-2408G>A SNP (XRCC5Ku80) [corrected] also showed high and significant ORs in the group of "radiosensitive," familial breast cancer patients. In conclusion, our results provide preliminary evidence that the variant allele of c.-1310C>G (XRCC6Ku70) [corrected]and c.2099-2408G>A (XRCC5Ku80) [corrected] are risk alleles for breast cancer as well as CRS. The HV genotype of c.1781G>T (XRCC6Ku70) [corrected] on the contrary, seems to protect against breast cancer and ionizing radiation induced micronuclei. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Alternatives for joining Si wafers to strain-accommodating Cu for high-power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Nicholas; Messler, Robert W.; Khatri, Subhash

    2001-10-01

    Differences in the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) between silicon wafers and underlying copper electrodes have led to the use of purely mechanical dry pressure contacts for primary electrical and thermal connections in high-power solid-state electronic devices. These contacts are limited by their ability to dissipate I2R heat from within the device and by their thermal fatigue life. To increase heat dissipation and effectively deal with the CTE mismatch, metallurgical bonding of the silicon to a specially-structured, strain-accommodating copper electrode has been proposed. This study was intended to seek alternative methods for and demonstrate the feasibility of bonding Si to structured Cu in high-power solid-state devices. Three different but fundamentally related fluxless approaches identified and preliminarily assessed were: (1) conventional Sn-Ag eutectic solder; (2) a new, commercially-available active solder based on the Sn-Ag eutectic; and (3) solid-liquid interdiffusion bonding using the Au-In system. Metallurgical joints were made with varying quality levels (according to nonde-structive ultrasonic C-scan mapping, SEM, and electron microprobe) using each approach. Mechanical shear testing resulted in cohesive failure within the Si or the filler alloys. The best approach, in which eutectic Sn-Ag solder in pre-alloyed foil form was employed on Si and Cu substrates metallized (from the substrate outward) with Ti, Ni and Au, exhibited joint thermal conduction 74% better than dry pressure contacts.

  15. Metallurgical and Mechanical Characterization of High Temperature Titanium Alloys Joined by Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, Kapil Dev

    In the world of joining, riveting and additive manufacturing, weight reduction, and omission of defects (at both macro and micro level) remain of paramount. Therefore, in the wake of ubiquitous fusion welding (FW) and widely accepted approach of riveting using Inconel bolts to resist corrosion at higher temperature, friction stir welding (FSW) has emerged as a novice jewel in friction based additive manufacturing industry. With advancements in automation of welding process and tool material, FSW of materials with higher work hardening such as steel and titanium has also become probable. Process and property relations associated with FSW are inevitable in case of dissimilar titanium alloys, due to presence of heterogeneity (whether atrocious or advantageous) in and around the weld nugget. These process property relationships are needed to be studied and addressed properly in order to optimize the processing window for improved mechanical and metallurgical properties. In this study FSWed similar and dissimilar butt joints of α+β, and near α titanium, alloys have been produced for varying processing conditions in order to study the effect of rotation speed (rpm) and traverse speed (TS; mm-min-1). The aim of this study is to assess the effect of tool geometry, tool rpm, TS on microstructure and mechanical properties of most widely used α+β titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V (Ti-64), standard grain and fine grain in addition to α+β,Ti-5Al-4V (T-54M), standard grain, and near α, Ti-6Al-2Mo-4Zr-2Sn (Ti-6242), standard grain (SG) and fine grain (FG). During FSW, a unique α+β fine-grained microstructure has been formed depending on whether or not the peak temperature in the weld nugget (WN) reached above or below β transus temperature. The resulting microstructure consists of acicular α+β, emanating from the prior β grain boundary as the weld cools off. The changes in the microstructure are observed by optical microscopy (OM). Later, a detailed analysis of material

  16. Requirement for XLF/Cernunnos in alignment-based gap filling by DNA polymerases lambda and mu for nonhomologous end joining in human whole-cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Akopiants, Konstantin; Zhou, Rui-Zhe; Mohapatra, Susovan; Valerie, Kristoffer; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Chen, David J; Revy, Patrick; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Povirk, Lawrence F

    2009-07-01

    XLF/Cernunnos is a core protein of the nonhomologous end-joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. To better define the role of Cernunnos in end joining, whole-cell extracts were prepared from Cernunnos-deficient human cells. These extracts effected little joining of DNA ends with cohesive 5' or 3' overhangs, and no joining at all of partially complementary 3' overhangs that required gap filling prior to ligation. Assays in which gap-filled but unligated intermediates were trapped using dideoxynucleotides revealed that there was no gap filling on aligned DSB ends in the Cernunnos-deficient extracts. Recombinant Cernunnos protein restored gap filling and end joining of partially complementary overhangs, and stimulated joining of cohesive ends more than twentyfold. XLF-dependent gap filling was nearly eliminated by immunodepletion of DNA polymerase lambda, but was restored by addition of either polymerase lambda or polymerase mu. Thus, Cernunnos is essential for gap filling by either polymerase during nonhomologous end joining, suggesting that it plays a major role in aligning the two DNA ends in the repair complex.

  17. Cyclic and isothermal oxidation behavior at 1100 and 1200 C of Ni-20Cr, Ni-20Cr-3Mn, Ni-20Cr-3Si, and Ni-40Cr alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Alloys of Ni-20Cr, Ni-20Cr-3Mn, Ni-20Cr-3Si, and Ni-40Cr were cyclically oxidized at 1100 and 1200 C for up to 100 hours. Oxidation behavior was judged by sample thickness and weight change, metallography, diffraction, and microprobe analysis. The least attacked were Ni-40Cr and Ni-20Cr-3Si. The alloy Ni-20Cr-3Mn was much less attacked than Ni-20Cr, but more than the other alloys. The formation of Cr2O3 accounted for the increased resistance of Ni-Cr and Ni-20Cr-3Si, and the formation of MnCr2O4 accounts for the improvement in Ni-20Cr-3mn over Ni-20Cr.

  18. Asymmetrical interfacial reactions of Ni/SAC101(NiIn)/Ni solder joint induced by current stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chen-Yi; Chiu, Tsung-Chieh; Lin, Kwang-Lung

    2018-03-01

    An electric current can asymmetrically trigger either atomic migration or interfacial reactions between a cathode and an anode. The present study investigated the dissolution of metallization and formation of an interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) in the Cu/Ni/Sn1.0Ag0.1Cu0.02Ni0.05In/Ni/Cu solder joint at various current densities in the order of 103 A/cm2 at temperatures ranging from 100 °C to 150 °C. The polarization behavior of Ni dissolution and IMC formation under current stressing were systematically investigated. The asymmetrical interfacial reactions of the solder joint were found to be greatly influenced by ambient temperature. The dissolution of Ni and its effect on interfacial IMC formation were also discussed.

  19. Preparation and characterization of Ni-P/Ni3.1B composite alloy coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yurong; He, Jiawei; Wang, Wenchang; Shi, Jianhua; Mitsuzaki, Naotoshi; Chen, Zhidong

    2014-02-01

    The preparation of Ni-P/Ni3.1B composite alloy coating on the surface of copper was achieved by co-deposition of Ni3.1B nanoparticles with Ni-P coating during electroless plating. Ni-P-B alloy coating was obtained by heat-treating the as-plated Ni-P/Ni3.1B composite coating. The effect of the concentration of sodium alginate, borax, thiourea, Ni3.1B, temperature, and pH value on the deposition rate and B content were investigated and determined to be: 30 g L-1, 10 g L-1, 2 mg L-1, 20 mg L-1, 70 °C and 9.0 , respectively. Sodium alginate and thiourea were played as surfactant for coating Ni3.1B nanoparticles and stabilizer for the plating bath, respectively. Ni-P/Ni3.1B composite coating had good performance such as corrosion resistance and solderability.

  20. Who is El Niño?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philander, S. George

    It is a curious story, about a phenomenon we first welcomed as a blessing but now view with dismay, if not horror [Philander, 1998]. We named it El Niño for the child Jesus, provided it with relatives—La Niña and ENSO—and are devoting innumerable studies to the description and idealization of this family. These scriptures provide such a broad spectrum of historical, cultural, and scientific perspectives that there is now confusion about the identity of El Niño. Trenberth [1997] summarizes the situation as follows.The atmospheric component tied to El Niño is termed the “Southern Oscillation.” Scientists often call the phenomenon where the atmosphere and ocean collaborate ENSO, short for El Niño-Southern Oscillation. El Niño then corresponds to the warm phase of ENSO. The opposite “La Niña” (“the girl” in Spanish) phase consists of a basinwide cooling of the tropical Pacific and thus the cold phase of ENSO. However, for the public, the term for the whole phenomenon is “El Niño.”