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Sample records for zeolitized fly ash

  1. Fly ash based zeolitic pigments for application in anticorrosive paints

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Ruchi, E-mail: shawruchi1@gmail.com; Tiwari, Sangeeta, E-mail: stiwari2@amity.edu

    2016-04-13

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the utilization of waste fly ash in anticorrosive paints. Zeolite NaY was synthesized from waste fly ash and subsequently modified by exchanging its nominal cation Na{sup +} with Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+} ions. The metal ion exchanged zeolite was then used as anticorrosive zeolitic pigments in paints. The prepared zeolite NaY was characterized using X-Ray diffraction technique and Scanning electron microscopy. The size, shape and density of the prepared fly ash based pigments were determined by various techniques. The paints were prepared by using fly ash based zeolitic pigments in epoxymore » resin and the percentages of pigments used in paints were 2% and 5%. These paints were applied to the mild steel panels and the anticorrosive properties of the pigments were assessed by the electrochemical spectroscopy technique (EIS).« less

  2. Hierarchical zeolites from class F coal fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitta, Pallavi

    Fly ash, a coal combustion byproduct is classified as types class C and class F. Class C fly ash is traditionally recycled for concrete applications and Class F fly ash often disposed in landfills. Class F poses an environmental hazard due to disposal and leaching of heavy metals into ground water and is important to be recycled in order to mitigate the environmental challenges. A major recycling option is to reuse the fly ash as a low-cost raw material for the production of crystalline zeolites, which serve as catalysts, detergents and adsorbents in the chemical industry. Most of the prior literature of fly ash conversion to zeolites does not focus on creating high zeolite surface area zeolites specifically with hierarchical pore structure, which are very important properties in developing a heterogeneous catalyst for catalysis applications. This research work aids in the development of an economical process for the synthesis of high surface area hierarchical zeolites from class F coal fly ash. In this work, synthesis of zeolites from fly ash using classic hydrothermal treatment approach and fusion pretreatment approach were examined. The fusion pretreatment method led to higher extent of dissolution of silica from quartz and mullite phases, which in turn led to higher surface area and pore size of the zeolite. A qualitative kinetic model developed here attributes the difference in silica content to Si/Al ratio of the beginning fraction of fly ash. At near ambient crystallization temperatures and longer crystallization times, the zeolite formed is a hierarchical faujasite with high surface area of at least 360 m2/g. This work enables the large scale recycling of class F coal fly ash to produce zeolites and mitigate environmental concerns. Design of experiments was used to predict surface area and pore sizes of zeolites - thus obviating the need for intense experimentation. The hierarchical zeolite catalyst supports tested for CO2 conversion, yielded hydrocarbons

  3. Synthesis and characterization of zeolite from coal fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Luo, Qiong; Wang, Guodong; Li, Xianlong; Na, Ping

    2018-05-01

    Fly ash (FA) from coal-based thermal power plant was used to synthesize zeolite in NaOH solution with hydrothermal method in this work. Firstly, the effects of calcination and acid treatment on the removal of impurities in fly ash were studied. Then based on the pretreated FA, the effects of alkali concentration, reaction temperature and Si/Al ratio on the synthesis of zeolite were studied in detail. The mineralogy, morphology, thermal behavior, infrared spectrum and specific surface for the synthetic sample were investigated. The results indicated that calcination at 750 °C for 1.5 h can basically remove unburned carbon from FA, and 4 M hydrochloric acid treatment of calcined FA at 90 °C for 2 h will reduce the quality of about 34.3%wt, which are mainly iron, calcium and sulfur elements. The concentration of NaOH, reaction temperature and Si/Al ratio have important effect on the synthesis of zeolite. In this study, 0.5 M NaOH cannot obtain any zeolite. High temperature is beneficial to zeolite synthesis from FA, but easily lead to a variety of zeolites. The synthetic sample contains three kinds of zeolites such as zeolite P, sodalite and zeolite X, when the reaction conditions are 2 M NaOH and 120 °C for 24 h. In this research, quartz always exists in the synthetic sample, but will reduce with the increase of temperature. The synthetic zeolite has the specific surface area of about 42 m2 g‑1 and better thermal stability.

  4. Alkaline hydrothermal conversion of fly ash filtrates into zeolites 2: utilization in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Somerset, Vernon; Petrik, Leslie; Iwuoha, Emmanuel

    2005-01-01

    Filtrates were collected using a codisposal reaction wherein fly ash was reacted with acid mine drainage. These codisposal filtrates were then analyzed by X-ray Fluorescence spectrometry for quantitative determination of the SiO2 and Al2O3 content. Alkaline hydrothermal zeolite synthesis was then applied to the filtrates to convert the fly ash material into zeolites. The zeolites formed under the experimental conditions were faujasite, sodalite, and zeolite A. The use of the fly ash-derived zeolites and a commercial zeolite was explored in wastewater decontamination experiments as it was applied to acid mine drainage in different dosages. The concentrations of Ni, Zn, Cd, As, and Pb metal ions in the treated wastewater were investigated. The results of the treatment of the acid mine drainage with the prepared fly ash zeolites showed that the concentrations of Ni, Zn, Cd, and Hg were decreased as the zeolite dosages of the fly ash zeolite (FAZ1) increased.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of zeolites prepared from industrial fly ash.

    PubMed

    Franus, Wojciech; Wdowin, Magdalena; Franus, Małgorzata

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the possibility of using fly ash to produce synthetic zeolites. The synthesis class F fly ash from the Stalowa Wola SA heat and power plant was subjected to 24 h hydrothermal reaction with sodium hydroxide. Depending on the reaction conditions, three types of synthetic zeolites were formed: Na-X (20 g fly ash, 0.5 dm(3) of 3 mol · dm(-3) NaOH, 75 °C), Na-P1 (20 g fly ash, 0.5 dm(3) of 3 mol · dm(-3) NaOH, 95 °C), and sodalite (20 g fly ash, 0.8 dm(3) of 5 mol · dm(-3) NaOH + 0.4 dm(3) of 3 mol · dm(-3) NaCl, 95 °C). As synthesized materials were characterized to obtain mineral composition (X-ray diffractometry, Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometry), adsorption properties (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, N2 isotherm adsorption/desorption), and ion exchange capacity. The most effective reaction for zeolite preparation was when sodalite was formed and the quantitative content of zeolite from X-ray diffractometry was 90 wt%, compared with 70 wt% for the Na-X and 75 wt% for the Na-P1. Residues from each synthesis reaction were the following: mullite, quartz, and the remains of amorphous aluminosilicate glass. The best zeolitic material as characterized by highest specific surface area was Na-X at almost 166 m(2) · g(-1), while for the Na-P1 and sodalite it was 71 and 33 m(2) · g(-1), respectively. The ion exchange capacity decreased in the following order: Na-X at 1.8 meq · g(-1), Na-P1 at 0.72 meq · g(-1), and sodalite at 0.56 meq · g(-1). The resulting zeolites are competitive for commercially available materials and are used as ion exchangers in industrial wastewater and soil decontamination.

  6. Fly ash zeolite catalyst support for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campen, Adam

    This dissertation research aimed at evaluating a fly ash zeolite (FAZ) catalyst support for use in heterogeneous catalytic processes. Gas phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) over a fixed-bed of the prepared catalyst/FAZ support was identified as an appropriate process for evaluation, by comparison with commercial catalyst supports (silica, alumina, and 13X). Fly ash, obtained from the Wabash River Generating Station, was first characterized using XRD, SEM/EDS, particle size, and nitrogen sorption techniques. Then, a parametric study of a two-step alkali fusion/hydrothermal treatment process for converting fly ash to zeolite frameworks was performed by varying the alkali fusion agent, agent:flyash ratio, fusion temperature, fused ash/water solution, aging time, and crystallization time. The optimal conditions for each were determined to be NaOH, 1.4 g NaOH: 1 g fly ash, 550 °C, 200 g/L, 12 hours, and 48 hours. This robust process was applied to the fly ash to obtain a faujasitic zeolite structure with increased crystallinity (40 %) and surface area (434 m2/g). Following the modification of fly ash to FAZ, ion exchange of H+ for Na+ and cobalt incipient wetness impregnation were used to prepare a FTS catalyst. FTS was performed on the catalysts at 250--300 °C, 300 psi, and with a syngas ratio H2:CO = 2. The HFAZ catalyst support loaded with 11 wt% cobalt resulted in a 75 % carbon selectivity for C5 -- C18 hydrocarbons, while methane and carbon dioxide were limited to 13 and 1 %, respectively. Catalyst characterization was performed by XRD, N2 sorption, TPR, and oxygen pulse titration to provide insight to the behavior of each catalyst. Overall, the HFAZ compared well with silica and 13X supports, and far exceeded the performance of the alumina support under the tested conditions. The successful completion of this research could add value to an underutilized waste product of coal combustion, in the form of catalyst supports in heterogeneous catalytic processes.

  7. Zeolite formation from coal fly ash and its adsorption potential

    SciTech Connect

    Duangkamol Ruen-ngam; Doungmanee Rungsuk; Ronbanchob Apiratikul

    The possibility in converting coal fly ash (CFA) to zeolite was evaluated. CFA samples from the local power plant in Prachinburi province, Thailand, were collected during a 3-month time span to account for the inconsistency of the CFA quality, and it was evident that the deviation of the quality of the raw material did not have significant effects on the synthesis. The zeolite product was found to be type X. The most suitable weight ratio of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to CFA was approximately 2.25, because this gave reasonably high zeolite yield with good cation exchange capacity (CEC). The silica (Si)-to-aluminummore » (Al) molar ratio of 4.06 yielded the highest crystallinity level for zeolite X at 79% with a CEC of 240 meq/100 g and a surface area of 325 m{sup 2}/g. Optimal crystallization temperature and time were 90{sup o}C and 4 hr, respectively, which gave the highest CEC of approximately 305 meq/100 g. Yields obtained from all experiments were in the range of 50-72%. 29 refs., 5 tabs., 7 figs.« less

  8. Performance of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Removal in Petrochemical Wastewater by Zeolited Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Gu, Guizhou; Ji, Shenghao

    2018-05-01

    The zeolitized fly ash was synthesized by alkali melt hydrothermal method. The cation exchange capacity of zeolitized fly ash was far greater than the raw material fly ash. The main component was NaP1 zeolite (Na6Al6Si10O32·12H2O), followed by mullite, and a small amount of heterozygous crystals. The effect of synthetic zeolite dosage, pH value, adsorption time and reaction temperature on the effect of nitrogen and phosphorus removal in petrochemical wastewater were investigated. The results showed that when the zeolitized fly ash dosage was 9 g/L, the petrochemical wastewater pH value was 6∼8, adsorption time was 30 min and the reaction temperature was 30°C, the synthetic zeolite had the best effect on the removal of TN and TP in petrochemical wastewater, and the removal was 65.5%, 91.4% respectively. Besides, the concentrations of TN and TP in the effluent were 11.04 mg/L, 0.31 mg/L respectively. The concentrations met the sewage discharge standard in petrochemical industry of "Liaoning sewage comprehensive discharge standard" (DB21 1627-2008). This study was to realize the comprehensive utilization of solid waste and achieve the purpose of waste and waste.

  9. Removal of trivalent chromium from aqueous solution by zeolite synthesized from coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deyi; Sui, Yanming; He, Shengbing; Wang, Xinze; Li, Chunjie; Kong, Hainan

    2008-07-15

    The capability of 14 zeolites synthesized from different fly ashes (ZFAs) to sequestrate Cr(III) from aqueous solutions was investigated in a batch mode. The influence of pH on the sorption of Cr(III) was examined. ZFAs had a much greater ability than fly ash to remove Cr(III), due to the high cation exchange capacity (CEC) and the high acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of ZFAs. The mechanism of Cr(III) removal by ZFAs involved ion exchange and precipitation. A high-calcium content in both the fly ashes and ZFAs resulted in a high ANC value and, as a result, a high immobilization capacity for Cr(III). The pH strongly influenced Cr(III) removal by ZFAs. Inside the solubility range, removal of chromium increased with increasing pH. Hydroxysodalite made from a high-calcium fly ash had a higher sorptive capacity for Cr(III) than the NaP1 zeolite from medium- and low-calcium fly ashes. On the other hand, at pH values above the solubility range, the efficiency of chromium removal by the ZFAs approached 100% due to the precipitation of Cr(OH)3 on the sorbent surfaces. It is concluded that ZFAs and high-calcium fly ashes may be promising materials for the purification of Cr(III) from water/wastewater.

  10. Synthesis of zeolite NaA membrane from fused fly ash extract.

    PubMed

    Ameh, Alechine E; Musyoka, Nicholas M; Fatoba, Ojo O; Syrtsova, Daria A; Teplyakov, Vladimir V; Petrik, Leslie F

    2016-01-01

    Zeolite-NaA membranes were synthesized from an extract of fused South African fly ash on a porous titanium support by a secondary growth method. The influence of the synthesis molar regime on the formation of zeolite NaA membrane layer was investigated. Two synthesis mixtures were generated by adding either aluminium hydroxide or sodium aluminate to the fused fly ash extract. The feedstock material and the synthesized membranes were characterized by X-diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). It was found by XRD and SEM that the cubic crystals of a typical zeolite NaA with a dense intergrown layer was formed on the porous Ti support. The study shows that the source of Al used had an effect on the membrane integrity as sodium aluminate provided the appropriate amount of Na(+) to form a coherent membrane of zeolite NaA, whereas aluminium hydroxide did not. Morphological, the single hydrothermal stage seeded support formed an interlocked array of zeolite NaA particles with neighbouring crystals. Also, a robust, continuous and well-intergrown zeolite NaA membrane was formed with neighbouring crystals of zeolite fused to each other after the multiple stage synthesis. The synthesized membrane was permeable to He (6.0 × 10(6) L m(-2)h(-1) atm(-1)) and CO2 (5.6 × 10(6) L m(-2)h(-1) atm(-1)), which indicate that the layer of the membrane was firmly attached to the porous Ti support. Membrane selectivity was maintained showing membrane integrity with permselectivity of 1.1, showing that a waste feedstock, fly ash, could be utilized for preparing robust zeolite NaA membranes on Ti support.

  11. The Effect of an Ultrasound Radiation on the Synthesis of 4A Zeolite from Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanto, H.; Imani, N. A. C.; Aslamiyah, N. R.; Istirokhatun, T.; Robbani, M. H.

    2018-05-01

    The use of coal as a fuel source generates a lot of solid waste fly ash. Thus, efforts to reduce or utilize the amount of fly ash are urgently needed. This paper presents zeolite synthesis from fly ash. The fly ash was activated by using NaOH solution prior to fusing process with a weight ratio of 1:2 and mixing with distilled water at a weight ratio of 1:5. Thereafter, the addition of alumina with a concentration of 0.71 %, 1.42 %, 2.12 %, and 2.8 % w/v was performed. The effects of heating and ultrasound radiation on the characteristic of zeolite products were investigated. The results showed that the addition of alumina 2.8 % w/v resulted in the Si/Al ratio of zeolite 4A is ∼1. SEM images demonstrated that the presence of ultrasound wave resulted in crystals structure morphology as also supported by XRD characterization. The average crystal size for the ultrasonic treatment was 42.46 nm.

  12. Evaluating Growth of Zeolites on Fly Ash in Hydro-Thermally Heated Low Alkaline Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Bhagwanjee; Singh, D. N.

    2017-12-01

    Fly ash has been well established materials for synthesis of zeolites, under hydrothermally heated aqueous NaOH solution. Efficacy of such technique is reported to be improved when high molarity of NaOH is used. Consequently, highly alkaline waste solution, as by-product, is generally disposed of in the surrounding, which may contaminate the environment. In this context, less alkaline NaOH solution may become a safer option, which has not been tried in the past as per the literature. With this in view, the present study demonstrates effectiveness of the 0.5 M NaOH solution and critically monitors transition on the fly ash after hydrothermal treatment. As an enhancement over previous researchers, such activation of the fly ash finally results in remarkable morphological and mineralogical growth on the bulk material (the residue), which comprises of new nano-sized crystals (the zeolites Na-P1 and natrolite), after 24 h of activation of the fly ash.

  13. Optimized Production of Coal Fly Ash Derived Synthetic Zeolites for Mercury Removal from Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauanov, Z.; Shah, D.; Itskos, G.; Inglezakis, V.

    2017-09-01

    Coal fly ash (CFA) derived synthetic zeolites have become popular with recent advances and its ever-expanding range of applications, particularly as an adsorbent for water and gas purification and as a binder or additive in the construction industry and agriculture. Among these applications, perpetual interest has been in utilization of CFA derived synthetic zeolites for removal of heavy metals from wastewater. We herein focus on utilization of locally available CFA for efficient adsorption of mercury from wastewater. To this end, experimental conditions were investigated so that to produce synthetic zeolites from Kazakhstani CFAs with conversion into zeolite up to 78%, which has remarkably high magnetite content. In particular, the effect of synthesis reaction temperature, reaction time, and loading of adsorbent were systematically investigated and optimized. All produced synthetic zeolites and the respective CFAs were characterized using XRD, XRF, PSA and porosimetric instruments to obtain microstructural and mineralogical data. Furthermore, the synthesized zeolites were studied for the removal of mercury from aqueous solutions. A comparison of removal eficiency and its relationship to the physical and chemical properties of the synthetic zeolites were analyzed and interpreted.

  14. Efficiency of fly ash belite cement and zeolite matrices for immobilizing cesium.

    PubMed

    Goñi, S; Guerrero, A; Lorenzo, M P

    2006-10-11

    The efficiency of innovative matrices for immobilizing cesium is presented in this work. The matrix formulation included the use of fly ash belite cement (FABC-2-W) and gismondine-type Na-P1 zeolite, both of which are synthesized from fly ash of coal combustion. The efficiency for immobilizing cesium is evaluated from the leaching test ANSI/ANS 16.1-1986 at the temperature of 40 degrees C, from which the apparent diffusion coefficient of cesium is obtained. Matrices with 100% of FABC-2-W are used as a reference. The integrity of matrices is evaluated by porosity and pore-size distribution from mercury intrusion porosimetry, X-ray diffraction and nitrogen adsorption analyses. Both matrices can be classified as good solidify systems for cesium, specially the FABC-2-W/zeolite matrix in which the replacement of 50% of belite cement by the gismondine-type Na-P1 zeolite caused a decrease of two orders of magnitude of cesium mean Effective Diffusion Coefficient (D(e)) (2.8e-09 cm(2)/s versus 2.2e-07 cm(2)/s, for FABC-2-W/zeolite and FABC-2-W matrices, respectively).

  15. Preparation of fly ash based zeolite for removal of fluoride from drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Laxmidhar; Kar, Biswabandita; Dash, Subhakanta

    2018-05-01

    Fluoride contamination of drinking water is a worldwide phenomenon and scientists are working relentlessly to find ways to remove fluoride from drinking water. Out of the different methods employed for removal fluoride from drinking water adsorption process is the most suitable because in this process the adsorbent is regenerated and the process is cost effective. In the present study fly ash is used as the raw material, which is treated with alkali (NaOH) to form NaP1 zeolite. This zeolite is then subjected to characterization by standard procedures. It is found that the synthesized zeolite has more crystalline character than the raw fly ash and has also more voids and channels on its surface. The surface of the synthesized zeolite is modified with calcium chloride and the same is employed for removal of fluoride under varying pH, contact time, initial concentration of fluoride, temperature and adsorbent dose etc so as to assess the suitably or otherwise of the synthesized product.

  16. Adsorption of Crystal Violet Dye Using Zeolite A Synthesized From Coal Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumaeri; Kusumastuti, E.; Santosa, S. J.; Sutarno

    2017-02-01

    Adsorption of Crystal Violet (CV) dye using zeolite A synthesized from coal fly ash (ZA) has been done. Effect of pH, contact time, and the initial concentration of dye adsorption was studied in this adsorption. Model experimental of adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics were also studied. The adsorption is done in a batch reactor at room temperature. A total of 0.01 g of zeolite A was added to the Erlenmeyer flask 50 mL containing 20 mL of the dye solution of Crystal Violet in a variety of conditions of pH, contact time and initial concentration. Furthermore, Erlenmeyer flask and its contents were shaken using an orbital shaker at a speed of 200 rpm. After a specified period of adsorption, the solution was centrifuged for 2 minutes so that the solids separated from the solution. The concentration of the dye after adsorption determined using Genesis-20 Spectrophotometer. The results showed that the Zeolite A synthesized from coal fly ash could be used as an effective adsorbent for Crystal Violet dye. The optimum adsorption occurs at pH 6, and contact time 45 minutes. At the initial concentration of 2 to 6 mg/L, adsorption is reduced from 79 to 62.8%. Crystal Violet dye adsorption in zeolite A fulfilled kinetic model of pseudo-order 2 and model of Freundlich adsorption isotherm.

  17. Optimization of hydrothermal synthesis of pure phase zeolite Na-P1 from South African coal fly ashes.

    PubMed

    Musyoka, Nicholas M; Petrik, Leslie F; Gitari, Wilson M; Balfour, Gillian; Hums, Eric

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed at optimizing the synthesis conditions for pure phase zeolite Na-P1 from three coal fly ashes obtained from power stations in the Mpumalanga province of South Africa. Synthesis variables evaluated were: hydrothermal treatment time (12-48 hours), temperature (100-160°C) and varying molar quantities of water during the hydrothermal treatment step (H(2)O:SiO(2) molar ratio ranged between 0-0.49). The optimum synthesis conditions for preparing pure phase zeolite Na-P1 were achieved when the molar regime was 1 SiO(2): 0.36 Al(2)O(3): 0.59 NaOH: 0.49 H(2)O and ageing was done at 47°C for 48 hours. The optimum hydrothermal treatment time and temperature was 48 hours and 140°C, respectively. Fly ashes sourced from two coal-fired power plants (A, B) were found to produce nearly same high purity zeolite Na-P1 under identical conditions whereas the third fly ash (C) lead to a low quality zeolite Na-P1 under these conditions. The cation exchange capacity for the high pure phase was found to be 4.11 meq/g. These results highlight the fact that adjustment of reactant composition and presynthesis or synthesis parameters, improved quality of zeolite Na-P1 can be achieved and hence an improved potential for application of zeolites prepared from coal fly ash.

  18. Integrated synthesis of zeolites 4A and Na-P1 using coal fly ash for application in the formulation of detergents and swine wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ariela M; Horn, Martha B; Ferret, Lizete S; Azevedo, Carla M N; Pires, Marçal

    2015-04-28

    Several researchers have reported zeolite synthesis using coal ash for a wide range of applications. However, little attention has been given to green processes, including moderate synthesis conditions, using waste as raw material and effluent reuse or reduction. In this study, Brazilian coal fly ashes were used for integrated synthesis of zeolites 4A and Na-P1 by two different routes and under moderate operating conditions (temperature and pressure). Both procedures produced zeolites with similar conversions (zeolite 4A at 82% purity and zeolite Na-P1 at 57-61%) and high CEC values (zeolites 4A: 4.5meqCa(2+)g(-1) and zeolites Na-P1: 2.6-2.8meqNH4(+)g(-1)). However, process 1 generated less effluent for the zeolite mass produced (7mLg(-1)), with low residual Si and Al levels and 74% of the Si available in the coal fly ash incorporated into the zeolite, while only 55% is used in process 2. For use as a builder in detergents, synthetic zeolite 4A exhibited conformity parameters equal to or greater than those of the commercial zeolite adopted as reference. Treatment of swine wastewater with zeolite Na-P1 resulted in a high removal capacity for total ammoniacal nitrogen (31mgg(-1)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effective utilizations of palm oil mill fly ash for synthetic amorphous silica and carbon zeolite composite synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utama, P. S.; Saputra, E.; Khairat

    2018-04-01

    Palm Oil Mill Fly Ash (POMFA) the solid waste of palm oil industry was used as a raw material for synthetic amorphous silica and carbon zeolite composite synthesis in order to minimize the wastes of palm oil industry. The alkaline extraction combine with the sol-gel precipitation and mechanical fragmentation was applied to produce synthetic amorphous silica. The byproduct, extracted POMFA was rich in carbon and silica content in a significant amount. The microwave heated hydrothermal process used to synthesize carbon zeolite composite from the byproduct. The obtained silica had chemical composition, specific surface area and the micrograph similar to commercial precipitated silica for rubber filler. The microwave heated hydrothermal process has a great potential for synthesizing carbon zeolite composite. The process only needs one-step and shorter time compare to conventional hydrothermal process.

  20. Synthesis of zeolites Na-A and Na-X from tablet compressed and calcinated coal fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tao; Gao, Wenyan; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Yifu; Meng, Changgong

    2017-10-01

    Zeolites Na-A and Na-X are important synthetic zeolites widely used for separation and adsorption in industry. It is of great significance to develop energy-efficient routines that can synthesize zeolites Na-A and Na-X from low-cost raw materials. Coal fly ash (CFA) is the major residue from the combustion of coal and biomass containing more than 85% SiO2 and Al2O3, which can readily replace the conventionally used sodium silicate and aluminate for zeolite synthesis. We used Na2CO3 to replace the expensive NaOH used for the calcination of CFA and showed that tablet compression can enhance the contact with Na2CO3 for the activation of CFA through calcination for the synthesis of zeolites Na-A and Na-X under mild conditions. We optimized the control variables for zeolite synthesis and showed that phase-pure zeolite Na-A can be synthesized with CFA at reactant molar ratio, hydrothermal reaction temperature and reaction time of 1.3Na2O: 0.6Al2O3: 1SiO2: 38H2O at 80°C for 6 h, respectively, while phase-pure zeolite Na-X can be synthesized at 2.2Na2O: 0.2Al2O3: 1SiO2: 88H2O at 100°C for 8 h, respectively. The composition, morphology, specific surface area, vibration spectrum and thermogravimetry of synthesized Na-A and Na-X were further characterized.

  1. Zeolite formation from coal fly ash and heavy metal ion removal characteristics of thus-obtained Zeolite X in multi-metal systems.

    PubMed

    Jha, Vinay Kumar; Nagae, Masahiro; Matsuda, Motohide; Miyake, Michihiro

    2009-06-01

    Zeolitic materials have been prepared from coal fly ash as well as from a SiO(2)-Al(2)O(3) system upon NaOH fusion treatment, followed by subsequent hydrothermal processing at various NaOH concentrations and reaction times. During the preparation process, the starting material initially decomposed to an amorphous form, and the nucleation process of the zeolite began. The carbon content of the starting material influenced the formation of the zeolite by providing an active surface for nucleation. Zeolite A (Na-A) was transformed into zeolite X (Na-X) with increasing NaOH concentration and reaction time. The adsorption isotherms of the obtained Na-X based on the characteristics required to remove heavy ions such as Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) were examined in multi-metal systems. Thus obtained experimental data suggests that the Langmuir and Freundlich models are more accurate compared to the Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich (DKR) model. However, the sorption energy obtained from the DKR model was helpful in elucidating the mechanism of the sorption process. Further, in going from a single- to multi-metal system, the degree of fitting for the Freundlich model compared with the Langmuir model was favored due to its basic assumption of a heterogeneity factor. The Extended-Langmuir model may be used in multi-metal systems, but gives a lower value for equilibrium sorption compared with the Langmuir model.

  2. Removal of Pb(II) from wastewater using Al2O3-NaA zeolite composite hollow fiber membranes synthesized from solid waste coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Ji, Jiayou; Wang, Shulin; Xu, Chenxi; Yang, Kun; Xu, Man

    2018-09-01

    Al 2 O 3 -NaA zeolite composite hollow fiber membranes were successfully fabricated via hydrothermal synthesis by using industrial solid waste coal fly ash and porous Al 2 O 3 hollow fiber supports. The as-synthesized Al 2 O 3 -NaA zeolite composite hollow fiber membranes were then characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The hollow fiber membranes were used to remove lead ions (Pb(II), 50 mg L -1 ) from synthetic wastewater with a removal efficiency of 99.9% at 0.1 MPa after 12 h of filtration. This study showed that the Al 2 O 3 -NaA zeolite composite hollow fiber membranes (the pore size of the membrane was about 0.41 nm in diameter) synthesized from coal fly ash could be efficiently used for treating low concentration Pb(II) wastewater. It recycled solid waste coal fly ash not only to solve its environment problems, but also can produce high-value Al 2 O 3 -NaA zeolite composite hollow fiber membranes for separation application in treating wastewater containing Pb(II). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Simultaneous removal of aqueous Zn2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, and Pb2+ by zeolites synthesized from low-calcium and high-calcium fly ash.

    PubMed

    Ji, X D; Ma, Y Y; Peng, S H; Gong, Y Y; Zhang, F

    2017-10-01

    In this study, zeolites were synthesized from low-calcium (LCZ) and high-calcium (HCZ) fly ash, respectively. Subsequently, the zeolites were tested for their removal effectiveness for four aqueous cations, namely, Zn 2+ , Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ , and Pb 2+ , as a function of contact time, pH value, adsorbent dosage, and initial concentration of heavy metals. Both zeolites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, specific surface area, and cation exchange capacity. The results show that HCZ mainly consists of an unnamed zeolite (Na 6 [AlSiO 4 ] 6 ·4H 2 O), whereas LCZ mainly consists of faujasite-type zeolite. The optimum sorption conditions were pH = 6.0; adsorbent dosage = 1.0 g·L -1 ; temperature = 25 °C; contact time = 100 min; and initial heavy metal concentration = 100 mg·L -1 . The sorption kinetics of the four aqueous cations on both LCZ and HCZ followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the sorption isotherm data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model. For LCZ, the maximum adsorption capacities of Zn 2+ , Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ , and Pb 2+ were 155.76, 197.86, 123.76, and 186.22 mg·g -1 , respectively. For HCZ, the values were 154.08, 183.15, 118.91, and 191.94 mg·g -1 , respectively. The zeolites were regenerated by NaCl solution (1 mol·L -1 ) and showed high removal efficiency. In conclusion, zeolites produced by fly ash are promising materials for removing Zn 2+ , Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ , and Pb 2+ from wastewater.

  4. The influence of zeolites fly ash bead/TiO2 composite material surface morphologies on their adsorption and photocatalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu; Wang, Fazhou; Hakki, Amer; Macphee, Donald E.; Liu, Peng; Hu, Shuguang

    2017-01-01

    A low cost zeolite fly ash bead/TiO2 (ZFABT) composite materials with various surface structure features were prepared for describing those structures importance on TiO2 coating, adsorbability and photocatalytic performances. The results indicated that fly ash bead (FAB) surface was significantly altered by the precipitation/growth of secondary zeolite phases after alkali activation, which generates abundant open pores and stacked petal-liked spherical beads (∼2 μm, Sodalite zeolites). More importantly, this porosity increases as activation time was increased from 2 h to 12 h, through the precipitation of sodalite and then Na-P1 (lamellar crystals) and Na-X (octahedral crystals) zeolite structures. Compared to those of unsupported TiO2 or inactivated support/TiO2 samples, all of ZFABT samples exhibited a higher adsorption capacity and photocatalytic efficiency for RhB removal. However, adsorption is not only one factor to influence TiO2 surface reaction, the intraparticle diffusion rate of rhodamine B (RhB) molecules, and light penetration are also important parameters. Alkali activated 4 h ZFABT sample exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity, indicating its pore structure provided a better balance for those parameters to achieve a synergistic adsorption/photocatalytic process. The kinetics model suggested its high intraparticle diffusion rate allowed for more RhB molecules to easily reach the reaction surface, which is more important for high efficiency photocatalysis.

  5. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, David R.; Velenyi, Louis J.; Pepera, Marc A.; Dolhyj, Serge R.

    1986-01-01

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  6. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  7. Fly ash carbon passivation

    SciTech Connect

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most ofmore » the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.« less

  8. The application of silicalite-1/fly ash cenosphere (S/FAC) zeolite composite for the adsorption of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jia; Xu, Fang; Wang, Deju; Huang, Jue; Cai, Weimin

    2009-06-15

    Silicalite-1/fly ash cenosphere (S/FAC) zeolite composite has been applied for batch adsorption of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) from water systems. Here the key experimental conditions, including the ratio of initial MTBE concentration to the amount weight of S/FAC, adsorption time and temperature, have been discussed in detail. The results show that approximately 93-95% MTBE could be adsorbed with initial concentration of MTBE solution 1000 microg l(-1). The column flow-through experiments also prove the high capacity of S/FAC composite for MTBE removal. The distinct advantages of S/FAC zeolite composite as adsorbent lie in (1) enhanced adsorption rate and capacity based on hierarchical micro and meso/macroporosity of S/FAC; (2) more easily operation and recycling process by assembly of nano-sized silicalite-1 zeolite on FAC support.

  9. Microsphere zeolite materials derived from coal fly ash cenospheres as precursors to mineral-like aluminosilicate hosts for 135,137Cs and 90Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereshchagina, Tatiana A.; Vereshchagin, Sergei N.; Shishkina, Nina N.; Vasilieva, Nataly G.; Solovyov, Leonid A.; Anshits, Alexander G.

    2013-06-01

    Hollow microsphere zeolite materials with a bilayered zeolite/glass crystalline shell bearing NaP1 zeolite were synthesized by the hydrothermal treatment of coal fly ash cenospheres (Si/Al = 2.7) in an alkaline medium. Cs+ and/or Sr2+ forms of zeolitized cenospheres with the different Cs+ and/or Sr2+ loading were prepared by the ion exchange from nitrate solutions. The resulted (Cs,Na)P1, (Sr,Na)P1 and (Cs,Sr,Na)P1 bearing microsphere zeolites were converted to glass ceramics by heating at 900-1000 °C. The differential scanning calorimetry and quantitative phase analysis were used to monitor the solid-phase transformation of the initial and ion exchanged zeolite materials. It was established that the final solidified forms of Cs+ and/or Sr2+ are glass-crystalline ceramic materials based on pollucite-nepheline, Sr-feldspar-nepheline and Sr-feldspar-pollucite composites including ˜60 wt.% of the major host phases (pollucite, Sr-feldspar) and 10-20 wt.% of glass. The 137Cs leaching rate of 4.1 × 10-7 g cm-2 day-1 was determined for the pollucite glass-ceramic according to Russian State Standard (GOST) No. 52126 P-2003 (7 day, 25 °C, distilled water).

  10. Synthesis of ZSM-5 zeolite from coal fly ash and rice husk: characterization and application for partial oxidation of methane to methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisnandi, Y. K.; Yanti, F. M.; Murti, S. D. S.

    2017-04-01

    Indonesian fly ash (SiO2/Al2O3 mole ratio = 3.59) was used together with rice husk (SiO2 92%) as raw material for mesoporous ZSM-5 zeolite synthesis. Prior being used, coal fly ash and rice husk were subjected to pre-treatment in order to extract silicate (SiO4 4-) and aluminate (AlO4 5-) and to remove the impurities. Then the ZSM-5 zeolite were synthesized through hydrothermal treatment using two types of templates (TPAOH and PDDA). The as-synthesized ZSM-5 was characterized using FTIR, XRD, SEM-EDX, and BET. The result of FTIR showed peaks at 1250-950 cm-1 (v asymetric T-O), 820-650 cm-1 (v symetric T-O), and at 650-500 cm-1 confirming the presence of the five number ring of the pentasil structure. The result of XRD showed the appearance of certain peaks in the position 2 theta between 7-9° and 22-25° indicative of ZSM-5 structure, but also showed the pattern of low intensity magnetite and hematite. The SEM image showed the rough surface of hexagonal crystals from ZSM-5 structure, indicative of mesoporosity in the structure. EDX result showed Si/Al ratio of 20, while surface area analysis gave SA of 43.16. The ZSM-5 zeolites then was modified with cobalt oxide through impregnation method. The catalytic activity as heterogeneous catalysts in partial oxidation of methane was tested. The result showed that hence the catalytic activity of ZSM-5 and Co/ZSM-5 from fly ash and rice husk were still inferior compared to the pro-analysis sourced-counterpart, they were potential to be used as catalyst in the partial oxidation of methane to methanol.

  11. Selenium in fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Gutenmann, W.H.; Bache, C.A.; Youngs, W.D.

    1976-03-05

    Selenium, at concentrations exceeding 200 parts per million (ppM) (dry weight), has been found in white sweet clover voluntarily growing on beds of fly ash in central New York State. Guinea pigs fed such clover concentrated selenium in their tissues. The contents of the honey stomachs of bees foraging on this seleniferous clover contained negligible selenium. Mature vegetables cultured on 10 percent (by weight) fly ash-amended soil absorbed up to 1 ppM of selenium. Fly ashes from 21 states contained total selenium contents ranging from 1.2 to 16.5 ppM. Cabbage grown on soil containing 10 percent (by weight) of thesemore » fly ashes absorbed selenium (up to 3.7 ppM) in direct proportion (correlation coefficient r = .89) to the selenium concentration in the respective fly ash. Water, aquatic weeds, algae, dragonfly nymphs, polliwogs, and tissues of bullheads and muskrats from a fly ash-contaminated pond contained concentrations of selenium markedly elevated over those of controls.« less

  12. Sorption properties of the activated carbon-zeolite composite prepared from coal fly ash for Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+).

    PubMed

    Jha, Vinay Kumar; Matsuda, Motohide; Miyake, Michihiro

    2008-12-15

    Composite materials of activated carbon and zeolite have been prepared successfully by activating coal fly ash (CFA) by fusion with NaOH at 750 degrees C in N(2) followed by hydrothermal treatments under various conditions. Uptake experiments for Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) were performed with the materials thus obtained from CFA. Of the various composite materials, that were obtained by hydrothermal treatment with NaOH solution (ca. 4M) at 80 degrees C (a composite of activated carbon and zeolite X/faujasite) proved to be the most suitable for the uptake of toxic metal ions. The relative selectivity of the present sorbents for the various ions was Pb(2+)>Cu(2+)>Cd(2+)>Ni(2+), with equilibrium uptake capacities of 2.65, 1.72, 1.44 and 1.20mmol/g, respectively. The sorption isotherm was a good fit to the Langmuir isotherm and the sorption is thought to progress mainly by ion exchange with Na(+). The overall reaction is pseudo-second order with rate constants of 0.14, 0.17, 0.21 and 0.20Lg/mmol min for the uptake of Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Ni(2+), respectively.

  13. Eco-friendly fly ash utilization: potential for land application

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, A.; Thapliyal, A.

    2009-07-01

    The increase in demand for power in domestic, agricultural, and industrial sectors has increased the pressure on coal combustion and aggravated the problem of fly ash generation/disposal. Consequently the research targeting effective utilization of fly ash has also gained momentum. Fly ash has proved to be an economical substitute for expensive adsorbents as well as a suitable raw material for brick manufacturing, zeolite synthesis, etc. Fly ash is a reservoir of essential minerals but is deficient in nitrogen and phosphorus. By amending fly ash with soil and/or various organic materials (sewage sludge, bioprocess materials) as well as microbial inoculants likemore » mycorrhizae, enhanced plant growth can be realized. Based on the sound results of large scale studies, fly ash utilization has grown into prominent discipline supported by various internationally renowned organizations. This paper reviews attempts directed toward various utilization of fly ash, with an emphasis on land application of organic/microbial inoculants amended fly ash.« less

  14. Fly ash in concrete : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1990-08-01

    This study was initiated to develop information regarding the use of fly ash in portland cement concrete for state construction projects. : Concrete mixes containing 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 60% fly ash were evaluated in the laboratory in combination w...

  15. Evaluation of Fly Ash Quality Control Tools

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-06-30

    Many entities currently use fly ash in portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and structures. Although the body of knowledge is : great concerning the use of fly ash, several projects per year are subject to poor performance where fly ash is named ...

  16. Evaluation of fly ash quality control tools.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-06-30

    Many entities currently use fly ash in portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and structures. Although the body of knowledge is : great concerning the use of fly ash, several projects per year are subject to poor performance where fly ash is named ...

  17. High-volume fly ash concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the proposed study is to design, test, and evaluate high-volume fly ash concrete mixtures. Traditional specifications : limit the amount of fly ash to 40% or less cement replacement. This program attempts to increase the ash content ...

  18. MSW fly ash stabilized with coal ash for geotechnical application.

    PubMed

    Kamon, M; Katsumi, T; Sano, Y

    2000-09-15

    The solidification and stabilization of municipal solid waste (MSW) fly ash for the purpose of minimizing the geo-environmental impact caused by toxic heavy metals as well as ensuring engineering safety (strength and soaking durability) are experimentally evaluated. The mixtures of MSW fly ash stabilized with cement and fluidized bed combustion coal fly ash (FCA) were used for unconfined compressive strength tests, leachate tests, and soaking tests. The behavior of soluble salts contained in the MSW fly ash significantly affects strength development, soaking durability, and the hardening reaction of the stabilized MSW fly ash mixtures. The cement stabilization of the MSW fly ash does not have enough effect on strength development and soaking durability. The addition of cement only contributes to the containment of heavy metals due to the high level of alkalinity. When using FCA as a stabilizing agent for MSW fly ash, the mixture exhibits high strength and durability. However, the Cd leachate cannot be prevented in the early stages of curing. Using a combination of cement and FCA as a MSW fly ash stabilizer can attain high strength, high soaking durability, and the containment of heavy metals. The stabilized MSW fly ash with cement and FCA can be practically applied to embankments.

  19. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Boxley, Chett [Park City, UT

    2012-05-15

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  20. Construction procedures using self hardening fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, S. I.; Parker, D. G.

    1980-07-01

    Fly ash produced in Arkansas from burning Wyoming low sulfur coal is self-hardening and can be effective as a soil stabilizing agent for clays and sands. The strength of soil-self hardening fly ash develops rapidly when compacted immediately after mixing. Seven day unconfined compressive strengths up to 1800 psi were obtained from 20% fly ash and 80% sand mixtures. A time delay between mixing the fly ash with the soil and compaction of the mixture reduced the strength. With two hours delay, over a third of the strength was lost and with four hours delay, the loss was over half. Gypsum and some commercial concrete retarders were effective in reducing the detrimental effect of delayed compaction. Adequate mixing of the soil and fly ash and rapid compaction of the mixtures were found to be important parameters in field construction of stabilized bases.

  1. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Boxley, Chett [Park City, UT; Akash, Akash [Salt lake City, UT; Zhao, Qiang [Natick, MA

    2012-05-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  2. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-01-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  3. Integrated acid mine drainage management using fly ash.

    PubMed

    Vadapalli, Viswanath R K; Gitari, Mugera W; Petrik, Leslie F; Etchebers, Olivier; Ellendt, Annabelle

    2012-01-01

    Fly Ash (FA) from a power station in South Africa was investigated to neutralise and remove contaminants from Acid Mine Drainage (AMD). After this primary treatment the insoluble FA residue namely solid residue (SR) was investigated as a suitable mine backfill material by means of strength testing. Moreover, SR was used to synthesise zeolite-P using a two-step synthesis procedure. Furthermore, the zeolite-P was investigated to polish process water from the primary FA-AMD reaction. The main objective of this series of investigations is to achieve zero waste and to propose an integrated AMD management using FA. Fly Ash was mixed with AMD at various predetermined FA-AMD ratios until the mixtures achieved circumneutral pH or higher. The supernatants were then analyzed using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Ion Chromatography (IC) for cations and anions respectively. The physical strength testing of SR was carried out by mixing it with 3% Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and curing for 410 days. Synthesis of zeolite-P using SR was carried out by two step synthesis procedure: ageing for 24 hours followed by a mild hydrothermal synthesis at 100°C for 4 days. The polishing of process water from primary AMD treatment using FA was ascertained by mixing the process water with zeolite at a liquid to solid ratio of 100:1 for 1 hour. The results indicated that FA can be successfully used to ameliorate AMD. High removal of major AMD contaminants Fe, Al, Mg, Mn and sulphate was achieved with the ash treatment and trace elements such as Zn, Ni, Cu and Pb were also removed by the FA. Strength testing over 410 days indicated that the material gained strength over the testing period. The maximum unconfined compressive strength and elastic modulus was observed to be approximately 0.3 MPa and 150 Mpa respectively. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the synthesized product indicated that SR was successfully converted into zeolite-P with some mullite phase

  4. Optimization of soil stabilization with class C fly ash.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1987-01-01

    Previous Iowa DOT sponsored research has shown that some Class : C fly ashes are cementitious (because calcium is combined as calcium : aluminates) while other Class C ashes containing similar amounts of : elemental calcium are not (1). Fly ashes fro...

  5. Heavy metals in MSW incineration fly ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, C.; Ribeiro, A.; Ottosen, L.

    2003-05-01

    Incineration is a common solution for dealing with the increasing amount of municipal solid waste (MSW). During the process, the heavy metals initially present in the waste go through several transformations, ending up in combustion products, such as fly ash. This article deals with some issues related to the combustion of MSW and the formation of fly ash, especially in what concerns heavy metals. Treatment of the flue gas in air pollution control equipment plays an important role and the basic processes to accomplish this are explained. Fly ash from a semi-dry flue gas treatment system is characterized regarding its physical-chemical properties: pH, solubility, chemical composition, and leaching, amongst others. Results indicate a high alkalinity and the presence of large amounts of calcium, chlorides, sulfates, carbonates, sodium and potassium. Metal concentrations in fly ash are: 6,2g/kg for zinc, 2,4g/kg for lead, 1,7g/kg for iron, and 7,9g/kg for magnesium. Copper, manganese, chromium and cadmium are also present with 546, 338, 104 and 91mg/kg of fly ash, respectively. These results are extremely important in subsequent studies on the treatment of fly ash.

  6. Detection of fly ash in Portland cement fly ash concrete : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1991-12-01

    The chemical composition, phases present, and textural characteristics of suite of 113 fly ashes were studied. The fly ashes came from Gifford-Hill & Co., Inc. power plants in Cason, TX; Gentry, AR; Westlake, LA; Boyce, LA; Choteau, OK and Oologah, O...

  7. POLISHING INDUSTRIAL WASTE STREAM EFFLUENTS USING FLY ASH - NATURAL CLAY SORBENT COMBINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory evaluation of the use of acidic and basic fly ashes, bentonite, bauxite, illite, kaolinite, zeolite, vermiculite, and activated alumina is presented for polishing a 3.8 x 10 to the 6th power liters per day waste stream from the feldspar mining and processing industry...

  8. Removal of chloride from MSWI fly ash.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Sheng; Chang, Fang-Chih; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Tsai, Min-Shing; Ko, Chun-Han

    2012-10-30

    The high levels of alkali chloride and soluble metal salts present in MSWI fly ash is worth noting for their impact on the environment. In addition, the recycling or reuse of fly ash has become an issue because of limited landfill space. The chloride content in fly ash limits its application as basis for construction materials. Water-soluble chlorides such as potassium chloride (KCl), sodium chloride (NaCl), and calcium chloride hydrate (CaCl(2) · 2H(2)O) in fly ash are easily washed away. However, calcium chloride hydroxide (Ca(OH)Cl) might not be easy to leach away at room temperature. The roasting and washing-flushing processes were applied to remove chloride content in this study. Additionally, air and CO(2) were introduced into the washing process to neutralize the hazardous nature of chlorides. In comparison with the water flushing process, the roasting process is more efficient in reducing the process of solid-liquid separation and drying for the reuse of Cl-removed fly ash particles. In several roasting experiments, the removal of chloride content from fly ash at 1050°C for 3h showed the best results (83% chloride removal efficiency). At a solid to liquid ratio of 1:10 the water-flushing process can almost totally remove water-soluble chloride (97% chloride removal efficiency). Analyses of mineralogical change also prove the efficiency of the fly ash roasting and washing mechanisms for chloride removal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Geotechnical characterization of some Indian fly ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.K.; Yudhbir

    2005-10-01

    This paper reports the findings of experimental studies with regard to some common engineering properties (e.g., grain size, specific gravity, compaction characteristics, and unconfined compression strength) of both low and high calcium fly ashes, to evaluate their suitability as embankment materials and reclamation fills. In addition, morphology, chemistry, and mineralogy of fly ashes are studied using scanning electron microscope, electron dispersive x-ray analyzer, x-ray diffractometer, and infrared absorption spectroscopy. In high calcium fly ash, mineralogical and chemical differences are observed for particles, {gt}75 {mu} m and the particles of {lt} 45 {mu} m size. The mode and duration of curingmore » significantly affect the strength and stress-strain behavior of fly ashes. The geotechnical properties of fly ash are governed by factors like lime content (CaO), iron content (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and loss on ignition. The distinct difference between self-hardening and pozzolanic reactivity has been emphasized.« less

  10. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

    1983-08-15

    A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  11. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Blander, Milton; Wai, Chien M.; Nagy, Zoltan

    1984-01-01

    A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  12. Fly ash system technology improves opacity

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    2007-06-15

    Unit 3 of the Dave Johnston Power Plant east of Glenrock, WY, USA had problems staying at or below the opacity limits set by the state. The unit makes use of a Lodge Cottrell precipitator. When the plant changed to burning Power River Basin coal, ash buildup became a significant issue as the fly ash control system was unable to properly evacuate hoppers on the unit. To overcome the problem, the PLC on the unit was replaced with a software optimization package called SmartAsh for the precipitator fly ash control system, at a cost of $500,000. After the upgrade, theremore » have been no plugged hoppers and the opacity has been reduced from around 20% to 3-5%. 2 figs.« less

  13. Mercury release from fly ashes and hydrated fly ash cement pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wen; Zhang, Chao-yang; Kong, Xiang-ming; Zhuo, Yu-qun; Zhu, Zhen-wu

    2018-04-01

    The large-scale usage of fly ash in cement and concrete introduces mercury (Hg) into concrete structures and a risk of secondary emission of Hg from the structures during long-term service was evaluated. Three fly ashes were collected from coal-fired power plants and three blend cements were prepared by mixing Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) with the same amount of fly ash. The releasing behaviors of Hg0 from the fly ash and the powdered hydrated cement pastes (HCP) were measured by a self-developed Hg measurement system, where an air-blowing part and Hg collection part were involved. The Hg release of fly ashes at room temperature varied from 25.84 to 39.69 ng/g fly ash during 90-days period of air-blowing experiment. In contrast, the Hg release of the HCPs were in a range of 8.51-18.48 ng/g HCP. It is found that the Hg release ratios of HCPs were almost the same as those of the pure fly ashes, suggesting that the hydration products of the HCP have little immobilization effect on Hg0. Increasing temperature and moisture content markedly promote the Hg release.

  14. Using fly ash to mitigate explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Taulbee, D.

    2008-07-01

    In 2005 the University of Kentucky's Center for Applied Energy Research was given funding to evaluate the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs) to reduce the explosive potential of ammonium nitrate (AN) fertilizers. Fly ash C (FAC), fly ash F (FAF) and flue gas desulfurization by-product (FGD) were evaluated. It was found that applying a CCB coating to the AN particles at concentrations of 5 wt% or greater prevented the AN explosion from propagating. The article reports on results so far and outlines further work to be done. 6 figs.

  15. Innovative prediction of fly ash performance in concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-02-01

    In the last half century much research has been conducted to find an acceptable cement substitute; the : most intriguing and interesting of those materials is fly ash. Fly ash consists of almost perfectly spherical : particles that are rich in calciu...

  16. Properties of Fly Ash Blocks Made from Adobe Mould

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chokhani, Alankrit; Divakar, B. S.; Jawalgi, Archana S.; Renukadevi, M. V.; Jagadish, K. S.

    2018-06-01

    Fly ash being one of the industrial waste products poses a serious disposal problem. This paper presents an experimental study of utilization of fly ash to produce blocks with varying proportions and mix combinations. Composition of fly ash blocks mainly consist of fly ash and sand, with cementitious product as either cement, lime or both, such as fly ash-sand-cement, fly ash-sand-lime and fly ash-sand-cement-lime are used. Four different proportions for each of the mix combinations are experimented. Compressive strength, water absorption, Initial rate of absorption, and dry density of fly ash blocks are studied. The influence of partial and complete replacement of cement by lime is examined.

  17. Properties of Fly Ash Blocks Made from Adobe Mould

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chokhani, Alankrit; Divakar, B. S.; Jawalgi, Archana S.; Renukadevi, M. V.; Jagadish, K. S.

    2018-02-01

    Fly ash being one of the industrial waste products poses a serious disposal problem. This paper presents an experimental study of utilization of fly ash to produce blocks with varying proportions and mix combinations. Composition of fly ash blocks mainly consist of fly ash and sand, with cementitious product as either cement, lime or both, such as fly ash-sand-cement, fly ash-sand-lime and fly ash-sand-cement-lime are used. Four different proportions for each of the mix combinations are experimented. Compressive strength, water absorption, Initial rate of absorption, and dry density of fly ash blocks are studied. The influence of partial and complete replacement of cement by lime is examined.

  18. FLY ASH RECYCLE IN DRY SCRUBBING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the effects of fly ash recycle in dry scrubbing. (Previous workers have shown that the recycle of product solids improves the utilization of slaked lime--Ca(OH)2--for sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal by spray dryers with bag filters.) In laboratory-scale experimen...

  19. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum and fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The Cumberland Fossil Plant (CUF) is located in Stewart County, Tennessee, and began commercial operation in 1972. This is the Tennessee Valley Authority`s newest fossil (coal-burning) steam electric generating plant. Under current operating conditions, the plant burns approximately seven million tons of coal annually. By-products from the combustion of coal are fly ash, approximately 428,000 tons annually, and bottom ash, approximately 115,000 tons annually. Based on historical load and projected ash production rates, a study was initially undertaken to identify feasible alternatives for marketing, utilization and disposal of ash by-products. The preferred alternative to ensure that facilities are planned formore » all by-products which will potentially be generated at CUF is to plan facilities to handle wet FGD gypsum and dry fly ash. A number of different sites were evaluated for their suitability for development as FGD gypsum and ash storage facilities. LAW Engineering was contracted to conduct onsite explorations of sites to develop information on the general mature of subsurface soil, rock and groundwater conditions in the site areas. Surveys were also conducted on each site to assess the presence of endangered and threatened species, wetlands and floodplains, archaeological and cultural resources, prime farmland and other site characteristics which must be considered from an environmental perspective.« less

  20. Possibilities of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash utilisation.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Silvie; Koval, Lukáš; Škrobánková, Hana; Matýsek, Dalibor; Winter, Franz; Purgar, Amon

    2015-08-01

    Properties of the waste treatment residual fly ash generated from municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash were investigated in this study. Six different mortar blends with the addition of the municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash were evaluated. The Portland cement replacement levels of the municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash used were 25%, 30% and 50%. Both, raw and washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash samples were examined. According to the mineralogical composition measurements, a 22.6% increase in the pozzolanic/hydraulic properties was observed for the washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash sample. The maximum replacement level of 25% for the washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash in mortar blends was established in order to preserve the compressive strength properties. Moreover, the leaching characteristics of the crushed mortar blend was analysed in order to examine the immobilisation of its hazardous contents. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

  2. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Hnat, James G.; Mathur, Akshay; Simpson, James C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

  3. MEASURE OF FLY ASH RESISTIVITY USING SIMULATED FLUE GAS ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, describing the apparatus and laboratory procedures used to determine resistivity for a number of fly ashes under a variety of test conditions, supports research to develop a technique for predicting fly ash resistivity from chemical analyses of coal and coal ash. This...

  4. Treatment of fly ash from power plants using thermal plasma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mayman, Sulaiman; AlShunaifi, Ibrahim; Albeladi, Abdullah; Binjuwair, Saud

    2017-01-01

    Fly ash from power plants is very toxic because it contains heavy metals. In this study fly ash was treated with a thermal plasma. Before their treatment, the fly ash was analyzed by many technics such as X-ray fluorescence, CHN elemental analysis, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. With these technics, the composition, the chemical and physical proprieties of fly ash are determined. The results obtained by these analysis show that fly ash is mainly composed of carbon, and it contains also sulfur and metals such as V, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Ni, and Rh. The scanning electron microscopy analysis shows that fly ash particles are porous and have very irregular shapes with particle sizes of 20–50 μm. The treatment of fly ash was carried out in a plasma reactor and in two steps. In the first step, fly ash was treated in a pyrolysis/combustion plasma system to reduce the fraction of carbon. In the second step, the product obtained by the combustion of fly ash was vitrified in a plasma furnace. The leaching results show that the fly ash was detoxified by plasma vitrification and the produced slag is amorphous and glassy. PMID:28546898

  5. Treatment of fly ash from power plants using thermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Al-Mayman, Sulaiman; AlShunaifi, Ibrahim; Albeladi, Abdullah; Ghiloufi, Imed; Binjuwair, Saud

    2017-01-01

    Fly ash from power plants is very toxic because it contains heavy metals. In this study fly ash was treated with a thermal plasma. Before their treatment, the fly ash was analyzed by many technics such as X-ray fluorescence, CHN elemental analysis, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. With these technics, the composition, the chemical and physical proprieties of fly ash are determined. The results obtained by these analysis show that fly ash is mainly composed of carbon, and it contains also sulfur and metals such as V, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Ni, and Rh. The scanning electron microscopy analysis shows that fly ash particles are porous and have very irregular shapes with particle sizes of 20-50 μm. The treatment of fly ash was carried out in a plasma reactor and in two steps. In the first step, fly ash was treated in a pyrolysis/combustion plasma system to reduce the fraction of carbon. In the second step, the product obtained by the combustion of fly ash was vitrified in a plasma furnace. The leaching results show that the fly ash was detoxified by plasma vitrification and the produced slag is amorphous and glassy.

  6. Effectiveness of fly ash for strength and durability of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, D.W.S.; Lewis, R.K.

    1985-09-01

    The effectiveness, K, of a fly ash can be defined as the ratio of the amount of cement replaced to the amount of fly ash added, provided the specified requirements of the concrete are maintained. It is generally assumed that the effectiveness of a fly ash can be treated as a constant. This paper presents results on concrete made with various mix proportions using three different cements and fly ash from three different sources. It was found that the K factor of each fly ash in achieving common 28-day compressive strength varies over a wide range depending on the amountmore » of fly ash used, the type of cement, the incorporation of chemical admixtures and the particular strength level chosen. Besides strength, K can also be calculated for other properties. For the materials used in this investigation, the K factors with respect to carbonation were found to be unequal to K factors for strength.« less

  7. Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Seeley, Forest G.

    1981-01-01

    The invention described herein relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

  8. Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, W.J.; Seeley, F.G.

    1979-11-01

    The invention relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

  9. Retention of elemental mercury in fly ashes in different atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Lopez-Anton; M. Diaz-Somoano; M.R. Martinez-Tarazona

    2007-01-15

    Mercury is an extremely volatile element, which is emitted from coal combustion to the environment mostly in the vapor phase. To avoid the environmental problems that the toxic species of this element may cause, control technologies for the removal of mercury are necessary. Recent research has shown that certain fly ash materials have an affinity for mercury. Moreover, it has been observed that fly ashes may catalyze the oxidation of elemental mercury and facilitate its capture. However, the exact nature of Hg-fly ash interactions is still unknown, and mercury oxidation through fly ash needs to be investigated more thoroughly. Inmore » this work, the influence of a gas atmosphere on the retention of elemental mercury on fly ashes of different characteristics was evaluated. The retention capacity was estimated comparatively in inert and two gas atmospheres containing species present in coal gasification and coal combustion. Fly ashes produced in two pulverized coal combustion (PCC) plants, produced from coals of different rank (CTA and CTSR), and a fly ash (CTP) produced in a fluidized bed combustion (FBC) plant were used as raw materials. The mercury retention capacity of these fly ashes was compared to the retention obtained in different activated carbons. Although the capture of mercury is very similar in the gasification atmosphere and N{sub 2}, it is much more efficient in a coal combustion retention, being greater in fly ashes from PCC than those from FBC plants. 22 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.« less

  10. Sulfate resistance of high calcium fly ash concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhole, Rajaram

    Sulfate attack is one of the mechanisms which can cause deterioration of concrete. In general, Class C fly ash mixtures are reported to provide poor sulfate resistance. Fly ashes, mainly those belonging to the Class C, were tested as per the ASTM C 1012 procedure to evaluate chemical sulfate resistance. Overall the Class C fly ashes showed poor resistance in the sulfate environment. Different strategies were used in this research work to improve the sulfate resistance of Class C fly ash mixes. The study revealed that some of the strategies such as use of low W/CM (water to cementing materials by mass ratio), silica fume or ultra fine fly ash, high volumes of fly ash and, ternary or quaternary mixes with suitable supplementary cementing materials, can successfully improve the sulfate resistance of the Class C fly ash mixes. Combined sulfate attack, involving physical and chemical action, was studied using sodium sulfate and calcium sulfate solutions. The specimens were subjected to wetting-drying cycles and temperature changes. These conditions were found to accelerate the rate of degradation of concrete placed in a sodium sulfate environment. W/CM was found to be the main governing factor in providing sulfate resistance to mixes. Calcium sulfate did not reveal damage as a result of mainly physical action. Characterization of the selected fly ashes was undertaken by using SEM, XRD and the Rietveld analysis techniques, to determine the relation between the composition of fly ashes and resistance to sulfate attack. The chemical composition of glass represented on the ternary diagram was the main factor which had a significant influence on the sulfate resistance of fly ash mixtures. Mixes prepared with fly ashes containing significant amounts of vulnerable crystalline phases offered poor sulfate resistance. Comparatively, fly ash mixes containing inert crystalline phases such as quartz, mullite and hematite offered good sulfate resistance. The analysis of hydrated lime-fly

  11. The Effects of Bottom Ash on Setting Time and Compressive Strength of Fly Ash Geopolymer Paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affandhie, B. A.; Kurniasari, P. T.; Darmawan, M. S.; Subekti, S.; Wibowo, B.; Husin, N. A.; Bayuaji, R.; Irawan, S.

    2017-11-01

    This research is to find out the contribution of waste energy utilization of fly ash and bottom ash coal as binding agent of geopolymer concrete. This research methodology uses experimental approach in laboratory by making cylinder paste test object with dimension diameter of 2.5 cm x height 5 cm with some combination of fly ash and bottom ash mix with time setting test (ASTM C 191-04a) and compressive strength (ASTM C 39-04a). The research concludes that the effect of bottom ash on fly ash-based geopolymer paste shows good results in setting time and compressive strength.

  12. A review on the effect of fly ash characteristics and their variations on the synthesis of fly ash based geopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wattimena, Oswyn K.; Antoni, Hardjito, Djwantoro

    2017-09-01

    There are more than four decades since the last 1970s where geopolymers concrete was first introduced and developed to use as a replacement to conventional concrete material which uses cement as a binder. And since the last two decades, geopolymers which utilized fly ash as aluminosilicate source material, i.e. fly ash based geopolymers, have been investigated. Many researchers present how to produce the best fly ash based geopolymer with a various source of constituent material as well as mixing formula to achieve exceptional concrete performance. Although there is a similar trend towards factors affecting the result of fly ash based geopolymer synthesis, there is still remain a wide range in mixture proportion. The considerable variation in fly ash characteristics as source material in the synthesis can very likely be one of the causes of this problem. This paper attempts to identify the effect of source material variation of geopolymer concrete, particularly which use fly ash as source material and focuses on the variation of its characteristics and the effects to properties of concrete. From the reviews it concluded that different sources (and even the same source, but different batch) of fly ash materials will give some different characteristics of the fly ash, where it would affect the synthesis process of the fly ash based geopolymer concretes.

  13. Experimental use of fly ash concrete in prefabricated bridge-deck slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1987-01-01

    Hydraulic cement concretes with and without fly ash were investigated to assess the suitability of using fly ash in bridge-deck concrete. Eight prefabricated concrete slabs were prepared: four were control and the remaining contained fly ash. They we...

  14. Alkali content of fly ash : measuring and testing strategies for compliance.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-04-01

    Sodium and potassium are the common alkalis present in fly ash. Excessive amounts of fly ash alkalis can cause efflorescence : problems in concrete products and raise concern about the effectiveness of the fly ash to mitigate alkali-silica reaction (...

  15. Environmental hazard of oil shale combustion fly ash.

    PubMed

    Blinova, Irina; Bityukova, Liidia; Kasemets, Kaja; Ivask, Angela; Käkinen, Aleksandr; Kurvet, Imbi; Bondarenko, Olesja; Kanarbik, Liina; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Aruoja, Villem; Schvede, Hedi; Kahru, Anne

    2012-08-30

    The combined chemical and ecotoxicological characterization of oil shale combustion fly ash was performed. Ash was sampled from the most distant point of the ash-separation systems of the Balti and Eesti Thermal Power Plants in North-Eastern Estonia. The fly ash proved potentially hazardous for tested aquatic organisms and high alkalinity of the leachates (pH>10) is apparently the key factor determining its toxicity. The leachates were not genotoxic in the Ames assay. Also, the analysis showed that despite long-term intensive oil-shale combustion accompanied by considerable fly ash emissions has not led to significant soil contamination by hazardous trace elements in North-Eastern Estonia. Comparative study of the fly ash originating from the 'new' circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion technology and the 'old' pulverized-fired (PF) one showed that CFB fly ash was less toxic than PF fly ash. Thus, complete transfer to the 'new' technology will reduce (i) atmospheric emission of hazardous trace elements and (ii) fly ash toxicity to aquatic organisms as compared with the 'old' technology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reclaimed fly ash as select fill under PCC pavement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-11-01

    With the support of the Iowa Fly Ash Affiliates, research on reclaimed fly ash for use as a : construction material has been ongoing since 1991. The material exhibits engineering : properties similar to those of soft limestone or sandstone and a ligh...

  17. Multi-scale analytical investigation of fly ash in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboustait, Mohammed B.

    Much research has been conducted to find an acceptable concrete ingredient that would act as cement replacement. One promising material is fly ash. Fly ash is a by-product from coal-fired power plants. Throughout this document work on the characterization of fly ash structure and composition will be explored. This effort was conducted through a mixture of cutting edge multi-scale analytical X-ray based techniques that use both bulk experimentation and nano/micro analytical techniques. Furtherly, this examination was coupled by performing Physical/Mechanical ASTM based testing on fly ash-enrolled-concrete to examine the effects of fly ash introduction. The most exotic of the cutting edge characterization techniques endorsed in this work uses the Nano-Computed Tomography and the Nano X-ray Fluorescence at Argonne National Laboratory to investigate single fly ash particles. Additional Work on individual fly ash particles was completed by laboratory-based Micro-Computed Tomography and Scanning Electron Microscopy. By combining the results of individual particles and bulk property tests, a compiled perspective is introduced, and accessed to try and make new insights into the reactivity of fly ash within concrete.

  18. Process for the recovery of alumina from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Murtha, M.J.

    1983-08-09

    An improvement in the lime-sinter process for recovering alumina from pulverized coal fly ash is disclosed. The addition of from 2 to 10 weight percent carbon and sulfur to the fly ash-calcium carbonate mixture increase alumina recovery at lower sintering temperatures.

  19. Pore Structure Characterization in Concrete Prepared with Carbonated Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Sanjukta

    2018-03-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is a technique to address the global concern of continuously rising CO2 level in the atmosphere. Fly ash is considered as a suitable medium for CCS due to presence of metal oxides. The fly ash which has already sequestered carbon dioxide is referred to as carbonated fly ash. Recent research reveals better durability of concretes using carbonated fly ash as part replacement of cement. In the present research pore structure characterization of the carbonated fly ash concrete has been carried out. Mercury Intrusion porosimetry test has been conducted on control concrete and concrete specimens using fly ash and carbonated fly ash at replacement levels of 25% and 40%. The specimens have been water cured for 28 days and 90 days. It is observed that porosity reduction rate is more pronounced in carbonated fly ash concrete compared to control concrete at higher water curing age. Correlation analysis is also carried out which indicates moderately linear relationship between porosity % and pore distribution with particle size and water curing.

  20. Structure, properties, and surfactant adsorption behavior of fly ash carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulaots, Indrek

    The objective of this research was to suggest methods by which certain problems associated with use of coal fly ash as a pozzolanic agent in concrete mixtures could be alleviated, guided by a better characterization of fly ash properties. A sample suite of eighty fly ashes was gathered from utilities across the world (mainly US-based) and included ashes from coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The widely used foam index test is used to characterize ashes with respect to their propensity to adsorb surfactants (called Air Entraining Admixtures or AEAs) used to impart freeze-thaw resistance to concrete. In ash-containing concrete mixtures, AEAs are adsorbed from the polar concrete-water solution onto non-polar unburned carbon surfaces in the ash. The AEA uptake by fly ashes only crudely correlates with the amount of carbon in the fly ash, because carbon surface area, accessibility and polarity all play a role in determining adsorption capacities. Fly ash carbon particle size distribution is also a key factor. Fine carbon particles in fly ash fractions of <106mum are responsible for about 90% of surfactant adsorption capacity. Surfactant adsorption on fly ash carbon is, in the foam index test, a dynamic process. The time of the test (typically <10 minutes) is not long enough to permit penetration of small porosity by the relatively large AEA molecules, and only the most readily available adsorption surface near the geometrical surface of the carbon particles is utilized. The nature of the foam index test was also examined, and it is recommended that a more standardized test procedure based upon pure reagents be adopted for examining the nature of fly ashes. Several possible reagents were identified. Room temperature fly ash ozonation is a powerful technique that allows increasing fly ash surface polarity in a relatively short time and thus is very effective for decreasing the AEA uptake capacity. Depending on the ozone input concentration, sample amount

  1. Characterization of metals released from coal fly ash during dredging at the Kingston ash recovery project.

    PubMed

    Bednar, A J; Averett, D E; Seiter, J M; Lafferty, B; Jones, W T; Hayes, C A; Chappell, M A; Clarke, J U; Steevens, J A

    2013-09-01

    A storage-pond dike failure occurred on December 22, 2008 at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant resulting in the release of over 4million cubic meters (5million cubic yards) of fly ash. Approximately half of the released ash was deposited in the main channel of the Emory River, Tennessee, USA. Remediation efforts of the Emory River focused on hydraulic dredging, as well as mechanical excavation in targeted areas. However, agitation of the submerged fly ash during hydraulic dredging introduces river water into the fly ash material, which could promote dissolution and desorption of metals from the solid fly ash material. Furthermore, aeration of the dredge slurry could alter the redox state of metals in the fly ash material and thereby change their sorption, mobility, and toxicity properties. The research presented here focuses on the concentrations and speciation of metals during the fly ash recovery from the Emory River. Our results indicate that arsenite [As(III)] released from the fly ash material during dredging was slowly oxidized to arsenate [As(V)] in the slurry recovery system with subsequent removal through precipitation or sorption reactions with suspended fly ash material. Concentrations of other dissolved metals, including iron and manganese, also generally decreased in the ash recovery system prior to water discharge back to the river. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Self, S.A.

    1994-12-01

    Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executivemore » summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal. Volume 1 contains the dissertation of Ghosal which covers the characterization of fly ash and the measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.« less

  3. Evaluation of fly ash in water reduced paving mixtures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1985-06-01

    Fly ash was used to replace 15% of the cement in C3WR and C6WR concrete : paving mixes containing ASTM C494 Type A water reducin9 admixtures. Two Class : C ashes and one Class F ash from Iowa approved sources were examined in each : mix. When Class C...

  4. Fly ash in landfill top covers - a review.

    PubMed

    Brännvall, E; Kumpiene, J

    2016-01-01

    Increase of energy recovery from municipal solid waste by incineration results in the increased amounts of incineration residues, such as fly ash, that have to be taken care of. Material properties should define whether fly ash is a waste or a viable resource to be used for various applications. Here, two areas of potential fly ash application are reviewed: the use of fly ash in a landfill top cover either as a liner material or as a soil amendment in vegetation layer. Fly ashes from incineration of three types of fuel are considered: refuse derived fuel (RDF), municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and biofuel. Based on the observations, RDF and MSWI fly ash is considered as suitable materials to be used in a landfill top cover liner. Whereas MSWI and biofuel fly ashes based on element availability for plant studies, could be considered suitable for the vegetation layer of the top cover. Responsible application of MSWI ashes is, however, warranted in order to avoid element accumulation in soil and elevation of background values over time.

  5. Assessing fly ash treatment: remediation and stabilization of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Lima, A T; Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

    2012-03-01

    Fly ashes from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), straw (ST) and co-combustion of wood (CW) are here analyzed with the intent of reusing them. Two techniques are assessed, a remediation technique and a solidification/stabilization one. The removal of heavy metals from fly ashes through the electrodialytic process (EDR) has been tried out before. The goal of removing heavy metals has always been the reuse of fly ash, for instance in agricultural fields (BEK). The best removal rates are here summarized and some new results have been added. MSW fly ashes are still too hazardous after treatment to even consider application to the soil. ST ash is the only residue that gets concentrations low enough to be reused, but its fertilizing value might be questioned. An alternative reuse for the three ashes is here preliminary tested, the combination of fly ash with mortar. Fly ashes have been substituted by cement fraction or aggregate fraction. Surprisingly, better compressive strengths were obtained by replacing the aggregate fraction. CW ashes presented promising results for the substitution of aggregate in mortar and possibly in concrete. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomass fly ash incorporation in cement based materials =

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamma, Rejini

    In recent years, pressures on global environment and energy security have led to an increasing demand on renewable energy sources, and diversification of Europe's energy supply. Among these resources the biomass could exert an important role, since it is considered a renewable and CO2 neutral energy resource once the consumption rate is lower than the growth rate, and can potentially provide energy for heat, power and transports from the same installation. Currently, most of the biomass ash produced in industrial plants is either disposed of in landfill or recycled on agricultural fields or forest, and most times this goes on without any form of control. However, considering that the disposal cost of biomass ashes are raising, and that biomass ash volumes are increasing worldwide, a sustainable ash management has to be established. The main objective of the present study is the effect of biomass fly ashes in cement mortars and concretes in order to be used as a supplementary cementitious material. The wastes analyzed in the study were collected from the fluidized bed boilers and grate boilers available in the thermal power plants and paper pulp plants situated in Portugal. The physical as well as chemical characterisations of the biomass fly ashes were investigated. The cement was replaced by the biomass fly ashes in 10, 20 and 30% (weight %) in order to investigate the fresh properties as well as the hardened properties of biomass fly ash incorporated cement mortar and concrete formulations. Expansion reactions such as alkali silica reaction (ASR), sulphate attack (external and internal) were conducted in order to check the durability of the biomass fly ash incorporated cement mortars and concretes. Alternative applications such as incorporation in lime mortars and alkali activation of the biomass fly ashes were also attempted. The biomass fly ash particles were irregular in shape and fine in nature. The chemical characterization revealed that the biomass fly

  7. Physical and biological studies of coal and oil fly ash.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, G L; McNeill, K L; Prentice, B A; McFarland, A R

    1983-01-01

    Studies were performed to compare the physical and chemical characteristics and the in vitro macrophage cytotoxicity of oil and coal fly ash. Sampling methodology was developed to collect size-fractionated particulate matter from the smokestack of either a coal-fired or an oil-fired power plant. Morphological studies demonstrated particle heterogeneity, although most coal fly ash particles appeared to be spherical. Oil fly ash contained two major morphologies; nonopaque amorphous particles and opaque amorphous particles. Elemental analysis indicates that the coal ash is predominantly composed of aluminosilicate particles, while the oil ash is predominantly inorganic sulfates and carbonaceous particles. In vitro macrophage assays demonstrate that the finest coal fly ash particles are the most cytotoxic; the cytotoxicity is significantly less than that of alpha-quartz, the positive control particle. In contrast, the oil fly ash particles are more cytotoxic than quartz. The cytotoxicity of oil fly ash is due to soluble components, possibly vanadium salts. Images FIGURE 2. A FIGURE 2. B FIGURE 2. C FIGURE 2. D PMID:6641653

  8. Water holding capacities of fly ashes: Effect of size fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, A.; Rano, R.

    2007-07-01

    Water holding capacities of fly ashes from different thermal power plants in Eastern India have been compared. Moreover, the effect of size fractionation (sieving) on the water holding capacities has also been determined. The desorption rate of water held by the fly ash fractions at ambient temperature (25-30{sup o}C) has been investigated. The effect of mixing various size fractions of fly ash in increasing the water holding capacities of fly ash has been studied. It is observed that the fly ash obtained from a thermal power plant working on stoker-fired combustor has the highest water holding capacity, followed by themore » one that works on pulverized fuel combustor. Fly ash collected from super thermal power plant has the least water holding capacity (40.7%). The coarser size fractions of fly ashes in general have higher water holding capacities than the finer ones. An attempt has been made to correlate the results obtained, with the potential use in agriculture.« less

  9. The leaching characteristics of selenium from coal fly ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Wang, J.; Burken, J.G.

    2007-11-15

    The leaching characteristics of selenium from several bituminous and subbituminous coal fly ashes under different pH conditions were investigated using batch methods. Results indicated that pH had a significant effect on selenium leaching from bituminous coal ash. The minimum selenium leaching occurred in the pH range between 3 and 4, while the maximum selenium leaching occurred at pH 12. The release of selenium from subbituminous coal ashes was very low for the entire experimental pH range, possibly due to the high content of calcium which can form hydration or precipitation products as a sink for selenium. The adsorption results formore » different selenium species indicated that Se(VI) was hardly adsorbable on either bituminous coal ashes or subbitumminous coal ashes at any pH. However, Se(I) was highly adsorbed by bituminous coal ashes under acidic pH conditions and was mostly removed by subbitumminous coal ashes across the entire pH range. This result suggests that the majority of selenium released from the tested fly ashes was Se(IV). A speciation-based model was developed to simulate the adsorption of Se(IV) on bituminous coal fly ash, and the pH-independent adsorption constants of HSeO{sup 3-} and SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} were determined. The modeling approach is useful for understanding and predicting the release process of selenium from fly ash.« less

  10. Investigation on Leaching Behaviour of Fly Ash and Bottom Ash Replacement in Self-Compacting Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    Fly ash and bottom ash are some of the waste generated by coal-fired power plants, which contains large quantities of toxic and heavy metals. In recent years, many researchers have been interested in studying on the properties of self-compacting concrete incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash but there was very limited research from the combination of fly ash and bottom ash towards the environmental needs. Therefore, this research was focused on investigating the leachability of heavy metals of SCC incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash by using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure, Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure and Static Leaching Test. The samples obtained from the coal-fired power plant located at Peninsula, Malaysia. In this study, the potential heavy metals leached out from SCC that is produced with fly ash as a replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement and bottom ash as a substitute for sand with the ratios from 10% to 30% respectively were designated and cast. There are eight heavy metals of concern such as As, Cr, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Mn and Fe. The results indicated that most of the heavy metals leached below the permissible limits from the United States Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization limit for drinking water. As a conclusion, the minimum leaching of the heavy metals from the incorporation of fly ash and bottom ash in self-compacting concrete was found in 20% of fly ash and 20% of bottom ash replacement. The results also indicate that this incorporation could minimize the potential of environmental problems.

  11. Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Dobbins, Michael S.; Murtha, Marlyn J.

    1983-05-31

    A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

  12. Effective use of fly ash slurry as fill material.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, S; Kawaguchi, M; Yasuhara, K

    2000-09-15

    A lot of effort has been put into increasing coal ash utilization; however, 50% of total amount is disposed of on land and in the sea. Several attempts have been reported recently concerning slurried coal fly ash use for civil engineering materials, such as for structural fill and backfill. The authors have studied this issue for more than 15 years and reported its potential for (1) underwater fills, (2) light weight backfills, and (3) light weight structural fills, through both laboratory tests and construction works. This paper is an overview of the results obtained for slurry, focusing on the following. (1) Coal fly ash reclaimed by slurry placement shows lower compressibility, higher ground density, and higher strength than by the other methods. This higher strength increases stability against liquefaction during earthquake. (2) Higher stability of the fly ash ground formed by slurry placement is caused by higher density and its self-hardening property. (3) Stability of fly ash reclaimed ground can be increased by increasing density and also by strength enhancement by cement addition. (4) Technical data obtained through a man-made island construction project shows the advantages of fly ash slurry in terms of mechanical properties such as higher stability against sliding failure, sufficient ground strength, and also in terms of cost saving. (5) Concentration in leachates from the placed slurry is lower than the Japanese environmental law. (6) In order to enlarge the fly ash slurry application toward a lightweight fill, mixtures of air foam, cement and fly ash were examined. Test results shows sufficient durability of this material against creep failure. This material was then used as lightweight structural fill around a high-rise building, and showed sufficient quality. From the above data, it can be concluded that coal fly ash slurry can be effectively utilized in civil engineering projects.

  13. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-04-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  14. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-12-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  15. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  16. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  17. Effect of Alkali Concentration on Fly Ash Geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatimah Azzahran Abdullah, Siti; Yun-Ming, Liew; Bakri, Mohd Mustafa Al; Cheng-Yong, Heah; Zulkifly, Khairunnisa; Hussin, Kamarudin

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the effect of NaOH concentration on fly ash geopolymers with compressive up to 56 MPa at 12M. The physical and mechanical on fly ash geopolymer are investigated. Test results show that the compressive strength result complied with bulk density result whereby the higher the bulk density, the higher the strength. Thus, the lower water absorption and porosity due to the increasing of NaOH concentration.

  18. Mutagenicity and genotoxicity of coal fly ash water leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, R.; Mukherjee, A.

    2009-03-15

    Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. The prevalent practice of disposal is as slurry of ash and water to storage or ash ponds located near power stations. This has lain to waste thousands of hectares of land all over the world. Since leaching is often the cause of off-site contamination and pathway of introduction into the human environment, a study on the genotoxic effects of fly ash leachate is essential. Leachate prepared from the fly ash sample was analyzed for metal content, and tested for mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Analyses of metals show predominance of the metalsmore » - sodium, silicon, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, and sulphate. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay, was conducted on two-tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium strains TA97a and TA102. For genotoxicity, the alkaline version of comet assay on fly ash leachate was carried in vitro on human blood cells and in vivo on Nicotiana plants. The leachate was directly mutagenic and induced significantconcentration-dependent increases in DNA damage in whole blood cells, lymphocytes, and in Nicotiana plants. The comet parameters show increases in tail DNA percentage (%), tail length (mu m), and olive tail moment (arbitrary units). Our results indicate that leachate from fly ash dumpsites has the genotoxic potential and may lead to adverse effects on vegetation and on the health of exposed human populations.« less

  19. Characterization of typical heavy metals in pyrolysis MSWI fly ash.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tengtun; Wang, Li'ao; Zeng, Yunmin; Zhao, Xue; Wang, Lei; Zhan, Xinyuan; Li, Tong; Yang, Lu

    2018-06-07

    Thermal treatment methods are used extensively in the process of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash. However, the characterization of heavy metals during this process should be understood more clearly in order to control secondary pollution. In this paper, the content, speciation and leaching toxicity of mercury (Hg), plumbum (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) in fly ash treated under different temperatures and time were firstly analysed as pre-tests. Later, pilot-scale pyrolysis equipment was used to explore the concentration and speciation changes in the heavy metals of fly ash. Finally, the phase constitution and microstructure changes in fly ash were compared before and after pyrolysis using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The results showed that (a) The appropriate processing temperature was between 400°C and 450°C, and the processing time should be 1 h. (b) The stability of heavy metals in fly ash increased after pyrolysis. (c) XRD and SEM results indicated that phase constitution changed a little, but the microstructure varied to a porous structure similar to that of a coral reef after pyrolysis. These results suggest that pyrolysis could be an effective method in controlling heavy metal pollution in fly ash.

  20. Recyclability of Concrete Pavement Incorporating High Volume of Fly Ash.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Isamu; Ishida, Takeo; Fukumoto, Sunao

    2015-08-21

    Recyclable concrete pavement was made from fly ash and crushed limestone sand and gravel as aggregates so that the concrete pavement could be recycled to raw materials for cement production. With the aim to use as much fly ash as possible for the sustainable development of society, while achieving adequate strength development, pavement concrete having a cement-replacement ratio of 40% by mass was experimentally investigated, focusing on the strength development at an early age. Limestone powder was added to improve the early strength; flexural strength at two days reached 3.5 MPa, the minimum strength for traffic service in Japan. The matured fly ash concrete made with a cement content of 200 kg/m3 achieved a flexural strength almost equal to that of the control concrete without fly ash. Additionally, Portland cement made from the tested fly ash concrete was tested to confirm recyclability, with the cement quality meeting the Japanese classification of ordinary Portland cement. Limestone-based recyclable fly ash concrete pavement is, thus, a preferred material in terms of sustainability.

  1. Recyclability of Concrete Pavement Incorporating High Volume of Fly Ash

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Isamu; Ishida, Takeo; Fukumoto, Sunao

    2015-01-01

    Recyclable concrete pavement was made from fly ash and crushed limestone sand and gravel as aggregates so that the concrete pavement could be recycled to raw materials for cement production. With the aim to use as much fly ash as possible for the sustainable development of society, while achieving adequate strength development, pavement concrete having a cement-replacement ratio of 40% by mass was experimentally investigated, focusing on the strength development at an early age. Limestone powder was added to improve the early strength; flexural strength at two days reached 3.5 MPa, the minimum strength for traffic service in Japan. The matured fly ash concrete made with a cement content of 200 kg/m3 achieved a flexural strength almost equal to that of the control concrete without fly ash. Additionally, Portland cement made from the tested fly ash concrete was tested to confirm recyclability, with the cement quality meeting the Japanese classification of ordinary Portland cement. Limestone-based recyclable fly ash concrete pavement is, thus, a preferred material in terms of sustainability. PMID:28793518

  2. Properties and Leachability of Self-Compacting Concrete Incorporated with Fly Ash and Bottom Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Jamaluddin, Norwati; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    The process of combustion in coal-fired power plant generates ashes, namely fly ash and bottom ash. Besides, coal ash produced from coal combustion contains heavy metals within their compositions. These metals are toxic to the environment as well as to human health. Fortunately, treatment methods are available for these ashes, and the use of fly ash and bottom ash in the concrete mix is one of the few. Therefore, an experimental program was carried out to study the properties and determine the leachability of selfcompacting concrete incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash. For experimental study, self-compacting concrete was produced with fly ash as a replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement and bottom ash as a replacement for sand with the ratios of 10%, 20%, and 30% respectively. The fresh properties tests conducted were slump flow, t500, sieve segregation and J-ring. Meanwhile for the hardened properties, density, compressive strength and water absorption test were performed. The samples were then crushed to be extracted using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and heavy metals content within the samples were identified accordingly using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The results demonstrated that both fresh and hardened properties were qualified to categorize as self-compacting concrete. Improvements in compressive strength were observed, and densities for all the samples were identified as a normal weight concrete with ranges between 2000 kg/m3 to 2600 kg/m3. Other than that, it was found that incorporation up to 30% of the ashes was safe as the leached heavy metals concentration did not exceed the regulatory levels, except for arsenic. In conclusion, this study will serve as a reference which suggests that fly ash and bottom ash are widely applicable in concrete technology, and its incorporation in self-compacting concrete constitutes a potential means of adding value to appropriate mix and design.

  3. The Effect of Baggase Ash on Fly Ash-Based Geopolimer Binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayuaji, R.; Darmawan, M. S.; Husin, N. A.; Banugraha, R.; Alfi, M.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.

    2018-06-01

    Geopolymer concrete is an environmentally friendly concrete. However, the geopolymer binder has a problem with setting time; mainly the composition comprises high calcium fly ash. This study utilized bagasse ash to improve setting time on fly ash-based geopolymer binder. The characterization of bagasse ash was carried out by using chemical and phase analysis, while the morphology characterization was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The setting time test and the compressive strength test used standard ASTM C 191-04 and ASTM C39 / C39M respectively. The compressive strength of the samples determined at 3, 28 and 56 days. The result compared the requirement of the standards.

  4. Fly ash reinforced thermoplastic vulcanizates obtained from waste tire powder.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, V; Xiu, Zhang Zhen; Xu, Deng; Lee, Sung Hyo; Kim, Jin Kuk; Kang, Dong Jin; Bang, Dae-Suk

    2009-03-01

    Novel thermoplastic composites made from two major industrial and consumer wastes, fly ash and waste tire powder, have been developed. The effect of increasing fly ash loadings on performance characteristics such as tensile strength, thermal, dynamic mechanical and magnetic properties has been investigated. The morphology of the blends shows that fly ash particles have more affinity and adhesion towards the rubbery phase when compared to the plastic phase. The fracture surface of the composites shows extensive debonding of fly ash particles. Thermal analysis of the composites shows a progressive increase in activation energy with increase in fly ash loadings. Additionally, morphological studies of the ash residue after 90% thermal degradation shows extensive changes occurring in both the polymer and filler phases. The processing ability of the thermoplastics has been carried out in a Monsanto processability testing machine as a function of shear rate and temperature. Shear thinning behavior, typical of particulate polymer systems, has been observed irrespective of the testing temperatures. Magnetic properties and percolation behavior of the composites have also been evaluated.

  5. Illinois basin coal fly ashes. 1. Chemical characterization and solubility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, W.R.; Griffin, R.A.; Dickerson, D.R.; Schuller, R.M.; Martin, S.M.C.

    1984-01-01

    Twelve precipitator-collected fly ash samples (nine derived from high-sulfur Illinois Basin coals and three from Western U.S. coals) were found to contain a variety of paraffins, aryl esters, phenols, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons including phenanthrene, pyrene, and chrysene but all at very low concentrations. Less than 1% of the organic carbon in the samples was extractable into benzene. Solubility studies with a short-term (24-h) extraction procedure and a long-term (20-week) procedure indicate that the inorganic chemical composition of some types of fly ash effluent is time dependent and may be most toxic to aquatic ecosystems when initially mixed with water and pumped to disposal ponds. Some acidic, high-Cd fly ashes would be classified as hazardous wastes if coal ash was included in this waste category by future RCRA revisions. ?? 1984 American Chemical Society.

  6. Combined disc pelletisation and thermal treatment of MSWI fly ash.

    PubMed

    Huber, Florian; Herzel, Hannes; Adam, Christian; Mallow, Ole; Blasenbauer, Dominik; Fellner, Johann

    2018-03-01

    An environmentally friendly and cost efficient way for the management of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash represents its thermal co-treatment together with combustible waste. However, the safe introduction and storage of MSWI fly ash in the waste bunker is challenging and associated with severe problems (e.g. dust emissions, generation of undefined lumps and heat in case of moistened MSWI fly ash). Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the suitability of pelletisation as a pretreatment of MSWI fly ash. In particular, MSWI fly ash was characterised after sampling, pelletisation and thermal treatment and the transfer of constituents to secondary fly ash and flue gas was investigated. For this purpose, MSWI fly ash pellets with a water content of about 0.15 kg/kg and a diameter of about 8 mm have been produced by disc pelletiser and treated in an electrically heated pilot-scale rotary kiln at different temperatures, ranging from 450 °C to 1050 °C. The total contents of selected elements in the MSWI fly ash before and after thermal treatment and in the generated secondary fly ash have been analysed in order to understand the fate of each element. Furthermore, leachable contents of selected elements and total content of persistent organic pollutants of the thermally treated MSWI fly ash were determined. Due to the low total content of Hg (0.7 mg/kg) and the low leachate content of Pb (<0.36 mg/kg), even at the lowest treatment temperature of 450 °C, thermally treated MSWI fly ash pellets can be classified as non-hazardous waste. However, temperatures of at least 650 °C are necessary to decrease the toxic equivalency of PCDD/F and DL-PCB. The removal of toxic heavy metals like Cd and Pb is significantly improved at temperatures of 850 °C, 950 °C or even 1050 °C. The observed metal removal led to relatively high contents of e.g. Cu (up to 11,000 mg/kg), Pb (up to 91,000 mg/kg) and Zn (up to 21,000 mg/kg) in

  7. Leaching of Mixtures of Biochar and Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Porat, Iris; Phillips, Jana Randolph

    2009-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments.2, 5, 6 Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis7-9, 12 (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion1, 13, 14 have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations.10, 11, 16 Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogenmore » and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and reduces available aluminum.3, 17 Combinations of these benefits likely lead to the observed increased yields for crops including corn and sugarcane.17 with biochar addition to soil. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) 8, 17 than do unammended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way.18 Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes.15 Here, we are examining the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluating leaching of organic carbon and metals from the mixtures.« less

  8. Fly ashes from coal and petroleum coke combustion: current and innovative potential applications.

    PubMed

    González, Aixa; Navia, Rodrigo; Moreno, Natalia

    2009-12-01

    Coal fly ashes (CFA) are generated in large amounts worldwide. Current combustion technologies allow the burning of fuels with high sulfur content such as petroleum coke, generating non-CFA, such as petroleum coke fly ash (PCFA), mainly from fluidized bed combustion processes. The disposal of CFA and PCFA fly ashes can have severe impacts in the environment such as a potential groundwater contamination by the leaching of heavy metals and/or particulate matter emissions; making it necessary to treat or reuse them. At present CFA are utilized in several applications fields such as cement and concrete production, agriculture and soil stabilization. However, their reuse is restricted by the quality parameters of the end-product or requirements defined by the production process. Therefore, secondary material markets can use a limited amount of CFA, which implies the necessity of new markets for the unused CFA. Some potential future utilization options reviewed herein are zeolite synthesis and valuable metals extraction. In comparison to CFA, PCFA are characterized by a high Ca content, suggesting a possible use as neutralizers of acid wastewaters from mining operations, opening a new potential application area for PCFA that could solve contamination problems in emergent and mining countries such as Chile. However, this potential application may be limited by PCFA heavy metals leaching, mainly V and Ni, which are present in PCFA in high concentrations.

  9. Arsenic removal from water using a novel amorphous adsorbent developed from coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaihua; Zhang, Dongxue; Zhang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A novel effective adsorbent of alumina/silica oxide hydrate (ASOH) for arsenic removal was developed through simple chemical reactions using coal fly ash. The iron-modified ASOH with enhancing adsorption activity was further developed from raw fly ash based on the in situ technique. The adsorbents were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, scanning electron micrograph, laser particle size and Brunauer-Emmet-Teller surface area. The results show that the adsorbents are in amorphous and porous structure, the surface areas of which are 8-12 times that of the raw ash. The acidic hydrothermal treatment acts an important role in the formation of the amorphous structure of ASOH rather than zeolite crystal. A series of adsorption experiments for arsenic on them were studied. ASOH can achieve a high removal efficiency for arsenic of 96.4% from water, which is more than 2.5 times that of the raw ash. Iron-modified ASOH can enhance the removal efficiency to reach 99.8% due to the in situ loading of iron (Fe). The condition of synthesis pH = 2-4 is better for iron-modified ASOH to adsorb arsenic from water.

  10. Synthesis of Zeolite-X from Bottom Ash for H2 Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, R. Y.; Romadiansyah, T. Q.; Tsamarah, A. D.; Widiastuti, N.

    2018-01-01

    Zeolite-X was synthesized from bottom ash power plant waste using fusion method on air atmosphere. The fused product dissolved in demineralized water and aluminate solution was added to adjust the SiO2/Al2O3 molar ratio gel prior hydrothermal process. The synthesis results were characterized using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). The results showed that the zeolite-X has a high crystallinity with octahedral particle. The pure-form zeolite-X then was characterized and tested for H2 gas adsorption by gravimetric method to determine the H2 gas adsorption capacity of zeolite-X from bottom ash and it was compared to synthetic zeolite-X.

  11. Potassic zeolites from Brazilian coal ash for use as a fertilizer in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Flores, Camila Gomes; Schneider, Helena; Marcilio, Nilson Romeu; Ferret, Lizete; Oliveira, João Carlos Pinto

    2017-12-01

    Brazilian coal has an ash content ranging from 30 to 50% by weight. Consequently, its use in coal-fired thermoelectric for power production generates a lot of waste. The construction sector is the largest consumer of coal ash, but it cannot absorb the entire amount generated. Thus, other applications for coal ash should be studied in aim to optimize the use of this industrial waste. This research had as focus to synthesize potassic zeolite from of the coal ash into on potassium fertilizer for the grown wheat plant. In this work, it was used a subbituminous coal from Mina do Leão (RS, Brazil) presenting 48.7% ash content on a dry basis. Concerning the synthesis of potassic zeolite, it was adopted the conventional method of hydrothermal treatment with potassium hydroxide. A schedule of experiments was conducted in order to define the optimum condition of zeolite synthesis that was then used an alkaline solution of 5M KOH with a reaction time of 24h at 150°C. According to this procedure, it was obtained a zeolite with a single crystalline phase, identified through X-ray diffraction as Merlinoite. Subsequently, it was performed a set of tests using potassic zeolite asa fertilizer for plants in a greenhouse. The synthesized potassic zeolite showed a good potential for its use as fertilizer in agriculture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chromium behavior during thermal treatment of MSW fly ash.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Donald W; Chan, Chris C Y; Marsh, Hilary

    2002-02-14

    Energy-from-waste incineration has been promoted as an environmentally responsible method for handling non-recyclable waste from households. Despite the benefits of energy production, elimination of organic residues and reduction of volume of waste to be landfilled, there is concern about fly ash disposal. Fly ash from an incinerator contains toxic species such as Pb, Zn, Cd and Cr which may leach into soil and ground water if landfilled. Thermal treatment of the fly ash from municipal solid waste has been tested and proposed as a treatment option for removal of metal species such as Pb, Cd and Zn, via thermal re-volatilization. However, Cr is an element that remains in the residue of the heat treated fly ash and appears to become more soluble. This Cr solubilization is of concern if it exceeds the regulatory limit for hazardous waste. Hence, this unexpected behavior of Cr was investigated. The initial work involved microscopic characterization of Cr in untreated and thermally-treated MSW fly ash. This was followed by determining leaching characteristics using standard protocol leaching tests and characterization leaching methods (sequential extraction). Finally, a mechanism explaining the increased solubilization was proposed and tested by reactions of synthetic chemicals.

  13. [MSW incineration fly ash melting by DSC-DTA].

    PubMed

    Li, Rundong; Chi, Yong; Li, Shuiqing; Wang, Lei; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2002-07-01

    Melting characteristics of two kinds of municipal solid waste incineration(MSWI) fly ash were studied in this paper by high temperature differential scanning calorimetry and differential temperature analysis. MSWI fly ash was considered as hazardous waste because it contains heavy metals and dioxins. The experiments were performed in either N2 or O2 atmosphere in temperature range of 20 degrees C-1450 degrees C at various heating rates. Two different MSW incineration fly ashes used in the experiments were collected from our country and France respectively. The process of fly ash melting exhibits two reactions occurring at temperature ranges of about 480 degrees C-670 degrees C and 1136 degrees C-1231 degrees C, respectively. The latent heat of polymorphic transformation and fusion were approximately 20 kJ/kg and 700 kJ/kg, while the total heat required for melting process was about 1800 kJ/kg. The paper also studied effect of CaO to melting. A heat flux thermodynamic model for fly ash melting was put forward and it agrees well with experimental data.

  14. Mercury capture by selected Bulgarian fly ashes: Influence of coal rank and fly ash carbon pore structure on capture efficiency

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kostova, I.J.; Hower, J.C.; Mastalerz, Maria; Vassilev, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    Mercury capture by fly ash C was investigated at five lignite- and subbituminous-coal-burning Bulgarian power plants (Republika, Bobov Dol, Maritza East 2, Maritza East 3, and Sliven). Although the C content of the ashes is low, never exceeding 1.6%, the Hg capture on a unit C basis demonstrates that the low-rank-coal-derived fly ash carbons are more efficient in capturing Hg than fly ash carbons from bituminous-fired power plants. While some low-C and low-Hg fly ashes do not reveal any trends of Hg versus C, the 2nd and, in particular, the 3rd electrostatic precipitator (ESP) rows at the Republika power plant do have sufficient fly ash C range and experience flue gas sufficiently cool to capture measurable amounts of Hg. The Republika 3rd ESP row exhibits an increase in Hg with increasing C, as observed in other power plants, for example, in Kentucky power plants burning Appalachian-sourced bituminous coals. Mercury/C decreases with an increase in fly ash C, suggesting that some of the C is isolated from the flue gas stream and does not contribute to Hg capture. Mercury capture increases with an increase in Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and micropore surface area. The differences in Hg capture between the Bulgarian plants burning low-rank coal and high volatile bituminous-fed Kentucky power plants suggests that the variations in C forms resulting from the combustion of the different ranks also influence the efficiency of Hg capture. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Rheology and Extrusion of Cement-Fly Ashes Pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micaelli, F.; Lanos, C.; Levita, G.

    2008-07-01

    The addition of fly ashes in cement pastes is tested to optimize the forming of cement based material by extrusion. Two sizes of fly ashes grains are examinated. The rheology of concentrated suspensions of ashes mixes is studied with a parallel plates rheometer. In stationary flow state, tested suspensions viscosities are satisfactorily described by the Krieger-Dougherty model. An "overlapped grain" suspensions model able to describe the bimodal suspensions behaviour is proposed. For higher values of solid volume fraction, Bingham viscoplastic behaviour is identified. Results showed that the plastic viscosity and plastic yield values present minimal values for the same optimal formulation of bimodal mixes. The rheological study is extended to more concentrated systems using an extruder. Finally it is observed that the addition of 30% vol. of optimized ashes mix determined a significant reduction of required extrusion load.

  16. Restoration of fly ash dump through biological interventions.

    PubMed

    Juwarkar, Asha A; Jambhulkar, Hemlata P

    2008-04-01

    Field experiment on 10 ha area of fly ash dump was conducted to restore and revegetate it using biological interventions, which involves use of organic amendment, selection of suitable plant species along with specialized nitrogen fixing strains of biofertilizer. The results of the study indicated that amendment with farm yard manure at 50 t/ha improved the physical properties of fly ash such as maximum water holding capacity from 40.0 to 62.42% while porosity improved from 56.78 to 58.45%. The nitrogen content was increased by 4.5 times due to addition of nitrogen fixing strains of Bradyrhizobium and Azotobacter species, while phosphate content was increased by 10.0 times due to addition of VAM, which helps in phosphate immobilization. Due to biofertilizer inoculation different microbial groups such as Rhizobium, Azotobacter and VAM spores, which were practically absent in fly ash improved to 7.1 x 10(7), 9.2 x 10(7) CFU/g and 35 VAM spores/10 g of fly ash, respectively. Inoculation of biofertilizer and application of FYM helped in reducing the toxicity of heavy metals such as cadmium, copper, nickel and lead which were reduced by 25, 46, 48 and 47%, respectively, due to the increased organic matter content in the fly ash which complexes the heavy metals thereby decreasing the toxicity of metals. Amendment of fly ash with FYM and biofertilizer helped in profuse root development showing 15 times higher growth in Dendrocalamus strictus plant as compared to the control. Thus amendment and biofertilizer application provided better supportive material for anchorage and growth of the plant.

  17. Water Adsorption Isotherms on Fly Ash from Several Sources.

    PubMed

    Navea, Juan G; Richmond, Emily; Stortini, Talia; Greenspan, Jillian

    2017-10-03

    In this study, horizontal attenuated total reflection (HATR) Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was combined with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) gravimetry to investigate the adsorption isotherms of water on fly ash, a byproduct of coal combustion in power plants. Because of composition variability with the source region, water uptake was studied at room temperature as a function of relative humidity (RH) on fly ash from several regions: United States, India, The Netherlands, and Germany. The FT-IR spectra show water features growth as a function of RH, with water absorbing on the particle surface in both an ordered (ice-like) and a disordered (liquid-like) structure. The QCM data was modeled using the Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) adsorption isotherm model. The BET model was found to describe the data well over the entire range of RH, showing that water uptake on fly ash takes place mostly on the surface of the particle, even for poorly combusted samples. In addition, the source region and power-plant efficiency play important roles in the water uptake and ice nucleation (IN) ability of fly ash. The difference in the observed water uptake and IN behavior between the four samples and mullite (3Al 2 O 3 ·2SiO 2 ), the aluminosilicate main component of fly ash, is attributed to differences in composition and the density of OH binding sites on the surface of each sample. A discussion is presented on the RH required to reach monolayer coverage on each sample as well as a comparison between surface sites of fly ash samples and enthalpies of adsorption of water between the samples and mullite.

  18. Optimising Ambient Setting Bayer Derived Fly Ash Geopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, Evan; Kealley, Catherine S.; van Riessen, Arie; Hart, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    The Bayer process utilises high concentrations of caustic and elevated temperature to liberate alumina from bauxite, for the production of aluminium and other chemicals. Within Australia, this process results in 40 million tonnes of mineral residues (Red mud) each year. Over the same period, the energy production sector will produce 14 million tonnes of coal combustion products (Fly ash). Both industrial residues require impoundment storage, yet combining some of these components can produce geopolymers, an alternative to cement. Geopolymers derived from Bayer liquor and fly ash have been made successfully with a compressive strength in excess of 40 MPa after oven curing. However, any product from these industries would require large volume applications with robust operational conditions to maximise utilisation. To facilitate potential unconfined large-scale production, Bayer derived fly ash geopolymers have been optimised to achieve ambient curing. Fly ash from two different power stations have been successfully trialled showing the versatility of the Bayer liquor-ash combination for making geopolymers. PMID:28773513

  19. Optimising Ambient Setting Bayer Derived Fly Ash Geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Evan; Kealley, Catherine S; van Riessen, Arie; Hart, Robert D

    2016-05-19

    The Bayer process utilises high concentrations of caustic and elevated temperature to liberate alumina from bauxite, for the production of aluminium and other chemicals. Within Australia, this process results in 40 million tonnes of mineral residues (Red mud) each year. Over the same period, the energy production sector will produce 14 million tonnes of coal combustion products (Fly ash). Both industrial residues require impoundment storage, yet combining some of these components can produce geopolymers, an alternative to cement. Geopolymers derived from Bayer liquor and fly ash have been made successfully with a compressive strength in excess of 40 MPa after oven curing. However, any product from these industries would require large volume applications with robust operational conditions to maximise utilisation. To facilitate potential unconfined large-scale production, Bayer derived fly ash geopolymers have been optimised to achieve ambient curing. Fly ash from two different power stations have been successfully trialled showing the versatility of the Bayer liquor-ash combination for making geopolymers.

  20. Temporal and spatial variations in fly ash quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hower, J.C.; Trimble, A.S.; Eble, C.F.

    2001-01-01

    Fly ash quality, both as the amount of petrographically distinguishable carbons and in chemistry, varies in both time and space. Temporal variations are a function of a number of variables. Variables can include variations in the coal blend organic petrography, mineralogy, and chemistry; variations in the pulverization of the coal, both as a function of the coal's Hardgrove grindability index and as a function of the maintenance and settings of the pulverizers; and variations in the operating conditions of the boiler, including changes in the pollution control system. Spatial variation, as an instantaneous measure of fly ash characteristics, should not involve changes in the first two sets of variables listed above. Spatial variations are a function of the gas flow within the boiler and ducts, certain flow conditions leading to a tendency for segregation of the less-dense carbons in one portion of the gas stream. Caution must be applied in sampling fly ash. Samples from a single bin, or series of bins, m ay not be representative of the whole fly ash, providing a biased view of the nature of the material. Further, it is generally not possible to be certain about variation until the analysis of the ash is complete. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Arsenic and selenium capture by fly ashes at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    M. Antonia Lopez-Anton; Mercedes Diaz-Somoano; D. Alan Spears

    2006-06-15

    Arsenic and selenium compounds may be emitted to the environment during coal conversion processes, although some compounds are retained in the fly ashes, in different proportions depending on the characteristics of the ashes and process conditions. The possibility of optimizing the conditions to achieve better trace element retention appears to be an attractive, economical option for reducing toxic emissions. This approach requires a good knowledge of fly ash characteristics and a thorough understanding of the capture mechanism involved in the retention. In this work the ability of two fly ashes, one produced in pulverized coal combustion and the other inmore » fluidized bed combustion, to retain arsenic and selenium compounds from the gas phase in coal combustion and coal gasification atmospheres was investigated. To explore the possible simultaneous retention of mercury, the influence of the unburned coal particle content was also evaluated. Retention capacities between 2 and 22 mg g{sup -1} were obtained under different conditions. The unburned coal particle content in the fly ash samples does not significantly modify retention capacities. 21 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.« less

  2. Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahon L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  3. Alkali content of fly ash : measuring and testing strategies for compliance : [tech transfer summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the test methods used to determine the : alkali content of fly ash. It also evaluated if high-alkali fly ash : exacerbates alkali-silica reaction in laboratory tests and field : concrete.

  4. Development of a standard operating procedure for analysis of ammonia concentrations in coal fly ash : [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-04-01

    Fly ash produced when pulverized coal is burned in electrical generators can be used as a : concrete additive with many benefits. However, fly ash can have a high ammonia content, : which is released when used in concrete, potentially exposing worker...

  5. Updating Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Fly Ash for Use in Concrete

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-12-22

    When incorporated in concrete mixtures, fly ashes are known to influence both its fresh and hardened properties. An accurate and quick technique to predict the extent of this influence based on the characteristics of fly ash would be highly beneficia...

  6. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation

    SciTech Connect

    L. Djurdjevic; M. Mitrovic; P. Pavlovic

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the 'Nikola Tesla-A' thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central partmore » of the deposit towards its edges. Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.« less

  7. Elemental analyses of chars isolated from a biomass gasifier fly ash

    Treesearch

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Hui Pan

    2012-01-01

    Processing of pine wood chips in a pilot-scale downdraft gasifier generated a carbon-rich fly ash as a byproduct. Studies on biomass-derived fly ashes have generally focused on their direct characterisation, as generated, to develop options for utilisation or disposal. Analogous to studies on coal-derived fly ashes, strategies were applied here to assess the...

  8. Study on Strength Behavior of Organic Soil Stabilized with Fly Ash

    PubMed Central

    Molla, Md. Keramat Ali; Sarkar, Grytan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of fly ash on the consistency, compactness, acidic properties, and strength of organic soil. The presence of organic content in the soil has detrimental impacts on the physical and strength behavior of soil. To investigate the effectiveness of fly ash in the stabilization of organic soil, two types of fly ashes (Type I and Type II) at different percentages were used. It is found that fly ash significantly reduces the plasticity index of the organic soil, whereas the liquid and plastic limits increase. The dry density of the fly ash-soil mixture increases significantly, while the water requirement reduces due to the addition of fly ash. The increase of dry density compromises higher strength. The increase of qu with the increase of fly ash content is mainly due to the pozzolanic reaction of fly ash, although the reduction in water content results from the addition of dry fly ash solid. Moreover, Type I fly ash contributes a higher value of qu compared to Type II fly ash. This is attributed to the characteristics of fly ash including CaO and CaO/SiO2 ratio. PMID:29085881

  9. FILTRATION MODEL FOR COAL FLY ASH WITH GLASS FABRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a new mathematical model for predicting woven glass filter performance with coal fly ash aerosols from utility boilers. Its data base included: an extensive bench- and pilot-scale laboratory investigation of several dust/fabric combinations; field data from t...

  10. Quality control of highway concrete containing fly ash.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-01-01

    This report is essentially a synthesis of pertinent information concerning the use of fly ash as an ingredient in concrete for highway construction. It has been prepared to provide a basis for an adequate response by the Department of Highways and Tr...

  11. Bias of air void system data from fly ash concretes.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1983-01-01

    Hollow censopheres of fly ash may have walls so thin that they will appear to be air voids when they appear on a polished slab prepared for air void determination by ASTM C457. Therefore the following precautions are recommended. 1. The operator of t...

  12. PREFERENTIAL PARTITIONING OF PAHS AND PCBS TO COAL FLY ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has long been known that fly ash has a significant capacity for the adsorption of several classes of anthropogenic pollutants, including toxic metals, nutrients and organic compounds. This adsorption capacity has been utilized by wastewater treatment plants for the removal of ...

  13. MERCURY CAPTURE ON COAL COMBUSTION FLY ASH. (R827649)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was performed at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to test the hypotheses that (1) different carbon types contained in coal combustion fly ash have variable sorption capabilities relative to mercury and (2) the inorganic fraction of coal combustion fl...

  14. Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Self, S.A.

    1994-12-01

    Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executivemore » summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal and Ebert. Volume 2 contains the dissertation of Ebert which covers the measurements of the optical constants of slags, and calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.« less

  15. Calcium phosphate stabilization of fly ash with chloride extraction.

    PubMed

    Nzihou, Ange; Sharrock, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Municipal solid waste incinerator by products include fly ash and air pollution control residues. In order to transform these incinerator wastes into reusable mineral species, soluble alkali chlorides must be separated and toxic trace elements must be stabilized in insoluble form. We show that alkali chlorides can be extracted efficiently in an aqueous extraction step combining a calcium phosphate gel precipitation. In such a process, sodium and potassium chlorides are obtained free from calcium salts, and the trace metal ions are immobilized in the calcium phosphate matrix. Moderate calcination of the chemically treated fly ash leads to the formation of cristalline hydroxylapatite. Fly ash spiked with copper ions and treated by this process shows improved stability of metal ions. Leaching tests with water or EDTA reveal a significant drop in metal ion dissolution. Hydroxylapatite may trap toxic metals and also prevent their evaporation during thermal treatments. Incinerator fly ash together with air pollution control residues, treated by the combined chloride extraction and hydroxylapatite formation process may be considered safe to use as a mineral filler in value added products such as road base or cement blocks.

  16. Recovery of gallium and vanadium from gasification fly ash.

    PubMed

    Font, Oriol; Querol, Xavier; Juan, Roberto; Casado, Raquel; Ruiz, Carmen R; López-Soler, Angel; Coca, Pilar; García Peña, Francisco

    2007-01-31

    The Puertollano Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant (Spain) fly ash is characterized by a relatively high content of Ga and V, which occurs mainly as Ga2O3 and as Ga3+ and V3+ substituting for Al3+ in the Al-Si fly ash glass matrix. Investigations focused on evaluating the potential recovery of Ga and V from these fly ashes. Several NaOH based extraction tests were performed on the IGCC fly ash, at different temperatures, NaOH/fly ash (NaOH/FA) ratios, NaOH concentrations and extraction times. The optimal Ga extraction conditions was determined as 25 degrees C, NaOH 0.7-1 M, NaOH/FA ratio of 5 L/kg and 6 h, attaining Ga extraction yields of 60-86%, equivalent to 197-275 mg of Ga/kg of fly ash. Re-circulation of leachates increased initial Ga concentrations (25-38 mg/L) to 188-215 mg/L, while reducing both content of impurities and NaOH consumption. Carbonation of concentrated Ga leachate demonstrated that 99% of the bulk Ga content in the leachate precipitates at pH 7.4. At pH 10.5 significant proportions of impurities, mainly Al (91%), co-precipitate while >98% of the bulk Ga remains in solution. A second carbonation of the remaining solution (at pH 7.5) recovers the 98.8% of the bulk Ga. Re-dissolution (at pH 0) of the precipitate increases Ga purity from 7 to 30%, this being a suitable Ga end product for further purification by electrolysis. This method produces higher recovery efficiency than currently applied for Ga on an industrial scale. In contrast, low V extraction yields (<64%) were obtained even when using extreme alkaline extraction conditions, which given the current marked price of this element, limits considerably the feasibility of V recovery from IGCC fly ash.

  17. Glass-ceramic from mixtures of bottom ash and fly ash.

    PubMed

    Vu, Dinh Hieu; Wang, Kuen-Sheng; Chen, Jung-Hsing; Nam, Bui Xuan; Bac, Bui Hoang

    2012-12-01

    Along with the gradually increasing yield of the residues, appropriate management and treatment of the residues have become an urgent environmental protection problem. This work investigated the preparation of a glass-ceramic from a mixture of bottom ash and fly ash by petrurgic method. The nucleation and crystallization kinetics of the new glass-ceramic can be obtained by melting the mixture of 80% bottom ash and 20% fly ash at 950 °C, which was then cooled in the furnace for 1h. Major minerals forming in the glass-ceramics mainly are gehlenite (Ca(2)Al(2)SiO(7)) & akermanite (Ca(2)MgSiO(7)) and wollastonite (CaSiO(3)). In addition, regarding chemical/mechanical properties, the chemical resistance showing durability, and the leaching concentration of heavy metals confirmed the possibility of engineering and construction applications of the most superior glass-ceramic product. Finally, petrurgic method of a mixture of bottom ash and fly ash at 950 °C represents a simple, inexpensive, and energy saving method compared with the conventional heat treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The influence of sugarcane bagasse ash as fly ash on cement quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, N.; Damayanti, M. C.; Pratama, S. W. I.

    2017-01-01

    Fly ash often is used as the third material for cement. The fly ash from sugarcane bagasse is usually considered as industrial waste material that can be added to the base material of cement (clinker, trash, gypsum and lime stone) for economic and environment reason. The amount of fly ash usually up to 30 % of cement material, but in this research the percentage of sugarcane bagasse ash (SBA) is added to cement material is up to 15% total weight. Then the x-rays fluorescence (XRF) was used to determine its chemical composition of raw material and cement samples. The physical properties of cement such as fineness, setting time, expansion, and compressive strength were measured using Automatic Blaine, Vicat, Autoclave, respectively. The result show that the percentage of sugarcane bagasse ash influences the quality of cement and concrete, and this is confirmed with Indonesia National Standard (SNI). It is showed that the sugarcane bagasse ash could be use as material to improve the quality of cement and will solve the environment waste material

  19. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation.

    PubMed

    Djurdjević, L; Mitrović, M; Pavlović, P; Gajić, G; Kostić, O

    2006-05-01

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges (ranging from 1-80%). Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids (38.07-185.16 microg/g of total phenolics and 4.12-27.28 microg/g of phenolic acids) in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. Ash samples contained high amounts of ferulic, vanillic, and p-coumaric acid, while the content of both p-hydroxybenzoic and syringic acid was relatively low. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

  20. Fly-ash geo-polymer foamed concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargin, Aleksey; Baev, Vladimir; Mashkin, Nikolay

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the interest of researchrs in using fly-ash as a raw material for the geo-polymer synthesis is increasing. Kuzbass region (in Russia) has a large amount of ash wastes generated, which defined the relevace of the study performed in this paper. Results of investigating load-bearing capacity of structural insulating material produced by geo-polymerization of fly-ash of Kemerovo hydro-electric power plant with the addition of complex activator are described in the paper. Hydrogen peroxide solution was used as the foaming agent. The activation time, the temperature of isothermal holding and hardening in normal conditions for all samples were constant. The compressive strength and the mean density of geo-polymer foamed concrete were determined. The influence of the material composition on its properties was revealed. It is found that of the geo-polymer foamed concrete with the optimum composition has hardness of 1,1-3,5 MPa at the density of 400 to 900 kg/m3. Thus, the production of the fly-ash geo-polymer concretes and mortars is feasible, justified and promising.

  1. Glass-ceramics from municipal incinerator fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Boccaccini, A.R.; Petitmermet, M.; Wintermantel, E.

    1997-11-01

    In countries where the population density is high and the availability of space for landfilling is limited, such as the west-European countries and Japan, the significance of municipal solid waste incineration, as part of the waste management strategy, is continuously increasing. In Germany and Switzerland, for example, more than {approximately}40% of unrecycled waste is being or will be incinerated. Also, in other countries, including the US, the importance of waste incineration will increase in the next few years. Although incineration reduces the volume of the waste by {approximately} 90%, it leaves considerable amounts of solid residues, such as bottom andmore » boiler ashes, and filter fly ashes. Consequently, new technological options for the decontamination and/or inertization of incinerator filter fly ash are being developed with the objective of rendering a product that can be reused or, at least, be deposited in standard landfill sites with no risk. The proposed alternatives include immobilization by cement-based techniques, wet chemical treatments and thermal treatments of vitrification. Of these, vitrification is the most promising solution, because, if residues are melted at temperatures > 1,300 C, a relatively inert glass is produced. In the present investigation, glass-ceramics were obtained by a controlled crystallization heat treatment of vitrified incinerator filter fly ashes. The mechanical and other technical properties of the products were measured with special emphasis on assessing their in vitro toxic potential.« less

  2. Studies of fly ash using thermal analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hanxu; Shen, Xiang-Zhong; Sisk, B.

    1996-12-31

    Improved thermoanalytical methods have been developed that are capable of quantitative identification of various components of fly ash from a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustion system. The thermogravimetric procedure developed can determine quantities of H{sub 2}O, Ca(OH){sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, CaSO{sub 4} and carbonaceous matter in fly ash with accuracy comparable to more time-consuming ASTM methods. This procedure is a modification of the Mikhail-Turcotte methods that can accurately analyze bed ash, with higher accuracy regarding the greater amount of carbonaceous matter in fly ash. In addition, in conjunction with FTIR and SEM/EDS analysis, the reduction mechanism of CaSO{sub 4} as CaSO{submore » 4} + 4H{sub 2} = CaS + 4H{sub 2}O has been confirmed in this study. This mechanism is important in analyzing and evaluating sulfur capture in fluidized-bed combustion systems.« less

  3. Fly ash particles spheroidization using low temperature plasma energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhovtsov, V. V.; Volokitin, O. G.; Kondratyuk, A. A.; Vitske, R. E.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the investigations on producing spherical particles 65-110 μm in size using the energy of low temperature plasma (LTP). These particles are based on flow ash produced by the thermal power plant in Seversk, Tomsk region, Russia. The obtained spherical particles have no defects and are characterized by a smooth exterior surface. The test bench is designed to produce these particles. With due regard for plasma temperature field distribution, it is shown that the transition of fly ash particles to a state of viscous flow occurs at 20 mm distance from the plasma jet. The X-ray phase analysis is carried out for the both original state of fly ash powders and the particles obtained. This analysis shows that fly ash contains 56.23 wt.% SiO2; 20.61 wt.% Al2O3 and 17.55 wt.% Fe2O3 phases that mostly contribute to the integral (experimental) intensity of the diffraction maximum. The LTP treatment results in a complex redistribution of the amorphous phase amount in the obtained spherical particles, including the reduction of O2Si, phase, increase of O22Al20 and Fe2O3 phases and change in Al, O density of O22Al20 chemical unit cell.

  4. Leaching of mixtures of biochar and fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Porat, Iris; Phillips, Jana R.

    2009-06-22

    Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments. Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations. Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development,more » improves cation exchange capacity and decreases available aluminum. A combination of these benefits likely is responsible for observed increases in yields for crops such as corn and sugarcane. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) than do unamended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way. Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil. Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes. In the present study, we examined the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluated the leaching of organic carbon and metals from these mixtures. The carbon sorption experiments showed release of carbon from biochar, rather than sorption, except at the highest concentrations in the Biochar HW sample. Similar results were obtained by others for oxidative leaching of bituminous coal

  5. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-10-28

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

  6. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

  7. MSWI boiler fly ashes: magnetic separation for material recovery.

    PubMed

    De Boom, Aurore; Degrez, Marc; Hubaux, Paul; Lucion, Christian

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays, ferrous materials are usually recovered from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) bottom ash by magnetic separation. To our knowledge, such a physical technique has not been applied so far to other MSWI residues. This study focuses thus on the applicability of magnetic separation on boiler fly ashes (BFA). Different types of magnet are used to extract the magnetic particles. We investigate the magnetic particle composition, as well as their leaching behaviour (EN 12457-1 leaching test). The magnetic particles present higher Cr, Fe, Mn and Ni concentration than the non-magnetic (NM) fraction. Magnetic separation does not improve the leachability of the NM fraction. To approximate industrial conditions, magnetic separation is also applied to BFA mixed with water by using a pilot. BFA magnetic separation is economically evaluated. This study globally shows that it is possible to extract some magnetic particles from MSWI boiler fly ashes. However, the magnetic particles only represent from 23 to 120 g/kg of the BFA and, though they are enriched in Fe, are composed of similar elements to the raw ashes. The industrial application of magnetic separation would only be profitable if large amounts of ashes were treated (more than 15 kt/y), and the process should be ideally completed by other recovery methods or advanced treatments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fly Ash as a Time Marker for Anthropocene Alluvial Sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettis, E. A., III; Grimley, D. A.; Anders, A. M.; Bates, B.; Hannan, E.

    2014-12-01

    Human land use has transformed the landscapes, ecosystems and hydrology of the North American Midcontinent. One widespread impact of this transformation is increased runoff and accelerated soil erosion, which, along with direct human channel modifications and artificial drainage, have dramatically altered hydrologic and ecological conditions in streams and rivers with far-reaching results. A legacy of this change in streams and rivers is preserved on floodplains throughout the region in sediment known as post-settlement alluvium (PSA). Documenting the spatial and temporal pattern of historic floodplain sedimentation in the drainage network is part of a larger effort to understand decadal and century-scale sediment routing through the drainage system and the role of floodplain sedimentation in carbon sequestration. Fly ash, a product of high-temperature coal combustion, began to accumulate on the landscape in the early historic period (c.a.1840-1850 in Iowa and Illinois) as coal-burning technology such as steam engines came into use after 1850; prior to which no source of fly ash was present. Release of fly ash from coal burning in power plants and steam locomotives likely peaked in the early-mid 20th century. Fly ash particles (~ 1 to 10 % magnetic) are identified by their spheroidal shape and range in size from coarse clay to silt (~1-63µ). By identifying the percentage of fly ash spheroids in the magnetic separate (10 - 60µ size range) of a soil or sediment profile, the pre-fly ash Historic surface could be discerned. Application of this technique in selected localities in eastern Iowa (Clear Creek drainage) and central Illinois (Sangamon River drainage) resulted in successful demarcation of the PSA contact in areas where the boundary was physically evident. Bolstered by this success we were able to confidently demark the PSA contact in other settings where the boundary was not as physically evident. This relatively easy to implement, inexpensive tool will

  9. Determination of anisotropy and multimorphology in fly ash based geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. Irfan; Azizli, Khairun; Sufian, Suriati; Man, Zakaria; Siyal, Ahmer Ali; Ullah, Hafeez

    2015-07-01

    In this study, Malaysian coal fly ash-based geopolymers were investigated for its morphology and chemical composition using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-rays (SEM-EDX). Geopolymer was synthesized using sodium hydroxide as activator. SEM studies revealed multiphasous structure of the material, composed of geopolymeric gel, partially reacted fly ashparticles and selectively leached particles. EDX analysis confirmed the chemical composition of different regions. Infra red spectroscopic studies supported the SEM-EDX analysis by confirming presence of unreacted quartzite and mullite in geopolymers. It is concluded that geopolymers possese a non uniform chemistry through out the structure.

  10. Determination of anisotropy and multimorphology in fly ash based geopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M. Irfan, E-mail: mirfanwazir@gmail.com; Azizli, Khairun, E-mail: khairun-azizli@petronas.com.my; Sufian, Suriati, E-mail: suriati@petronas.com.my

    2015-07-22

    In this study, Malaysian coal fly ash-based geopolymers were investigated for its morphology and chemical composition using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-rays (SEM-EDX). Geopolymer was synthesized using sodium hydroxide as activator. SEM studies revealed multiphasous structure of the material, composed of geopolymeric gel, partially reacted fly ashparticles and selectively leached particles. EDX analysis confirmed the chemical composition of different regions. Infra red spectroscopic studies supported the SEM-EDX analysis by confirming presence of unreacted quartzite and mullite in geopolymers. It is concluded that geopolymers possese a non uniform chemistry through out the structure.

  11. Alkali-activated complex binders from class C fly ash and Ca-containing admixtures.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaolu; Shi, Huisheng; Chen, Liming; Dick, Warren A

    2010-01-15

    Processes that maximize utilization of industrial solid wastes are greatly needed. Sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate solution were used to create alkali-activated complex binders (AACBs) from class C fly ash (CFA) and other Ca-containing admixtures including Portland cement (PC), flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG), and water treatment residual (WTR). Specimens made only from CFA (CFA100), or the same fly ash mixed with 40 wt% PC (CFA60-PC40), with 10 wt% FGDG (CFA90-FGDG10), or with 10 wt% WTR (CFA90-WTR10) had better mechanical performance compared to binders using other mix ratios. The maximum compressive strength of specimens reached 80.0 MPa. Geopolymeric gel, sodium polysilicate zeolite, and hydrated products coexist when AACB reactions occur. Ca from CFA, PC, and WTR precipitated as Ca(OH)(2), bonded in geopolymers to obtain charge balance, or reacted with dissolved silicate and aluminate species to form calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. However, Ca from FGDG probably reacted with dissolved silicate and aluminate species to form ettringite. Utilization of CFA and Ca-containing admixtures in AACB is feasible. These binders may be widely utilized in various applications such as in building materials and for solidification/stabilization of other wastes, thus making the wastes more environmentally benign.

  12. Removal of copper (II) ion from aqueous solution using zeolite Y synthesized from rice husk ash: Equilibrium and kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuyen, Nguyen Thi Kim; Nhan, Do Nguyen Thanh; Nhat, Trieu Thi; An, Ngo Thanh; Long, Nguyen Quang

    2017-09-01

    Zeolite Y was synthesized from silica of rice-husk ash using hydrothermal process. The crystalline structure FAU of zeolite Y was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Surface's area of the catalyst was determined by physic-adsorption method using BET model. The zeolite was examined for possibility of Cu2+ adsorbent by an ion-exchange mechanism. Various adsorption isotherm models, such as Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich were tested for equilibrium study. The integration method was applied to find out the possible kinetic equation of the Cu2+ adsorption on the zeolite Y which obtained from cheap and locally available rice husk ash.

  13. Geopolymer lightweight bricks manufactured from fly ash and foaming agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Wan Mastura Wan; Hussin, Kamarudin; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Kadir, Aeslina Abdul

    2017-04-01

    This paper deals with the development of lightweight geopolymer bricks by using foaming agent and fly ash. The mix parameters analysed through a laboratory experiment with fix ratio of sodium silicate/sodium hydroxide solution mass ratio 2.5, fly ash/alkaline activator solution mass ratio 2.0, foaming agent/paste mass ratio 1:2 and molarity of sodium hydroxide solution used was 12M. Different curing temperature (Room Temperature, 60, 80) and foaming agent/water mass ratio (1:10 and 1:20) were studied. Compressive strength, density analysis, and water absorption has been investigated. The results show that the foamed geopolymer bricks with a lower foam/water mass ratio (1:10)and high curing temperature (80°C) leading to a better properties. Mixtures with a low density of around 1420 kg/m3 and a compressive strength of around 10 MPa were achieved.

  14. Utilization of blended fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash in geopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Rattanasak, Ubolluk, E-mail: ubolluk@buu.ac.t

    2010-04-15

    In this paper, synthesis of geopolymer from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash was studied in order to effectively utilize both ashes. FBC-fly ash and bottom ash were inter-ground to three different finenesses. The ashes were mixed with as-received PCC-fly ash in various proportions and used as source material for synthesis of geopolymer. Sodium silicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) and 10 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions at mass ratio of Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}/NaOH of 1.5 and curing temperature of 65 deg. C for 48 h were used for making geopolymer. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronmore » microscopy (SEM), degree of reaction, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed on the geopolymer pastes. Compressive strength was also tested on geopolymer mortars. The results show that high strength geopolymer mortars of 35.0-44.0 MPa can be produced using mixture of ground FBC ash and as-received PCC-fly ash. Fine FBC ash is more reactive and results in higher degree of reaction and higher strength geopolymer as compared to the use of coarser FBC ash. Grinding increases reactivity of ash by means of increasing surface area and the amount of reactive phase of the ash. In addition, the packing effect due to fine particles also contributed to increase in strength of geopolymers.« less

  15. Characterization of fly ash ceramic pellet for phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiyang; Cooke, Richard A; Wang, Li; Ma, Fang; Bhattarai, Rabin

    2017-03-15

    Phosphorus has been recognized as a leading pollutant for surface water quality deterioration. In the Midwestern USA, subsurface drainage not only provides a pathway for excess water to leave the field but it also drains out nutrients like nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Fly ash has been identified as one of the viable materials for phosphorus removal from contaminated waters. In this study, a ceramic pellet was manufactured using fly ash for P absorption. Three types of pellet with varying lime and clay proportions by weight (type 1: 10% lime + 30% clay, type 2: 20% lime + 20% clay, and type 3: 30% lime + 10% clay) were characterized and evaluated for absorption efficiency. The result showed that type 3 pellet (60% fly ash with 30% lime and 10% clay) had the highest porosity (14%) and absorption efficiency and saturated absorption capacity (1.98 mg P/g pellet) compared to type 1 and 2 pellets. The heavy metal leaching was the least (30 μg/L of chromium after 5 h) for type 3 pellet compared to other two. The microcosmic structure of pellet from scanning electron microscope showed the type 3 pellet had the better distribution of aluminum and iron oxide on the surface compared other two pellets. This result indicates that addition of lime and clay can improve P absorption capacity of fly ash while reducing the potential to reduce chromium leaching. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiological and material characterization of high volume fly ash concrete.

    PubMed

    Ignjatović, I; Sas, Z; Dragaš, J; Somlai, J; Kovács, T

    2017-03-01

    The main goal of research presented in this paper was the material and radiological characterization of high volume fly ash concrete (HVFAC) in terms of determination of natural radionuclide content and radon emanation and exhalation coefficients. All concrete samples were made with a fly ash content between 50% and 70% of the total amount of cementitious materials from one coal burning power plant in Serbia. Physical (fresh and hardened concrete density) and mechanical properties (compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and modulus of elasticity) of concrete were tested. The radionuclide content ( 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K) and radon massic exhalation of HVFAC samples were determined using gamma spectrometry. Determination of massic exhalation rates of HVFAC and its components using radon accumulation chamber techniques combined with a radon monitor was performed. The results show a beneficial effect of pozzolanic activity since the increase in fly ash content resulted in an increase in compressive strength of HVFAC by approximately 20% for the same mass of cement used in the mixtures. On the basis of the obtained radionuclide content of concrete components the I -indices of different HVFAC samples were calculated and compared with measured values (0.27-0.32), which were significantly below the recommended 1.0 index value. The prediction was relatively close to the measured values as the ratio between the calculated and measured I-index ranged between 0.89 and 1.14. Collected results of mechanical and radiological properties and performed calculations clearly prove that all 10 designed concretes with a certain type of fly ash are suitable for structural and non-structural applications both from a material and radiological point of view. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Spectroscopic studies of fly ash-based geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rożek, Piotr; Król, Magdalena; Mozgawa, Włodzimierz

    2018-06-01

    In the present work fly-ash based geopolymers with different contents of alkali-activator and water were prepared. Alkali-activation was conducted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at the SiO2/Na2O molar ratio of 3, 4, and 5. Water content was at the ratio of 30, 40, and 50 wt% in respect to the weight of the fly ash. Structural and microstructural characterization (FT-IR spectroscopy, 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR, X-ray diffraction, SEM) of the specimens as well as compressive strength and apparent density measurements were carried out. The obtained geopolymers are mainly amorphous due to the presence of disordered aluminosilicate phases. However, hydroxysodalite have been identified as a crystalline product of geopolymerization. The major band in the mid-infrared spectra (at about 1000 cm-1) is related to Sisbnd O(Si,Al) asymmetric stretching vibrations and is an indicator of the geopolymeric network formation. Several component bands in this region can be noticed after the decomposition process. Decomposition of band at 1450 cm-1 (vibrations of Csbnd O bonds in bicarbonate group) has been also conducted. Higher NaOH content favors carbonation, inasmuch as the intensity of the band then increases. Both water and alkaline activator contents have an influence on compressive strength and microstructure of the obtained fly-ash based geopolymers.

  18. Geopolymerisation of fly ashes with waste aluminium anodising etching solutions.

    PubMed

    Ogundiran, M B; Nugteren, H W; Witkamp, G J

    2016-10-01

    Combined management of coal combustion fly ash and waste aluminium anodising etching solutions using geopolymerisation presents economic and environmental benefits. The possibility of using waste aluminium anodising etching solution (AES) as activator to produce fly ash geopolymers in place of the commonly used silicate solutions was explored in this study. Geopolymerisation capacities of five European fly ashes with AES and the leaching of elements from their corresponding geopolymers were studied. Conventional commercial potassium silicate activator-based geopolymers were used as a reference. The geopolymers produced were subjected to physical, mechanical and leaching tests. The leaching of elements was tested on 28 days cured and crushed geopolymers using NEN 12457-4, NEN 7375, SPLP and TCLP leaching tests. After 28 days ambient curing, the geopolymers based on the etching solution activator showed compressive strength values between 51 and 84 MPa, whereas the commercial potassium silicate based geopolymers gave compressive strength values between 89 and 115 MPa. Based on the regulatory limits currently associated with the used leaching tests, all except one of the produced geopolymers (with above threshold leaching of As and Se) passed the recommended limits. The AES-geopolymer geopolymers demonstrated excellent compressive strength, although less than geopolymers made from commercial activator. Additionally, they demonstrated low element leaching potentials and therefore can be suitable for use in construction works. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Coal fly ash as a resource for rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Franus, Wojciech; Wiatros-Motyka, Małgorzata M; Wdowin, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) have been recognised as critical raw materials, crucial for many clean technologies. As the gap between their global demand and supply increases, the search for their alternative resources becomes more and more important, especially for the countries which depend highly on their import. Coal fly ash (CFA), which when not utilised is considered waste, has been regarded as the possible source of many elements, including REE. Due to the increase in the energy demand, CFA production is expected to grow, making research into the use of this material a necessity. As Poland is the second biggest coal consumer in the European Union, the authors have studied different coal fly ashes from ten Polish power plants for their rare earth element content. All the fly ashes have a broadly similar distribution of rear earth elements, with light REE being dominant. Most of the samples have REE content relatively high and according to Seredin and Dai (Int J Coal Geol 94: 67-93, 2012) classification can be considered promising REE raw materials.

  20. Magnetic separation of coal fly ash from Bulgarian power plants.

    PubMed

    Shoumkova, Annie S

    2011-10-01

    Fly ash from three coal-burning power plants in Bulgaria: 'Maritza 3', 'Republika' and 'Rousse East' were subjected to wet low-intensity magnetic separation. The tests were performed at different combinations of magnetic field intensity, flow velocity and diameter of matrix elements. It was found that all parameters investigated affected the separation efficiency, but their influence was interlinked and was determined by the properties of the material and the combination of other conditions. Among the fly ash characteristics, the most important parameters, determining the magnetic separation applicability, were mineralogical composition and distribution of minerals in particles. The main factors limiting the process were the presence of paramagnetic Fe-containing mineral and amorphous matter, and the existence of poly-mineral particles and aggregates of magnetic and non-magnetic particles. It was demonstrated that the negative effect of both factors could be considerably limited by the selection of a proper set of separation conditions. The dependences between concentration of ferromagnetic iron in the ash, their magnetic properties and magnetic fraction yields were studied. It was experimentally proved that, for a certain set of separation conditions, the yields of magnetic fractions were directly proportional to the saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetic components of the ash. The main properties of typical magnetic and non-magnetic fractions were studied.

  1. Utilization of western coal fly ash in construction of highways in the Midwest

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-03-01

    Coal burning utilities in the Midwest are increasingly using sub-bituminous coal from Wyoming. These utilities typically produce fly ash, which, because of its high calcium oxide content, may be classified as Class C fly ash. These ashes are characte...

  2. Comparison of leaching characteristics of heavy metals from bottom and fly ashes in Korea and Japan.

    PubMed

    Shim, Young-Sook; Rhee, Seung-Whee; Lee, Woo-Keun

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this research was to compare the leaching characteristics of heavy metals such as cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, etc., in Korean and Japanese municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) ash. The rate of leaching of heavy metal was measured by KSLT and JTL-13, and the amount of heavy metals leached was compared with the metal content in each waste component. Finally, bio-availability testing was performed to assess the risks associated with heavy metals leached from bottom ash and fly ash. From the results, the value of neutralization ability in Japanese fly ash was four times higher than that in Korean fly ash. The reason was the difference in the content of Ca(OH)(2) in fly ash. The amount of lead leached exceeded the regulatory level in both Japanese and Korean fly ash. The rate of leaching was relatively low in ash with a pH in the range of 6-10. The bio-availability test in fly ash demonstrated that the amount of heavy metals leached was Pb>Cd>Cr, but the order was changed to Pb>Cr>Cd in the bottom ash. The leaching concentration of lead exceeded the Japanese risk level in all fly ashes from the two countries, but the leaching concentration of cadmium exceeded the regulatory level in Korean fly ash only.

  3. Utilization of coal fly ash in solidification of liquid radioactive waste from research reactor.

    PubMed

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the potential utilization of fly ash was investigated as an additive in solidification process of radioactive waste sludge from research reactor. Coal formations include various percentages of natural radioactive elements; therefore, coal fly ash includes various levels of radioactivity. For this reason, fly ashes have to be evaluated for potential environmental implications in case of further usage in any construction material. But for use in solidification of radioactive sludge, the radiological effects of fly ash are in the range of radioactive waste management limits. The results show that fly ash has a strong fixing capacity for radioactive isotopes. Specimens with addition of 5-15% fly ash to concrete was observed to be sufficient to achieve the target compressive strength of 20 MPa required for near-surface disposal. An optimum mixture comprising 15% fly ash, 35% cement, and 50% radioactive waste sludge could provide the solidification required for long-term storage and disposal. The codisposal of radioactive fly ash with radioactive sludge by solidification decreases the usage of cement in solidification process. By this method, radioactive fly ash can become a valuable additive instead of industrial waste. This study supports the utilization of fly ash in industry and the solidification of radioactive waste in the nuclear industry.

  4. A brief review on fly ash and its use in surface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhajantri, Vishwanath; Krishna, Prasad; Jambagi, Sudhakar

    2018-04-01

    Fly ash is a by-product obtained from coal power plants. Over the past two decades, handling this industrial waste has been a great challenge for many developing countries. However, this menace can be used in many industrial applications viz., civil, automobile and aerospace applications. In civil industry, the fly ash has been used in concreate to enhance the porosity that increases the curing time of the concrete. The fly ash has been gaining importance these days as a feedstock material for many thermal spray processes. In automobile sector, the fly ash has been used as a thermal barrier coating in IC engines, whereas in aerospace industry, which demands lighter and stronger materials, the fly ash has been used as a reinforcement material. Hence, so far, fly ash has been used as an either single or a composite feed stock material in thermal spray processes. The fly ash with other materials like alumina, titania and red mud have been deposited using thermal spray processes. These coatings have exhibited higher wear, corrosion and erosion resistance as compared to the uncoated specimens. In this paper, a brief review on fly ash and its use, especially its use as a feed stock in thermal spray coating, is presented. Therefore, the use of fly ash has opened a new frontier of research in thermal spray coating area where economically viable coatings can be produced using industrial waste like fly ash.

  5. Influence of Cements Containing Calcareous Fly Ash as a Main Component Properties of Fresh Cement Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gołaszewski, Jacek; Kostrzanowska-Siedlarz, Aleksandra; Ponikiewski, Tomasz; Miera, Patrycja

    2017-10-01

    The main goal of presented research was to examine usability of cements containing calcareous fly ash (W) from technological point of view. In the paper the results of tests concerning the influence of CEM II and CEM IV cements containing fly ash (W) on rheological properties, air content, setting times and plastic shrinkage of mortars are presented and discussed. Moreover, compatibility of plasticizers with cements containing fly ash (W) was also studied. Additionally, setting time and hydration heat of cements containing calcareous fly ash (W) were determined. In a broader aspect, the research contributes to promulgation of the possibility of using calcareous fly ash (W) in cement and concrete technology, what greatly benefits the environment protection (utilization of waste fly ash). Calcareous fly ash can be used successfully as the main component of cement. Cements produced by blending with processed fly ash or cements produced by interginding are characterized by acceptable technological properties. In respect to CEM I cements, cements containing calcareous fly ash worsen workability, decrease air content, delay setting time of mixtures. Cements with calcareous fly ash show good compatibility with plasticizers.

  6. Illinois basin coal fly ashes. 2. Equilibria relationships and qualitative modeling of ash-water reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, W.R.; Griffin, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Alkaline and acidic Illinois Basin coal fly ash samples were each mixed with deionized water and equilibrated for about 140 days to simulate ash ponding environments. Common to both equilibrated solutions, anhydrite solubility dominated Ca2+ activities, and Al3+ activities were in equilibrium with both matrix mullite and insoluble aluminum hydroxide phases. Aqueous silica activities were controlled by both mullite and matrix silicates. The pH of the extract of the acidic fly ash was 4.1 after 24 h but increased to a pH value of 6.4 as the H2SO4, assumed to be adsorbed to the particle surfaces, was exhausted by the dissolution of matrix iron oxides and aluminosilicates. The activities of aqueous Al3+ and iron, initially at high levels during the early stages of equilibration, decreased to below analytical detection limits as the result of the formation of insoluble Fe and Al hydroxide phases. The pH of the extract of the alkaline fly ash remained above a pH value of 10 during the entire equilibration interval as a result of the hydrolysis of matrix oxides. As with the acidic system, Al3+ activities were controlled by amorphous aluminum hydroxide phases that began to form after about 7 days of equilibration. The proposed mechanisms and their interrelations are discussed in addition to the solubility diagrams used to deduce these relationships. ?? 1984 American Chemical Society.

  7. The High Teperature Influence on Geopolymer Fly Ash Mixture’s Compressisive Strength with Insudtrial Waste Material Substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayuaji, R.; Wibowo, B.; Subekti, S.; Santoso, S. E.; Hardiyanto, E.; Kaelani, Y.; Mallu, L. L.

    2017-11-01

    This research aimed to figure out the influence of fly ash mixture from the industrial waste at the temperatures of 150°C, 450°C, 750°C viewed from the strength and resistance of geopolymer paste. As a result, cement will be substituted by industrial waste like fly ash. This experimental research was conducted on the mix design of geopolymer concrete which was made by dimension with 2.5 cm in diameter and 5 cm in height from four mixture composition of fly ash and industrial waste i.e. 100% fly ash, 50% fly ash+50% bottom ash, 50% fly ash+50% sandblast, and 50% fly ash+50% carbide waste. Each mixture was tested in terms of porosity and compressive strength. In conclusion, in the mixture of 50% fly ash+50% Sandblast and 50% fly ash+50% bottom ash in 12 molars, 1.5 activator comparison can be used to substitute fly ash at high temperature. Meanwhile, the mixture of 50% fly ash+50% carbide waste in 8 molars, 0.5 activator comparison has very small strength remaining if it is compared to the mixture of fly ash and other industrial waste (Bottom ash and Sandblast). The performance of mixture paste of 50% fly ash+50% carbide waste was very vulnerable after being burnt. Consequently, it cannot be used as the main structure at high temperature.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, and mercury adsorption properties of hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve prepared with fly ash

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Minmin; Hou, Li-an; Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Xunfeng

    2013-01-01

    A novel hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve (HMAS) was prepared with fly ash and impregnated with zeolite A precursors. This improved the mercury adsorption of HMAS compared to original MCM-41. The HMAS was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and 29Si and 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectra. These showed that the HMAS structure was still retained after impregnated with zeolite A. But the surface area and pore diameter of HMAS decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of mercury from aqueous solution was studied on untreated MCM-41and HMAS. The mercury adsorption rate of HMAS was higher than that of origin MCM-41. The adsorption of mercury was investigated on HMAS regarding the pH of mercury solution, initial mercury concentration, and the reaction temperature. The experimental data fit well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Dublin–Radushkevich isotherm and the characterization show that the mercury adsorption on HMAS involved the ion-exchange mechanisms. In addition, the thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. The adsorption of mercury on HMAS followed the first order kinetics. PMID:23687400

  9. Synthesis, characterization, and mercury adsorption properties of hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve prepared with fly ash.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minmin; Hou, Li-An; Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Xunfeng

    2013-05-15

    A novel hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve (HMAS) was prepared with fly ash and impregnated with zeolite A precursors. This improved the mercury adsorption of HMAS compared to original MCM-41. The HMAS was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and 29 Si and 27 Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectra. These showed that the HMAS structure was still retained after impregnated with zeolite A. But the surface area and pore diameter of HMAS decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of mercury from aqueous solution was studied on untreated MCM-41and HMAS. The mercury adsorption rate of HMAS was higher than that of origin MCM-41. The adsorption of mercury was investigated on HMAS regarding the pH of mercury solution, initial mercury concentration, and the reaction temperature. The experimental data fit well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Dublin-Radushkevich isotherm and the characterization show that the mercury adsorption on HMAS involved the ion-exchange mechanisms. In addition, the thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. The adsorption of mercury on HMAS followed the first order kinetics.

  10. Potential use of fly ash to soil treatment in the Morava region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulíková, Lucia; Kresta, František; Rochovanský, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Soil treatment by binders is a standard technology and leads to optimal utilization of excavated soils in road constructions. Soil treatment is controlled in the Czech Republic by EN 14227-15 and Technical Requirement TP 94. Soil treatment using fly ash has not been performed in the Czech Republic, although there is a sufficient normative base. Fly ash produced by burning of hard coal in the Moravian region was tested as a potential binder. Fly ash samples were mixed with loess loams (CI). Tested siliceous fly ash of class F (ASTM C618) did not showed hydraulic properties but it showed positive effect on reducing maximum dry density of mixtures, increasing the IBI value (Immediate bearing index) and decreasing tendency to volume changes when the amount of fly ash was increased. The results of laboratory tests demonstrate the possibility of using fly ashes as a binder for soil treatment.

  11. Physical and Chemical Character of Fly Ash of Coal Fired Power Plant in Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triwulan; Priadana, K. A.; Ekaputri, J. J.; Bayuaji, R.

    2017-11-01

    Quality of fly ash is varying widely in the field, it depends on the combustion process and the quality of the basic ingredients, namely coal. It will affect the physical and mechanical properties of the concrete mixtures used. This study used 12 samples of fly ash. The physical and chemical properties and finesse modulus were analyzed. The fly ash was mixed with OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement) with the proportion of 20% fly ash and 80% OPC. The specimens were form with mortar dimension of 5cm x 5 cm. The test was affected by the correlation of fly ash fineness modulus to compressive strength, correlation density of fly ash to compressive strength, and correlation of carbon content to the compressive strength.

  12. Development of a standard operating procedure for analysis of ammonia concentrations in coal fly ash.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-04-01

    Research was performed to support the development and recommendation of a standard operating : procedure (SOP) for analyzing the ammonia content in fly ash intended for use in concrete. A review : of existing ash producers found that several differen...

  13. Update on fly ash technology relating to highway construction : January 1983.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1983-01-01

    This report abstracts the information concerning the use of fly ash in highway construction contained in the Proceedings of the Sixth International Ash Utilization Symposium held March 7-10, 1982, at Reno, Nevada. The Proceedings include 54 papers, o...

  14. Effect of fly ash calcination in geopolymer synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadhi, Tjokorde Walmiki; Jatiningrum, Mirna; Arisiani, Gresia

    2015-12-01

    Geopolymer, a largely amorphous class of inorganic polymer consisting of aluminosilicate repeat units, is an environmentally attractive engineering material due to its ability to consume aluminosilicate waste as raw materials. This work studies the effect of the calcination temperature of a coal fly ash generated by a low-efficiency boiler on the mechanical strength of geopolymer mortar synthesized using a mixture of the fly ash, potassium hydroxide as the alkali activator, and locally available sand as the filler aggregate. The calcination temperature is varied between 500-700 °C, with a calcination period of 2 hours in an electric furnace. Two sand samples with different particle size distributions are used. The key response variable is the compressive strength at room temperature, measured after curing at 80 °C for 7 and 14 days. Uncalcined ash, with a carbon content of approximately 31.0%, is not amenable for geopolymer synthesis. Analysis of experimental data using the ANOVA method for general factorial design identifies significant main effects for all three experimental variables. Two-way interactions are significant, except that between sand type and curing period. Higher calcination temperature significantly improves the strength of the mortar. However, the strength of the obtained geopolymer mortars are still significantly lower than that of ordinary Portland cement mortar.

  15. Removal of hazardous metals from MSW fly ash--an evaluation of ash leaching methods.

    PubMed

    Fedje, Karin Karlfeldt; Ekberg, Christian; Skarnemark, Gunnar; Steenari, Britt-Marie

    2010-01-15

    Incineration is a commonly applied management method for municipal solid waste (MSW). However, significant amounts of potentially hazardous metal species are present in the resulting ash, and these may be leached into the environment. A common idea for cleaning the ash is to use enhanced leaching with strong mineral acids. However, due to the alkalinity of the ash, large amounts of acid are needed and this is a drawback. Therefore, this work was undertaken in order to investigate some alternative leaching media (EDTA, ammonium nitrate, ammonium chloride and a number of organic acids) and to compare them with the usual mineral acids and water. All leaching methods gave a significant increase in ash specific surface area due to removal of soluble bulk (matrix) compounds, such as CaCO(3) and alkali metal chlorides. The use of mineral acids and EDTA mobilised many elements, especially Cu, Zn and Pb, whereas the organic acids generally were not very effective as leaching agents for metals. Leaching using NH(4)NO(3) was especially effective for the release of Cu. The results show that washing of MSW filter ash with alternative leaching agents is a possible way to remove hazardous metals from MSW fly ash.

  16. Physical-durable performance of concrete incorporating high loss on ignition-fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Trong-Phuoc; Ngo, Si-Huy; Hwang, Chao-Lung

    2018-04-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using raw fly ash with a high loss on ignition in concrete. The fly ash-free concrete samples were prepared with different water-to-binder (w/b) ratios of 0.35, 0.40, and 0.45, whereas the fly ash concrete samples were prepared with a constant w/b of 0.40 and with various fly ash contents (10%, 20%, and 30%) as a cement substitution. The physical properties and durability performance of the concretes were evaluated through fresh concrete properties, compressive strength, strength efficiency of cement, ultrasonic pulse velocity, and resistance to sulfate attack. Test results show that the w/b ratio affected the concrete properties significantly. The incorporation of fly ash increased the workability and reduced the unit weight of fresh concrete. In addition, the fly ash concrete samples containing up to 20% fly ash exhibited an improved strength at long-term ages. Further, all of the fly ash concrete samples showed a good durability performance with ultrasonic pulse velocity value of greater than 4100 m/s and a comparable sulfate resistance to the no-fly ash concrete.

  17. CO₂ carbonation under aqueous conditions using petroleum coke combustion fly ash.

    PubMed

    González, A; Moreno, N; Navia, R

    2014-12-01

    Fly ash from petroleum coke combustion was evaluated for CO2 capture in aqueous medium. Moreover the carbonation efficiency based on different methodologies and the kinetic parameters of the process were determined. The results show that petroleum coke fly ash achieved a CO2 capture yield of 21% at the experimental conditions of 12 g L(-1), 363°K without stirring. The carbonation efficiency by petroleum coke fly ash based on reactive calcium species was within carbonation efficiencies reported by several authors. In addition, carbonation by petroleum coke fly ash follows a pseudo-second order kinetic model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemical and engineering properties of fired bricks containing 50 weight percent of class F fly ash

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Patel, V.; Laird, C.J.; Ho, K.K.

    2001-01-01

    The generation of fly ash during coal combustion represents a considerable solid waste disposal problem in the state of Illinois and nationwide. In fact, the majority of the three million tons of fly ash produced from burning Illinois bituminous coals is disposed of in landfills. The purpose of this study was to obtain a preliminary assessment of the technical feasibility of mitigating this solid waste problem by making fired bricks with the large volume of fly ash generated from burning Illinois coals. Test bricks were produced by the extrusion method with increasing amounts (20-50% by weight) of fly ash as a replacement for conventional raw materials. The chemical characteristics and engineering properties of the test bricks produced with and without 50 wt% of fly ash substitutions were analyzed and compared. The properties of the test bricks containing fly ash were at least comparable to, if not better than, those of standard test bricks made without fly ash and met the commercial specifications for fired bricks. The positive results of this study suggest that further study on test bricks with fly ash substitutions of greater than 50wt% is warranted. Successful results could have an important impact in reducing the waste disposal problem related to class F fly ash while providing the brick industry with a new low cost raw material. Copyright ?? 2001 Taylor & Francis.

  19. Nitration of benzo[a]pyrene adsorbed on coal fly ash particles by nitrogen dioxide: role of thermal activation.

    PubMed

    Kristovich, Robert L; Dutta, Prabir K

    2005-09-15

    Nitration of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) by nitrogen dioxide (NO2) adsorbed on the surface of thermally activated coal fly ash and model aluminosilicate particles led to the formation of nitrobenzo[a]pyrenes as verified by extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was utilized to follow the nitration reaction on the surface of zeolite Y. Nitrobenzo[a]pyrene formation was observed along with the formation of nitrous acid and nitrate species. The formation of the BaP radical cation was also observed on thermally activated aluminosilicate particles by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. On the basis of GC/MS, DRIFTS, and ESR spectroscopy results, a mechanism of nitration involving intermediate BaP radical cations generated on thermally activated aluminosilicate particles is proposed. These observations have led to the hypothesis that nitration of adsorbed polyaromatic hydrocarbons on coal fly ash by reaction with nitrogen oxides can occur in the smokestack, but with the aging of the fly ash particles, the extent of the nitration reaction will be diminished.

  20. Gehlenite and anorthite formation from fluid fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perná, Ivana; Šupová, Monika; Hanzlíček, Tomáš

    2018-04-01

    Fluid fly ash could be considered a waste, but, when well treated, it may also become a useful secondary source material. Its rather high content of calcium-containing phases along with thermally treated alumino-silicate residues resulting from coal combustion can lead to the formation of a stable system with newly formatted phases. The high temperature destroys the clay lattice and activates a new configuration of aluminum ions, changing their coordination to oxygen. The effect is accompanied by changes in charge in the surroundings, which are compensated for by calcium ions. The higher the temperature of the fluid ash treatment, the more pronounced the appearance of gehlenite and anorthite in the final mass. Both are natural materials and, together with mullite and anhydrite, they could ensure safety and protection even if exposed to open fire of up to 1150 °C.

  1. Study of PCDD/Fs distribution in fly ash, ash deposits, and bottom ash from a medical waste incinerator in China.

    PubMed

    Du, Yingzhe; Jin, Yuqi; Lu, Shengyong; Peng, Zheng; Li, Xiaodong; Yan, Jianhua

    2013-02-01

    Over the past decades in China, the number of medical waste incinerators (MWIs) has been rising rapidly, causing emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). In this study, samples of fly ash, ash deposits, and bottom ash from typical MWIs were analyzed for PCDD/Fs and their distribution characteristics. Results showed international toxic equivalent (I-TEQ) values in the range of 6.9-67 ng I-TEQ/g in fly ash and ash deposits, whereas the concentration in bottom ash was extremely low (only 1.33 pg I-TEQ/g), yet the generation of PCDD/Fs was mostly de novo synthesis in fly ash and ash deposits according to the ratio of PCDFs to PCDDs; the major distribution differences of PCDD/Fs in fly ash was manifested by the content of toxic furan 2,3,7,8-TCDF but other toxic PCDD/Fs showed similar distribution. Other findings are that 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF had the most contribution to TEQ concentration, and that the most abundant toxic furan congener is 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDF. Correlation analysis showed that there was no significant correlation between PCDD/Fs concentration and several other physical and chemical parameters. This paper is of interest because it presents the emission performances of PCDD/Fs in ash from medical waste incineration in China. PCDD/F contents in fly ash and ash deposits vary between 6.9 and 67.3 ng I-TEQ/g. However, the concentration in bottom ash was extremely low (only 1.33 x 10(-3) ng I-TEQ/g). The fingerprints of PCDD/Fs in fly ash are almost similar, except for 2,3,7,8-TCDF. There is no marked correlation between PCDD/Fs and other physicochemical properties.

  2. On the removal of hexavalent chromium from a Class F fly ash.

    PubMed

    Huggins, F E; Rezaee, M; Honaker, R Q; Hower, J C

    2016-05-01

    Coarse and fine samples of a Class F fly ash obtained from commercial combustion of Illinois bituminous coal have been exposed to two long-term leaching tests designed to simulate conditions in waste impoundments. ICP-AES analysis indicated that the coarse and fine fly ash samples contained 135 and 171mg/kg Cr, respectively. Measurements by XAFS spectroscopy showed that the ash samples originally contained 5 and 8% of the chromium, respectively, in the hexavalent oxidation state, Cr(VI). After exposure to water for more than four months, the percentage of chromium as Cr(VI) in the fly-ash decreased significantly for the coarse and fine fly-ash in both tests. Combining the XAFS data with ICP-AES data on the concentration of chromium in the leachates indicated that, after the nineteen-week-long, more aggressive, kinetic test on the coarse fly ash, approximately 60% of the Cr(VI) had been leached, 20% had been reduced to Cr(III) and retained in the ash, and 20% remained as Cr(VI) in the ash. In contrast, during the six-month-long baseline test, very little Cr was actually leached from either the coarse or the fine fly-ash (<0.1mg/kg); rather, about 66% and 20%, respectively, of the original Cr(VI) in the coarse and fine fly-ash was retained in the ash in that form, while the remainder, 34% and 80%, respectively, was reduced and retained in the ash as Cr(III). The results are interpreted as indicating that Cr(VI) present in Class F fly-ash can be reduced to Cr(III) when in contact with water and that such chemical reduction can compete with physical removal of Cr(VI) from the ash by aqueous leaching. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantification of the degree of reaction of fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Haha, M., E-mail: mohsen.ben-haha@empa.c; De Weerdt, K., E-mail: klaartje.de.weerdt@sintef.n; Lothenbach, B.

    2010-11-15

    The quantification of the fly ash (FA) in FA blended cements is an important parameter to understand the effect of the fly ash on the hydration of OPC and on the microstructural development. The FA reaction in two different blended OPC-FA systems was studied using a selective dissolution technique based on EDTA/NaOH, diluted NaOH solution, the portlandite content and by backscattered electron image analysis. The amount of FA determined by selective dissolution using EDTA/NaOH is found to be associated with a significant possible error as different assumptions lead to large differences in the estimate of FA reacted. In addition, atmore » longer hydration times, the reaction of the FA is underestimated by this method due to the presence of non-dissolved hydrates and MgO rich particles. The dissolution of FA in diluted NaOH solution agreed during the first days well with the dissolution as observed by image analysis. At 28 days and longer, the formation of hydrates in the diluted solutions leads to an underestimation. Image analysis appears to give consistent results and to be most reliable technique studied.« less

  4. Abatement of organic pollutants using fly ash based adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Adegoke, Kayode Adesina; Oyewole, Rhoda Oyeladun; Lasisi, Bukola Morenike; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2017-11-01

    The presence of organic pollutants in the environment is of major concern because of their toxicity, bio-accumulating tendency, threat to human life and the environment. It is a well-known fact that, these pollutants can damage nerves, liver, and bones and could also block functional groups of essential enzymes. Conventional methods for removing dissolved pollutants include chemical precipitation, chemical oxidation or reduction, filtration, ion-exchange, electrochemical treatment, application of membrane technology, evaporation recovery and biological treatment. Although all the pollutant treatment techniques can be employed, they have their inherent advantages and limitations. Among all these methods, adsorption process is considered better than other methods because of convenience, easy operation and simplicity of design. A fundamentally important characteristic of good adsorbents is their high porosity and consequent larger surface area with more specific adsorption sites. This paper presents a review of adsorption of different pollutants using activated carbon prepared from fly ash sources and the attendant environmental implications. Also, the ways of overcoming barriers to fly ash utilization together with regeneration studies are also discussed.

  5. Improvements of nano-SiO2 on sludge/fly ash mortar.

    PubMed

    Lin, D F; Lin, K L; Chang, W C; Luo, H L; Cai, M Q

    2008-01-01

    Sewage sludge ash has been widely applied to cementitious materials. In this study, in order to determine effects of nano-SiO(2) additives on properties of sludge/fly ash mortar, different amounts of nano-SiO(2) were added to sludge/fly ash mortar specimens to investigate their physical properties and micro-structures. A water-binding ratio of 0.7 was assigned to the mix. Substitution amounts of 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% of sludge/fly ash (1:1 ratio) were proposed. Moreover, 0%, 1%, 2%, and 3% of nano-SiO(2) was added to the mix. Tests, including SEM and compressive strength, were carried out on mortar specimens cured at 3, 7, and 28 days. Results showed that sludge/fly ash can make the crystals of cement hydration product finer. Moreover, crystals increased after nano-SiO(2) was added. Hence, nano-SiO(2) can improve the effects of sludge/fly ash on the hydration of mortar. Further, due to the low pozzolanic reaction active index of sludge ash, early compressive strengths of sludge/fly ash mortar were decreased. Yet, nano-SiO(2) could help produce hydration crystals, which implies that the addition of nano-SiO(2) to mortar can improve the influence of sludge/fly ash on the development of the early strength of the mortar.

  6. The measurement of unburned carbon in fly ash using infrared photoacoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, D.J.; Brown, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    Unburned carbon in fly ash yields valuable information on coal combustion efficiency in coal-fired boilers. The carbon content of fly ash is also an important parameters in the sale of fly ash for Portland cement. Unfortunately, a reliable and inexpensive instrument for measuring unburned carbon is not commercially available. The authors have developed an off-line instrument that detects carbon in fly ash via the photoacoustic effect. In this process, amplitude-modulated radiation is absorbed by a bulk sample of fly ash. The wavelength of the radiation is chosen such that mineral compounds and moisture in the fly ash are transparent tomore » the radiation but carbon is strongly absorbing. The modulated absorption generates a periodic pressure wave at the surface of the sample which propagates through the surrounding air as an acoustic wave. This wave is detected by a sensitive microphone, and is dependent on the carbon content of the sample. The resulting instrument has been used to measure fly ash carbon concentrations from less than 0.1% to nearly 7% by mass. The precision of these measurements is nominally within 4%, which is equivalent to the precision of the chemical analysis used to develop the calibration standards. The applicability of a theoretical model to the empirical results is discussed with respect to fly ash sample preparation.« less

  7. Field evaluation of fly ash in aggregate shoulder materials : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1985-06-01

    This study consisted of an evaluation of self-hardening fly ash (Class C) used as an additive in the treatment of shoulders surfaced with sand clay gravel and/or shell (oyster). This was accomplished through construction of fly ash treated aggregate ...

  8. SPECIATION OF MERCURY IN THE PRESENCE OF COAL AND WASTE COMBUSTION FLY ASHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study that focused on the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hgo) in the presence of both complex, four-component, model fly ashes, and actual coal combustion fly ashes collected from a pilot plant. Steady-state oxidation of Hgo promoted by the four-com...

  9. Influence Of Trace Metal Distribution On Its Leachability From Coal Fly Ash

    EPA Science Inventory

    The risks associated with the reuse of coal fly ash in natural environmental settings in terms of their mobility and ecotoxicological significance is largely determined by: (1) the physicochemical conditions the fly ash is placed under; (2) the total leachable metal content in fl...

  10. Experimental Study on Durability Improvement of Fly Ash Concrete with Durability Improving Admixture

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Hong-zhu; Kasami, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the durability of fly ash concrete, a series of experimental studies are carried out, where durability improving admixture is used to reduce drying shrinkage and improve freezing-thawing resistance. The effects of durability improving admixture, air content, water-binder ratio, and fly ash replacement ratio on the performance of fly ash concrete are discussed in this paper. The results show that by using durability improving admixture in nonair-entraining fly ash concrete, the compressive strength of fly ash concrete can be improved by 10%–20%, and the drying shrinkage is reduced by 60%. Carbonation resistance of concrete is roughly proportional to water-cement ratio regardless of water-binder ratio and fly ash replacement ratio. For the specimens cured in air for 2 weeks, the freezing-thawing resistance is improved. In addition, by making use of durability improving admixture, it is easier to control the air content and make fly ash concrete into nonair-entraining one. The quality of fly ash concrete is thereby optimized. PMID:25013870

  11. Experimental study on durability improvement of fly ash concrete with durability improving admixture.

    PubMed

    Quan, Hong-zhu; Kasami, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the durability of fly ash concrete, a series of experimental studies are carried out, where durability improving admixture is used to reduce drying shrinkage and improve freezing-thawing resistance. The effects of durability improving admixture, air content, water-binder ratio, and fly ash replacement ratio on the performance of fly ash concrete are discussed in this paper. The results show that by using durability improving admixture in nonair-entraining fly ash concrete, the compressive strength of fly ash concrete can be improved by 10%-20%, and the drying shrinkage is reduced by 60%. Carbonation resistance of concrete is roughly proportional to water-cement ratio regardless of water-binder ratio and fly ash replacement ratio. For the specimens cured in air for 2 weeks, the freezing-thawing resistance is improved. In addition, by making use of durability improving admixture, it is easier to control the air content and make fly ash concrete into nonair-entraining one. The quality of fly ash concrete is thereby optimized.

  12. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout: Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    To investigate the kinetics of beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout The project is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout.

  13. Geoenvironmental impacts of using high carbon fly ash in structural fill applications : [research summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-03-01

    Coal power plants generate approximately 50% of the electricity in the : United States. As a result, large amounts of coal combustion byproducts, : especially fly ash, are produced annually. Only 40% of the fly ash : (mainly C and F-type classificati...

  14. Permeation Properties and Pore Structure of Surface Layer of Fly Ash Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Qiu, Qiwen; Xing, Feng; Pan, Dong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the nature of permeation properties and pore structure of concrete surface layers containing fly ash. Concretes containing different dosages of fly ash as a replacement for cement (15% and 30% by weight of total cement materials, respectively) were investigated. Concrete without any fly ash added was also employed as the reference specimen. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the surface layer properties of concrete including chloride transport, apparent water permeability and pore structure. The results demonstrate that incorporation of fly ash, for the early test period, promotes the chloride ingress at the surface layer of concrete but substituting proportions of fly ash may have little impact on it. With the process of chloride immersion, the chloride concentration at the surface layer of concrete with or without fly ash was found to be nearly the same. In addition, it is suggested that the water permeability at the concrete surface area is closely related to the fly ash contents as well as the chloride exposure time. Pore structure was characterized by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) test and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. The modification of pore structure of concrete submersed in distilled water is determined by the pozzolanic reaction of fly ash and the calcium leaching effect. The pozzolanic reaction was more dominant at the immersion time of 180 days while the calcium leaching effect became more evident after 270 days. PMID:28788677

  15. Evaluation of interactions between soil and coal fly ash leachates using column percolation tests.

    PubMed

    Tsiridis, V; Petala, M; Samaras, P; Sakellaropoulos, G P

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work was the assessment of the environmental impact of different origin fly ashes with regard to their final disposal. The experimental procedure included the performance of single column tests and column tests of fly ash and soil in series. The appraisal of the potential environmental hazards was implemented using physicochemical analyses and bioassays. Two different fly ash samples were examined, one fly ash produced from the combustion of sub-bituminous coal (CFA) and one fly ash produced from the combustion of lignite (LFA). Single column percolation tests were performed according to NEN 7343 protocol, while fly ash/soil experiments were conducted incorporating slight modifications to this protocol. The study focused on the release of metals Ba, Cr, Cu, Mo, Se and Zn and the ecotoxic behavior of leachates on crustacean Daphnia magna and bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The infiltration of the leachates of both fly ashes through soil affected considerably their leaching profile. The transport of Cu and Zn was facilitated by the dynamic leaching conditions and influenced by the pH of the leachates. Moreover, the release and bioavailability of Cr, Cu and Zn was probably altered during the infiltration experiments and organisms' response was not always correlated with the concentration of metals. Nevertheless, the results are signalling that possible manipulations and final disposal of fly ash should be considered when environmental threats are investigated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. H2S adsorption by municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash with heavy metals immobilization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huanan; Zhu, Yu; Bian, Songwei; Ko, Jae Hac; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Xu, Qiyong

    2018-03-01

    As a byproduct of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plant, fly ash is becoming a challenge for waste management in recent years. In this study, MSWI fly ash (FA) was evaluated for the potential capacity of odorous gas H 2 S removal. Results showed that fly ash demonstrated longer breakthrough time and higher H 2 S capacities than coal fly ash and sandy soil, due to its high content of alkali oxides of metals including heavy metals. H 2 S adsorption capacities of FA1 and FA2 were 15.89 and 12.59 mg H 2 S/g, respectively for 750 ppm H 2 S. The adsorption of H 2 S on fly ash led to formation of elemental sulfur and metal sulfide. More importantly, the formation of metal sulfide significantly reduced the leachability of heavy metals, such as Cr, Cu, Cd and Pb as shown by TCLP tests. The adsorption isotherms fit well with Langmuir model with the correlation coefficient over 0.99. The adsorption of H 2 S on fly ash features simultaneous H 2 S removal and stabilization and heavy metals found in most MSWI fly ash, making fly ash the potential low cost recycled sorbent material. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship between textural properties, fly ash carbons, and Hg capture in fly ashes derived from the combustion of anthracitic pulverized feed blends

    SciTech Connect

    Isabel Surez-Ruiz; Jose B. Parra

    2007-08-15

    In this work, the textural properties of a series of whole anthracitic-derived fly ashes sampled in eight hoppers from the electrostatic precipitators and their sized fractions (from {gt}150 to {lt}25 {mu}m) are investigated. Data from N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms at 77 K, helium density, and mercury porosimetry have contributed to establish a relationship between the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas, VTOT, porosity, carbon content (the type of fly ash carbons), and Hg retention in these fly ashes. The unburned carbons in these ashes are macroporous materials, and they are different from the carbons in fly ashes from classes C and Fmore » (the latter derived from the combustion of bituminous coals) and show different textural properties. These ashes represent the end member of the fly ash classes C and F with respect to certain textural properties. Although the BET surface area and VTOT values for the studied samples are the lowest reported, they increase with the increase in carbon content, anisotropic carbon content, and particle size of the ashes. Thus, a positive relationship between all these parameters and Hg capture by the coarser ash fractions was found. The finest fraction of carbons ({lt}25 {mu}m) represented an exception. Although it makes a significant contribution to the total carbon of the whole fly ashes and shows relatively higher surface areas and VTOT values, its Hg concentration was found to be the lowest. This suggests that the type of unburned carbons in the finest fraction and/or other adsorption mechanisms may play a role in Hg concentration. Because the textural properties of anisotropic carbons depend on their subtype and on their origin, the need for its differentiation has been evidenced. 54 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.« less

  18. Effects of chemical composition of fly ash on efficiency of metal separation in ash-melting of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takashi, E-mail: t-okada@u-fukui.ac.jp; Tomikawa, Hiroki

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Separation of Pb and Zn from Fe and Cu in ash-melting of municipal solid waste. ► Molar ratio of Cl to Na and K in fly ash affected the metal-separation efficiency. ► The low molar ratio and a non-oxidative atmosphere were better for the separation. - Abstract: In the process of metal separation by ash-melting, Fe and Cu in the incineration residue remain in the melting furnace as molten metal, whereas Pb and Zn in the residue are volatilized. This study investigated the effects of the chemical composition of incineration fly ash on the metal-separation efficiency of themore » ash-melting process. Incineration fly ash with different chemical compositions was melted with bottom ash in a lab-scale reactor, and the efficiency with which Pb and Zn were volatilized preventing the volatilization of Fe and Cu was evaluated. In addition, the behavior of these metals was simulated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Depending on the exhaust gas treatment system used in the incinerator, the relationships among Na, K, and Cl concentrations in the incineration fly ash differed, which affected the efficiency of the metal separation. The amounts of Fe and Cu volatilized decreased by the decrease in the molar ratio of Cl to Na and K in the ash, promoting metal separation. The thermodynamic simulation predicted that the chlorination volatilization of Fe and Cu was prevented by the decrease in the molar ratio, as mentioned before. By melting incineration fly ash with the low molar ratio in a non-oxidative atmosphere, most of the Pb and Zn in the ash were volatilized leaving behind Fe and Cu.« less

  19. Physical factors affecting the mutagenicity of fly ash from a coal-fired power plant.

    PubMed

    Fisher, G L; Chrisp, C E; Raabe, O G

    1979-05-25

    The two finest, most respirable coal fly ash fractions collected from the smokestack of a power plant were more mutagenic than two coarser fractions. Mutagenicity was evaluated in the histidine-requiring bacterial strains TA 1538, TA 98, and TA 100 of Salmonella typhimurium. Ash samples collected from the hoppers of an electrostatic precipitator in the plant were not mutagenic. The mutagens in coal fly ash were resistant to x-ray or ultraviolet irradiation, possibly as a result of stabilization by fly ash surfaces. All mutagenic activity is lost with heating to 350 degrees C.

  20. Mercury retention by fly ashes from coal combustion: Influence of the unburned carbon content

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Anton, M.A.; Diaz-Somoano, M.; Martinez-Tarazona, M.R.

    2007-01-31

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of unburned carbon particles present in fly ashes produced by coal combustion on mercury retention. To achieve this objective, the work was divided into two parts. The aim of the first part of the study was to estimate the amount of mercury captured by the fly ashes during combustion in power stations and the relationship of this retention to the unburned carbon content. The second part was a laboratory-scale study aimed at evaluating the retention of mercury concentrations greater than those produced in power stations by fly ashes of differentmore » characteristics and by unburned carbon particles. From the results obtained it can be inferred that the unburned carbon content is not the only variable that controls mercury capture in fly ashes. The textural characteristics of these unburned particles and of other components of fly ashes also influence retention.« less

  1. Composite Ni-Co-fly ash coatings on 5083 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagopoulos, C. N.; Georgiou, E. P.; Tsopani, A.; Piperi, L.

    2011-03-01

    Ni-Co-fly ash coatings were deposited on zincate treated 5083 wrought aluminium alloy substrates with the aid of the electrodeposition technique. Structural and chemical characterization of the produced composite coatings was performed with the aid of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) techniques. The Ni-Co-fly ash coatings were found to consist of a crystalline Ni-Co solid solution with dispersed fly ash particles. In addition, chemical analysis of the Ni-Co matrix showed that it consisted of 80 wt.% Ni and 20 wt.% Co. The co-deposition of fly ash particles leads to a significant increase of the microhardness of the coating. The corrosion behaviour of the Ni-Co-fly ash/zincate coated aluminium alloy, in a 0.3 M NaCl solution (pH = 3.5), was studied by means of potentiodynamic corrosion experiments.

  2. Use of rubber and bentonite added fly ash as a liner material.

    PubMed

    Cokca, Erdal; Yilmaz, Zeka

    2004-01-01

    In many countries regulations require all hazardous waste disposal facilities to be lined with suitable impermeable barriers to protect against contamination. In this study, a series of laboratory tests on rubber and bentonite added fly ash were conducted. The aim of the tests was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing fly ash, rubber and bentonite as a low hydraulic conductivity liner material. Type C fly ash was obtained from Soma thermal power plant in Turkey; rubber in pulverized form was waste from the retreading industry. To investigate the properties of rubber and bentonite added fly ash, hydraulic conductivity, leachate analysis, unconfined compression, split tensile strength, one-dimensional consolidation, swell and freeze/thaw cycle tests were performed. The overall evaluation of results have revealed that rubber and bentonite added fly ash showed good promise and a candidate for construction of a liner.

  3. Evaluation of fly ash in lean Portland Cement Concrete base "Econocrete".

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1986-08-01

    Fly ash was used in this evaluation study to replace 30, 50 and 70 : percent of the 400 1bs. of cement currently used in each cu. yd. of : portland cement econocrete base paving mix. : Two Class "c" ashes and one Class "F" ash from Iowa approved sour...

  4. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. [Quarterly report], October 1, 1995--January 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Yilmaz, E.

    The objective is to investigate the kinetics of beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The three year project that was proposed is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The increasing use of coal fly ash as pozzolanic material in Portland cement concrete means that there is the highest economic potential in marketability of large volumes of fly ash. For the concrete industry to consider large scale use the flymore » ash must be of the highest quality. This means that the residual carbon content of the fly ash must have an acceptable loss on ignition (LOI) value, usually between 7--2% residual carbon. The economic gains to be had from low-carbon ash is a fact that is generally accepted by the electricity generating companies. However, since the cost of producing low-carbon in large quantities, based on present technology, far outweighs any financial gains, no electrical power company using coal as its fuel at present considers the effort worthwhile. The concrete industry would use fly ash in cement concrete mix if it can be assured of its LOI value. At present no utility company would give such assurance. Hence with several million tons of fly ash produced by a single power plant per year all that can be done is to dump the fly ash in landfills. The kinetics of fly ash beneficiation have been investigated in the zone II kinetic regime, using a Cahn TG 121 microbalance in the temperature 550--750{degrees}C. The P{sub 02} and total surface area dependence of the reaction kinetics were determined using a vacuum accessory attached to the microbalance and a surface area analyzer (ASAP 2010), respectively.« less

  5. Use of fly ash in diets of cage and floor broilers

    SciTech Connect

    Pharr, C.L.; Andrews, L.D.

    1980-09-01

    Three experiments were conducted to compare limestone to fly ash from a coal-fired generator station as a calcium source for broilers. In experiment 1, 5 male and 5 female broiler chicks were placed in each of 32 cages. Sixteen cages of birds were fed a ration with limestone supplying 30% of the total calcium and 16 cages were fed a ration with 30% of the total calcium supplied by fly ash. The total calcium and phosphorus levels of the rations were 1.0% and .5%, respectively. In this experiment no significant difference was found for 8-week body weight between diets wheremore » the added calcium was from limestone or fly ash. In experiment 2 a group of 40 male and 40 female cage reared broilers and 40 male and 40 female floor reared broilers were fed a basal diet of limestone providing 33% of the total calcium. Three diets with increasing fly ash levels were fed to three cage groups of 40 male and 40 female broilers providing 33, 46, and 45% of the total calcium of .9, 1.1, and 1.8%, respectively. Broilers fed the highest fly ash level weighed significantly less at 8 weeks than the caged controls but did not differ from the other treatments. Bone breaking strength as measured by the Allo Kramer Shear Press was similar between the basal and low level fly ash group and increased with higher fly ash levels. In experiment 3 four groups of 40 male broilers in cages were fed limestone diets with graded levels of limestone for the calcium source. Another four groups of 40 caged male broilers were fed fly ash diets with equivalent graded levels of fly ash for the calcium source. Both limestone and fly ash diets provided .17, .34, .51, and .68% calcium of a total calcium content of .28, .45, .62, and .79%, respectively.« less

  6. Gypsum treated fly ash as a liner for waste disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Sivapullaiah, Puvvadi V., E-mail: siva@civil.iisc.ernet.in; Baig, M. Arif Ali, E-mail: reach2arif@gmail.com

    2011-02-15

    Fly ash has potential application in the construction of base liners for waste containment facilities. While most of the fly ashes improve in the strength with curing, the ranges of permeabilities they attain may often not meet the basic requirement of a liner material. An attempt has been made in the present context to reduce the hydraulic conductivity by adding lime content up to 10% to two selected samples of class F fly ashes. The use of gypsum, which is known to accelerate the unconfined compressive strength by increasing the lime reactivity, has been investigated in further improving the hydraulicmore » conductivity. Hydraulic conductivities of the compacted specimens have been determined in the laboratory using the falling head method. It has been observed that the addition of gypsum reduces the hydraulic conductivity of the lime treated fly ashes. The reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of the samples containing gypsum is significantly more for samples with high amounts of lime contents (as high as 1000 times) than those fly ashes with lower amounts of lime. However there is a relatively more increase in the strengths of the samples with the inclusion of gypsum to the fly ashes at lower lime contents. This is due to the fact that excess lime added to fly ash is not effectively converted into pozzolanic compounds. Even the presence of gypsum is observed not to activate these reactions with excess lime. On the other hand the higher amount of lime in the presence of sulphate is observed to produce more cementitious compounds which block the pores in the fly ash. The consequent reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of fly ash would be beneficial in reducing the leachability of trace elements present in the fly ash when used as a base liner.« less

  7. Trends in the Rare Earth Element Content of U.S.-Based Coal Combustion Fly Ashes.

    PubMed

    Taggart, Ross K; Hower, James C; Dwyer, Gary S; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2016-06-07

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are critical and strategic materials in the defense, energy, electronics, and automotive industries. The reclamation of REEs from coal combustion fly ash has been proposed as a way to supplement REE mining. However, the typical REE contents in coal fly ash, particularly in the United States, have not been comprehensively documented or compared among the major types of coal feedstocks that determine fly ash composition. The objective of this study was to characterize a broad selection of U.S. fly ashes of varied geological origin in order to rank their potential for REE recovery. The total and nitric acid-extractable REE content for more than 100 ash samples were correlated with characteristics such as the major element content and coal basin to elucidate trends in REE enrichment. Average total REE content (defined as the sum of the lanthanides, yttrium, and scandium) for ashes derived from Appalachian sources was 591 mg kg(-1) and significantly greater than in ashes from Illinois and Powder River basin coals (403 and 337 mg kg(-1), respectively). The fraction of critical REEs (Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Y, and Er) in the fly ashes was 34-38% of the total and considerably higher than in conventional ores (typically less than 15%). Powder River Basin ashes had the highest extractable REE content, with 70% of the total REE recovered by heated nitric acid digestion. This is likely due to the higher calcium content of Powder River Basin ashes, which enhances their solubility in nitric acid. Sc, Nd, and Dy were the major contributors to the total REE value in fly ash, based on their contents and recent market prices. Overall, this study shows that coal fly ash production could provide a substantial domestic supply of REEs, but the feasibility of recovery depends on the development of extraction technologies that could be tailored to the major mineral content and origins of the feed coal for the ash.

  8. Selenium in pollen gathered by bees foraging on fly ash-grown plants

    SciTech Connect

    De Jong, D.; Morse, R.A.; Gutenmann, W.H.

    1977-10-01

    Fly ash is the material collected in the stacks of coal burning electric power-generating plants by electrostatic precipitators. About 26 million metric tons of fly ash was estimated to have been produced in 1975 (BRACKETT, 1970). Aside from a small percentage of the material which is used as a base material for roads and in concrete, the bulk of it is deposited in landfills. It was first reported by Gutenmann et al. (1976) that sweet clover, found voluntarily growing on a fly ash landfill site, contained up to 200 ppM of selenium. Fly ashes from 21 states were found tomore » contain the element. Cabbage grown on each of these fly ashes added (7 percent w/w) to soil was shown to absorb selenium in proportion to its concentration in the particular ash (GUTENMANN et al., 1976). The percentage of fly ash in soil was also shown to dictate the extent of selenium absorption by a variety of plants (FURR et al., 1976). In the work reported, pollen collected by honey bees foraging on plants growing on a fly ash landfill was analyzed for selenium and compared with that collected by bees from the same plants growing on soil.« less

  9. Differences in gasification behaviors and related properties between entrained gasifier fly ash and coal char

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Gu; Shiyong Wu; Youqing Wu

    2008-11-15

    In the study, two fly ash samples from Texaco gasifiers were compared to coal char and the physical and chemical properties and reactivity of samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM-energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption method, and isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. The main results were obtained. The carbon content of gasified fly ashes exhibited 31-37%, which was less than the carbon content of 58-59% in the feed coal. The fly ashes exhibited higher Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, richer meso- and micropores, more disordered carbon crystalline structure, and better CO{sub 2} gasification reactivitymore » than coal char. Ashes in fly ashes occurred to agglomerate into larger spherical grains, while those in coal char do not agglomerate. The minerals in fly ashes, especial alkali and alkaline-earth metals, had a catalytic effect on gasification reactivity of fly ash carbon. In the low-temperature range, the gasification process of fly ashes is mainly in chemical control, while in the high-temperature range, it is mainly in gas diffusion control, which was similar to coal char. In addition, the carbon in fly ashes was partially gasified and activated by water vapor and exhibited higher BET surface area and better gasification activity. Consequently, the fact that these carbons in fly ashes from entrained flow gasifiers are reclaimed and reused will be considered to be feasible. 15 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.« less

  10. Dilithium dialuminium trisilicate Crystalline Phase Prepared from Coal Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhitong; Xia, Meisheng; Ye, Ying

    2012-06-01

    The dilithium dialuminium trisilicate phase Li2Al2Si3O10 was prepared using coal fly ash and lithium hydroxide monohydrate LiOH·H2O as precursors. The influences of various preparation conditions on Li2Al2Si3O10 forming were investigated. The results showed that the optimum additive amount of LiOH·H2O was about 20%. The onset of calcining temperature and time was identified as 980 °C and 1 h, respectively. XRD analysis indicated that the content of Li2Al2Si3O10 phase increased at the expense of quartz and mullite, with calcining temperatures increasing and time extending. SEM observation revealed that the calcined samples were drastically interlocked together with the prolonging of time. The obtained Li2Al2Si3O10 phase was well crystallized and with small grain size.

  11. Characteristics of SCC with Fly Ash and Manufactured Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen Kumar, K.; Radhakrishna

    2016-09-01

    Self compacting concrete (SCC) of M40 grade was designed. The binder in SCC consists of OPC and fly ash in the ratio of 65:35. River sand was replaced by manufactured sand (M-sand) at replacement levels of 20,40,60,80 and 100%. An attempt was made to evaluate the workability and strength characteristics of self compacting concrete with river sand and manufactured sand as fine aggregates. For each replacement level, constant workability was maintained by varying the dosage of superplasticizer. T50 flow time, V Funnel time, V-funnel T5 time as well as compressive, split tensile and flexural strength of SCC were found at each replacement level of M-sand. They were compared to SCC with river sand. Results indicate favourable use of M-sand in preparation of Self Compacting Concrete.

  12. Floating cultivation of marine cyanobacteria using coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Yoshida, E; Takeyama, H; Matsunaga, T

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop improved methodologies for bulk culturing of biotechnologically useful marine cyanobacteria in the open ocean. We have investigated the viability of using coal fly ash (CFA) blocks as the support medium in a novel floating culture system for marine micro-algae. The marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. NKBG 040607 was found to adhere to floating CFA blocks in liquid culture medium. Maximum density of attached cells of 2.0 x 10(8) cells/cm2 was achieved using seawater. The marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. NKBG 042902 weakly adhered to floating CFA blocks in BG-11 medium. Increasing the concentration of calcium ion in the culture medium enhanced adherence to CFA blocks.

  13. Possible applications for municipal solid waste fly ash.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, C; Ribeiro, A; Ottosen, L

    2003-01-31

    The present study focuses on existing practices related to the reuse of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) fly ash and identifies new potential uses. Nine possible applications were identified and grouped into four main categories: construction materials (cement, concrete, ceramics, glass and glass-ceramics); geotechnical applications (road pavement, embankments); "agriculture" (soil amendment); and, miscellaneous (sorbent, sludge conditioning). Each application is analysed in detail, including final-product technical characteristics, with a special emphasis on environmental impacts. A comparative analysis of the different options is performed, stressing the advantages but also the weaknesses of each option. This information is systemized in order to provide a framework for the selection of best technology and final products. The results presented here show new possibilities for this waste reuse in a short-term, in a wide range of fields, resulting in great advantages in waste minimization as well as resources conservation.

  14. Use of solid residue from thermal power plant (fly ash) for enhancing sewage sludge anaerobic digestion: Influence of fly ash particle size.

    PubMed

    Montalvo, S; Cahn, I; Borja, R; Huiliñir, C; Guerrero, L

    2017-11-01

    The influence of fly ash particle size on methane production and anaerobic biodegradability was evaluated. Assays with different fly ash particle sizes (0.8-2.36mm) at a concentration of 50mg/L were ran under mesophilic conditions. In anaerobic processes operating with fly ash, greater removal of both volatile total and suspended solids, chemical oxygen demand (total and soluble) was achieved, with an increase of methane production between 28% and 96% compared to the control reactors. The highest increase occurred at ash particles sizes of 1.0-1.4mm. The metal concentrations in the digestates obtained after anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge are far below those considered as limiting for the use of sludge in soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemical composition and physical properties of filter fly ashes from eight grate-fired biomass combustion plants.

    PubMed

    Lanzerstorfer, Christof

    2015-04-01

    For the handling, treatment and utilization of fly ash from biomass combustion its chemical composition and physical properties are important. In this study eight filter fly ashes from different grate-fired biomass combustion plants were investigated. In fly ash from straw combustion high concentrations of (K) were found, whereas in the fly ash from wood combustion the concentrations of Ca and Mg were higher. The average concentration of PO4(3-) was similar in both types of fly ashes. In all wood fly ashes some measured heavy metal concentrations were above the limits for utilization. The straw fly ashes were much less contaminated and can be utilized. For wood fly ash most parameters showed little variation, except from one fly ash where the dust pre-separator is in poor condition. The average values were: mass median diameter 4.3±0.8 μm, spread of particle size distribution 19±11, particle density 2620±80 kg/m3 and angle of repose 50°±1°. The density of the straw fly ashes is lower (2260±80 kg/m3) and the spread of the size distribution is higher (72±24). For one straw combustion fly ash the values of the mass median diameter and the angle of repose were similar to the values of wood combustion fly ash, for the other straw fly ash the values differed considerably. While the particle size of this fly ash was much smaller, surprisingly the angle of repose was also lower. This can be attributed to the formation of small agglomerates in this fly ash, which were not disintegrated without a certain stress. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Optimizing and Characterizing Geopolymers from Ternary Blend of Philippine Coal Fly Ash, Coal Bottom Ash and Rice Hull Ash.

    PubMed

    Kalaw, Martin Ernesto; Culaba, Alvin; Hinode, Hirofumi; Kurniawan, Winarto; Gallardo, Susan; Promentilla, Michael Angelo

    2016-07-15

    Geopolymers are inorganic polymers formed from the alkaline activation of amorphous alumino-silicate materials resulting in a three-dimensional polymeric network. As a class of materials, it is seen to have the potential of replacing ordinary Portland cement (OPC), which for more than a hundred years has been the binder of choice for structural and building applications. Geopolymers have emerged as a sustainable option vis-à-vis OPC for three reasons: (1) their technical properties are comparable if not better; (2) they can be produced from industrial wastes; and (3) within reasonable constraints, their production requires less energy and emits significantly less CO₂. In the Philippines, the use of coal ash, as the alumina- and silica- rich geopolymer precursor, is being considered as one of the options for sustainable management of coal ash generation from coal-fired power plants. However, most geopolymer mixes (and the prevalent blended OPC) use only coal fly ash. The coal bottom ash, having very few applications, remains relegated to dumpsites. Rice hull ash, from biomass-fired plants, is another silica-rich geopolymer precursor material from another significantly produced waste in the country with only minimal utilization. In this study, geopolymer samples were formed from the mixture of coal ash, using both coal fly ash (CFA) and coal bottom ash (CBA), and rice hull ash (RHA). The raw materials used for the geopolymerization process were characterized using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) for elemental and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for mineralogical composition. The raw materials' thermal stability and loss on ignition (LOI) were determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and reactivity via dissolution tests and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP) analysis. The mechanical, thermal and microstructural properties of the geopolymers formed were analyzed using compression tests, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning

  17. Optimizing and Characterizing Geopolymers from Ternary Blend of Philippine Coal Fly Ash, Coal Bottom Ash and Rice Hull Ash

    PubMed Central

    Kalaw, Martin Ernesto; Culaba, Alvin; Hinode, Hirofumi; Kurniawan, Winarto; Gallardo, Susan; Promentilla, Michael Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymers are inorganic polymers formed from the alkaline activation of amorphous alumino-silicate materials resulting in a three-dimensional polymeric network. As a class of materials, it is seen to have the potential of replacing ordinary Portland cement (OPC), which for more than a hundred years has been the binder of choice for structural and building applications. Geopolymers have emerged as a sustainable option vis-à-vis OPC for three reasons: (1) their technical properties are comparable if not better; (2) they can be produced from industrial wastes; and (3) within reasonable constraints, their production requires less energy and emits significantly less CO2. In the Philippines, the use of coal ash, as the alumina- and silica- rich geopolymer precursor, is being considered as one of the options for sustainable management of coal ash generation from coal-fired power plants. However, most geopolymer mixes (and the prevalent blended OPC) use only coal fly ash. The coal bottom ash, having very few applications, remains relegated to dumpsites. Rice hull ash, from biomass-fired plants, is another silica-rich geopolymer precursor material from another significantly produced waste in the country with only minimal utilization. In this study, geopolymer samples were formed from the mixture of coal ash, using both coal fly ash (CFA) and coal bottom ash (CBA), and rice hull ash (RHA). The raw materials used for the geopolymerization process were characterized using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) for elemental and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for mineralogical composition. The raw materials’ thermal stability and loss on ignition (LOI) were determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and reactivity via dissolution tests and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP) analysis. The mechanical, thermal and microstructural properties of the geopolymers formed were analyzed using compression tests, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning

  18. Mechanical and Durability Properties of Fly Ash Based Concrete Exposed to Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagadgar, Sarfaraz Ahmed; Saha, Suman; Rajasekaran, C.

    2017-06-01

    Efforts over the past few years for improving the performance of concrete suggest that cement replacement with mineral admixtures can enhance the strength and durability of concrete. Feasibility of producing good quality concrete by using alccofine and fly ash replacements is investigated and also the potential benefits from their incorporation were looked into. In this study, an attempt has been made to assess the performance of concrete in severe marine conditions exposed upto a period of 150 days. This work investigates the influence of alccofine and fly ash as partial replacement of cement in various percentages (Alccofine - 5% replacement to cement content) and (fly ash - 0%, 15%, 30%, 50% & 60% to total cementitious content) on mechanical and durability properties (Permit ion permeability test and corrosion current density) of concrete. Usage of alccofine and high quantity of fly ash as additional cementitious materials in concrete has resulted in higher workability of concrete. Inclusion of alccofine shows an early strength gaining property whereas fly ash results in gaining strength at later stage. Concrete mixes containing 5% alccofine with 15% fly ash replacement reported greater compressive strength than the other concrete mixes cured in both curing conditions. Durability test conducted at 56 and 150 days indicated that concrete containing higher percentages of fly ash resulted in lower permeability as well lesser corrosion density.

  19. Characterization of fly ashes from circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) boilers cofiring coal and petroleum coke

    SciTech Connect

    Feihu Li; Jianping Zhai; Xiaoru Fu

    2006-08-15

    The chemistry, mineralogy, morphology, and particle size distribution were investigated in fly ashes from the burning of Datong (ShanXi, China) bituminous coal and the cofiring of Mideast high-sulfur petroleum coke (PC) with 30:70 (cal %) and 50:50 (cal %) blends of Datong bituminous coal in two commercial CFBC boilers. With the exception of CaO, the amounts of major oxides in the fly ashes from cofiring PC and coal were close to those of the common coal fly ashes. The PC-coal fly ashes were enriched in Ni, V, and Mo, implying these trace elements were mainly derived from PC. Ni andmore » V, along with several other elements, such as Cr, Cu, Se, Pb, U, Th, and possibly As and Cd, increased in content with a decrease in temperature of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The results of chemistry, mineralogy, and morphology studies suggested that the desulfurization rate of the CFBC boilers at current conditions was low, and the PC tends to coarsen the fly ash particles and increase the loss on ignition (LOI) values, making these fly ashes unsuitable for use as a cement additive or a mineral admixture in concrete. Further studies on the combustion status of the CFBC boilers are needed if we want to be able to increase the desulfurization rate and produce high-quality fly ashes for broader and full utilization. 22 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.« less

  20. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of class-F fly ash.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bumjoo; Prezzi, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Coal-burning power plants in the United States (US) generate more than 70 million tons of fly ash as a by-product annually. Recycling large volumes of fly ash in geotechnical applications may offer an attractive alternative to the disposal problem as most of it is currently dumped in ponds or landfills. Class-F fly ash, resulting from burning of bituminous or anthracite coals, is the most common type of fly ash in the US. In the present study, the mechanical characteristics (compaction response, compressibility, and shear strength) of class-F fly ash were investigated by performing various laboratory tests (compaction test, one-dimensional compression test, direct shear test and consolidated-drained triaxial compression test) on fly ash samples collected from three power plants in the state of Indiana (US). Test results have shown that despite some morphological differences, class-F fly ash exhibits mechanical properties that are, in general, comparable to those observed in natural sandy soils.

  1. Suppression of phosphate liberation from eutrophic lake sediment by using fly ash and ordinary Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Heng-Peng Ye; Fan-Zhong Chen; Yan-Qing Sheng

    2006-08-15

    In this study, the effect of suppression on phosphate liberation from eutrophic lake sediment by using fly ash and ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated by small scale experiment. A system including sediment, lake water, and several kinds of capping materials was designed to clarify the suppression of phosphate liberation from sediment under the anaerobic condition. The suppression efficiencies of fly ash, OPC and glass bead used as control material were also determined, and these effects were discussed. The suppression efficiency of glass bead was 44.4%, and those of fly ash and OPC were 84.4%, 94.9%, respectively. The suppression bymore » fly ash and OPC was mainly carried out by the adsorption effect, in addition to the covering effect. The suppression efficiency depended on the amounts of the material used, and about 90% of liberated phosphate was suppressed by fly ash of 10.0 Kg m{sup -2}, and OPC of 6.0 Kg m{sup -2}. The concentrations of heavy metals, such as mercury, cadmium, lead, copper, zinc, chromium, silver, arsenic and nickel, in fly ash and OPC were lower than those in the environmental materials. And it was considered that the concentrations of heavy metals in fly ash and OPC were too low to influence the ecosystem in natural water region.« less

  2. Recycling of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash by using hydrocyclone separation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ming-Sheng; Chen, Ying-Liang; Wei, Pei-Shou

    2013-03-01

    The municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) in Taiwan generate about 300,000 tons of fly ash annually, which is mainly composed of calcium and silicon compounds, and has the potential for recycling. However, some heavy metals are present in the MSWI fly ash, and before recycling, they need to be removed or reduced to make the fly ash non-hazardous. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to use a hydrocyclone for the separation of the components of the MSWI fly ash in order to obtain the recyclable portion. The results show that chloride salts can be removed from the fly ash during the hydrocyclone separation process. The presence of a dense medium (quartz sand in this study) is not only helpful for the removal of the salts, but also for the separation of the fly ash particles. After the dense-medium hydrocyclone separation process, heavy metals including Pb and Zn were concentrated in the fine particles so that the rest of the fly ash contained less heavy metal and became both non-hazardous and recyclable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A pilot study of mercury liberation and capture from coal-fired power plant fly ash.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Gao, Xiaobing; Goeckner, Bryna; Kollakowsky, Dave; Ramme, Bruce

    2005-03-01

    The coal-fired electric utility generation industry has been identified as the largest anthropogenic source of mercury (Hg) emissions in the United States. One of the promising techniques for Hg removal from flue gas is activated carbon injection (ACI). The aim of this project was to liberate Hg bound to fly ash and activated carbon after ACI and provide high-quality coal combustion products for use in construction materials. Both bench- and pilot-scale tests were conducted to liberate Hg using a thermal desorption process. The results indicated that up to 90% of the Hg could be liberated from the fly ash or fly-ash-and-activated-carbon mixture using a pilot-scale apparatus (air slide) at 538 degrees C with a very short retention time (less than 1 min). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) evaluation indicated no significant change in fly ash carbon particle morphology following the thermal treatment. Fly ash particles collected in the baghouse of the pilot-scale apparatus were smaller in size than those collected at the exit of the air slide. A similar trend was observed in carbon particles separated from the fly ash using froth flotation. The results of this study suggest a means for power plants to reduce the level of Hg in coal-combustion products and potentially recycle activated carbon while maintaining the resale value of fly ash. This technology is in the process of being patented.

  4. Experimental and numerical analysis of metal leaching from fly ash-amended highway bases

    SciTech Connect

    Cetin, Bora; Aydilek, Ahmet H., E-mail: aydilek@umd.edu; Li, Lin

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study is the evaluation of leaching potential of fly ash-lime mixed soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This objective is met with experimental and numerical analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn leaching decreases with increase in fly ash content while Ba, B, Cu increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decrease in lime content promoted leaching of Ba, B and Cu while Zn increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerical analysis predicted lower field metal concentrations. - Abstract: A study was conducted to evaluate the leaching potential of unpaved road materials (URM) mixed with lime activated high carbon fly ashes and to evaluate groundwater impacts of barium, boron, copper, and zinc leaching. Thismore » objective was met by a combination of batch water leach tests, column leach tests, and computer modeling. The laboratory tests were conducted on soil alone, fly ash alone, and URM-fly ash-lime kiln dust mixtures. The results indicated that an increase in fly ash and lime content has significant effects on leaching behavior of heavy metals from URM-fly ash mixture. An increase in fly ash content and a decrease in lime content promoted leaching of Ba, B and Cu whereas Zn leaching was primarily affected by the fly ash content. Numerically predicted field metal concentrations were significantly lower than the peak metal concentrations obtained in laboratory column leach tests, and field concentrations decreased with time and distance due to dispersion in soil vadose zone.« less

  5. Leachate concentrations from water leach and column leach tests on fly ash-stabilized soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bin-Shafique, S.; Benson, C.H.; Edil, T.B.

    2006-01-15

    Batch water leaching tests (WLTs) and column leaching tests (CLTs) were conducted on coal-combustion fly ashes, soil, and soil-fly ash mixtures to characterize leaching of Cd, Cr, Se, and Ag. The concentrations of these metals were also measured in the field at two sites where soft fine-grained soils were mechanically stabilized with fly ash. Concentrations in leachate from the WLTs on soil-fly ash mixtures are different from those on fly ash alone and cannot be accurately estimated based on linear dilution calculations using concentrations from WLTs on fly ash alone. The concentration varies nonlinearly with fly ash content due tomore » the variation in pH with fly ash content. Leachate concentrations are low when the pH of the leachate or the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the soil is high. Initial concentrations from CLTs are higher than concentrations from WLTs due to differences in solid-liquid ratio, pH, and solid-liquid contact. However, both exhibit similar trends with fly ash content, leachate pH, and soil properties. Scaling factors can be applied to WLT concentrations (50 for Ag and Cd, 10 for Cr and Se) to estimate initial concentrations for CLTs. Concentrations in leachate collected from the field sites were generally similar or slightly lower than concentrations measured in CLTs on the same materials. Thus, CLTs appear to provide a good indication of conditions that occur in the field provided that the test conditions mimic the field conditions. In addition, initial concentrations in the field can be conservatively estimated from WLT concentrations using the aforementioned scaling factors provided that the pH of the infiltrating water is near neutral.« less

  6. Sintering of MSW fly ash for reuse as a concrete aggregate.

    PubMed

    Mangialardi, T

    2001-10-12

    The sintering process of municipal solid waste (MSW) fly ash was investigated in order to manufacture sintered products for reuse as concrete aggregates. Four types of fly ash resulting from different Italian MSW incineration plants were tested in this study. A modification of the chemical composition of MSW fly ash--through a preliminary four-stage washing treatment of this material with water--was attempted to improve the chemical and mechanical characteristics of sintered products.The sintering treatment of untreated or washed fly ash was performed on cylindrical compact specimens (15 mm in diameter and 20mm in height) at different compact pressures, sintering temperatures and times.The sintering process of untreated MSW fly ashes proved to be ineffective for manufacturing sintered products for reuse as a construction material, because of the adverse chemical characteristics of these fly ashes in terms of sulfate, chloride, and vitrifying oxide contents.A preliminary washing treatment of MSW fly ash with water greatly improved the chemical and mechanical characteristics of sintered products and, for all the types of fly ash tested, the sintered products satisfied the Italian requirements for normal weight aggregates for use in concretes having a specified strength not greater than 12 and 15N/mm(2), when measured on cylindrical and cubic specimens, respectively.A compact pressure of 28 N/mm(2), a sintering temperature of 1140 degrees C, and a sintering time of 60 min were the best operating conditions for manufacturing sintered products of washed MSW fly ash.

  7. Salt-soda sinter process for recovering aluminum from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Seeley, Forest G.

    1981-01-01

    A method for recovering aluminum values from fly ash comprises sintering the fly ash with a mixture of NaCl and Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3 to a temperature in the range 700.degree.-900.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to convert greater than 90% of the aluminum content of the fly ash into an acid-soluble fraction and then contacting the thus-treated fraction with an aqueous solution of nitric or sulfuric acid to effect dissolution of aluminum and other metal values in said solution.

  8. The application of waste fly ash and construction-waste in cement filling material in goaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. X.; Xiao, F. K.; Guan, X. H.; Cheng, Y.; Shi, X. P.; Liu, S. M.; Wang, W. W.

    2018-01-01

    As the process of urbanization accelerated, resulting in a large number of abandoned fly ash and construction waste, which have occupied the farmland and polluted the environment. In this paper, a large number of construction waste and abandoned fly ash are mixed into the filling material in goaf, the best formula of the filling material which containing a large amount of abandoned fly ash and construction waste is obtained, and the performance of the filling material is analyzed. The experimental results show that the cost of filling material is very low while the performance is very good, which have a good prospect in goaf.

  9. Salt-soda sinter process for recovering aluminum from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, W.J.; Seeley, F.G.

    A method for recovering aluminum values from fly ash comprises sintering the fly ash with a mixture of NaCl and Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ to a temperature in the range 700/sup 0/ to 900/sup 0/C for a period of time sufficient to convert greater than 90% of the aluminum content of the fly ash into an acidsoluble fraction and then contacting the thus-treated fraction with an aqueous solution of nitric or sulfuric acid to effect dissolution of aluminum and other metal values in said solution.

  10. RARE EARTH ELEMENTS IN FLY ASHES AS POTENTIAL INDICATORS OF ANTHROPOGENIC SOIL CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.

    2003-08-01

    Studies of rare earth element (REE) content of disposed fly ashes and their potential mobility were neglected for decades because these elements were believed to be environmentally benign. A number of recent studies have now shown that REE may pose a long-term risk to the biosphere. Therefore, there is a critical need to study the REE concentrations in fly ash and their potential mobilization and dispersal upon disposal in the environment. We analyzed the REE content of bulk, size fractionated, and density separated fractions of three fly ash samples derived from combustion of sub bituminous coals from the western Unitedmore » States and found that the concentrations of these elements in bulk ashes were within the range typical of fly ashes derived from coals from the North American continent. The concentrations of light rare earth elements (LREE) such as La, Ce, and Nd, however, tended towards the higher end of the concentration range whereas, the concentrations of middle rare earth elements (MREE) (Sm and Eu) and heavy rare earth elements (HREE) (Lu) were closer to the lower end of the observed range for North American fly ashes. The concentrations of REE did not show any significant enrichment with decreasing particle size, this is typical of nonvolatile lithophilic element behavior during the combustion process. The lithophilic nature of REE was also confirmed by their concentrations in heavy density fractions of these fly ashes being on average about two times more enriched than the concentrations in the light density fractions. Shale normalized average of REE concentrations of fly ashes and coals revealed significant positive anomalies for Eu and Dy. Because of these distinctive positive anomalies of Eu and Dy, we believe that fly ash contamination of soils can be fingerprinted and distinguished from other sources of anthropogenic REE inputs in to the environment.« less

  11. The application of electrocoagulation for the conversion of MSWI fly ash into nonhazardous materials.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wing-Ping; Yang, Renbo; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Huang, Jui-Yuan

    2014-05-01

    This research investigated the electrocoagulation of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash at a liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S) of 20:1. The leachate that was obtained from this treatment was recovered for reutilization. Two different anodic electrodes were investigated, and two unit runs were conducted. In Unit I, the optimum anode was chosen, and in Unit II, the optimum anode and the recovered leachate were used to replace deionized water for repeating the same electrocoagulation experiments. The results indicate that the aluminum (Al) anode performed better than the iridium oxide (IrO2) anode. The electrocoagulation technique includes washing with water, changing the composition of the fly ash, and stabilizing the heavy metals in the ash. Washing with water can remove the soluble salts from fly ash, and the fly ash can be converted into Friedel's salt (3CaO·Al2O3·CaCl2·10H2O) under an uniform electric field and the sacrificial release of Al(+3) ions, which stabilizes the toxic heavy metals and brings the composition of the fly ash to within the regulatory limits of the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). Use of the Al anode to manage the MSWI fly ash and the leachate obtained from the electrocoagulation treatment is therefore feasible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Potential of fly ash for neutralisation of acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Asif; Jia, Yu; Maurice, Christian; Öhlander, Björn

    2016-09-01

    Lignite (PK), bituminous (FI) and biomass (SE) fly ashes (FAs) were mineralogically and geochemically characterised, and their element leachability was studied with batch leaching tests. The potential for acid neutralisation (ANP) was quantified by their buffering capacity, reflecting their potential for neutralisation of acid mine drainage. Quartz was the common mineral in FAs detected by XRD with iron oxide, anhydrite, and magnesioferrite in PK, mullite and lime in FI, and calcite and anorthite in SE. All the FAs had high contents of major elements such as Fe, Si, Al and Ca. The Ca content in SE was six and eight times higher compared to PK and FI, respectively. Sulphur content in PK and SE was one magnitude higher than FI. Iron concentrations were higher in PK. The trace element concentrations varied between the FAs. SE had the highest ANP (corresponding to 275 kg CaCO3 tonne(-1)) which was 15 and 10 times higher than PK and FI, respectively. The concentrations of Ca(2+), SO4 (2-), Na(+) and Cl(-) in the leachates were much higher compared to other elements from all FA samples. Iron, Cu and Hg were not detected in any of the FA leachates because of their mild to strong alkaline nature with pH ranging from 9 to 13. Potassium leached in much higher quantity from SE than from the other ashes. Arsenic, Mn and Ni leached from PK only, while Co and Pb from SE only. The concentrations of Zn were higher in the leachates from SE. The FAs used in this study have strong potential for the neutralisation of AMD due to their alkaline nature. However, on the other hand, FAs must be further investigated, with scaled-up experiments before full-scale application, because they might leach pronounced concentrations of elements of concern with decreasing pH while neutralising AMD.

  13. Comparison study of phosphorus adsorption on different waste solids: Fly ash, red mud and ferric-alum water treatment residues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Yu, Yange; Li, Haiyan; Shen, Chanchan

    2016-12-01

    The adsorption of phosphorus (P) onto three industrial solid wastes (fly ash, red mud and ferric-alum water treatment residual (FAR)) and their modified materials was studied systematically via batch experiments. Compared with two natural adsorbents (zeolite and diatomite), three solid wastes possessed a higher adsorption capacity for P because of the higher Fe, Al and Ca contents. After modification (i.e., the fly ash and red mud modified by FeCl 3 and FARs modified by HCl), the adsorption capacity increased, especially for the modified red mud, where more Fe bonded P was observed. The P adsorption kinetics can be satisfactorily fitted using the pseudo-second-order model. The Langmuir model can describe well the P adsorption on all of the samples in our study. pH and dissolved organic matter (DOM) are two important factors for P adsorption. Under neutral conditions, the maximum adsorption amount on the modified materials was observed. With the deviation from pH7, the adsorption amount decreased, which resulted from the change of P species in water and surface charges of the adsorbents. The DOM in water can promote P adsorption, which may be due to the promotion effects of humic-Fe(Al) complexes and the pH buffer function exceeds the depression of competitive adsorption. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Utilization of coal fly ash as a slow-release granular medium for soil improvement.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jeong Gun; Jo, Young Min

    2003-01-01

    This work proposes a new potential application of waste coal fly ash as a K fertilizer support. Fly ash was reacted with KOH to facilitate the impregnation of K as well as to enhance the bonding force. In particular, the applied process resulted in a significant slow-releasing characteristic of fertilizer elements. To examine the effect of K impregnation, a few detailed leaching tests were carried out in terms of process variables such as reaction time and temperature, sintering time and temperature, and KOH concentration. The current experiment presented an optimum preparation condition that is competitive with conventional commercial fertilizers. The manufactured ash fertilizers inhibited release of the K elements. It was also found through the continuous leaching test with pure water that the ash fertilizer had excellent moisture absorbability. However, the effects of some trace elements in fly ash on soil health and crop productivity as well as environmental considerations need to be established with long-term studies.

  15. Synergistic effect of fly ash in in-vessel composting of biomass and kitchen waste.

    PubMed

    Manyapu, Vivek; Mandpe, Ashootosh; Kumar, Sunil

    2018-03-01

    The present study aims to utilize coal fly ash for its property to adsorb heavy metals and thus reducing the bioavailability of the metals for plant uptake. Fly ash was incorporated into the in-vessel composting system along with organic waste. The in-vessel composting experiments were conducted in ten plastic vessels of 15 L capacity comprising varying proportions of biomass waste, kitchen waste and fly ash. In this study, maximum degradation of organic matter was observed in Vessel 3 having k value of 0.550 d -1 . In vessel 10, 20% fly ash with a combination of 50% biomass waste and 30% kitchen waste along with the addition of 5% jaggery as an additive produced the best outcome with least organic matter (%C) loss and lowest value of rate constant (k). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF OIL FLY ASH AND RELEVANCE TO AMBIENT AIR PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated increased human morbidity and mortality with elevations in the concentration of ambient air particulate matter (PM). Fugitive fly ash from the combustion of oil and residual fuel oil significantly contributes to the ambient air particle bur...

  17. Effects of blends of cement kiln dust and fly ash on properties of concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluated concretes containing cement kiln dust (CKD) and fly ash to determine whether satisfactory properties can be achieved for long-lasting performance in the field. The results indicate that certain combinations of cement, CKD, and fl...

  18. Heavy metal concentrations of leachate from fly ash fills in Louisiana : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1982-04-01

    The Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, having an acute awareness of the potential of landfilled industrial wastes to pollute groundwater, conducted a laboratory leachate experiment to determine if self-setting fly ash poses such ...

  19. Use of soil-steel slag-class-C fly ash mixtures in subgrade applications.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-12-07

    In Indiana, large quantities of recyclable : materials - such as steel slag, blast furnace : slag and fly ash - are generated each year as : by-products of various industries. Instead of : disposing these by-products into landfills, : we can recycle ...

  20. Removal of cadmium from aqueous solutions using industrial coal fly ash-nZVI.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lixia; Wei, Qi; Chen, Yueqin; Song, Qiuyang; Sun, Conghui; Wang, Zhiqiang; Wu, Guanghong

    2018-02-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to test the effects of various solution properties, such as pH, temperature, initial concentration and anoxic and aerobic atmosphere, on Cd removal by nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) supported on industrial coal fly ash. Cd (II) could be removed by adsorption on fly ash-nZVI in a very short time (5 min) with high removal rates (greater than 99.9%) over a wide range of concentration (5-100 mg l -1 ). Cd (II) was physically adsorbed on the surface of fly ash-nZVI. The preparation of fly ash-nZVI can incorporate the use of waste media, making the overall adsorbent more removal efficient and low cost.

  1. Stabilization of chromium-bearing electroplating sludge with MSWI fly ash-based Friedel matrices.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guangren; Yang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Shixiang; Zhou, Jizhi; Sun, Ying; Xu, Yunfeng; Liu, Qiang

    2009-06-15

    This work investigated the feasibility and effectiveness of MSWI fly ash-based Friedel matrices on stabilizing/solidifying industrial chromium-bearing electroplating sludge using MSWI fly ash as the main raw material with a small addition of active aluminum. The compressive strength, leaching behavior and chemical speciation of heavy metals and hydration phases of matrices were characterized by TCLP, XRD, FTIR and other experimental methods. The results revealed that MSWI fly ash-based Friedel matrices could effectively stabilize chromium-bearing electroplating sludge, the formed ettringite and Friedel phases played a significant role in the fixation of heavy metals in electroplating sludge. The co-disposal of chromium-bearing electroplating sludge and MSWI fly ash-based Friedel matrices with a small addition of active aluminum is promising to be an effective way of stabilizing chromium-bearing electroplating sludge.

  2. The Effect of Fly Ash on the Corrosion Behaviour of Galvanised Steel Rebarsin Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittarelli, Francesca; Mobili, Alessandra; Bellezze, Tiziano

    2017-08-01

    The effect of fly ash on the corrosion behaviour of galvanised steel rebars in cracked concrete specimens exposed to wet-dry cycles in a chloride solution has been investigated. The obtained results show that the use of fly ash, replacing either cement or aggregate, always improves the corrosion behaviour of galvanised steel reinforcements. In particular, the addition of fly ash, even in the presence of concrete cracks, decreases the corrosion rate monitored in very porous concretes, as those with w/c = 0.80, to values comparable with those obtained in good quality concretes, as those with w/c = 0.45. Therefore, fly ash cancels the negative effect, at least from the corrosion point of view, of a great porosity of the cement matrix.

  3. Coal Combustion Residual Beneficial Use Evaluation: Fly Ash Concrete and FGD Gypsum Wallboard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains documents related to the evaluation of coal combustion residual beneficial use of fly ash concrete and FGD gypsum wallboard including the evaluation itself and the accompanying appendices

  4. Removal of cadmium from aqueous solutions using industrial coal fly ash-nZVI

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lixia; Wei, Qi; Chen, Yueqin; Song, Qiuyang; Sun, Conghui; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2018-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to test the effects of various solution properties, such as pH, temperature, initial concentration and anoxic and aerobic atmosphere, on Cd removal by nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) supported on industrial coal fly ash. Cd (II) could be removed by adsorption on fly ash-nZVI in a very short time (5 min) with high removal rates (greater than 99.9%) over a wide range of concentration (5–100 mg l−1). Cd (II) was physically adsorbed on the surface of fly ash-nZVI. The preparation of fly ash-nZVI can incorporate the use of waste media, making the overall adsorbent more removal efficient and low cost. PMID:29515830

  5. The geochemistry and bioreactivity of fly-ash from coal-burning power stations.

    PubMed

    Jones, Timothy; Wlodarczyk, Anna; Koshy, Lata; Brown, Patrick; Shao, Longyi; BéruBé, Kelly

    2009-07-01

    Fly-ash is a byproduct of the combustion of coal in power stations for the generation of electricity. The fly-ash forms from the melting of incombustible minerals found naturally in the coal. The very high coal combustion temperatures result in the formation of microscopic glass particles from which minerals such as quartz, haematite and mullite can later recrystallize. In addition to these minerals, the glassy fly-ash contains a number of leachable metals. Mullite is a well-known material in the ceramics industry and a known respiratory hazard. Macroscopically mullite can be found in a large range of morphologies; however microscopic crystals appear to favour a fibrous habit. Fly-ash is a recognized bioreactive material in rat lung, generating hydroxyl radicals, releasing iron, and causing DNA damage. However, the mechanisms of the bioreactivity are still unclear and the relative contributions of the minerals and leachable metals to that toxicity are not well known.

  6. Optimum mixture proportions for concretes containing fly ash and silica fume.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1991-01-01

    Concretes with equal water/cement ratios and equal paste volumes of various combinations of cement, fly ash, and silica fume were tested to establish parameters for strength and chloride permeability. Comparative specimens with Type II and Type III c...

  7. Identification of potential concerns associated with FDOT use of ammoniated coal fly ash.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this project include a careful examination of the issues surrounding high ammonia content in cement due to the use of ammoniated fly ash. The researchers will gather information from published material and consider policies and prac...

  8. Adsorption of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid from an Aqueous Solution on Fly Ash.

    PubMed

    Kuśmierek, Krzysztof; Świątkowski, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    The adsorption of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) on fly ash was studied. The effects of adsorbent dose, contact time, pH, ionic strength, and temperature on the adsorption were investigated. Adsorption kinetic data were analyzed using pseudo-first and pseudo-second order models, and results showed that adsorption kinetics were better represented by the pseudo-second order model. Adsorption isotherms of 2,4-D on fly ash were analyzed using the Freundlich and Langmuir models. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH°, and ΔS°) indicated that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. The negative values of ΔG° and the positive value of ΔH° indicate the spontaneous nature of 2,4-D adsorption on fly ash, and that the adsorption process was endothermic. Results showed that fly ash is an efficient, low-cost adsorbent for removal of 2,4-D from water.

  9. The effect of fly ash on the sulfate resistance of concrete

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1989-08-01

    The durability of concrete is determined by its ability to endure the physical and environmental surroundings without losing the functional properties and structural integrity of the original design. Concrete containing fly ash can be proportioned to...

  10. Synthesis of geopolymer composites from a mixture of ferronickel slag and fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Kang; Feng, Enjuan; Zhao, Hongyi; Liu, Futian

    2017-03-01

    The synthesis of geopolymers using ferronickel slag and fly ash under alkaline activation was studied. In order to study the effects of different fly ash content on the mechanical properties of the geopolymers produced, the compressive strength of samples was tested at 3, 7, 28 days. The results showed that when the fly ash content was 40%, the compressive strength reached the highest (110.32MPa) at 28 days. XRD analysis showed that the ferronickel slag geopolymers had amorphous aluminosilicate phase formation, indicating that the hydration reaction occurred. FTIR analysis showed the reaction of the geopolymers generated at Si-O-T (Si, Al) and Al-O-Si three-dimensional network. In SEM images, the structure of the geopolymers with 40% fly ash was more compact and cohesive.

  11. Leaching characteristics of arsenic and selenium from coal fly ash: role of calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Wang; Jianmin Wang; Yulin Tang

    2009-05-15

    Understanding the leaching behavior of arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) in coal fly ash is important in evaluating the potential environmental impact of coal fly ash. Batch experiments were employed to systematically investigate the leaching behavior of As and Se in two major types of coal fly ashes, bituminous coal ash and sub-bituminous coal ash, and to determine the underlying processes that control As and Se leaching. The effects of pH, solid/liquid (S/L) ratio, calcium addition, and leaching time on the release of As and Se were studied. Overall, bituminous coal ash leached significantly more As and Se than sub-bituminousmore » coal ash, and Se was more readily leachable, in both absolute concentration and relative fraction, than As for both types of fly ashes. Adsorption/desorption played a major role on As and Se leaching from bituminous coal ashes. However, calcium precipitation played the most important role in reducing As and Se leaching from sub-bituminous coal ashes in the entire experimental pH range. The leaching of As and Se from bituminous coal ashes generally increased with increases in the S/L ratio and leaching time. However, for sub-bituminous coal ashes, the leaching of As was not detected under most experimental conditions, while the leaching of Se increased with increases in the S/L ratio and leaching time. As{sup V} and Se{sup IV} were found to be the major species in all ash leachates in this study. 46 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.« less

  12. The effect of fly ash and coconut fibre ash as cement replacement materials on cement paste strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayuaji, R.; Kurniawan, R. W.; Yasin, A. K.; Fatoni, H. AT; Lutfi, F. M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Concrete is the backbone material in the construction field. The main concept of the concrete material is composed of a binder and filler. Cement, concrete main binder highlighted by environmentalists as one of the industry are not environmentally friendly because of the burning of cement raw materials in the kiln requires energy up to a temperature of 1450° C and the output air waste CO2. On the other hand, the compound content of cement that can be utilized in innovation is Calcium Hydroxide (CaOH), this compound will react with pozzolan material and produces additional strength and durability of concrete, Calcium Silicate Hydrates (CSH). The objective of this research is to explore coconut fibers ash and fly ash. This material was used as cement replacement materials on cement paste. Experimental method was used in this study. SNI-03-1974-1990 is standard used to clarify the compressive strength of cement paste at the age of 7 days. The result of this study that the optimum composition of coconut fiber ash and fly ash to substitute 30% of cement with 25% and 5% for coconut fibers ash and fly ash with similar strength if to be compared normal cement paste.

  13. Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Adams, Marshall; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a varietymore » of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately

  14. Applications of Nano palm oil fuel ash and Nano fly ash in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Hussein M.; Jokhio, Gul Ahmed; Mat Yahaya, Fadzil; Humada, Ali M.

    2018-04-01

    This paper discusses the applications of Nano waste materials including palm oil fuel ash and fly ash in the concrete production. The implementation of nanotechnology has been instrumental in the development of significant interest among the stakeholders to improve the mechanical and chemical properties of materials involved in the production of concrete. Although many researchers have shown the potential of nanomaterials to increase strength and durability of concrete and improve its physical and chemical properties, there is still a knowledge gap regarding the preparation of Nano waste materials from agricultural waste to use as cement replacement instead of non-renewable materials. Therefore, it should be focused on to study Nano- waste materials to benefit from these characteristics during preparation of concrete mixtures. Therefore, this paper highlights the potential of waste materials in the Nano size to partially replace cement in concrete and achieve the same or better result than the traditional concrete. This paper recommends to conduct further experimental works to improve the concrete material properties by investigating the properties of waste materials in Nano size.

  15. Effect of rice husk ash and fly ash on the compressive strength of high performance concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Lam, Tang; Bulgakov, Boris; Aleksandrova, Olga; Larsen, Oksana; Anh, Pham Ngoc

    2018-03-01

    The usage of industrial and agricultural wastes for building materials production plays an important role to improve the environment and economy by preserving nature materials and land resources, reducing land, water and air pollution as well as organizing and storing waste costs. This study mainly focuses on mathematical modeling dependence of the compressive strength of high performance concrete (HPC) at the ages of 3, 7 and 28 days on the amount of rice husk ash (RHA) and fly ash (FA), which are added to the concrete mixtures by using the Central composite rotatable design. The result of this study provides the second-order regression equation of objective function, the images of the surface expression and the corresponding contours of the objective function of the regression equation, as the optimal points of HPC compressive strength. These objective functions, which are the compressive strength values of HPC at the ages of 3, 7 and 28 days, depend on two input variables as: x1 (amount of RHA) and x2 (amount of FA). The Maple 13 program, solving the second-order regression equation, determines the optimum composition of the concrete mixture for obtaining high performance concrete and calculates the maximum value of the HPC compressive strength at the ages of 28 days. The results containMaxR28HPC = 76.716 MPa when RHA = 0.1251 and FA = 0.3119 by mass of Portland cement.

  16. Extraction of heavy metals from MSW incinerator fly ash using saponins.

    PubMed

    Hong, K J; Tokunaga, S; Ishigami, Y; Kajiuchi, T

    2000-08-01

    An extraction process with saponins was evaluated for removing heavy metals from MSW (municipal solid waste) incinerator fly ashes. Two different fly ashes, A and B, were treated on a laboratory scale with three triterpene-glycoside type of saponins, M, Q, and T, in the pH range 4-9. The results were compared with those of the HCI and EDTA treatment. The treatment with saponins extracted 20-45% of Cr from the fly ashes. Saponins were also effective in extracting Cu from fly ash A attaining 50-60% extraction. Saponin T extracted 100% of Pb from fly ash A at pH around 4. The extraction of Zn with the saponin treatment was similar to that of the HCl treatment. Further, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn were fractionated by sequential extraction to investigate the effect of saponins on each fraction. Extraction behavior of other elements during the saponin treatment was also studied. The leaching test on the residues received after the saponin treatment showed that the fly ashes were successfully detoxified to meet the landfilling guideline.

  17. Destruction of inorganic municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash in a DC arc plasma furnace.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Ni, Guohua; Jiang, Yiman; Chen, Longwei; Chen, Mingzhou; Meng, Yuedong

    2010-09-15

    Due to the toxicity of dioxins, furans and heavy metals, there is a growing environmental concern on municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash in China. The purpose of this study is directed towards the volume-reduction of fly ash without any additive by thermal plasma and recycling of vitrified slag. This process uses extremely high-temperature in an oxygen-starved environment to completely decompose complex waste into very simple molecules. For developing the proper plasma processes to treat MSWI fly ash, a new crucible-type plasma furnace was built. The melting process metamorphosed fly ash to granulated slag that was less than 1/3 of the volume of the fly ash, and about 64% of the weight of the fly ash. The safety of the vitrified slag was tested. The properties of the slag were affected by the differences in the cooling methods. Water-cooled and composite-cooled slag showed more excellent resistance against the leaching of heavy metals and can be utilized as building material without toxicity problems. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of Kaolin in Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Concrete: Destructive and Non-Destructive Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahya, Z.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Ramli, N. Mohd; Burduhos-Nergis, D. D.; Razak, R. Abd

    2018-06-01

    Development of geopolymer concrete is mainly to reduce the production of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) that adverse the natural effect. Fly ash is a by-product collected from electrical generating power plant which resulted from burning pulverized coal. Since fly ash is waste materials, it can be recycled for future advantages particularly as pozzolanic materials in construction industry. This study focused on the feasibility of fly ash based geopolymer concrete to which kaolin has been added. The main constituents of geopolymer production for this study were class F fly ash, sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. The concentration of NaOH solution was fixed at 12 Molar, ratio of fly ash/alkaline activator and sodium silicate/NaOH fixed at 1.5 and 2.5, respectively. Kaolin was added in range 5% to 15% from the mass of fly ash and all the samples were cured at room temperature. Destructive and non-destructive test were performed on geopolymer concrete to evaluate the best mix proportions that yield the highest strength as well as the quality of the concrete. Compressive strength, flexural strength, rebound hammer and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) result have been obtained. It shown that 5% replacement of kaolin contributed to maximum compressive strength and flexural strength of 40.4 MPa and 12.35 MPa at 28 days. These result was supported by non-destructive test for the same mix proportion.

  19. Thermal and hydrometallurgical recovery methods of heavy metals from municipal solid waste fly ash.

    PubMed

    Kuboňová, L; Langová, Š; Nowak, B; Winter, F

    2013-11-01

    Heavy metals in fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators are present in high concentrations. Therefore fly ash must be treated as a hazardous material. On the other hand, it may be a potential source of heavy metals. Zinc, lead, cadmium, and copper can be relatively easily removed during the thermal treatment of fly ash, e.g. in the form of chlorides. In return, wet extraction methods could provide promising results for these elements including chromium and nickel. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare thermal and hydrometallurgical treatment of municipal solid waste fly ash. Thermal treatment of fly ash was performed in a rotary reactor at temperatures between 950 and 1050°C and in a muffle oven at temperatures from 500 to 1200°C. The removal more than 90% was reached by easy volatile heavy metals such as cadmium and lead and also by copper, however at higher temperature in the muffle oven. The alkaline (sodium hydroxide) and acid (sulphuric acid) leaching of the fly ash was carried out while the influence of temperature, time, concentration, and liquid/solid ratio were investigated. The combination of alkaline-acidic leaching enhanced the removal of, namely, zinc, chromium and nickel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Surface mechanical behaviour of composite Ni-P-fly ash/zincate coated aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagopoulos, C. N.; Georgiou, E. P.

    2009-04-01

    Ni-P-fly ash coatings were produced on zincate coated 5083 wrought aluminium alloy substrates with the aid of an electroless deposition technique. Structural and chemical characterization of the produced coatings was performed with the aid of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) techniques. The Ni-P-fly ash coating was found to consist of an amorphous Ni-P matrix with dispersed fly ash particles. The wear resistance of the Ni-P-fly ash coating on zincate treated aluminium alloy was observed to be higher than that of the bare aluminium alloy, when sliding against a stainless steel counterface. In addition, the adhesion between the Ni-P-fly ash/zincate coating and the aluminium alloy substrate was also studied with a scratch testing apparatus. The adhesion strength of Ni-P-fly ash/zincate coating on the aluminium alloy substrate was observed to be higher in comparison to the Ni-P/zincate coating on the same aluminium alloy.

  1. Hydration of Hybrid Alkaline Cement Containing a Very Large Proportion of Fly Ash: A Descriptive Model

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Lodeiro, Inés; Donatello, Shane; Fernández-Jiménez, Ana; Palomo, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    In hybrid alkaline fly ash cements, a new generation of binders, hydration, is characterized by features found in both ordinary portland cement (OPC) hydration and the alkali activation of fly ash (AAFA). Hybrid alkaline fly ash cements typically have a high fly ash (70 wt % to 80 wt %) and low clinker (20 wt % to 30 wt %) content. The clinker component favors curing at ambient temperature. A hydration mechanism is proposed based on the authors’ research on these hybrid binders over the last five years. The mechanisms for OPC hydration and FA alkaline activation are summarized by way of reference. In hybrid systems, fly ash activity is visible at very early ages, when two types of gel are formed: C–S–H from the OPC and N–A–S–H from the fly ash. In their mutual presence, these gels tend to evolve, respectively, into C–A–S–H and (N,C)–A–S–H. The use of activators with different degrees of alkalinity has a direct impact on reaction kinetics but does not modify the main final products, a mixture of C–A–S–H and (N,C)–A–S–H gels. The proportion of each gel in the mix does, however, depend on the alkalinity generated in the medium. PMID:28773728

  2. Case study of fly ash brick manufacturing units at Kota in Rajasthan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Y.; Saxena, B. K.; Rao, K. V. S.

    2018-03-01

    Kota Super Thermal Power Station of 1240 MW is located at Kota in Rajasthan, India. The quantity of fly ash generated by it is about 1.64 to 2.03 million tonnes per year. This fly ash is being utilized for making bricks, tiles, portland pozzolana cement, construction of highways, and other purposes. 1.79 million tonnes of fly ash was utilized for different applications in one year duration from April 01st, 2015 to March 31st, 2016. Out of this total utilization, 0.6439 million tonnes (36.06 %) of fly ash was used for making bricks, blocks, and tiles. In this paper, a case study of two fly ash brick manufacturing units using fly ash produced from Kota Super Thermal Power Station is described. These units produce about 15,000 and 20,000 bricks respectively by employing 10 and 16 workers each and are making a profit of about Rs. 6,000 and Rs. 8,000 per day in one shift.

  3. Synthesis of zeolite from rice husk ash waste of brick industries as hydrophobic adsorbent for fuel grade ethanol purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnomo, A.; Alhanif, M.; Khotimah, C.; Zuhra, UA; Putri, BR; Kumoro, AC

    2017-11-01

    A lot of researchers have devoted on ethanol utilization as renewable energy to substitute petroleum based gasoline. When ethanol is being used as a new fuel candidate, it should have at least of 99.5% purity. Usually produced via sugar fermentation process, further purification of ethanol from other components in fermentation broth to obtain its fuel grade is a crucial step. The purpose of this research is to produce synthetic zeolite as hydrophobic adsorbent from rice husk ash for ethanol-water separation and to investigate the influence of weight, adsorption time and initial ethanol concentration on zeolite adsorption capacity. This research consisted of rice husk silica extraction, preparation of hydrophobic zeolite adsorbent, physical characterization using SEM, EDX and adsorption test for an ethanol-water solution. Zeolite with highest adsorption capacity was obtained with 15: 1 alumina silica composition. The best adsorption condition was achieved when 4-gram hydrophobic zeolite applied for adsorption of 100 mL of 10% (v/v) ethanol-water solution for 120 minutes, which resulted in ethanol with 98.93% (v/v) purity. The hydrophobic zeolite from rice husk ash is a potential candidate as an efficient adsorbent to purify raw ethanol into fuel grade ethanol. Implementation of this new adsorbent for ethanol production in commercial scale may reduce the energy consumption of that usually used for the distillation processes.

  4. Greatly increased use of fly ash in hydraulic cement concrete (HCC) for pavement layers and transportation structures - volume I.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this phase is to evaluate the past, current and future trends of use of fly ash in concrete and restrictions to its use. The American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) conducts an annual survey of fly ash production and use. Typically on an ...

  5. Fabrication and adsorption properties of hybrid fly ash composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Mengfan; Ma, Qingliang; Lin, Qingwen; Chang, Jiali; Ma, Hongzhu

    2017-02-01

    In order to realize the utilization of fly ash (FA) as industrial solid waste better, high-efficient inorganic/organic hybrid composite adsorbents derived from (Ca(OH)2/Na2FeO4) modified FA (MF) was fabricated. The hydrophilic cationic polymer (P(DMDAAC-co-AAM) or hydrophobic modifier (KH-570) were used. The prepared composites were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and contact angle test. The adsorption of cationic composites MF/P(DMDAAC-co-AAM) towards Orange II in wastewater was investigated. The results show that: adsorption amount of 24.8 mg/g with 2000 mg/L of composites, 50 mg/L Orange II, original pH (6-8), at 40 min and room temperature, was obtained. Meanwhile, oil adsorption ratio Q(g/g) of hydrophobic composites MF/KH-570 was also evaluated. The maximum Q of 17.2 g/g to kerosene was obtained at 40 min. The isotherm and kinetics of these two adsorption processes were also studied. The results showed that the fabricated MF composites modified with hydrophilic or hydrophobic group can be used to adsorb dye in wastewater or oil effectively.

  6. Thermal Resistance Variations of Fly Ash Geopolymers: Foaming Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng-Yong, Heah; Yun-Ming, Liew; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Hussin, Kamarudin

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of the characteristic of unfoamed and foamed geopolymers after exposure to elevated temperatures (200-800 °C). Unfoamed geopolymers were produced with Class F fly ash and sodium hydroxide and liquid sodium silicate. Porous geopolymers were prepared by foaming with hydrogen peroxide. Unfoamed geopolymers possessed excellent strength of 44.2 MPa and degraded 34% to 15 MPa in foamed geopolymers. The strength of unfoamed geopolymers decreased to 5 MPa with increasing temperature up to 800 °C. Foamed geopolymers behaved differently whereby they deteriorated to 3 MPa at 400 °C and increased up to 11 MPa at 800 °C. Even so, the geopolymers could withstand high temperature without any disintegration and spalling up to 800 °C. The formation of crystalline phases at higher temperature was observed deteriorating the strength of unfoamed geopolymers but enhance the strength of foamed geopolymers. In comparison, foamed geopolymer had better thermal resistance than unfoamed geopolymers as pores provide rooms to counteract the internal damage.

  7. Properties of Portland cement--stabilised MSWI fly ashes.

    PubMed

    Polettini, A; Pomi, R; Sirini, P; Testa, F

    2001-11-16

    In the present paper, the properties of Portland cement mixtures containing fly ashes (FA) collected at four different Italian municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plants were investigated. In particular, physical/mechanical characteristics (setting time, unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and shrinkage/expansion), as well as the acid neutralisation behaviour of the solidified products were considered. The FA composition, revealing enrichment in heavy metals, chlorides and sulphates, significantly altered the hydration behaviour of Portland cement. Consequently, for some of the investigated FA the maximum allowable content for the mixtures to achieve appreciable mechanical strength was 20 wt.%. Even at low FA dosages setting of cement was strongly delayed. In order to improve the properties of FA/cement mixtures, the use of additives was tested.Moreover, the acid neutralisation capacity (ANC) of the solidified products was evaluated in order to assess the ability of the matrix to resist acidification, and also to provide information on hydration progression, as well as on heavy metal release under different pH conditions. Comparison of the results from the present work with previous studies carried out on spiked mixtures lead to the conclusion that the mechanical properties of the stabilised FA could not be predicted based on the effect exerted by heavy metals and anions only, even when the dilution effect exerted on cement was taken into account. It was likely that a major role was also played by alkalis, which were present in the FA at much higher concentrations than in cement.

  8. Fly ash-based geopolymer lightweight concrete using foaming agent.

    PubMed

    Al Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Yahya, Zarina; Razak, Rafiza Abdul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our investigation on the possibility of producing foam concrete by using a geopolymer system. Class C fly ash was mixed with an alkaline activator solution (a mixture of sodium silicate and NaOH), and foam was added to the geopolymeric mixture to produce lightweight concrete. The NaOH solution was prepared by dilute NaOH pellets with distilled water. The reactives were mixed to produce a homogeneous mixture, which was placed into a 50 mm mold and cured at two different curing temperatures (60 °C and room temperature), for 24 hours. After the curing process, the strengths of the samples were tested on days 1, 7, and 28. The water absorption, porosity, chemical composition, microstructure, XRD and FTIR analyses were studied. The results showed that the sample which was cured at 60 °C (LW2) produced the maximum compressive strength for all tests, (11.03 MPa, 17.59 MPa, and 18.19 MPa) for days 1, 7, and 28, respectively. Also, the water absorption and porosity of LW2 were reduced by 6.78% and 1.22% after 28 days, respectively. The SEM showed that the LW2 sample had a denser matrix than LW1. This was because LW2 was heat cured, which caused the geopolymerization rate to increase, producing a denser matrix. However for LW1, microcracks were present on the surface, which reduced the compressive strength and increased water absorption and porosity.

  9. Compressive and bonding strength of fly ash based geopolymer mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zailani, Warid Wazien Ahmad; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Zainol, Mohd Remy Rozainy Mohd Arif; Razak, Rafiza Abd.; Tahir, Muhammad Faheem Mohd

    2017-09-01

    Geopolymer which is produced by synthesizing aluminosilicate source materials with an alkaline activator solution promotes sustainable and excellent properties of binder. The purpose of this paper is to determine the optimum binder to sand ratio of geopolymer mortars based on mechanical properties. In order to optimize the formulation of geopolymer mortar, various binder to sand ratios (0.25, 0.33, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0) are prepared. The investigation on the effect of sand inclusion to the compressive and bonding strength of geopolymer mortar is approached. The experimental results show that the bonding strength performance of geopolymer is also depends on the various binder to sand ratio, where the optimum ratio 0.5 gives a highest strength of 12.73 MPa followed by 12.35 MPa, which corresponds the ratio 1.0 for geopolymer, while the compared value of OPC bonding strength is given by 9.3 MPa. The morphological structure at the interface zone is determined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and the homogenous bonding between geopolymer and substrate can be observed. Fly ash based geopolymers reveal a new category of mortar which has high potential to be used in the field of concrete repair and rehabilitation.

  10. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    García-Maté, M.; De la Torre, A.G.; León-Reina, L.

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 monthsmore » of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 ± 2 and 72 ± 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits.« less

  11. Thermal Resistance Variations of Fly Ash Geopolymers: Foaming Responses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng-Yong, Heah; Yun-Ming, Liew; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Hussin, Kamarudin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of the characteristic of unfoamed and foamed geopolymers after exposure to elevated temperatures (200–800 °C). Unfoamed geopolymers were produced with Class F fly ash and sodium hydroxide and liquid sodium silicate. Porous geopolymers were prepared by foaming with hydrogen peroxide. Unfoamed geopolymers possessed excellent strength of 44.2 MPa and degraded 34% to 15 MPa in foamed geopolymers. The strength of unfoamed geopolymers decreased to 5 MPa with increasing temperature up to 800 °C. Foamed geopolymers behaved differently whereby they deteriorated to 3 MPa at 400 °C and increased up to 11 MPa at 800 °C. Even so, the geopolymers could withstand high temperature without any disintegration and spalling up to 800 °C. The formation of crystalline phases at higher temperature was observed deteriorating the strength of unfoamed geopolymers but enhance the strength of foamed geopolymers. In comparison, foamed geopolymer had better thermal resistance than unfoamed geopolymers as pores provide rooms to counteract the internal damage. PMID:28345643

  12. Leaching characteristics of fly ash from thermal power plants of Soma and Tuncbilek, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Baba, Alper; Kaya, Abidin

    2004-02-01

    Use of lignite in power generation has led to increasing environmental problems associated not only with gaseous emissions but also with the disposal of ash residues. In particular, use of low quality coal with high ash content results in huge quantities of fly ash to be disposed of. The main problem related to fly ash disposal is the heavy metal content of the residue. In this regard, experimental results of numerous studies indicate that toxic trace metals may leach when fly ash contacts water. In this study, fly ash samples obtained from thermal power plants, namely Soma and Tunçbilek, located at the west part of Turkey, were subjected to toxicity tests such as European Committee for standardization (CEN) and toxicity characteristic leaching (TCLP) procedures of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The geochemical composition of the tested ash samples from the power plant show variations depending on the coal burned in the plants. Furthermore, the CEN and TCLP extraction results showed variations such that the ash samples were classified as 'toxic waste' based on TCLP result whereas they were classified as 'non-toxic' wastes based on CEN results, indicating test results are pH dependent.

  13. Critical Elements in Fly Ash from the Combustion of Bituminous Coal in Major Polish Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielowicz, Barbara; Botor, Dariusz; Misiak, Jacek; Wagner, Marian

    2018-03-01

    The concentration of critical elements, including such REE as Fe, Co, W, Zn, Cr, Ni, V, Mn, Ti, Ag, Ga, Ta, Sr, Li, and Cu, in the so-called fly ash obtained from the 9 Polish power plants and 1 thermal power station has been determined. The obtained values, compared with the global average concentration in bituminous coal ash and sedimentary rocks (Clarke values), have shown that the enrichment of fly ash in the specified elements takes place in only a few bituminous coal processing sites in Poland. The enrichment factor (EF) is only slightly higher (the same order of magnitude) than the Clarke values. The enrichment factor in relation to the Clarke value in the Earth's crust reached values above 10 in all of the examined ashes for the following elements: Cr, Ni, V, W, and, in some ash samples, also Cu and Zn. The obtained values are low, only slightly higher than the global average concentrations in sedimentary rocks and bituminous coal ashes. The ferromagnetic grains (microspheres) found in bituminous coal fly ashes seem to be the most economically prospective in recovery of selected critical elements. The microanalysis has shown that iron cenospheres and plerospheres in fly ash contain, in addition to enamel and iron oxides (magnetite and hematite), iron spinels enriched in Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, W, and Zn.

  14. Evaluation of fly ash concrete durability containing class II durability aggregates.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1986-07-01

    Fly ash was used in this evaluation study to replace 15% of the cement in : Class C-3 concrete paving mixes. One Class "c" ash from Iowa approved : sources was examined in each mix. Substitution rate was based on 1 to 1 : basis, for each pound of cem...

  15. Geoenvironmental impacts of using high carbon fly ash in structural fill applications.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-03-01

    Fly ash produced by power plants in the United States occasionally contains significant amounts of unburned carbon due to the : use of the increased prevalence of low nitrogen-oxide and sulphur-oxide burners in recent years. This ash cannot be reused...

  16. Sulfidation treatment of molten incineration fly ashes with Na2S for zinc, lead and copper resource recovery.

    PubMed

    Kuchar, D; Fukuta, T; Onyango, M S; Matsuda, H

    2007-04-01

    The present study focuses on the conversion of heavy metals involved in molten incineration fly ashes to metal sulfides which could be thereafter separated by flotation. The sulfidation treatment was carried out for five molten incineration fly ashes (Fly ash-A to Fly ash-E) by contacting each fly ash with Na(2)S solution for a period of 10 min to 6h. The initial molar ratio of S(2-) to Me(2+) was adjusted to 1.20. The conversion of heavy metals to metal sulfides was evaluated by measuring the S(2-) residual concentrations using an ion selective electrode. The formation of metal sulfides was studied by XRD and SEM-EDS analyses. In the case of Fly ash-A to Fly ash-D, more than 79% of heavy metals of zinc, lead and copper was converted to metal sulfides within the contacting period of 0.5h owing to a fast conversion of metal chlorides to metal sulfides. By contrast, the conversion of about 35% was achieved for Fly ash-E within the same contacting period, which was attributed to a high content of metal oxides. Further, the S(2-) to Me(2+) molar ratio was reduced to 1.00 to minimize Na(2)S consumption and the conversions obtained within the contacting period of 0.5h varied from 76% for Fly ash-D to 91% for Fly ash-C. Finally, soluble salts such as NaCl and KCl were removed during the sulfidation treatment, which brought about a significant enrichment in metals content by a factor varying from 1.5 for Fly ash-D to 4.9 for Fly ash-A.

  17. Comparison of heterogeneous photolytic reduction of Hg(II) in the coal fly ashes and synthetic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yindong; Eichhorst, Terry; Olson, Michael R.; Rutter, Andrew P.; Shafer, Martin M.; Wang, Xuejun; Schauer, James J.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we examined the heterogeneous reduction of Hg(II) on the coal fly ash samples and synthetic aerosols under different light conditions in a controlled laboratory reactor. Three types of coal fly ashes were studied: a high carbon fly ash from a stoker boiler, a low carbon/low sulfate fly ash from a pulverized coal combustor burning low sulfur coal, and a high sulfate fly ash from a pulverized coal combustor burning high sulfur coal. The rate of Hg(II) reduction on the three diverse fly ash samples was found to be relatively fast with an average half-life of 1.6 h under clear sky atmospheric conditions (under the irradiance of 1000 W/m2). The reduction rate in the low sulfate/low carbon fly ash was approximately 1.5 times faster than with the other coal fly ash samples. Synthetic aerosols made of carbon black and levoglucosan produced Hg(II) reduction rates similar to coal fly ashes. However, aerosols composed of adipic acid resulted in reduction rates that were 3-5 times faster. The sensitivity of adipic acid reduction to light source wavelength was found to be greater than for the coal fly ash and other synthetic aerosols. Aerosols made from the water extracts of coal fly ash samples produced reduction rates equal to or slightly higher than with the native fly ash suggesting that the soluble components of fly ash play a significant role in the reduction mechanism. The measured reduction rates are likely important in the chemical processing of mercury in power plant plumes and potentially in the atmosphere and should be considered for incorporation in atmospheric transport models that are used to understand the fate of atmospheric mercury.

  18. Amelioration of soil PAH and heavy metals by combined application of fly ash and biochar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masto, Reginald; George, Joshy; Ansari, Md; Ram, Lal

    2016-04-01

    Generation of electricity through coal combustion produces huge quantities of fly ash. Sustainable disposal and utilization of these fly ash is a major challenge. Fly ash along with other amendments like biochar could be used for amelioration of soil. In this study, fly ash and biochar were used together for amelioration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated soil. Field experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of fly ash and biochar on the amelioration of soil PAH, and the yield of Zea mays. The treatments were control, biochar (4 t/ha), fly ash (4 t/ha), ash + biochar ( 2 + 2 t/ha). Soil samples were collected after the harvest of maize crop and analysed for chemical and biological parameters. Thirteen PAHs were analysed in the postharvest soil samples. Soil PAHs were extracted in a microwave oven at 120 °C using hexane : acetone (1:1) mixture. The extracted solutions were concentrated, cleaned and the 13 PAHs [Acenaphthene (Ace), fluorene (Flr), phenanthrene (Phn), anthracene(Ant), pyrene(Pyr), benz(a)anthracene (BaA), chrysene (Chy), benzo(b)fluoranthene (BbF), benzo(k)fluoranthene (BkF), benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene (BghiP), dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene)(Inp)] were analysed using GC-MS. The mean pH increased from 6.09 in control to 6.64 and 6.58 at biochar and fly ash treated soils, respectively. N content was not affected, whereas addition of biochar alone and in combination with fly ash, has significantly increased the soil organic carbon content. P content was almost double in combined (9.06 mg/kg) treatment as compared to control (4.32 mg/kg). The increase in K due to biochar was 118%, whereas char + ash increased soil K by 64%. Soil heavy metals were decreased: Zn (-48.4%), Ni (-41.4%), Co (-36.9%), Cu (-35.7%), Mn (-34.3%), Cd (-33.2%), and Pb (-30.4%). Soil dehydrogenase activity was significantly increased by ash and biochar treatments and the maximum activity was observed for the combined

  19. Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Loya, E Ivan; Allouche, Erez N; Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal

    2012-08-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5

  20. Evaluation of Fly Ash Quality Control Tools : Technical Summary

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-06-01

    Many entities currently use fl y ash in portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and structures. Although : the body of knowledge is great concerning the use of fl y ash, several projects per year are subject to poor : performance where fl y ash is n...

  1. Evaluation of fly ash quality control tools : tech summary.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-06-01

    Many entities currently use fl y ash in portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and structures. Although : the body of knowledge is great concerning the use of fl y ash, several projects per year are subject to poor : performance where fl y ash is n...

  2. Leaching for recovery of copper from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash: influence of ash properties and metal speciation.

    PubMed

    Lassesson, Henric; Fedje, Karin Karlfeldt; Steenari, Britt-Marie

    2014-08-01

    Recovery of metals occurring in significant amounts in municipal solid waste incineration fly ash, such as copper, could offer several advantages: a decreased amount of potentially mobile metal compounds going to landfill, saving of natural resources and a monetary value. A combination of leaching and solvent extraction may constitute a feasible recovery path for metals from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash. However, it has been shown that the initial dissolution and leaching is a limiting step in such a recovery process. The work described in this article was focused on elucidating physical and chemical differences between two ash samples with the aim of explaining the differences in copper release from these samples in two leaching methods. The results showed that the chemical speciation is an important factor affecting the release of copper. The occurrence of copper as phosphate or silicate will hinder leaching, while sulphate and chloride will facilitate leaching. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Fly Ash-based Geopolymer Lightweight Concrete Using Foaming Agent

    PubMed Central

    Al Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Yahya, Zarina; Razak, Rafiza Abdul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our investigation on the possibility of producing foam concrete by using a geopolymer system. Class C fly ash was mixed with an alkaline activator solution (a mixture of sodium silicate and NaOH), and foam was added to the geopolymeric mixture to produce lightweight concrete. The NaOH solution was prepared by dilute NaOH pellets with distilled water. The reactives were mixed to produce a homogeneous mixture, which was placed into a 50 mm mold and cured at two different curing temperatures (60 °C and room temperature), for 24 hours. After the curing process, the strengths of the samples were tested on days 1, 7, and 28. The water absorption, porosity, chemical composition, microstructure, XRD and FTIR analyses were studied. The results showed that the sample which was cured at 60 °C (LW2) produced the maximum compressive strength for all tests, (11.03 MPa, 17.59 MPa, and 18.19 MPa) for days 1, 7, and 28, respectively. Also, the water absorption and porosity of LW2 were reduced by 6.78% and 1.22% after 28 days, respectively. The SEM showed that the LW2 sample had a denser matrix than LW1. This was because LW2 was heat cured, which caused the geopolymerization rate to increase, producing a denser matrix. However for LW1, microcracks were present on the surface, which reduced the compressive strength and increased water absorption and porosity. PMID:22837687

  4. Chemical associations and mobilization of heavy metals in fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Gisela; Eggenberger, Urs; Schlumberger, Stefan; Mäder, Urs K

    2017-04-01

    This study focusses on chemical and mineralogical characterization of fly ash and leached filter cake and on the determination of parameters influencing metal mobilization by leaching. Three different leaching processes of fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plants in Switzerland comprise neutral, acidic and optimized acidic (+ oxidizing agent) fly ash leaching have been investigated. Fly ash is characterized by refractory particles (Al-foil, unburnt carbon, quartz, feldspar) and newly formed high-temperature phases (glass, gehlenite, wollastonite) surrounded by characteristic dust rims. Metals are carried along with the flue gas (Fe-oxides, brass) and are enriched in mineral aggregates (quartz, feldspar, wollastonite, glass) or vaporized and condensed as chlorides or sulphates. Parameters controlling the mobilization of neutral and acidic fly ash leaching are pH and redox conditions, liquid to solid ratio, extraction time and temperature. Almost no depletion for Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd is achieved by performing neutral leaching. Acidic fly ash leaching results in depletion factors of 40% for Zn, 53% for Cd, 8% for Pb and 6% for Cu. The extraction of Pb and Cu are mainly limited due to a cementation process and the formation of a PbCu 0 -alloy-phase and to a minor degree due to secondary precipitation (PbCl 2 ). The addition of hydrogen peroxide during acidic fly ash leaching (optimized acidic leaching) prevents this reduction through oxidation of metallic components and thus significantly higher depletion factors for Pb (57%), Cu (30%) and Cd (92%) are achieved. The elevated metal depletion using acidic leaching in combination with hydrogen peroxide justifies the extra effort not only by reduced metal loads to the environment but also by reduced deposition costs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of coal fly ash components by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ctvrtnickova, Tereza; Mateo, Mari-Paz; Yañez, Armando; Nicolas, Gines

    2009-10-01

    The high sensitivity of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection of most of the fly ash components enables the analysis of these residues produced during the combustion of coal. Fly ash consists of oxides (SiO 2, Al 2O 3, Fe 2O 3, CaO…) and unburnt carbon which is the major determinant of combustion efficiency in coal fired boilers. For example, an excessive amount of residual carbon dispersed in the fly ash means a significant loss of energy (Styszko et al., 2004 [1]). Standard methods employed for the analysis of fly ash make not possible a control of boiler in real time. LIBS technique can significantly reduce the time of analysis, in some cases even an online detection can be performed. For this reason, some studies have been addressed in order to demonstrate the capability of the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique for the detection of carbon content in high pressure conditions typical of thermal power plants (Noda et al., 2002 [2]) and for the monitoring of unburnt carbon for the boiler control in real time (Kurihara et al., 2003 [3]). In particular, the content of unburnt carbon is a valuable indicator for the control of fly ash quality and for the boiler combustion. Depending on this unburnt carbon content, fly ash can be disposed as an industrial waste or as a raw material for the production of concrete in the construction sector. In this study, analyses were performed on specimens of various forms of preparation. Pressed pellets were prepared with two different binders. Presented results concern the nature and amount of the binder used to pelletize the powder, and the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy parameters and procedure required to draw calibration curves of elements from the fly ash. Analysis "on tape" was performed in order to establish the experimental conditions for the future "online analysis".

  6. Thermal and hydrometallurgical recovery methods of heavy metals from municipal solid waste fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Kuboňová, L., E-mail: lenka.kubonova@vsb.cz; Langová, Š.; Nowak, B.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • MSW fly ash was thermally and hydrometallurgically treated to remove heavy metals. • More than 90% of easy volatile heavy metals (Cd and Pb) were removed thermally. • More than 90% of Cd, Cr, Cu an Zn were removed by alkaline – acid leaching. • The best results were obtained for the solution of 3 M NaOH and 2 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. - Abstract: Heavy metals in fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators are present in high concentrations. Therefore fly ash must be treated as a hazardous material. On the other hand, it may be amore » potential source of heavy metals. Zinc, lead, cadmium, and copper can be relatively easily removed during the thermal treatment of fly ash, e.g. in the form of chlorides. In return, wet extraction methods could provide promising results for these elements including chromium and nickel. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare thermal and hydrometallurgical treatment of municipal solid waste fly ash. Thermal treatment of fly ash was performed in a rotary reactor at temperatures between 950 and 1050 °C and in a muffle oven at temperatures from 500 to 1200 °C. The removal more than 90% was reached by easy volatile heavy metals such as cadmium and lead and also by copper, however at higher temperature in the muffle oven. The alkaline (sodium hydroxide) and acid (sulphuric acid) leaching of the fly ash was carried out while the influence of temperature, time, concentration, and liquid/solid ratio were investigated. The combination of alkaline-acidic leaching enhanced the removal of, namely, zinc, chromium and nickel.« less

  7. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF COAL FLY ASH AMENDMENTS ON THE TOXICITY OF A CONTAMINATED MARINE SEDIMENT

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Robert M.; Perron, Monique M.; Friedman, Carey L.; Suuberg, Eric M.; Pennell, Kelly G.; Cantwell, Mark G.; Pelletier, Marguerite C.; Ho, Kay T.; Serbst, Jonathan R.; Ryba, Stephan A.

    2013-01-01

    Approaches for cleaning-up contaminated sediments range from dredging to in situ treatment. In the present report, we discuss the effects of amending reference and contaminated sediments with coal fly ash to reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of a field sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Six fly ashes and a coconut charcoal were evaluated in 7 d whole sediment toxicity tests with a marine amphipod (Ampelisca abdita) and mysid (Americamysis bahia). Fly ashes with high carbon content and the coconut charcoal showed proficiency at reducing toxicity. Some of the fly ashes demonstrated toxicity in the reference treatments. It is suspected that some of this toxicity is related to the presence of ammonia associated with fly ashes as a result of post-oxidation treatment to reduce nitrous oxides emissions. Relatively simple methods exist to remove ammonia from fly ash prior to use and fly ashes with low ammonia content are available. Fly ashes were also shown to effectively reduce overlying water concentrations of several PAHs. There was no evidence of the release of the metals cadmium, copper, nickel or lead from the fly ashes. A preliminary 28 d polychaete bioaccumulation study with one of the high carbon fly ashes and a reference sediment was also performed. Although preliminary, there was no evidence of adverse effects to worm growth or lipid content, or the accumulation of PAHs or mercury from exposure to the fly ash. These data show fly ashes with high carbon contents may represent viable remedial materials for reducing the bioavailability of organic contaminants in sediments. PMID:18717615

  8. Intra- and inter-unit variation in fly ash petrography and mercury adsorption: Examples from a western Kentucky power station

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hower, J.C.; Finkelman, R.B.; Rathbone, R.F.; Goodman, J.

    2000-01-01

    Fly ash was collected from eight mechanical and 10 baghouse hoppers at each of the twin 150-MW wall-fired units in a western Kentucky power station. The fuel burned at that time was a blend of many low-sulfur, high-volatile bituminous Central Appalachian coals. The baghouse ash showed less variation between units than the mechanical hoppers. The mechanical fly ash, coarser than the baghouse ash, showed significant differences in the amount of total carbon and in the ratio of isotropic coke to both total carbon and total coke - the latter excluding inertinite and other unburned, uncoked coal. There was no significant variation in proportions of inorganic fly ash constituents. The inter-unit differences in the amount and forms of mechanical fly ash carbon appear to be related to differences in pulverizer efficiency, leading to greater amounts of coarse coal, therefore unburned carbon, in one of the units. Mercury capture is a function of both the total carbon content and the gas temperature at the point of fly ash separation, mercury content increasing with an increase in carbon for a specific collection system. Mercury adsorption on fly ash carbon increases at lower flue-gas temperatures. Baghouse fly ash, collected at a lower temperature than the higher-carbon mechanically separated fly ash, contains a significantly greater amount of Hg.

  9. Effect of adding acid solution on setting time and compressive strength of high calcium fly ash based geopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, Herianto, Jason Ghorman; Anastasia, Evelin; Hardjito, Djwantoro

    2017-09-01

    Fly ash with high calcium oxide content when used as the base material in geopolymer concrete could cause flash setting or rapid hardening. However, it might increase the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete. This rapid hardening could cause problems if the geopolymer concrete is used on a large scale casting that requires a long setting time. CaO content can be indicated by pH values of the fly ash, while higher pH is correlated with the rapid setting time of fly ash-based geopolymer. This study investigates the addition of acid solution to reduce the initial pH of the fly ash and to prolong the setting time of the mixture. The acids used in this study are hydrochloric acid (HCl), sulfuric acid (H2 SO4), nitric acid (HNO3) and acetic acid (CH3 COOH). It was found that the addition of acid solution in fly ash was able to decrease the initial pH of fly ash, however, the initial setting time of geopolymer was not reduced. It was even faster than that of the control mixture. The acid type causes various influence, depending on the fly ash properties. In addition, the use of acid solution in fly ash reduces the compressive strength of geopolymer mortar. It is concluded that the addition of acid solution cannot prolong the rapid hardening of high calcium fly ash geopolymer, and it causes adverse effect on the compressive strength.

  10. Geochemically structural characteristics of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash particles and mineralogical surface conversions by chelate treatment.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Hiroki; Sawada, Takaya; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Takahashi, Fumitake

    2016-01-01

    Leaching behaviors of heavy metals contained in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash have been studied well. However, micro-characteristics of MSWI fly ash particles are still uncertain and might be non-negligible to describe their leaching behaviors. Therefore, this study investigated micro-characteristics of MSWI fly ash particles, especially their structural properties and impacts of chelate treatment on surface characteristics. According to SEM observations, raw fly ash particles could be categorized into four types based on their shapes. Because chelate treatment changed the surface of fly ash particles dramatically owing to secondary mineral formations like ettringite, two more types could be categorized for chelate-treated fly ash particles. Acid extraction experiments suggest that fly ash particles, tested in this study, consist of Si-base insoluble core structure, Al/Ca/Si-base semi-soluble matrices inside the body, and KCl/NaCl-base soluble aggregates on the surface. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of the same fly ash particles during twice moistening treatments showed that KCl/NaCl moved under wet condition and concentrated at different places on the particle surface. However, element mobility depended on secondary mineral formations. When insoluble mineral like gypsum was generated and covered the particle surface, it inhibited element transfer under wet condition. Surface characteristics including secondary mineral formation of MSWI fly ash particles are likely non-negligible to describe trace element leaching behaviors.

  11. Investigation on the fly ash thermal treatment on the performance of Lithium Ferriphosphate (LiFePO{sub 4}) battery

    SciTech Connect

    Febiolita, Bella; Khoirunnissak, Dewi; Purwanto, Agus, E-mail: aguspurw@gmail.com

    Addition of the fly ash can be used to improve the capacity of LiFePO{sub 4} battery. Fly ash was added in Acethylene Black (AB) as 2% of the total weight of Acetylene Black (AB). The effects of temperature variation and fly ash characteristics were analyzed. Fly ash was prepared by heating at 50, 100, 150, and 250°C in muffle furnace for 5 hours and passed in 200 mesh screen prior to mixing it with other compounds. Lithium Ferriphospat (LiFePO{sub 4}), fly ash, Acethylene Black (AB), Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) as a binder and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent were mixed tomore » be slurry. The slurry were coated, dried and hot pressed to make a cathode film. The performance of battery lithium was examined by eight channel battery analyzer. The composition of the fly ash was examined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and Fourier Tansform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The excellent performance was shown in the fly ash addition which were treated by heating at 150°C. The capacity of fly ash added LiFePO{sub 4} battery is 94.373 mAh/g, which is higher than that of without fly ash addition, i.e. 67.998 mAh/g.« less

  12. Effects of different surface modification and contents on municipal solid waste incineration fly ash/epoxy composites.

    PubMed

    Goh, C K; Valavan, S E; Low, T K; Tang, L H

    2016-12-01

    Incineration fly ash, a waste from municipal solid waste incineration plant can be used to replace conventional filler as reinforcing filler to enhance the mechanical strength of a composite. Surface modification was performed on the incineration fly ash before mixing into the soft polymer matrix so as to improve interfacial bond of the filler and epoxy resin. In this study, detailed characterisation of mechanical, morphological and leaching behaviours of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash infused composite has been carried out. Flexural and tensile test was conducted to determine the effect on mechanical properties of the composite by varying the concentration of incineration fly ash filler added into polymer matrix and surface modification of incineration fly ash filler using silane coupling agent and colloidal mesoporous silica (CMS). The results indicated that composite infused with incineration fly ash filler surface treated with CMS shown improvement on the tensile and flexural strengths. In addition, SEM images showed that surface modification of incineration fly ash with colloidal mesoporous silica enhanced the interfacial bonding with polymer resin which explained the improvement of mechanical strength. Leaching test showed result of toxic metals such as Pb, Zn, Fe, Cu, Cr, Cd and Rb immobilised in the polymer matrix of the composite. Hence, the use of MSWI fly ash as reinforcing filler in the composite appears green and sustainable because this approach is a promising opportunity to substitute valuable raw material with MSWI fly ash. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Porosity of Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC) incorporating high volume fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiawan, S. A.; Sunarmasto; Murti, G. Y.

    2017-02-01

    Degradation of concrete could be triggered by the presence of aggressive agents from the environment into the body of concrete. The penetration of these agents is influenced by the pore characteristics of the concrete. Incorporating a pozzolanic material such as fly ash could modify the pore characteristic of the concrete. This research aims to investigate the influence of incorporating fly ash at high volume level on the porosity of Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC). Laboratory investigations were carried out following the ASTM C642 for measuring density and volume of permeable pores (voids) of the SCC with varying fly ash contents (50-70% by weight of total binder). In addition, a measurement of permeable voids by saturation method was carried out to obtain an additional volume of voids that could not be measured by the immersion and boiling method of ASTM C642. The results show that the influence of fly ash content on the porosity appears to be dependent on age of SCC. At age less than 56 d, fly ash tends to cause an increase of voids but at 90 d of age it reduces the pores. The additional pores that can be penetrated by vacuum saturation method counts about 50% of the total voids.

  14. Thermo-mechanical properties and microfabric of fly ash-stabilized gold tailings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Kyu; Shang, Julie Q; Jeong, Sangseom

    2014-07-15

    This paper studies the changes in thermal conductivity, temperature, and unconfined compressive strength of gold tailings and fly ash mixtures during the curing period of 5 days. The microfabric of the cured mixtures was investigated with mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). The mixture samples were prepared at their maximum dry unit weight and optimum moisture content. Effect of adding fly ash to gold tailings (i.e., 0, 20, and 40% of the dry weight of tailings) was examined, and a comparison was made on samples prepared at the same fly ash content by replacing gold tailings with humic acid (i.e., gold tailings and humic acid ratios of 100:0, 90:10, and 80:20 by weight) or by varying pore fluid chemistry (i.e., water and salt solutions of 1M NaCl and CaCl2). The results show that the initial thermal conductivity of the samples is sensitive to the mixture proportion and a declination in the thermal conductivity is observed due to hydration of fly ash and evaporation. Inclusion of fly ash and salts into gold tailings improves the unconfined compressive strength but the presence of humic acid in samples leads to the decrease of the strength. MIP results reveal the pore structure changes associated with the packing states of the samples that reflect the influential factors considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An Experimental Study of High Strength-High Volume Fly Ash Concrete for Sustainable Construction Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kate, Gunavant K.; Thakare, Sunil B., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Concrete is the most widely used building material in the construction of infrastructures such as buildings, bridges, highways, dams, and many other facilities. This paper reports the development, the basic idea, the main properties of high strength-high volume fly ash with application in concrete associated with the development and implementation of Sustainable Properties of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete (HVFAC) Mixtures and Early Age Shrinkage and mechanical properties of concrete for 7,28,56 and 90days. Another alternative to make environment-friendly concrete is the development of high strength-high-volume fly ash concrete which is an synthesized from materials of geological origin or by-product materials such as fly ash which is rich in silicon and aluminum. In this paper 6 concrete mixtures were produced to evaluate the effect of key parameters on the mechanical properties of concrete and its behavior. The study key parameters are; binder material content, cement replacement ratios, and the steel fibers used to High Volume Fly Ash mixtures for increasing performance of concrete.

  16. Characterization and modes of occurrence of elements in feed coal and fly ash; an integrated approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownfield, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Despite certain environmental concerns, coal is likely to remain an important component of the United States energy supply, partly because it is the most abundant domestically available fossil fuel. One of the concerns about coal combustion for electricity production is the potential release of elements from coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) - fly ash - to the environment. This concern prompted the need for accurate, reliable, and comprehensive information on the contents and modes of occurrence of selected elements in power-plant feed coal and fly ash. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is collaborating with several electric utilities to determine the chemical and mineralogical properties of feed coal and fly ash. Our first study analyzed coal and fly ash from a Kentucky power plant, which uses many different bituminous coals from the Appalachian and Illinois Basins. Sulfur content of these feed coals rangedfrom 2.5 to 3.5 percent. The second study analyzed coal and fly ash from an Indiana power plant, which uses subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin (fig. 1). Sulfur content of this feed coal ranged from 0.23 to 0.47 percent. A summary of important aspects of our approach and results are presented in this report. 

  17. Effect of chemical admixtures on properties of high-calcium fly ash geopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattanasak, Ubolluk; Pankhet, Kanokwan; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    2011-06-01

    Owing to the high viscosity of sodium silicate solution, fly ash geopolymer has the problems of low workability and rapid setting time. Therefore, the effect of chemical admixtures on the properties of fly ash geopolymer was studied to overcome the rapid set of the geopolymer in this paper. High-calcium fly ash and alkaline solution were used as starting materials to synthesize the geopolymer. Calcium chloride, calcium sulfate, sodium sulfate, and sucrose at dosages of 1wt% and 2wt% of fly ash were selected as admixtures based on concrete knowledge to improve the properties of the geopolymer. The setting time, compressive strength, and degree of reaction were recorded, and the microstructure was examined. The results show that calcium chloride significantly shortens both the initial and final setting times of the geopolymer paste. In addition, sucrose also delays the final setting time significantly. The degrees of reaction of fly ash in the geopolymer paste with the admixtures are all higher than those of the control paste. This contributes to the obvious increases in compressive strength.

  18. Combining sieving and washing, a way to treat MSWI boiler fly ash.

    PubMed

    De Boom, Aurore; Degrez, Marc

    2015-05-01

    Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) fly ashes contain some compounds that could be extracted and valorised. A process based on wet sieving and washing steps has been developed aiming to reach this objective. Such unique combination in MSWI fly ash treatment led to a non-hazardous fraction from incineration fly ashes. More specifically, MSWI Boiler Fly Ash (BFA) was separately sampled and treated. The BFA finer particles (13wt%) were found to be more contaminated in Pb and Zn than the coarser fractions. After three washing steps, the coarser fractions presented leaching concentrations acceptable to landfill for non-hazardous materials so that an eventual subsequent valorisation may be foreseen. At the contrary, too much Pb leached from the finest particles and this fraction should be further treated. Wet sieving and washing permit thus to reduce the leachability of MSWI BFA and to concentrate the Pb and Zn contamination in a small (in particle size and volume) fraction. Such combination would therefore constitute a straightforward and efficient basis to valorise coarse particles from MSWI fly ashes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mercury removal from coal combustion flue gas by modified fly ash.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqing; Wang, Hairui; Zhu, Tingyu; Kuang, Junyan; Jing, Pengfei

    2013-02-01

    Fly ash is a potential alternative to activated carbon for mercury adsorption. The effects of physicochemical properties on the mercury adsorption performance of three fly ash samples were investigated. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and other methods were used to characterize the samples. Results indicate that mercury adsorption on fly ash is primarily physisorption and chemisorption. High specific surface areas and small pore diameters are beneficial to efficient mercury removal. Incompletely burned carbon is also an important factor for the improvement of mercury removal efficiency, in particular. The C-M bond, which is formed by the reaction of C and Ti, Si and other elements, may improve mercury oxidation. The samples modified with CuBr2, CuCl2 and FeCl3 showed excellent performance for Hg removal, because the chlorine in metal chlorides acts as an oxidant that promotes the conversion of elemental mercury (Hg0) into its oxidized form (Hg2+). Cu2+ and Fe3+ can also promote Hg0 oxidation as catalysts. HCl and O2 promote the adsorption of Hg by modified fly ash, whereas SO2 inhibits the Hg adsorption because of competitive adsorption for active sites. Fly ash samples modified with CuBr2, CuCl2 and FeCl3 are therefore promising materials for controlling mercury emissions.

  20. The role of fly-ash particulate material and oxide catalysts in stone degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, A. J.; Johnson, J. B.; Thompson, G. E.; Wood, G. C.; Sage, P. W.; Cooke, M. J.

    Studies of fly-ash composition identified the presence of calcium and sulphur, indicating their potential role as sources of calcium sulphate. Residual acidity (particularly for oil fly ash) suggested the possibility of enhanced chemical reaction, and the presence of transition metals, probably as oxides, might accelerate the oxidation of SO 2 to SO 42-. Exposure tests in a laboratory-based rig simulating dry deposition on Portland and Monks Park limestone, either seeded or unseeded with fly-ash particulate material or transition metal oxide catalysts, were carried out using an SO 2-containing environment at 95% r.h. Enhanced sulphation of these seeded limestones due to the above factors was minimal; at high loadings of fly ash, there was even evidence of masking the limestone surface, reducing sulphation. However, pure CaCO 3 powder in the exposure rig showed increases in sulphation when seeded with metal oxide catalysts. Thus the limestones examined contained sufficient inherent catalysts for the oxidation of SO 2 to SO 42- to proceed at such a rate that external catalysts were superfluous. This implies that dissolution rate of SO 2 in moisture films controls the availability of species for reaction with these carbonate-based stones and that fly ash deposited from the atmosphere does not enhance the reaction.

  1. Alkaline bioleaching of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by autochthonous extremophiles.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Thulasya; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2016-10-01

    The increasing demand for energy and the generation of solid waste have caused an alarming rise in fly ash production globally. Since heavy metals continue to be in demand for the production of materials, resource recovery from the recycling of these wastes has the potential to delay the depletion of natural ores. The use of microorganisms for the leaching of metals, in a process called bioleaching, is an eco-friendly and economical way to treat the metal-laden wastes. Bioleaching of fly ash is challenging due largely to the alkaline nature and toxic levels of heavy metals which are detrimental to microbial growth and bioleaching activity. The present work reports the isolation of indigenous bacteria from a local landfill site and their bioleaching performance [corrected]. 38 autochthonous strains of bacteria were isolated from eight samples collected and plated on five different media. 18 of the isolates showed bioleaching potential, with significant alkaline pH or fly ash tolerance. Genetic characterization of the strains revealed a dominance of Firmicutes, with Alkalibacterium sp. TRTYP6 showing highest fly ash tolerance of up to 20% w/v fly ash, and growth over a pH range 8-12.5. The organism selectively recovered about 52% Cu from the waste. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a study on bioleaching with extreme alkaliphiles is reported. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of the elastic modulus of fly ash-based stabilizer applied in the trackbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lojda, Vít; Lidmila, Martin; Pýcha, Marek

    2017-09-01

    This paper describes a unique application of a fly ash-based stabilizer in the trackbed of a railway main line. The key goals of the stabilizer application are to protect the subgrade against the ingress of rain water, to increase the frost resistance and to remediate the natural ground constituted of weathered rock. The stabilizer was designed as a mixture of fly ash, generated as a waste material from coal plants, gypsum, calcium oxide and water. The mixture recipe was developed in a laboratory over several years. In 2005, a trial section of a railway line with subgrade consisting of clay limestone (weathered marlite) was built in the municipality of Smiřice. Since then, periodical measurements including collection of samples for laboratory evaluation of the fly ash-based stabilizer have taken place. Over the time span of the measurements, changes in mineral composition and development of fly ash transforming structures leading to the formation of C-A-S-H gel were detected. This paper describes the experimental laboratory investigation of the influence of dynamic loading on the elastic modulus of fly ash stabilizer samples and the development of permanent deformation of the samples with increasing number of loading cycles.

  3. Utilization of fly ash as partial sand replacement in oil palm shell lightweight aggregate concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazrin Akmal, A. Z. Muhammad; Muthusamy, K.; Mat Yahaya, F.; Hanafi, H. Mohd; Nur Azzimah, Z.

    2017-11-01

    Realization on the increasing demand for river sand supply in construction sector has inspired the current research to find alternative material to reduce the use of natural sand in oil palm shell lightweight aggregate concrete (OPS LWAC) production. The existence of fly ash, a by-product generated from coal power plant, which pose negative impact to the environment when it is disposed as waste, were used in this research. The effect of fly ash content as partial sand replacement towards workability and compressive strength of OPS lightweight aggregate concrete were investigated. Four concrete mixes containing various percentage of fly ash that are 0%, 10%, 20% and 30% by weight of sand were used in the experimental work. All mixes were cast in form of cubes before subjected to water curing until the testing age. Compressive strength test were conducted at 1, 3, 7 and 28 days. The finding shows that the workability of the OPS LWAC decreases when more fly ash are used as sand replacement. It was found that adding of 10% fly ash as sand replacement content resulted in better compressive strength of OPS LWAC, which is higher than the control mix.

  4. Reburning Characteristics of Residual Carbon in Fly Ash from CFB Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. H.; Luo, H. H.; Chen, H. P.; Yang, H. P.; Wang, X. H.

    The content of residual carbon in fly ash of CFB boilers is a litter high especially when low-grade coal, such as lean coal, anthracite coal, gangue, etc. is in service, which greatly influences the efficiency of boilers and fly ash further disposal. Reburn of fly ash through collection, recirculation in CFB furnace or external combustor is a possibly effective strategy to decrease the carbon content, mainly depending on the residual carbon reactivity. In this work, the combustion properties of residual carbon in fly ash and corresponding original coal from large commercial CFB boilers (Kaifeng (440t/h), and Fenyi (410t/h), all in china) are comparably investigated through experiments. The residual carbon involved was firstly extracted and enriched from fly ash by means of floating elutriation to mitigate the influence of ash and minerals on the combustion behavior of residual carbon. Then, the combustion characteristic of two residual carbons and the original coal particles was analyzed with thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA, STA409C from Nestch, Germany). It was observed that the ignition temperature of the residual carbon is much higher than that of original coal sample, and the combustion reactivity of residual carbon is not only dependent on the original coal property, but also the operating conditions. The influence of oxygen content and heating rate was also studied in TGA. The O2 concentration is set as 20%, 30%, 40% and 70% respectively in O2/N2 gas mixture with the flow rate of 100ml/min. It was found that higher oxygen content is favor for decreasing ignition temperature, accelerating the combustion rate of residual carbon. And about 40% of oxygen concentration is experimentally suggested as an optimal value when oxygen-enriched combustion is put into practice for decreasing residual carbon content of fly ash in CFB boilers.

  5. Characterization of Fly and Bottom Ashes Mixtures Treated using Sodium Lauryl Sulphate and Polyvinyl Alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, C. G.; Ayob, A.; Zaki, M. F. Muhammad; Razali, M. E.; Lew, E. V.; Hong, P. Y.

    2018-03-01

    Malaysia promotes coal as an option for solid fuel in electric power generation. Demanding of electricity needs, therefore, has led to increase the coal consumption and thus producing more coal waste products. The disposal of coal waste ashes has been a main concern to power generation station due to the need of disposal sites and operational costs. This study investigates the composition of fly ash (FA) and bottom ash (BA) mixtures with difference component percentage treated with sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at 1.5 and 2.5 wt% solutions and examined in terms of specific gravity, pH, maximum dry density properties, and its surface morphology. Although the chemical composition of the SLS and PVA treated fly and bottom ashes studied in this current work is not altered extensively, significant changes could be observed in its physicochemical properties. Chemically treated fly and bottom ashes mixtures with SLS and PVA at 1.5 wt% solution exhibited specific gravity of 1.97 to 2.92 and high pH values within range of 9.28 to 10.52. The mixture of BA:FA=0:1 ratio depicting high maximum dry density of 1.35 to 1.56 g/cm3 in both SLS and PVA solutions at 1.5 and 2.5 wt%. Scanning electron microscopy image shows distinct surface morphologies of SLS-treated fly and bottom ashes mixture that the particles are packed closely, strongly bonded similar to popcorn shape due to the effect of active silanol groups acted on coal ashes surface with the presence of Al-O/Si-O/other oxides. These findings suggest that higher level of chemical interaction between the fly and bottom ashes particles, significantly enhances pozzolanic reactions such as shear strength, plasticity, cementing properties, and thus other engineering properties.

  6. Aggregate material formulated with MSWI bottom ash and APC fly ash for use as secondary building material.

    PubMed

    del Valle-Zermeño, R; Formosa, J; Chimenos, J M; Martínez, M; Fernández, A I

    2013-03-01

    The main goal of this paper is to obtain a granular material formulated with Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) bottom ash (BA) and air pollution control (APC) fly ash to be used as secondary building material. Previously, an optimum concrete mixture using both MSWI residues as aggregates was formulated. A compromise between the environmental behavior whilst maximizing the reuse of APC fly ash was considered and assessed. Unconfined compressive strength and abrasion resistance values were measured in order to evaluate the mechanical properties. From these results, the granular mixture was not suited for certain applications owing to the high BA/APC fly ash content and low cement percentages used to reduce the costs of the final product. Nevertheless, the leaching test performed showed that the concentrations of all heavy metals were below the limits established by the current Catalan legislation for their reutilization. Therefore, the material studied might be mainly used in embankments, where high mechanical properties are not needed and environmental safety is assured. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effect of Alkaline Activator Ratio on the Compressive Strength of Fly Ash-Based Geopolymer Paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lăzărescu, A. V.; Szilagyi, H.; Baeră, C.; Ioani, A.

    2017-06-01

    Alkaline activation of fly ash is a particular procedure in which ash resulting from a power plant combined with a specific alkaline activator creates a solid material when dried at a certain temperature. In order to obtain desirable compressive strengths, the mix design of fly ash based geopolymer pastes should be explored comprehensively. To determine the preliminary compressive strength for fly ash based geopolymer paste using Romanian material source, various ratios of Na2SiO3 solution/ NaOH solution were produced, keeping the fly ash/alkaline activator ratio constant. All the mixes were then cured at 70 °C for 24 hours and tested at 2 and 7 days, respectively. The aim of this paper is to present the preliminary compressive strength results for producing fly ash based geopolymer paste using Romanian material sources, the effect of alkaline activators ratio on the compressive strength and studying the directions for future research.

  8. Environmentally-Friendly Dense and Porous Geopolymers Using Fly Ash and Rice Husk Ash as Raw Materials

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Daniele; Formia, Alessandra; Tulliani, Jean-Marc; Palmero, Paola

    2016-01-01

    This paper assesses the feasibility of two industrial wastes, fly ash (FA) and rice husk ash (RHA), as raw materials for the production of geopolymeric pastes. Three typologies of samples were thus produced: (i) halloysite activated with potassium hydroxide and nanosilica, used as the reference sample (HL-S); (ii) halloysite activated with rice husk ash dissolved into KOH solution (HL-R); (iii) FA activated with the alkaline solution realized with the rice husk ash (FA-R). Dense and porous samples were produced and characterized in terms of mechanical properties and environmental impact. The flexural and compressive strength of HL-R reached about 9 and 43 MPa, respectively. On the contrary, the compressive strength of FA-R is significantly lower than the HL-R one, in spite of a comparable flexural strength being reached. However, when porous samples are concerned, FA-R shows comparable or even higher strength than HL-R. Thus, the current results show that RHA is a valuable alternative to silica nanopowder to prepare the activator solution, to be used either with calcined clay and fly ash feedstock materials. Finally, a preliminary evaluation of the global warming potential (GWP) was performed for the three investigated formulations. With the mix containing FA and RHA-based silica solution, a reduction of about 90% of GWP was achieved with respect to the values obtained for the reference formulation. PMID:28773587

  9. The analysis of mechanical properties of non autoclaved aerated concrete with the substitution of fly ash and bottom ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolina, R.; Muhammad, F.

    2018-02-01

    Based on PP. No.85 of 1999 on the management of hazardous and toxic (B3), fly ash and bottom ash wastes are categorized into B3 waste because there are heavy metal oxide contents that can pollute the environment. One form of environmental rescue that can be applied is to utilize waste fly ash and bottom ash in the manufacture of concrete. In this research, fly ash and bottom ash waste are used as substitution of cement and fine aggregate to make lightweight concrete. The purpose of this research is to know the mechanical properties of non-autoclaved aerated lightweight concrete (NAAC) with FA and BA substitution to cement and fine aggregate which is expected to improve the quality of concrete. The NAAC lightweight concrete in this study is divided into 4 categories: normal NAAC lightweight concrete, NAAC lightweight NAAC substituted concrete with FA, NAAC lightweight concrete substituted with BA, and NAAC combined light weight from FA and BA with variations of 10%, 20% And 30%. The test specimen used in cylindrical shape, which was tested at the age of 28 days, amounted to 90 pieces and consisted of 10 variations. Each variation amounted to 9 samples. Based on the test results with FA and BA substitutions of 10%, 20%, and 30%, the highest compressive strength was achieved in samples with FA 30% of 12.687 MPa, maximum tensile strength achieved in samples with FA 30% of 1,540 MPa, The highest absorption was achieved in normal NAAC of 5.66%. Based on the weight of the contents of all samples, samples can be categorized in lightweight concrete, since the weight of the contents is less than 1900 kg / m3.

  10. Leaching characteristics of toxic constituents from coal fly ash mixed soils under the influence of pH.

    PubMed

    Komonweeraket, Kanokwan; Cetin, Bora; Benson, Craig H; Aydilek, Ahmet H; Edil, Tuncer B

    2015-04-01

    Leaching behaviors of Arsenic (As), Barium (Ba), Calcium (Ca), Cadmium (Cd), Magnesium (Mg), Selenium (Se), and Strontium (Sr) from soil alone, coal fly ash alone, and soil-coal fly ash mixtures, were studied at a pH range of 2-14 via pH-dependent leaching tests. Seven different types of soils and coal fly ashes were tested. Results of this study indicated that Ca, Cd, Mg, and Sr showed cationic leaching pattern while As and Se generally follows an oxyanionic leaching pattern. On the other hand, leaching of Ba presented amphoteric-like leaching pattern but less pH-dependent. In spite of different types and composition of soil and coal fly ash investigated, the study reveals the similarity in leaching behavior as a function of pH for a given element from soil, coal fly ash, and soil-coal fly ash mixtures. The similarity is most likely due to similar controlling mechanisms (e.g., solubility, sorption, and solid-solution formation) and similar controlling factors (e.g., leachate pH and redox conditions). This offers the opportunity to transfer knowledge of coal fly ash that has been extensively characterized and studied to soil stabilized with coal fly ash. It is speculated that unburned carbon in off-specification coal fly ashes may provide sorption sites for Cd resulting in a reduction in concentration of these elements in leachate from soil-coal fly ash mixture. Class C fly ash provides sufficient CaO to initiate the pozzolanic reaction yielding hydrated cement products that oxyanions, including As and Se, can be incorporated into. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Recycling of Sustainable Co-Firing Fly Ashes as an Alkali Activator for GGBS in Blended Cements

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yann-Hwang; Huang, Ran; Tsai, Chia-Jung; Lin, Wei-Ting

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of co-firing fly ashes from different boilers, circulating fluidized beds (CFB) or stokers as a sustainable material in alkali activators for ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS). The mixture ratio of GGBS and co-firing fly ashes is 1:1 by weight. The results indicate that only CF fly ash of CFB boilers can effectively stimulate the potential characteristics of GGBS and provide strength as an alkali activator. CF fly ash consists of CaO3 (48.5%), SiO2 (21.1%), Al2O3 (13.8%), SO3 (10.06%), Fe2O3 (2.25%) and others (4.29%). SA fly ash consists of Al2O3 (19.7%), SiO2 (36.3%), Fe2O3 (28.4%) and others (15.6%). SB fly ash consists of Al2O3 (15%), SiO2 (25.4%), Zn (20.6%), SO3 (10.9%), Fe2O3 (8.78%) and others (19.32%). The mixtures of SA fly ash and SB fly ash with GGBS, respectively, were damaged in the compressive strength test during seven days of curing. However, the built up strength of the CF fly ash and GGBS mixture can only be maintained for 7–14 days, and the compressive strength achieves 70% of that of a controlled group (cement in hardening cement paste). The strength of blended CF fly ash and GGBS started to decrease after 28 days, and the phenomenon of ettrigite was investigated due to the high levels of sulfur content. The CaO content in sustainable co-firing fly ashes must be higher than a certain percentage in reacting GGBS to ensure the strength of blended cements. PMID:28787970

  12. Production of lightweight aggregates from washing aggregate sludge and fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Corrochano, Beatriz; Alonso-Azcárate, Jacinto; Rodas, Magdalena

    2010-05-01

    manufactured with 75%:25% and 50%:50% proportions of washing aggregate sludge:fly ash, heated at different temperatures and dwell times, were expanded LWAs (BI > 0). They showed the lowest loose bulk density, the lowest dry and apparent particle density, the lowest water absorption and the highest compressive strength. The possible applications of sintered pellets, taking into consideration compressive strength and water absorption values, could be similar to those of Arlita G3 (insulation, geotechnical applications, gardening and/or horticulture) and/or Arlita F3 (prefabricated lightweight structures and insulation lightweight concretes), two varieties of the most widely marketed LWAs in Spain. References - Benbow, J., September 1987. Mineral in fire protection construction support market. Industrial Minerals, 61-73. - Bethanis, S., Cheeseman, C.R., Sollars, C.J., 2004. Effect of sintering temperature on the properties and leaching of incinerator bottom ash. Waste Management and Research 22 (4), 255-264. - De' Gennaro, R., Cappelletti, P., Cerri, G., De' Gennaro, M., Dondi, M., Langella, A., 2004. Zeolitic tuffs as raw materials for lightweight aggregates. Applied Clay Science 25 (1-2), 71-81. - Fakhfakh, E., Hajjaji, W., Medhioub, M., Rocha, F., López-Galindo, A., Setti, M.,Kooli, F., Zargouni, F., Jamoussi, F., 2007. Effects of sand addition on production of lightweight aggregates from Tunisian smectite-rich clayey rocks. Applied Clay Science 35, 228-237. - UNE-EN-13055-1, 2003. Lightweight aggregates - lightweight aggregates for concrete, mortar and grout. - Yasuda, Y., 1991. Sewage-sludge utilization in Tokyo. Water Science and Technology 23 (10-12), 1743-1752.

  13. Coal fly ash-slag-based geopolymers: microstructure and metal leaching.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Maria; Querol, Xavier; Davidovits, Joseph; Antenucci, Diano; Nugteren, Henk; Fernández-Pereira, Constantino

    2009-07-15

    This study deals with the use of fly ash as a starting material for geopolymeric matrices. The leachable concentrations of geopolymers were compared with those of the starting fly ash to evaluate the retention of potentially harmful elements within the geopolymer matrix. Geopolymer matrices give rise to a leaching scenario characterised by a highly alkaline environment, which inhibits the leaching of heavy metals but may enhance the mobilization of certain oxyanionic species. Thus, fly ash-based geopolymers were found to immobilize a number of trace pollutants such as Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Nb, Ni, Pb, Sn, Th, U, Y, Zr and rare earth elements. However, the leachable levels of elements occurring in their oxyanionic form such as As, B, Mo, Se, V and W were increased after geopolymerization. This suggests that an optimal dosage, synthesis and curing conditions are essential in order to obtain a long-term stable final product that ensures an efficient physical encapsulation.

  14. Optimization of fly ash as sand replacement materials (SRM) in cement composites containing coconut fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadzri, N. I. M.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Mazlee, M. N.; Jamal, Z. A. Z.

    2016-07-01

    The need of utilizing industrial and agricultural wastes is very important to maintain sustainability. These wastes are often incorporated with cement composites to improve performances in term of physical and mechanical properties. This study presents the results of the investigation of the response of cement composites containing coconut fiber as reinforcement and fly ash use as substitution of sand at different hardening days. Hardening periods of time (7, 14 and 28 days) were selected to study the properties of cement composites. Optimization result showed that 20 wt. % of fly ash (FA) is a suitable material for sand replacement (SRM). Meanwhile 14 days of hardening period gave highest compressive strength (70.12 MPa) from the cement composite containing 9 wt. % of coconut fiber and fly ash. This strength was comparable with the cement without coconut fiber (74.19 MPa) after 28 days of curing.

  15. Belite cement clinker from coal fly ash of high Ca content. Optimization of synthesis parameters.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, A; Goñi, S; Campillo, I; Moragues, A

    2004-06-01

    The optimization of parameters of synthesis of belite cement clinker from coal fly ash of high Ca content is presented in this paper. The synthesis process is based on the hydrothermal-calcination-route of the fly ash without extra additions. The hydrothermal treatment was carried out in demineralized water and a 1 M NaOH solution for 4 h at the temperatures of 100 degrees C, 150 degrees C, and 200 degrees C. The precursors obtained during the hydrothermal treatmentwere heated at temperatures of 700 degrees C, 800 degrees C, 900 degrees C, and 1000 degrees C. The changes of fly ash composition after the different treatments were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, surface area (BET-N2), and thermal analyses. From the results obtained we concluded that the optimum temperature of the hydrothermal treatment was 200 degrees C, and the optimum temperature for obtaining the belite cement clinker was 800 degrees C.

  16. Biodegradability and methane production from secondary paper and pulp sludge: effect of fly ash and modeling.

    PubMed

    Huiliñir, César; Montalvo, Silvio; Guerrero, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    The effect of fly ash on biodegradability and methane production from secondary paper and pulp sludge, including its modeling, was evaluated. Three tests with fly ash concentrations of 0, 10 and 20 mg/L were evaluated at 32 °C. Methane production was modeled using the modified Gompertz equation. The results show that the doses used produce a statistically significant increase of accumulated methane, giving values greater than 225 mL of CH4 per gram of volatile solids (VS) added, and 135% greater than that obtained in the control assay. Biodegradability of VS increased 143% with respect to the control assays, giving values around 43%. The modified Gompertz model can describe well methane generation from residual sludge of the paper industry water treatment, with parameter values between those reported in the literature. Thus, the addition of fly ash to the process causes a significant increase of accumulated methane and VS removal, improving the biodegradability of paper and pulp sludge.

  17. Effect of Fly-Ash on Corrosion Resistance Characteristics of Rebar Embedded in Recycled Aggregate Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revathi, Purushothaman; Nikesh, P.

    2018-04-01

    In the frame of an extended research programme dealing with the utilization of recycled aggregate in concrete, the corrosion resistance characteristics of rebars embedded in recycled aggregate concrete is studied. Totally five series of concrete mixtures were prepared with fly-ash as replacement for cement in the levels of 10-30% by weight of cement. Corrosion studies by 90 days ponding test, linear polarization test and impressed voltage tests were carried out, in order to investigate whether corrosion behaviour of the rebars has improved due to the replacement of cement with fly-ash. Results showed that the replacement of cement with fly-ash in the range of 20-30% improves the corrosion resistance characteristics of recycled aggregate concrete.

  18. Fly ash leachate induces oxidative stress in freshwater fish Channa punctata (Bloch).

    PubMed

    Ali, M; Parvez, S; Pandey, S; Atif, F; Kaur, M; Rehman, H; Raisuddin, S

    2004-09-01

    Oxidative stress inducing potential of fly ash leachate (FAL) was studied in a freshwater fish, Channa punctata (Bloch). Fish were exposed to fly ash leachate for 24 h and lipid peroxidation (LPO) was studied as a marker of oxidative stress. Catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities and levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) were also estimated in the exposed fish. FAL (1 ml/l) induced LPO in all the organs and most prominent response was in the gill. It also caused induction of enzymes and glutathione. Liver showed highest level of induction of enzyme activities. The results of this study demonstrate that fly ash constituents have potential to induce oxidative stress in fish and gills are the most vulnerable organs. It is also suggested that in case of exposure to FAL, along with LPO antioxidant defense is also activated to counteract the reactive oxygen species (ROS) at least partly in the initial stages of exposure.

  19. Prediction of the Chloride Resistance of Concrete Modified with High Calcium Fly Ash Using Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michał; Glinicki, Michał A.; Gibas, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to generate rules for the prediction of the chloride resistance of concrete modified with high calcium fly ash using machine learning methods. The rapid chloride permeability test, according to the Nordtest Method Build 492, was used for determining the chloride ions’ penetration in concrete containing high calcium fly ash (HCFA) for partial replacement of Portland cement. The results of the performed tests were used as the training set to generate rules describing the relation between material composition and the chloride resistance. Multiple methods for rule generation were applied and compared. The rules generated by algorithm J48 from the Weka workbench provided the means for adequate classification of plain concretes and concretes modified with high calcium fly ash as materials of good, acceptable or unacceptable resistance to chloride penetration. PMID:28793740

  20. Microscopic observations of self-healing products in calcareous fly ash mortars.

    PubMed

    Jóźwiak-Niedźwiedzka, Daria

    2015-01-01

    The results of microstructural characterization of mortars containing fly ash class C (High Calcium Fly Ash) from combustion of lignite are presented. The evaluation of the microstructure was performed using scanning electron microscope, optical, and confocal microscope. The tested beams were bent till the crack and microcracks opening, which were healed during the different curing time. The results showed that the replacement of cement with fly ash class C influenced the process of crack healing. The addition of HCFA, at both 30% and 60%, speeds up the self-healing process in cracks and particularly in micro-cracks. In the research, the completely filling up of the cracks by new phases has not been observed, only the beginning of such process has been noticed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Fly Ash Porous Material using Geopolymerization Process for High Temperature Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Jamaludin, Liyana; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ghazali, Che Mohd Ruzaidi; Ahmad, Mohd Izzat

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effect of temperature on geopolymers manufactured using pozzolanic materials (fly ash). In this paper, we report on our investigation of the performance of porous geopolymers made with fly ash after exposure to temperatures from 600 °C up to 1000 °C. The research methodology consisted of pozzolanic materials (fly ash) synthesized with a mixture of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate solution as an alkaline activator. Foaming agent solution was added to geopolymer paste. The geopolymer paste samples were cured at 60 °C for one day and the geopolymers samples were sintered from 600 °C to 1000 °C to evaluate strength loss due to thermal damage. We also studied their phase formation and microstructure. The heated geopolymers samples were tested by compressive strength after three days. The results showed that the porous geopolymers exhibited strength increases after temperature exposure. PMID:22605984

  2. Investigation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content in fly ash and bottom ash of biomass incineration plants in relation to the operating temperature and unburned carbon content.

    PubMed

    Košnář, Zdeněk; Mercl, Filip; Perná, Ivana; Tlustoš, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    The use of biomass fuels in incineration power plants is increasing worldwide. The produced ashes may pose a serious threat to the environment due to the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), because some PAHs are potent carcinogens, mutagens and teratogens. The objective of this study was to investigate the content of total and individual PAHs in fly and bottom ash derived from incineration of phytomass and dendromass, because the data on PAH content in biomass ashes is limited. Various operating temperatures of incineration were examined and the relationship between total PAH content and unburned carbon in ashes was also considered. The analysis of PAHs was carried out in fly and bottom ash samples collected from various biomass incineration plants. PAH determination was performed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The correlations between the low, medium and high molecular weight PAHs and each other in ashes were conducted. The relationship between PAH content and unburned carbon, determined as a loss on ignition (L.O.I.) in biomass ashes, was performed using regression analysis. The PAH content in biomass ashes varied from 41.1±1.8 to 53,800.9±13,818.4ng/g dw. This variation may be explained by the differences in boiler operating conditions and biomass fuel composition. The correlation coefficients for PAHs in ash ranged from 0.8025 to 0.9790. The regression models were designed and the coefficients of determination varied from 0.908 to 0.980. The PAH content in ash varied widely with fuel type and the effect of operating temperature on PAH content in ash was evident. Fly ashes contained higher amounts of PAHs than bottom ashes. The low molecular weight PAHs prevailed in tested ashes. The exponential relationship between the PAH content and L.O.I. for fly ashes and the linear for bottom ashes was observed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Scheitlin, Frank M.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  4. Melting of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash by waste-derived thermite reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuen-Sheng; Lin, Kae-Long; Lee, Ching-Hwa

    2009-02-15

    This work describes a novel approach for melting municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash, based on self-propagating reactions, by using energy-efficient simulated waste-derived thermite. The self-propagating characteristics, the properties of the recycled alloy and slag and the partitioning of heavy metals during the process are also studied. Experimental results demonstrate that the mix ratio of fly ash to the starting mixture of less than 30% supports the development of the self-propagating reaction with a melting temperature of 1350-2200 degrees C. Furthermore, metallic iron (or alloy) and the slag were retrieved after activation of the thermite reactions among the starting mixtures. It was noted that more than 91wt.% of iron was retrieved as alloy and the rest of non-reductive oxides as slag. During the thermite reactions, the partition of heavy metals to the SFA and flue gas varied with the characteristics of the target metals: Cd was mainly partitioned to flue gas (75-82%), and partition slightly increased with the increasing fly ash ratio; Pb and Zn, were mainly partitioned to the SFA, and the partition increased with increasing fly ash ratio; Cu was partitioned to the SFA (18-31%) and was not found in the flue gas; and moreover stable Cr and Ni were not identified in both the SFA and flue gas. On the other hand, the determined TCLP leaching concentrations were all well within the current regulatory thresholds, despite the various FA ratios. This suggests that the vitrified fly ash samples were environmental safe in heavy metal leaching. The results of this study suggested that melting of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash by waste-derived thermite reactions was a feasible approach not only energy-beneficial but also environmental-safe.

  5. Utilization of Yatagan Power Plant Fly Ash in Production of Building Bricks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önel, Öznur; Tanriverdi, Mehmet; Cicek, Tayfun

    2017-12-01

    Fly ash is a by-product of coal combustion, which accumulates in large quantities near the coal-fired power plants as waste material. Fly ash causes serious operational and environmental problems. In this study, fly ash from Yatağgan thermal power plant was used to produce light-weight building bricks. The study aimed to reduce the problems related to fly ash by creating a new area for their use. The optimum process parameters were determined for the production of real size bricks to be used in construction industry. The commercial size bricks (200 × 200 × 90-110 mm) were manufactured using pilot size equipment. Mechanical properties, thermal conductivity coefficients, freezing and thawing strengths, water absorption rates, and unit volume weights of the bricks were determined. Etringite (Ca6Al2 (SO4)3 (OH)12 25(H2O)) and Calcium Silicate Hydrate (2CaO.SiO2.4H2O) were identified as the binding phases in the real size brick samples after 2 days of pre-curing and 28 days curing at 50° C and 95% relative moisture. The water absorption rate was found to be 27.7 % in terms of mass. The mechanical and bending strength of the brick samples with unit volume weight of 1.29 g.cm-3 were determined as 6.75 MPa and 1,56 MPa respectively. The thermal conductivity of the fly ash bricks was measured in average as 0,340 W m-1 K-1. The fly ash sample produced was subjected to toxic leaching tests (Toxic Property Leaching Procedure (EPA-TCLP 1311), Single-step BATCH Test and Method-A Disintegration Procedure (ASTM)). The results of these tests suggested that the materials could be classified as non-hazardous wastes / materials.

  6. Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Deschner, Florian, E-mail: florian.deschner@gmail.com; Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank

    2013-10-15

    The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 °C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the C–S–H and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 °C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 °C, ettringitemore » and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the C–S–H. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the C–S–H and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: •The reaction of quartz powder at 80 °C strongly enhances the compressive strength. •Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 °C was found after 2 days. •Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. •Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. •Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 °C correlates with sulphate content of C–S–H.« less

  7. Evaluation of fly ash pellets for phosphorus removal in a laboratory scale denitrifying bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiyang; Cooke, Richard A; Huang, Xiangfeng; Christianson, Laura; Bhattarai, Rabin

    2018-02-01

    Nitrate and orthophosphate from agricultural activities contribute significantly to nutrient loading in surface water bodies around the world. This study evaluated the efficacy of woodchips and fly ash pellets in tandem to remove nitrate and orthophosphate from simulated agricultural runoff in flow-through tests. The fly ash pellets had previously been developed specifically for orthophosphate removal for this type of application, and the sorption bench testing showed a good promise for flow-through testing. The lab-scale horizontal-flow bioreactor used in this study consisted of an upstream column filled with woodchips followed by a downstream column filled with fly ash pellets (3 and 1 m lengths, respectively; both 0.15 m diameter). Using influent concentrations of 12 mg/L nitrate and 5 mg/L orthophosphate, the woodchip bioreactor section was able to remove 49-85% of the nitrate concentration at three hydraulic retention times ranging from 0.67 to 4.0 h. The nitrate removal rate for woodchips ranged from 40 to 49 g N/m 3 /d. Higher hydraulic retention times (i.e., smaller flow rates) corresponded with greater nitrate load reduction. The fly ash pellets showed relatively stable removal efficiency of 68-75% across all retention times. Total orthophosphate adsorption by the pellets was 0.059-0.114 mg P/g which was far less than the saturated capacity (1.69 mg/g; based on previous work). The fly ash pellets also removed some nitrate and the woodchips also removed some orthophosphate, but these reductions were not significant. Overall, woodchip denitrification followed by fly ash pellet P-sorption can be an effective treatment technology for nitrate and phosphate removal in subsurface drainage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of water binder ratio and fly ash on the properties of foamed concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloma, Hanafiah, Urmila, Dea

    2017-11-01

    Foamed concrete is a lightweight concrete composed by cement, water, fine aggregate and evenly distributed foam. Foamed concrete is produced by adding foam to the mixture. The function of foam is to create air voids in the mixture, so the weight of the concrete becomes lighter. The foaming agent is diluted in water then given air pressure by foam generator to produce foam. This research utilizes coal combustion, which is fly ash as cementitious material with a percentage of 0%, 10%, 15%, and 20%. The purpose of the research is to examine the effect of water binder ratio 0.425, 0.450, 0.475, and 0.500 using fly ash on the properties of foamed concrete. Fresh concrete tests include slump flow and setting time test while hardened concrete tests include density and compressive strength. The maximum value of slump flow test result is 59.50 cm on FC-20-0.500 mixture with w/b = 0.500 and 20% of fly ash percentage. The results of the setting time tests indicate the fastest initial and final time are 335 and 720 minutes, respectively on FC-0-0.425 mixture with w/b = 0.425 without fly ash. The lowest density is 978.344 kg/m3 on FC-20-0.500 mixture with w/b = 0.500 and 20% of fly ash percentage. The maximum compressive strength value is 4.510 MPa at 28 days on FC-10-0.450 mixture with w/b = 0.450 and 10% of fly ash percentage.

  9. Heavy metal leaching from coal fly ash amended container substrates during Syngonium production

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.S.; Chen, J.J.; Li, Y.C.

    2008-02-15

    Coal fly ash has been proposed to be an alternative to lime amendment and a nutrient source of container substrates for ornamental plant production. A great concern over this proposed beneficial use, however, is the potential contamination of surface and ground water by heavy metals. In this study, three fly ashes collected from Florida, Michigan, and North Carolina and a commercial dolomite were amended in a basal substrate. The formulated substrates were used to produce Syngonium podophyllum Schott 'Berry Allusion' in 15-cm diameter containers in a shaded greenhouse. Leachates from the containers were collected during the entire six months ofmore » plant production and analyzed for heavy metal concentrations. There were no detectable As, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se in the leachates; Cd and Mo were only detected in few leachate samples. The metals constantly detected were Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn. The total amounts of Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn leached during the six-month production period were 95, 210, 44, and 337 {mu} g per container, indicating that such amounts in leachates may contribute little to contamination of surface and ground water. In addition, plant growth indices and fresh and dry weights of S. podophyllum 'Berry Allusion' produced from fly ash and dolomite-amended substrates were comparable except for the plants produced from the substrate amended with fly ash collected from Michigan which had reduced growth indices and fresh and dry weights. Thus, selected fly ashes can be alternatives to commercial dolomites as amendments to container substrates for ornamental plant production. The use of fly ashes as container substrate amendments should represent a new market for the beneficial use of this coal combustion byproduct.« less

  10. [Immobilization technology and mechanism of fly ash using H3PO4].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Jiang, Jian-Guo; Sui, Ji-Chao; Yang, Shi-Jian

    2006-08-01

    Chemical composition and toxicity leaching characteristics of fly ash was analyzed. The experiment results show that many heavy metals were contained; leaching concentration of Pb is 67.03 mg/L, which exceeds the limit of identification standard for hazardous wastes. Effect of input mass of H3PO4 on immobilization of heavy metals and its long-term environmental stability was studied. The results show that when input 8% - 14% (H3PO4 mass/ fly ash mass) of H3PO4 sound immobilization effect can be achieved; 8% and 12% of H3PO4 will bring a satisfactory environmental stability of heavy metals, while more H3PO4 led to less buffer capacity to acid conditions. In fly ash treated by 12% H3PO4, a small quantity of crystal Cr2P2O7, ZnP2, Pb3P4O13, Pb3P2O7, NaZnPO4, NaPbP3O9, Ca2ZnSi2O7 can be detected by XRD; many independent fly ash particles and bar-shaped Pb5 (PO4)3Cl with a diameter of 0.3 - 0.5 microm were observed by SEM; concentrated heavy metal materials were not obtained by CHBr3 floatation. Conclusions can be drawn that, through neutralization reaction of H3PO4 with strongly alkaline fly ash, stabilization reaction conditions were improved, entrapped heavy metals were chemically activated and PO4(3-) needed in stabilization was produced. Activated heavy metals combined with PO4(3-) on surface of fly ash,generated phosphates existing as forms of solid solution in SiO2, CaCO3, CaSO4, KCl, NaCl.

  11. Leaching kinetics of As, Mo, and Se from acidic coal fly ash samples

    SciTech Connect

    Neupane, Ghanashyam; Donahoe, Rona J.; Bhattacharyya, Siddhartha

    Annually, coal-fired electric power plants produce large volumes potentially hazardous coal combustion products (CCPs) including fly ash. Since majority of the coal fly ash and other CCPs deposited in dry land fills or wet lagoons, they pose risk of contamination to local environment and hydrogeology. In this study, we present results of leaching kinetics for As, Mo, and Se from three acidic fly ash samples. This study shows that the leachate concentrations of As, Mo, and Se increase over time. Three kinetics equations, pseudo-second order, Elovich, and power-function, are able to adequately describe the experimental leaching kinetics data. Experimental leachingmore » data and modeling results indicate that the rate limiting leaching of As, Mo, and Se is largely controlled by the dissolution of the fly ash particles. Furthermore, it is important to adopt effective containment/treatment schemes to avoid potential and persistent dispersion of trace elements from ash disposal facilities to surrounding environment for a long time.« less

  12. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by coal and coal fly ash particles samples in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    León-Mejía, Grethel; Silva, Luis F O; Civeira, Matheus S; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Machado, Miriana; Villela, Izabel Vianna; Hartmann, Andreas; Premoli, Suziane; Corrêa, Dione Silva; Da Silva, Juliana; Henriques, João Antônio Pêgas

    2016-12-01

    Exposure to coal and coal ashes can cause harmful effects in in vitro and in vivo systems, mainly by the induction of oxidative damage. The aim of this work was to assess cytotoxic and genotoxic effects using the V79 cell line treated with coal and coal fly ash particles derived from a coal power plant located in Santa Catarina, Brazil. Two coal samples (COAL11 and COAL16) and two coal fly ash samples (CFA11 and CFA16) were included in this study. COAL16 was co-firing with a mixture of fuel oil and diesel oil. The comet assay data showed that exposure of V79 cells to coal and coal fly ash particles induced primary DNA lesions. Application of lesion-specific endonucleases (FPG and ENDO III) demonstrated increased DNA effects indicating the presence of high amounts of oxidative DNA lesions. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay analysis showed that exposure of V79 cells to high concentrations of coal and coal fly ash particles induced cytotoxic effects (apoptosis and necrosis) and chromosomal instability (nucleoplasmic bridges, nuclear buds, and micronucleus (MN) formation). These results may be associated with compounds contained in the surface of the particles as hazardous elements, ultrafine/nanoparticles, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which were detected in the samples. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  13. Leaching kinetics of As, Mo, and Se from acidic coal fly ash samples

    DOE PAGES

    Neupane, Ghanashyam; Donahoe, Rona J.; Bhattacharyya, Siddhartha; ...

    2017-07-03

    Annually, coal-fired electric power plants produce large volumes potentially hazardous coal combustion products (CCPs) including fly ash. Since majority of the coal fly ash and other CCPs deposited in dry land fills or wet lagoons, they pose risk of contamination to local environment and hydrogeology. In this study, we present results of leaching kinetics for As, Mo, and Se from three acidic fly ash samples. This study shows that the leachate concentrations of As, Mo, and Se increase over time. Three kinetics equations, pseudo-second order, Elovich, and power-function, are able to adequately describe the experimental leaching kinetics data. Experimental leachingmore » data and modeling results indicate that the rate limiting leaching of As, Mo, and Se is largely controlled by the dissolution of the fly ash particles. Furthermore, it is important to adopt effective containment/treatment schemes to avoid potential and persistent dispersion of trace elements from ash disposal facilities to surrounding environment for a long time.« less

  14. Dehalogenation potential of municipal waste incineration fly ash. I. General principles.

    PubMed

    Pekárek, Vladimír; Karban, Jindrich; Fiserová, Eva; Bures, Michal; Pacáková, Vera; Vecerníková, Eva

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that the fly ash from filters of municipal waste incinerators (MWI-FA) shows dehalogenation properties after heating it to 240-450 degrees C. However, this property is not general, and fly ash samples do not possess dehalogenation ability at all in many cases. Fly ash has a very variable composition, and the state of the fly ash matter therefore plays the decisive role. In the present paper, the function of important components responsible for the dehalogenation activity of MWI-FA is analysed and compared with the model fly ash. With the aim of accounting for the dehalogenation activity of MWI-FA, the following studies of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) dechlorination were performed: The role of copper in dehalogenation experiments was evaluated for five types of metallic copper. The gasification of carbon in MWI-FA was studied in the 250-350 degrees C temperature range. Five different kinds of carbon were used, combined with conventional Cu(o) and activated nanosize copper powder. The dechlorination experiments were also carried out with Cu(II) compounds such as CuO, Cu(OH)2, CuCl2 and CuSO4. The results were discussed from the standpoint of thermodynamics of potential reactions. Based on these results, the model of fly ash was proposed, containing silica gel, metallic copper and carbon. The dechlorination ability of MWI-FA and the model fly ash are compared under oxygen-deficient atmosphere. The results show that, under given experimental conditions, copper acts in the dechlorination as a stoichiometric agent rather than as a catalyst. The increased surface activity of copper enhances its dechlorination activity. It was found further that the presence of copper leads to a decrease in the temperature of carbon gasification. The cyclic valence change from Cu(o) to Cu+ or Cu2+ is a prerequisite for the dehalogenation to take place. Thermodynamic analysis of the dechlorination effect, as well as the comparison of dechlorination pathways on MWI-FA and model

  15. High volumes fly ash engineered cementitious composites with cost-effective PVA fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dianyou; Xu, Zhichao; Liu, Yingchun

    2018-03-01

    A feasibility study of engineered cementitous composites (ECC) using the cost-effective PVA fiber (CEPVA-ECC) was developed based on the micromechanical design theory in order to reduce the cost of ECC. Different amounts of fly ash replacement (up to 83% replacement of cement) was utilized in CEPVA-ECC. The CEPVA-ECC using much cheaper Chinese domestic PVA fiber (1/4˜1/6 price of the imported fiber) maintained the tensile ductility characteristics (4%˜5%) with a moderate compressive strength (30˜40MPa). Moreover, the crack width was reduced with an increase of the fly ash amount.

  16. Detrimental effects of cement mortar and fly ash mortar on asthma progression.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ara; Jang, Hong-Seok; Roh, Yoon Seok; Park, Hee Jin; Talha, A F S M; So, Seung-Young; Lim, Chae Woong; Kim, Bumseok

    2013-11-01

    Currently, concrete additive materials are used worldwide to improve properties of concrete production and to reduce the total cost of the materials used in the concrete. However, the effects of exposure to various gases emitted from mortar mixed with additive materials are poorly understood. To evaluate the pattern of gas emission from cement mortar and additives, the emission levels of gas including ammonia (NH3) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured from two different mortar types, Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), and OPC with fly ash on various time points after manufacture. On days 1, 3, 10 and 30 after manufacture, moderate concentrations of NH3 (4, 9, 12 and 5 ppm) were measured in OPC mortar (24h, 150 mm × 150 mm × 50 mm), whereas higher concentrations of NH3 (73, 55, 20 and 5 ppm) were measured in OPC mortar with fly ash (24h, 150 mm × 150 mm × 50 mm). Furthermore, the concentration of VOCs was more than 10 ppm on 1, 3, and 10 days of age in OPC and OPC with fly ash mortars. To examine the mortars' allergic effects on the respiratory system, mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and divided into four groups: normal, asthma control, OPC mortar and OPC mortar with fly ash. The mice were housed in corresponding group cage for 10 days with OVA challenges to induce asthma. Histopathologically, increased infiltration of lymphocytes was observed in the lung perivascular area of mice housed in OPC mortar and OPC mortar with fly ash cages compared to lungs of asthma control mice. Moreover, severe bronchial lumen obstruction and increased hypertrophy of bronchial epithelial cells (p<0.05) were observed in the OPC mortar with fly ash group compared to OPC mortar or asthma control groups. Lungs of the two mortar groups generally expressed higher levels of genes related with asthma, including IL-4, eotaxin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) compared to lungs of asthma control mice. Additionally, the OPC mortar with fly ash group showed higher

  17. Thermal co-treatment of combustible hazardous waste and waste incineration fly ash in a rotary kiln.

    PubMed

    Huber, Florian; Blasenbauer, Dominik; Mallow, Ole; Lederer, Jakob; Winter, Franz; Fellner, Johann

    2016-12-01

    As current disposal practices for municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash are either associated with significant costs or negative environmental impacts, an alternative treatment was investigated in a field scale experiment. Thereto, two rotary kilns were fed with hazardous waste, and moistened MSWI fly ash (water content of 23%) was added to the fuel of one kiln with a ratio of 169kg/Mg hazardous waste for 54h and 300kg/Mg hazardous waste for 48h while the other kiln was used as a reference. It was shown that the vast majority (>90%) of the inserted MSWI fly ash was transferred to the bottom ash of the rotary kiln. This bottom ash complied with the legal limits for non-hazardous waste landfills, thereby demonstrating the potential of the investigated method to transfer hazardous waste (MSWI fly ash) into non-hazardous waste (bottom ash). The results of a simple mixing test (MSWI fly ash and rotary kiln bottom ash have been mixed accordingly without thermal treatment) revealed that the observed transformation of hazardous MSWI fly ash into non-hazardous bottom ash during thermal co-treatment cannot be referred to dilution, as the mixture did not comply with legal limits for non-hazardous waste landfills. For the newly generated fly ash of the kiln, an increase in the concentration of Cd, K and Pb by 54%, 57% and 22%, respectively, was observed. In general, the operation of the rotary kiln was not impaired by the MSWI fly ash addition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. About fly ash and other residues from burning coal.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1982-01-01

    This report has been prepared for the benefit of these persons involved in highway construction who are not familiar with coal ash terminology. The information presented will, it is hoped, assist them in avoiding confusion relating to the general cha...

  19. INTERACTION OF PLANAR AND NONPLANAR ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS WITH COAL FLY ASH: EFFECTS OF POLAR AND NONPOLAR SOLVENT SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coal fly ash has several uses but much of the material is treated as waste and disposed of in various ways including land filling. Coal fly ash also has a very high sorption capacity for a variety of anthropogenic contaminants and has been used to cleanse wastewater of such poll...

  20. Relation between leaching characteristics of heavy metals and physical properties of fly ashes from typical municipal solid waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Ni, Peng; Li, Hailong; Zhao, Yongchun; Zhang, Junying; Zheng, Chuguang

    2017-09-01

    Due to the alkalinity and high concentration of potentially hazardous heavy metals, fly ash from a municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator is classified as hazardous waste, which should be of particular concern. Physical and chemical characterizations of the contrasted fly ashes were investigated to explore the relation between leaching characteristics of heavy metals and physical properties of fly ashes. The results showed that CaClOH, NaCl, Ca(OH) 2 , KCl and SiO 2 were primary mineral compositions in the MSWI fly ashes, and the particle size distribution of fly ash ranged between 10 μm and 300 μm. The smaller the particle size distribution of fly ash, the larger the BET-specific surface area, which was beneficial to the leaching of heavy metals. As a result of various pores, it easily accumulated heavy metals as well. The leaching tests exhibited a high leachability of heavy metals and the leaching concentration of Pb in almost all of the fly ash samples went far beyond the Standard for Pollution Control on the Landfill Site of Municipal Solid Waste. Thereupon, it is necessary to establish proper disposal systems and management strategies for environmental protection based on the characteristics of MSW incineration (MSWI) fly ash in China.

  1. KINETIC STUDY OF ADSORPTION AND TRANSFORMATION OF MERCURY ON FLY ASH PARTICLES IN AN ENTRAINED FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experimental studies were performed to investigate the interactions of elemental mercury vapor with entrained fly ash particles from coal combustion in a flow reactor. The rate of transformation of elemental mercury on fly ash particles was evauated over the temperature range fro...

  2. Selenium content and oxidation states in fly ashes from western U.S. coals

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V; Quinn, Thomas R

    2003-08-01

    A selective extraction scheme was developed for the determination of the oxidation states of Se species in coal ashes. As compared to HF dissolution, extractions with 70% HC1O4 mobilized 90 to 100% of all compound and redox forms of Se from four of the five fly ashes. Extractions with 16M HNO3 did not mobilize all forms of Se as effectively as perchloric acid. Both oxidized forms of Se (IV and VI) were completely mobilized by 12M HCl extraction. Deionized-distilled water was not an effective extractant for mobilizing all compound forms of Se(IV) from fly ashes. Extraction data (70% HClO4, 16Mmore » HNO3, 12M HCl, DI water) indicated that the solid:solution ratio is a critical factor in Se extractability from fly ashes. Maximum extractions in all cases were obtained only with very high (1:500) solid:solution ratios. Extraction times from 1.5 to 25 hours did not significantly change Se extractability with any of the extractants except with 12M HCl, which required a minimum reaction time of 48 hours to attain maximum Se extractability. Reaction times shorter than the critical time and low solid:solution ratios significantly affected Se extractability from these fly ashes. Measurements of Se content and redox state in particle size and density fractions five western United States coal ashes indicated that typically, the Se content increased with decreasing particle size.. However, no consistent trend in Se concentration between the light and heavy density fractions of <2.7-m size fraction was observed. Selenium redox state data indicated that only Se(0) and Se(IV) forms were present in these five coal ashes. The presence of Se(IV) is significant since it is much more easily mobilized than the elemental form. Examination of fly ashes by the proposed scheme to determine Se redox species could permit better estimation of the Se content of plants grown on fly ash amended soils.« less

  3. Comparative Study on Synergetic Degradation of a Reactive Dye Using Different Types of Fly Ash in Combined Adsorption and Photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri Babu, P. V. S.; Swaminathan, G.

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive study was carried out on four different fly ashes used as a catalyst for the degradation of Acid Red 1 using ultraviolet rays. These fly ashes are collected from different thermal power stations located at various places in India and having different chemical compositions. Three fly ashes are from lignite-based thermal power plants, and one is from the coal-based power plant. One fly ash is classified as Class F, two fly ashes are classified as Class C and remaining one is not conforming to ASTM C618 classification. X-Ray Fluorescence analysis was used to identify the chemical composition of fly ashes and SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, Fe2O3 and TiO2 were found to be the major elements present in different proportions. Various analysis were carried out on all the fly ashes like Scanning Electron Microscopy to identify the microphysical properties, Energy Dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy to quantify the elements present in the catalyst and X-Ray Diffraction to identify the catalyst phase analysis. The radical generated during the reaction was identified by Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The parameters such as initial pH of the dye solution, catalyst dosage and initial dye concentration which influence the dye degradation efficiency were studied and optimised. In 60 min duration, the dye degradation efficiency at optimum parametric values of pH 2.5, initial dye concentration of 10 mg/L and catalyst dosage of 1.0 g/L using various fly ashes, i.e., Salam Power Plant, Barmer Lignite Power Plant, Kutch Lignite Power Plant and Neyveli Lignite Thermal Power plant (NLTP) were found to be 40, 60, 67 and 95 % respectively. The contribution of adsorption alone was 18 % at the above mentioned optimum parametric values. Among the above four fly ash NLTP fly ashes proved to be most efficient.

  4. Predicting Water Quality Problems Associated with Coal Fly Ash Disposal Facilities Using a Trace Element Partitioning Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Donahoe, R. J.; Graham, E. Y.

    2006-12-01

    For much of the U.S., coal-fired power plants are the most important source of electricity for domestic and industrial use. Large quantities of fly ash and other coal combustion by-products are produced every year, the majority of which is impounded in lagoons and landfills located throughout the country. Many older fly ash disposal facilities are unlined and have been closed for decades. Fly ash often contains high concentrations of toxic trace elements such as arsenic, boron, chromium, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, lead, strontium and vanadium. Trace elements present in coal fly ash are of potential concern due to their toxicity, high mobility in the environment and low drinking water MCL values. Concern about the potential release of these toxic elements into the environment due to leaching of fly ash by acid rain, groundwater or acid mine drainage has prompted the EPA to develop national standards under the subtitle D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) to regulate ash disposal in landfills and surface impoundments. An attempt is made to predict the leaching of toxic elements into the environment by studying trace element partitioning in coal fly ash. A seven step sequential chemical extraction procedure (SCEP) modified from Filgueiras et al. (2002) is used to determine the trace element partitioning in seven coal fly ash samples collected directly from electric power plants. Five fly ash samples were derived from Eastern Bituminous coal, one derived from Western Sub-bituminous coal and the other derived from Northern Lignite. The sequential chemical extraction procedure gives valuable information on the association of trace elements: 1) soluble fraction, 2) exchangeable fraction, 3) acid soluble fraction, 4) easily reducible fraction, 5) moderately reducible fraction, 6) poorly reducible fraction and 7) oxidizable organics/sulfide fraction. The trace element partitioning varies with the composition of coal fly ash which is influenced by the

  5. Fly ash carbon burn-out at TVA`s Colbert and Shawnee Stations: Site specific application study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, J.W.; Kirkconnell, S.F.

    1996-04-01

    Many power plants, particularly after conversion to low-NOx burners, produce fly ash that is too high in carbon content to be successfully marketed as a concrete admixture. Fly ash beneficiation using Carbon Burn-Out (CBO) technology offers the opportunity to market fly ash that was previously landfilled. This site application study of beneficiating pulverized coal boiler fly ash at Tennessee Valley Authority`s Colbert and Shawnee Stations indicates this process is a cost effective solution for decreasing solid waste disposal, increasing landfill life, improving boiler heat rate, and generating a positive revenue stream. Results indicate that the Colbert Station has the flymore » ash market, site integration potential, and positive economics to support construction and operation of a CBO plant with an annual production rate of approximately 150,000 tons. As the market for fly ash increases, this capacity may be expanded to handle the majority of fly ash generated at Colbert. Results of the Shawnee Station analysis indicate that site integration constraints combined with the lack of near term local area fly ash market growth do not support construction and operation of a CBO plant. CBO commercial process design work in developing a generic commercial design resulted in a major improvement to the heat recovery portion of the process. This development resulted in the elimination of five major equipment items, with a corresponding reduction in plant complexity and costs. The design change is now considered part of the commercial offering.« less

  6. Resistance to chloride ion penetration of concretes containing fly ash, silica fume, or slag.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1988-01-01

    The effects of two pozzolanic admixtures, fly ash and silica fume, and a ground-granulated blast furnace slag on the chloride ion intrusion of concretes prepared with low water-to-cementitious material ratios (w/c) (0.35 to 0.45) were investigated. E...

  7. Sustainable asphalt pavement: Application of slaughterhouse waste oil and fly ash in asphalt binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Ramos, Jorge Luis

    Increasing energy costs, lack of sufficient natural resources and the overwhelming demand for petroleum has stimulated the development of alternative binders to modify or replace petroleum-based asphalt binders. In the United States, the petroleum-based asphalt binder is mainly used to produce the Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA). There are approximately 4000 asphalt plants that make 500 million tons of asphalt binder valued at roughly 3 billion/year. The instability of the world's oil market has pushed oil prices to more than 80 per barrel in 2012, which increased the cost of asphalt binder up to $570 per ton. Therefore, there is a timely need to find alternative sustainable resources to the asphalt binder. This paper investigates the possibility of the partial replacement of the asphalt binder with slaughterhouse waste and/or fly ash. In order to achieve this objective, the asphalt binder is mixed with different percentages of waste oil and/or fly ash. In order to investigate the effect of these additives to the performance of the asphalt binder, a complete performance grade test performed on multiple samples. The results of the performance grade tests are compared with a control sample to observe how the addition of the waste oil and/or fly ash affects the sample. Considering the increasing cost and demand of asphalt, the use of slaughterhouse waste oil and/or fly ash as a partial replacement may result in environmental and monetary improvements in the transportation sector.

  8. Effects of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution concentration on fly ash-based lightweight geopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, W. M. W.; Hussin, K.; Abdullah, M. M. A.; Kadir, A. A.; Deraman, L. M.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the effects of NaOH concentration on properties of fly ash-based lightweight geopolymer were investigated. Lightweight geopolymer was produced using fly ash as source materials and synthetic foaming agents as air entraining agent. The alkaline solutions used in this study are combination of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) solution. Different molarities of NaOH solution (6M, 8M, 10M, 12M, and 14M) are taken for preparation of 50 x 50 x 50 mm cubes of lightweight geopolymer. The ratio of fly ash/alkaline solution, Na2SiO3/NaOH solution, foaming agent/water and foam/geopolymer paste were kept constant at 2.0, 2.5, 1:10 and 1:1 respectively. The samples were cured at 80°C for 24 hours and left at room temperature for tested at 7 days of ageing. Physical and mechanical properties such as density, water absorption, compressive strength and microstructure property were determined from the cube dried samples. The results show that the NaOH molarity had effects on the properties of lightweight geopolymer with the optimum NaOH molarity found is 12M due to the high strength of 15.6 MPa, lower water absorption (7.3%) and low density (1440 kg/m3). Microstructure analysis shows that the lightweight geopolymer contain some porous structure and unreacted fly ash particles remains.

  9. Cadmium Removal from Contaminated Water Using Polyelectrolyte-Coated Industrial Waste Fly Ash

    PubMed Central

    Olabemiwo, Fatai A.; Oyehan, Tajudeen A.; Khaled, Mazen

    2017-01-01

    Fly ash (FA) is a major industrial waste generated from power stations that add extra cost for proper disposal. Recent research efforts have consequently focused on developing ways to make use of FA in environmentally sound applications. This study, therefore, investigates the potential ability of raw fly ash (RFA) and polyelectrolyte-coated fly ash (PEFA) to remove cadmium (Cd) from polluted water. Using layer-by-layer approach, functionalized fly ash was coated with 20 layers from 0.03% (v/v) of cationic poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) and anionic polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) solutions. Both surface morphology and chemical composition of the adsorbent (PEFA) were characterized using Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR), and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) techniques. The effects of pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time, initial contaminant concentration, and mixing rate of the adsorption of Cd were also studied in batch mode experiments. Results of the study revealed that a 4.0 g/L dosage of PEFA removed around 99% of 2.0 mg/L of Cd in 15 min at 150 rpm compared to only 27% Cd removal achieved by RFA under the same conditions. Results also showed that adsorption by PEFA followed both Langmuir and Freundlich models with correlation coefficients of 98% and 99%, respectively. PMID:28680373

  10. Laboratory evaluation of fly ash treated embankment and base materials : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1988-04-01

    This study was undertaken to provide the Louisiana DOTD with a data base from which recommendations can be made concerning the modification or stabilization of soils using a Class C fly ash as a full or partial replacement for hydraulic cement or hyd...

  11. Cytotoxic effect of vanadium and oil-fired fly ash on hamster tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, L.J.; Graham, J.A.

    1984-08-01

    Hamster tracheal organ cultures were used to study the in vitro effects of vanadium and oil-fired fly ash on mucociliary respiratory epithelium. Two vanadium compounds, VOSO/sub 4/ and V/sub 2/O/sub 5/, and fly ash from an oil-fueled power plant were dissolved or suspended in culture medium over a range of concentrations and epithelia were exposed for 1 hr/day, for 9 consecutive days. At intervals during this period, alterations in cilia-beating frequency, cytology, and histology were documented by light microscopy. Explants treated with VOSO/sub 4/ either decreased ciliary activity or produced ciliostasis depending upon the concentration and length of exposure. Earlymore » morphological alterations consisted of vacuolization of both nuclei and cytoplasm. After multiple exposures, cytology of VOSO/sub 4/-treated respiratory mucosa was markedly affected. Similar changes were observed in cultures exposed to V/sub 2/O/sub 5/; however, the cytotoxicity appeared earlier and was more pronounced. Fly ash-treated explants produced similar biological effects when compared to both vanadium compounds. Thus, the data indicate that the extent of vanadium toxicity depends, at least in part, on the vanadium content of the compound tested, and that exposure to this metal and vanadium-rich fly ash can inhibit normal mucociliary function, a vital clearance mechanism in the respiratory tract.« less

  12. Optimum mix for fly ash geopolymer binder based on workability and compressive strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafa, S. A.; Ali, A. Z. M.; Awal, A. S. M. A.; Loon, L. Y.

    2018-04-01

    The request of concrete is increasing every day for sustaining the necessity of development of structure. The production of OPC not only consumes big amount of natural resources and energy, but also emit significant quantity of CO2 to the atmosphere. Therefore, it is necessary to find alternatives like Geopolymer to make the concrete environment friendly. Geopolymer is an inorganic alumino-silicate compound, produced from fly ash. This paper describes the experimental work conducted by casting 40 geopolymer paste mixes, and was cured at 80°C for 24 h to evaluate the effect of various parameters affecting the workability and compressive strength. Alkaline solution to fly ash ratio and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) concentration were chosen as the key parameters of strength and workability. Laboratory investigation with different percentage of sodium hydroxide concentration and different alkaline liquid to fly ash ratio reveals that the optimum ratios are 10 M, AL/FA=0.5. It has generally been found that the workability decreased and the compressive strength increased with an increase in the concentration of sodium hydroxide solution. However, workability was increased and the compressive strength was decreased with the increase in the ratio of fly ash to alkaline solution.

  13. Characterization of boron tolerant bacteria isolated from a fly ash dumping site for bacterial boron remediation.

    PubMed

    Edward Raja, Chellaiah; Omine, Kiyoshi

    2013-08-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, but can above certain concentrations be toxic to living organisms. A major environmental concern is the removal of boron from contaminated water and fly ash. For this purpose, the samples were collected from a fly ash dumping site, Nagasaki prefecture, Japan. The chemical characteristics and heavy metal concentration of the samples were performed by X-ray fluorescent analysis and leaching test. For bacterial analysis, samples were collected in sterile plastic sheets and isolation was carried out by serial dilution method. The boron tolerant isolates that showed values of maximum inhibitory concentration toward boron ranging from 100 to 260 mM level were screened. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, the isolates were most closely related to the genera Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Microbacterium and Ralstonia. The boron tolerance of these strains was also associated with resistant to several heavy metals, such as As (III), Cr (VI), Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Se (III) and Zn. Indeed, these strains were arsenic oxidizing bacteria confirmed by silver nitrate test. These strains exhibited their salt resistances ranging from 4 to 15 % were determined in Trypticase soy agar medium. The boron tolerant strains were capable of removing 0.1-2.0 and 2.7-3.7 mg l(-1) boron from the medium and fly ash at 168 h. Thus, we have successfully identified the boron tolerant and removal bacteria from a fly ash dumping site for boron remediation.

  14. EFFECTS OF IRON CONTENT IN COAL COMBUSTION FLY ASHES ON SPECIATION OF MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the effects of iron content in coal combustion fly ashes on speciation of mercury. (NOTE: The chemical form of mercury species in combustion flue gases is an important influence on the control of mercury emissions from coal combustion). The study focused on th...

  15. MERCURY SPECIATION IN COMBUSTION SYSTEMS: STUDIES WITH SIMULATED FLUE GASES AND MODEL FLY ASHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a bench-scale study of the effects of flue gas and fly ash parameters on the oxidation of elemental mercury in simulated flue gases containing hydrogen chloride (HCl), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and water vapor (H2O...

  16. Monitoring and evaluation of fly ash stabilization stabilized subgrade constructed by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-06-30

    This report describes the monitoring and evaluation of a field site where Class C fly ash was used to stabilize the : subgrade during construction of a rigid pavement in a portion of USH 12 near Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin. : Additionally, information f...

  17. Investigation on the Rheological Behavior of Fly Ash Cement Composites at Paste and Concrete Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, Hemalatha; Mapa, Maitri; Kushwaha, Rakhi

    2018-06-01

    Towards developing sustainable concrete, nowadays, high volume replacement of cement with fly ash (FA) is more common. Though the replacement of fly ash at 20-30% is widely accepted due to its advantages at both fresh and hardened states, applicability and acceptability of high volume fly ash (HVFA) is not so popular due to some adverse effects on concrete properties. Nowadays to suit various applications, flowing concretes such as self compacting concrete is often used. In such cases, implications of usage of HVFA on fresh properties are required to be investigated. Further, when FA replacement is beyond 40% in cement, it results in the reduction of strength and in order to overcome this drawback, additions such as nano calcium carbonate (CC), lime sludge (LS), carbon nano tubes (CNT) etc. are often incorporated to HVFA concrete. Hence, in this study, firstly, the influence of replacement level of 20-80% FA on rheological property is studied for both cement and concrete. Secondly, the influence of additions such as LS, CC and CNT on rheological parameters are discussed. It is found that the increased FA content improved the flowability in paste as well as in concrete. In paste, the physical properties such as size and shape of fly ash is the reason for increased flowability whereas in concrete, the paste volume contributes dominantly for the flowability rather than the effect due to individual FA particle. Reduced density of FA increases the paste volume in FA concrete thus reducing the interparticle friction by completely coating the coarse aggregate.

  18. Sorption of metolachlor and atrazine in fly ash amended soils: comparison of optimized isotherm models.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rakesh K; Singh, Neera

    2012-01-01

    Adsorption of metolachlor and atrazine was studied in the fly ash (Inderprastha and Badarpur)- amended Inceptisol and Alfisol soils using batch method. Results indicated that sorption of both the herbicides in soil+fly ash mixtures was highly nonlinear and sorption decreased with a higher herbicide concentration in the solution. Also, nonlinearity increased with an increase in the level of fly ash amendment from 0-5%. Three two-parameter monolayer isotherms viz. Langmuir, Temkin, Jovanovic and one imperical Freundlich models were used to fit the experimental data. Data analysis and comparison revealed that the Temkin and the Freundlich isotherms were best-suited to explain the sorption results and the observed and the calculated adsorption coefficient values showed less variability. The study suggested that sorption mechanism of metolachlor and atrazine involved the physical association at the sorbate surface and the nonlinearity in the sorption at higher pesticide or fly ash concentration was due to a decrease in the heat of adsorption and higher binding energy.

  19. Long-term effect of lime-fly ash treated soils.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-12-01

    In October of 2000 MDOT initiated State Study No. 147, entitled "Long-Term Effect of Lime-Fly Ash Treated Soils." The purpose of this study : was to evaluate the long-term performance of LFA stabilized soil as a base course material. Part of the impe...

  20. Investigation of air-entraining admixture dosage in fly ash concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Ley, M.T.; Harris, N.J.; Folliard, K.J.

    The amount of air-entraining admixture (AEA) needed to achieve a target air content in fresh concrete can vary significantly with differences in the fly ash used in the concrete. The work presented in this paper evaluates the ability to predict the AEA dosage on the basis of tests on the fly ash alone. All results were compared with the dosage of AEA required to produce an air content of 6% in fresh concrete. Fly ash was sampled from six separate sources. For four of these sources, samples were obtained both before and after the introduction of 'low-NOx burners'. Lack ofmore » definitive data about the coal itself or the specifics of the burning processes prevents the ability to draw specific conclusions about the impact of low-NOx burners on AEA demand. Nevertheless, the data suggest that modification of the burning process to meet environmental quality standards may affect the fly ash-AEA interaction.« less

  1. Optimization of activator solution and heat treatment of ground lignite type fly ash geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, Z.; Szabó, R.; Rácz, Á.; Lakatos, J.; Debreczeni, Á.; Mucsi, G.

    2017-02-01

    Geopolymers are inorganic polymers which can be produced by the reaction between silico aluminate oxides and alkali silicates in alkaline medium. Materialscontaining silica and alumina compounds are suitable for geopolymer production. These can beprimary materials or industrial wastes, i. e. fly ash, metallurgical slag and red mud. In this paper, the results of the systematic experimental series are presented which were carried out in order to optimize the geopolymer preparation process. Fly ash was ground for different residence time (0, 5, 10, 30, 60 min) in order to investigate the optimal specific surface area. NaOH activator solution concentration also varied (6, 8, 10, 12, 14 M). Furthermore, sodium silicate was added to NaOH as a network builder solution. In this last serie different heat curing temperatures (30, 60, 90°C) were also applied. After seven days of ageing the physical properties of the geopolymer(compressive strength and specimen density)were measured. Chemical leaching tests on the rawmaterial and the geopolymers were carried out to determine the elements which can be mobilized by different leaching solutions. It was found that the above mentioned parameters (fly ash fineness, molar concentration and composition of activator solution, heat curing) has great effect on the physical and chemical properties of geopolymer specimens. Optimal conditions were as follows: specific surface area of the fly ash above 2000 cm2/g, 10 M NaOH, 30°C heat curing temperature which resulted in 21 MPa compressive strength geopolymer.

  2. DIOXIN AND FURAN FORMATION ON FLY ASH FROM A MIXTURE OF CHLOROPHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To establish the relationship between specific chlorophenol (CP) congener distributions and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) products this work investigated the formation of PCDDs/Fs from different CP mixtures passed over fly ash under selected reaction ...

  3. CONTINUED ASSESSMENT OF A HIGH-VELOCITY FABRIC FILTRATION SYSTEM USED TO CONTROL FLY ASH EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a full-scale investigation of the performance of a variety of filter media, to provide technical and economic information under high-velocity conditions (high gas/cloth ratio). The fly ash emission studies demonstrated that woven fiberglass fabrics and...

  4. Synthesis of inorganic polymers using fly ash and primary lead slag.

    PubMed

    Onisei, S; Pontikes, Y; Van Gerven, T; Angelopoulos, G N; Velea, T; Predica, V; Moldovan, P

    2012-02-29

    The present work reports on the synthesis and properties of inorganic polymers ("geopolymers") made of 100% fly ash from lignite's combustion, 100% primary lead slag and mixtures of the two. In the inorganic polymers with both fly ash and lead slag the main crystalline phases detected are wüstite, magnetite, sodium zinc silicate, quartz, anorthite, and gehlenite; litharge partially dissolves. FTIR analysis in these samples revealed that the main peaks and bands of end members also exist, along with a new amorphous reaction product. In terms of microstructure, both fly ash and lead slag dissolve and contribute in the binding phase whereas the larger particles act as aggregates. For an increasing lead slag in the composition, the binding phase is changing in chemistry and reaches PbO values higher than 50 wt.% for the 100% lead slag inorganic polymer. Regarding the properties of fly ash and lead slag inorganic polymers, compressive strength is higher than 35 MPa in all cases and water absorption diminishes as the lead slag content increases. A comparison of leaching results before and after polymerisation reveals that pH is an important factor as Pb is immobilised in the binding phase, unlike Zn and As. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of lightweight aggregates prepared from fly ash on lightweight concrete performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punlert, S.; Laoratanakul, P.; Kongdee, R.; Suntako, R.

    2017-09-01

    Lightweight aggregates were prepared from fly ash of by-products from the paper industry. The influence of the ratio of clay to fly ash and processing conditions on lightweight aggregates properties were investigated. It was found that the amount of fly ash directly affected to porosity of lightweight aggregates. Lightweight aggregates with the ratio of clay to fly ash at 80:20 wt% using the sintering temperature at 1210°C exhibits bulk density of 1.66 g cm-3, compressive strength of 25 MPa and water absorption of 0.55%. The replacement of coarse aggregates with lightweight aggregates at 100 wt% for concrete production showed the ultimate properties of concrete with density of 1780 g cm-3, water absorption of 3.55%, compressive strength of 40.94 MPa and thermal conductivity of 0.77 W m-1K-1. The concrete had more than 25% weight reduction while keeping a similar compressive strength to an ordinary concrete. This is revealed that lightweight aggregates could be applied into structural concrete because it was able to reduce work load and increase safety factor of construction.

  6. Effect of Trona on the leaching of trace elements from coal fly ash.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-07-01

    Fly ashes were sampled from the ESPs by on-site contractors during air emission control tests. The injection tests were short-term, : lasting approximately three hours per test condition. EPRI received three batches of samples since November 2011, re...

  7. [Pretreatment technology for fly ash from MSWI and the corresponding study of chloride behavior].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fen-Fen; Takaoka, Masaki; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Jiang, Hui-Min; Kitajima, Yoshinori

    2013-06-01

    The introduced pretreatment technology, WCCB (Washing + Calcination), was effective to reduce chlorides in fly ash by consuming relatively low energy for recycling fly ash as the raw material for cement industry. The washing conditions are: twice-washing, liquid/solid = 3, mixing speed = 150 r x min(-1), 1st mixing time = 5 min, and 2nd mixing time = 10 min. The original incinerator was used for the calcination process, 1 000 degrees C, 10% O2 and dwelling time of 1 hour were adopted. By adopting X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray diffraction, the behavior of chlorides was explained and NaCl, KCl and CaCl2 are the main form of chlorides existing in fly ash. The reagent used in the air pollution control system to neutralize the acid component in the discharged gas surely acted a very important role in the formation of chlorides. The insoluble chlorides in fly ash had a very similar structure as that of Friedel's salt, which was related with CaCl2.

  8. Possibility of using waste tire rubber and fly ash with Portland cement as construction materials.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Arin; Degirmenci, Nurhayat

    2009-05-01

    The growing amount of waste rubber produced from used tires has resulted in an environmental problem. Recycling waste tires has been widely studied for the last 20 years in applications such as asphalt pavement, waterproofing systems and membrane liners. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing fly ash and rubber waste with Portland cement as a composite material for masonry applications. Class C fly ash and waste automobile tires in three different sizes were used with Portland cement. Compressive and flexural strength, dry unit weight and water absorption tests were performed on the composite specimens containing waste tire rubber. The compressive strength decreased by increasing the rubber content while increased by increasing the fly ash content for all curing periods. This trend is slightly influenced by particle size. For flexural strength, the specimens with waste tire rubber showed higher values than the control mix probably due to the effect of rubber fibers. The dry unit weight of all specimens decreased with increasing rubber content, which can be explained by the low specific gravity of rubber particles. Water absorption decreased slightly with the increase in rubber particles size. These composite materials containing 10% Portland cement, 70% and 60% fly ash and 20% and 30% tire rubber particles have sufficient strength for masonry applications.

  9. Mechanically activated fly ash as a high performance binder for civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, D.; Kullová, L.; Čekalová, M.; Novotný, P.; Pola, M.

    2017-01-01

    This study is aimed for investigation of fly ash binder with suitable properties for civil engineering needs. The fly ash from Czech brown coal power plant Prunerov II was used and mechanically activated to achieve suitable particle size for alkaline activation of hardening process. This process is driven by dissolution of aluminosilicate content of fly ash and by subsequent development of inorganic polymeric network called geopolymer. Hardening kinetics at 25 and 30 °C were measured by strain controlled small amplitude oscillatory rheometry with strain of 0.01 % and microstructure of hardened binder was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Strength development of hardened binder was investigated according to compressional and flexural strength for a period of 180 days. Our investigation finds out, that mechanically activated fly ash can be comparable to metakaolin geopolymers, according to setting time and mechanical parameters even at room temperature curing. Moreover, on the bases of long time strength development, achieved compressional strength of 134.5 after 180 days is comparable to performance of high grade Portland cement concretes.

  10. The Effect of Silane Addition on Chitosan-Fly Ash/CTAB as Electrolyte Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumastuti, E.; Isnaeni, D.; Sulistyaningsih, T.; Mahatmanti, F. W.; Jumaeri; Atmaja, L.; Widiastuti, N.

    2017-02-01

    Electrolyte membrane is an important component in fuel cell system, because it may influence fuel cell performance. Many efforts have been done to produce electrolyte membrane to replace comercial membrane. In this research, electrolyte membrane is composed of chitosan as an organic matrix and fly ash modified with CTAB and silane as inorganic filler. Fly ash is modified using silane as coupling agent to improve interfacial morphology between organic matrix and inorganic filler. This research aims to determine the best membrane performance based on its characteristics such as water uptake, mechanical properties, proton conductivity, and methanol permeability. The steps that have been done include silica preparation from fly ash, modification of silica surface with CTAB, silica coupling process with silane, synthesis of membranes with inversion phase method, and membrane characterization. The result shows that membrane C-FA/CTAB-Silane 10% (w/w) has the best performance with proton conductivity 8.00 x 10-4 S.cm-1, methanol permeability 3.37 x 10-7 cm.s-1, and selectivity 2.12 x 103 S.s.cm-3. The result of FTIR analysis on membrane C-FA/CTAB-Silane 10% shows that there is only physical interaction occured between chitosan, fly ash and silane, because there is no peak differences significantly at wave number 1000-1250 cm-1, while morphology analysis on membrane with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) shows good dispersion and there is no agglomeration on chitosan matrix.

  11. ELECTROSTATIC ENHANCEMENT OF FABRIC FILTRATION OF FLY ASH AND SPRAY DRYER BY-PRODUCT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes small pilot-scale experiments, showing that the pressure drop increase during the fabric filtration of redispersed spray dryer by-product (chiefly calcium salts and fly ash) is significantly reduced by electrostatic enhancement of the filtration. The pressure ...

  12. Use of fly ash in concrete by state transportation and highway departments.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1980-01-01

    This report provides a summary of replies to a questionnaire on the use of fly ash and blended cement (Type IP) in concrete. The questionnaire was directed to members of the Subcommittee on Materials of the American Association of State Highway Offic...

  13. ALTERATION OF CARDIAC ELECTRICAL ACTIVITY BY WATER-LEACHABLE COMPONENTS OF RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alteration of cardiac electrical activity by water-leachable components
    of residual oil fly ash (ROFA)

    Desuo Wang, Yuh-Chin T. Huang*, An Xie, Ting Wang

    *Human Studies Division, NHEERL, US EPA
    104 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
    Department of Basic ...

  14. Evaluation of experimental installation of fly ash concrete in Louisa : Concrete case study number 32.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1979-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the resistance of field concretes containing fly ash to damage from cycles of freezing and thawing as evidenced by scaling, based upon a reevaluation of a field project. In 1955 and 1956 an experimental ...

  15. Mercury capture by native fly ash carbons in coal-fired power plants

    PubMed Central

    Hower, James C.; Senior, Constance L.; Suuberg, Eric M.; Hurt, Robert H.; Wilcox, Jennifer L.; Olson, Edwin S.

    2013-01-01

    The control of mercury in the air emissions from coal-fired power plants is an on-going challenge. The native unburned carbons in fly ash can capture varying amounts of Hg depending upon the temperature and composition of the flue gas at the air pollution control device, with Hg capture increasing with a decrease in temperature; the amount of carbon in the fly ash, with Hg capture increasing with an increase in carbon; and the form of the carbon and the consequent surface area of the carbon, with Hg capture increasing with an increase in surface area. The latter is influenced by the rank of the feed coal, with carbons derived from the combustion of low-rank coals having a greater surface area than carbons from bituminous- and anthracite-rank coals. The chemistry of the feed coal and the resulting composition of the flue gas enhances Hg capture by fly ash carbons. This is particularly evident in the correlation of feed coal Cl content to Hg oxidation to HgCl2, enhancing Hg capture. Acid gases, including HCl and H2SO4 and the combination of HCl and NO2, in the flue gas can enhance the oxidation of Hg. In this presentation, we discuss the transport of Hg through the boiler and pollution control systems, the mechanisms of Hg oxidation, and the parameters controlling Hg capture by coal-derived fly ash carbons. PMID:24223466

  16. Evidence of Coal-Fly-Ash Toxic Chemical Geoengineering in the Troposphere: Consequences for Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, J. Marvin

    2015-01-01

    The widespread, intentional and increasingly frequent chemical emplacement in the troposphere has gone unidentified and unremarked in the scientific literature for years. The author presents evidence that toxic coal combustion fly ash is the most likely aerosolized particulate sprayed by tanker-jets for geoengineering, weather-modification and climate-modification purposes and describes some of the multifold consequences on public health. Two methods are employed: (1) Comparison of 8 elements analyzed in rainwater, leached from aerosolized particulates, with corresponding elements leached into water from coal fly ash in published laboratory experiments, and (2) Comparison of 14 elements analyzed in dust collected outdoors on a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter with corresponding elements analyzed in un-leached coal fly ash material. The results show: (1) the assemblage of elements in rainwater and in the corresponding experimental leachate are essentially identical. At a 99% confidence interval, they have identical means (T-test) and identical variances (F-test); and (2) the assemblage of elements in the HEPA dust and in the corresponding average un-leached coal fly ash are likewise essentially identical. The consequences on public health are profound, including exposure to a variety of toxic heavy metals, radioactive elements, and neurologically-implicated chemically mobile aluminum released by body moisture in situ after inhalation or through transdermal induction. PMID:26270671

  17. Evidence of Coal-Fly-Ash Toxic Chemical Geoengineering in the Troposphere: Consequences for Public Health.

    PubMed

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2015-08-11

    The widespread, intentional and increasingly frequent chemical emplacement in the troposphere has gone unidentified and unremarked in the scientific literature for years. The author presents evidence that toxic coal combustion fly ash is the most likely aerosolized particulate sprayed by tanker-jets for geoengineering, weather-modification and climate-modification purposes and describes some of the multifold consequences on public health. Two methods are employed: (1) Comparison of 8 elements analyzed in rainwater, leached from aerosolized particulates, with corresponding elements leached into water from coal fly ash in published laboratory experiments, and (2) Comparison of 14 elements analyzed in dust collected outdoors on a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter with corresponding elements analyzed in un-leached coal fly ash material. The results show: (1) the assemblage of elements in rainwater and in the corresponding experimental leachate are essentially identical. At a 99% confidence interval, they have identical means (T-test) and identical variances (F-test); and (2) the assemblage of elements in the HEPA dust and in the corresponding average un-leached coal fly ash are likewise essentially identical. The consequences on public health are profound, including exposure to a variety of toxic heavy metals, radioactive elements, and neurologically-implicated chemically mobile aluminum released by body moisture in situ after inhalation or through transdermal induction.

  18. Effect of fly ash content towards Sulphate resistance of oil palm shell lightweight aggregate concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthusamy, K.; Fadzil, M. Y.; Nazrin Akmal, A. Z. Muhammad; Ahmad, S. Wan; Nur Azzimah, Z.; Hanafi, H. Mohd; Mohamad Hafizuddin, R.

    2018-04-01

    Both oil palm shell (OPS) and fly ash are by-product generated from the industries. Disposal of these by-product as wastes cause negative impact to the environment. The use of both oil palm shell and fly ash in concrete is seen as an economical solution for making green and denser concrete. The primary aim of this research is to determine the effects of FA utilization as sand replacement in oil palm shell lightweight aggregate concrete (OPS LWAC) towards sulphate resistance. Five concrete mixes containing fly ash as sand replacement namely 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% were prepared in these experimental work. All mixes were cast in form of cubes before subjected to sulphate solution for the period of 5 months. It was found that addition of 10% fly ash as sand replacement content resulted in better sulphate resistance of OPS LWAC. The occurrence of pozzolanic reaction due to the presence of FA in concrete has consumed the vulnerable Calcium hydroxide to be secondary C-S-H gel making the concrete denser and more durable.

  19. Designing of Multiphase Fly Ash/MWCNT/PU Composite Sheet Against Electromagnetic Environmental Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gujral, Parth; Varshney, Swati; Dhawan, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    Fly ash and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) reinforced multiphase polyurethane (PU) composite sheets have been fabricated by using a solution casting technique. Utilization of fly ash was the prime objective in order to reduce environmental pollution and to enhance the shielding properties of PU polymer. Our study proves that fly ash particles with MWCNTs in a PU matrix leads to novel hybrid high performance electromagnetic shielding interference material. Scanning electron microscopy confirms the existence of fly ash particles along with MWCNTs in a PU matrix. This multiphase composite shows total shielding effectiveness of 35.8 dB (>99.99% attenuation) in the Ku-band (12.4-18 GHz) frequency range. This is attributed to high dielectric losses of reinforcement present in the polymers matrix. The Nicolson-Ross-Weir algorithm has been applied to calculate the electromagnetic attributes and dielectric parameters of the PU samples by using scattering parameters ( S 11, S 22, S 12, S 21). The synthesized multiphase composites were further characterized by using x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermo gravimetric analysis.

  20. Zeolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Zeolites are crystalline aluminosilicates that have complex framework structures. However, there are several features of zeolite crystals that make unequivocal structure determinations difficult. The acquisition of reliable structural information on zeolites is greatly facilitated by the availability of high-quality specimens. For structure determinations by conventional diffraction techniques, large single-crystal specimens are essential. Alternatively, structural determinations by powder profile refinement methods relax the constraints on crystal size, but still require materials with a high degree of crystalline perfection. Studies conducted at CAMMP (Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing) have demonstrated that microgravity processing can produce larger crystal sizes and fewer structural defects relative to terrestrial crystal growth. Principal Investigator: Dr. Albert Sacco

  1. Leaching characteristics of toxic constituents from coal fly ash mixed soils under the influence of pH

    SciTech Connect

    Komonweeraket, Kanokwan; Cetin, Bora, E-mail: bora.cetin@sdsmt.edu; Benson, Craig H., E-mail: chbenson@wisc.edu

    Highlights: • The impact of pH on the leaching of elements and metals from fly ash mixed soils. • Generally Ca, Cd, Mg, and Sr follows a cationic leaching pattern. • The leaching of As and Se shows an oxyanionic leaching pattern. • The leaching behavior of elements does not change based on material type. • Different fly ash types show different abilities in immobilizing trace elements. - Abstract: Leaching behaviors of Arsenic (As), Barium (Ba), Calcium (Ca), Cadmium (Cd), Magnesium (Mg), Selenium (Se), and Strontium (Sr) from soil alone, coal fly ash alone, and soil-coal fly ash mixtures, weremore » studied at a pH range of 2–14 via pH-dependent leaching tests. Seven different types of soils and coal fly ashes were tested. Results of this study indicated that Ca, Cd, Mg, and Sr showed cationic leaching pattern while As and Se generally follows an oxyanionic leaching pattern. On the other hand, leaching of Ba presented amphoteric-like leaching pattern but less pH-dependent. In spite of different types and composition of soil and coal fly ash investigated, the study reveals the similarity in leaching behavior as a function of pH for a given element from soil, coal fly ash, and soil-coal fly ash mixtures. The similarity is most likely due to similar controlling mechanisms (e.g., solubility, sorption, and solid-solution formation) and similar controlling factors (e.g., leachate pH and redox conditions). This offers the opportunity to transfer knowledge of coal fly ash that has been extensively characterized and studied to soil stabilized with coal fly ash. It is speculated that unburned carbon in off-specification coal fly ashes may provide sorption sites for Cd resulting in a reduction in concentration of these elements in leachate from soil-coal fly ash mixture. Class C fly ash provides sufficient CaO to initiate the pozzolanic reaction yielding hydrated cement products that oxyanions, including As and Se, can be incorporated into.« less

  2. Preparation of zeolite from incinerator ash and its application for the remediation of selected inorganic pollutants: A greener approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqra, J.; Faryal, M.; Uzaira, R.; Noshaba, T.

    2014-06-01

    Zeolites are potential materials and can conveniently be processed as adsorbents for the removal of environmental pollutants. A wide range of commercial zeolites have been marketed but due to high cost are of limited use. The present research offers a green approach for the synthesis of zeolite using Incinerator waste (ash) as precursor. The significance rests on the conversion of hazardous waste into a useful resource (adsorbent).Incinerator ash (IA) was converted hydrothermally under strongly alkaline conditions into zeolite (ZIA). The synthesized ZIA was applied as virgin adsorbent in batch mode for the removal of primary metal pollutants of Cadmium, Chromium and Lead. The residual concentration of each metal was analyzed on Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. Each series of batch was conducted at four varying induced concentration of metal salts as a function of time. The synthesized adsorbent was characterized on FTIR spectrophotometer to assess the involvement of functional group in metal binding to adsorbent surface. The results depicted the performance of ZIA (1mg/Kg) in removing 99.5 %, 84% and 78% of Cadmium, Chromium and Lead, respectively, upon adsorbate-adsorbent contact for 30 minutes, at lower dose of ZIA. It was also found that higher is the induced concentration, less is the removal efficiency. It may be due to limiting factor of adsorbent dose. Correlation matrix suggests positive relationship of Pb and Cr, Pb and Cd, Cr and Cd. No negative correlation was found. The study recommends the reutilization of Incinerator ash as a potential adsorbent, which can greatly enhance the sustainability of useful resources.

  3. Effect of additional materials on the properties of glass-ceramic produced from incinerator fly ashes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T W

    2004-07-01

    There are 21 Metro-waste incinerators in Taiwan under construction and are expected to be finished at year 2003. It is estimated that these incinerators will produce about two million tons of incinerator ash. In order to reduce the volume and eliminate contamination problems, high temperature molten technology studies have been conducted. The purpose of this research was that of trying to control the chemical composition of the glass-ceramic produced from incinerator fly ash, in order to improve the characteristics of the glass-ceramic. The experimental results showed that the additional materials, Mg(OH)2 and waste glass cullet, can change glass-ceramic phases from gehlenite to augite, pigeonite, and diopside. The physical, mechanical and chemical resistance properties of the glass-ceramic also showed much better characteristics than prepared glass-ceramic using incinerator fly ash alone.

  4. Mercury in coals and fly ashes from Republika and Bobov dol thermoelectric power plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kostova, I.; Vassileva, C.; Hower, J.; Mastalerz, Maria; Vassilev, S.; Nikolova, N.

    2011-01-01

    Feed coal and y ash samples were collected at Republika and Bobov Dol thermoelectric power plants (TPPs). The y ashes (FAs) were collected fromthree rows of the hot-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) array. Each sam- ple was wet-screened at 100, 200, 325 and 500 mesh. The coals and y ashes were characterized with regard to their petrological and chemical composition (including mercury content) and to their surface area properties. The calculated enrichment factor (EF) shows that the Hg concentrations in the bulk coal samples from Republika and Bobov Dol TPPs are 2.19 and 1.41, respectively. In some coal size fractions the EF can be up to 4 times higher than the Clarke value. The calculated EF for fly ashes shows that the Hg concentrations in the bulk samples studied are lower (between 0.03 and 0.32) than the Clarke value. The most enriched in Hg are the fly ashes from the 3rd ESP row of Republika TPP. The Hg distribution in bulk FAs taken from dierent rows of the electrostatic precipitators of both TPPs studied shows well established tendency of gradual increase in the Hg content from the 1st to the 2nd and 3rd ESP rows. The correlation between Hg content and surface area, mesopore and micropore volume of y ashes was also done in the present investigation.

  5. [Characterization of PAHs in fly ashes from coke production].

    PubMed

    Mu, Ling; Peng, Lin; Liu, Xiao-Feng; Bai, Hui-Ling; Zhang, Jian-Qiang

    2013-03-01

    In order to investigate the characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ashes from coking, PAHs in ashes from three coke production plants were analyzed with GC-MS, and the distribution characteristics of PAHs and potential toxicity risk were discussed. The sum of 16 EPA prior PAHs varied from 8.17 x 10(2) to 5.17 x 10(3) microg x g(-1). PAH contents from the coke oven (stamp charging) with the height of 3.2 m were two times higher than those from the one (top charging) with the height of 6.0 m, and PAHs in ashes from coal charging were significantly higher than those from coke pushing in the same plant. Four-ring and five-ring PAHs were the dominant species in ashes from coking and the sum of them accounted for more than 80.00% of total PAHs. Chrysene (Chr), benzo [a] anthracene (BaA) and benzo [b] fluoranthene (BbF) were abundant in all ash samples. The content of total BaP-based toxic equivalency (BaPeq) ranged from 1.64 x 10(2) to 9.57 x 10(2) microg x g(-1). From the carcinogenic point of view, besides benzo [a] pyrene (BaP), dibenz [a,h] anthracene (DbA) contributed most to the overall toxicity of PAHs, followed by BaA and BbF. BaPeq concentration from coal charging was 5.21-fold higher than that from coke pushing, indicating that different reuse ways should be considered based on their specific toxicity profiles of PAHs.

  6. Synthesis of adsorbent with zeolite structure from red mud and rice husk ash and its properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quyen, Dinh Thi Ngoc; Loc, Luu Cam; Ha, Huynh Ky Phuong; Nga, Dang Thi Hang; Tri, Nguyen; Van, Nguyen Thi Thuy

    2017-09-01

    There are many researches in the modification of red mud as adsorbent for treatment of wastewater or waste gases. Yet, most of them have to face up with a thorny problem caused by remaining alkali in red mud. In this study, the material with zeolite structure was synthesized by fusion method using red mud with the remaining alkali and rice husk ash as raw materials. It comprised alkaline fusion followed by hydrothermal treatment with step - change of synthesis temperature. The synthesized materials were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), BET and CO2 adsorption capacity. The influences on the quality of these materialswere investigated under various calcination temperatures, calcination times and the ratios of raw materials (based on SiO2/Al2O3 ratio). The optimum reaction parameters were determined. The results depicted that the sample treated at 600 °C for 2 hours with the ratio of SiO2/Al2O3 of 1.8 had the best adsorption capacity and total specific surface area compared with the others.

  7. [Correlation of Persistent Free Radicals, PCDD/Fs and Metals in Waste Incineration Fly Ash].

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-jiao; Chen, Tong; Zhan, Ming-xiu; Guo, Ying; Li, Xiao-dong

    2016-03-15

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are relatively highly stable and found in the formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Recent studies have concentrated on model dioxin formation reactions and there are few studies on actual waste incineration fly ash. In order to study EPFRs and the correlation with dioxins and heavy metals in waste incineration fly ash, the spins of EPFRs, concentration of PCDD/Fs and metals in samples from 6 different waste incinerators were detected. The medical waste incineration fly ash from Tianjin, municipal solid waste incineration fly ash from Jiangxi Province, black carbon and slag from municipal solid waste incinerator in Lanxi, Zhejiang Province, all contained EPFRs. Above all the signal in Tianjin sample was the strongest. Hydroxyl radicals, carbon-center radicals and semiquinone radicals were detected. Compared with other samples, Jiangxi fly ash had the highest toxic equivalent quantity (TEQ) of dioxins, up to 7.229 4 ng · g⁻¹. However, the dioxin concentration in the Tianjin sample containing the strongest EPFR signals was only 0.092 8 ng · g⁻¹. There was perhaps little direct numeric link between EPFRs and PCDD/Fs. But the spins of EPFRs in samples presented an increasing trend as the metal contents increased, especially with Al, Fe, Zn. The signal strength of radicals was purposed to be related to the metal contents. The concentration of Zn (0.813 7% ) in the Tianjin sample was the highest and this sample contained much more spins of oxygen-center radicals. We could presume the metal Zn had a greater effect on the formation of EPFRs, and was easier to induce the formation of radicals with a longer half-life period.

  8. Impact assessment of fly ash on ground water quality: An experimental study using batch leaching tests.

    PubMed

    Dandautiya, Rahul; Singh, Ajit Pratap; Kundu, Sanghamitra

    2018-05-01

    The fly ash, generated at the coal-based thermal power plant, is always a cause of concern to environmentalists owing to its adverse impact on air, water and land. There exists a high environmental risk when it is disposed to the environment. Thus, two different type of fly ash samples (FA-1 and FA-2) have been considered in this study to examine the leaching potential of the elements magnesium, aluminium, silicon, calcium, titanium, vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, nickel, cobalt, copper, zinc, arsenic, selenium, strontium, cadmium, barium and lead for different types of leachant. Toxicity characteristics leaching procedure and ASTM tests have been performed in the laboratory to simulate different natural leaching scenarios. Characterisation of samples have been done through X-ray diffraction and field emission gun scanning electron microscope. The effect of different liquid to solid ratios (i.e. 5, 10, 20 and 50) on the mobilisation of elements has been analysed. The results indicated that the maximum leaching of all elements occurred at a liquid to solid ratio of 5 except for arsenic, barium and silicon. The groundwater analysis has also been done to understand the actual effects of leachate. The elements presenting the highest leachability in the two fly ash samples under all tested conditions were magnesium, aluminium, silicon and calcium. It has been observed that calcium exhibits greater leaching effects than all other constituents. The study presented here has been found very useful for assessing contamination levels in groundwater owing to leaching effects of fly ash under different scenarios, which can be helpful to prevent spreading of the contaminants by efficient management of fly ash.

  9. A novel silica alumina-based backfill material composed of coal refuse and fly ash.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Sun, Henghu

    2012-04-30

    In this paper, a systematic study was conducted to investigate a novel silica alumina-based backfill material composed of coal refuse and fly ash. The coal refuse and fly ash had different properties under various thermal activation temperatures (20 °C, 150 °C, 350 °C, 550 °C, 750 °C and 950 °C). It is known that a thermal activation temperature ranging from 20 °C to 950 °C significantly increases the flowability and pozzolanic properties of the coal refuse; however, the flowability of fly ash decreases when the activation temperature is higher than 550 °C because of a severe agglomeration phenomenon on its surface. An optimal design for this backfill material was determined to include an activated portion composed of 5% coal refuse at 750 °C and 15% fly ash at 20 °C. This combination yields the best performance with excellent flowability, a high compressive strength and a low bleeding rate. The microanalysis results corresponded well with the performance tests at different activation conditions. In the coal refuse, kaolinite peaks began to decrease because of their transformation into metakaolin at 550 °C. Chlorite peaks disappeared at 750 °C. Muscovite peaks decreased at 750 °C and disappeared at 950 °C. During this process, muscovite 2M(1) gradually dehydroxylated to muscovite HT. Furthermore, this paper examined the environmental acceptance and economic feasibility of this technology and found that this silica alumina-based backfill material composed of coal refuse and fly ash not only meets EPA requirements but also has several advantages in industry feasibility when compared with hydraulic backfill, rock backfill and paste backfill. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Synthesis of fly ash based core-shell composites for use as functional pigment in paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Richa; Tiwari, Sangeeta

    2016-04-01

    Fly ash is a combustion residue, mainly composed of silica, alumina and iron oxides. It is produced by the power industries in very large amounts and usually disposed in landfills, which have represented an environmental problem in recent years1. The need to generate a market for fly ash consumption is the main reason why alternative applications have been studied. It has been applied as an additive in construction materials like cement and pavements2. The present work describes the synthesis of Flyash-Titania core-shell particles by precipitation technique using Titanium tetra isopropoxide (TTIP) which can be used for variety of applications such as NIR reflecting materials for cool coatings, Photocatalysis etc. In this work, Fly ash is used in core and Nano -TiO2 is coated as shell on it. Surfactants are used to improve the adhesion of Nano Titania shell on fly ash core. Effect on adhesion of TiO2 on Fly ash is studied by using different types of surfactant. The preparation of core shells was carried out in absence of surfactant as well as using anionic and non-ionic surfactants. The percentage of surfactant was varied to study the effect of amount of surfactant on the uniformity and size of particles in the shell using Kubelka-Munk transformed reflectance spectra. The morphology of core shell structures was studied using SEM technique. Use of anionic surfactant results in more uniform coating with reduced particle size of the shell material. The composite particles prepared by using anionic surfactant are having good pigment properties and also shows good reflectance in Near Infrared region and hence can be used as a pigment in cool coatings.

  11. Influence of mercury from fly ash on cattle reared nearby thermal power plant.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Vikas Eknath; Yadav, Raju Ravindra; Dakshinkar, Narayan Purushottam; Dhoot, Vinod Madanlal; Bhojane, Gautam Ramkrishna; Naik, Madhura Kiran; Shrivastava, Preeti; Naoghare, Pravin Krishnarao; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2012-12-01

    Cattle grazing nearby coal-fired power stations are exposed to fly ash. The present investigation aims to assess the environmental and health impacts of fly ash containing mercury emitted from thermal power plant. The health effect of fly ash were studied using 20 lactating cattle reared within a 5-km radius of s thermal power plant for the possible effect of fly ash such as the alterations in hematological and biochemical parameters of blood, milk, and urine. Results indicated that the hemoglobin levels (6.65 ± 0.40 g/dl) were significantly reduced in all the exposed animals. Biochemical parameters viz., blood urea nitrogen (27.35 ± 1.19 mg/dl), serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (43.39 ± 3.08 IU/l), albumin, and creatinine were found to be increased, whereas serum glutamate pyruvic transaminase (29.26 ± 2.02) and Ca(2+) were observed to be statistically insignificant in exposed animals. Mercury concentrations estimated in the blood, milk, and urine of exposed (n = 20) and control (n = 20) animals were 7.41 ± 0.86, 4.75 ± 0.57, 2.08 ± 0.18, and 1.05 ± 0.07, 0.54 ± 0.03, 0.20 ± 0.02 μg/kg, respectively. The significant increase (P < 0.01) in the levels of mercury in blood, milk, and urine of exposed animals in comparison to control indicated that the alterations of biochemical parameters in exposed cattle could be due to their long term exposure to fly ash mercury which may have direct or indirect impact on human populations via food chain.

  12. Interlaboratory comparison of mutagenesis testing of coal fly ash derived from differenct coal conversion technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Chrisp, C.; Hobbs, C.; Clark, R.

    1979-01-01

    This experiment showed that mutagenicity of fly ash derived from different coal conversion technologies, as determined by the Ames plate incorporation test, was similar in all three laboratories. The differences in mutagenic activity of each fly ash between laboratories with different solvent extraction methods were no greater than one order of magnitude. In addition, there were much smaller, but still significant differences in mutagenic activity between laboratories when the same solvent extract of a particular fly ash was tested in each laboratory. There were also significant differences in mutagenicity of the positive control mutagen (maximum of fivefold) between laboratories. Becausemore » of this difference in Ames test sensitivity between laboratories, the influence of the solvent extraction methods on differences in mutagenicity was not clear. However, the data suggested that either there were significant differences in the degree of sensitivity of Ames tests for different complex mixtures within each laboratory, or else there were differences in mutagen extraction efficiency between different solvent extraction methods. Both Ames test sensitivity and solvent extraction may be important. Further work would be necessary to separate the contribution of these two factors. An important aspect of further work would be to separate the contribution of the innate sensitivity of substrains of Ames tester strains in each laboratory from the possible effects of differences in Ames testing methodology. This could be done by testing the same extracts of fly ash and positive control mutagens with substrains of tester strains exchanged between laboratories. This work also implies that caution should be exercised in assuming that the same solvent would have the same efficiency for extraction of mutagens from different fly ashes even within the same laboratory.« less

  13. Development of Fly Ash-Based Sorbent to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majchrzak-Kucęba, I.; Nowak, W.

    In the present work the thermogravimetric characterization of the sorption of carbon dioxide on polymer-modifiedmesoporous materials (MCM-41) from fly ashes is described. In order to obtain MCM-41 materials from three different types fly ashes,(including CFB fly ash) hydrothermal processesusing the supernatantsof coal fly ashes and surfactantsas the structure-directing agents,have been carried out. The obtained mesoporous materials were subjected to polyethylenimine (PEI) modification by their impregnation to obtain samples with PEl contents of 30, 50 and 70%, respectively. CO2 sorption/desorption tests on loaded PEl samples were carried out in a flow of a mixture of gasses (CO2-1O%, O2-10%, N2-80%) at different temperatures: 25 and 75°C. The highest CO2 sorption value was obtained for the sample that contained the best-quality MCM-41 and was impregnatedwith PEI in the amount of 50%. This sample at a temperatureof 75°C can take CO2 in an amount equivalent to 111.7 mgCO2/g sample weight. Under the same conditions, but without PEI impregnation, this sample can take CO2 in an amount equivalent to 3.2 mgCO2/g sample weight, thus 35 times less. The research of CO2 adsorption on polymer-modified mesoporous materials from fly ashes carried out within this work has shown that these materials are characterized by high CO2 adsorption capacity under conditions typical of coal combustionboiler flue gas and have the chance of becoming an efficient adsorbent for application to post-combustion CO2 separation. For PEI impregnated samples, a different behaviour of adsorption/desorption profiles has also been observed (both sorption and desorptionprogressesvery rapidly).

  14. Biochemical methane potential from sewage sludge: Effect of an aerobic pretreatment and fly ash addition as source of trace elements.

    PubMed

    Huiliñir, César; Pinto-Villegas, Paula; Castillo, Alejandra; Montalvo, Silvio; Guerrero, Lorna

    2017-06-01

    The effect of aerobic pretreatment and fly ash addition on the production of methane from mixed sludge is studied. Three assays with pretreated and not pretreated mixed sludge in the presence of fly ash (concentrations of 0, 10, 25, 50, 250 and 500mg/L) were run at mesophilic condition. It was found that the combined use of aerobic pretreatment and fly ash addition increases methane production up to 70% when the fly ash concentrations were lower than 50mg/L, while concentrations higher than 250mg/L cause up to 11% decrease of methane production. For the anaerobic treatment of mixed sludge without pretreatment, the fly ash improved methane generation at all the concentrations studied, with a maximum of 56%. The removal of volatile solids does not show an improvement compared to the separate use of an aerobic pre-treatment and fly ash addition. Therefore, the combined use of the aerobic pre-treatment and fly ash addition improves only the production of methane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of genotoxicity of coal fly ash in Allium cepa root cells by combining comet assay with the Allium test.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Rajarshi; Mukherjee, Ashit Kumar; Mukherjee, Anita

    2009-06-01

    Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. Its utilization and disposal is of utmost importance. Using onion (Allium cepa) root tip system, the present study was carried out to evaluate the potential toxic and genotoxic effects of fly ash, collected from a thermal power plant in West Bengal, India. Prior to testing, the collected fly ash sample was mixed with sand in different proportions. Allium bulbs were allowed to germinate directly in fly ash and after five days the germinating roots were processed for the Allium test. Additionally, the Allium test was adapted for detecting DNA damage through comet assay. The results from the Allium test indicate that fly ash at 100% concentration inhibits root growth and mitotic indices; induces binucleated cells as a function of the proportion, but is not toxic at very low concentration. In the comet assay, a statistical increase for DNA strand breaks was found only at higher concentrations. The sample was analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometer for Zn, Pb, Cu, Ni, Cd and As, whose presence could partly be responsible for the toxicity of fly ash. The study concludes that the classical Allium test can give a more comprehensive data when done in combination with the comet assay, which is faster, simpler and independent of mitosis. Also when fly ash is used for other purposes in combination with soils, it should be judiciously used at very low concentrations in order to protect the ecosystem health from any potential adverse effects.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of grinding aid fly ash blended mortar effect on bond strength of masonry prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaraj, L.; Ravichandran, P. T.; Sagadevan, Suresh

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the effect of particle size reduction by applying top-down nanotechnology such as ball mill grinding process with the addition of amine-based grinding aids. The particle size reduction in synthesis process and its characterization were investigated for fly ash particles. The Rosin-Rammler-Bennet (RRB) distribution model using mathematical formulations were studied for fly ash ground particles. The hardened properties of grinding aid fly ash composite mortar were studied using compressive strength test. The optimum grinding time was 120 min identified through the particle size distribution analysis. The mean particle size decreased from 92.09 μm to 10.5 μm in which there is 89% reduction in particle size due to the grinding of fly ash particle with grinding aids. The compressive strength results show that substitutions of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) mortar by Amine-based Grinding aid Fly Ash (AGFA) 15% gives 12, 23% and at 30% gives 6, 8% of higher strength compare to the substitutions of raw fly ash. The addition of grinding aids in grinding process gives more advantages to reduce the particle size without changing chemical composition. The AGFA sample shows better performance in compressive strength and bond strength behavior of masonry prism. It may suggest that amine based grinding aids play a vital role and feasible to use in fly ash grinding process.

  17. Interaction of planar and nonplanar organic contaminants with coal fly ash: effects of polar and nonpolar solvent solutions.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Robert M; Ryba, Stephan A; Cantwell, Mark G; Gundersen, Jennifer L; Tien, Rex; Perron, Monique M

    2006-08-01

    Coal fly ash has a very high sorption capacity for a variety of anthropogenic contaminants and has been used to cleanse wastewater of pollutants for approximately 40 years. Like other black carbons, the planar structure of the residual carbon in fly ash results in elevated affinities for planar organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The present study was performed to understand better the mechanisms affecting the strong interaction between planar contaminants and coal fly ash. The removal of 10 PCBs and 10 PAHs by several fly ashes and other sorbents was evaluated under different experimental conditions to highlight the intermolecular forces influencing adsorption. Varying fly ash concentration and solvent system composition indicated that dispersive interactions were most prevalent. For the PCBs, empirical results also were compared to molecular modeling estimates of the energy necessary for the PCB molecule to assume a planar conformation (PCe). The PCe levels ranged from 8 to 25 kcal/mol, depending on the degree of ortho-substituted chlorination of the PCB. A significant correlation between PCe and PCB removal from solution was observed for the fly ashes and activated carbon, whereas the nonplanar sorbent octadecyl (C18) indicated no relationship. These findings demonstrate the strong interaction between black carbon fly ash and planar organic contaminants. Furthermore, as exemplified by the PCBs, these results show how this interaction is a function of a contaminant's ability to assume a planar conformation.

  18. Clean up fly ash from coal burning plants by new isolated fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Penicillium glabrum.

    PubMed

    Ertit Taştan, Burcu

    2017-09-15

    In Turkey approximately 45 million tons of coals are burned in a year and 19.3 million tons of fly ash have emerged. The bioremediation of heavy metals or different elements from fly ash makes them bio-available. However, in previous studies, requiring of long operational time and failing to show tolerance to high pulp densities of fly ash of selected fungal species makes them impractical. In this work, bioremediation of fly ash by new isolated fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Penicillium glabrum were investigated in one step and two step bioremediation process. Ca, Si, Fe and S were found to be considerable amount in studied fly ashes by ED-XRF element analysis. The bioremediation yields of Mo (100%), S (64.36%) Ni (50%) and Cu (33.33%) by F. oxysporum were high. The remediated elements by P. glabrum in fly ash were Mo (100%), S (57.43%), Ni (25%), Si (24.66%), V (12.5%), Ti (5%) and Sr (3.2%). The isolation of high fly ash resistant fungi and reduction of the bioremediation time will allow the practical applications of the bioremediation technology when it is scaled up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Irradiation effect on leaching behavior and form of heavy metals in fly ash of municipal solid waste incinerator.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan

    2012-01-15

    Fly ash from a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) is commonly classified as hazardous waste. High-energy electron beam irradiation systems have gained popularity recently as a clean and promising technology to remove environmental pollutants. Irradiation effects on leaching behavior and form of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash have not been investigated in any significant detail. An electron beam accelerator was used in this research. Electron beam irradiation on fly ash significantly increased the leaching potential of heavy metals from fly ash. The amount of absorbed dose and the metal species affected leaching behavior. When electron beam irradiation intensity increased gradually up to 210 kGy, concentration of Pb and Zn in the leachate increased linearly as absorbed dose increased, while that of Cu underwent no significant change. Concentration of Pb and Zn in the leachate increased up to 15.5% (10.7 mg/kg), and 35.6% (9.6 mg/kg) respectively. However, only 4.8% (0.3mg/kg) increase was observed in the case of Cu. The results imply that irradiation has significant effect on the leaching behavior of heavy metals in fly ash, and the effect is quite different among the metal species tested in this study. A commonly used sequential extraction analysis which can classify a metal species into five forms was conducted to examine any change in metal form in the irradiated fly ash. Notable change in metal form in fly ash was observed when fly ash was irradiated. Change in Pb form was much greater than that of Cu form. Change in metal form was related to leaching potential of the metals. Concentration of heavy metal in leachate was positively related to the exchangeable form which is the most mobile. It may be feasible to treat fly ash by electron beam irradiation for selective recovery of valuable metals or for pretreatment prior to conventional processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The secondary release of mercury in coal fly ash-based flue-gas mercury removal technology.

    PubMed

    He, Jingfeng; Duan, Chenlong; Lei, Mingzhe; Zhu, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    The secondary release of mercury from coal fly ash is a negative by-product from coal-fired power plants, and requires effective control to reduce environmental pollution. Analysing particle size distribution and composition of the coal fly ash produced by different mercury removing technologies indicates that the particles are generally less than 0.5 mm in size and are composed mainly of SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3. The relationships between mercury concentration in the coal fly ash, its particle size, and loss of ignition were studied using different mercury removing approaches. The research indicates that the coal fly ash's mercury levels are significantly higher after injecting activated carbon or brominating activated carbon when compared to regular cooperating-pollution control technology. This is particularly true for particle size ranges of >0.125, 0.075-0.125, and 0.05-0.075 mm. Leaching experiments revealed the secondary release of mercury in discarded coal fly ash. The concentration of mercury in the coal fly ash increases as the quantity of injecting activated carbon or brominating activated carbon increases. The leached concentrations of mercury increase as the particle size of the coal fly ash increases. Therefore, the secondary release of mercury can be controlled by adding suitable activated carbon or brominating activated carbon when disposing of coal fly ash. Adding CaBr2 before coal combustion in the boiler also helps control the secondary release of mercury, by increasing the Hg(2+) concentration in the leachate. This work provides a theoretical foundation for controlling and removing mercury in coal fly ash disposal.

  1. Comparison between rice husk ash grown in different regions for stabilizing fly ash from a solid waste incinerator.

    PubMed

    Benassi, L; Bosio, A; Dalipi, R; Borgese, L; Rodella, N; Pasquali, M; Depero, L E; Bergese, P; Bontempi, E

    2015-08-15

    The Stabilization of heavy metals from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash by rice husk ash (RHA) is under intense study as an effective strategy to recover and reuse industrial and agricultural waste together. We compare the metal entrapment performances of RHA from different Asian rice sources – namely from Japonica rice grown in Italy and Indica rice grown in India – Physicochemical and morphological characterization of the final stabilized material show that the same thermal treatment may result in marked structural differences in the silica contained in the two RHA. Remarkably, one of them displays a crystalline silica content, although obtained by a thermal treatment below 800 °C. We also find that the presence of an alkali metal ion (potassium) in the rice husk plays a crucial role in the attainment of the final silica phase. These physicochemical differences are mirrored by different stabilization yields by the two RHA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Selenium in particulates and gaseous fractions of smoke from cigarettes prepared from tobacco grown on fly-ash-amended soil

    SciTech Connect

    Gutemann, W.H.; Lisk, D.J.; Hoffman, D.

    Cigarettes prepared from tobacco grown in pots of soils amended with soft coal fly ash were smoked, and the mainstream and gaseous fractions were analyzed for total selenium concentration. Fly-ash-grown and control (soil-grown) tobaccos contained, respectively, 0.79 and 0.03 ppm selenium. The quantities of selenium (ng per cigarette) found in the mainstream particulate and gaseous fractions were, respectively, 62.4 and 246.0 for the fly-ash-grown and 8.6 and 12.0 for the control treatments. Studies of the absorption, retention, effects, metabolism, and excretion of selenium in the body are reviewed.

  3. Determination of 30 elements in coal and fly ash by thermal and epithermal neutron-activation analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, J.J.; Steinnes, E.

    1977-01-01

    Thirty elements are determined in coal and fly ash by instrumental neutron-activation analysis using both thermal and epithermal irradiation. Gamma-ray spectra were recorded 7 and 20 days after the irradiations. The procedure is applicable to the routine analysis of coals and fly ash. Epithermal irradiation was found preferable for the determination of Ni, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Mo, Sb, Cs, Ba, Sm, Tb, Hf, Ta, W, Th and U, whereas thermal irradiation was best for Sc, Cr, Fe, Co, La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Yb and Lu. Results for SRM 1632 (coal) and SRM 1633 (fly ash) agree with those of other investigators. ?? 1977.

  4. Coal Fly Ash Ceramics: Preparation, Characterization, and Use in the Hydrolysis of Sucrose

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Martins, Jorge; Gadelha, Carlos; Cavada, Benildo; Albertini, Alessandro Victor; Arruda, Francisco; Vasconcelos, Mayron; Teixeira, Edson; Alves, Francisca; Lima Filho, José; Freire, Valder

    2014-01-01

    Coal ash is a byproduct of mineral coal combustion in thermal power plants. This residue is responsible for many environmental problems because it pollutes soil, water, and air. Thus, it is important to find ways to reuse it. In this study, coal fly ash, obtained from the Presidente Médici Thermal Power Plant, was utilized in the preparation of ceramic supports for the immobilization of the enzyme invertase and subsequent hydrolysis of sucrose. Coal fly ash supports were prepared at several compaction pressures (63.66–318.30 MPa) and sintered at 1200°C for 4 h. Mineralogical composition (by X-ray diffraction) and surface area were studied. The ceramic prepared with 318.30 MPa presented the highest surface area (35 m2/g) and amount of immobilized enzyme per g of support (76.6 mg/g). In assays involving sucrose inversion, it showed a high degree of hydrolysis (around 81%) even after nine reuses and 30 days' storage. Therefore, coal fly ash ceramics were demonstrated to be a promising biotechnological alternative as an immobilization support for the hydrolysis of sucrose. PMID:25110726

  5. Phytoextraction of metals by Erigeron canadensis L. from fly ash landfill of power plant "Kolubara".

    PubMed

    Krgović, Rada; Trifković, Jelena; Milojković-Opsenica, Dušanka; Manojlović, Dragan; Marković, Marijana; Mutić, Jelena

    2015-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the concentrations of Pb, Cd, As, Cr, Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, Ba, Fe, Al and Ag in Erigeron canadensis L. growing on fly ash landfill of power plant "Kolubara", Serbia. The content of each element was determined in every part of plant separately (root, stalk and inflorescence) and correlated with the content of elements in each phase of sequential extraction of fly ash. In order to ambiguously select the factors that are able to decidedly characterize the particular part of plant, principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were performed. The bioconcentration factors and translocation factors for each metal were calculated in order to determine the feasibility of the use of plant E. canadensis L. for phytoremediation purpose. There were strong positive correlations between metals in every part of plant samples, and metals from pseudo total form of sequential extraction indicate that the bioavailability of elements in fly ash is similarly correlated with total form. Retained Al, Fe, Cr and Co in the root indicate its suitability for phytostabilization. This plant takes up Cd and Zn from the soil (bioconcentration factors (BCFs) greater than 1), transporting them through the stalk into the inflorescence (translocation factors (TFs) higher than 1). Regarding its dominance in vegetation cover and abundance, E. canadensis L. can be considered adequate for phytoextraction of Cd and Zn from coal ash landfills at Kolubara.

  6. Catalytic oxidation of gaseous reduced sulfur compounds using coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Kastner, James R; Das, K C; Melear, Nathan D

    2002-11-11

    Activated carbon has been shown to oxidize reduced sulfur compounds, but in many cases it is too costly for large-scale environmental remediation applications. Alternatively, we theorized that coal fly ash, given its high metal content and the presence of carbon could act as an inexpensive catalytic oxidizer of reduced sulfur compounds for "odor" removal. Initial results indicate that coal fly ash can catalyze the oxidization of H(2)S and ethanethiol, but not dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) at room temperature. In batch reactor systems, initial concentrations of 100-500 ppmv H(2)S or ethanethiol were reduced to 0-2 ppmv within 1-2 and 6-8 min, respectively. This was contrary to control systems without ash in which concentrations remained constant. Diethyl disulfide was formed from ethanethiol substantiating the claim that catalytic oxidation occurred. The presence of water increased the rate of adsorption/reaction of both H(2)S and ethanethiol for the room temperature reactions (23-25 degrees C). Additionally, in a continuous flow packed bed reactor, a gaseous stream containing an inlet H(2)S concentration of 400-500 ppmv was reduced to 200 ppmv at a 4.6s residence time. The removal efficiency remained at 50% for approximately 4.6h or 3500 reactor volumes. These results demonstrate the potential of using coal fly ash in reactors for removal of H(2)S and other reduced sulfur compounds.

  7. Parameters Affecting the Mechanical Properties of Fly Ash-Based Geopolymer Binders – Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lăzărescu, A.; Szilagyi, H.; Ioani, A.; Baeră, C.

    2018-06-01

    As the demand for concrete and the needs to satisfy development of infrastructure facilities increase, it is essential to find alternatives to create environment-friendly concrete. The particular procedure of alkaline activation of fly ash - in which ash resulting from a power plant is combined with a specific alkaline activator in order to create a solid material, then dried at a certain temperature - opened new opportunities for this new material to get attention worldwide. In order to obtain a material with similar properties of ordinary Portland cement concrete and to obtain desirable compressive strengths, the parameters that affect this type of binders should be fully understood. The aim of this paper is to study the main parameters affecting the mechanical strength of the fly ash-based geopolymer paste and their interactions. Parameters such as molarity of sodium hydroxide (from 8M to 12M) and alkaline activators ratio (from 0,5 to 2,5) were analysed to observe how they affect the mechanical properties of the geopolymer paste. Experimental results show that the compressive strength of the fly ash-based geopolymer paste produced using Romanian local raw materials increases with the increase of the concentration of sodium hydroxide and higher ratios of Na2SiO3/NaOH solution.

  8. Application of fly ash on the growth performance and translocation of toxic heavy metals within Cajanus cajan L.: implication for safe utilization of fly ash for agricultural production.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vimal Chandra; Abhilash, P C; Upadhyay, Raj Narayan; Tewari, D D

    2009-07-15

    The present study was undertaken to examine the influence of the application of fly ash (FA) into garden soil for Cajanus cajan L. cultivation and on accumulation and translocation of hazardous metals from FA to edible part. Numerous studies have been reported on the growth and yield of agricultural crops under FA stress; however, there is a dearth of studies recommending the safe utilization of fly ash for crop production. Pot experiments were conducted on C. cajan L., a widely cultivating legume in India for its highly nutritious seeds. C. cajan L. were grown in garden soil and amended with varying concentrations of FA in a weight/weight ratio (0%, 25%, 50% and 100%; w/w). Incorporation of fly ash from 25% to 100% in garden soil increases the levels of pH, particle density, porosity and water holding capacity from 3.47% to 26.39%, 3.98% to 26.14%, 37.50% to 147.92% and 163.16% to 318.42%, respectively, than the control while bulk density decrease respectively from 8.94% to 48.89%. Pot experiment found that accumulation and translocation of heavy metals in tested plant depends on the concentration of FA. Addition of FA at lower concentration (25%) had shown positive results in most of the studied parameters of growth and yield (14.23% than control). The experimental results confirmed that lower concentration of FA (25%) is safe for C. cajan cultivation, which not only enhanced the yield of C. cajan L. significantly but also ensured the translocation of heavy metals to edible parts within the critical limits.

  9. Influence of supercritical water treatment on heavy metals in medical waste incinerator fly ash.

    PubMed

    Bo, Da; Zhang, Fu-Shen; Zhao, Lijuan

    2009-10-15

    In this work, medical waste (MW) incinerator fly ashes from different types of incinerators were subjected to supercritical water (SCW) and SCW+H(2)O(2) (SCWH) treatments. Sequential extraction experiments showed that, after SCW treatment, heavy metals in exchangeable and carbonate forms in the ashes could be transferred into other relatively stable forms, e.g., Ba and Cr into residual fraction, Cu and Pb into organic matter fraction. SCWH treatment could stabilize heavy metals in Fe-Mn oxides and residual fractions. However, the behavior of As was quite different from heavy metals, which could be leached out from residue fraction after SCW and SWCH treatments. The leached As tended to absorb onto Fe-Mn oxides and organic matters under near neutral environment, but it could react with Ca(2+) at lower pH, increasing the mobility of this element. Therefore, it is necessary to neutralize acidic ash to near neutral condition before subjecting it to SCW and SCWH treatments so as to effectively stabilize hazardous elements in the ash. Consequently, it is believed that SCWH treatment is an effective alternative for hazardous elements detoxification in MW fly ash.

  10. Geochemistry and mineralogy of fly-ash from the Mae Moh lignite deposit, Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, B.R.; Powell, M.A.; Fyfe, W.S.

    The concentration of 21 elements in fly ash from three boilers (75 MW, 150 MW, and 300 MW) at the EGAT power plant, Mae Moh, Thailand, were determined by INAA. The concentration of 10 major elements was determined by XRF. As, Co, Cr, Ni, Mo, and Sb generally increase in concentration going from bottom ash (BA) through the sequence of electrostatic precipitator ashes (ESPA) and reach maxima of As (352 ppm), Co (45 ppm), Cr (105 ppm), Mo (32 ppm), Ni (106 ppm), and Sb (15 ppm) in the ESPA. Ce, Cs, Fe, Hf, La, Sc, Ta, Tb, and Ybmore » did not exhibit concentration trends or are variable except in the case of one boiler, which showed an increase going from BA to ESPA. Only Br decreased in composition going from BA to ESPA. Rb, Sm, U, and Th showed marked variation in trends. The major elements identified by EDS were Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Fe, and Ba, with minor amounts of Mg, Na, Ti, Mn, and Sr. Al, Si, K, and Ca occur together and are present in most of the fly-ash particles. Ba was found as a major component with Ca, Al, and Si. Fe and Ca are usually associated with sulfur. Some small spheres (< 5 {mu}m) are comprised almost entirely of Fe (probably as oxide). Symplectite textures are noted in high-Fe phases. All elements except Br are significantly enriched in the fly ash relative to the coal, which contains 35% ash. Particle chemistry is consistent with the major mineral phases identified by XRD, which include: quartz, magnetite, mullite, gehlenite, anorthite, hematite, anhydrite, and clinopyroxene.« less

  11. Sulfur-bearing coatings on fly ash from a coal-fired power plant: Composition, origin, and influence on ash alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, N.S.; Rice, C.A.; Breit, G.N.; Johnson, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Fly ash samples collected from two locations in the exhaust stream of a coal-fired power plant differ markedly with respect to the abundance of thin (???0.1 ??m) sulfur-rich surface coatings that are observable by scanning electron microscopy. The coatings, tentatively identified as an aluminum-potassium-sulfate phase, probably form upon reaction between condensed sulfuric acid aerosols and glass surfaces, and are preferentially concentrated on ash exposed to exhaust stream gases for longer. The coatings are highly soluble and if sufficiently abundant, can impart an acidic pH to solutions initially in contact with ash. These observations suggest that proposals for ash use and predictions of ash behavior during disposal should consider the transient, acid-generating potential of some ash fractions and the possible effects on initial ash leachability and alteration. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. The effect of slag addition on strength development of Class C fly ash geopolymer concrete at normal temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardhono, Arie; Law, David W.; Sutikno, Dani, Hasan

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the effect of slag addition on strength development and workability of fly ash/slag based geopolymer (FASLG) concrete cured at normal temperature. Class C fly ash with high ferrite (Fe) content was used as the primary material. The proportions of fly ash (FA) to slag (SL) are: 1 FA : 0 SL, 0.9 FA : 0.1 SL, 0.7 FA : 0.3 SL, and 0.5 FA : 0.5 SL. The workability and strength properties were determined by slump, vikat, and compressive strength tests. The result shows that the highest compressive strength was achieved by FASLG-3 concrete with 30% slag addition and exhibited a comparable strength to that normal concrete at 28 days. The 30% slag addition also improve the workability and increase the setting time of FASLG concrete specimens. It can be concluded that the slag inclusion on fly ash will improve the performance of geopolymer concrete at normal temperature.

  13. Modified fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration as catalyst support for Mn-Ce composite oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiongbo; Liu, Ying; Yang, Ying; Ren, Tingyan; Pan, Lang; Fang, Ping; Chen, Dingsheng; Cen, Chaoping

    2017-08-01

    Fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration was modified by hydrothermal treatment and used as catalyst support for Mn-Ce composite oxides. The prepared catalyst showed good activity for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH3. A NO conversion of 93% could be achieved at 300 °C under a GHSV of 32857 h-1. With the help of characterizations including XRD, BET, SEM, TEM, XPS and TPR, it was found that hydrothermal treatment brought a large surface area and abundant mesoporous to the modified fly ash, and Mn-Ce composite oxides were highly dispersed on the surface of the support. These physical and chemical properties were the intrinsic reasons for the good SCR activity. This work transformed fly ash into high value-added products, providing a new approach to the resource utilization and pollution control of fly ash.

  14. Effects of combined lime and fly ash stabilization on the elastic moduli of montmorillonitic soils : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1988-04-01

    A laboratory study using bentonite to simulate the montmorillonite component of soils common to Louisiana was undertaken to evaluate the effects of combined lime and fly ash additions on stabilization reactions. Samples containing bentonite (75 weigh...

  15. Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.

    2009-07-15

    There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with flymore » ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.« less

  16. Hydraulic conductivity of fly ash-sewage sludge mixes for use in landfill cover liners.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Inga; Svensson, Malin; Ecke, Holger; Kumpiene, Jurate; Maurice, Christian; Andreas, Lale; Lagerkvist, Anders

    2009-08-01

    Secondary materials could help meeting the increasing demand of landfill cover liner materials. In this study, the effect of compaction energy, water content, ash ratio, freezing, drying and biological activity on the hydraulic conductivity of two fly ash-sewage sludge mixes was investigated using a 2(7-1) fractional factorial design. The aim was to identify the factors that influence hydraulic conductivity, to quantify their effects and to assess how a sufficiently low hydraulic conductivity can be achieved. The factors compaction energy and drying, as well as the factor interactions material x ash ratio and ash ratio x compaction energy affected hydraulic conductivity significantly (alpha=0.05). Freezing on five freeze-thaw cycles did not affect hydraulic conductivity. Water content affected hydraulic conductivity only initially. The hydraulic conductivity data were modelled using multiple linear regression. The derived models were reliable as indicated by R(adjusted)(2) values between 0.75 and 0.86. Independent on the ash ratio and the material, hydraulic conductivity was predicted to be between 1.7 x 10(-11)m s(-1) and 8.9 x 10(-10)m s(-1) if the compaction energy was 2.4 J cm(-3), the ash ratio between 20% and 75% and drying did not occur. Thus, the investigated materials met the limit value for non-hazardous waste landfills of 10(-9)m s(-1).

  17. Recent studies on activated carbons and fly ashes from Turkish resources

    SciTech Connect

    Ayhan Demirbas; Gulsin Arslan; Erol Pehlivan

    2006-05-15

    This article deals with adsorptive properties of activated carbons (ACs) and fly ashes from Turkish coal and biomass resources. ACs because of their high surface area, microporous character and the chemical nature of their surface have been considered potential adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastewater. Pyrolysis is an established process method for preparation of activated carbon from biomass. The bio-char is can be used as AC. The adsorption properties of ACs were strictly defined by the physicochemical nature of their surface and their texture, i.e., pore volume, pore size distribution, surface area. It is well knownmore » that the pH of the solution-adsorbant mixture is an important variable in the adsorption process. Fly ash has the highest adsorption capacity (198.2 mg/g for Cd(II)). Almond shell AC has the lowest adsorption capacity (2.7 mg/g).« less

  18. Characterizations of coal fly ash nanoparticles and induced in vitro toxicity in cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambandam, Bharathi; Palanisami, Eganathan; Abbugounder, Rajasekar; Prakhya, Balakrishnamurthy; Thiyagarajan, Devasena

    2014-02-01

    The present study illustrates the characterization and cytotoxicity studies of coal fly ash nanoparticles (CFA-NPs). The coal fly ash (CFA) collected from electrostatic precipitator of a coal-fired power plant and the average size of the CFA-NPs was found to be 9-50 nm. Imaging techniques showed predominantly homogenous spherical shaped nanoparticles. The X-ray diffraction analysis and energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) analysis spectra reveal the elemental constituents of the CFA-NPs contain several toxic heavy metals. Cytotoxicity of CFA-NPs was determined by MTT assay. Cellular metabolism is inhibited in a dose dependent manner by CFA concentrations varying from 13 to 800 μg mL-1. After 48 h exposure, the Hep2, A549 and HepG2 cell lines prove more sensitive to CFA-NPs at varying levels which results in IC50 (50 % inhibitory concentration) cytotoxicity end point.

  19. Mineralogical, Microstructural and Thermal Characterization of Coal Fly Ash Produced from Kazakhstani Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauanov, Z.; Abylgazina, L.; Spitas, C.; Itskos, G.; Inglezakis, V.

    2017-09-01

    Coal fly ash (CFA) is a waste by-product of coal combustion. Kazakhstan has vast coal deposits and is major consumer of coal and hence produces huge amounts of CFA annually. The government aims to recycle and effectively utilize this waste by-product. Thus, a detailed study of the physical and chemical properties of material is required as the data available in literature is either outdated or not applicable for recently produced CFA samples. The full mineralogical, microstructural and thermal characterization of three types of coal fly ash (CFA) produced in two large Kazakhstani power plants is reported in this work. The properties of CFAs were compared between samples as well as with published values.

  20. Alkali borosilicate glass by fly ash from a coal-fired power plant.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Soo; Taniguchi, Shoji; Park, Young Jun

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of using coal fly ash as a silica source for alkali borosilicate glass was investigated. Alkali borosilicate glasses were prepared from the coal fly ash mixed with 30 wt.% reagents composed of Na(2)O and B(2)O(3) by susceptor-induction heating. Their densities ranged from 2.24 to 2.55 g cm(-3) and decreased as the amount of B(2)O(3) addition increased. However, the Vickers microhardness showed a different tendency with the density since the glass network connectivity improved by boron anomaly, which was identified by a nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The Vickers microhardness of the glass product, with the addition of 15 wt.% B(2)O(3) and 15 wt.% Na(2)O, was about 4030 MPa. Furthermore, the changes in microstructure were consistent with those in the chemical stability by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP).

  1. Durability and Strength of Sustainable Self-Consolidating Concrete Containing Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, O.; Hawat, W. Al

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the durability and strength of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) is assessed through development and testing of six binary mixes at fixed water-to-binder (w/b) ratio of 0.36. In each of the six SCC mixes, a different percentage of cement is replaced with fly ash. The development of compressive strength for each of the mixes is assessed by testing samples after 3, 7, and 28 days of curing. Durability of each of the six SCC mixes is assessed by measuring the charge passed in Rapid Chloride Permeability (RCP) test. Charge passed was measured in samples cured for 1, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 40 days of curing. All mixes out-performed the control mix in terms of resistance to chloride penetration. Binary mix in which 20% of cement is replaced with fly ash exhibited 28-day strength slightly surpassing the control mix.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and DC conductivity studies of conducting polyaniline/PVA/Fly ash polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revanasiddappa, M.; Swamy, D. Siddalinga; Vinay, K.; Ravikiran, Y. T.; Raghavendra, S. C.

    2018-05-01

    The present work is an investigation of dc conduction behaviour of conducting polyaniline/fly ash nano particles blended in polyvinyl Alcohol (PANI/PVA/FA) synthesized via in-situ polymerization technique using (NH4)2S2O8 as an oxidising agent with varying fly ash cenosphere by 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 wt%. The structural characterization of the synthesised polymer composites was examined using FT-IR, XRD and SEM techniques. Dc conductivity as a function of temperature has been measured in the temperature range from 302K - 443K. The increase of conductivity with increasing temperature reveals semiconducting behaviour of the composites and shows an evidence for the transport properties of the composites.

  3. Vanadium Recovery from Oil Fly Ash by Carbon Removal and Roast-Leach Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Myungwon; Mishra, Brajendra

    2018-02-01

    This research mainly focuses on the recovery of vanadium from oil fly ash by carbon removal and the roast-leach process. The oil fly ash contained about 85% unburned carbon and 2.2% vanadium by weight. A vanadium-enriched product was obtained after carbon removal, and the vanadium content of this product was 19% by weight. Next, the vanadium-enriched product was roasted with sodium carbonate to convert vanadium oxides to water-soluble sodium metavanadate. The roasted sample was leached with water at 60°C, and the extraction percentage of vanadium was about 92% by weight. Several analytical techniques, such as inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), x-ray fluorescence (XRF), and thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), were utilized for sample analyses. Thermodynamic modeling was also conducted with HSC chemistry software to explain the experimental results.

  4. Acute and subchronic inhalation exposures of hamsters to nickel-enriched fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, A.P.; Moss, O.R.; Milliman, E.M.

    1979-08-01

    One 6-h inhalation exposure of hamsters to Ni-enriched fly ash (NEFA) aerosol (respirable aerosol concentration approx. 200 ..mu..g/liter) deposited about 80 ..mu..g in the deep lung, of which 75 ..mu..g was still present 30 days postexposure. The animals tolerated the exposure well during the 30-day postexposure observation period. Two-month exposures of hamsters to NEFA or fly ash (FA) aerosols (approx. 185 ..mu..g/liter) resuled in a deep lung burden of about 5.7 mg, dark discoloration of lungs, heavily dust-laden macrophages, and significantly higher lung weights than in controls, but only minimal inflammatory reaction and no deaths. There was no difference betweenmore » NEFA and FA effects. The NEFA contained 9% Ni; FA contained 0.03% Ni. The results of this study indicate low acute and subchronic toxicity and slow lung clearance of NEFA and FA.« less

  5. Reuse of municipal solid wastes incineration fly ashes in concrete mixtures.

    PubMed

    Collivignarelli, Carlo; Sorlini, Sabrina

    2002-01-01

    This study is aimed at assessing the feasibility of concrete production using stabilized m.s.w. (municipal solid waste) incineration fly ashes in addition to natural aggregates. The tested fly ashes were washed and milled, then stabilized by a cement-lime process and finally were reused as a "recycled aggregate" for cement mixture production, in substitution of a natural aggregate (with dosage of 200-400 kg m(-3)). These mixtures, after curing, were characterized with conventional physical-mechanical tests (compression, traction, flexure, modulus of elasticity, shrinkage). In samples containing 200 kg(waste) m(-3)(concrete), a good compressive strength was achieved after 28 days of curing. Furthermore, concrete leaching behavior was evaluated by means of different leaching tests, both on milled and on monolithic samples. Experimental results showed a remarkable reduction of metal leaching in comparison with raw waste. In some cases, similar behavior was observed in "natural" concrete (produced with natural aggregates) and in "waste containing" concrete.

  6. Variations in Compressive Strength of Geopolymer due to the CaO Added Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuqing; Koumoto, Tatsuya; Kondo, Fumiyoshi

    Recently, geopolymer has been a noteworthy material which can be used as a replacement for portland cement. The mechanical characteristics and consistency of the geopolymer are strongly affected by its chemical components of fly ash. The variations in compressive strength of geopolymer due to the CaO added fly ash were investigated in this paper. The compressive strengths of geopolymer were increased with an increase in the curing period, and the characteristics changed from the one of plastic soil material to brittle material such as concrete, regardless of CaO content. Also, the results of compressive strength and modulus of deformation showed their maximum value in the case of 8-10% CaO content. From this result, the maximum characteristics of the strengths were assumed to be exerted in case which the water draining process of geopolymer was balanced with the water absorbing process of additional CaO.

  7. Preparation of sintered foam materials by alkali-activated coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yelong; Ye, Junwei; Lu, Xiaobin; Liu, Mangang; Lin, Yuan; Gong, Weitao; Ning, Guiling

    2010-02-15

    Coal fly ash from coal fired power stations is a potential raw material for the production of ceramic tiles, bricks and blocks. Previous works have demonstrated that coal fly ash consists mainly of glassy spheres that are relatively resistant to reaction. An objective of this research was to investigate the effect of alkali on the preparation process of the foam material. Moreover, the influence of foam dosage on the water absorption, apparent density and compressive strength was evaluated. The experimental results showed that homogenous microstructures of interconnected pores could be obtained by adding 13 wt.% foaming agent at 1050 degrees C, leading to foams presenting water absorption, apparent density and compressive strength values of about 126.5%, 0.414 g/cm(3), 6.76 MPa, respectively.

  8. Effect of COSMOS technologies in detoxifying municipal solid waste incineration fly ash, preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccinelli, Elsa; Lasagni, Marina; Collina, Elena; Bonaiti, Stefania; Bontempi, Elza

    2017-05-01

    This study investigates the effect of technologies for heavy metal stabilization on the concentration of PolyChlorinatedDibenzo-p-Dioxins (PCDD) and PolyChlorinatedDibenzoFurans (PCDF), abbreviated PCDD/F, in Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) fly ash. We determined the variation of the Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and PCDD/F concentration between raw and stabilized material. The technologies, that already proved to be very promising for heavy metal entrapment, showed encouraging results also for PCDD/F detoxification. This result could be very impacting on the management of MSWI fly ash: at the best of our knowledge, there are no methods, in literature, that can provide good results in stabilization of heavy metals, and abatement of chlorinated organic pollutants contained in the same matrix.

  9. Thermal Behaviour of Metakaolin/Fly Ash Geopolymers with Chamotte Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Rovnaník, Pavel; Šafránková, Kristýna

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymers are generally appreciated for their good resistance against high temperatures. This paper compares the influence of thermal treatment with temperatures ranging from 200 to 1200 °C on the mechanical properties and microstructure of geopolymers based on two different aluminosilicate precursors, metakaolin and fly ash. Moreover, the paper is also aimed at characterizing the effect of chamotte aggregate on the performance of geopolymers subjected to high temperatures. Thermal treatment leads to a deterioration in the strength of metakaolin geopolymer, whereas fly ash geopolymer gains strength upon heating. The formation of albite above 900 °C is responsible for the fusion of geopolymer matrix during exposure to 1200 °C, which leads to the deformation of the geopolymer samples. Chamotte aggregate improves the performance of geopolymer material by increasing the thermal stability of geopolymers via sintering of the aggregate particles with the geopolymer matrix in the contact zone. PMID:28773657

  10. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Class C Fly Ash-Based Geopolymer Paste and Mortar

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueying; Ma, Xinwei; Zhang, Shoujie; Zheng, Enzu

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents workability, compressive strength and microstructure for geopolymer pastes and mortars made of class C fly ash at mass ratios of water-to-fly ash from 0.30 to 0.35. Fluidity was in the range of 145–173 mm for pastes and 131–136 mm for mortars. The highest strengths of paste and mortar were 58 MPa and 85 MPa when they were cured at 70 °C for 24 h. In XRD patterns, unreacted quartz and some reacted product were observed. SEM examination indicated that reacted product has formed and covered the unreacted particles in the paste and mortar that were consistent with their high strength. PMID:28809222

  11. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Class C Fly Ash-Based Geopolymer Paste and Mortar.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueying; Ma, Xinwei; Zhang, Shoujie; Zheng, Enzu

    2013-04-09

    This paper presents workability, compressive strength and microstructure for geopolymer pastes and mortars made of class C fly ash at mass ratios of water-to-fly ash from 0.30 to 0.35. Fluidity was in the range of 145-173 mm for pastes and 131-136 mm for mortars. The highest strengths of paste and mortar were 58 MPa and 85 MPa when they were cured at 70 °C for 24 h. In XRD patterns, unreacted quartz and some reacted product were observed. SEM examination indicated that reacted product has formed and covered the unreacted particles in the paste and mortar that were consistent with their high strength.

  12. Characterization of fly ash from the gasification of wood and assessment for its application as a soil amendment

    Treesearch

    Hui Pan; Thomas L. Eberhardt

    2011-01-01

    Fly ash was collected as a byproduct from the processing of southern pine wood chips in a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. General properties of the fly ash were determined to assess its applicability as a soil amendment. Its alkaline pH (9.5) and high concentrations of Ca, K, and Mg suggest that it could be used as both a liming agent and a fertilizer. The...

  13. Instrumental activation analysis of coal and fly ash with thermal and epithermal neutrons and short-lived nuclides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinnes, E.; Rowe, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis is applied to the determination of about 25 elements in coals and fly ash by means of nuclides with half-lives of less than 48 h ; thermal and epithermal irradiations are used. The results indicate that epithermal activation is preferable for twelve of the elements (Ga, As, Br, Sr, In, Cs, Ba, La, Sm, Ho, W and U). Data for SRM 1632 (coal) and SRM 1633 (fly ash) compare favorably with the results obtained by other investigators. ?? 1976.

  14. Destruction kinetic of PCDDs/Fs in MSWI fly ash using microwave peroxide oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Min; Fang, Wen-Bin; Tsai, Kuo-Sheng; Kao, Jimmy C M; Lin, Kae-Long; Chen, Ching-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Microwave peroxide oxidation is a less greenhouse gas emission and energy-efficient technology to destroy toxic organic compounds in hazardous waste. The research novelty is to adopt the innovative microwave peroxide oxidation in H2SO4/HNO3 solution to efficiently destroy the polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs)/Fs in municipal solid waste incineration fly ash. The major objective of this paper is to study dynamic destruction of PCDDs/Fs using the microwave peroxide oxidation. Almost all PCDDs/Fs in the raw fly ash can be destructed in 120 min at a temperature of 423 K using the microwave peroxide oxidation treatment. It was found that the microwave peroxide oxidation provides the potential to destruct the PCDDs/Fs content in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash to a low level as a function of treatment time. A useful kinetic correlation between destruction efficiency and treatment conditions is proposed on the basis of the experimental data obtained in this study. The significance of this work in terms of practical engineering applications is that the necessary minimum treatment time can be solved using a proposed graphic illustration method, by which the minimum treatment time is obtained if the desired destruction efficiency and treatment temperature are known. Because of inorganic salt dissolution, the temperature would be a critical factor facilitating the parts of fly ash dissolution. Material loss problem caused by the microwave peroxide oxidation and the effects of treatment time and temperature are also discussed in this paper.

  15. Environmental, physical and structural characterisation of geopolymer matrixes synthesised from coal (co-)combustion fly ashes.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ayuso, E; Querol, X; Plana, F; Alastuey, A; Moreno, N; Izquierdo, M; Font, O; Moreno, T; Diez, S; Vázquez, E; Barra, M

    2008-06-15

    The synthesis of geopolymer matrixes from coal (co-)combustion fly ashes as the sole source of silica and alumina has been studied in order to assess both their capacity to immobilise the potentially toxic elements contained in these coal (co-)combustion by-products and their suitability to be used as cement replacements. The geopolymerisation process has been performed using (5, 8 and 12 M) NaOH solutions as activation media and different curing time (6-48 h) and temperature (40-80 degrees C) conditions. Synthesised geopolymers have been characterised with regard to their leaching behaviour, following the DIN 38414-S4 [DIN 38414-S4, Determination of leachability by water (S4), group S: sludge and sediments. German standard methods for the examination of water, waste water and sludge. Institut für Normung, Berlin, 1984] and NEN 7375 [NEN 7375, Leaching characteristics of moulded or monolithic building and waste materials. Determination of leaching of inorganic components with the diffusion test. Netherlands Normalisation Institute, Delft, 2004] procedures, and to their structural stability by means of compressive strength measurements. In addition, geopolymer mineralogy, morphology and structure have been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), respectively. It was found that synthesised geopolymer matrixes were only effective in the chemical immobilisation of a number of elements of environmental concern contained in fly ashes, reducing (especially for Ba), or maintaining their leachable contents after the geopolymerisation process, but not for those elements present as oxyanions. Physical entrapment does not seem either to contribute in an important way, in general, to the immobilisation of oxyanions. The structural stability of synthesised geopolymers was mainly dependent on the glass content of fly ashes, attaining at the optimal activation conditions (12 M NaOH, 48 h, 80

  16. Optimisation of nano-silica modified self-compacting high-Volume fly ash mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achara, Bitrus Emmanuel; Mohammed, Bashar S.; Fadhil Nuruddin, Muhd

    2017-05-01

    Evaluation of the effects of nano-silica amount and superplasticizer (SP) dosage on the compressive strength, porosity and slump flow on high-volume fly ash self-consolidating mortar was investigated. Multiobjective optimisation technique using Design-Expert software was applied to obtain solution based on desirability function that simultaneously optimises the variables and the responses. A desirability function of 0.811 gives the optimised solution. The experimental and predicted results showed minimal errors in all the measured responses.

  17. Immobilization of MSWI fly ash through geopolymerization: effects of water-wash.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Wang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Shi, Yunchun; Gao, Xingbao

    2011-02-01

    The present research explored the role played by water-wash on geopolymerization for the immobilization and solidification of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash. The water-wash pretreatment substantially promoted the early strength of geopolymer and resulted in a higher ultimate strength compared to the counterpart without water-wash. XRD pattern of water-washed fly ash (WFA) revealed that NaCl and KCl were nearly eliminated in the WFA. Aside from geopolymer, ettringite (Ca(6)Al(2)(SO(4))(3)(OH)(12)·26H(2)O) was formed in MSWI fly ash-based geopolymer (Geo-FA). Meanwhile, calcium aluminate hydrate (Ca(2)Al(OH)(7)·3H(2)O), not ettringite, appeared in geopolymer that was synthesized with water-washed fly ash (Geo-WFA). Leached Geo-WFA (Geo-WFA-L) did not exhibit any signs of deterioration, while there was visual cracking on the surface of leached Geo-FA (Geo-FA-L). The crack may be caused by the migration of K(+), Na(+), and Cl(-) ions outside Geo-FA and the negative effect from crystallization of expansive compounds can not be excluded. Furthermore, transformation of calcium aluminate hydrate in Geo-WFA to ettringite in Geo-WFA-L allowed the reduction of the pore size of the specimen. IR spectrums suggested that Geo-WFA can supply more stable chemical encapsulation for heavy metals. Static monolithic leaching tests were conducted for geopolymers to estimate the immobilization efficiency. Heavy metal leaching was elucidated using the first-order reaction/diffusion model. Combined with the results from compressive strength and microstructure of samples, the effects of water-wash on immobilization were inferred in this study. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mineralogy, chemical composition, and microstructure of ferrospheres in fly ashes from coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Yongchun Zhao; Junying Zhang; Junmin Sun

    2006-08-15

    Fourteen samples of coal and ferrospheres, which were recovered by dry magnetic separation from fly ashes, were collected from five power plants in China. The mineralogy, chemical composition, and microstructure of ferrospheres in fly ashes have been studied by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FSEM-EDX). Iron in ferrospheres mainly occurs as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, {alpha}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and Fe{sup 3+}-glass, ferrian spinel, and so on. On the basis of iron content, the ferrospheres in fly ashes are classified into four groups,more » namely ferrooxides, aluminosilicate-bearing ferrooxides, high-ferriferous aluminosilicates, and ferroaluminosilicates . Ferrooxides are derived from the oxidation of iron-bearing minerals, whereas aluminosilicate-bearing ferrooxides, high-ferriferous aluminosilicates, and ferroaluminosilicates are formed by the fusion of different proportions of inherent iron-bearing minerals and clay minerals. According to their microstructure, the ferrospheres in fly ashes are classified into seven groups, namely sheet ferrospheres, dendritic ferrospheres, granular ferrospheres, smooth ferrospheres, ferroplerospheres, porous ferrospheres, and molten drop ferrospheres. Sheet ferrospheres are derived from the oxidation of iron-bearing minerals immediately; smooth ferrospheres, molten drop ferrospheres, ferroplerospheres, and porous ferrospheres are the complex eutectic of inherent iron-bearing minerals and clay minerals; dendritic ferrospheres and granular ferrospheres are formed by the conglutination after the oxidation of iron-bearing minerals. Ferrooxides and aluminosilicate-bearing ferrooxides are important sources of the initial layer that occurs in deposits formed in coal-burning systems. 78 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.« less

  19. Gaseous mercury from curing concretes that contain fly ash: laboratory measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Danold W. Golightly; Ping Sun; Chin-Min Cheng

    2005-08-01

    Total gaseous mercury in headspace air was measured for enclosed concretes dry curing at 40 C for intervals of 2, 28, and 56 days. Release of mercury was confirmed for ordinary Portland cement concrete (OPC) and three concretes in which class F fly ash from coal-combustion substituted for a fraction of the cement: (a) 33% fly ash (FA33), (b) 55% fly ash (FA55), and (c) 33% fly ash plus 0.5% mercury-loaded powdered activated carbon (HgPAC). Mean rates of mercury release (0.10-0.43 ng/day per kg of concrete) over the standard first 28 days of curing followed the order OPC {lt} FA33more » {approximately} FA55 {lt} HgPAC. The mercury flux from exposed surfaces of these concretes ranged from 1.9 {+-} 0.5 to 8.1 {+-} 2.0 ng/m{sup 2}/h, values similar to the average flux for multiple natural substrates in Nevada, 4.2 {+-} 1.4 ng/m{sup 2}/h, recently published by others. Air sampling extending for 28 days beyond the initial 28-day maturation for OPC, FA55, and HgPAC suggested that the average Hg release rate by OPC is constant over 56 days and that mercury release rates for FA55 and HgPAC may ultimately diminish to levels exhibited by OPC concrete. The release of mercury from all samples was less than 0.1% of total mercury content over the initial curing period, implying that nearly all of the mercury was retained in the concrete. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.« less

  20. Performance of fly ash based geopolymer incorporating palm kernel shell for lightweight concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, Rafiza Abd; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Yahya, Zarina; Jian, Ang Zhi; Nasri, Armia

    2017-09-01

    A concrete which cement is totally replaced by source material such as fly ash and activated by highly alkaline solutions is known as geopolymer concrete. Fly ash is the most common source material for geopolymer because it is a by-product material, so it can get easily from all around the world. An investigation has been carried out to select the most suitable ingredients of geopolymer concrete so that the geopolymer concrete can achieve the desire compressive strength. The samples were prepared to determine the suitable percentage of palm kernel shell used in geopolymer concrete and cured for 7 days in oven. After that, other samples were prepared by using the suitable percentage of palm kernel shell and cured for 3, 14, 21 and 28 days in oven. The control sample consisting of ordinary Portland cement and palm kernel shell and cured for 28 days were prepared too. The NaOH concentration of 12M, ratio Na2SiO3 to NaOH of 2.5, ratio fly ash to alkaline activator solution of 2.0 and ratio water to geopolymer of 0.35 were fixed throughout the research. The density obtained for the samples were 1.78 kg/m3, water absorption of 20.41% and the compressive strength of 14.20 MPa. The compressive strength of geopolymer concrete is still acceptable as lightweight concrete although the compressive strength is lower than OPC concrete. Therefore, the proposed method by using fly ash mixed with 10% of palm kernel shell can be used to design geopolymer concrete.

  1. Improving lithium-ion battery performances by adding fly ash from coal combustion on cathode film

    SciTech Connect

    Dyartanti, Endah Retno; Jumari, Arif, E-mail: arifjumari@yahoo.com; Nur, Adrian

    A lithium battery is composed of anode, cathode and a separator. The performance of lithium battery is also influenced by the conductive material of cathode film. In this research, the use of fly ash from coal combustion as conductive enhancer for increasing the performances of lithium battery was investigated. Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO{sub 4}) was used as the active material of cathode. The dry fly ash passed through 200 mesh screen, LiFePO{sub 4} and acethylene black (AB), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a binder and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent were mixed to form slurry. The slurry was then coated, driedmore » and hot pressed to obtain the cathode film. The ratio of fly ash and AB were varied at the values of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5% while the other components were at constant. The anode film was casted with certain thickness and composition. The performance of battery lithium was examined by Eight Channel Battery Analyzer, the composition of the cathode film was examined by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), and the structure and morphology of the anode film was analyzed by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). The composition, structure and morphology of cathode film was only different when fly ash added was 4% of AB or more. The addition of 2% of AB on cathode film gave the best performance of 81.712 mAh/g on charging and 79.412 mAh/g on discharging.« less

  2. Stabilization of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash using silica fume

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinying; Chen, Quanyuan; State Environmental Protection Engineering Center for Pollution Treatment and Control in Textile Industry, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620

    Highlights: • The stabilization of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash was investigated. • The addition of silica fume effectively reduced the leaching of Pb and Cd. • The relation of solid phase transformation and leaching behavior of heavy metals was discussed. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of silica fume on stabilizing heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash. In addition to compressive strength measurements, hydrated pastes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal-analyses (DTA/TG), and MAS NMR ({sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si) techniques. It was found thatmore » silica fume additions could effectively reduce the leaching of toxic heavy metals. At the addition of 20% silica fume, leaching concentrations for Cu, Pb and Zn of the hydrated paste cured for 7 days decreased from 0.32 mg/L to 0.05 mg/L, 40.99 mg/L to 4.40 mg/L, and 6.96 mg/L to 0.21 mg/L compared with the MSWI fly ash. After curing for 135 days, Cd and Pb in the leachates were not detected, while Cu and Zn concentrations decreased to 0.02 mg/L and 0.03 mg/L. The speciation of Pb and Cd by the modified version of the European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) extractions showed that these metals converted into more stable state in hydrated pastes of MSWI fly ash in the presence of silica fume. Although exchangeable and weak-acid soluble fractions of Cu and Zn increased with hydration time, silica fume addition of 10% can satisfy the requirement of detoxification for heavy metals investigated in terms of the identification standard of hazardous waste of China.« less

  3. Use of fly-ash slurry in backfill grouting in coal mines.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ning; Zhao, Jinhai; Sun, Xizhen; Bai, Liyang; Wang, Changxiang

    2017-11-01

    Cave backfill grouting implies grouting of the caving rock mass prior to it being compacted. The filling materials strengthen the caving rock and support the overlying strata to achieve the purpose of slowing down the surface subsidence. The broken roof will fail and collapse during mining operations performed without appropriate supporting measures being taken. It is difficult to perform continuous backfill mining on the working face of such roofs using the existing mining technology. In order to solve the above problems, fly ash and mine water are considered as filling materials, and flow characteristics of fly-ash slurry are investigated through laboratory experiments and theoretical analyses. Laws governing the diffusion of fly-ash slurry in the void of caving rock masses and in the void between a caving rock mass and a basic roof are obtained and verified. Based on the results obtained from the above analyses and actual conditions at the Zhaoguan coal mine, Shandong Province, China, a cave backfill grouting system of the hauling pipeline is developed and successfully tested at the 1703 working face in the Zhaoguan coal mine. The results demonstrate that a filling rate of 43.46% is achieved, and the surface subsidence coefficient of the grouting process is found to be 0.475. Compared to the total caving method, the proposed system is found to achieve a reduction rate of 40.63%. This effectively helps in lowering the value of the surface subsidence coefficient. Fly ash and mine water, considered as primary materials in this study, also play a significant role in improving the air quality and water environment.

  4. Use of Fly Ash in the Mitigation of Alkali-Silica Reaction in Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-12

    in Proceedings of teh International Symposium on Advances in Concrete Technology . 1992. 36. Siddique, R. and J. Klaus, Influence of metakaolin on...Fly Ash in Concrete, in Canada Center for Mineral and Energy Technology , Natural Resources Canada, , CANMET , Editor. 1994, MSL 94-45(IR): Ottawa...Proceedings of teh International Symposium on Advances in Concrete Technology . 1992. 36. Siddique, R. and J. Klaus, Influence of metakaolin on the

  5. Experimental Study on Rise Husk Ash & Fly Ash Based Geo-Polymer Concrete Using M-Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda Kishore, G.; Gayathri, B.

    2017-08-01

    Serious environmental problems by means of increasing the production of Ordinary Portland cement (OPC), which is conventionally used as the primary binder to produce cement concrete. An attempt has been made to reduce the use of ordinary Portland cement in cement concrete. There is no standard mix design of geo-polymer concrete, an effort has been made to know the physical, chemical properties and optimum mix of geo-polymer concrete mix design. Concrete cubes of 100 x 100 x 100 mm were prepared and cured under steam curing for about 24 hours at temperature range of 40°C to 60°C. Fly ash is replaced partially with rice husk ash at percentage of 10%, 15% and 25%. Sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate are of used as alkaline activators with 5 Molar and 10 Molar NaOH solutions. Natural sand is replaced with manufacture sand. Test results were compared with controlled concrete mix of grade M30. The results shows that as the percentage of rice husk ash and water content increases, compressive strength will be decreases and as molarity of the alkaline solution increases, strength will be increases.

  6. Can washing-pretreatment eliminate the health risk of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash reuse?

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Pan, Yun; Zhang, Lingen; Yue, Yang; Zhou, Jizhi; Xu, Yunfeng; Qian, Guangren

    2015-01-01

    Although the reuse of washing-pretreated MSWI fly ash bas been a hot topic, the associated risk is still an issue of great concern. The present study investigated the influence of washing-pretreatment on the total contents and bioaccessibility of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash. Furthermore, the study incorporated bioaccessibility adjustment into probabilistic risk assessment, to quantify the health risk from multi-pathway exposure to the concerned chemicals as a result of reusing washed MSWI fly ash. The results revealed that both water-washing and acid-washing process have resulted in the concentrated heavy metal content, and have reduced the bioaccessibility of heavy metals. Besides, the acid-washing process increased the cancer risk in most cases, while the effect of water-washing process was uncertain. However, both water-washing and acid-washing pretreatment could decrease the hazard index based on bioaccesilbility. Despite the uncertainties accompanying these procedures, the results indicated that, in this application scenario, only water-washing or acid-washing process cannot reduce the actual risk from all samples to acceptable level, especially for cancer risk. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Coal fly ash based carbons for SO2 removal from flue gases.

    PubMed

    Rubio, B; Izquierdo, M T

    2010-07-01

    Two different coal fly ashes coming from the burning of two coals of different rank have been used as a precursor for the preparation of steam activated carbons. The performance of these activated carbons in the SO(2) removal was evaluated at flue gas conditions (100 degrees C, 1000 ppmv SO(2), 5% O(2), 6% H(2)O). Different techniques were used to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of the samples in order to explain the differences found in their behaviour. A superior SO(2) removal capacity was shown by the activated carbon obtained using the fly ash coming from a sub-bituminous-lignite blend. Experimental results indicated that the presence of higher amount of certain metallic oxides (Ca, Fe) in the carbon-rich fraction of this fly ash probably has promoted a deeper gasification in the activation with steam. A more suitable surface chemistry and textural properties have been obtained in this case which explains the higher efficiency shown by this sample in the SO(2) removal. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Enrichment and oral bioaccessibility of selected trace elements in fly ash-derived magnetic components.

    PubMed

    Bourliva, Anna; Papadopoulou, Lambrini; Aidona, Elina; Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Vourlias, George; Devlin, Eamonn; Sanakis, Yiannis

    2017-01-01

    The mineralogy, morphology, and chemical composition of magnetic fractions separated from fly ashes (FAs) originating from Greek lignite-burning power plants was investigated. The oral bioaccessibility of potentially harmful elements (PHEs) from the fly ash magnetic fractions (FAMFs) was also assessed using in vitro gastrointestinal extraction (BARGE Unified Bioaccessibility Method, UBM). The FAMFs isolated were in the range 4.6-18.4%, and their mass specific magnetic susceptibility ranged from 1138 × 10 -8 to 1682 × 10 -8  m 3 /kg. XRD analysis and Mossbauer spectroscopy indicated that the dominant iron species were Fe-rich aluminosilicate glass along with magnetite, hematite, and maghemite (in decreasing order). The raw FAs exhibited differences in their chemical composition, indicating the particularity of every lignite basin. The elemental contents of FAMFs presented trends with fly ash type; thus, the FAMFs of high-Ca FAs were enriched in siderophile (Cr, Co, Ni) and lithophile (Cs, Li, Rb) elements and those separated from low-Ca FAs were presented depleted in chalcophile elements. Based on UBM extraction tests, the PHEs were more bioaccessible from the non-magnetic components of the FAs compared to the magnetic ones; however, the bioaccessible fractions estimated for the FAMFs were exceeding 40 % in many cases. Arsenic was found to be significantly bioaccessible (median ~ 80 %) from FAMFs despite the lower As contents in the magnetic fraction.

  9. Synthesis and adsorption properties of titanosilicates ETS-4 and ETS-10 from fly ash.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liying; Singh, Ranjeet; Li, Gang; Xiao, Penny; Webley, Paul; Zhai, Yuchun

    2011-11-15

    ETS-4 and ETS-10 titanosilicates were prepared from fly ash and anatase, as silica and titanium sources respectively, via a hydrothermal procedure for the first time. The fusion of fly ash by alkali was carried out at a relatively low temperature and the use potassium fluoride salt was avoided in the synthesis of ETS. The by-product of this process is mainly NaCl, which is a useful source material for industry. The energy efficiency and yield of the synthesis process was improved by directly recycling the final filtrate after recovering the product viz ETS-4. All the ETS materials were characterized in terms of structural morphology, thermal stability and surface/pore properties. The properties of ETS-4 prepared from fly ash by the filtrate recycling method were comparable to that from commercial sources. The results show that ETS type materials can be prepared from cheaper resources, with good purity, comparable physico-chemical properties as well as excellent adsorption properties with lower environmental impact. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Study on microstructure and tensile properties of fly ash AMCs welded by FSW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachinkumar, Narendranath, S.; Chakradhar, D.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum matrix composite (AMCs) constitute a new class of light weight and high strength materials which have widespread applications in almost all engineering sectors. But the cost of AMCs is the only barrier to increase their applications still. Hence there is a huge demand for the composites containing low cost reinforcement with less weight, keeping this in mind, in the present work, Friction stir welding (FSW) of AA6061/SiC/fly ash was carried out successfully. Microstructural study on the welded specimens was performed using optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results indicate that fly ash particles were uniformly distributed in the weld nugget area because of the stirring action of the FSW tool also promoted the grain refinement of the matrix material with complete elimination of clusters present in matrix material which resulting in sound welds without any defects for AA6061/SiC/fly ash composites. 82% of joint efficiency is obtained for selected AMCs. Transverse tensile test results showed that all welds fractured in HAZ.

  11. Methyl-orange and cadmium simultaneous removal using fly ash and photo-Fenton systems.

    PubMed

    Visa, Maria; Duta, Anca

    2013-01-15

    Wastewaters resulting from the textile and dye finishing industries need complex treatment for efficient removal of colour and other compounds existent in the dyeing and rising baths (heavy metals, surfactants, equalizers, etc.). Modified fly ash (FA) mixed with TiO(2) photocatalyst represent a viable option for simultaneous removal of dyes and heavy metals, and the optimized conditions are discussed in this paper for synthetic wastewaters containing methyl-orange (MO) and cadmium. For a cost-effective dye removal process, further tests were done, replacing the photocatalyst with a (photo)Fenton system. The optimized technological parameters (contact time, amount of fly ash and amount of Fe(2+)/H(2)O(2)) allow to reach removal efficiencies up to 88% for the heavy metal and up to 70% for the dye. The adsorption mechanisms and the process kinetic are discussed, also considering the possibility of in situ generation of the Fenton system, due to the fly ash composition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Removal of heavy metals from fly ash leachate using combined bioelectrochemical systems and electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hu-Chun; Lei, Tao; Shi, Gang; Sun, Xiao-Nan; Wei, Xue-Yan; Zhang, Li-Juan; Wu, Wei-Min

    2014-01-15

    Based on environmental and energetic analysis, a novel combined approach using bioelectrochemical systems (BES) followed by electrolysis reactors (ER) was tested for heavy metals removal from fly ash leachate, which contained high detectable levels of Zn, Pb and Cu according to X-ray diffraction analysis. Acetic acid was used as the fly ash leaching agent and tested under various leaching conditions. A favorable condition for the leaching process was identified to be liquid/solid ratio of 14:1 (w/w) and leaching duration 10h at initial pH 1.0. It was confirmed that the removal of heavy metals from fly ash leachate with the combination of BESs and ER is feasible. The metal removal efficiency was achieved at 98.5%, 95.4% and 98.1% for Cu(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II), respectively. Results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) indicated that Cu(II) was reduced and recovered mainly as metal Cu on cathodes related to power production, while Zn(II) and Pb(II) were not spontaneously reduced in BESs without applied voltage and basically electrolyzed in the electrolysis reactors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of washed MSWI fly ash in cement composites: long-term environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenzhou; Tian, Sicong; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong; Zhang, Zuotai

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, long-term environmental impacts of compact and ground cement composites, in which 30 wt.% of cement was replaced by washed municipal solid wastes incineration (MSWI) fly ash, were investigated for use in building industry. Consecutive leaching tests over a time span of 180 days were performed in acid water, deionized water, and saline water, respectively, with the accumulative concentration of different elements determined in the leachate. Different leaching behaviors are observed among different potential toxic elements (PTEs). For instance, higher concentrations of V in the leachate were observed from the compact cement composites than those from the ground ones. The concentration of Ba in the leachate increased with the decrease of particle size of the cement composites, and an initial increase in the leaching efficiency of Sn was followed by a clear decline with the leaching time. In addition, kinetic study revealed that the leaching behaviors of potential toxic elements follow a second-order model. The results demonstrated that the addition of washed MSWI fly ash into cement can contribute to the attrition resistance, indicating that the washed MSWI fly ash could be a promising alternative for cement as supplementary building materials.

  14. Investigation of effects of prolonged inhalation of nickel-enriched fly ash in Syrian Golden hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    Groups of 102 Male Syrian Golden hamsters were chronically exposed to approx. 70 micrograms/l respirable Nickel Enriched Fly Ash aerosol (high NEFA group), approx. 17 micrograms/l (low NEFA group), or approx. 70 micrograms/l FA 6 hrs/day, 5 days/week for 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 months. Identical control groups received sham exposures. The NEFA particles of respirable size contained approximately 6% nickel, compared to about 0.3% for FA. Exposure to NEFA had no significant effect on the apparent well being, body weight and life span of the animals although heavy deposits of NEFA in the lungs were found. The lungmore » weights and mean lung volumes of the high NEFA and FA exposed animals were significantly higher and larger, respectively, than for the low NEFA and control groups. There was a 100% incidence of dust deposition (anthracosis) and significantly higher incidence plus severity of interstitial reaction and bronchiolization in the dust-exposed groups than the controls. The severity of lung reactions was significantly lower in the low NEFA group than the high NEFA and FA groups. The results of this study conclude that the addition of nickel to fly ash under these conditions did not significantly (P< 0.05) enhance the pathogenicity (including carcinogenicity) of fly ash in this animal model.« less

  15. Direct synthesis of carbon nanofibers from South African coal fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintsho, Nomso; Shaikjee, Ahmed; Masenda, Hilary; Naidoo, Deena; Billing, Dave; Franklyn, Paul; Durbach, Shane

    2014-08-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs), cylindrical nanostructures containing graphene, were synthesized directly from South African fly ash (a waste product formed during the combustion of coal). The CNFs (as well as other carbonaceous materials like carbon nanotubes (CNTs)) were produced by the catalytic chemical vapour deposition method (CCVD) in the presence of acetylene gas at temperatures ranging from 400°C to 700°C. The fly ash and its carbonaceous products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), laser Raman spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements. It was observed that as-received fly ash was capable of producing CNFs in high yield by CCVD, starting at a relatively low temperature of 400°C. Laser Raman spectra and TGA thermograms showed that the carbonaceous products which formed were mostly disordered. Small bundles of CNTs and CNFs observed by TEM and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) showed that the catalyst most likely responsible for CNF formation was iron in the form of cementite; X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed these findings.

  16. Sustainability, Eco-Point and Engineering Performance of Different Workability OPC Fly-Ash Mortar Mixes.

    PubMed

    Razi, Putri Zulaiha; Abdul Razak, Hashim; Khalid, Nur Hafizah A

    2016-05-06

    This study investigates the engineering performance and CO₂ footprint of mortar mixers by replacing Portland cement with 10%, 20%, 40% and 60% fly ash, a common industrial waste material. Samples of self-compacting mortar (SCM) were prepared with four different water/binder ratios and varying dosages of superplasticizer to give three ranges of workability, i.e. , normal, high and self-compacting mortar mix. The engineering performance was assessed in term of compressive strength after designated curing periods for all mixes. CO₂ footprint was the environmental impact indicator of each production stage. The optimum mix obtained was at 10% replacement rate for all mixes. Total production emission reduced by 56% when the fly ash replacement rate increased from 0% to 60% (maximum). This is translated to a reduction of 80% in eco-points (assuming that the energy consumption rate of production with 0% fly ash is at 100%). Such re-utilization is encouraged since it is able to reduce possible soil toxicity due to sulfur leaching by 5% to 27% and landfill area by 15% to 91% on average.

  17. Mechanical properties and microstructure analysis of fly ash geopolymeric recycled concrete.

    PubMed

    Shi, X S; Collins, F G; Zhao, X L; Wang, Q Y

    2012-10-30

    Six mixtures with different recycled aggregate (RA) replacement ratios of 0%, 50% and 100% were designed to manufacture recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) and alkali-activated fly ash geopolymeric recycled concrete (GRC). The physical and mechanical properties were investigated indicating different performances from each other. Optical microscopy under transmitted light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were carried out in this study in order to identify the mechanism underlying the effects of the geopolymer and RA on concrete properties. The features of aggregates, paste and interfacial transition zone (ITZ) were compared and discussed. Experimental results indicate that using alkali-activated fly ash geopolymer as replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) effectively improved the compressive strength. With increasing of RA contents in both RAC and GRC, the compressive strength decreased gradually. The microstructure analysis shows that, on one hand, the presence of RA weakens the strength of the aggregates and the structure of ITZs; on the other hand, due to the alkali-activated fly ash in geopolymer concrete, the contents of Portlandite (Ca(OH)(2)) and voids were reduced, as well as improved the matrix homogeneity. The microstructure of GRC was changed by different reaction products, such as aluminosilicate gel. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Unburnt carbon from coal fly ashes as a precursor of activated carbon for nitric oxide removal.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Begoña; Izquierdo, M Teresa; Mayoral, M Carmen; Bona, M Teresa; Andres, Jose M

    2007-05-08

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the characteristics of an activated carbon obtained from unburnt carbon in coal fly ashes to be used in the removal of NO. Carbon-rich fraction was obtained by mechanical sieving of fly ashes. The mineral matter was removed by conventional HCl and HF demineralization procedure. Activation was carried out with steam at 900 degrees C in order to develop porosity onto the sample. Characterization of samples was performed by several techniques with a main objective: to follow the mineral matter content, composition and distribution on the samples in order to better understand how to remove it from unburnt carbon in fly ashes. To study the use of this unburnt carbon as a precursor for the preparation of activated carbons for gas cleaning, the NO removal by ammonia using activated carbon as a catalyst at low temperature was performed. Results show a good performance of activated carbon in this reaction that is in relationship with BET surface area.

  19. Biomarker responses in the earthworm, Dichogaster curgensis exposed to fly ash polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Markad, Vijaykumar L; Gaupale, Tekchand C; Bhargava, Shobha; Kodam, Kisan M; Ghole, Vikram S

    2015-08-01

    Earthworms are globally accepted as a model organism in terrestrial ecotoxicology for assessment of environmental pollution. This study evaluated and compared effects of fly ash polluted soils collected from two geographically different thermal power plants on biomarker responses in the earthworm, Dichogaster curgensis. To evaluate relationship between distance sampling and biomarker responses in the earthworm D. curgensis, soil samples at 0.5, 1 and 3km from thermal plant were analyzed for physico-chemical properties and metal concentrations. Biochemical alterations, lysosomal membrane stability, genotoxic effects, and histological changes were examined on 1, 7, and 14 d of exposure to fly ash contaminated soils collected from different thermal power plants. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly increased, while glutathione reductase (GR) activity was found to be decreased in treated animals. Catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S- transferase (GST) activities were found to be increased initially up to 7d exposure and further decreased on 14d exposure. D. curgensis exposed to fly ash contaminated soils showed significant lysosomal membrane destabilization and DNA damage. Extensive histopathological changes were observed in the tissues of the body wall and intestinal tract of the exposed D. curgensis along with accumulation of heavy metals. These results demonstrate that soil pollution around thermal power plants has adverse biological effects of on the indicator organism D. curgensis and no correlation was found between distance and extent of biological biochemical responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanical Properties and Shear Strengthening Capacity of High Volume Fly Ash-Cementitious Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Aswin K.; Anand, K. B.

    2018-02-01

    This paper discusses development of Poly Vinyl Alcohol (PVA) fibre reinforced cementitious composites taking into account environmental sustainability. Composites with fly ash to cement ratios from 0 to 3 are investigated in this study. The mechanical properties of HVFA-cement composite are discussed in this paper at PVA fiber volume fraction maintained at 1% of total volume of composite. The optimum replacement of cement with fly ash was found to be 75%, i.e. fly ash to cement ratio (FA/C) of 3. The increase in fiber content from 1% to 2% showed better mechanical performance. A strain capacity of 2.38% was obtained for FA/C ratio of 3 with 2% volume fraction of fiber. With the objective of evaluating the performance of cementitious composites as a strengthening material in reinforced concrete beams, the beams deficient in shear capacity were strengthened with optimal mix having 2% volume fraction of fiber as the strengthening material and tested under four-point load. The reinforced concrete beams designed as shear deficient were loaded to failure and retrofitted with the composite in order to assess the efficiency as a repair material under shear.

  1. Removal of Cr6 + and Ni2+ from aqueous solution using bagasse and fly ash.

    PubMed

    Rao, M; Parwate, A V; Bhole, A G

    2002-01-01

    Raw bagasse and fly ash, the waste generated in sugar mills and boilers respectively have been used as low-cost potential adsorbents. Raw bagasse was pretreated with 0.1N NaOH followed by 0.1N CH3COOH before its application. These low-cost adsorbents were used for the removal of chromium and nickel from an aqueous solution. The kinetics of adsorption and extent of adsorption at equilibrium are dependent on the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, adsorbate and experimental system. The effect of hydrogen ion concentration, contact time, sorbent dose, initial concentrations of adsorbate and adsorbent and particle size on the uptake of chromium and nickel were studied in batch experiments. The Sorption data has been correlated with Langmuir, Freundlich and Bhattacharya and Venkobachar adsorption models. The efficiencies of adsorbent materials for the removal of Cr(VI) and Ni(II) were found to be between 56.2 and 96.2% and 83.6 and 100%, respectively. These results were obtained at the optimized conditions of pH, contact time, sorbent dose, sorbate concentration of 100 mg/l and with the variation of adsorbent particles size between 0.075 and 4.75 mm. The order of selectivity is powdered activated carbon > bagasse > fly ash for Cr(VI) removal and powdered activated carbon > fly ash > bagasse for Ni(II) removal.

  2. Pervious concrete using fly ash aggregate as coarse aggregate-an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Subhakanta; Kar, Biswabandita; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

    2018-05-01

    The present study deals with the fabrication of pervious concrete from fly ash aggregates. The pervious concrete were obtained by the mixture of three different size fly ash aggregates (4.75 mm,9.5 mm,12.5 mm), Portland cement, water with little amount of sand or without sand. Admixtures like Silica fume(SF) and Super plasticizer are added to the mixture to enhance the strength of concrete. Trial being taken on preparation of Fly ash based pervious concrete (FPC) with different w/c ratio i.e. 0.30, 0.35 and 0.40 respectively. Tests such as porosity, permeability and compressive, strength are studied for this concrete material and the result concluded that the concrete when cured for 28 days its compressive strength falls in between 7.15 - 15.74 MPa and permeability 9.38 - 16.07 mm/s with porosity 27.59 - 34.05% and these are suited to be used as for use as an environment friendly concrete.

  3. In-situ study of beneficial utilization of coal fly ash in reactive mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Kyu; Shang, Julie Q; Wang, Hongliu; Zhao, Cheng

    2014-03-15

    Oxidation of reactive mine tailings and subsequent generation of acid mine drainage (AMD) have been long recognized as the largest environmental concern for the mining industry. Laboratory studies on utilization of coal fly ash in management of reactive mine tailings have shown reducing water and oxygen infiltration into tailings matrix, thus preventing oxidation of sulphide minerals and acid generation. However, few data from field studies to evaluate the performance of co-placement of mine tailings and fly ash (CMF hereafter) are reported in the open literature. This paper documents the construction and instrumentation of three CMF systems on the Musselwhite mine located in Ontario, Canada and presents results of 3-year real time monitoring. The field data indicates that the CMFs reduced the ingress of water due to cementation generated by hydration of fly ash. It was also found that the electrical conductivity of leachate from CMFs decreased in the early stage of co-placement, compared to the control. With further study, the principle and approach demonstrated in this paper can be adopted as a sustainable technology in the mine tailings management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Very high volume fly ash green concrete for applications in India.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Mishra, Dhanada K; Wu, Chang; Leung, Christopher Ky

    2018-06-01

    Safe disposal of fly ash generated by coal-based thermal power plants continues to pose significant challenges around the world and in India in particular. Green structural concrete with 80% cement replaced by local Chinese fly ash has been recently developed to achieve a target characteristic compressive strength of 45 MPa. Such green concrete mixes are not only cheaper in cost, but also embody lower energy and carbon footprint, compared with conventional mixes. This study aims to adopt such materials using no less than 80% fly ash as binder in routine concrete works in countries like India with the commonly used lower target characteristic compressive strength of 30 MPa. It is achieved by the simple and practical method of adjusting the water/binder ratio and/or superplasticiser dosage. The proposed green concrete shows encouraging mechanical properties at 7 days and 28 days, as well as much lower material cost and environmental impact compared with commercial Grade 30 concrete. This technology can play an important role in meeting the huge infrastructure demands in India in a sustainable manner.

  5. Alkali-activated concrete with Serbian fly ash and its radiological impact.

    PubMed

    Nuccetelli, Cristina; Trevisi, Rosabianca; Ignjatović, Ivan; Dragaš, Jelena

    2017-03-01

    The present paper reports the results of a study on different types of fly ash from Serbian coal burning power plants and their potential use as a binder in alkali-activated concrete (AAC) depending on their radiological and mechanical properties. Five AAC mixtures with different types of coal burning fly ash and one type of blast furnace slag were designed. Measurements of the activity concentrations of 40 K, 226 Ra and 232 Th were done both on concrete constituents (fly ash, blast furnace slag and aggregate) and on the five solid AAC samples. Experimental results were compared by using the activity concentration assessment tool for building materials - the activity concentration index I, as introduced by the EU Basic Safety Standards (CE, 2014). All five designed alkali-activated concretes comply with EU BSS screening requirements for indoor building materials. Finally, index I values were compared with the results of the application of a more accurate index - I(ρd), which accounts for thickness and density of building materials (Nuccetelli et al., 2015a). Considering the actual density and thickness of each concrete sample index - I(ρd) values are lower than index I values. As an appendix, a synthesis of main results concerning mechanical and chemical properties is provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sustainability, Eco-Point and Engineering Performance of Different Workability OPC Fly-Ash Mortar Mixes

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Putri Zulaiha; Abdul Razak, Hashim; Khalid, Nur Hafizah A.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the engineering performance and CO2 footprint of mortar mixers by replacing Portland cement with 10%, 20%, 40% and 60% fly ash, a common industrial waste material. Samples of self-compacting mortar (SCM) were prepared with four different water/binder ratios and varying dosages of superplasticizer to give three ranges of workability, i.e., normal, high and self-compacting mortar mix. The engineering performance was assessed in term of compressive strength after designated curing periods for all mixes. CO2 footprint was the environmental impact indicator of each production stage. The optimum mix obtained was at 10% replacement rate for all mixes. Total production emission reduced by 56% when the fly ash replacement rate increased from 0% to 60% (maximum). This is translated to a reduction of 80% in eco-points (assuming that the energy consumption rate of production with 0% fly ash is at 100%). Such re-utilization is encouraged since it is able to reduce possible soil toxicity due to sulfur leaching by 5% to 27% and landfill area by 15% to 91% on average. PMID:28773465

  7. Heavy metal removal from MSS fly ash by thermal and chlorination treatments

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyong; Chen, Jiacong; Huang, Limao

    2015-01-01

    The thermal behavior of heavy metals in the co-incineration of municipal solid waste-sludge incinerator fly ash (MSS fly ash) was studied using a laboratory-scale tube furnace. The results indicate that without the addition of chlorinating agents, temperature was an important parameter and had significantly influenced on heavy metal removal, whereas the residence time had a weak effect. Between 900 and 1000 °C for 60 to 300 min, heavy metals reacted with chloride-inherent in the fly ash, and approximately 80 to 89% of Pb, 48% to 56% of Cd, 27% to 36% of Zn and 6% to 24% of Cu were removed. After the adding chlorinating agents, the evaporation rate of the heavy metals improved dramatically, where the evaporation rates of Cu and Zn were larger than that of Pb and Cd. As the amount of added chlorinating agents increased, the removal rate of heavy metals increased. However, the effect of the type of chlorinating agent on the chlorination of heavy metals differed considerably, where NaCl had the weakest effect on the removal rate of Cu, Cd and Zn. In terms of resource recovery and decontamination, MgCl2 and CaCl2 are the best choices due to their efficient removal of Zn. PMID:26602592

  8. Experimental study of influence characteristics of flue gas fly ash on acid dew point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jinhui; Li, Jiahu; Wang, Shuai; Yuan, Hui; Ren, Zhongqiang

    2017-12-01

    The long-term operation experience of a large number of utility boilers shows that the measured value of acid dew point is generally lower than estimated value. This is because the influence of CaO and MgO on acid dew point in flue gas fly ash is not considered in the estimation formula of acid dew point. On the basis of previous studies, the experimental device for acid dew point measurement was designed and constructed, and the acid dew point under different smoke conditions was measured. The results show that the CaO and MgO in the flue gas fly ash have an obvious influence on the acid dew point, and the content of the fly ash is negatively correlated with the temperature of acid dew point At the same time, the concentration of H2SO4 in flue gas is different, and the acid dew point of flue gas is different, and positively correlated with the acid dew point.

  9. Graphene/fly ash geopolymeric composites as self-sensing structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saafi, Mohamed; Tang, Leung; Fung, Jason; Rahman, Mahbubur; Sillars, Fiona; Liggat, John; Zhou, Xiangming

    2014-06-01

    The reduction of graphene oxide during the processing of fly ash-based geopolymers offers a completely new way of developing low-cost multifunctional materials with significantly improved mechanical and electrical properties for civil engineering applications such as bridges, buildings and roads. In this paper, we present for the first time the self-sensing capabilities of fly ash-based geopolymeric composites containing in situ reduced graphene oxide (rGO). Geopolymeric composites with rGO concentrations of 0.0, 0.1 and 0.35% by weight were prepared and their morphology and conductivity were determined. The piezoresistive effect of the rGO-geopolymeric composites was also determined under tension and compression. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results indicate that the rGO sheets can easily be reduced during synthesis of geopolymers due to the effect of the alkaline solution on the functional groups of GO. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed that the majority of pores and voids within the geopolymers were significantly reduced due to the addition of rGO. The rGO increased the electrical conductivity of the fly ash-based rGO-geopolymeric composites from 0.77 S m-1 at 0.0 wt% to 2.38 S m-1 at 0.35 wt%. The rGO also increased the gauge factor by as much as 112% and 103% for samples subjected to tension and compression, respectively.

  10. Acceleration of Intended Pozzolanic Reaction under Initial Thermal Treatment for Developing Cementless Fly Ash Based Mortar.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yang-Hee; Kang, Sung-Hoon; Hong, Sung-Gul; Moon, Juhyuk

    2017-02-24

    Without using strong alkaline solution or ordinary Portland cement, a new structural binder consisting of fly ash and hydrated lime was hardened through an intensified pozzolanic reaction. The main experimental variables are the addition of silica fume and initial thermal treatment (60 °C for 3 days). A series of experiments consisting of mechanical testing (compressive and flexural strength, modulus of elasticity), X-ray diffraction, and measurements of the heat of hydration, pore structure, and shrinkage were conducted. These tests show that this new fly ash-based mortar has a compressive strength of 15 MPa at 91 days without any silica fume addition or initial thermal treatment. The strength increased to over 50 MPa based on the acceleration of the intensified pozzolanic reaction from the silica fume addition and initial thermal treatment. This is explained by a significant synergistic effect induced by the silica fume. It intensifies the pozzolanic reaction under thermal treatment and provides a space filling effect. This improved material performance can open a new pathway to utilize the industrial by-product of fly ash in cementless construction materials.

  11. Physical and chemical characterization of fly ashes from Swiss waste incineration plants and determination of the ash fraction in the nanometer range.

    PubMed

    Buha, Jelena; Mueller, Nicole; Nowack, Bernd; Ulrich, Andrea; Losert, Sabrina; Wang, Jing

    2014-05-06

    Waste incineration had been identified as an important source of ultrafine air pollutants resulting in elaborated treatment systems for exhaust air. Nowadays, these systems are able to remove almost all ultrafine particles. However, the fate of ultrafine particles caught in the filters has received little attention so far. Based on the use of engineered nano-objects (ENO) and their transfer into the waste stream, it can be expected that not only combustion generated nanoparticles are found in fly ashes but that many ENO finally end up in this matrix. A more detailed characterization of the nanoparticulate fraction of fly ashes is therefore needed. Physical and chemical characterizations were performed for fly ashes from five selected waste incineration plants (WIPs) with different input materials such as municipal waste, wood and sewage sludge. The intrinsic densities of the fly ashes were in the range of 2.7-3.2 g/cm(3). When the fly ash particle became airborne, the effective density depended on the particle size, increasing from 0.7-0.8 g/cm(3) for 100-150 nm to 2 g/cm(3) for 350-500 nm. The fly ash samples were fractionated at 2 μm, yielding fine fractions (<2 μm) and coarse fractions (>2 μm). The size distributions of the fine fractions in the airborne form were further characterized, which allowed calculation of the percentage of the fly ash particles below 100 nm. We found the highest mass-based percentage was about 0.07%; the number percentage in the fine fraction was in the range of 4.8% to 22%. Comparison with modeling results showed that ENO may constitute a considerable part of the fly ash particles below 100 nm. Chemical analyses showed that for the municipal waste samples Ca and Al were present in higher concentrations in the coarse fraction; for the mixed wood and sludge sample the P concentration was higher in the coarse fraction; for most other samples and elements they were enriched in the fine fraction. Electron microscopic images of fly ashes

  12. Microstructure and wear characterization of aluminum matrix composites reinforced with industrial waste fly ash particulates synthesized by friction stir processing

    SciTech Connect

    Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com

    Fly ash (FA) is a waste product of coal combustion in thermal power plants which is available in massive quantities all over the world causing land pollution. This paper reports the characterization of AA6061 aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) reinforced with FA particles synthesized using friction stir processing (FSP). The volume fraction of FA particles was varied from 0 to 18 in steps of 6. The prepared AMCs were characterized using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscattered diagram (EBSD). The wear rate was estimated using a pin-on-disc wear apparatus. FA particles were observed to be distributed homogeneouslymore » in the AMC irrespective of the location within the stir zone. The EBSD micrographs revealed remarkable grain refinement in the AMC. The incorporation of FA particles enhanced the microhardness and wear resistance of the AMC. The strengthening mechanisms of the AMC were discussed and correlated to the observed microstructures. The wear mechanisms were identified by characterizing the wear debris and worn surfaces. - Highlights: •Industrial waste fly ash was used to produce aluminum matrix composites. •Friction stir processing was used to produce AA6061/Fly Ash composite. •Fly ash particles refined the grains of aluminum matrix. •Fly ash particles enhanced the hardness and wear resistance. •Successful utilization of fly ash to make aluminum composites reduces land pollution.« less

  13. Particle size distribution of fly ash from co-incineration of bituminous coal with municipal solid waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieślik, Ewelina; Konieczny, Tomasz; Bobik, Bartłomiej

    2018-01-01

    One of the source of air pollutants is emission from local coal-fired boiler-houses and domestic heating boilers. The consequence of incineration of municipal waste is the introduction of additional pollutants into the atmosphere, including fly ash. The aim of this work was to evaluate the particle size distribution of fly ash emitted by coal combustion and co-incineration of coal with municipal waste in a domestic 18 kW central heating boiler equipped with an automatic fuel feeder. Mixtures of bituminous coal with different types of solid waste (5, 10 and 15% of mass fraction) were used. Solid waste types consisted of: printed, colored PE caps, fragmented cable trunking, fragmented car gaskets and shredded tires from trucks. During the incineration of a given mixture of municipal waste with bituminous coal, the velocity of exhaust gas was specified, the concentration and mass flow of fly ash were determined together with the physico-chemical parameters of the exhaust gas, the samples of emitted fly ash were taken as the test material. Particle size analysis of fly ash was performed using laser particle sizer Fritch Analysette 22. The PM10 share from all fly ashes from incineration of mixtures was about 100%. Differences were noted between PM2.5 and PM1.

  14. Influence of Blended Cements with Calcareous Fly Ash on Chloride Ion Migration and Carbonation Resistance of Concrete for Durable Structures.

    PubMed

    Glinicki, Michał A; Jóźwiak-Niedźwiedzka, Daria; Gibas, Karolina; Dąbrowski, Mariusz

    2016-01-02

    The objective of this paper is to examine the possible use of new blended cements containing calcareous fly ash in structural concrete, potentially adequate for structural elements of nuclear power plants. The investigation included five new cements made with different contents of non-clinker constituents: calcareous fly ash, siliceous fly ash, ground granulated blastfurnace slag, and a reference cement-ordinary Portland cement. The influence of innovative cements on the resistance of concrete to chloride and carbonation exposure was studied. Additionally, an evaluation of the microstructure was performed using optical microscopy on concrete thin sections. Test results revealed a substantial improvement of the resistance to chloride ion penetration into concrete containing blended cements. The resistance was higher for increased clinker replacement levels and increased with curing time. However, concrete made with blended cements exhibited higher depth of carbonation than the Portland cement concrete, except the Portland-fly ash cement with 14.3% of calcareous fly ash. The thin sections analysis confirmed the values of the carbonation depth obtained from the phenolphthalein test. Test results indicate the possible range of application for new cements containing calcareous fly ash.

  15. Influence of Blended Cements with Calcareous Fly Ash on Chloride Ion Migration and Carbonation Resistance of Concrete for Durable Structures

    PubMed Central

    Glinicki, Michał A.; Jóźwiak-Niedźwiedzka, Daria; Gibas, Karolina; Dąbrowski, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the possible use of new blended cements containing calcareous fly ash in structural concrete, potentially adequate for structural elements of nuclear power plants. The investigation included five new cements made with different contents of non-clinker constituents: calcareous fly ash, siliceous fly ash, ground granulated blastfurnace slag, and a reference cement—ordinary Portland cement. The influence of innovative cements on the resistance of concrete to chloride and carbonation exposure was studied. Additionally, an evaluation of the microstructure was performed using optical microscopy on concrete thin sections. Test results revealed a substantial improvement of the resistance to chloride ion penetration into concrete containing blended cements. The resistance was higher for increased clinker replacement levels and increased with curing time. However, concrete made with blended cements exhibited higher depth of carbonation than the Portland cement concrete, except the Portland-fly ash cement with 14.3% of calcareous fly ash. The thin sections analysis confirmed the values of the carbonation depth obtained from the phenolphthalein test. Test results indicate the possible range of application for new cements containing calcareous fly ash. PMID:28787821

  16. Alkaline modified oil shale fly ash: optimal synthesis conditions and preliminary tests on CO2 adsorption.

    PubMed

    Reinik, Janek; Heinmaa, Ivo; Kirso, Uuve; Kallaste, Toivo; Ritamäki, Johannes; Boström, Dan; Pongrácz, Eva; Huuhtanen, Mika; Larsson, William; Keiski, Riitta; Kordás, Krisztián; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2011-11-30

    Environmentally friendly product, calcium-silica-aluminum hydrate, was synthesized from oil shale fly ash, which is rendered so far partly as an industrial waste. Reaction conditions were: temperature 130 and 160°C, NaOH concentrations 1, 3, 5 and 8M and synthesis time 24h. Optimal conditions were found to be 5M at 130°C at given parameter range. Original and activated ash samples were characterized by XRD, XRF, SEM, EFTEM, (29)Si MAS-NMR, BET and TGA. Semi-quantitative XRD and MAS-NMR showed that mainly tobermorites and katoite are formed during alkaline hydrothermal treatment. Physical adsorption of CO(2) on the surface of the original and activated ash samples was measured with thermo-gravimetric analysis. TGA showed that the physical adsorption of CO(2) on the oil shale fly ash sample increases from 0.06 to 3-4 mass% after alkaline hydrothermal activation with NaOH. The activated product has a potential to be used in industrial processes for physical adsorption of CO(2) emissions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Applicability of Zeolite Based Systems for Ammonia Removal and Recovery From Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Das, Pallabi; Prasad, Bably; Singh, Krishna Kant Kumar

    2017-09-01

      Ammonia discharged in industrial effluents bears deleterious effects and necessitates remediation. Integrated systems devoted to recovery of ammonia in a useful form and remediation of the same addresses the challenges of waste management and its utilization. A comparative performance evaluation study was undertaken to access the suitability of different zeolite based systems (commercial zeolites and zeolites synthesized from fly ash) for removal of ammonia followed by its subsequent release. Four main parameters which were studied to evaluate the applicability of such systems for large scale usage are cost-effectiveness, ammonia removal efficiency, performance on regeneration, and ammonia release percentage. The results indicated that synthetic zeolites outperformed zeolites synthesized from fly ash, although the later proved to be more efficient in terms of total cost incurred. Process technology development in this direction will be a trade-of between cost and ammonia removal and release efficiencies.

  18. APC fly ashes stabilized with Portland cement for further development of road sub-base aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formosa, J.; Giro-Paloma, J.; Maldonado-Alameda, A.; Huete-Hernández, S.; Chimenos, J. M.

    2017-10-01

    Although waste-to-energy plants allow reducing the mass and volume of municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerated, an average around 30 % of the total content remains as bottom ash (BA) and air pollution control (APC) ashes at the end of combustion process. While weathered bottom ash (WBA) is considered a non-hazardous residue that can be revalorized as a secondary aggregate, APC fly ashes generated during the flue gas treatment are classified as hazardous waste and are handled in landfill disposal after stabilization, usually with Portland cement (OPC). However, taking into account the amount of APC residues produced and the disposing cost in landfill, their revalorization is an important issue that could be effectively addressed. As MSW can be incinerated producing bottom ashes (BA) or air pollutant control (APC) residues, the development of a mortar formulated with APC fly ash as secondary building material is a significant risk to the environment for their content of heavy metals. In this way, Design of Experiment (DoE) was used for the improvement of granular material (GM) formulation composed by APC and OPC for further uses as road sub-base aggregate. DoE analysis was successful in the modelling and optimization the formulation as function of the mechanical properties and APC amount. Consequently, an optimal mortar formulation (OMF) of around 50 wt.% APC and 50 wt.% OPC was considered. The OMF leachates and abrasion resistance have been analyzed. These results have demonstrated the viability of OMF as non-hazardous material feasible to be used as secondary aggregate. Moreover, it would be possible to consider the environmental assessment of a GM composed by ≈20 wt.% of OMF and ≈80 wt.% of WBA in order to improve mechanical properties and heavy metals stabilization.

  19. ACUTE PULMONARY AND SYSTEMIC EFFECTS OF INHALED COAL FLY ASH IN RATS: COMPARISON TO AMBIENT ENVIRONMENTAL PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although primary particle emissions of ash from coal-fired power plants are well controlled, coal fly ash (CFA) can still remain a significant fraction of the overall particle exposure for some plant workers and highly impacted communities. The effect of CFA on pulmonary and syst...

  20. Aluminum-fly ash metal matrix composites for automotive parts. [Reports for April 1 to June 30, 1999, and July 1 to September 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, David; Purgert, Robert; Rhudy, Richard

    1999-10-15

    Some highlights are: (1) During this quarter's field trials, sand mold castings of parts and permanent mold tensile testing bars, K mold bars, and ingots were made from aluminum alloy-fly ash melts. (2) Another objective was met, i.e., to use class ''F'' type precipitator fly ash consisting of particle sizes less than 100 microns. It was possible to pour the composite melt into the sand mold through a filter. (3) Trials were run to determine the required amount of the wetting agent, magnesium, to ensure appropriate mixing of the aluminum alloy and fly ash. The magnesium content required to mixmore » ''F'' fly ash was much lower compared to that required to mix hybrid ''C-F'' fly ash in similar melts. Fly ash particles of less than 100 microns were mixed in aluminum melt. Large scale field trials were undertaken at Eck Industries with the goal of standardizing procedures for producing aluminum-fly ash composite melts and to analyze the structure and properties of the resulting material. Limited testing of tensile properties has been done on pressure die cast parts, and attempts are underway to improve the distribution of fly ash in both sand cast and pressure die cast samples. Eck Industries performed radiographic, heat treatment, and tensile tests on permanent mold cast tensile test bars. After fly ash mixing experiments, the Lanxide high speed-high shear mixer (originally designed for mixing Al-SiC melts) was employed in an attempt to avoid fly ash agglomeration. It led to demixing (instead of deagglomerating) of some fly ash. However, the permanent mold tensile bars poured after high shear mixing displayed good distribution of fly ash in castings. A modified impeller design is being considered for high speed-high shear mixing of aluminum-fly ash melts.« less

  1. Binary effect of fly ash and palm oil fuel ash on heat of hydration aerated concrete.

    PubMed

    Mehmannavaz, Taha; Ismail, Mohammad; Radin Sumadi, Salihuddin; Rafique Bhutta, Muhammad Aamer; Samadi, Mostafa; Sajjadi, Seyed Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    The binary effect of pulverized fuel ash (PFA) and palm oil fuel ash (POFA) on heat of hydration of aerated concrete was studied. Three aerated concrete mixes were prepared, namely, concrete containing 100% ordinary Portland cement (control sample or Type I), binary concrete made from 50% POFA (Type II), and ternary concrete containing 30% POFA and 20% PFA (Type III). It is found that the temperature increases due to heat of hydration through all the concrete specimens especially in the control sample. However, the total temperature rises caused by the heat of hydration through both of the new binary and ternary concrete were significantly lower than the control sample. The obtained results reveal that the replacement of Portland cement with binary and ternary materials is beneficial, particularly for mass concrete where thermal cracking due to extreme heat rise is of great concern.

  2. Binary Effect of Fly Ash and Palm Oil Fuel Ash on Heat of Hydration Aerated Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Mehmannavaz, Taha; Ismail, Mohammad; Radin Sumadi, Salihuddin; Rafique Bhutta, Muhammad Aamer; Samadi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    The binary effect of pulverized fuel ash (PFA) and palm oil fuel ash (POFA) on heat of hydration of aerated concrete was studied. Three aerated concrete mixes were prepared, namely, concrete containing 100% ordinary Portland cement (control sample or Type I), binary concrete made from 50% POFA (Type II), and ternary concrete containing 30% POFA and 20% PFA (Type III). It is found that the temperature increases due to heat of hydration through all the concrete specimens especially in the control sample. However, the total temperature rises caused by the heat of hydration through both of the new binary and ternary concrete were significantly lower than the control sample. The obtained results reveal that the replacement of Portland cement with binary and ternary materials is beneficial, particularly for mass concrete where thermal cracking due to extreme heat rise is of great concern. PMID:24696646

  3. High-efficiency cogeneration boiler bagasse-ash geochemistry and mineralogical change effects on the potential reuse in synthetic zeolites, geopolymers, cements, mortars, and concretes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Malcolm W; Despland, Laure M; Lake, Neal J; Yee, Lachlan H; Anstoetz, Manuela; Arif, Elisabeth; Parr, Jeffery F; Doumit, Philip

    2017-04-01

    Sugarcane bagasse ash re-utilisation has been advocated as a silica-rich feed for zeolites, pozzolans in cements and concretes, and geopolymers. However, many papers report variable success with the incorporation of such materials in these products as the ash can be inconsistent in nature. Therefore, understanding what variables affect the ash quality in real mills and understanding the processes to characterise ashes is critical in predicting successful ash waste utilisation. This paper investigated sugarcane bagasse ash from three sugar mills (Northern NSW, Australia) where two are used for the co-generation of electricity. Data shows that the burn temperatures of the bagasse in the high-efficiency co-generation boilers are much higher than those reported at the temperature measuring points. Silica polymorph transitions indicate the high burn temperatures of ≈1550 °C, produces ash dominated α -quartz rather than expected α-cristobilite and amorphous silica; although α-cristobilite, and amorphous silica are present. Furthermore, burn temperatures must be ≤1700 °C, because of the absence of lechatelierite where silica fusing and globulisation dominates. Consequently, silica-mineralogy changes deactivate the bagasse ash by reducing silica solubility, thus making bagasse ash utilisation in synthetic zeolites, geopolymers, or a pozzolanic material in mortars and concretes more difficult. For the ashes investigated, use as a filler material in cements and concrete has the greatest potential. Reported mill boiler temperatures discrepancies and the physical characteristics of the ash, highlight the importance of accurate temperature monitoring at the combustion seat if bagasse ash quality is to be prioritised to ensure a usable final ash product.

  4. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in blended cement Part 1: Processing and characterization of MSWI fly ash.

    PubMed

    Aubert, J E; Husson, B; Sarramone, N

    2006-08-25

    This paper is the first of a series of two articles dealing with the processes applied to MSWI fly ash with a view to reusing it safely in cement-based materials. Part 1 presents two stabilization processes and Part 2 deals with the use of the two treated fly ashes (TFA) in mortars. Two types of binder were used: an Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) containing more than 95% clinker (CEM I 52.5R) and a binary blend cement composed of 70% ground granulated blast furnace slag and 30% clinker (CEM III-B 42.5N). In this first part, two stabilization processes are presented: the conventional process, called "A", based on the washing, phosphation and calcination of the ash, and a modified process, called "B", intended to eliminate metallic aluminum and sulfate contained in the ash. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the two TFA were comparable. The main differences observed were those expected, i.e. TFA-B was free of metallic aluminum and sulfate. The mineralogical characterization of the two TFAs highlighted the presence of large amounts of a calcium aluminosilicate phase taking two forms, a crystalline form (gehlenite) and an amorphous form. Hydration studies on pastes containing mixed TFA and calcium hydroxide showed that this phase reacted with calcium hydroxide to form calcium aluminate hydrates. This formation of hydrates was accompanied by a hardening of the pastes. These results are very encouraging for the reuse of such TFA in cement-based materials because they can be considered as pozzolanic additions and could advantageously replace a part of the cement in cement-based materials. Finally, leaching tests were carried out to evaluate the environmental impact of the two TFAs. The elements which were less efficiently stabilized by process A were zinc, cadmium and antimony but, when the results of the leaching tests were compared with the thresholds of the European landfill directive, TFA-A could nevertheless be accepted at landfills for non

  5. Effect of Feed Forms on the Results of Melting of Fly Ash by a DC Plasma Arc Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingzhou; Meng, Yuedong; Shi, Jiabiao; Ni, Guohua; Jiang, Yiman; Yu, Xinyao; ZHAO, Peng

    2009-10-01

    Fly ash from a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) without preprocessing (original