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Sample records for zero-g parabolic airplane

  1. Prevalence, Predictors, and Prevention of Motion Sickness in Zero-G Parabolic Flights.

    PubMed

    Golding, John F; Paillard, Aurore C; Normand, Hervé; Besnard, Stéphane; Denise, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Zero-G parabolic flight reproduces the weightlessness of space for short periods. However, motion sickness may affect some fliers. The aim was to assess the extent of this problem and to find possible predictors and modifying factors. Airbus zero-G flights consist of 31 parabolas performed in blocks. Each parabola consisted of 20 s of 0 g sandwiched by 20 s of hypergravity of 1.5-1.8 g. The survey covered N = 246 person-flights (193 men, 53 women), ages (M ± SD) 36.0 ± 11.3 yr. An anonymous questionnaire included motion sickness rating (1 = OK to 6 = vomiting), Motion Sickness Susceptibility Questionnaire (MSSQ), antimotion sickness medication, prior zero-G experience, anxiety level, and other characteristics. Participants had lower MSSQ percentile scores (27.4 ± 28.0) than the population norm of 50. Motion sickness was experienced by 33% and 12% vomited. Less motion sickness was predicted by older age, greater prior zero-G flight experience, medication with scopolamine, lower MSSQ scores, but not gender or anxiety. Sickness ratings in fliers pretreated with scopolamine (1.81 ± 1.58) were lower than for nonmedicated fliers (2.93 ± 2.16), and incidence of vomiting in fliers using scopolamine treatment was reduced by half to a third. Possible confounding factors including age, sex, flight experience, and MSSQ could not account for this. Motion sickness affected one-third of zero-G fliers despite being intrinsically less motion sickness susceptible compared to the general population. Susceptible individuals probably try to avoid such a provocative environment. Risk factors for motion sickness included younger age and higher MSSQ scores. Protective factors included prior zero-G flight experience (habituation) and antimotion sickness medication.Golding JF, Paillard AC, Normand H, Besnard S, Denise P. Prevalence, predictors, and prevention of motion sickness in zero-G parabolic flights. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(1):3-9.

  2. The First European Parabolic Flight Campaign with the Airbus A310 ZERO-G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletser, Vladimir; Rouquette, Sebastien; Friedrich, Ulrike; Clervoy, Jean-Francois; Gharib, Thierry; Gai, Frederic; Mora, Christophe

    2016-12-01

    Aircraft parabolic flights repetitively provide up to 23 seconds of reduced gravity during ballistic flight manoeuvres. Parabolic flights are used to conduct short microgravity investigations in Physical and Life Sciences and in Technology, to test instrumentation prior to space flights and to train astronauts before a space mission. The use of parabolic flights is complementary to other microgravity carriers (drop towers, sounding rockets), and preparatory to manned space missions on board the International Space Station and other manned spacecraft, such as Shenzhou and the future Chinese Space Station. After 17 years of using the Airbus A300 ZERO-G, the French company Novespace, a subsidiary of the ' Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales' (CNES, French Space Agency), based in Bordeaux, France, purchased a new aircraft, an Airbus A310, to perform parabolic flights for microgravity research in Europe. Since April 2015, the European Space Agency (ESA), CNES and the ` Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.' (DLR, the German Aerospace Center) use this new aircraft, the Airbus A310 ZERO-G, for research experiments in microgravity. The first campaign was a Cooperative campaign shared by the three agencies, followed by respectively a CNES, an ESA and a DLR campaign. This paper presents the new Airbus A310 ZERO-G and its main characteristics and interfaces for scientific experiments. The experiments conducted during the first European campaign are presented.

  3. Prolonging Microgravity on Parabolic Airplane Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David W.

    2003-01-01

    Three techniques have been proposed to prolong the intervals of time available for microgravity experiments aboard airplanes flown along parabolic trajectories. Typically, a pilot strives to keep an airplane on such a trajectory during a nominal time interval as long as 25 seconds, and an experimental apparatus is released to float freely in the airplane cabin to take advantage of the microgravitational environment of the trajectory for as long as possible. It is usually not possible to maintain effective microgravity during the entire nominal time interval because random aerodynamic forces and fluctuations in pilot control inputs cause the airplane to deviate slightly from a perfect parabolic trajectory, such that the freely floating apparatus bumps into the ceiling, floor, or a wall of the airplane before the completion of the parabola.

  4. Effect of Mental Arithmetic on heart rate responses during Parabolic Flights: the Barcelona Zero-G Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Jeffrey R.; Alonsopérez Lanza, María Victoria; Desclaux, David Ferrer; Goswami, Nandu; González Alonso, Daniel Ventura; Moser, Maximilian; Grote, Vincent; Garcia-Cuadrado, Gloria; Perez-Poch, Antoni

    2014-07-01

    When an astronaut transitions from a low to high gravitational environment, fluid shifts from the head towards the feet resulting in orthostatic intolerance and syncope. Ground based experiments have shown that by stimulating the cardiovascular system via simple mental stressors, syncope can be delayed, potentially enabling astronauts to reach assistance before loss of consciousness. However, the effect of mental stressors on the stimulation of the cardiovascular system in gravitational environments different than that of Earth's is unknown. As such, this paper investigates the effects that mental stressors under various gravitational environments. To do this, a pilot study was performed in which two participants were flown on two separate parabolic flights that simulated hyper and hypogravity conditions. The plane used was an Aerobatic Single-Engine Cap-10B plane (twin seater), and each participant executed 11 parabolas. The participants were the winners of the Barcelona Zero-G Challenge 2011 organized by UPC Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya-BarcelonaTech and Aeroclub Barcelona-Sabadell. Measurements were made of the participants' hemodynamic and autonomic response throughout the parabolas, using a Chronocord: high precision HRV monitor. Comparisons of the baseline response without mental stressors, and the response with mental stressors during different gravitational loading conditions were made. It was observed that there is an increase in cardiovascular activity during hypo- and hyper-gravity when performing mental arithmetic. Our results show that the twin seater aerobatic single engine CAP-10B aicraft can provide changing gravitational loading conditions for enough periods to study changes in physiological systems.

  5. Zero-G Workstation Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundersen, R. T.; Bond, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Zero-g workstations were designed throughout manned spaceflight, based on different criteria and requirements for different programs. The history of design of these workstations is presented along with a thorough evaluation of selected Skylab workstations (the best zero-g experience available on the subject). The results were applied to on-going and future programs, with special emphasis on the correlation of neutral body posture in zero-g to workstation design. Where selected samples of shuttle orbiter workstations are shown as currently designed and compared to experience gained during prior programs in terms of man machine interface design, the evaluations were done in a generic sense to show the methods of applying evaluative techniques.

  6. NASA's Zero-g aircraft operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. K.

    1988-01-01

    NASA's Zero-g aircraft, operated by the Johnson Space Center, provides the unique weightless or zero-g environment of space flight for hardware development and test and astronaut training purposes. The program, which began in 1959, uses a slightly modified Boeing KC-135A aircraft, flying a parabolic trajectory, to produce weightless periods of 20 to 25 seconds. The program has supported the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Apollo-Soyuz and Shuttle programs as well as a number of unmanned space operations. Typical experiments for flight in the aircraft have included materials processing experiments, welding, fluid manipulation, cryogenics, propellant tankage, satellite deployment dynamics, planetary sciences research, crew training with weightless indoctrination, space suits, tethers, etc., and medical studies including vestibular research. The facility is available to microgravity research organizations on a cost-reimbursable basis, providing a large, hands-on test area for diagnostic and support equipment for the Principal Investigators and providing an iterative-type design approach to microgravity experiment development. The facility allows concepts to be proven and baseline experimentation to be accomplished relatively inexpensively prior to committing to the large expense of a space flight.

  7. Performance of light sources and radiation sensors under low gravity realized by parabolic airplane flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Hiroaki; Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Hirai, Takehiro

    A fundamental study was conducted to establish an experimental system for space farming. Since to ensure optimal light for plant cultivation in space is of grave importance, this study examined the performance of light sources and radiation sensors under microgravity conditions created during the parabolic airplane flight. Three kinds of light sources, a halogen bulb, a fluorescent tube, and blue and red LEDs, and ten models of radiation sensors available in the market were used for the experiment. Surface temperature of the light sources, output signals from the radiation sensors, spectroscopic characteristics were measured at the gravity levels of 0.01, 1.0 and 1.8 G for 20 seconds each during parabolic airplane flights. As a result, the performance of the halogen lamp was affected the most by the gravity level among the three light sources. Under the microgravity conditions which do not raise heat convection, the temperature of the halogen lamp rose and the output of the radiation sensors increased. Spectral distributions of the halogen lamp indicated that peak wavelength appeared the highest at the level of 0.01G, which contributed to the increase in light intensity. In the case of red and blue LEDs, which are promising light sources in space farming, the temperature of both LED chips rose but irradiance from red LED increased and that from blue LED decreased under microgravity conditions due to the different thermal characteristics.

  8. ZERO-G - Crippen, Robert L.

    1979-04-03

    Zero-gravity experiments in KC-135 conducted by John Young, Robert L. Crippen, Joseph Kerwin, and Margaret Seddon. 1. Kerwin, Joseph - Zero-G 2. Seddon, Margaret - Zero-G 3. Young, John - Zero-G 4. Aircraft - KC-135

  9. Crew Training - STS-30/61B (Zero-G)

    1985-08-21

    KC-135 inflight training of the STS-30/61B Crew for suit donning doffing and Zero-G orientation for Rudolfo Neri, Astronaut Mary Cleave, and Ricardo Peralta, Backup Neri. 1. Astronaut Cleave, Mary - Zero-G 2. Neri, Rodolfo - Zero-G 3. Peralta, Ricard - Zero-G

  10. Grasping rigid objects in zero-g

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Greg D.

    1993-12-01

    The extra vehicular activity helper/retriever (EVAHR) is a prototype for an autonomous free- flying robotic astronaut helper. The ability to grasp a moving object is a fundamental skill required for any autonomous free-flyer. This paper discusses an algorithm that couples resolved acceleration control with potential field based obstacle avoidance to enable a manipulator to track and capture a rigid object in (imperfect) zero-g while avoiding joint limits, singular configurations, and unintentional impacts between the manipulator and the environment.

  11. CREW TRAINING - STS-33/51L (ZERO-G)

    1985-10-16

    Teacher-in-Space trainees on the KC-135 for Zero-G training. Sharon Christa McAuliffe experiences a few moments of weightlessness provided by the KC-135. She and Bob Mayfield, a JSC Aerospace Education Specialist, are previewing a Molecular Mixing Experiment which was designed to demonstrate differences of separation process in 1-G and Zero-G.

  12. Zero-G Thermodynamic Venting System (TVS) Performance Prediction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Han

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the Zero-g Thermodynamic Venting System (TVS) performance prediction computer program. The zero-g TVS is a device that destratifies and rejects environmentally induced zero-g thermal gradients in the LH2 storage transfer system. A recirculation pump and spray injection manifold recirculates liquid throughout the length of the tank thereby destratifying both the ullage gas and liquid bulk. Heat rejection is accomplished by the opening of the TVS control valve which allows a small flow rate to expand to a low pressure thereby producing a low temperature heat sink which is used to absorb heat from the recirculating liquid flow. The program was written in FORTRAN 77 language on the HP-9000 and IBM PC computers. It can be run on various platforms with a FORTRAN compiler.

  13. 3D Printing in Zero-G ISS Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werkheiser, Niki; Cooper, Kenneth C.; Edmunson, Jennifer E.; Dunn, Jason; Snyder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a long term strategy to fabricate components and equipment on-demand for manned missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. To support this strategy, NASA's Marshall Space Fligth Center (MSFC) and Made in Space, Inc. are developing the 3D Printing In Zero-G payload as a Technology Demonstration for the International Space Station (ISS). The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment ('3D Print') will be the frst machine to perform 3D printing in space.

  14. CREW TRAINING - STS-33/51L (ZERO-G)

    1985-10-16

    S85-42472 (16 Oct. 1985) --- Teacher-in-Space trainees on the KC-135 for zero-G training. Sharon Christa McAuliffe, right, and Barbara R. Morgan, play leap-frog in the temporary weightlessness of the KC-135. Photo credit: NASA

  15. Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology Flight Volume Measurements Under Zero G Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garofalo, Anthony A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to perform analysis of data using the Systems Engineering Educational Discovery (SEED) program data from 2011 and 2012 Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology flight volume measurements under Zero G conditions (parabolic Plane flight data). Also experimental planning and lab work for future sub-orbital experiments to use the NASA PZT technology for fluid volume measurement. Along with conducting data analysis of flight data, I also did a variety of other tasks. I provided the lab with detailed technical drawings, experimented with 3d printers, made changes to the liquid nitrogen skid schematics, and learned how to weld. I also programmed microcontrollers to interact with various sensors and helped with other things going on around the lab.

  16. Fluid Vessel Quantity Using Non-invasive PZT Technology Flight Volume Measurements Under Zero G Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garofalo, Anthony A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to perform analysis of data using the Systems Engineering Educational Discovery (SEED) program data from 2011 and 2012 Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology flight volume measurements under Zero G conditions (parabolic Plane flight data). Also experimental planning and lab work for future sub-orbital experiments to use the NASA PZT technology for fluid volume measurement. Along with conducting data analysis of flight data, I also did a variety of other tasks. I provided the lab with detailed technical drawings, experimented with 3d printers, made changes to the liquid nitrogen skid schematics, and learned how to weld. I also programmed microcontrollers to interact with various sensors and helped with other things going on around the lab.

  17. CREW TRAINING - STS-33/51L (ZERO-G)

    1985-10-16

    S85-42473 (16 Oct. 1985) --- Sharon Christa McAuliffe, a teacher-citizen observer on STS-51L, smiles before participating in some zero-G rehearsals for her upcoming flight. She is seated near the controls of the KC-135 aircraft, flying for the Johnson Space Center from Ellington Air Field. Referred to as the ?zero-gravity? aircraft, the KC-135 provides brief moments of weightlessness for shuttle crew members in training. Photo credit: NASA

  18. Crew Training - STS-33/51L (Zero-G)

    1985-10-16

    S85-42470 (16 Oct. 1985) --- Sharon Christa McAuliffe, right, and Barbara R. Morgan, participating in the Teacher-in-Space Project, team up with Bob Mayfield, a JSC aerospace educations specialist, to preview some experiments in zero-G. A KC-135 aircraft flies a special pattern to provide series of brief periods of weightlessness. McAuliffe, prime crew member for STS-51L, injects a hydroponic solution into a cylinder to review one of the experiments planned for the flight. Morgan is backup for McAuliffe on that mission. Photo credit: NASA

  19. Pilot investigation - Nominal crew induced forces in zero-g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klute, Glenn K.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents pilot-study data of test subject forces induced by intravehicular activities such as push-offs and landings with both hands and feet. Five subjects participated in this investigation. Three orthogonal force axes were measured in the NASA KC-135 research aircraft's 'zero-g' environment. The largest forces were induced during vertical foot push-offs, including one of 534 newtons (120 lbs). The mean vertical foot push-off was 311 newtons (70 lbs). The vertical hand push-off forces were also relatively large, including one of 267 newtons (60 lbs) with a mean of 151 newtons (34 lbs). These force magnitudes of these forces would result in a Shuttle gravity environment of about 1 x exp 10 -4 g's.

  20. 3D Printing In Zero-G ISS Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werkheiser, Niki; Cooper, Kenneth; Edmunson, Jennifer; Dunn, Jason; Snyder, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a long term strategy to fabricate components and equipment on-demand for manned missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. To support this strategy, NASA and Made in Space, Inc. are developing the 3D Printing In Zero-G payload as a Technology Demonstration for the International Space Station (ISS). The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment ('3D Print') will be the first machine to perform 3D printing in space. The greater the distance from Earth and the longer the mission duration, the more difficult resupply becomes; this requires a change from the current spares, maintenance, repair, and hardware design model that has been used on the International Space Station (ISS) up until now. Given the extension of the ISS Program, which will inevitably result in replacement parts being required, the ISS is an ideal platform to begin changing the current model for resupply and repair to one that is more suitable for all exploration missions. 3D Printing, more formally known as Additive Manufacturing, is the method of building parts/objects/tools layer-by-layer. The 3D Print experiment will use extrusion-based additive manufacturing, which involves building an object out of plastic deposited by a wire-feed via an extruder head. Parts can be printed from data files loaded on the device at launch, as well as additional files uplinked to the device while on-orbit. The plastic extrusion additive manufacturing process is a low-energy, low-mass solution to many common needs on board the ISS. The 3D Print payload will serve as the ideal first step to proving that process in space. It is unreasonable to expect NASA to launch large blocks of material from which parts or tools can be traditionally machined, and even more unreasonable to fly up multiple drill bits that would be required to machine parts from aerospace-grade materials such as titanium 6-4 alloy and Inconel. The technology to produce parts on demand, in space, offers

  1. CREW TRAINING - STS-33/51L (ZERO-G)

    1985-11-20

    S85-44835 (20 Nov. 1985) --- This flying human chain represents prime and backup payload specialists for two upcoming STS missions. The group, representing trainees for STS-61C later this year and STS-51L early next year, shared some 40 parabolas in NASA?s KSC-135, ?Zero-G? aircraft on Nov. 20. Left to right are Gerard Magilton, RCA backup payload specialist for STS-61C; Sharon Christa McAuliffe, payload specialist/teacher citizen observer for STS-51L; U.S. Rep. Bill Nelson (D., Florida), scheduled for 61-C; Barbara R. Morgan, backup to McAuliffe; and Robert J. Cenker, RCA payload specialist for 61-C. The photo was taken by Keith Meyers, New York Times. Photo credit: NASA

  2. CREW TRAINING - STS-33/51-L (Zero-G)

    1985-11-20

    S85-44834 (20 Nov. 1985) --- This flying human chain represents prime and backup payload specialists for two upcoming STS missions. The group, representing trainees for STS-61C later this year and STS-51L early next year, shared some 40 parabolas in NASA?s KC-135, ?Zero-G? aircraft on Nov. 20, 1985. Left to right are Gerard Magilton, RCA backup payload specialist for STS-61C; Sharon Christa McAuliffe, payload specialist/teacher citizen observer for STS-51L; U.S. Representative Bill Nelson (D., Florida), scheduled for 61C; Barbara R. Morgan, backup to McAuliffe; and Robert J. Cenker, RCA payload specialist for 61C. The photo was taken by Otis Imboden. Photo credit: NASA

  3. 3D Printing in Zero-G ISS Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mallory M.; Werkheiser, Mary J.; Cooper, Kenneth G.; Snyder, Michael P.; Edmunson, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a long term strategy to fabricate components and equipment on-demand for manned missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. To support this strategy, NASA and Made in Space, Inc. are developing the 3D Printing In Zero-G payload as a Technology Demonstration for the International Space Station. The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment will be the first machine to perform 3D printing in space. The greater the distance from Earth and the longer the mission duration, the more difficult resupply becomes; this requires a change from the current spares, maintenance, repair, and hardware design model that has been used on the International Space Station up until now. Given the extension of the ISS Program, which will inevitably result in replacement parts being required, the ISS is an ideal platform to begin changing the current model for resupply and repair to one that is more suitable for all exploration missions. 3D Printing, more formally known as Additive Manufacturing, is the method of building parts/ objects/tools layer-by-layer. The 3D Print experiment will use extrusion-based additive manufacturing, which involves building an object out of plastic deposited by a wire-feed via an extruder head. Parts can be printed from data files loaded on the device at launch, as well as additional files uplinked to the device while on-orbit. The plastic extrusion additive manufacturing process is a low-energy, low-mass solution to many common needs on board the ISS. The 3D Print payload will serve as the ideal first step to proving that process in space. It is unreasonable to expect NASA to launch large blocks of material from which parts or tools can be traditionally machined, and even more unreasonable to fly up specialized manufacturing hardware to perform the entire range of function traditionally machining requires. The technology to produce parts on demand, in space, offers unique design options that are not possible

  4. A manipulator arm for zero-g simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodie, S. B.; Grant, C.; Lazar, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    A 12-ft counterbalanced Slave Manipulator Arm (SMA) was designed and fabricated to be used for resolving the questions of operational applications, capabilities, and limitations for such remote manned systems as the Payload Deployment and Retrieval Mechanism (PDRM) for the shuttle, the Free-Flying Teleoperator System, the Advanced Space Tug, and Planetary Rovers. As a developmental tool for the shuttle manipulator system (or PDRM), the SMA represents an approximate one-quarter scale working model for simulating and demonstrating payload handling, docking assistance, and satellite servicing. For the Free-Flying Teleoperator System and the Advanced Tug, the SMA provides a near full-scale developmental tool for satellite servicing, docking, and deployment/retrieval procedures, techniques, and support equipment requirements. For the Planetary Rovers, it provides an oversize developmental tool for sample handling and soil mechanics investigations. The design of the SMA was based on concepts developed for a 40-ft NASA technology arm to be used for zero-g shuttle manipulator simulations.

  5. Short duration microgravity experiments in physical and life sciences during parabolic flights: the first 30 ESA campaigns.

    PubMed

    Pletser, Vladimir

    2004-11-01

    Aircraft parabolic flights provide repetitively up to 20 s of reduced gravity during ballistic flight manoeuvres. Parabolic flights are used to conduct short microgravity investigations in Physical and Life Sciences, to test instrumentation and to train astronauts before a space flight. The European Space Agency (ESA) has organized since 1984 thirty parabolic flight campaigns for microgravity research experiments utilizing six different airplanes. More than 360 experiments were successfully conducted during more than 2800 parabolas, representing a cumulated weightlessness time of 15 h 30 m. This paper presents the short duration microgravity research programme of ESA. The experiments conducted during these campaigns are summarized, and the different airplanes used by ESA are shortly presented. The technical capabilities of the Airbus A300 'Zero-G' are addressed. Some Physical Science, Technology and Life Science experiments performed during the last ESA campaigns with the Airbus A300 are presented to show the interest of this unique microgravity research tool to complement, support and prepare orbital microgravity investigations. c2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Moon and Mars gravity environment during parabolic flights: a new European approach to prepare for planetary exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletser, Vladimir; Clervoy, Jean-Fran; Gharib, Thierry; Gai, Frederic; Mora, Christophe; Rosier, Patrice

    Aircraft parabolic flights provide repetitively up to 20 seconds of reduced gravity during ballis-tic flight manoeuvres. Parabolic flights are used to conduct short microgravity investigations in Physical and Life Sciences and in Technology, to test instrumentation prior to space flights and to train astronauts before a space mission. The European Space Agency (ESA) has organized since 1984 more than fifty parabolic flight campaigns for microgravity research experiments utilizing six different airplanes. More than 600 experiments were conducted spanning several fields in Physical Sciences and Life Sciences, namely Fluid Physics, Combustion Physics, Ma-terial Sciences, fundamental Physics and Technology tests, Human Physiology, cell and animal Biology, and technical tests of Life Sciences instrumentation. Since 1997, ESA uses the Airbus A300 'Zero G', the largest airplane in the world used for this type of experimental research flight and managed by the French company Novespace, a subsidiary of the French space agency CNES. From 2010 onwards, ESA and Novespace will offer the possibility of flying Martian and Moon parabolas during which reduced gravity levels equivalent to those on the Moon and Mars will be achieved repetitively for periods of more than 20 seconds. Scientists are invited to submit experiment proposals to be conducted at these partial gravity levels. This paper presents the technical capabilities of the Airbus A300 Zero-G aircraft used by ESA to support and conduct investigations at Moon-, Mars-and micro-gravity levels to prepare research and exploration during space flights and future planetary exploration missions. Some Physiology and Technology experiments performed during past ESA campaigns at 0, 1/6 an 1/3 g are presented to show the interest of this unique research tool for microgravity and partial gravity investigations.

  7. Perceptual disturbances predicted in zero-g through three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Holly, Jan E

    2003-01-01

    Perceptual disturbances in zero-g and 1-g differ. For example, the vestibular coriolis (or "cross-coupled") effect is weaker in zero-g. In 1-g, blindfolded subjects rotating on-axis experience perceptual disturbances upon head tilt, but the effects diminish in zero-g. Head tilts during centrifugation in zero-g and 1-g are investigated here by means of three-dimensional modeling, using a model that was previously used to explain the zero-g reduction of the on-axis vestibular coriolis effect. The model's foundation comprises the laws of physics, including linear-angular interactions in three dimensions. Addressed is the question: In zero-g, will the vestibular coriolis effect be as weak during centrifugation as during on-axis rotation? Centrifugation in 1-g was simulated first, with the subject supine, head toward center. The most noticeable result concerned direction of head yaw. For clockwise centrifuge rotation, greater perceptual effects arose in simulations during yaw counterclockwise (as viewed from the top of the head) than for yaw clockwise. Centrifugation in zero-g was then simulated with the same "supine" orientation. The result: In zero-g the simulated vestibular coriolis effect was greater during centrifugation than during on-axis rotation. In addition, clockwise-counterclockwise differences did not appear in zero-g, in contrast to the differences that appear in 1-g.

  8. Zero-g tests of involving Hamilton standard personnel and others

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Zero-g tests of involving Hamilton standard personnel, Don Williams and Larry Magers. View includes Williams and Magers tumbling in zero-g as photographer takes picures. Williams is wearing a headset (30361); Williams floats among Hamilton standard technicians (30362).

  9. hwhwap_ep33_zero-g_workout

    2018-02-23

    Gary Jordan (Host): Houston, We Have a Podcast. Welcome to the official podcast of the NASA Johnson Space Center, Episode 33: The Zero-G Workout. I'm Gary Jordan, and I'll be your host today. So on this podcast, we bring in the experts -- NASA scientists, engineers, astronauts -- all to let you know the coolest information about what's going on right here at NASA. So today, we're talking about how zero g affects the human body and what we can do about it. So working on this very problem is Dr. Andrea Hanson, who's the International Space Station Exercise Countermeasures Operations Ops Lead. Phew. Oh, there's more -- within Human Physiology, Performance Protection, and Operations Lab. There it is. She's got a big title and a big job here at the Johnson Space Center. So basically, bad stuff can happen to the human body when astronauts are in space for a long time, and countermeasures are just a way to prevent that stuff from happening. Of course, I had to ask her for some exercise tips, but, more importantly, she described what happens to the human body in zero gravity, what NASA is doing about it, and how we can use this knowledge to go deeper into space. So with no further delay, let's go light speed and jump right ahead to our talk with Dr. Andrea Hanson. Enjoy. [ Music ] Host: Andrea, thanks so much for coming on today to talk about exercise physiology on the Space Station. I was really excited to talk about this specific topic personally because exercise is kind of, I personally like exercising and take a lot of the things that I do in the gym based off of what is being done in space, so thank you again for coming on. Andrea Hanson: Yeah, thanks for having me. Host: Okay, so one of the big problems that we are facing and the, basically, what you are addressing is microgravity does not agree with the human body when it's up there for a long time, right? So what's going on there? Andrea Hanson: Yeah. So the body responds pretty immediately to living in the

  10. Long-term exposure to zero-g and the gastro-intestinal tract function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormack, Percial D.

    1989-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) function is described with emphasis placed on its important role to smooth, delay, and modify sudden fluid load stress applied to the fluid distribution control system in the body. Two basic components of the GIT are considered: stomach dynamics, which involves storage, mixing, and discharge of food into the intestine after addition of gastric juices; and absorption of water and electrolytes from the small intestine. A dynamic model of these components is described, along with performance characteristics computed consecutively for one g and zero g conditions. The main impact of the zero g condition appears to be through a change in osmotic driven transport across the gut wall. A dramatic change in transport characteristics is predicted with implication for many body systems (the immune system in particular) during long-term exposure to zero g. Experimental measurements in zero g are needed to evaluate these predictions.

  11. SPACESUIT DONNING AND DOFFING - ZERO-G TRAINING - DON PETERSON - STS-6

    1982-07-14

    Spacesuit Donning and Doffing in Zero-G Training for Don Peterson of the STS-6 Crew with Astronaut Jerry Ross assisting; and, apparatus for testing the JSC Mechanically-Induced Settling Technology (MIST) Experiment. The training is being held aboard the KC-135 to simulate weightlessness. He is being assisted to don the lower torso of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) by an ILC Technician. 1. ASTRONAUT ROSS, JERRY L. - ZERO-G SUITING 2. SHUTTLE - EXPERIMENTS (MIST)

  12. Apollo-Soyuz pamphlet no. 8: Zero-g technology. [experimental designispace processing and aerospace engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, L. W.; From, T. P.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of liquids in zero gravity environments is discussed with emphasis on foams, wetting, and wicks. A multipurpose electric furnace (MA-010) for the high temperature processing of metals and salts in zero-g is described. Experiments discussed include: monolectic and synthetic alloys (MA-041); multiple material melting point (MA-150); zero-g processing of metals (MA-070); surface tension induced convection (MA-041); halide eutectic growth; interface markings in crystals (MA-060); crystal growth from the vapor phase (MA-085); and photography of crystal growth (MA-028).

  13. Attached manipulator system design and concept verification for zero-g simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, R.; Burkitt, W.; Corveleyn, P.; Cramer, P.; Duwaik, O.; Flatau, C.; Garber, P.; Grant, C.; Greeb, F.; Johnson, C.

    1973-01-01

    The attached manipulator system (AMS) is to simulate and demonstrate zero-g shuttle manipulator cargo handling operations. It is not the design or development of the shuttle attached manipulator system (SAMS); however, every effort is being made, to insure that the AMS will be functionally similar to the SAMS.

  14. Spacsuit donning and doffing in zero-g training for Don Peterson STS-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Spacsuit donning and doffing in zero-g training for Don Peterson of the STS-6 crew. The training is being held aboard the KC-135 to simulate weightlessness. He is being assisted to don the lower torso of the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) by an ILC technician.

  15. Host computer software specifications for a zero-g payload manhandling simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    The HP PASCAL source code was developed for the Mission Planning and Analysis Division (MPAD) of NASA/JSC, and takes the place of detailed flow charts defining the host computer software specifications for MANHANDLE, a digital/graphical simulator that can be used to analyze the dynamics of onorbit (zero-g) payload manhandling operations. Input and output data for representative test cases are contained.

  16. Optical Gauging of Liquid and Solid Hydrogen in Zero-g Environments for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caimi, F. M.; Kocak, D. M.; Justak, J. F.

    2006-04-01

    Knowledge of fuel reserve levels is required for propellant management systems and power considerations in many space applications. Although methods are known for gauging fuel amounts in gravitational environments, no simple passive method is known for quantifying fuel reserves in a zero-g environment. Current ground-based methods for cryogenic liquid quantification use wire resistance measurements or point sensors, combined with pressure and temperature measurements to arrive at the desired accuracy. This paper presents an optical sensor design based on existing radiometric and integrating sphere techniques that have the potential to provide quantification in both zero-g and ground based applications. The general approach relies upon optical absorption of liquid or solid hydrogen in a vibrational overtone spectral region. The cryogen storage tank is configured as an "Integrating Sphere." Inside the tank, in a zero-g environment, the liquid and/or gaseous fuel will be free-floating and/or attached to the walls. Incident light irradiates even the smallest portion of the sphere due to the integration. The amount of light absorbed in the tank will be proportional to the amount of fuel present. Therefore, regardless of scatter, all light passed through the medium in the sphere is contained and can be quantified. This paper presents simulations for various liquid hydrogen volumetric configurations and confirms utility of the method. Initial experimental results for a liquid hydrogen analyte in non-zero-g environments are provided. Using this sensor, it is possible to achieve a 10× increase in fuel measurement accuracy which can provide an increased orbit or payload capability.

  17. STS 61-B crewmembers training on the KC-135 in zero-G

    1985-08-21

    STS 61-B crewmembers training on the KC-135 in zero-G. Views include Payload specialist Charles D. Walker attempting to down the lower torso of his extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) in zero-G in the KC-135. He is being assisted by other participants in the training (39135); Payload specialist Rodolfo Neri floating in midair during training in the KC-135 (39136,39138); Mission specialist Mary L. Cleave floating in midair during her training aboard the KC-135 (39137); Astronaut Bryan D. O'Connor assists Astronaut Sherwood C. Spring in completing his donning of the EMU in the KC-135 (39139); Technicians aid Spring with his EMU in the KC-135 (39140); O'Connor appears to be leaping up in zero-G aboard the KC-135 (39141); Astronaut Brewster Shaw is assisted by a technician to don his EMU (39142); Shaw is attempting to don the EMU gloves while O'Connor watches (39143); Shaw does jumping jacks while Neri attempts to travel down a rope guideline (39144).

  18. Estimating zero-g flow rates in open channels having capillary pumping vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Radhakrishnan

    2003-02-01

    In vane-type surface tension propellant management devices (PMD) commonly used in satellite fuel tanks, the propellant is transported along guiding vanes from a reservoir at the inlet of the device to a sump at the outlet from where it is pumped to the satellite engine. The pressure gradient driving this free-surface flow under zero-gravity (zero-g) conditions is generated by surface tension and is related to the differential curvatures of the propellant-gas interface at the inlet and outlet of the PMD. A new semi-analytical procedure is prescribed for accurately calculating the extremely small fuel flow rates under reasonably idealized conditions. Convergence of the algorithm is demonstrated by detailed numerical calculations. Owing to the substantial cost and the technical hurdles involved in accurately estimating these minuscule flow rates by either direct numerical simulation or by experimental methods which simulate zero-g conditions in the lab, it is expected that the proposed method will be an indispensable tool in the design and operation of satellite fuel tanks.

  19. Techniques for determination of impact forces during walking and running in a zero-G environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenisen, Michael; Walton, Marlei; Bishop, Phillip; Squires, William

    1992-01-01

    One of the deleterious adaptations to the microgravity conditions of space flight is the loss of bone mineral content. This loss appears to be at least partially attributable to the minimal skeletal axial loading concomitant with microgravity. The purpose of this study was to develop and fabricate the instruments and hardware necessary to quantify the vertical impact forces (Fz) imparted to users of the space shuttle passive treadmill during human locomotion in a three-dimensional zero-gravity environment. The shuttle treadmill was instrumented using a Kistler forceplate to measure vertical impact forces. To verify that the instruments and hardware were functional, they were tested both in the one-G environment and aboard the KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft. The magnitude of the impact loads generated in one-G on the shuttle treadmill for walking at 0.9 m/sec and running at 1.6 and 2.2 m/sec were 1.1, 1.7, and 1.7 G, respectively, compared with loads of 0.95, 1.2, and 1.5 G in the zero-G environment.

  20. 3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment, In Space Manufacturing (LPS, 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, Quincy; Cooper, Ken; Werkheiser, Niki

    2015-01-01

    The 3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment has been an ongoing effort for several years. In June 2014 the technology demonstration 3D printer was launched to the International Space Station. In November 2014 the first 21 parts were manufactured in orbit marking the beginning of a paradigm shift that will allow astronauts to be more self-sufficient and pave the way to larger scale orbital manufacturing. Prior to launch the 21 parts were built on the ground with the flight unit with the same feedstock. These ground control samples are to be tested alongside the flight samples in order to determine if there is a measurable difference between parts built on the ground vs. parts built in space. As of this writing, testing has not yet commenced. Tests to be performed are structured light scanning for volume and geometric discrepancies, CT scanning for density measurement, destructive testing of mechanical samples, and SEM analysis for inter-laminar adhesion discrepancies. Additionally, an ABS material characterization was performed on mechanical samples built from the same CAD files as the flight and ground samples on different machine / feedstock combinations. The purpose of this testing was twofold: first to obtain mechanical data in order to have a baseline comparison for the flight and ground samples and second to ascertain if there is a measurable difference between machines and feedstock.

  1. Development and Design of Zero-g Liquid Quantity Gauge for Solar Thermal Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Green, Steven T.; Petullo, Steven P.; VanDresar, Neil T.

    2002-01-01

    The development and design of a cryogenic liquid quantity gauge for zero-gravity (zero-g) applications are described. The gauge, named the compression mass gauge (CMG), operates on the principle of slightly changing the volume of the tank by an oscillating bellows. The resulting pressure change is measured and used to predict the volume of vapor in the tank, from which the volume of liquid is computed. For each gauging instance, pressures are measured for several different bellows frequencies to enable minor real-gas effects to be quantified and thereby to obtain a gauging accuracy of 11 percent of tank volume. The CMG has been selected by NASA's Future-X program for a flight demonstration on the United States Air Force-Boeing Solar Orbit Transfer Vehicle Space Experiment (SOTVSE). This report reviews the design trade studies needed for the CMG to satisfy the SOTVSE limitations on its power, volume, and mass and also describes the mechanical design of the CMG.

  2. Development and Design of a Zero-G Liquid Quantity Gauge for a Solar Thermal Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Green, Steven T.; Petullo, Steven P.; VanDresar, Neil T.; Taylor, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The development and design of a cryogenic liquid quantity gauge for zero-g applications is described. The gauge, named the Compression Mass Gauge (CMG), operates on the principle of slightly changing the volume of the tank by an oscillating bellows. The resulting pressure change is measured and used to predict the volume of vapor in the tank, from which the volume of liquid is computed. For each gauging instance, pressures are measured for several different bellows frequencies to enable minor real-gas effects to be quantified and thereby to obtain a gauging accuracy of +/- 1% of tank volume. Southwest Research Institute (Tm) and NASA-GRC (Glenn Research Center) have developed several previous breadboard and engineering development gauges and tested them in cryogenic hydrogen and nitrogen to establish the gauge capabilities, to resolve several design issues, and to formulate data processing algorithms. The CMG has been selected by NASA's Future X program for a flight demonstration on the USAF (United States Air Force) / Boeing Solar Thermal Vehicle Space Experiment (SOTVSE). This paper reviews the design trade studies needed to satisfy the SOTVSE limitations on CMG power, volume, and mass, and describes the mechanical design of the CMG.

  3. Zero-G experiments in two-phase fluids flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; King, C. D.; Littles, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The two-phase flows studied were liquid and gas mixtures in a straight flow channel of circular cross-section. Boundaries between flow regimes have been defined for normogravity on coordinates of gas quality and total mass velocity; and, when combined with boundary expressions having a Froude number term, an analytical model was derived predicting boundary shifts with changes in gravity level. Experiments with air and water were performed, first in the normogravity environment of a ground laboratory and then in 'zero gravity' aboard a KC-135 aircraft flying parabolic trajectories. Data reduction confirmed regime boundary shifts in the direction predicted, although the magnitude was a little less than predicted. Pressure drop measurements showed significant increases for the low gravity condition.

  4. Zero-G experimental validation of a robotics-based inertia identification algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggemann, Jeremy J.; Ferrel, Ivann; Martinez, Gerardo; Xie, Pu; Ma, Ou

    2010-04-01

    The need to efficiently identify the changing inertial properties of on-orbit spacecraft is becoming more critical as satellite on-orbit services, such as refueling and repairing, become increasingly aggressive and complex. This need stems from the fact that a spacecraft's control system relies on the knowledge of the spacecraft's inertia parameters. However, the inertia parameters may change during flight for reasons such as fuel usage, payload deployment or retrieval, and docking/capturing operations. New Mexico State University's Dynamics, Controls, and Robotics Research Group has proposed a robotics-based method of identifying unknown spacecraft inertia properties1. Previous methods require firing known thrusts then measuring the thrust, and the velocity and acceleration changes. The new method utilizes the concept of momentum conservation, while employing a robotic device powered by renewable energy to excite the state of the satellite. Thus, it requires no fuel usage or force and acceleration measurements. The method has been well studied in theory and demonstrated by simulation. However its experimental validation is challenging because a 6- degree-of-freedom motion in a zero-gravity condition is required. This paper presents an on-going effort to test the inertia identification method onboard the NASA zero-G aircraft. The design and capability of the test unit will be discussed in addition to the flight data. This paper also introduces the design and development of an airbearing based test used to partially validate the method, in addition to the approach used to obtain reference value for the test system's inertia parameters that can be used for comparison with the algorithm results.

  5. A Fundamental Study of Smoldering with Emphasis on Experimental Design for Zero-G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Pagni, Patrick J.

    1995-01-01

    A research program to study smoldering combustion with emphasis on the design of an experiment to be conducted in the space shuttle was conducted at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley. The motivation of the research is the interest in smoldering both as a fundamental combustion problem and as a serious fire risk. Research conducted included theoretical and experimental studies that have brought considerable new information about smolder combustion, the effect that buoyancy has on the process, and specific information for the design of a space experiment. Experiments were conducted at normal gravity, in opposed and forward mode of propagation and in the upward and downward direction to determine the effect and range of influence of gravity on smolder. Experiments were also conducted in microgravity, in a drop tower and in parabolic aircraft flights, where the brief microgravity periods were used to analyze transient aspects of the problem. Significant progress was made on the study of one-dimensional smolder, particularly in the opposed-flow configuration. These studies provided enough information to design a small-scale space-based experiment that was successfully conducted in the Spacelab Glovebox in the June 1992 USML-1/STS-50 mission of the Space Shuttle Columbia.

  6. ASTRONAUT YOUNG, JOHN W. - ZERO-GRAVITY (ZERO-G) - KC-135

    1978-12-15

    S79-30347 (31 March 1979) --- Taking advantage of a brief period of zero-gravity afforded aboard a KC-135 flying a parabolic curve, the flight crew of the first space shuttle orbital flight test (STS-1) goes through a spacesuit donning exercise. Astronaut John W. Young has just entered the hard-material torso of the shuttle spacesuit by approaching it from below. He is assisted by astronaut Robert L. Crippen. The torso is held in place by a special stand here, simulating the function provided by the airlock wall aboard the actual shuttle craft. The life support system is mated to the torso on Earth and remains so during the flight, requiring this type of donning and doffing exercise. Note Crippen?s suit is the type to be used for intravehicular activity in the shirt sleeve environment to be afforded aboard shuttle. The suit worn by Young is for extravehicular activity (EVA). Young will be STS-1 commander and Crippen, pilot. They will man the space shuttle orbiter 102 Columbia. Photo credit: NASA

  7. Who dares to join a parabolic flight?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montag, Christian; Zander, Tina; Schneider, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Parabolic flights represent an important tool in space research to investigate zero gravity on airplanes. Research on these flights often target psychological and biological processes in humans to investigate if and how we can adapt to this unique environment. This research is costly, hard to conduct and clearly heavily relies on humans participating in experiments in this (unnatural) situation. The present study investigated N =66 participants and N =66 matched control persons to study if participants in such experimental flights differ in terms of their personality traits from non-parabonauts. The main finding of this study demonstrates that parabonauts score significantly lower on harm avoidance, a trait closely linked to being anxious. As anxious humans differ from non-anxious humans in their biology, the present observations need to be taken into account when aiming at the generalizability of psychobiological research findings conducted in zero gravity on parabolic flights.

  8. Labyrinth and cerebral-spinal fluid pressure changes in guinea pigs and monkeys during simulated zero G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    This study was undertaken to explore the hypothesis that shifts of body fluids from the legs and torso toward the head contribute to the motion sickness experienced by astronauts and cosmonauts. The shifts in body fluids observed during zero-G exposure were simulated by elevating guinea pigs' and monkeys' torsos and hindquarters. Cerebral-spinal fluid pressure was recorded from a transducer located in a brain ventricle; labyrinth fluid pressure was recorded from a pipette cemented in a hole in a semicircular canal. An anticipated divergence in cerebral-spinal fluid pressure and labyrinth fluid pressure during torso elevation was not observed. The results of this study do not support a fluid shift mechanism of zero-G-induced motion sickness. However, a more complete test of the fluid shift mechanism would be obtained if endolymph and perilymph pressure changes were determined separately; we have been unable to perform this test to date.

  9. Quantitation of Bone Growth Rate Variability in Rats Exposed to Micro-(near zero G) and Macrogravity (2G)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromage, Timothy G.; Doty, Stephen B.; Smolyar, Igor; Holton, Emily

    1997-01-01

    Our stated primary objective is to quantify the growth rate variability of rat lamellar bone exposed to micro- (near zero G: e.g., Cosmos 1887 & 2044; SLS-1 & SLS-2) and macrogravity (2G). The primary significance of the proposed work is that an elegant method will be established that unequivocally characterizes the morphological consequences of gravitational factors on developing bone. The integrity of this objective depends upon our successful preparation of thin sections suitable for imaging individual bone lamellae, and our imaging and quantitation of growth rate variability in populations of lamellae from individual bone samples.

  10. Summary Report on Phase I Results from the 3D Printing in Zero G Technology Demonstration Mission, Volume I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, T. J.; Bean, Q. A.; Beshears, R. D.; Rolin, T. D.; Werkheiser, N. J.; Ordonez, E. A.; Ryan, R. M.; Ledbetter, F. E., III

    2016-01-01

    Human space exploration to date has been confined to low-Earth orbit and the Moon. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a unique opportunity for researchers to prove out the technologies that will enable humans to safely live and work in space for longer periods of time and venture beyond the Earth/Moon system. The ability to manufacture parts in-space rather than launch them from Earth represents a fundamental shift in the current risk and logistics paradigm for human spaceflight. In September 2014, NASA, in partnership with Made In Space, Inc., launched the 3D Printing in Zero-G technology demonstration mission to explore the potential of additive manufacturing for in-space applications and demonstrate the capability to manufacture parts and tools on orbit using fused deposition modeling. This Technical Publication summarizes the results of testing to date of the ground control and flight prints from the first phase of this ISS payload.

  11. Airplane Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... to severe hearing loss Ringing in your ear (tinnitus) Spinning sensation (vertigo) Vomiting resulting from vertigo Bleeding ... complications may include: Permanent hearing loss Ongoing (chronic) tinnitus Prevention Follow these tips to avoid airplane ear: ...

  12. Parabolic trough solar collector

    SciT

    Eaton, J.H.

    1985-01-15

    A parabolic trough solar collector using reflective flexible materials is disclosed. A parabolic cylinder mirror is formed by stretching a flexible reflecting material between two parabolic end formers. The formers are held in place by a spreader bar. The resulting mirror is made to track the sun, focusing the sun's rays on a receiver tube. The ends of the reflective material are attached by glue or other suitable means to attachment straps. The flexible mirror is then attached to the formers. The attachment straps are mounted in brackets and tensioned by tightening associated nuts on the ends of the attachmentmore » straps. This serves both to stretch the flexible material orthogonal to the receiver tube and to hold the flexible material on the formers. The flexible mirror is stretched in the direction of the receiver tube by adjusting tensioning nuts. If materials with matching coefficients of expansion for temperature and humidity have been chosen, for example, aluminum foil for the flexible mirror and aluminum for the spreader bar, the mirror will stay in adjustment through temperature and humidity excursions. With dissimilar materials, e.g., aluminized mylar or other polymeric material and steel, spacers can be replaced with springs to maintain proper adjustment. The spreader bar cross section is chosen to be in the optic shadow of the receiver tube when tracking and not to intercept rays of the sun that would otherwise reach the receiver tube. This invention can also be used to make non-parabolic mirrors for other apparatus and applications.« less

  13. Operation and performance of the Ciba-Corning 512 coagulation monitor during parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gocke, Robyn; Lloyd, Charles W.; Greenthaner, Nancy K.

    1991-01-01

    The goal was to assess the functionality and evaluate the procedures and operations required to operate the Ciba-Corning 512 Coagulation Monitor during parabolic flight. This monitor determines the clotting characteristics of blood. The analyzer operates by laser detection of the cessation of blood flow in a capillary channel within a test cartridge. Test simulator results were excellent for both pre-and post-flight. In-flight results were not obtained due to the warm-up time required for the simulator. Since this is an electronic function only, the expected results on the simulator would be the same in zero-g.

  14. 3D Printing in Zero G Technology Demonstration Mission: Summary of On-Orbit Operations, Material Testing, and Future Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, Tracie; Bean, Quincy; Werkheiser, Niki; Ordonez, Erick; Ledbetter, Frank; Ryan, Richard; Newton, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Human space exploration to date has been limited to low Earth orbit and the moon. The International Space Station (ISS), an orbiting laboratory 200 miles above the earth, provides a unique and incredible opportunity for researchers to prove out the technologies that will enable humans to safely live and work in space for longer periods of time and venture farther into the solar system. The ability to manufacture parts in-space rather than launch them from earth represents a fundamental shift in the current risk and logistics paradigm for human spaceflight. In particularly, additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) techniques can potentially be deployed in the space environment to enhance crew safety (by providing an on-demand part replacement capability) and decrease launch mass by reducing the number of spare components that must be launched for missions where cargo resupply is not a near-term option. In September 2014, NASA launched the 3D Printing in Zero G technology demonstration mission to the ISS to explore the potential of additive manufacturing for in-space applications and demonstrate the capability to manufacture parts and tools on-orbit. The printer for this mission was designed and operated by the company Made In Space under a NASA SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) phase III contract. The overarching objectives of the 3D print mission were to use ISS as a testbed to further maturation of enhancing technologies needed for long duration human exploration missions, introduce new materials and methods to fabricate structure in space, enable cost-effective manufacturing for structures and mechanisms made in low-unit production, and enable physical components to be manufactured in space on long duration missions if necessary. The 3D print unit for fused deposition modeling (FDM) of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) was integrated into the ISS Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) in November 2014 and phase I printing operations took place from

  15. Pilotless Airplanes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-05

    FTD/SDAWS/Capt Craven Approved for public release; Distribution unlimited. THIS TRANSLATION IS A RENDITION OF THE ORIGI- NAL FOREIGN TEXT WITHOUT ANY...and electronic computers also spurred advances in the field of pilotless airplanes. During this period the turbine jet engine underwent a very strong...Contains the Doppler radar frequency tracking device; alternator and flight-guidance computer ; the flight control box; the remote control receiver; the

  16. Commercialization of parabolic dish systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washom, B.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of recent federal tax and regulatory legislation on the commercialization of parabolic solar reflector technology is assessed. Specific areas in need of technical or economic improvement are noted.

  17. Commercialization of parabolic dish systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washom, B.

    1982-07-01

    The impact of recent federal tax and regulatory legislation on the commercialization of parabolic solar reflector technology is assessed. Specific areas in need of technical or economic improvement are noted.

  18. Parabolic aircraft solidification experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L. (Principal Investigator); Smith, Guy A.; OBrien, Susan

    1996-01-01

    A number of solidification experiments have been utilized throughout the Materials Processing in Space Program to provide an experimental environment which minimizes variables in solidification experiments. Two techniques of interest are directional solidification and isothermal casting. Because of the wide-spread use of these experimental techniques in space-based research, several MSAD experiments have been manifested for space flight. In addition to the microstructural analysis for interpretation of the experimental results from previous work with parabolic flights, it has become apparent that a better understanding of the phenomena occurring during solidification can be better understood if direct visualization of the solidification interface were possible. Our university has performed in several experimental studies such as this in recent years. The most recent was in visualizing the effect of convective flow phenomena on the KC-135 and prior to that were several successive contracts to perform directional solidification and isothermal casting experiments on the KC-135. Included in this work was the modification and utilization of the Convective Flow Analyzer (CFA), the Aircraft Isothermal Casting Furnace (ICF), and the Three-Zone Directional Solidification Furnace. These studies have contributed heavily to the mission of the Microgravity Science and Applications' Materials Science Program.

  19. Parabolic solar concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecpoyotl-Torres, M.; Campos-Alvarez, J.; Tellez-Alanis, F.; Sánchez-Mondragón, J.

    2006-08-01

    In this work we present the basis of the solar concentrator design, which has is located at Temixco, Morelos, Mexico. For this purpose, this place is ideal due to its geographic and climatic conditions, and in addition, because it accounts with the greatest constant illumination in Mexico. For the construction of the concentrator we use a recycled parabolic plate of a telecommunications satellite dish (NEC). This plate was totally covered with Aluminum. The opening diameter is of 332 cm, the focal length is of 83 cm and the opening angle is of 90°. The geometry of the plate guaranties that the incident beams, will be collected at the focus. The mechanical treatment of the plate produces an average reflectance of 75% in the visible region of the solar spectrum, and of 92% for wavelengths up to 3μm in the infrared region. We obtain up to 2000°C of temperature concentration with this setup. The reflectance can be greatly improved, but did not consider it as typical practical use. The energy obtained can be applied to conditions that require of those high calorific energies. In order to optimize the operation of the concentrator we use a control circuit designed to track the apparent sun position.

  20. Parabolic flight experience is related to increased release of stress hormones.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Stefan; Brümmer, Vera; Göbel, Simon; Carnahan, Heather; Dubrowski, Adam; Strüder, Heiko K

    2007-06-01

    Numerous studies have shown significant effects of weightlessness on adaptational processes of the CNS, cardiovascular and/or muscular system. Most of these studies have been carried out during parabolic flights, using the recurring 20 s of weightlessness at each parabola. Although some of these studies reported on potential influences not only of weightlessness but also of the stressful situation within a parabolic flight, especially provoked by the ongoing changes between 1.8, 1 and 0 G, so far there seems to be only marginal information about objective parameters of stress evoked by parabolic flights. By collecting blood samples from a permanent venous catheter several times during parabolic flights, we were able to show an increase of prolactin, cortisol and ACTH in the course of a 120 min flight. We conclude, therefore, that previous reported effects of weightlessness on adaptational processes may be affected not only by weightlessness but also by the exposure to other stressors experienced within the environment of a Zero-G airbus.

  1. UPC BarcelonaTech Platform. Innovative aerobatic parabolic flights for life sciences experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Poch, Antoni; Gonzalez, Daniel

    We present an innovative method of performing parabolic flights with aerobatic single-engine planes. A parabolic platform has been established in Sabadell Airport (Barcelona, Spain) to provide an infraestructure ready to allow Life Sciences reduced gravity experiments to be conducted in parabolic flights. Test flights have demonstrated that up to 8 seconds of reduced gravity can be achieved by using a two-seat CAP10B aircraft, with a gravity range between 0.1 and 0.01g in the three axis. A parabolic flight campaign may be implemented with a significant reduction in budget compared to conventional parabolic flight campaigns, and with a very short time-to-access to the platform. Operational skills and proficiency of the pilot controling the aircraft during the maneuvre, sensitivity to wind gusts, and aircraft balance are the key issues that make a parabola successful. Efforts are focused on improving the total “zero-g” time and the quality of reduced gravity achieved, as well as providing more space for experiments. We report results of test flights that have been conducted in order to optimize the quality and total microgravity time. A computer sofware has been developed and implemented to help the pilot optimize his or her performance. Finally, we summarize the life science experiments that have been conducted in this platform. Specific focus is given to the very successful 'Barcelona ZeroG Challenge', this year in its third edition. This educational contest gives undergraduate and graduate students worldwide the opportunity to design their research within our platform and test it on flight, thus becoming real researchers. We conclude that aerobatic parabolic flights have proven to be a safe, unexpensive and reliable way to conduct life sciences reduced gravity experiments.

  2. Amphibious Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The airplane pictured is the new Air Shark I, a four-place amphibian that makes extensive use of composite materials and cruises at close to 200 miles per hour under power from a 200-horsepower engine. Air Shark I is a "homebuilt" airplane, assembled from a kit of parts and components furnished by Freedom Master Corporation, Satellite Beach, Florida. The airplane incorporates considerable NASA technology and its construction benefited from research assistance provided by Kennedy Space Center (KSC) In designing the Shark, company president Arthur M. Lueck was able to draw on NASA's aeronautical technology bank through KSC's computerized "recon" library. As a result of his work at KSC, the wing of the Air Shark I is a new airfoil developed by Langley Research Center for light aircraft. In addition, Lueck opted for NASA-developed "winglets," vertical extensions of the wing that reduce drag by smoothing air turbulence at the wingtips. The NASA technology bank also contributed to the hull design. Lueck is considering application of NASA laminar flow technology-means of smoothing the airflow over wing and fuselage-to later models for further improvement of the Shark's aerodynamic efficiency. A materials engineer, Lueck employed his own expertise in designing and selecting the materials for the composite segments, which include all structural members, exposed surfaces and many control components. The materials are fiber reinforced plastics, or FRP They offer a high strength-to-weight ratio, with a nominal strength rating about one and a half times that of structural steel. They provide other advantages: the materials can be easily molded into finished shapes without expensive tooling or machining, and they are highly corrosion resistant. The first homebuilt to be offered by Freedom Master, Air Shark I completed air and water testing in mid-1985 and the company launched production of kits.

  3. Airplane Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huguet, L

    1921-01-01

    The authors argue that the center of gravity has a preponderating influence on the longitudinal stability of an airplane in flight, but that manufacturers, although aware of this influence, are still content to apply empirical rules to the balancing of their airplanes instead of conducting wind tunnel tests. The author examines the following points: 1) longitudinal stability, in flight, of a glider with coinciding centers; 2) the influence exercised on the stability of flight by the position of the axis of thrust with respect to the center of gravity and the whole of the glider; 3) the stability on the ground before taking off, and the influence of the position of the landing gear. 4) the influence of the elements of the glider on the balance, the possibility of sometimes correcting defective balance, and the valuable information given on this point by wind tunnel tests; 5) and a brief examination of the equilibrium of power in horizontal flight, where the conditions of stability peculiar to this kind of flight are added to previously existing conditions of the stability of the glider, and interfere in fixing the safety limits of certain evolutions.

  4. Development of a preliminary design of a method to measure the effectiveness of virus exclusion during water process reclamation at zero-G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, A. S.; Wells, A. F.; Tenoso, H. J.; Linnecke, C. B.

    1976-01-01

    Organon Diagnostics has developed, under NASA sponsorship, a monitoring system to test the capability of a water recovery system to reject the passage of viruses into the recovered water. In this system, a non-pathogenic marker virus, bacteriophage F2, is fed into the process stream before the recovery unit and the reclaimed water is assayed for its presence. An engineering preliminary design has been performed as a parallel effort to the laboratory development of the marker virus test system. Engineering schematics and drawings present a preliminary instrument design of a fully functional laboratory prototype capable of zero-G operation.

  5. Development of integrated, zero-G pneumatic transporter/rotating paddle incinerator/catalytic afterburner subsystem for processing human wastes on board spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, S. F.; Labak, L. J.; Honegger, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A four component system was developed which consists of a particle size reduction mechanism, a pneumatic waste transport system, a rotating-paddle incinerator, and a catalytic afterburner to be integrated into a six-man, zero-g subsystem for processing human wastes on board spacecraft. The study included the development of different concepts or functions, the establishment of operational specifications, and a critical evaluation for each of the four components. A series of laboratory tests was run, and a baseline subsystem design was established. An operational specification was also written in preparation for detailed design and testing of this baseline subsystem.

  6. Development of an integrated, zero-G pneumatic transporter/rotating-paddle incinerator/catalytic afterburner subsystem for processing human waste on board spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, S. F.; Labak, L. J.; Honegger, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A baseline laboratory prototype of an integrated, six man, zero-g subsystem for processing human wastes onboard spacecraft was investigated, and included the development of an operational specification for the baseline subsystem, followed by design and fabrication. The program was concluded by performing a series of six tests over a period of two weeks to evaluate the performance of the subsystem. The results of the tests were satisfactory, however, several changes in the design of the subsystem are required before completely satisfactory performance can be achieved.

  7. Composite isogrid structures for parabolic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, Edward M. (Inventor); Boyd, Jr., William E. (Inventor); Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor); Dyer, Jack E. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to high stiffness parabolic structures utilizing integral reinforced grids. The parabolic structures implement the use of isogrid structures which incorporate unique and efficient orthotropic patterns for efficient stiffness and structural stability.

  8. Electronic Nose Functionality for Breath Gas Analysis during Parabolic Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolch, Michael E.; Hummel, Thomas; Fetter, Viktor; Helwig, Andreas; Lenic, Joachim; Moukhamedieva, Lana; Tsarkow, Dimitrij; Chouker, Alexander; Schelling, Gustav

    2017-06-01

    The presence of humans in space represents a constant threat for their health and safety. Environmental factors such as living in a closed confinement, as well as exposure to microgravity and radiation, are associated with significant changes in bone metabolism, muscular atrophy, and altered immune response, which has impacts on human performance and possibly results in severe illness. Thus, maintaining and monitoring of crew health status has the highest priority to ensure whole mission success. With manned deep space missions to moon or mars appearing at the horizon where short-term repatriation back to earth is impossible the availability of appropriate diagnostic platforms for crew health status is urgently needed. In response to this need, the present experiment evaluated the functionality and practicability of a metal oxide based sensor system (eNose) together with a newly developed breath gas collecting device under the condition of altering acceleration. Parabolic flights were performed with an Airbus A300 ZeroG at Bordeaux, France. Ambient air and exhaled breath of five healthy volunteers was analyzed during steady state flight and parabolic flight maneuvres. All volunteers completed the study, the breath gas collecting device valves worked appropriately, and breathing through the collecting device was easy and did not induce discomfort. During breath gas measurements, significant changes in metal oxide sensors, mainly sensitive to aromatic and sulphur containing compounds, were observed with alternating conditions of acceleration. Similarly, metal oxide sensors showed significant changes in all sensors during ambient air measurements. The eNose as well as the newly developed breath gas collecting device, showed appropriate functionality and practicability during alternating conditions of acceleration which is a prerequisite for the intended use of the eNose aboard the International Space Station (ISS) for breath gas analysis and crew health status

  9. Microgravity Active Vibration Isolation System on Parabolic Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenbo; Pletser, Vladimir; Yang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    The Microgravity Active Vibration Isolation System (MAIS) aims at reducing on-orbit vibrations, providing a better controlled lower gravity environment for microgravity physical science experiments. The MAIS will be launched on Tianzhou-1, the first cargo ship of the China Manned Space Program. The principle of the MAIS is to suspend with electro-magnetic actuators a scientific payload, isolating it from the vibrating stator. The MAIS's vibration isolation capability is frequency-dependent and a decrease of vibration of about 40dB can be attained. The MAIS can accommodate 20kg of scientific payload or sample unit, and provide 30W of power and 1Mbps of data transmission. The MAIS is developed to support microgravity scientific experiments on manned platforms in low earth orbit, in order to meet the scientific requirements for fluid physics, materials science, and fundamental physics investigations, which usually need a very quiet environment, increasing their chances of success and their scientific outcomes. The results of scientific experiments and technology tests obtained with the MAIS will be used to improve future space based research. As the suspension force acting on the payload is very small, the MAIS can only be operative and tested in a weightless environment. The 'Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.' (DLR, German Aerospace Centre) granted a flight opportunity to the MAIS experiment to be tested during its 27th parabolic flight campaign of September 2015 performed on the A310 ZERO-G aircraft managed by the French company Novespace, a subsidiary of the 'Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales' (CNES, French Space Agency). The experiment results confirmed that the 6 degrees of freedom motion control technique was effective, and that the vibration isolation performance fulfilled perfectly the expectations based on theoretical analyses and simulations. This paper will present the design of the MAIS and the experiment results obtained during the

  10. Strongly nonlinear parabolic variational inequalities.

    PubMed

    Browder, F E; Brézis, H

    1980-02-01

    An existence and uniqueness result is established for a general class of variational inequalities for parabolic partial differential equations of the form partial differentialu/ partial differentialt + A(u) + g(u) = f with g nondecreasing but satisfying no growth condition. The proof is based upon a type of compactness result for solutions of variational inequalities that should find a variety of other applications.

  11. Parabolic tapers for overmoded waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Doane, J.L.

    1983-11-25

    A waveguide taper with a parabolic profile, in which the distance along the taper axis varies as the square of the tapered dimension, provides less mode conversion than equal length linear tapers and is easier to fabricate than other non-linear tapers.

  12. Stability of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1922-01-01

    The author attempts to correct the misconception that piloting an airplane requires extraordinary skill and balance. He also tries to show that airplanes are extremely stable in flight. Some of the major points covered in this article include: automatic pilots, airplanes designed to be stable, and the reliance on mathematics to help in designing stable aircraft.

  13. Hypogravity Research and Educational Parabolic Flight Activities Conducted in Barcelona: a new Hub of Innovation in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Poch, Antoni; González, Daniel Ventura; López, David

    2016-12-01

    We report on different research and educational activities related to parabolic flights conducted in Barcelona since 2008. We use a CAP10B single-engine aerobatic aircraft flying out of Sabadell Airport and operating in visual flight conditions providing up to 8 seconds of hypogravity for each parabola. Aside from biomedical experiments being conducted, different student teams have flown in parabolic flights in the framework of the international contest `Barcelona Zero-G Challenge', and have published their results in relevant symposiums and scientific journals. The platform can certainly be a good testbed for a proof-of-concept before accessing other microgravity platforms, and has proved to be excellent for motivational student campaigns.

  14. Perception of Egocentric Distance during Gravitational Changes in Parabolic Flight.

    PubMed

    Clément, Gilles; Loureiro, Nuno; Sousa, Duarte; Zandvliet, Andre

    2016-01-01

    We explored the effect of gravity on the perceived representation of the absolute distance of objects to the observers within the range from 1.5-6 m. Experiments were performed on board the CNES Airbus Zero-G during parabolic flights eliciting repeated exposures to short periods of microgravity (0 g), hypergravity (1.8 g), and normal gravity (1 g). Two methods for obtaining estimates of perceived egocentric distance were used: verbal reports and visually directed motion toward a memorized visual target. For the latter method, because normal walking is not possible in 0 g, blindfolded subjects translated toward the visual target by pulling on a rope with their arms. The results showed that distance estimates using both verbal reports and blind pulling were significantly different between normal gravity, microgravity, and hypergravity. Compared to the 1 g measurements, the estimates of perceived distance using blind pulling were shorter for all distances in 1.8 g, whereas in 0 g they were longer for distances up to 4 m and shorter for distances beyond. These findings suggest that gravity plays a role in both the sensorimotor system and the perceptual/cognitive system for estimating egocentric distance.

  15. Perception of Egocentric Distance during Gravitational Changes in Parabolic Flight

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Gilles; Loureiro, Nuno; Sousa, Duarte; Zandvliet, Andre

    2016-01-01

    We explored the effect of gravity on the perceived representation of the absolute distance of objects to the observers within the range from 1.5–6 m. Experiments were performed on board the CNES Airbus Zero-G during parabolic flights eliciting repeated exposures to short periods of microgravity (0 g), hypergravity (1.8 g), and normal gravity (1 g). Two methods for obtaining estimates of perceived egocentric distance were used: verbal reports and visually directed motion toward a memorized visual target. For the latter method, because normal walking is not possible in 0 g, blindfolded subjects translated toward the visual target by pulling on a rope with their arms. The results showed that distance estimates using both verbal reports and blind pulling were significantly different between normal gravity, microgravity, and hypergravity. Compared to the 1 g measurements, the estimates of perceived distance using blind pulling were shorter for all distances in 1.8 g, whereas in 0 g they were longer for distances up to 4 m and shorter for distances beyond. These findings suggest that gravity plays a role in both the sensorimotor system and the perceptual/cognitive system for estimating egocentric distance. PMID:27463106

  16. Summary Report on Phase I and Phase II Results From the 3D Printing in Zero-G Technology Demonstration Mission. Volume II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, T. J.; Werkheiser, N. J.; Ledbetter, F. E., III

    2018-01-01

    In-space manufacturing seeks to develop the processes, skill sets, and certification architecture needed to provide a rapid response manufacturing capability on long-duration exploration missions. The first 3D printer on the Space Station was developed by Made in Space, Inc. and completed two rounds of operation on orbit as part of the 3D Printing in Zero-G Technology Demonstration Mission. This Technical Publication provides a comprehensive overview of the technical objections of the mission, the two phases of hardware operation conducted on orbit, and the subsequent detailed analysis of specimens produced. No engineering significant evidence of microgravity effects on material outcomes was noted. This technology demonstration mission represents the first step in developing a suite of manufacturing capabilities to meet future mission needs.

  17. Design Concepts for Zero-G Whole Body Cleansing on ISS Alpha. Part 2; Individual Design Project; Degree awarded by International Space Univ., 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohanty, Susmita

    2001-01-01

    This document was originally published in 1997 as a International Space University Master of Space Studies student's project. While the specifics may be a little dated, the results gleaned are still relevant and valid. Johnson Space Center is now abuzz with preparations for the International Space Station. The work on the various systems for the U.S. Habitation Module will begin in 1998. As a prelude, the Flight Crew Support Division perceived the need to take a closer, more critical took at planning the Whole Body Cleansing function for ISS. This report is an endeavour to retrieve all data available on whole body cleansing mechanisms used, past and present, by the Russians and the Americans, analyze it and create design concepts for products/product systems for zero-g whole body cleansing on ISS Alpha, for typical duration of about 90 days. This report takes a close look at the Skylab collapsible shower, the Mir shower/sauna, the full body cleansing methods currently in use onboard the Space Shuttle and Mir and at the Whole Body Shower designed and tested for Space Station Freedom. It attempts to "listen" carefully to what the Mir astronauts (Norm Thagard, Shannon Lucid and John Blaha) have to say about their personal hygiene experiences during their recent stays on Mir. The findings in the report call for a change in paradigm. What is good for Earth conditions is not necessarily good for Zero-g! It concludes that a shower is not a good idea for the ISS. The final concept that is proposed reflects very strongly what the Mir astronauts would like to have and to use onboard a station like the ISS, The report concludes with directions of how to take the "idea" further and realize it in the form of a product system for Whole Body Cleansing onboard the ISS.

  18. General problem of the airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Maurice; Richard, Paul

    1922-01-01

    A series of equations relating to airplanes are given and examples listed. Some of the equations listed include: the speed, altitude and carrying capacity of various airplanes; weight of an airplane; weight of various parts of an airplane; the polars of the wings; speeds of airplanes; radius of action.

  19. Droplet burning at zero G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Questions of the importance and feasibility of performing experiments on droplet burning at zero gravity in Spacelab were studied. Information on the physics and chemistry of droplet combustion, with attention directed specifically to the chemical kinetics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid mechanics of the phenomena involved, are presented. The work was divided into three phases, the justification, the feasibility, and the conceptual development of a preliminary design. Results from the experiments performed revealed a few new facts concerning droplet burning, notably burning rates in excess of theoretical prediction and a phenomenon of flash extinction, both likely traceable to accumulation of carbon produced by gas-phase pyrolysis in the fuel-rich zone enclosed by the reaction surface. These experiments also showed that they were primarily due to timing difficulties.

  20. Strongly nonlinear parabolic variational inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Browder, Felix E.; Brézis, Haim

    1980-01-01

    An existence and uniqueness result is established for a general class of variational inequalities for parabolic partial differential equations of the form ∂u/∂t + A(u) + g(u) = f with g nondecreasing but satisfying no growth condition. The proof is based upon a type of compactness result for solutions of variational inequalities that should find a variety of other applications. PMID:16592776

  1. Improvement Design of Parabolic Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihsan, S. I.; Safian, M. A. I. M.; Taufek, M. A. M.; Mohiuddin, A. K. M.

    2017-03-01

    The performance of parabolic trough solar collector (PTSC) has been evaluated using different heat transfer working fluids; namely water and SAE20 W50 engine oil. New and slightly improved PTSC was developed to run the experimental study. Under the meteorological conditions of Malaysia, authors found that PTSC can operate at a higher temperature than water collector but the performance efficiency of collector using engine oil is much lower than the water collector.

  2. Effects of varying gravity levels in parabolic flight on the size-mass illusion.

    PubMed

    Clément, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    When an observer lifts two objects with the same weight but different sizes, the smaller object is consistently reported to feel heavier than the larger object even after repeated trials. Here we explored the effect of reduced and increased gravity on this perceptual size-mass illusion. Experiments were performed on board the CNES Airbus A300 Zero-G during parabolic flights eliciting repeated exposures to short periods of zero g, 0.16 g, 0.38 g, one g, and 1.8 g. Subjects were asked to assess perceived heaviness by actively oscillating objects with various sizes and masses. The results showed that a perceptual size-mass illusion was clearly present at all gravity levels. During the oscillations, the peak arm acceleration varied as a function of the gravity level, irrespective of the mass and size of the objects. In other words we did not observe a sensorimotor size-mass illusion. These findings confirm dissociation between the sensorimotor and perceptual systems for determining object mass. In addition, they suggest that astronauts on the Moon or Mars with the eyes closed will be able to accurately determine the relative difference in mass between objects.

  3. Effects of Varying Gravity Levels in Parabolic Flight on the Size-Mass Illusion

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    When an observer lifts two objects with the same weight but different sizes, the smaller object is consistently reported to feel heavier than the larger object even after repeated trials. Here we explored the effect of reduced and increased gravity on this perceptual size-mass illusion. Experiments were performed on board the CNES Airbus A300 Zero-G during parabolic flights eliciting repeated exposures to short periods of zero g, 0.16 g, 0.38 g, one g, and 1.8 g. Subjects were asked to assess perceived heaviness by actively oscillating objects with various sizes and masses. The results showed that a perceptual size-mass illusion was clearly present at all gravity levels. During the oscillations, the peak arm acceleration varied as a function of the gravity level, irrespective of the mass and size of the objects. In other words we did not observe a sensorimotor size-mass illusion. These findings confirm dissociation between the sensorimotor and perceptual systems for determining object mass. In addition, they suggest that astronauts on the Moon or Mars with the eyes closed will be able to accurately determine the relative difference in mass between objects. PMID:24901519

  4. Low Sidelobe Scanning Beams for Parabolic Reflectors,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Parabolic antennas, *Sidelobes, *Electronic scanners, Parabolas, Far field, Antenna feeds , Reflectors, Low level, Amplitude, Distortion, Configurations, Secondary, Compensation, Feeding , Symposia, Taper

  5. Multiscale techniques for parabolic equations.

    PubMed

    Målqvist, Axel; Persson, Anna

    2018-01-01

    We use the local orthogonal decomposition technique introduced in Målqvist and Peterseim (Math Comput 83(290):2583-2603, 2014) to derive a generalized finite element method for linear and semilinear parabolic equations with spatial multiscale coefficients. We consider nonsmooth initial data and a backward Euler scheme for the temporal discretization. Optimal order convergence rate, depending only on the contrast, but not on the variations of the coefficients, is proven in the [Formula: see text]-norm. We present numerical examples, which confirm our theoretical findings.

  6. Solar Parabolic Dish Annual Technology Evaluation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The activities of the JPL Solar Thermal Power Systems Parabolic Dish Project for FY 1982 are summarized. Included are discussions on designs of module development including their concentrator, receiver, and power conversion subsystems. Analyses and test results, along with progress on field tests, Small Community Experiment System development, and tests at the Parabolic Dish Test Site are also included.

  7. Solar parabolic dish technology evaluation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The activities of the JPL Solar Thermal Power Systems Parabolic Dish Project for FY 1983 are summarized. Included are discussions on designs of module development including concentrator, receiver, and power conversion subsystems together with a separate discussion of field tests, Small Community Experiment system development, and tests at the Parabolic Dish Test Site.

  8. Metal Airplane Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    It has long been thought that metal construction of airplanes would involve an increase in weight as compared with wood construction. Recent experience has shown that such is not the case. This report describes the materials used, treatment of, and characteristics of metal airplane construction.

  9. The Airplane Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Lee; Grant, Roderick

    1991-01-01

    Presents an experiment to investigate centripetal force and acceleration that utilizes an airplane suspended on a string from a spring balance. Investigates the possibility that lift on the wings of the airplane accounts for the differences between calculated tension and measured tension on the string. (MDH)

  10. Parabolic Dish Concentrator (PDC-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, E. W.; Argoud, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The design, construction, and installation of the Parabolic Dish Concentrator, Type 1 (PDC-1) has been one of the most significant JPL concentrator projects because of the knowledge gained about this type of concentrator and the development of design, testing, and analysis procedures which are applicable to all solar concentrator projects. The need for these procedures was more clearly understood during the testing period which started with the prototype panel evaluation and ended with the performance characterization of the completed concentrator. For each phase of the test program, practical test procedures were required and these procedures defined the mathematical analysis which was essential for successful concentrator development. The concentrator performance appears to be limited only by the distortions resulting from thermal gradients through the reflecting panels. Simple optical testing can be extremely effective, but comprehensive mechanical and optical analysis is essential for cost effective solar concentrator development.

  11. Photovoltaic applications of Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winston, R.

    1975-01-01

    The use of a compound parabolic concentrator as field collector, in conjunction with a primary focusing concentrator for photovoltaic applications is studied. The primary focusing concentrator can be a parabolic reflector, an array of Fresnel mirrors, a Fresnel lens or some other lens. Silicon solar cell grid structures are proposed that increase efficiency with concentration up to 10 suns. A ray tracing program has been developed to determine energy distribution at the exit of a compound parabolic concentrator. Projected total cost of a CPC/solar cell system will be between 4 and 5 times lower than for flat plate silicon cell arrays.

  12. Analysis of the Quality of Parabolic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambot, Thomas; Ord, Stephan F.

    2016-01-01

    Parabolic flights allow researchers to conduct several 20 second micro-gravity experiments in the course of a single day. However, the measurement can have large variations over the course of a single parabola, requiring the knowledge of the actual flight environment as a function of time. The NASA Flight Opportunities program (FO) reviewed the acceleration data of over 400 parabolic flights and investigated the quality of micro-gravity for scientific purposes. It was discovered that a parabolic flight can be segmented into multiple parts of different quality and duration, a fact to be aware of when planning an experiment.

  13. Stability of the parabolic Poincaré bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Suratno; Biswas, Indranil; Dan, Krishanu

    Given a compact Riemann surface X and a moduli space Mα(Λ) of parabolic stable bundles on it of fixed determinant of complete parabolic flags, we prove that the Poincaré parabolic bundle on X × Mα(Λ) is parabolic stable with respect to a natural polarization on X × Mα(Λ).

  14. The Bristol "Badminton" Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    The Bristol Badminton, Type 99 airplane has a radial aircooled engine (a Bristol Jupiter 9 cylinder 450 HP.) and three fuel tanks. It is a single seat biplane weighing 1,840 lbs. empty and 2,460 lbs. loaded.

  15. English airplane construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwencke, D

    1930-01-01

    English airplane construction is presented with a particular emphasis on metal construction techniques. Steel rib and fuselage construction are discussed as well as the use of duralumin in construction.

  16. Airplane Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F; Crook, L H

    1918-01-01

    Report presents stress analysis of individual components of an airplane. Normal and abnormal loads, sudden loads, simple stresses, indirect simple stresses, resultant unit stress, repetitive and equivalent stress, maximum steady load and stress are considered.

  17. General airplane performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockfeller, W C

    1939-01-01

    Equations have been developed for the analysis of the performance of the ideal airplane, leading to an approximate physical interpretation of the performance problem. The basic sea-level airplane parameters have been generalized to altitude parameters and a new parameter has been introduced and physically interpreted. The performance analysis for actual airplanes has been obtained in terms of the equivalent ideal airplane in order that the charts developed for use in practical calculations will for the most part apply to any type of engine-propeller combination and system of control, the only additional material required consisting of the actual engine and propeller curves for propulsion unit. Finally, a more exact method for the calculation of the climb characteristics for the constant-speed controllable propeller is presented in the appendix.

  18. Reflective Properties of a Parabolic Mirror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Gordon P.

    1991-01-01

    An incident light ray parallel to the optical axis of a parabolic mirror will be reflected at the focal point and vice versa. Presents a mathematical proof that uses calculus, algebra, and geometry to prove this reflective property. (MDH)

  19. Solutions to variational inequalities of parabolic type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanguo

    2006-09-01

    The existence of strong solutions to a kind of variational inequality of parabolic type is investigated by the theory of semigroups of linear operators. As an application, an abstract semi permeable media problem is studied.

  20. Stall-proof Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachmann, G

    1927-01-01

    My lecture has to do with the following questions. Is the danger of stalling necessarily inherent in the airplane in its present form and structure, or can it be diminished or eliminated by suitable means? Do we possess such means or devices and how must they operate? In this connection I will devote special attention to the exhibition of stall-proof airplanes by Fokker under the auspices of the English Air Ministry, which took place in Croyden last April.

  1. Reverberation Modelling Using a Parabolic Equation Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    the limits of their applicability. Results: Transmission loss estimates produced by the PECan parabolic equation acoustic model were used in...environments is possible when used in concert with a parabolic equation passive acoustic model . Future plans: The authors of this report recommend further...technique using other types of acoustic models should be undertaken. Furthermore, as the current method when applied as-is results in estimates that reflect

  2. The Airplane Cabin Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Howard; Hertzberg, Vicki Stover; Dupont, Chris; Espinoza, Josh L; Levy, Shawn; Nelson, Karen; Norris, Sharon

    2018-06-06

    Serving over three billion passengers annually, air travel serves as a conduit for infectious disease spread, including emerging infections and pandemics. Over two dozen cases of in-flight transmissions have been documented. To understand these risks, a characterization of the airplane cabin microbiome is necessary. Our study team collected 229 environmental samples on ten transcontinental US flights with subsequent 16S rRNA sequencing. We found that bacterial communities were largely derived from human skin and oral commensals, as well as environmental generalist bacteria. We identified clear signatures for air versus touch surface microbiome, but not for individual types of touch surfaces. We also found large flight-to-flight beta diversity variations with no distinguishing signatures of individual flights, rather a high between-flight diversity for all touch surfaces and particularly for air samples. There was no systematic pattern of microbial community change from pre- to post-flight. Our findings are similar to those of other recent studies of the microbiome of built environments. In summary, the airplane cabin microbiome has immense airplane to airplane variability. The vast majority of airplane-associated microbes are human commensals or non-pathogenic, and the results provide a baseline for non-crisis-level airplane microbiome conditions.

  3. Research rocket test RR-1 (Black Brant VC) and RR-2 (Aerobee 170A): Investigations of the stability of bubbles in plain and fiber-reinforced metal and solidified in a near-zero-g environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, I. C.; Yost, V. H.

    1973-01-01

    The results of the first two of a series of research rocket flights are presented. The objectives of these flights were (1) to learn about the capabilities of these rockets, (2) to learn how to interface the payloads and rockets, and (3) to process some of the composite casting demonstration capsules intended originally for Apollo 15. The capsules contained experiments for investigating the stability of gas bubbles in plain and fiber-reinforced metal melted and solidified in a near-zero-g (0.0119g) environment. The characteristics of the two research rockets, an Aerobee 170A and a Black Brant VC, used to obtain the periods of near-zero-g and the temperature control unit used for processing the contents of the two experiment capsules are discussed.

  4. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... airplanes and jet airplanes. 36.7 Section 36.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... § 36.7 Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes. (a) Applicability. This section applies to all transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes for which an acoustical change...

  5. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... airplanes and jet airplanes. 36.7 Section 36.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... § 36.7 Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes. (a) Applicability. This section applies to all transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes for which an acoustical change...

  6. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... airplanes and jet airplanes. 36.7 Section 36.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... § 36.7 Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes. (a) Applicability. This section applies to all transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes for which an acoustical change...

  7. 77 FR 37797 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A330-200 series airplanes; Airbus Model A330-200 Freighter series airplanes; Airbus Model A330-300 series airplanes; Airbus Model A340-200 series airplanes; and Airbus Model A340-300 series...

  8. 76 FR 79560 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ...-1323; Directorate Identifier 2010-NM-212-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... airplanes; Model A330-223F and -243F airplanes; and Model A340-200, -300, -500, and -600 series airplanes... airplane flight manual. We are proposing this AD to prevent movement of the elevators to zero position...

  9. Controllable parabolic-cylinder optical rogue wave.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei-Ping; Chen, Lang; Belić, Milivoj; Petrović, Nikola

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate controllable parabolic-cylinder optical rogue waves in certain inhomogeneous media. An analytical rogue wave solution of the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation with spatially modulated coefficients and an external potential in the form of modulated quadratic potential is obtained by the similarity transformation. Numerical simulations are performed for comparison with the analytical solutions and to confirm the stability of the rogue wave solution obtained. These optical rogue waves are built by the products of parabolic-cylinder functions and the basic rogue wave solution of the standard nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Such rogue waves may appear in different forms, as the hump and paw profiles.

  10. The evolution of airplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, A.; Charles, J. D.; Lorente, S.

    2014-07-01

    The prevailing view is that we cannot witness biological evolution because it occurred on a time scale immensely greater than our lifetime. Here, we show that we can witness evolution in our lifetime by watching the evolution of the flying human-and-machine species: the airplane. We document this evolution, and we also predict it based on a physics principle: the constructal law. We show that the airplanes must obey theoretical allometric rules that unite them with the birds and other animals. For example, the larger airplanes are faster, more efficient as vehicles, and have greater range. The engine mass is proportional to the body size: this scaling is analogous to animal design, where the mass of the motive organs (muscle, heart, lung) is proportional to the body size. Large or small, airplanes exhibit a proportionality between wing span and fuselage length, and between fuel load and body size. The animal-design counterparts of these features are evident. The view that emerges is that the evolution phenomenon is broader than biological evolution. The evolution of technology, river basins, and animal design is one phenomenon, and it belongs in physics.

  11. The very good property for parabolic vector bundles over curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soibelman, Alexander

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this note is to extend Beilinson and Drinfeld's "very good" property to moduli stacks of parabolic vector bundles on curves of genuses g = 0 and g = 1. Beilinson and Drinfeld show that for g > 1 a trivial parabolic structure is sufficient for the moduli stacks to be "very good." We give a sufficient condition on the parabolic structure for this property to hold in the case of nontrivial parabolic structure.

  12. Solar Thermal Power Systems parabolic dish project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truscello, V. C.

    1981-01-01

    The status of the Solar Thermal Power Systems Project for FY 1980 is summarized. Included is: a discussion of the project's goals, program structure, and progress in parabolic dish technology. Analyses and test results of concentrators, receivers, and power converters are discussed. Progress toward the objectives of technology feasibility, technology readiness, system feasibility, and system readiness are covered.

  13. Parabolic Dish Concentrator (PDC-2) Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafinejad, D.

    1984-01-01

    The design of the Parabolic Dish Concentrator (PDC-2) is described. The following five subsystems of the concentrator are discussed: (1) reflective surface subsystem, (2) support structure subsystem, (3) foundation, (4) drive subsystem, and (5) electrical and control subsystem. The status of the PDC-2 development project is assessed.

  14. The linear regulator problem for parabolic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Kunisch, K.

    1983-01-01

    An approximation framework is presented for computation (in finite imensional spaces) of Riccati operators that can be guaranteed to converge to the Riccati operator in feedback controls for abstract evolution systems in a Hilbert space. It is shown how these results may be used in the linear optimal regulator problem for a large class of parabolic systems.

  15. How to activate a plant gravireceptor. Early mechanisms of gravity sensing studied in characean rhizoids during parabolic flights.

    PubMed

    Limbach, Christoph; Hauslage, Jens; Schäfer, Claudia; Braun, Markus

    2005-10-01

    Early processes underlying plant gravity sensing were investigated in rhizoids of Chara globularis under microgravity conditions provided by parabolic flights of the A300-Zero-G aircraft and of sounding rockets. By applying centrifugal forces during the microgravity phases of sounding rocket flights, lateral accelerations of 0.14 g, but not of 0.05 g, resulted in a displacement of statoliths. Settling of statoliths onto the subapical plasma membrane initiated the gravitropic response. Since actin controls the positioning of statoliths and restricts sedimentation of statoliths in these cells, it can be calculated that lateral actomyosin forces in a range of 2 x 10(-14) n act on statoliths to keep them in place. These forces represent the threshold value that has to be exceeded by any lateral acceleration stimulus for statolith sedimentation and gravisensing to occur. When rhizoids were gravistimulated during parabolic plane flights, the curvature angles of the flight samples, whose sedimented statoliths became weightless for 22 s during the 31 microgravity phases, were not different from those of in-flight 1g controls. However, in ground control experiments, curvature responses were drastically reduced when the contact of statoliths with the plasma membrane was intermittently interrupted by inverting gravistimulated cells for less than 10 s. Increasing the weight of sedimented statoliths by lateral centrifugation did not enhance the gravitropic response. These results provide evidence that graviperception in characean rhizoids requires contact of statoliths with membrane-bound receptor molecules rather than pressure or tension exerted by the weight of statoliths.

  16. Concentrating Solar Power Projects - Chabei 64MW Molten Salt Parabolic

    project Status Date: September 29, 2016 Project Overview Project Name: Chabei 64MW Molten Salt Parabolic Technology: Parabolic trough Turbine Capacity: Net: 64.0 MW Gross: 64.0 MW Status: Under development Do you have more information, corrections, or comments? Background Technology: Parabolic trough Status: Under

  17. Exploring Venus by Solar Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    A solar-powered airplane is proposed to explore the atmospheric environment of Venus. Venus has several advantages for a solar airplane. At the top of the cloud level, the solar intensity is comparable to or greater than terrestrial solar intensities. The Earthlike atmospheric pressure means that the power required for flight is lower for Venus than that of Mars, and the slow rotation of Venus allows an airplane to be designed for continuous sunlight, with no energy storage needed for night-time flight. These factors mean that Venus is perhaps the easiest planet in the solar system for flight of a long-duration solar airplane.

  18. Automated airplane surface generation

    SciT

    Smith, R.E.; Cordero, Y.; Jones, W.

    1996-12-31

    An efficient methodology and software axe presented for defining a class of airplane configurations. A small set of engineering design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, vertical tall, horizontal tail, and canard components. Wing, canard, and tail surface grids axe manifested by solving a fourth-order partial differential equation subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design variables are incorporated into the boundary conditions, and the solution is expressed as a Fourier series. The fuselage is described by an algebraic function with four design parameters. The computed surface grids are suitablemore » for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation and configuration optimizations. Both batch and interactive software are discussed for applying the methodology.« less

  19. Airplane dopes and doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W H

    1919-01-01

    Cellulose acetate and cellulose nitrate are the important constituents of airplane dopes in use at the present time, but planes were treated with other materials in the experimental stages of flying. The above compounds belong to the class of colloids and are of value because they produce a shrinking action on the fabric when drying out of solution, rendering it drum tight. Other colloids possessing the same property have been proposed and tried. In the first stages of the development of dope, however, shrinkage was not considered. The fabric was treated merely to render it waterproof. The first airplanes constructed were covered with cotton fabric stretched as tightly as possible over the winds, fuselage, etc., and flying was possible only in fine weather. The necessity of an airplane which would fly under all weather conditions at once became apparent. Then followed experiments with rubberized fabrics, fabrics treated with glue rendered insoluble by formaldehyde or bichromate, fabrics treated with drying and nondrying oils, shellac, casein, etc. It was found that fabrics treated as above lost their tension in damp weather, and the oil from the motor penetrated the proofing material and weakened the fabric. For the most part the film of material lacked durability. Cellulose nitrate lacquers, however were found to be more satisfactory under varying weather conditions, added less weight to the planes, and were easily applied. On the other hand, they were highly inflammable, and oil from the motor penetrated the film of cellulose nitrate, causing the tension of the fabric to be relaxed.

  20. Parabolic dish collectors - A solar option

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscello, V. C.

    1981-05-01

    A description is given of several parabolic-dish high temperature solar thermal systems currently undergoing performance trials. A single parabolic dish has the potential for generating 20 to 30 kW of electricity with fluid temperatures from 300 to 1650 C. Each dish is a complete power-producing unit, and may function either independently or as part of a group of linked modules. The two dish designs under consideration are of 11 and 12 meter diameters, yielding receiver operating temperatures of 925 and 815 C, respectively. The receiver designs described include (1) an organic working fluid (toluene) Rankine cycle engine; (2) a Brayton open cycle unit incorporating a hybrid combustion chamber and nozzle and a shaft-coupled permanent magnet alternator; and (3) a modified Stirling cycle device originally designed for automotive use. Also considered are thermal buffer energy storage and thermochemical transport and storage.

  1. Mechatronic Prototype of Parabolic Solar Tracker.

    PubMed

    Morón, Carlos; Díaz, Jorge Pablo; Ferrández, Daniel; Ramos, Mari Paz

    2016-06-15

    In the last 30 years numerous attempts have been made to improve the efficiency of the parabolic collectors in the electric power production, although most of the studies have focused on the industrial production of thermoelectric power. This research focuses on the application of this concentrating solar thermal power in the unexplored field of building construction. To that end, a mechatronic prototype of a hybrid paraboloidal and cylindrical-parabolic tracker based on the Arduido technology has been designed. The prototype is able to measure meteorological data autonomously in order to quantify the energy potential of any location. In this way, it is possible to reliably model real commercial equipment behavior before its deployment in buildings and single family houses.

  2. Mechatronic Prototype of Parabolic Solar Tracker

    PubMed Central

    Morón, Carlos; Díaz, Jorge Pablo; Ferrández, Daniel; Ramos, Mari Paz

    2016-01-01

    In the last 30 years numerous attempts have been made to improve the efficiency of the parabolic collectors in the electric power production, although most of the studies have focused on the industrial production of thermoelectric power. This research focuses on the application of this concentrating solar thermal power in the unexplored field of building construction. To that end, a mechatronic prototype of a hybrid paraboloidal and cylindrical-parabolic tracker based on the Arduido technology has been designed. The prototype is able to measure meteorological data autonomously in order to quantify the energy potential of any location. In this way, it is possible to reliably model real commercial equipment behavior before its deployment in buildings and single family houses. PMID:27314359

  3. Concentrating Solar Power Projects - Parabolic Trough Projects |

    Project Godawari Solar Project Gujarat Solar One Gulang 100MW Thermal Oil Parabolic Trough project Guzmán Kuraymat (ISCC Kuraymat) Kathu Solar Park KaXu Solar One KVK Energy Solar Project La Africana La Dehesa La Power Facility Nevada Solar One (NSO) NOOR I NOOR II Olivenza 1 Orellana Palma del Río I Palma del Río

  4. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airplanes and jet airplanes. 36.7 Section 36.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... paragraph (b) of this section: (1) Airplanes with high bypass ratio jet engines. For an airplane that has jet engines with a bypass ratio of 2 or more before a change in type design— (i) The airplane, after...

  5. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... airplanes and jet airplanes. 36.7 Section 36.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... paragraph (b) of this section: (1) Airplanes with high bypass ratio jet engines. For an airplane that has jet engines with a bypass ratio of 2 or more before a change in type design— (i) The airplane, after...

  6. Simulation of parabolic reflectors for ultraviolet phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, David Robert

    2016-08-01

    Ultraviolet (UVR) phototherapy is widely used to treat an array of skin conditions, including psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo. For such interventions, a quantified dose is vital if the treatment is to be both biologically effective and to avoid the detrimental effects of over-dosing. As dose is absorbed at surface level, the orientation of patient site with respect to the UVR lamps modulates effective dose. Previous investigations have modelled this behaviour, and examined the impact of shaped anodized aluminium reflectors typically placed around lamps in phototherapy cabins. These mirrors are effective but tend to yield complex patterns of reflection around the cabin which can result in substantial dose inhomogeneity. There has been some speculation over whether using the reflective property of parabolic mirrors might improve dose delivery or homogeneity through the treatment cabin. In this work, the effects of parabolic mirrors are simulated and compared with standard shaped mirrors. Simulation results strongly suggest that parabolic reflectors reduce total irradiance relative to standard shaped reflectors, and have a negligible impact on dose homogeneity.

  7. Trend of airplane flight characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Koppen, Joachim

    1933-01-01

    This report describes the development of airplane characteristics since the war and indicates the direction development should take in the immediate future. Some of the major topics include: the behavior of an airplane about its lateral, vertical, and longitudinal axes. Behavior at large angles of attack and landing characteristics are also included.

  8. 78 FR 9787 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R, and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model A300 C4-605R Variant F airplanes (collectively called Model A300- 600 series airplanes); and Airbus [[Page 9788

  9. 76 FR 77934 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ...-1321; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-045-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A319 series airplanes, Model A320-211, -212, -214, -231, -232, and -233 airplanes, and Model A321 series airplanes that would...

  10. 77 FR 48469 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ...-0808; Directorate Identifier 2010-NM-170-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... airplanes, and Model A340-200 and A340-300 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of an... require, depending on airplane configuration, modifying three flight control primary computers (FCPCs...

  11. 78 FR 68347 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of...-200, A340- 300, A340-500, and A340-600 series airplanes. AD 2009-04-07 required revising the airplane... reference unit (ADIRU) from providing erroneous data to other airplane systems. AD 2011-02-09 required...

  12. 77 FR 24829 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT... and -300 series airplanes; Model A330-223F and -243F airplanes; and Model A340-200, -300, -500, and -600 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report that during the evaluation of engine failures...

  13. 14 CFR 125.93 - Airplane limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane limitations. 125.93 Section 125.93...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements § 125.93 Airplane...

  14. 78 FR 27015 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A330-200 and A330-300 series airplanes, and Model A340-200 and A340-300 series airplanes... seal on a solenoid. This AD requires, depending on airplane configuration, modifying three flight...

  15. 14 CFR 23.3 - Airplane categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane categories. 23.3 Section 23.3... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES General § 23.3 Airplane categories. (a) The normal category is limited to airplanes that have a seating configuration, excluding pilot...

  16. 14 CFR 23.3 - Airplane categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane categories. 23.3 Section 23.3... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES General § 23.3 Airplane categories. (a) The normal category is limited to airplanes that have a seating configuration, excluding pilot...

  17. 14 CFR 125.93 - Airplane limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane limitations. 125.93 Section 125.93...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements § 125.93 Airplane...

  18. 14 CFR 23.3 - Airplane categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane categories. 23.3 Section 23.3... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES General § 23.3 Airplane categories. (a) The normal category is limited to airplanes that have a seating configuration, excluding pilot...

  19. 14 CFR 125.93 - Airplane limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane limitations. 125.93 Section 125.93...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements § 125.93 Airplane...

  20. 14 CFR 23.3 - Airplane categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane categories. 23.3 Section 23.3... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES General § 23.3 Airplane categories. (a) The normal category is limited to airplanes that have a seating configuration, excluding pilot...

  1. 14 CFR 125.93 - Airplane limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane limitations. 125.93 Section 125.93...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements § 125.93 Airplane...

  2. 14 CFR 23.3 - Airplane categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane categories. 23.3 Section 23.3... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES General § 23.3 Airplane categories... airplanes that have a seating configuration, excluding pilot seats, of nine or less, a maximum certificated...

  3. 14 CFR 125.93 - Airplane limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane limitations. 125.93 Section 125.93...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements § 125.93 Airplane...

  4. 77 FR 24367 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A300 B4-2C, B4-103, and B4-203 airplanes; Model A300 B4- 600, B4-600R, and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model C4-605R Variant F airplanes (collectively called A300-600 series airplanes); and Model...

  5. Femtosecond parabolic pulse shaping in normally dispersive optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Sukhoivanov, Igor A; Iakushev, Sergii O; Shulika, Oleksiy V; Díez, Antonio; Andrés, Miguel

    2013-07-29

    Formation of parabolic pulses at femtosecond time scale by means of passive nonlinear reshaping in normally dispersive optical fibers is analyzed. Two approaches are examined and compared: the parabolic waveform formation in transient propagation regime and parabolic waveform formation in the steady-state propagation regime. It is found that both approaches could produce parabolic pulses as short as few hundred femtoseconds applying commercially available fibers, specially designed all-normal dispersion photonic crystal fiber and modern femtosecond lasers for pumping. The ranges of parameters providing parabolic pulse formation at the femtosecond time scale are found depending on the initial pulse duration, chirp and energy. Applicability of different fibers for femtosecond pulse shaping is analyzed. Recommendation for shortest parabolic pulse formation is made based on the analysis presented.

  6. On the parallel solution of parabolic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallopoulos, E.; Saad, Youcef

    1989-01-01

    Parallel algorithms for the solution of linear parabolic problems are proposed. The first of these methods is based on using polynomial approximation to the exponential. It does not require solving any linear systems and is highly parallelizable. The two other methods proposed are based on Pade and Chebyshev approximations to the matrix exponential. The parallelization of these methods is achieved by using partial fraction decomposition techniques to solve the resulting systems and thus offers the potential for increased time parallelism in time dependent problems. Experimental results from the Alliant FX/8 and the Cray Y-MP/832 vector multiprocessors are also presented.

  7. Alignment method for parabolic trough solar concentrators

    DOEpatents

    Diver, Richard B [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-02-23

    A Theoretical Overlay Photographic (TOP) alignment method uses the overlay of a theoretical projected image of a perfectly aligned concentrator on a photographic image of the concentrator to align the mirror facets of a parabolic trough solar concentrator. The alignment method is practical and straightforward, and inherently aligns the mirror facets to the receiver. When integrated with clinometer measurements for which gravity and mechanical drag effects have been accounted for and which are made in a manner and location consistent with the alignment method, all of the mirrors on a common drive can be aligned and optimized for any concentrator orientation.

  8. A parabolic mirror x-ray collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franks, A.; Jackson, K.; Yacoot, A.

    2000-05-01

    A robust and stable x-ray collimator has been developed to produce a parallel beam of x-rays by total external reflection from a parabolic mirror. The width of the gold-coated silica mirror varies along its length, which allows it to be bent from a plane surface into a parabolic form by application of unequal bending forces at its ends. A family of parabolas of near constant focal length can be formed by changing the screw-applied bending force, thus allowing the collimator to cater for a range of wavelengths by the turning of a screw. Even with radiation with a wavelength as short as that as Mo Kicons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> 1 (icons/Journals/Common/lambda" ALT="lambda" ALIGN="TOP"/> = 0.07 nm), a gain in flux by a factor of 5.5 was achieved. The potential gain increases with wavelength, e.g. for Cu Kicons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> 1 radiation this amounts to over a factor of ten.

  9. Small Airplane Certification Compliance Program

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-01-02

    This advisory circular (AC) provides a compilation of historically acceptable means of compliance to specifically selected sections of Part 23 of the Federal Aviation Regulations that have become burdensome for small low performance airplanes to show...

  10. The structure of airplane fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walen, E Dean

    1920-01-01

    This report prepared by the Bureau of Standards for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics supplies the necessary information regarding the apparatus and methods of testing and inspecting airplane fabrics.

  11. 77 FR 10409 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ...; Model A310 series airplanes; Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R, and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model C4-605R... Model A300 B4-603, B4-620, and B4-622 airplanes, Model A300 B4-605R and B4-622R airplanes, Model A300 F4-605R and F4- 622R airplanes, and Model A300 C4-605R Variant F airplanes. (d) Subject Air Transport...

  12. Differential equations in airplane mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carleman, M T

    1922-01-01

    In the following report, we will first draw some conclusions of purely theoretical interest, from the general equations of motion. At the end, we will consider the motion of an airplane, with the engine dead and with the assumption that the angle of attack remains constant. Thus we arrive at a simple result, which can be rendered practically utilizable for determining the trajectory of an airplane descending at a constant steering angle.

  13. Concentrating Solar Power Projects - Delingha 50MW Thermal Oil Parabolic

    Trough project | Concentrating Solar Power | NREL Delingha 50MW Thermal Oil Parabolic Trough project Status Date: April 17, 2017 Project Overview Project Name: Delingha 50MW Thermal Oil Parabolic Contractor: IDOM : Thermal energy storage system engineering Plant Configuration Solar Field # of Loops: 190

  14. Concentrating Solar Power Projects - Gulang 100MW Thermal Oil Parabolic

    Trough project | Concentrating Solar Power | NREL Gulang 100MW Thermal Oil Parabolic Trough project Status Date: September 29, 2016 Project Overview Project Name: Gulang 100MW Thermal Oil Parabolic ): Webmaster Solar Participants Developer(s): Changzhou Royal Tech Solar Thermal Equipment Co., Ltd. Owner(s

  15. Airplane Upset Training Evaluation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawron, Valerie J.; Jones, Patricia M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Airplane upset accidents are a leading factor in hull losses and fatalities. This study compared five types of airplane-upset training. Each group was composed of eight, non-military pilots flying in their probationary year for airlines operating in the United States. The first group, 'No aero / no upset,' was made up of pilots without any airplane upset training or aerobatic flight experience; the second group, 'Aero/no upset,' of pilots without any airplane-upset training but with aerobatic experience; the third group, 'No aero/upset,' of pilots who had received airplane-upset training in both ground school and in the simulator; the fourth group, 'Aero/upset,' received the same training as Group Three but in addition had aerobatic flight experience; and the fifth group, 'In-flight' received in-flight airplane upset training using an instrumented in-flight simulator. Recovery performance indicated that clearly training works - specifically, all 40 pilots recovered from the windshear upset. However few pilots were trained or understood the use of bank to change the direction of the lift vector to recover from nose high upsets. Further, very few thought of, or used differential thrust to recover from rudder or aileron induced roll upsets. In addition, recovery from icing-induced stalls was inadequate.

  16. Jet propulsion for airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckingham, Edgar

    1924-01-01

    This report is a description of a method of propelling airplanes by the reaction of jet propulsion. Air is compressed and mixed with fuel in a combustion chamber, where the mixture burns at constant pressure. The combustion products issue through a nozzle, and the reaction of that of the motor-driven air screw. The computations are outlined and the results given by tables and curves. The relative fuel consumption and weight of machinery for the jet, decrease as the flying speed increases; but at 250 miles per hour the jet would still take about four times as much fuel per thrust horsepower-hour as the air screw, and the power plant would be heavier and much more complicated. Propulsion by the reaction of a simple jet can not compete with air screw propulsion at such flying speeds as are now in prospect.

  17. How to Activate a Plant Gravireceptor. Early Mechanisms of Gravity Sensing Studied in Characean Rhizoids during Parabolic Flights1

    PubMed Central

    Limbach, Christoph; Hauslage, Jens; Schäfer, Claudia; Braun, Markus

    2005-01-01

    Early processes underlying plant gravity sensing were investigated in rhizoids of Chara globularis under microgravity conditions provided by parabolic flights of the A300-Zero-G aircraft and of sounding rockets. By applying centrifugal forces during the microgravity phases of sounding rocket flights, lateral accelerations of 0.14g, but not of 0.05g, resulted in a displacement of statoliths. Settling of statoliths onto the subapical plasma membrane initiated the gravitropic response. Since actin controls the positioning of statoliths and restricts sedimentation of statoliths in these cells, it can be calculated that lateral actomyosin forces in a range of 2 × 10−14 n act on statoliths to keep them in place. These forces represent the threshold value that has to be exceeded by any lateral acceleration stimulus for statolith sedimentation and gravisensing to occur. When rhizoids were gravistimulated during parabolic plane flights, the curvature angles of the flight samples, whose sedimented statoliths became weightless for 22 s during the 31 microgravity phases, were not different from those of in-flight 1g controls. However, in ground control experiments, curvature responses were drastically reduced when the contact of statoliths with the plasma membrane was intermittently interrupted by inverting gravistimulated cells for less than 10 s. Increasing the weight of sedimented statoliths by lateral centrifugation did not enhance the gravitropic response. These results provide evidence that graviperception in characean rhizoids requires contact of statoliths with membrane-bound receptor molecules rather than pressure or tension exerted by the weight of statoliths. PMID:16183834

  18. Nonuniform depth grids in parabolic equation solutions.

    PubMed

    Sanders, William M; Collins, Michael D

    2013-04-01

    The parabolic wave equation is solved using a finite-difference solution in depth that involves a nonuniform grid. The depth operator is discretized using Galerkin's method with asymmetric hat functions. Examples are presented to illustrate that this approach can be used to improve efficiency for problems in ocean acoustics and seismo-acoustics. For shallow water problems, accuracy is sensitive to the precise placement of the ocean bottom interface. This issue is often addressed with the inefficient approach of using a fine grid spacing over all depth. Efficiency may be improved by using a relatively coarse grid with nonuniform sampling to precisely position the interface. Efficiency may also be improved by reducing the sampling in the sediment and in an absorbing layer that is used to truncate the computational domain. Nonuniform sampling may also be used to improve the implementation of a single-scattering approximation for sloping fluid-solid interfaces.

  19. Steam engine research for solar parabolic dish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demler, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The parabolic dish solar concentrator provides an opportunity to generate high grade energy in a modular system. Most of the capital is projected to be in the dish and its installation. Assurance of a high production demand of a standard dish could lead to dramatic cost reductions. High production volume in turn depends upon maximum application flexibility by providing energy output options, e.g., heat, electricity, chemicals and combinations thereof. Subsets of these options include energy storage and combustion assist. A steam engine design and experimental program is described which investigate the efficiency potential of a small 25 kW compound reheat cycle piston engine. An engine efficiency of 35 percent is estimated for a 700 C steam temperature from the solar receiver.

  20. Analysis of the Quality of Parabolic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambot, Thomas; Ord, Stephan F.

    2016-01-01

    Parabolic flight allows researchers to conduct several micro-gravity experiments, each with up to 20 seconds of micro-gravity, in the course of a single day. However, the quality of the flight environment can vary greatly over the course of a single parabola, thus affecting the experimental results. Researchers therefore require knowledge of the actual flight environment as a function of time. The NASA Flight Opportunities program (FO) has reviewed the acceleration data for over 400 parabolas and investigated the level of micro-gravity quality. It was discovered that a typical parabola can be segmented into multiple phases with different qualities and durations. The knowledge of the microgravity characteristics within the parabola will prove useful when planning an experiment.

  1. Parabolic flight - Loss of sense of orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; Graybiel, A.

    1979-01-01

    On the earth, or in level flight, a blindfolded subject being rotated at constant velocity about his recumbent long body axis experiences illusory orbital motion of his body in the opposite direction. By contrast, during comparable rotation in the free-fall phase of parabolic flight, no body motion is perceived and all sense of external orientation may be lost; when touch and pressure stimulation is applied to the body surface, a sense of orientation is reestablished immediately. The increased gravitoinertial force period of a parabola produces an exaggeration of the orbital motion experienced in level flight. These observations reveal an important influence of touch, pressure, and kinesthetic information on spatial orientation and provide a basis for understanding many of the postural illusions reported by astronauts in space flight.

  2. 78 FR 14162 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Airbus Model A310-203, -204, -222, -304, -322, and -324 airplanes. This AD was prompted by a design... Airbus Model A310-203, -204, -222, -304, - 322, and -324 airplanes, certificated in any category...

  3. Graviresponses of Paramecium biaurelia during parabolic flights.

    PubMed

    Krause, Martin; Bräucker, Richard; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    2006-12-01

    The thresholds of graviorientation and gravikinesis in Paramecium biaurelia were investigated during the 5th DLR (German Aerospace Center) parabolic-flight campaign at Bordeaux in June 2003. Parabolic flights are a useful tool for the investigation of swimming behaviour in protists at different accelerations. At normal gravity (1 g) and hypergravity (1 g to 1.8 g), precision of orientation and locomotion rates depend linearly on the applied acceleration as seen in earlier centrifuge experiments. After transition from hypergravity to decreased gravity (minimal residual acceleration of <10(-2) g), graviorientation as well as gravikinesis show a full relaxation with different kinetics. The use of twelve independent cell samples per flight guarantees high data numbers and secures the statistical significance of the obtained data. The relatively slow change of acceleration between periods of microgravity and hypergravity (0.4 g/s) enabled us to determine the thresholds of graviorientation at 0.6 g and of gravikinesis at 0.4 g. The gravity-unrelated propulsion rate of the sample was found to be 874 microm/s, exceeding the locomotion rate of horizontally swimming cells (855 microm/s). The measured thresholds of graviresponses were compared with data obtained from earlier centrifuge experiments on the sounding rocket Maxus-2. Measured thresholds of gravireactions indicate that small energies, close to the thermal noise level, are sufficient for the gravitransduction process. Data from earlier hypergravity experiments demonstrate that mechanosensitive ion channels are functioning over a relative wide range of acceleration. From this, we may speculate that gravireceptor channels derive from mechanoreceptor channels.

  4. The X-15 airplane - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dana, William H.

    1993-01-01

    The X-15 rocket research airplane flew to an altitude of 354,000 ft and reached Mach 6.70. In almost 200 flights, this airplane was used to gather aerodynamic-heating, structural loads, stability and control, and atmospheric-reentry data. This paper describes the origins, design, and operation of the X-15 airplane. In addition, lessons learned from the X-15 airplane that are applicable to designing and testing the National Aero-Space Plane are discussed.

  5. 77 FR 24137 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule... Register. That AD applies to all Airbus Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R, and F4-600R series airplanes, Model... Airbus Model A300 B4-600, B4- 600R, and F4-600R series airplanes, Model A300 C4-605R Variant F airplanes...

  6. 78 FR 53640 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A330-200 Freighter series airplanes; Model A330-200 and - 300 series airplanes, and Model... of the forward or aft cargo door. To address this condition, Airbus issued four separate Alert...

  7. 77 FR 42952 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A318-112 and -121 airplanes; Model A319-111, -112, -115, - 132, and -133 airplanes; Model... MCAI states: During structural part assembly in Airbus production line, some nuts Part Number (P/N...

  8. 78 FR 52414 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A320-214, -232 and -233 airplanes; and Model A321-211, - 213, and -231 airplanes. This AD... Service Information Airbus requested that we revise the NPRM (77 FR 63270, October 16, 2012) to reflect...

  9. 77 FR 64701 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A300 series airplanes; Model A310 series airplanes; and Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R, and F4... that the AD be effective after Airbus completes certifying the improved design for the fuel pump half...

  10. 77 FR 65799 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A330-200 freighter series airplanes, Model A330-200 and - 300 series airplanes, and Model... [Amended] 0 2. The FAA amends Sec. 39.13 by adding the following new AD: 2012-21-20 Airbus: Amendment 39...

  11. 78 FR 70003 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Airbus Model A300 series airplanes; Airbus Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R, and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model...

  12. 76 FR 61555 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... pieces unit welded, instead of 4 pieces unit with 3 welds (old design) as pictured in Appendix 1 of this... pre-modification 02447. Blue and Green. A300 airplanes post-modification 02447 Blue. A300-600 airplanes Blue. A310 airplanes Green. Table 2--Applicable Service Information Airbus Mandatory Service...

  13. 77 FR 70366 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A330-243, -243F, -341, -342, and -343 airplanes equipped with Rolls-Royce Trent 700 engines...: Vladimir Ulyanov, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA...

  14. 78 FR 7261 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A310-203 airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report of an analysis that demonstrated a...-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, WA 98057-3356; telephone (425...

  15. 76 FR 50706 - Airworthiness Directives; SOCATA Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ...-0868; Directorate Identifier 2011-CE-027-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; SOCATA Airplanes... SOCATA Model TBM 700 Airplanes. This proposed AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness... copies of the referenced service information at the FAA, Small Airplane Directorate, 901 Locust, Kansas...

  16. 78 FR 31386 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of...) for all Airbus Model A330-200 and -300 series airplanes; and Model A340-200, -300, -500, and -600 series airplanes. That AD currently requires a one-time detailed inspection of both main landing gear...

  17. 14 CFR 125.355 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 125.355 Section 125.355...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.355 Airplane...

  18. 14 CFR 121.605 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 121.605 Section 121.605..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.605 Airplane equipment. No person may dispatch or release an airplane unless it is airworthy and is equipped as prescribed in § 121...

  19. 77 FR 70369 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of the escape... the escape slide raft, which could result in delayed evacuation from the airplane during an emergency...

  20. 14 CFR 125.355 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 125.355 Section 125.355...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.355 Airplane...

  1. 14 CFR 125.355 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 125.355 Section 125.355...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.355 Airplane...

  2. 14 CFR 125.355 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 125.355 Section 125.355...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.355 Airplane...

  3. 14 CFR 121.605 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 121.605 Section 121.605..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.605 Airplane equipment. No person may dispatch or release an airplane unless it is airworthy and is equipped as prescribed in § 121...

  4. 14 CFR 121.605 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 121.605 Section 121.605..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.605 Airplane equipment. No person may dispatch or release an airplane unless it is airworthy and is equipped as prescribed in § 121...

  5. 14 CFR 125.355 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 125.355 Section 125.355...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.355 Airplane...

  6. 14 CFR 121.605 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 121.605 Section 121.605..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.605 Airplane equipment. No person may dispatch or release an airplane unless it is airworthy and is equipped as prescribed in § 121...

  7. 14 CFR 121.605 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 121.605 Section 121.605..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.605 Airplane equipment. No person may dispatch or release an airplane unless it is airworthy and is equipped as prescribed in § 121...

  8. Comparison of Non-Parabolic Hydrodynamic Simulations for Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. W.; Brennan, K. F.

    1996-01-01

    Parabolic drift-diffusion simulators are common engineering level design tools for semiconductor devices. Hydrodynamic simulators, based on the parabolic band approximation, are becoming more prevalent as device dimensions shrink and energy transport effects begin to dominate device characteristic. However, band structure effects present in state-of-the-art devices necessitate relaxing the parabolic band approximation. This paper presents simulations of ballistic diodes, a benchmark device, of Si and GaAs using two different non-parabolic hydrodynamic formulations. The first formulation uses the Kane dispersion relationship in the derivation of the conservation equations. The second model uses a power law dispersion relation {(hk)(exp 2)/2m = xW(exp Y)}. Current-voltage relations show that for the ballistic diodes considered. the non-parabolic formulations predict less current than the parabolic case. Explanations of this will be provided by examination of velocity and energy profiles. At low bias, the simulations based on the Kane formulation predict greater current flow than the power law formulation. As the bias is increased this trend changes and the power law predicts greater current than the Kane formulation. It will be shown that the non-parabolicity and energy range of the hydrodynamic model based on the Kane dispersion relation are limited due to the binomial approximation which was utilized in the derivation.

  9. Gravity-induced absorption changes in Phycomyces blakesleeanus during parabolic flights: first spectral approach in the visible.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Werner

    2006-12-01

    Gravity-induced absorption changes as experienced during a series of parabolas on the Airbus 300 Zero-G have been measured previously pointwise on the basis of dual-wavelength spectroscopy. Only the two wavelengths of 460 and 665 nm as generated by light-emitting diodes have been utilised during our first two parabolic-flight campaigns. In order to gain complete spectral information throughout the wavelength range from 400 to 900 nm, a miniaturized rapid scan spectrophotometer was designed. The difference of spectra taken at 0 g and 1.8 g presents the first gravity-induced absorption change spectrum measured on wild-type Phycomyces blakesleeanus sporangiophores, exhibiting a broad positive hump in the visible range and negative values in the near infrared with an isosbestic point near 735 nm. The control experiment performed with the stiff mutant A909 of Phycomyces blakesleeanus does not show this structure. These results are in agreement with those obtained with an array spectrophotometer. In analogy to the more thoroughly understood so-called light-induced absorption changes, we assume that gravity-induced absorption changes reflect redox changes of electron transport components such as flavins and cytochromes localised within the plasma membrane.

  10. Experimental analysis of a Flat Plate Pulsating Heat Pipe with Self-ReWetting Fluids during a parabolic flight campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecere, Anselmo; De Cristofaro, Davide; Savino, Raffaele; Ayel, Vincent; Sole-Agostinelli, Thibaud; Marengo, Marco; Romestant, Cyril; Bertin, Yves

    2018-06-01

    A Flat Plate Pulsating Heat Pipe (FPPHP) filled with an ordinary liquid (water) and a self-rewetting mixture (dilutes aqueous solutions of long-chain alcohols with unusual surface tension behavior) is investigated under variable gravity conditions on board a 'Zero-g' plane during the 65th Parabolic Flight Campaign of the European Space Agency. The FPPHP thermal performance in terms of evaporator and condenser temperatures, start-up levels and flow regimes is characterized for the two working fluids and a power input ranging from 0 to 200 W (up to 17 W/cm2 at the heater/evaporator wall interface). The experimental set-up also includes a transparent plate enabling the visualization of the oscillating flow patterns during the experiments. For a low power input (4 W/cm2), the pulsating heat pipe filled with pure water is not able to work under low-g conditions, because the evaporator immediately exhibits dry-out conditions and the fluid oscillations stops, preventing heat transfer between the hot and cold side and resulting in a global increase of the temperatures. On the other hand, the FPPHP filled with the self-rewetting fluid runs also during the microgravity phase. The liquid rewets several times the evaporator zone triggering the oscillatory regime. The self-rewetting fluid helps both the start-up and the thermal performance of the FPPHP in microgravity conditions.

  11. Parabolic features and the erosion rate on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    The impact cratering record on Venus consists of 919 craters covering 98 percent of the surface. These craters are remarkably well preserved, and most show pristine structures including fresh ejecta blankets. Only 35 craters (3.8 percent) have had their ejecta blankets embayed by lava and most of these occur in the Atla-Beta Regio region; an area thought to be recently active. parabolic features are associated with 66 of the 919 craters. These craters range in size from 6 to 105 km diameter. The parabolic features are thought to be the result of the deposition of fine-grained ejecta by winds in the dense venusian atmosphere. The deposits cover about 9 percent of the surface and none appear to be embayed by younger volcanic materials. However, there appears to be a paucity of these deposits in the Atla-Beta Regio region, and this may be due to the more recent volcanism in this area of Venus. Since parabolic features are probably fine-grain, wind-deposited ejecta, then all impact craters on Venus probably had these deposits at some time in the past. The older deposits have probably been either eroded or buried by eolian processes. Therefore, the present population of these features is probably associated with the most recent impact craters on the planet. Furthermore, the size/frequency distribution of craters with parabolic features is virtually identical to that of the total crater population. This suggests that there has been little loss of small parabolic features compared to large ones, otherwise there should be a significant and systematic paucity of craters with parabolic features with decreasing size compared to the total crater population. Whatever is erasing the parabolic features apparently does so uniformly regardless of the areal extent of the deposit. The lifetime of parabolic features and the eolian erosion rate on Venus can be estimated from the average age of the surface and the present population of parabolic features.

  12. Directional Stability of Towed Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soehne, W.

    1956-01-01

    So far, very careful investigations have been made regarding the flight properties, in particular the static and dynamic stability, of engine-propelled aircraft and of untowed gliders. In contrast, almost no investigations exist regarding the stability of airplanes towed by a towline. Thus, the following report will aim at investigating the directional stability of the towed airplane and, particularly, at determining what parameters of the flight attitude and what configuration properties affect the stability. The most important parameters of the flight attitude are the dynamic pressure, the aerodynamic coefficients of the flight attitude, and the climbing angle. Among the configuration properties, the following exert the greatest influence on the stability: the tow-cable length, the tow-cable attachment point, the ratio of the wing loadings of the towing and the towed airplanes, the moments of inertia, and the wing dihedral of the towed airplane. In addition, the size and shape of the towed airplane vertical tail, the vertical tail length, and the fuselage configuration are decisive factors in determining the yawing moment and side force due to sideslip, respectively.

  13. Proceedings of the Fifth Parabolic Dish Solar Thermal Power Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. W. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The proceedings of the Fifth Parabolic Dish Solar Thermal Power Program Annual Review are presented. The results of activities within the Parabolic Dish Technology and Module/Systems Development element of the Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Energy Systems Program were emphasized. Among the topics discussed were: overall Project and Program aspects, Stirling and Brayton module development, concentrator and engine/receiver development along with associated hardware and test results; distributed systems operating experience; international parabolic dish development activities; and non-DOE-sponsored domestic dish activities. Solar electric generation was also addressed.

  14. Air resistance measurements on actual airplane parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    For the calculation of the parasite resistance of an airplane, a knowledge of the resistance of the individual structural and accessory parts is necessary. The most reliable basis for this is given by tests with actual airplane parts at airspeeds which occur in practice. The data given here relate to the landing gear of a Siemanms-Schuckert DI airplane; the landing gear of a 'Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft' airplane (type Roland Dlla); landing gear of a 'Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen' G airplane; a machine gun, and the exhaust manifold of a 269 HP engine.

  15. On two parabolic systems: Convergence and blowup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yamin

    1998-12-01

    This dissertation studies two parabolic systems. It consists of two parts. In part one (chapter one), we prove a convergence result, namely, the solution (AK,/ BK) of a system of chemical diffusion-reaction equations (with reaction rate K) converges to the solution (A, B) of a diffusion- instantaneous-reaction equation. To prove our main result, we use some L1 and L2 'energy' estimates and a compactness result due to Aubin (1). As a by-product we also prove that as K approaches infinity, the limit solution exhibits phase separation between A and B. In part two (chapter two), we study the blowup rate for a system of heat equations ut=/Delta u,/ vt=/Delta v in a bounded domain Ωtimes(0,T) coupled in the nonlinear Neumann boundary conditions [/partial u/over/partial n]=vp,/ [/partial v/over/partial n]=uq on ∂Omega×[ 0,T), where p>0,/ q>0,/ pq>1 and n is the exterior normal vector on ∂Omega. Under certain assumptions, we establish exact blowup rate which generalizes the corresponding results of some authors' recent work including Deng (2), Deng-Fila-Levine (3) and Hu-Yin (4). ftn (1) J. P. A scUBIN, Un theoreme de compacite, C. R. Acad. Sci., 256(1963), pp. 5042-5044. (2) K. D scENG, Blow-up rates for parabolic systems, Z. Angew. Math. Phys., 47(1996), No. 1, pp. 132-143. (3) K. D scENG, M. F scILA AND H. A. L scEVINE, On critical exponents for a system of heat equations coupled in the boundary conditions, Acta Math. Univ. Comenian. (N.S.), 36(1994), No. 2, pp. 169-192. (4) B. H scU scAND H. M. Y scIN, The profile near blowup time for solutions of the heat equation with a nonlinear boundary condition, Trans. Amer. Math. Soc., 346(1994), pp. 117-135.

  16. Fabrication of parabolic cylindrical microlens array by shaped femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhi; Yin, Kai; Dong, Xinran; Duan, Ji'an

    2018-04-01

    A simple and efficient technique for fabricating parabolic cylindrical microlens arrays (CMLAs) on the surface of fused silica by shaped femtosecond (fs) laser direct-writing is demonstrated. By means of spatially shaping of a Gaussian fs laser beam to a Bessel distribution, an inversed cylindrical shape laser intensity profile is formed in a specific cross-sectional plane among the shaped optical field. Applying it to experiments, large area close-packed parabolic CMLAs with line-width of 37.5 μm and array size of about 5 × 5 mm are produced. The cross-sectional outline of obtained lenslets has a satisfied parabolic profile and the numerical aperture (NA) of lenslets is more than 0.35. Furthermore, the focusing performance of the fabricated CMLA is also tested in this work and it has been demonstrated that the focusing power of the CMLA with a parabolic profile is better than that with a semi-circular one.

  17. The French thermo-helio-electricity-KW parabolic dish program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audibert, M.; Peri, G.

    1982-01-01

    The testing and development of parabolic dish solar thermal power plants to produce, thermal mechanical, or electrical energy are discussed. The design, construction, and experiments of prototype collectors to prove the feasibility of such collectors is described.

  18. FASTRACK (TM): Parabolic and Suborbital Experiment Support Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephanie E. (Compiler); Levine, Howard G.; Romero, V.

    2016-01-01

    FASTRACK was developed by NASA Kennedy Space Center and Space Florida to provide capabilities to conduct frequent, affordable, and responsive flight opportunities for reduced gravity experiments, technology development, and hardware testing on suborbital vehicles and parabolic flights.

  19. An X-band parabolic antenna based on gradient metasurface

    SciT

    Yao, Wang; Yang, Helin, E-mail: emyang@mail.ccnu.edu.cn; Tian, Ying

    We present a novel parabolic antenna by employing reflection gradient metasurface which is composed of a series of circle patches on a grounded dielectric substrate. Similar to the traditional parabolic antenna, the proposed antenna take the metasurface as a “parabolic reflector” and a patch antenna was placed at the focal point of the metasurface as a feed source, then the quasi-spherical wave emitted by the source is reflected and transformed to plane wave with high efficiency. Due to the focus effect of reflection, the beam width of the antenna has been decreased from 85.9° to 13° and the gain hasmore » been increased from 6.5 dB to 20.8 dB. Simulation and measurement results of both near and far-field plots demonstrate good focusing properties of the proposed parabolic antenna.« less

  20. Antenna cab interior showing waveguide from external parabolic antenna (later ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing waveguide from external parabolic antenna (later addition), looking north. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  1. Detail, external parabolic antenna (later addition). Note how waveguide was ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, external parabolic antenna (later addition). Note how waveguide was cut to remove active portion of antenna. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  2. 14 CFR 125.75 - Airplane flight manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 125.75 Section 125... Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved Airplane Flight Manual or... approved Airplane Flight Manual or the approved equivalent aboard each airplane it operates. A certificate...

  3. 14 CFR 125.75 - Airplane flight manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 125.75 Section 125... Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved Airplane Flight Manual or... approved Airplane Flight Manual or the approved equivalent aboard each airplane it operates. A certificate...

  4. 14 CFR 125.75 - Airplane flight manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 125.75 Section 125... Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved Airplane Flight Manual or... approved Airplane Flight Manual or the approved equivalent aboard each airplane it operates. A certificate...

  5. Parabolic dish test site: History and operating experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    The parabolic dish test site (PDTS) was established for testing point-focusing solar concentrator systems operating at temperatures approaching 1650 C. Among tests run were evaluation and performance characterization of parabolic dish concentrators, receivers, power conversion units, and solar/fossil-fuel hybrid systems. The PDTS was fully operational until its closure in June, 1984. The evolution of the test program, a chronological listing of the experiments run, and data summaries for most of the tests conducted are presented.

  6. 77 FR 50644 - Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Airplane Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... airplanes that have P/N 1134104-1 or 1134104-5 A/C compressor motor installed; an aircraft logbook check for... following: (1) Inspect the number of hours on the A/C compressor hour meter; and (2) Check the aircraft.... Do the replacement following Cessna Aircraft Company Model 525 Maintenance Manual, Revision 23, dated...

  7. Affective states and adaptation to parabolic flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, Aurélie; Langlet, Cécile; Tzanova, Tzvetomira; Hainaut, Jean-Philippe; Monfort, Vincent; Bolmont, Benoît

    2017-05-01

    This exploratory study investigates (i) inter-individual variations of affective states before a parabolic flight (i.e., PF) on the basis of quality of adaptation to physical demands, and (ii) intra-individual variations of affective states during a PF. Mood-states, state-anxiety and salivary cortisol were assessed in two groups with a different quality of adaptation (an Adaptive Group, i.e., AG, and a Maladaptive Group, i.e., MG) before and during a PF. Before PF, MG scored higher on mood states (Anger-Hostility, Fatigue-Inertia) than AG. During the flight, while AG seemed to present "normal" affective responses to the demanding environment (e.g., increase in salivary cortisol), MG presented increases in mood states such as Confusion-Bewilderment or Tension-Anxiety. The findings suggest that the psychological states of MG could have disturbed their ability to integrate sensory information from an unusual environment, which led to difficulties in coping with the physical demands of PF.

  8. Paper Airplanes: A Classroom Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Painter, Richard A.

    1976-01-01

    A learning experience is described for upper elementary or junior high students involving the manufacture, transportation, and marketing of a product for consumers. Steps are given and roles are assigned for students to convert raw material (paper) to a finished product (paper airplanes) and to sell it. (AV)

  9. Testing a Windmill Airplane ("autogiro")

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiferth, R

    1927-01-01

    In order to clear up the matter ( In the Spanish report it was stated that the reference surface for the calculation of the coefficients c(sub a) and c(sub w) was the area of all four wings, instead of a single wing), the model of a windwill airplane was tested in the Gottingen wind tunnel.

  10. Glues Used in Airplane Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, S W; Truax, T R

    1920-01-01

    This report was prepared for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and presents the results of investigations conducted by the Forest Products Laboratory of the United States Forest Service on the manufacture, preparation, application, testing and physical properties of the different types of glues used in wood airplane parts.

  11. The Testing of Airplane Fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schraivogel, Karl

    1932-01-01

    This report considers the determining factors in the choice of airplane fabrics, describes the customary methods of testing and reports some of the experimental results. To sum up briefly the results obtained with the different fabrics, it may be said that increasing the strength of covering fabrics by using coarser yarns ordinarily offers no difficulty, because the weight increment from doping is relatively smaller.

  12. 14 CFR 121.207 - Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Provisionally certificated airplanes... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.207 Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations. In...

  13. 14 CFR 121.207 - Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Provisionally certificated airplanes... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.207 Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations. In...

  14. 14 CFR 121.207 - Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Provisionally certificated airplanes... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.207 Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations. In...

  15. 14 CFR 121.207 - Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Provisionally certificated airplanes... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.207 Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations. In...

  16. 14 CFR 121.207 - Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Provisionally certificated airplanes... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.207 Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations. In...

  17. Annoyance caused by propeller airplane flyover noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, D. A.; Powell, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to provide information on quantifying the annoyance response of people to propeller airplane noise. The items of interest were current noise metrics, tone corrections, duration corrections, critical band corrections, and the effects of engine type, operation type, maximum takeoff weight, blade passage frequency, and blade tip speed. In each experiment, 64 subjects judged the annoyance of recordings of propeller and jet airplane operations presented at d-weighted sound pressure levels of 70, 80, and 90 dB in a testing room which simulates the outdoor acoustic environment. The first experiment examined 11 propeller airplanes with maximum takeoff weights greater than or equal to 5700 kg. The second experiment examined 14 propeller airplanes weighting 5700 kg or less. Five jet airplanes were included in each experiment. For both the heavy and light propeller airplanes, perceived noise level and perceived level (Stevens Mark VII procedure) predicted annoyance better than other current noise metrics.

  18. Interaction Between Air Propellers and Airplane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, W F

    1927-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was the determination of the character and amount of interaction between air propellers as usually mounted on airplanes and the adjacent parts of the airplane structure - or, more specifically, those parts of the airplane structure within the wash of the propeller, and capable of producing any significant effect on propeller performance. In report no. 177 such interaction between air propellers and certain simple geometrical forms was made the subject of investigation and report. The present investigation aims to carry this general study one stage further by substituting actual airplane structures for the simple geometrical forms. From the point of view of the present investigation, the airplane structures, viewed as an obstruction in the wake of the propeller, must also be viewed as a necessary part of the airplane and not as an appendage which might be installed or removed at will. (author)

  19. Headache during airplane travel ("airplane headache"): first case in Greece.

    PubMed

    Kararizou, Evangelia; Anagnostou, Evangelos; Paraskevas, George P; Vassilopoulou, Sofia D; Naoumis, Dimitrios; Kararizos, Grigoris; Spengos, Konstantinos

    2011-08-01

    Headache related to airplane flights is rare. We describe a 37-year-old female patient with multiple intense, jabbing headache episodes over the last 3 years that occur exclusively during airplane flights. The pain manifests during take-off and landing, and is located always in the left retro-orbital and frontotemporal area. It is occasionally accompanied by dizziness, but no additional symptoms occur. Pain intensity diminishes and disappears after 15-20 min. Apart from occasional dizziness, no other symptoms occur. The patient has a history of tension-type headache and polycystic ovaries. Blood tests and imaging revealed no abnormalities. Here, we present the first case in Greece. We review the current literature on this rare syndrome and discuss on possible pathophysiology and the investigation of possible co-factors such as anxiety and depression.

  20. Analysis of Stresses in German Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoff, Wilhelm

    1923-01-01

    This report contains an account of the origin of the views and fundamental principles underlying the construction of German airplanes during the war. The report contains a detailed discussion of the aerodynamic principles and their use in determining the strength of airplanes, the analysis of the strength qualities of materials and in the construction, the calculated strength of air flows and a description of tests made in determining the strength of airplanes.

  1. 77 FR 40823 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Sanjay Ralhan, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane... International Branch, send it to ATTN: Sanjay Ralhan, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116...

  2. 77 FR 34283 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... after receipt. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Sanjay Ralhan, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch... it to ATTN: Sanjay Ralhan, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane...

  3. Observing halos through airplane windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    2017-09-01

    A halo is one of the most frequent and impressive optical phenomena easily observable in the sky. It is also one of the natural optical phenomena most often visible through an airplane window. Halos and related phenomena vary from a single spot of light formed by reflection of the sun from the tops of plate-shaped ice crystals to large rings with splashes of colors, caused by a combination of reflection and refraction in ice crystals. Even with extreme heat at the ground, an airplane quickly rises through sufficient altitude to find ice crystals in the clouds, enabling an alert passenger (or pilot) to see ice-crystal optical phenomena. This paper briefly reviews these phenomena with photographs and diagrams. Photographs include commonly seen halos, as well as Bottlinger's rings, a rare halo that is still not fully explained. Tips are given for enhancing your chances of seeing and understanding halos.

  4. Molten salt parabolic trough system with synthetic oil preheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuasa, Minoru; Hino, Koichi

    2017-06-01

    Molten salt parabolic trough system (MSPT), which can heat the heat transfer fluid (HTF) to 550 °C has a better performance than a synthetic oil parabolic trough system (SOPT), which can heat the HTF to 400 °C or less. The utilization of HTF at higher temperature in the parabolic trough system is able to realize the design of a smaller size of storage tank and higher heat to electricity conversion efficiency. However, with MSPT there is a great amount of heat loss at night so it is necessary to circulate the HTF at a high temperature of about 290 °C in order to prevent solidification. A new MSPT concept with SOPT preheating (MSSOPT) has been developed to reduce the heat loss at night. In this paper, the MSSOPT system, its performance by steady state analysis and annual performance analysis are introduced.

  5. First Middle East Aircraft Parabolic Flights for ISU Participant Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletser, Vladimir; Frischauf, Norbert; Cohen, Dan; Foster, Matthew; Spannagel, Ruven; Szeszko, Adam; Laufer, Rene

    2017-06-01

    Aircraft parabolic flights are widely used throughout the world to create microgravity environment for scientific and technology research, experiment rehearsal for space missions, and for astronaut training before space flights. As part of the Space Studies Program 2016 of the International Space University summer session at the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, a series of aircraft parabolic flights were organized with a glider in support of departmental activities on `Artificial and Micro-gravity' within the Space Sciences Department. Five flights were organized with manoeuvres including several parabolas with 5 to 6 s of weightlessness, bank turns with acceleration up to 2 g and disorientation inducing manoeuvres. Four demonstration experiments and two experiments proposed by SSP16 participants were performed during the flights by on board operators. This paper reports on the microgravity experiments conducted during these parabolic flights, the first conducted in the Middle East for science and pedagogical experiments.

  6. Supersonic airplane study and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson

    1993-01-01

    A supersonic airplane creates shocks which coalesce and form a classical N-wave on the ground, forming a double bang noise termed sonic boom. A recent supersonic commercial transport (the Concorde) has a loud sonic boom (over 100 PLdB) and low aerodynamic performance (cruise lift-drag ratio 7). To enhance the U.S. market share in supersonic transport, an airframer's market risk for a low-boom airplane has to be reduced. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used to design airplanes to meet the dual constraints of low sonic boom and high aerodynamic performance. During the past year, a research effort was focused on three main topics. The first was to use the existing design tools, developed in past years, to design one of the low-boom wind-tunnel configurations (Ames Model 3) for testing at Ames Research Center in April 1993. The second was to use a Navier-Stokes code (Overflow) to support the Oblique-All-Wing (OAW) study at Ames. The third was to study an optimization technique applied on a Haack-Adams body to reduce aerodynamic drag.

  7. Accelerating Airy beams with non-parabolic trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besieris, Ioannis M.; Shaarawi, Amr M.

    2014-11-01

    A class of Airy accelerating beams with non-parabolic trajectories are derived by means of a novel application of a conformal transformation originally due to Bateman. It is also shown that the salient features of these beams are very simply incorporated in a solution which is derived by applying a conventional conformal transformation together with a Galilean translation to the basic accelerating Airy beam solution of the two-dimensional paraxial equation. Motivation for the non-parabolic beam trajectories is provided and the effects of finite-energy requirements are discussed.

  8. Critical spaces for quasilinear parabolic evolution equations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prüss, Jan; Simonett, Gieri; Wilke, Mathias

    2018-02-01

    We present a comprehensive theory of critical spaces for the broad class of quasilinear parabolic evolution equations. The approach is based on maximal Lp-regularity in time-weighted function spaces. It is shown that our notion of critical spaces coincides with the concept of scaling invariant spaces in case that the underlying partial differential equation enjoys a scaling invariance. Applications to the vorticity equations for the Navier-Stokes problem, convection-diffusion equations, the Nernst-Planck-Poisson equations in electro-chemistry, chemotaxis equations, the MHD equations, and some other well-known parabolic equations are given.

  9. A comparative Thermal Analysis of conventional parabolic receiver tube and Cavity model tube in a Solar Parabolic Concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugam, S.; Ramakrishna, P.; Sangavi, S.

    2018-02-01

    Improvements in heating technology with solar energy is gaining focus, especially solar parabolic collectors. Solar heating in conventional parabolic collectors is done with the help of radiation concentration on receiver tubes. Conventional receiver tubes are open to atmosphere and loose heat by ambient air currents. In order to reduce the convection losses and also to improve the aperture area, we designed a tube with cavity. This study is a comparative performance behaviour of conventional tube and cavity model tube. The performance formulae were derived for the cavity model based on conventional model. Reduction in overall heat loss coefficient was observed for cavity model, though collector heat removal factor and collector efficiency were nearly same for both models. Improvement in efficiency was also observed in the cavity model’s performance. The approach towards the design of a cavity model tube as the receiver tube in solar parabolic collectors gave improved results and proved as a good consideration.

  10. ESA Parabolic Flight, Drop Tower and Centrifuge Opportunities for University Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callens, Natacha; Ventura-Traveset, Javier; Zornoza Garcia-Andrade, Eduardo; Gomez-Calero, Carlos; van Loon, Jack J. W. A.; Pletser, Vladimir; Kufner, Ewald; Krause, Jutta; Lindner, Robert; Gai, Frederic; Eigenbrod, Christian

    The European Space Agency (ESA) Education Office was established in 1998 with the purpose of motivating young people to study science, engineering and technology subjects and to ensure a qualified workforce for ESA and the European space sector in the future. To this end the ESA Education Office is supporting several hands-on activities including small student satellites and student experiments on sounding rockets, high altitude balloons as well as microgravity and hypergravity platforms. This paper is intended to introduce three new ESA Education Office hands-on activities called "Fly Your Thesis!", "Drop Your Thesis!" and "Spin Your Thesis!". These activities give re-spectively access to aircraft parabolic flight, drop tower and centrifuge campaigns to European students. These educational programmes offer university students the unique opportunity to design, build, and eventually perform, in microgravity or hypergravity, a scientific or techno-logical experiment which is linked to their syllabus. During the "Fly Your Thesis!" campaigns, the students accompany their experiments onboard the A300 Zero-G aircraft, operated by the company Novespace, based in Bordeaux, France, for a series of three flights of 30 parabolas each, with each parabola providing about 20s of microgravity [1]. "Drop Your Thesis!" campaigns are held in the ZARM Drop Tower, in Bremen, Germany. The installation delivers 4.74s of microgravity in dropping mode and 9.3s in the catapulting mode [2]. Research topics such as fluid physics, fundamental physics, combustion, biology, material sciences, heat transfer, astrophysics, chemistry or biochemistry can greatly benefit from using microgravity platforms. "Spin Your Thesis!" campaigns take place in the Large Diameter Centrifuge (LDC) facility, at ESTEC, Noordwijk, in the Netherlands. This facility offers an acceleration from 1 to 20 times Earth's gravity [3]. The use of hypergravity allows completing the scientific picture of how gravity has an

  11. 77 FR 65808 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A320-214 and -232 airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports that medium-head fasteners were... installation of upper panels on Frame 35 in Airbus A320 final assembly line. Investigations revealed that...

  12. 78 FR 68352 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A330-223F, -223, -321, -322, and -323 airplanes. This AD was prompted by fatigue load... this AD, contact Airbus SAS, Airworthiness Office--EAL, 1 Rond Point Maurice Bellonte, 31707 Blagnac...

  13. 78 FR 9581 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R, and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model A300 C4-605R Variant F...-03-11 Airbus: Amendment 39-17346. Docket No. FAA-2012-1002; Directorate Identifier 2012-NM-052-AD. (a...

  14. 78 FR 14647 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... (AD) for certain Airbus Model A310-204, -222, -304, -322, and -324 airplanes. This AD was prompted by... the Airbus A310 Airworthiness Limitation Section (ALS) Part 1 and bolts must be replaced at or before...

  15. 78 FR 60798 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ...-0363; Directorate Identifier 2013-NM-031-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... directive (AD) for all Airbus Model A330-200, -300 and -200 Freighter series airplanes, and Model A340-200... information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus SAS--Airworthiness Office--EAL, 1 Rond Point...

  16. 77 FR 19065 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... directive (AD) for all Airbus Model A340-600 series airplanes. This AD requires a detailed inspection for.... Relevant Service Information Airbus has issued All Operators Telex A340-25A5191, dated January 18, 2011...

  17. 77 FR 51717 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... applies to certain Airbus Model A300 B4-2C, B4-103, and B4- 203 airplanes; and Model A300 B4-601, B4-603... information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus SAS--EAW (Airworthiness Office), 1 Rond Point...

  18. 77 FR 40485 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... (AD) for all Airbus Model A300 series airplanes; all Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R, and F4-600R series... new AD: 2012-13-06 Airbus: Amendment 39-17108. Docket No. FAA-2012-0040; Directorate Identifier 2011...

  19. 78 FR 15874 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R, and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model A300 C4-605R Variant F... ground threat avoidance, an Airbus A310 aeroplane experienced an uncommanded slide back of the co-pilot...

  20. 78 FR 19085 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of oil residue... (MCAI) states: During Airbus Final Assembly Line flight tests, AoA [angle of attack] data from two...

  1. 78 FR 17071 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A330-200, -300, and -200 Freighter series airplanes; and all Airbus Model A340-200 and -300 series...

  2. 77 FR 19071 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A330-200, A330-300, A340-500, and A340-600 series airplanes. This AD...: During structural part assembly in Airbus production line, some nuts Part Number (P/N) ASNA2531-4 were...

  3. 77 FR 19067 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A321-131, -211, -212, and -231 airplanes. This AD requires a.... Relevant Service Information Airbus has issued Mandatory Service Bulletin A320-57-1120, Revision 01...

  4. 77 FR 75825 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A330-200 and -300 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report of a prematurely... [Amended] 0 2. The FAA amends Sec. 39.13 by adding the following new AD: 2012-25-12 Airbus: Amendment 39...

  5. 77 FR 57003 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A318, A319, and A320 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report of a torn out.... The FAA amends Sec. 39.13 by adding the following new AD: 2012-18-12 Airbus: Amendment 39-17189...

  6. 78 FR 21227 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A330-200, A330-200 Freighter, A330-300, A340-200, and A340-300 series airplanes; and Model... that, due to similar design, the enhanced MLG bogie pivot pin (Airbus modification 54500) could also be...

  7. 78 FR 71996 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A318-112, A319-111, A319-112, A319-115, A319-132, and A319-133 airplanes. This AD was... developing this AD. We have considered the comments received. Request To Refer to Revised EASA AD Airbus...

  8. 78 FR 60667 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... all Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 series airplanes. AD 2012- 26-51 required revising the...''), to correct an unsafe condition for the specified products. The MCAI states: Recently, an Airbus A330...

  9. 78 FR 52405 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A330-300, A340-200, and A340-300 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by a determination... Airbus: Amendment 39-17549. Docket No. FAA-2013-0335; Directorate Identifier 2012-NM-187-AD. [[Page 52407...

  10. 78 FR 78694 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... all Airbus Model A330-200 and -300 series airplanes, and Model A340-200 and -300 series airplanes. AD..., and corrective actions if needed. This new AD expands the applicability, reduces the compliance time... the comment received. Request To Change Compliance Time US Airways requested that we change the...

  11. 14 CFR 129.25 - Airplane security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane security. 129.25 Section 129.25 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS... AND FOREIGN OPERATORS OF U.S.-REGISTERED AIRCRAFT ENGAGED IN COMMON CARRIAGE General § 129.25 Airplane...

  12. 14 CFR 129.25 - Airplane security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane security. 129.25 Section 129.25 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS... AND FOREIGN OPERATORS OF U.S.-REGISTERED AIRCRAFT ENGAGED IN COMMON CARRIAGE General § 129.25 Airplane...

  13. 14 CFR 129.25 - Airplane security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane security. 129.25 Section 129.25 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS... AND FOREIGN OPERATORS OF U.S.-REGISTERED AIRCRAFT ENGAGED IN COMMON CARRIAGE General § 129.25 Airplane...

  14. 14 CFR 129.25 - Airplane security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane security. 129.25 Section 129.25 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS... AND FOREIGN OPERATORS OF U.S.-REGISTERED AIRCRAFT ENGAGED IN COMMON CARRIAGE General § 129.25 Airplane...

  15. 14 CFR 129.25 - Airplane security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane security. 129.25 Section 129.25 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS... AND FOREIGN OPERATORS OF U.S.-REGISTERED AIRCRAFT ENGAGED IN COMMON CARRIAGE General § 129.25 Airplane...

  16. 77 FR 58785 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ...-620, B4-605R, and B4-622R airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report that the door frame... operate safely. This proposed AD would require reinforcing of the door frame shells of passenger doors 2... door frame shells, which could result in in-flight decompression of the airplane and consequent injury...

  17. Injuries to seat occupants of light airplanes.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1989-02-01

    A series of 55 light-airplane accidents was examined in an effort to demonstrate the role of seats in the genesis of injury in seat occupants. Good engineering, design of airplane seats is an important related issue which is not treated in this study...

  18. 77 FR 5195 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... 747-400D series airplanes; and Model 747-200B series airplanes having a stretched upper deck. The...; and Model 747-200B series airplanes having a stretched upper deck. The original NPRM was published in... having a stretched upper deck; certificated in any category; excluding airplanes that have been converted...

  19. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage 3...

  20. 14 CFR 125.75 - Airplane flight manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 125.75 Section 125... OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6... Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved Airplane Flight Manual or...

  1. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977, using...

  2. 78 FR 4051 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ...-400D, 747-400F, 747SR, and 747SP series airplanes; and certain Model 757-200, -200PF, and -300 series... Model 757 series airplanes. This new AD adds airplanes to the applicability and revises the initial compliance times for those airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of problems associated with the...

  3. 14 CFR 21.5 - Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. 21.5... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS General § 21.5 Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. (a) With each airplane or rotorcraft that was not type certificated with an Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual...

  4. 14 CFR 21.5 - Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. 21.5... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS General § 21.5 Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. (a) With each airplane or rotorcraft not type certificated with an Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual and...

  5. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977, using...

  6. 14 CFR 21.5 - Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. 21.5... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS General § 21.5 Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. (a) With each airplane or rotorcraft not type certificated with an Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual and...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1437 - Accessories for multiengine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Accessories for multiengine airplanes. 23... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1437 Accessories for multiengine airplanes. For multiengine airplanes...

  8. 14 CFR 21.5 - Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. 21.5... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS General § 21.5 Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. (a) With each airplane or rotorcraft not type certificated with an Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual and...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1437 - Accessories for multiengine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Accessories for multiengine airplanes. 23... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1437 Accessories for multiengine airplanes. For multiengine airplanes...

  10. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage 3...

  11. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage 3...

  12. 14 CFR 21.5 - Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. 21.5... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS General § 21.5 Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. Link to an..., 2010. (a) With each airplane or rotorcraft that was not type certificated with an Airplane or...

  13. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage 3...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1437 - Accessories for multiengine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Accessories for multiengine airplanes. 23... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1437 Accessories for multiengine airplanes. For multiengine airplanes...

  15. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977, using...

  16. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977, using...

  17. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage 3...

  18. 14 CFR 125.75 - Airplane flight manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 125.75 Section 125... OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6... Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved Airplane Flight Manual or...

  19. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977, using...

  20. 78 FR 53638 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    .... Model CL-600-2C10 (Regional Jet Series 700, 701, & 702) airplanes, Model CL-600-2D15 (Regional Jet Series 705) airplanes, Model CL-600-2D24 (Regional Jet Series 900) airplanes, and Model CL- 600-2E25 (Regional Jet Series 1000) airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of erratic pitch movement and...

  1. 77 FR 67267 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... (AD) for certain Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-2C10 (Regional Jet Series 700, 701, & 702) airplanes, Model CL-600-2D15 (Regional Jet Series 705) airplanes, Model CL-600-2D24 (Regional Jet Series 900) airplanes, and Model CL- 600-2E25 (Regional Jet Series 1000) airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report...

  2. 77 FR 49389 - Airworthiness Directives; Revo, Incorporated Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ..., Incorporated Models COLONIAL C-1, COLONIAL C-2, LAKE LA-4, LAKE LA-4A, LAKE LA-4P, and LAKE LA-4-200 airplanes... COLONIAL C-1 airplanes are identical in every other respect to those installed on the airplanes referenced... COLONIAL C-1 airplanes to the Applicability, and add an optional terminating action for the requirements...

  3. Optimal back-to-front airplane boarding.

    PubMed

    Bachmat, Eitan; Khachaturov, Vassilii; Kuperman, Ran

    2013-06-01

    The problem of finding an optimal back-to-front airplane boarding policy is explored, using a mathematical model that is related to the 1+1 polynuclear growth model with concave boundary conditions and to causal sets in gravity. We study all airplane configurations and boarding group sizes. Optimal boarding policies for various airplane configurations are presented. Detailed calculations are provided along with simulations that support the main conclusions of the theory. We show that the effectiveness of back-to-front policies undergoes a phase transition when passing from lightly congested airplanes to heavily congested airplanes. The phase transition also affects the nature of the optimal or near-optimal policies. Under what we consider to be realistic conditions, optimal back-to-front policies lead to a modest 8-12% improvement in boarding time over random (no policy) boarding, using two boarding groups. Having more than two groups is not effective.

  4. An Application of Calculus: Optimum Parabolic Path Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atasever, Merve; Pakdemirli, Mehmet; Yurtsever, Hasan Ali

    2009-01-01

    A practical and technological application of calculus problem is posed to motivate freshman students or junior high school students. A variable coefficient of friction is used in modelling air friction. The case in which the coefficient of friction is a decreasing function of altitude is considered. The optimum parabolic path for a flying object…

  5. Orthostatic intolerance and motion sickness after parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Brown, T. E.; Wood, S. J.; Benavides, E. W.; Bondar, R. L.; Stein, F.; Moradshahi, P.; Harm, D. L.; Fritsch-Yelle, J. M.; Low, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    Because it is not clear that the induction of orthostatic intolerance in returning astronauts always requires prolonged exposure to microgravity, we investigated orthostatic tolerance and autonomic cardiovascular function in 16 healthy subjects before and after the brief micro- and hypergravity of parabolic flight. Concomitantly, we investigated the effect of parabolic flight-induced vomiting on orthostatic tolerance, R-wave-R-wave interval and arterial pressure power spectra, and carotid-cardiac baroreflex and Valsalva responses. After parabolic flight 1) 8 of 16 subjects could not tolerate 30 min of upright tilt (compared to 2 of 16 before flight); 2) 6 of 16 subjects vomited; 3) new intolerance to upright tilt was associated with exaggerated falls in total peripheral resistance, whereas vomiting was associated with increased R-wave-R-wave interval variability and carotid-cardiac baroreflex responsiveness; and 4) the proximate mode of new orthostatic failure differed in subjects who did and did not vomit, with vomiters experiencing comparatively isolated upright hypocapnia and cerebral vasoconstriction and nonvomiters experiencing signs and symptoms reminiscent of the clinical postural tachycardia syndrome. Results suggest, first, that syndromes of orthostatic intolerance resembling those developing after space flight can develop after a brief (i.e., 2-h) parabolic flight and, second, that recent vomiting can influence the results of tests of autonomic cardiovascular function commonly utilized in returning astronauts.

  6. Strict parabolicity of the multifractal spectrum at the Anderson transition

    SciT

    Suslov, I. M., E-mail: suslov@kapitza.ras.ru

    Using the well-known “algebra of multifractality,” we derive the functional equation for anomalous dimensions Δ{sub q}, whose solution Δ = χq(q–1) corresponds to strict parabolicity of the multifractal spectrum. This result demonstrates clearly that a correspondence of the nonlinear σ-models with the initial disordered systems is not exact.

  7. Approximation Methods for Inverse Problems Governed by Nonlinear Parabolic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-12-17

    We present a rigorous theoretical framework for approximation of nonlinear parabolic systems with delays in the context of inverse least squares...numerical results demonstrating the convergence are given for a model of dioxin uptake and elimination in a distributed liver model that is a special case of the general theoretical framework .

  8. The dynamics of parabolic flight: flight characteristics and passenger percepts.

    PubMed

    Karmali, Faisal; Shelhamer, Mark

    2008-09-01

    Flying a parabolic trajectory in an aircraft is one of the few ways to create freefall on Earth, which is important for astronaut training and scientific research. Here we review the physics underlying parabolic flight, explain the resulting flight dynamics, and describe several counterintuitive findings, which we corroborate using experimental data. Typically, the aircraft flies parabolic arcs that produce approximately 25 seconds of freefall (0 g) followed by 40 seconds of enhanced force (1.8 g), repeated 30-60 times. Although passengers perceive gravity to be zero, in actuality acceleration, and not gravity, has changed, and thus we caution against the terms "microgravity" and "zero gravity. " Despite the aircraft trajectory including large (45°) pitch-up and pitch-down attitudes, the occupants experience a net force perpendicular to the floor of the aircraft. This is because the aircraft generates appropriate lift and thrust to produce the desired vertical and longitudinal accelerations, respectively, although we measured moderate (0.2 g) aft-ward accelerations during certain parts of these trajectories. Aircraft pitch rotation (average 3°/s) is barely detectable by the vestibular system, but could influence some physics experiments. Investigators should consider such details in the planning, analysis, and interpretation of parabolic-flight experiments.

  9. Orthostatic Intolerance and Motion Sickness After Parabolic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Brown, Troy E.; Wood, Scott J.; Benavides, Edgar W.; Bondar, Roberta L.; Stein, Flo; Moradshahi, Peyman; Harm, Deborah L.; Low, Phillip A.

    1999-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is common in astronauts after prolonged space flight. However, the "push-pull effect" in military aviators suggests that brief exposures to transitions between hypo- and hypergravity are sufficient to induce untoward autonomic cardiovascular physiology in susceptible individuals. We therefore investigated orthostatic tolerance and autonomic cardiovascular function in 16 healthy test subjects before and after a seated 2-hr parabolic flight. At the same time, we also investigated relationships between parabolic flight-induced vomiting and changes in orthostatic and autonomic cardiovascular function. After parabolic flight, 8 of 16 subjects could not tolerate a 30-min upright tilt test, compared to 2 of 16 before flight. Whereas new intolerance in non-Vomiters resembled the clinical postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), new intolerance in Vomiters was characterized by comparatively isolated upright hypocapnia and cerebral vasoconstriction. As a group, Vomiters also had evidence for increased postflight fluctuations in efferent vagal-cardiac nerve traffic occurring independently of any superimposed change in respiration. Results suggest that syndromes of orthostatic intolerance resembling those occurring after space flight can occur after a brief (i.e., 2-hr) parabolic flight.

  10. Compound parabolic concentrator with cavity for tubular absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1983-01-01

    A compond parabolic concentrator with a V-shaped cavity is provided in which an optical receiver is emplaced. The cavity redirects all energy entering between the receiver and the cavity structure onto the receiver, if the optical receiver is emplaced a distance from the cavity not greater than 0.27 r (where r is the radius of the receiver).

  11. The dynamics of parabolic flight: flight characteristics and passenger percepts

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, Faisal; Shelhamer, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Flying a parabolic trajectory in an aircraft is one of the few ways to create freefall on Earth, which is important for astronaut training and scientific research. Here we review the physics underlying parabolic flight, explain the resulting flight dynamics, and describe several counterintuitive findings, which we corroborate using experimental data. Typically, the aircraft flies parabolic arcs that produce approximately 25 seconds of freefall (0 g) followed by 40 seconds of enhanced force (1.8 g), repeated 30–60 times. Although passengers perceive gravity to be zero, in actuality acceleration, and not gravity, has changed, and thus we caution against the terms "microgravity" and "zero gravity. " Despite the aircraft trajectory including large (45°) pitch-up and pitch-down attitudes, the occupants experience a net force perpendicular to the floor of the aircraft. This is because the aircraft generates appropriate lift and thrust to produce the desired vertical and longitudinal accelerations, respectively, although we measured moderate (0.2 g) aft-ward accelerations during certain parts of these trajectories. Aircraft pitch rotation (average 3°/s) is barely detectable by the vestibular system, but could influence some physics experiments. Investigators should consider such details in the planning, analysis, and interpretation of parabolic-flight experiments. PMID:19727328

  12. NREL, SPI Solar and Trimark Optimize Parabolic Trough Receiver Performance

    (CSP) plants. Photo of parabolic trough receiver equipment in a laboratory Photo by Dennis Schroeder Receivers in CSP plants take a lot of abuse, from dramatic temperature changes to numerous mechanical conditions can lead to big improvements in the overall efficiency of CSP plants

  13. Parabolic Dish Solar Thermal Power Annual Program Review Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The results of activities of the parabolic dish technology and applications development element of DOE's Solar Thermal Energy System Program are presented. Topics include the development and testing of concentrators, receivers, and power conversion units; system design and development for engineering experiments; economic analysis and marketing assessment; and advanced development activities. A panel discussion concerning industrial support sector requirements is also documented.

  14. Far-Field Turbulent Vortex-Wake/Exhaust Plume Interaction for Subsonic and HSCT Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Adam, Ihab; Wong, Tin-Chee

    1996-01-01

    Computational study of the far-field turbulent vortex-wake/exhaust plume interaction for subsonic and high speed civil transport (HSCT) airplanes is carried out. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved using the implicit, upwind, Roe-flux-differencing, finite-volume scheme. The two-equation shear stress transport model of Menter is implemented with the NS solver for turbulent-flow calculation. For the far-field study, the computations of vortex-wake interaction with the exhaust plume of a single engine of a Boeing 727 wing in a holding condition and two engines of an HSCT in a cruise condition are carried out using overlapping zonal method for several miles downstream. These results are obtained using the computer code FTNS3D. The results of the subsonic flow of this code are compared with those of a parabolized NS solver known as the UNIWAKE code.

  15. IR Spectrometer Using 90-degree Off-axis Parabolic Mirrors

    SciT

    Robert M. Malone, Richard, G. Hacking, Ian J. McKenna, and Daniel H. Dolan

    2008-09-02

    A gated spectrometer has been designed for real-time, pulsed infrared (IR) studies at the National Synchrotron Light ource at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A pair of 90-degree, off-axis parabolic mirrors are used to relay the light from an entrance slit to an output IR recording camera. With an initial wavelength range of 1500–4500 nm required, gratings could not be used in the spectrometer because grating orders would overlap. A magnesium oxide prism, placed between these parabolic mirrors, serves as the dispersion element. The spectrometer is doubly telecentric. With proper choice of the air spacing between the prism and the secondmore » parabolic mirror, any spectral region of interest within the InSb camera array’s sensitivity region can be recorded. The wavelengths leaving the second parabolic mirror are collimated, thereby relaxing the camera positioning tolerance. To set up the instrument, two different wavelength (visible) lasers are introduced at the entrance slit and made collinear with the optical axis via flip mirrors. After dispersion by the prism, these two laser beams are directed to tick marks located on the outside housing of the gated IR camera. This provides first-order wavelength calibration for the instrument. Light that is reflected off the front prism face is coupled into a high-speed detector to verify steady radiance during the gated spectral imaging. Alignment features include tick marks on the prism and parabolic mirrors. This instrument was designed to complement singlepoint pyrometry, which provides continuous time histories of a small collection of spots from shock-heated targets.« less

  16. Agricultural Airplane Mission Time Structure Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewel, J. W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The time structure characteristics of agricultural airplane missions were studied by using records from NASA VGH flight recorders. Flight times varied from less than 3 minutes to more than 103 minutes. There was a significant reduction in turning time between spreading runs as pilot experience in the airplane type increased. Spreading runs accounted for only 25 to 29 percent of the flight time of an agricultural airplane. Lowering the longitudinal stick force appeared to reduce both the turning time between spreading runs and pilot fatigue at the end of a working day.

  17. Shuttle Laser Technology Experiment Facility (LTEF)-to-airplane lasercom experiment: Airplane considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalil, Ford

    1990-01-01

    NASA is considering the use of various airplanes for a Shuttle Laser Technology Experiment Facility (LTEF)-to-Airplane laser communications experiment. As supporting documentation, pertinent technical details are included about the potential use of airplanes located at Ames Research Center and Wallops Flight Facility. The effects and application of orbital mechanics considerations are also presented, including slant range, azimuth, elevation, and time. The pros and cons of an airplane equipped with a side port with a bubble window versus a top port with a dome are discussed.

  18. Physiologic Pressure and Flow Changes During Parabolic Flight (Pilot Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantalos, George; Sharp, M. Keith; Mathias, John R.; Hargens, Alan R.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Buckey, Jay C.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain measurement of cutaneous tissue perfusion central and peripheral venous pressure, and esophageal and abdominal pressure in human test subjects during parabolic flight. Hemodynamic data recorded during SLS-I and SLS-2 missions have resulted in the paradoxical finding of increased cardiac stroke volume in the presence of a decreased central venous pressure (CVP) following entry in weightlessness. The investigators have proposed that in the absence of gravity, acceleration-induced peripheral vascular compression is relieved, increasing peripheral vascular capacity and flow while reducing central and peripheral venous pressure, This pilot study seeks to measure blood pressure and flow in human test subjects during parabolic flight for different postures.

  19. Parabolic dish systems at work - Applying the concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marriott, A. T.

    1981-01-01

    An overview is given of parabolic dish solar concentrator application experiments being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy. The 'engineering experiments' comprise the testing of (1) a small-community powerplant system, in conjunction with a grid-connected utility; (2) stand-alone applications at remote sites such as military installations, radar stations and villages; and (3) dish modules that can deliver heat for direct use in industrial processes. Applicability projections are based on a dish and receiver that use a Brayton engine with an engine/generator efficiency of 25% and a production level of up to 25,000 units per year. Analyses indicate that parabolic-dish power systems can potentially replace small, oil-fired power plants in all regions of the U.S. between 1985 and 1991.

  20. Integrated parabolic nanolenses on MicroLED color pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demory, Brandon; Chung, Kunook; Katcher, Adam; Sui, Jingyang; Deng, Hui; Ku, Pei-Cheng

    2018-04-01

    A parabolic nanolens array coupled to the emission of a nanopillar micro-light emitting diode (LED) color pixel is shown to reduce the far field divergence. For a blue wavelength LED, the total emission is 95% collimated within a 0.5 numerical aperture zone, a 3.5x improvement over the same LED without a lens structure. This corresponds to a half-width at half-maximum (HWHM) line width reduction of 2.85 times. Using a resist reflow and etchback procedure, the nanolens array dimensions and parabolic shape are formed. Experimental measurement of the far field emission shows a HWHM linewidth reduction by a factor of 2x, reducing the divergence over the original LED.

  1. Development and testing of Parabolic Dish Concentrator No. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, E. W.; Thostesen, T. O.

    1984-01-01

    Parabolic Dish Concentrator No. 1 (PDC-1) is a 12-m-diameter prototype concentrator with low life-cycle costs for use with thermal-to-electric energy conversion devices. The concentrator assembly features panels made of a resin transfer molded balsa core/fiberglass sandwich with plastic reflective film as the reflective surface and a ribbed framework to hold the panels in place. The concentrator assembly tracks in azimuth and elevation on a base frame riding on a circular track. It is shown that the panels do not exhibit the proper parabolic contour. However, thermal gradients were discovered in the panels with daily temperature changes. The PDC-1 has sufficient optical quality to operate satisfactorily in a dish-electric system. The PDC-1 development provides the impetus for creating innovative optical testing methods and valuable information for use in designing and fabricating concentrators of future dish-electric systems.

  2. Achieving uniform efficient illumination with multiple asymmetric compound parabolic luminaires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Kashin, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Luminaire designs based on multiple asymmetric nonimaging compound parabolic reflectors are proposed for 2-D illumination applications that require highly uniform far-field illuminance, while ensuring maximal lighting efficiency and sharp angular cutoffs. The new designs derive from recent advances in nonimaging secondary concentrators for line-focus solar collectors. The light source is not treated as a single entity, but rather is divided into two or more separate adjoining sources. An asymmetric compound parabolic luminaire is then designed around each half-source. Attaining sharp cutoffs requires relatively large reflectors. However, severe truncation of the reflectors renders these devices as compact as many conventional luminaires, at the penalty of a small fraction of the radiation being emitted outside the nominal cutoff. The configurations that maximize the uniformity of far-field illuminance offer significant improvements in flux homogeneity relative to alternative designs to date.

  3. Achieving uniform efficient illumination with multiple asymmetric compound parabolic luminaires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Kashin, Peter

    1993-11-01

    Luminaire designs based on multiple asymmetric nonimaging compound parabolic reflectors are proposed for 2-D illumination applications that require highly uniform far-field illuminance, while insuring maximal lighting efficiency and sharp angular cutoffs. The new designs derive from recent advances in nonimaging secondary concentrators for line-focus solar collectors. The light source is not treated as a single entity, but rather is divided into two or more separate adjoining sources. An asymmetric Compound Parabolic Luminaire is then designed around each half-source. Attaining sharp cutoffs requires relatively large reflectors. However, severe truncation of the reflectors renders these devices as compact as many conventional luminaires, at the penalty of a small fraction of the radiation being emitted outside the nominal cutoff. The configurations that maximize the uniformity of far-field illumination offer significant improvements in flux homogeneity relative to alternative designs to date.

  4. Secondary concentrators for parabolic dish solar thermal power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Poon, P. T.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of different concepts are currently being studied with the objective to lower the cost of parabolic mirrors and to provide alternatives. One of the considered approaches involves the use of compound concentrators. A compound solar concentrator is a concentrator in which the sunlight is reflected or refracted more than once. It consists of a primary mirror or lens, whose aperture determines the amount of sunlight gathered, and a smaller secondary mirror or lens. Additional small optical elements may also be incorporated. The possibilities and problems regarding a use of compound concentrators in parabolic dish systems are discussed. Attention is given to concentrating secondary lenses, secondary imaging and concentrating mirrors, conical secondary mirrors, compound elliptic secondary concentrating mirrors, and hyperbolic trumpet secondary concentrating mirrors.

  5. Treatment of motion sickness in parabolic flight with buccal scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, William T.; Degioanni, Joseph J.; Reschke, Millard F.; Bungo, Michael W.; Kutyna, Frank A.; Homick, Jerry L.; Calkins, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of acute motion sickness induced by parabolic flight with a preparation of scopolamine placed in the buccal pouch was investigated. Twenty-one subjects flew aboard a KC-135 aircraft operated by NASA which performed parabolic maneuvers resulting in periods of 0-g, 1-g, and 1.8-g. Each subject flew once with a tablet containing scopolamine and once with a placebo in a random order, crossover design. Signs and symptoms of motion sickness were systematically recorded during each parabola by an investigator who was blind to the content of the tablet. Compared with flights using placebo, flights with buccal scopolamine resulted in significantly lower scores for nausea (31-35 percent reduction) and vomiting (50 percent reduction in number of parabolas with vomiting). Side effects of the drug during flight were negligible. It is concluded that buccal scopolamine is more effective than a placebo in treating ongoing motion sickness.

  6. Irrigation market for solar thermal parabolic dish systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib-Agahi, H.; Jones, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    The potential size of the onfarm-pumped irrigation market for solar thermal parabolic dish systems in seven high-insolation states is estimated. The study is restricted to the displacement of three specific fuels: gasoline, diesel and natural gas. The model was developed to estimate the optimal number of parabolic dish modules per farm based on the minimum cost mix of conventional and solar thermal energy required to meet irrigation needs. The study concludes that the potential market size for onfarm-pumped irrigation applications ranges from 101,000 modules when a 14 percent real discount rate is assumed to 220,000 modules when the real discount rate drops to 8 percent. Arizona, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico and Texas account for 98 percent of the total demand for this application, with the natural gas replacement market accounting for the largest segment (71 percent) of the total market.

  7. A new TRNSYS component for parabolic trough collector simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drosou, Vassiliki; Valenzuela, Loreto; Dimoudi, Argiro

    2018-03-01

    This study describes and evaluates a new simulation component for parabolic trough collectors (PTCs). The new simulation component is implemented in the TRNSYS software environment by means of new Type that is suitable for integration into the calculation of a whole concentrating solar thermal plant, in order to evaluate the energy production of a PTC. The main advantage of the new Type is that is derived from experimental data available on efficiency Test Reports, according to the current European and International standards, rather than the theoretical approach considered in the existing parabolic trough component of TRNSYS library. The performance of the new Type has been validated with real experimental data obtained from the DISS solar test loop in Plataforma Solar de Almería, Spain. The paper describes the modelling approach, presents the comparison of simulation results with measurements taken at the DISS facility and evaluates the results.

  8. Parabolic discounting of monetary rewards by physical effort.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Matthias N; Hager, Oliver M; Tobler, Philippe N; Kaiser, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    When humans and other animals make decisions in their natural environments prospective rewards have to be weighed against costs. It is well established that increasing costs lead to devaluation or discounting of reward. While our knowledge about discount functions for time and probability costs is quite advanced, little is known about how physical effort discounts reward. In the present study we compared three different models in a binary choice task in which human participants had to squeeze a handgrip to earn monetary rewards: a linear, a hyperbolic, and a parabolic model. On the group as well as the individual level, the concave parabolic model explained most variance of the choice data, thus contrasting with the typical hyperbolic discounting of reward value by delay. Research on effort discounting is not only important to basic science but also holds the potential to quantify aberrant motivational states in neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Design and resolution analysis of parabolic mirror spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Su; Wang, Guodong; Xia, Guo; Sun, Yanchao; Hu, Mingyong

    2017-10-01

    In order to further eliminate aberration and improve resolution, the paper employs parabolic mirror as the collimating mirror and the focusing mirror to design "Z" configuration and "U" configuration optical structure of parabolic spectrometer with the F number 2.5 and the spectral range varying from 250 nm to 850 nm. We conduct experiments on ZEMAX to simulate and optimize the initial parameters of two structures with the root-mean-square (RMS) radius of spots along Y axis as the optimization goal. Through analyzing the spot diagram and the root-mean-square (RMS) of Y axis, we can see that the "U" configuration spectrometers can achieve much better spectral resolution than the "Z" configuration.

  10. A Review of Psycho-Physiological Responses to Parabolic Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brummer, Vera; Schneider, Stefan; Guardiera, Simon; Struder, Heiko K.

    2008-06-01

    This review combines and correlates data of several studies conducted in the recent years where we were able to show an increase in stress hormone concentrations, EEG activity and a decrease in mood during parabolic flights. The aim of these studies was to consider whether previous results showing a decrease in mental and perceptual motor performance during weightlessness were solely due to the changes in gravity itself or were also, at least partly, explainable by an increase of stress and/or arousal during parabolic flights. A correlation between stress hormones and mood but not between EEG activity and mood nor between stress hormones and EEG activity could be found. We propose two different stressors: First an activation of the adrenomedullary system, secondly a general increase of cortical arousal. Whereas the first one is perceived by subjects, this is not the case for the second one.

  11. Integrated parabolic nanolenses on MicroLED color pixels.

    PubMed

    Demory, Brandon; Chung, Kunook; Katcher, Adam; Sui, Jingyang; Deng, Hui; Ku, Pei-Cheng

    2018-04-20

    A parabolic nanolens array coupled to the emission of a nanopillar micro-light emitting diode (LED) color pixel is shown to reduce the far field divergence. For a blue wavelength LED, the total emission is 95% collimated within a 0.5 numerical aperture zone, a 3.5x improvement over the same LED without a lens structure. This corresponds to a half-width at half-maximum (HWHM) line width reduction of 2.85 times. Using a resist reflow and etchback procedure, the nanolens array dimensions and parabolic shape are formed. Experimental measurement of the far field emission shows a HWHM linewidth reduction by a factor of 2x, reducing the divergence over the original LED.

  12. Radiative Heat Transfer During Atmosphere Entry at Parabolic Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, Kenneth K.; Wick, Bradford H.

    1961-01-01

    Stagnation point radiative heating rates for manned vehicles entering the earth's atmosphere at parabolic velocity are presented and compared with corresponding laminar convective heating rates. The calculations were made for both nonlifting and lifting entry trajectories for vehicles of varying nose radius, weight-to-area ratio, and drag. It is concluded from the results presented that radiative heating will be important for the entry conditions considered.

  13. Analytic convergence of harmonic metrics for parabolic Higgs bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Semin; Wilkin, Graeme

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the moduli space of parabolic Higgs bundles over a punctured Riemann surface with varying weights at the punctures. We show that the harmonic metric depends analytically on the weights and the stable Higgs bundle. This gives a Higgs bundle generalisation of a theorem of McOwen on the existence of hyperbolic cone metrics on a punctured surface within a given conformal class, and a generalisation of a theorem of Judge on the analytic parametrisation of these metrics.

  14. Proceedings: Fourth Parabolic Dish Solar Thermal Power Program Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The results of activities within the parabolic dish technology and applications development program are presented. Stirling, organic Rankine and Brayton module technologies, associated hardware and test results to date; concentrator development and progress; economic analyses; and international dish development activities are covered. Two panel discussions, concerning industry issues affecting solar thermal dish development and dish technology from a utility/user perspective, are also included.

  15. Optimal feedback control infinite dimensional parabolic evolution systems: Approximation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Wang, C.

    1989-01-01

    A general approximation framework is discussed for computation of optimal feedback controls in linear quadratic regular problems for nonautonomous parabolic distributed parameter systems. This is done in the context of a theoretical framework using general evolution systems in infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces. Conditions are discussed for preservation under approximation of stabilizability and detectability hypotheses on the infinite dimensional system. The special case of periodic systems is also treated.

  16. Criteria for evaluation of reflective surface for parabolic dish concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F.

    1980-01-01

    Commercial, second surface glass mirror are emphasized, but aluminum and metallized polymeric films are also included. Criteria for sealing solar mirrors in order to prevent environmental degradation and criteria for bonding sagged or bent mirrors to substrate materials are described. An overview of the technical areas involved in evaluating small mirror samples, sections, and entire large gores is presented. A basis for mirror criteria was established that eventually may become part of inspection and evaluation techniques for three dimensional parabolic reflective surfaces.

  17. IR Spectrometer Using 90-Degree Off-Axis Parabolic Mirrors

    SciT

    Robert M. Malone, Ian J. McKenna

    2008-03-01

    A gated spectrometer has been designed for real-time, pulsed infrared (IR) studies at the National Synchrotron Light Source at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A pair of 90-degree, off-axis parabolic mirrors are used to relay the light from an entrance slit to an output recording camera. With an initial wavelength range of 1500–4500 nm required, gratings could not be used in the spectrometer because grating orders would overlap. A magnesium oxide prism, placed between these parabolic mirrors, serves as the dispersion element. The spectrometer is doubly telecentric. With proper choice of the air spacing between the prism and the second parabolicmore » mirror, any spectral region of interest within the InSb camera array’s sensitivity region can be recorded. The wavelengths leaving the second parabolic mirror are collimated, thereby relaxing the camera positioning tolerance. To set up the instrument, two different wavelength (visible) lasers are introduced at the entrance slit and made collinear with the optical axis via flip mirrors. After dispersion by the prism, these two laser beams are directed to tick marks located on the outside housing of the gated IR camera. This provides first-order wavelength calibration for the instrument. Light that is reflected off the front prism face is coupled into a high-speed detector to verify steady radiance during the gated spectral imaging. Alignment features include tick marks on the prism and parabolic mirrors. This instrument was designed to complement single-point pyrometry, which provides continuous time histories of a small collection of spots from shock-heated targets.« less

  18. Real-time optical laboratory solution of parabolic differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, David; Jackson, James

    1988-01-01

    An optical laboratory matrix-vector processor is used to solve parabolic differential equations (the transient diffusion equation with two space variables and time) by an explicit algorithm. This includes optical matrix-vector nonbase-2 encoded laboratory data, the combination of nonbase-2 and frequency-multiplexed data on such processors, a high-accuracy optical laboratory solution of a partial differential equation, new data partitioning techniques, and a discussion of a multiprocessor optical matrix-vector architecture.

  19. Self-accelerating parabolic beams in quadratic nonlinear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolev, Ido; Libster, Ana; Arie, Ady

    2012-09-01

    We present experimental observation of self-accelerating parabolic beams in quadratic nonlinear media. We show that the intensity peaks of the first and second harmonics are asynchronous with respect to one another in the two transverse coordinates. In addition, the two coupled harmonics have the same acceleration within and after the nonlinear medium. We also study the evolution of second harmonic accelerating beams inside the quadratic media and their correlation with theoretical beams.

  20. Synergies between optical and physical variables in intercepting parabolic targets

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, José; López-Moliner, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Interception requires precise estimation of time-to-contact (TTC) information. A long-standing view posits that all relevant information for extracting TTC is available in the angular variables, which result from the projection of distal objects onto the retina. The different timing models rooted in this tradition have consequently relied on combining visual angle and its rate of expansion in different ways with tau being the most well-known solution for TTC. The generalization of these models to timing parabolic trajectories is not straightforward. For example, these different combinations rely on isotropic expansion and usually assume first-order information only, neglecting acceleration. As a consequence no optical formulations have been put forward so far to specify TTC of parabolic targets with enough accuracy. It is only recently that context-dependent physical variables have been shown to play an important role in TTC estimation. Known physical size and gravity can adequately explain observed data of linear and free-falling trajectories, respectively. Yet, a full timing model for specifying parabolic TTC has remained elusive. We here derive two formulations that specify TTC for parabolic ball trajectories. The first specification extends previous models in which known size is combined with thresholding visual angle or its rate of expansion to the case of fly balls. To efficiently use this model, observers need to recover the 3D radial velocity component of the trajectory which conveys the isotropic expansion. The second one uses knowledge of size and gravity combined with ball visual angle and elevation angle. Taking into account the noise due to sensory measurements, we simulate the expected performance of these models in terms of accuracy and precision. While the model that combines expansion information and size knowledge is more efficient during the late trajectory, the second one is shown to be efficient along all the flight. PMID:23720614

  1. Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Parabolic Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Hideaki; Bey, Kim S.; Hou, Gene J. W.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a time and its corresponding spatial discretization scheme, based upon the assumption of a certain weak singularity of parallel ut(t) parallel Lz(omega) = parallel ut parallel2, for the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for one-dimensional parabolic problems. Optimal convergence rates in both time and spatial variables are obtained. A discussion of automatic time-step control method is also included.

  2. 78 FR 46306 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... on the A330 and A340 type design Section 19, which is a flammable fluid leakage zone and a zone... Model A340 series airplanes: Doing the bleed leak detection loop modification of the auxiliary power...

  3. Development of light and small airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachmann, G

    1926-01-01

    The author has endeavored to select only the most important lines of development and has limited the description of individual airplanes to a few typical examples. Comparisons are presented between German and foreign accomplishments.

  4. Fire prevention on airplanes. Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabatier, J

    1929-01-01

    Various methods for preventing fires in airplanes are presented with most efforts centering around prevention of backfires, new engine and carburetor designs, as well as investigations on different types of fuels.

  5. Utilization conditions of different types of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DE MAROLLES

    1922-01-01

    This report presents examples of different methods of comparing aircraft mathematically. In the example given a biplane and monoplane are compared as to what speed one type of airplane is better at than another.

  6. Precision controllability of the F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisk, T. R.; Matheny, N. W.

    1979-01-01

    A flying qualities evaluation conducted on a preproduction F-15 airplane permitted an assessment to be made of its precision controllability in the high subsonic and low transonic flight regime over the allowable angle of attack range. Precision controllability, or gunsight tracking, studies were conducted in windup turn maneuvers with the gunsight in the caged pipper mode and depressed 70 mils. This evaluation showed the F-15 airplane to experience severe buffet and mild-to-moderate wing rock at the higher angles of attack. It showed the F-15 airplane radial tracking precision to vary from approximately 6 to 20 mils over the load factor range tested. Tracking in the presence of wing rock essentially doubled the radial tracking error generated at the lower angles of attack. The stability augmentation system affected the tracking precision of the F-15 airplane more than it did that of previous aircraft studied.

  7. Control of airplanes at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R Mckinnon

    1923-01-01

    Loss of control over the orientation of an airplane as the incidence approaches and enters the region of stalled flight is a prolific cause of serious accidents. This report discusses methods of landing at slow speeds approaching stall.

  8. The Kiln Drying of Wood for Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiemann, Harry D

    1919-01-01

    This report is descriptive of various methods used in the kiln drying of woods for airplanes and gives the results of physical tests on different types of woods after being dried by the various kiln-drying methods.

  9. Circulatory filling pressures during transient microgravity induced by parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, Ricky D.; Fanton, John W.; White, C. D.; Vernalis, Mariana N.; Crisman, R. P.; Koenig, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical concepts hold that blood in the gravity dependent portion of the body would relocate to more cephalad compartments under microgravity. The result is an increase in blood volume in the thoraic and cardiac chambers. However, experimental data has been somewhat contradictory and nonconclusive. Early studies of peripheral venous pressure and estimates of central venous pressure (CVP) from these data did not show an increase in CVP under microgravity. However, CVP recorded in human volunteers during a parabolic flight revealed an increase in CVP during the microgravity state. On the STS 40 shuttle mission, a payload specialist wore a fluid line that recorded CVP during the first few hours of orbital insertion. These data revealed decreased CVP. When this CVP catheter was tested during parabolic flight in four subjects, two had increased CVP recordings and two had decreased CVP measurements. In 1991, our laboratory performed parabolic flight studies in several chronic-instrumented baboons. It was again noted that centrally recorded right atrial pressure varied with exposure to microgravity, some animals having an increase, and others a decrease.

  10. 77 FR 26937 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of...) for certain Airbus Model A300 B2-1C, B2K-3C, B2-203, B4-2C, B4-103, and B4-203 airplanes; and Model... Airbus Service Bulletins (SB) A300-57-0235 and A300-57-6088 * * *. Subsequently, new cases of cracks were...

  11. 77 FR 55163 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A330-200, A330-300, A340-200, and A340- 300 series airplanes; and... Model A330-200, A330- 200 Freighter, A330-300, A340-200, and A340-300 series airplanes; and Model A340... measure, EASA issued AD 2011-0040 to require a one-time [detailed] inspection of the MLG (all types of...

  12. [A rarely known headache: Airplane travel headache].

    PubMed

    Azman, Filiz; Erkılınç, Büşra; Çabalar, Murat; Çağırıcı, Sultan; Yayla, Vildan

    2017-01-01

    Recently, headache associated with airplane travel has gained importance with case reports and took its place in the classification of headache in 2013. This rare condition has different spesific characteristic from the primary headaches and its pathophysiology is not clear yet. In this case report, a 27-years-old female patient was diagnosed with the headache associated with airplane travel by history, examination and imaging findings. The possible pathophysiology and treatment were discussed.

  13. A study of commuter airplane design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Wyatt, R. D.; Griswold, D. A.; Hammer, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Problems of commuter airplane configuration design were studied to affect a minimization of direct operating costs. Factors considered were the minimization of fuselage drag, methods of wing design, and the estimated drag of an airplane submerged in a propellor slipstream; all design criteria were studied under a set of fixed performance, mission, and stability constraints. Configuration design data were assembled for application by a computerized design methodology program similar to the NASA-Ames General Aviation Synthesis Program.

  14. Finite-time blow-up for quasilinear degenerate Keller-Segel systems of parabolic-parabolic type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashira, Takahiro; Ishida, Sachiko; Yokota, Tomomi

    2018-05-01

    This paper deals with the quasilinear degenerate Keller-Segel systems of parabolic-parabolic type in a ball of RN (N ≥ 2). In the case of non-degenerate diffusion, Cieślak-Stinner [3,4] proved that if q > m + 2/N, where m denotes the intensity of diffusion and q denotes the nonlinearity, then there exist initial data such that the corresponding solution blows up in finite time. As to the case of degenerate diffusion, it is known that a solution blows up if q > m + 2/N (see Ishida-Yokota [13]); however, whether the blow-up time is finite or infinite has been unknown. This paper gives an answer to the unsolved problem. Indeed, the finite-time blow-up of energy solutions is established when q > m + 2/N.

  15. Factors of airplane engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, Victor R

    1921-01-01

    This report is based upon an analysis of a large number of airplane-engine tests. It contains the results of a search for fundamental relations between many variables of engine operation. The data used came from over 100 groups of tests made upon several engines, primarily for military information. The types of engines were the Liberty 12 and three models of the Hispano-Suiza. The tests were made in the altitude chamber, where conditions simulated altitudes up to about 30,000 feet, with engine speeds ranging from 1,200 to 2,200 r.p.m. The compression ratios of the different engines ranged from under 5 to over 8 to 1. The data taken on the tests were exceptionally complete, including variations of pressure and temperature, besides the brake and friction torques, rates of fuel and air consumption, the jacket and exhaust heat losses.

  16. 78 FR 42417 - Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... certain Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Model PC-6/B2-H4 airplanes. This AD results from mandatory continuing... Aircraft Ltd. Model PC-6/B2-H4 airplanes, serial numbers 735, 863, 909, 923, 948, 956, 958, 977, 978, 979...

  17. Modeling of terminal-area airplane fuel consumption

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-08-01

    Accurate modeling of airplane fuel consumption is necessary for air transportation policy-makers to properly : adjudicate trades between competing environmental and economic demands. Existing public models used for : computing terminal-area airplane ...

  18. 78 FR 20229 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... Boeing Company Model 737-600, -700, -700C, -800, -900, and -900ER series airplanes. That AD currently... 20231

  19. 77 FR 12166 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... airplane has one or two attach brackets on the left wing prior to accomplishing the required rework... configuration before the rework. We disagree with adding an inspection to determine the airplane configuration...

  20. 77 FR 73908 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... affect the ability of the flightcrew to read primary displays for airplane attitude, altitude, or... the ability of the flightcrew to read primary displays for airplane attitude, altitude, or airspeed...

  1. Recurring norovirus transmission on an airplane.

    PubMed

    Thornley, Craig N; Emslie, Nicola A; Sprott, Tim W; Greening, Gail E; Rapana, Jackie P

    2011-09-01

    Previously reported outbreaks of norovirus gastroenteritis associated with aircraft have been limited to transmission during a single flight sector. During October 2009, an outbreak of diarrhea and vomiting occurred among different groups of flight attendants who had worked on separate flight sectors on the same airplane. We investigated the cause of the outbreak and whether the illnesses were attributable to work on the airplane. Information was obtained from flight attendants on demographic characteristics, symptoms, and possible transmission risk factors. Case patients were defined as flight attendants with diarrhea or vomiting <51 hours after the end of their first flight sector on the airplane during 13-18 October 2009. Stool samples were tested for norovirus RNA. A passenger had vomited on the Boeing 777-200 airplane on the 13 October flight sector. Sixty-three (82%) of 77 flight attendants who worked on the airplane during 13-18 October provided information, and 27 (43%) met the case definition. The attack rate among flight attendants decreased significantly over successive flight sectors from 13 October onward (P < .001). Working as a supervisor was independently associated with development of illness (adjusted odds ratio, 5.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-25.6). Norovirus genotype GI.6 was detected in stool samples from 2 case patients who worked on different flight sectors. Sustained transmission of norovirus is likely to have occurred because of exposures on this airplane during successive flight sectors. Airlines should make provision for adequate disinfection of airplanes with use of products effective against norovirus and other common infectious agents after vomiting has occurred.

  2. The ABCD matrix for parabolic reflectors and its application to astigmatism free four-mirror cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupraz, K.; Cassou, K.; Martens, A.; Zomer, F.

    2015-10-01

    The ABCD matrix for parabolic reflectors is derived for any incident angles. It is used in numerical studies of four-mirror cavities composed of two flat and two parabolic mirrors. Constraints related to laser beam injection efficiency, optical stability, cavity-mode, beam-waist size and high stacking power are satisfied. A dedicated alignment procedure leading to stigmatic cavity-modes is employed to overcome issues related to the optical alignment of parabolic reflectors.

  3. 14 CFR 121.141 - Airplane flight manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 121.141 Section 121... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Manual Requirements § 121.141 Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved airplane flight manual for each type of...

  4. 14 CFR 121.141 - Airplane flight manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 121.141 Section 121... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Manual Requirements § 121.141 Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved airplane flight manual for each type of...

  5. 14 CFR 121.141 - Airplane flight manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 121.141 Section 121... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Manual Requirements § 121.141 Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved airplane flight manual for each type of...

  6. 14 CFR 121.141 - Airplane flight manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 121.141 Section 121... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Manual Requirements § 121.141 Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved airplane flight manual for each type of...

  7. 77 FR 16490 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ...-2C10 (Regional Jet Series 700, 701, & 702) airplanes, Model CL-600-2D15 (Regional Jet Series 705) airplanes, and Model CL-600-2D24 (Regional Jet Series 900) airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by... and fuel tubes, and protective shields on the rudder quadrant support-beam in the aft equipment...

  8. 77 FR 47267 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... stretched upper deck. The existing AD currently requires repetitively inspecting for cracking or...; and Model 747-200B series airplanes having a stretched upper deck. The original NPRM (74 FR 33377... airplanes having a stretched upper deck; certificated in any category; excluding airplanes that have been...

  9. 76 FR 27168 - Airmen Transition to Experimental or Unfamiliar Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... airplanes. The current edition of AC 90-89, Amateur-Built and Ultralight Flight Testing Handbook, provides information on such testing. However, if a pilot is planning on participating in a flight-test program in an... airplanes and to flight instructors who teach in these airplanes. This information and guidance contains...

  10. 14 CFR 121.503 - Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes... Operations § 121.503 Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes. (a) A certificate holder conducting supplemental operations may schedule a pilot to fly in an airplane for eight hours or less during any 24...

  11. 14 CFR 121.570 - Airplane evacuation capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane evacuation capability. 121.570... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.570 Airplane evacuation capability. (a) No person may cause an airplane carrying passengers to be moved on the surface, take off, or...

  12. 14 CFR 121.159 - Single-engine airplanes prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Single-engine airplanes prohibited. 121.159 Section 121.159 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... airplanes prohibited. No certificate holder may operate a single-engine airplane under this part. [Doc. No...

  13. 14 CFR 61.159 - Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical experience: Airplane category... Transport Pilots § 61.159 Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating. (a) Except as provided in... certificate with an airplane category and class rating must have at least 1,500 hours of total time as a pilot...

  14. 14 CFR 125.91 - Airplane requirements: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane requirements: General. 125.91... AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements...

  15. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic airplane...

  16. 14 CFR 121.141 - Airplane flight manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 121.141 Section 121... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Manual Requirements § 121.141 Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved airplane flight manual for each type of...

  17. 14 CFR 121.303 - Airplane instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane instruments and equipment. 121.303... Airplane instruments and equipment. (a) Unless otherwise specified, the instrument and equipment... airspeed limitation and item of related information in the Airplane Flight Manual and pertinent placards...

  18. 14 CFR 125.407 - Maintenance log: Airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintenance log: Airplanes. 125.407 Section... OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6... Maintenance log: Airplanes. (a) Each person who takes corrective action or defers action concerning a reported...

  19. 14 CFR 121.161 - Airplane limitations: Type of route.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane limitations: Type of route. 121... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.161 Airplane... specifications, no certificate holder may operate a turbine-engine-powered airplane over a route that contains a...

  20. An Evaluation of Very Large Airplanes and Alternative Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    fuel alternatives II selected for detailed analysis. Conceptual de- signs of airplanes using each of these fuels were developed and estimates were made...recomnendations are made pertaining both to alternative fuels and to advanced-technolo.qy large airplanes. Future research and development ...recommendations with respect to very large airplanes and alternative fuels . Appropriate future research and development activities are also identified

  1. 78 FR 65190 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... altitude indications, and consequent loss of control of the airplane. DATES: This AD becomes effective... result in erroneous airspeed and altitude indications [and consequent loss of control of the airplane... indications, and consequent loss of control of the airplane. (f) Compliance You are responsible for having the...

  2. 14 CFR 61.159 - Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aeronautical experience: Airplane category... Transport Pilots § 61.159 Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating. (a) Except as provided in... certificate with an airplane category and class rating must have at least 1,500 hours of total time as a pilot...

  3. 14 CFR 121.570 - Airplane evacuation capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane evacuation capability. 121.570... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.570 Airplane evacuation capability. (a) No person may cause an airplane carrying passengers to be moved on the surface, take off, or...

  4. 14 CFR 121.303 - Airplane instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane instruments and equipment. 121.303... Airplane instruments and equipment. (a) Unless otherwise specified, the instrument and equipment... airspeed limitation and item of related information in the Airplane Flight Manual and pertinent placards...

  5. 14 CFR 125.407 - Maintenance log: Airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maintenance log: Airplanes. 125.407 Section... OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6... Maintenance log: Airplanes. (a) Each person who takes corrective action or defers action concerning a reported...

  6. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic airplane...

  7. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 23.71 Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical miles...

  8. 14 CFR 121.503 - Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes... Operations § 121.503 Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes. (a) A certificate holder conducting supplemental operations may schedule a pilot to fly in an airplane for eight hours or less during any 24...

  9. 14 CFR 121.503 - Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes... Operations § 121.503 Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes. (a) A certificate holder conducting supplemental operations may schedule a pilot to fly in an airplane for eight hours or less during any 24...

  10. 14 CFR 121.159 - Single-engine airplanes prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Single-engine airplanes prohibited. 121.159 Section 121.159 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... airplanes prohibited. No certificate holder may operate a single-engine airplane under this part. [Doc. No...

  11. 14 CFR 121.570 - Airplane evacuation capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane evacuation capability. 121.570... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.570 Airplane evacuation capability. (a) No person may cause an airplane carrying passengers to be moved on the surface, take off, or...

  12. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 23.71 Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical miles...

  13. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 23.71 Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical miles...

  14. 14 CFR 121.159 - Single-engine airplanes prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Single-engine airplanes prohibited. 121.159 Section 121.159 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... airplanes prohibited. No certificate holder may operate a single-engine airplane under this part. [Doc. No...

  15. 14 CFR 121.161 - Airplane limitations: Type of route.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane limitations: Type of route. 121... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.161 Airplane... specifications, no certificate holder may operate a turbine-engine-powered airplane over a route that contains a...

  16. 14 CFR 121.303 - Airplane instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane instruments and equipment. 121.303... Airplane instruments and equipment. (a) Unless otherwise specified, the instrument and equipment... airspeed limitation and item of related information in the Airplane Flight Manual and pertinent placards...

  17. 14 CFR 61.159 - Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aeronautical experience: Airplane category... Transport Pilots § 61.159 Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating. (a) Except as provided in... certificate with an airplane category and class rating must have at least 1,500 hours of total time as a pilot...

  18. 14 CFR 125.407 - Maintenance log: Airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maintenance log: Airplanes. 125.407 Section... OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6... Maintenance log: Airplanes. (a) Each person who takes corrective action or defers action concerning a reported...

  19. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic airplane...

  20. 14 CFR 125.91 - Airplane requirements: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane requirements: General. 125.91... AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements...

  1. 14 CFR 121.159 - Single-engine airplanes prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Single-engine airplanes prohibited. 121.159 Section 121.159 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... airplanes prohibited. No certificate holder may operate a single-engine airplane under this part. [Doc. No...

  2. 14 CFR 61.159 - Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aeronautical experience: Airplane category... Transport Pilots § 61.159 Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating. (a) Except as provided in... certificate with an airplane category and class rating must have at least 1,500 hours of total time as a pilot...

  3. 14 CFR 121.570 - Airplane evacuation capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane evacuation capability. 121.570... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.570 Airplane evacuation capability. (a) No person may cause an airplane carrying passengers to be moved on the surface, take off, or...

  4. 14 CFR 121.161 - Airplane limitations: Type of route.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane limitations: Type of route. 121... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.161 Airplane... specifications, no certificate holder may operate a turbine-engine-powered airplane over a route that contains a...

  5. 14 CFR 121.303 - Airplane instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane instruments and equipment. 121.303... Airplane instruments and equipment. (a) Unless otherwise specified, the instrument and equipment... airspeed limitation and item of related information in the Airplane Flight Manual and pertinent placards...

  6. 14 CFR 125.91 - Airplane requirements: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane requirements: General. 125.91... AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements...

  7. 14 CFR 61.159 - Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aeronautical experience: Airplane category... Transport Pilots § 61.159 Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating. (a) Except as provided in... certificate with an airplane category and class rating must have at least 1,500 hours of total time as a pilot...

  8. 14 CFR 121.161 - Airplane limitations: Type of route.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane limitations: Type of route. 121... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.161 Airplane... specifications, no certificate holder may operate a turbine-engine-powered airplane over a route that contains a...

  9. 14 CFR 121.161 - Airplane limitations: Type of route.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane limitations: Type of route. 121... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.161 Airplane... specifications, no certificate holder may operate a turbine-engine-powered airplane over a route that contains a...

  10. 14 CFR 121.570 - Airplane evacuation capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane evacuation capability. 121.570... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.570 Airplane evacuation capability. (a) No person may cause an airplane carrying passengers to be moved on the surface, take off, or...

  11. 14 CFR 121.159 - Single-engine airplanes prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Single-engine airplanes prohibited. 121.159 Section 121.159 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... airplanes prohibited. No certificate holder may operate a single-engine airplane under this part. [Doc. No...

  12. 14 CFR 121.503 - Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes... Operations § 121.503 Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes. (a) A certificate holder conducting supplemental operations may schedule a pilot to fly in an airplane for eight hours or less during any 24...

  13. 14 CFR 125.407 - Maintenance log: Airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maintenance log: Airplanes. 125.407 Section... OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6... Maintenance log: Airplanes. (a) Each person who takes corrective action or defers action concerning a reported...

  14. 14 CFR 125.91 - Airplane requirements: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane requirements: General. 125.91... AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements...

  15. 14 CFR 125.407 - Maintenance log: Airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maintenance log: Airplanes. 125.407 Section... OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6... Maintenance log: Airplanes. (a) Each person who takes corrective action or defers action concerning a reported...

  16. 14 CFR 121.503 - Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes... Operations § 121.503 Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes. (a) A certificate holder conducting supplemental operations may schedule a pilot to fly in an airplane for eight hours or less during any 24...

  17. 14 CFR 121.303 - Airplane instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane instruments and equipment. 121.303... Airplane instruments and equipment. (a) Unless otherwise specified, the instrument and equipment... airspeed limitation and item of related information in the Airplane Flight Manual and pertinent placards...

  18. 14 CFR 125.91 - Airplane requirements: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane requirements: General. 125.91... AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements...

  19. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic airplane...

  20. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic airplane...

  1. 77 FR 6685 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... proposed AD reduces compliance times for Model 767-400ER series airplanes. In addition, this proposed AD...). This proposed AD would reduce the compliance times for Model 767-400ER series airplanes. In addition... airplanes, the existing AD also requires a one- time inspection to determine if a tool runout option has...

  2. A study of the factors affecting the range of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, David

    1937-01-01

    A study was made of the most important factors affecting the range of airplanes. Numerical examples are given showing the effects of different variables on the range of a two-engine airplane. The takeoff problems of long-range airplanes are analyzed.

  3. 78 FR 78701 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... the time given in AD 2011-12-09. (i) Ground Fault Interrupt (GFI) Relay Position Change For airplanes... Company Model 737-300, -400, and -500 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by fuel system reviews... Model 737-300, -400, and - 500 series airplanes; certificated in any category; identified as Groups 5, 6...

  4. 77 FR 71357 - Airworthiness Directives; Pacific Aerospace Limited Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... adding a requirement to install station marking placards inside the rear cabin walls and inserting a... airplanes. This proposed AD also retains all actions in AD 2010-20-18, Amendment 39-16453 (75 FR 59606... for All Airplanes (Both Turbine and Piston Engine Airplanes) Retained From AD 2010-20-18, Amendment 39...

  5. 77 FR 40832 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ... ability of the flight crew to read primary displays for airplane attitude, altitude, or airspeed, and... displays for airplane attitude, altitude, or airspeed, and consequently reduce the ability of the flight...) malfunctions, which could affect the ability of the flight crew to read primary displays for airplane attitude...

  6. On purpose simulation model for molten salt CSP parabolic trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caranese, Carlo; Matino, Francesca; Maccari, Augusto

    2017-06-01

    The utilization of computer codes and simulation software is one of the fundamental aspects for the development of any kind of technology and, in particular, in CSP sector for researchers, energy institutions, EPC and others stakeholders. In that extent, several models for the simulation of CSP plant have been developed with different main objectives (dynamic simulation, productivity analysis, techno economic optimization, etc.), each of which has shown its own validity and suitability. Some of those models have been designed to study several plant configurations taking into account different CSP plant technologies (Parabolic trough, Linear Fresnel, Solar Tower or Dish) and different settings for the heat transfer fluid, the thermal storage systems and for the overall plant operating logic. Due to a lack of direct experience of Molten Salt Parabolic Trough (MSPT) commercial plant operation, most of the simulation tools do not foresee a suitable management of the thermal energy storage logic and of the solar field freeze protection system, but follow standard schemes. ASSALT, Ase Software for SALT csp plants, has been developed to improve MSPT plant's simulations, by exploiting the most correct operational strategies in order to provide more accurate technical and economical results. In particular, ASSALT applies MSPT specific control logics for the electric energy production and delivery strategy as well as the operation modes of the Solar Field in off-normal sunshine condition. With this approach, the estimated plant efficiency is increased and the electricity consumptions required for the plant operation and management is drastically reduced. Here we present a first comparative study on a real case 55 MWe Molten Salt Parabolic Trough CSP plant placed in the Tibetan highlands, using ASSALT and SAM (System Advisor Model), which is a commercially available simulation tool.

  7. Undetermined Coefficient Problems for Quasi-Linear Parabolic Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-18

    a student of John Burns, spent 3 years at Brown working with Tom Banks. His speciality is in control theory, in particular for viscoelastic...diffusion equation, SIAM J. Appld Maih, 39, (2), (1980), 272-289. [ 3 ] J. R. Cannon and H. M. Yin, A uniqueness theorem for a class of parabolic inverse...2.6) where H is a C’ function. This equation is of second kind Volterra type and can be u!uiquely solved for the function 0. Thus k = A

  8. RKKY exchange interaction within the parabolic quantum-well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baķ, Zygmunt

    2001-03-01

    Indirect magnetic exchange in a semimagnetic semiconductor heterostructure with the parabolic quantum-well barrier potential is considered. Within the analytical method, we provide the exact derivation of the spatial dependence of the RKKY exchange integral. Using the effective dimensionality approach, we show that the spectral dimensionality of the free electron (hole) system equals four. We prove, that the RKKY exchange integral shows conventional, sign reversal variation with the 2 kF period, however, the envelope function falls off in a manner characteristic to 4D systems.

  9. Overview of software development at the parabolic dish test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyazono, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    The development history of the data acquisition and data analysis software is discussed. The software development occurred between 1978 and 1984 in support of solar energy module testing at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Parabolic Dish Test Site, located within Edwards Test Station. The development went through incremental stages, starting with a simple single-user BASIC set of programs, and progressing to the relative complex multi-user FORTRAN system that was used until the termination of the project. Additional software in support of testing is discussed including software in support of a meteorological subsystem and the Test Bed Concentrator Control Console interface. Conclusions and recommendations for further development are discussed.

  10. Precision controllability of the YF-17 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisk, T. R.; Mataeny, N. W.

    1980-01-01

    A flying qualities evaluation conducted on the YF-17 airplane permitted assessment of its precision controllability in the transonic flight regime over the allowable angle of attack range. The precision controllability (tailchase tracking) study was conducted in constant-g and windup turn tracking maneuvers with the command augmentation system (CAS) on, automatic maneuver flaps, and the caged pipper gunsight depressed 70 mils. This study showed that the YF-17 airplane tracks essentially as well at 7 g's to 8 g's as earlier fighters did at 4 g's to 5 g's before they encountered wing rock. The pilots considered the YF-17 airplane one of the best tracking airplanes they had flown. Wing rock at the higher angles of attack degraded tracking precision, and lack of control harmony made precision controllability more difficult. The revised automatic maneuver flap schedule incorporated in the airplane at the time of the tests did not appear to be optimum. The largest tracking errors and greatest pilot workload occurred at high normal load factors at low angles of attack. The pilots reported that the high-g maneuvers caused some tunnel vision and that they found it difficult to think clearly after repeated maneuvers.

  11. Airplane takeoff and landing performance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B. (Inventor); Srivatsan, Raghavachari (Inventor); Person, Lee H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a real-time takeoff and landing performance monitoring system for an aircraft which provides a pilot with graphic and metric information to assist in decisions related to achieving rotation speed (VR) within the safe zone of a runway, or stopping the aircraft on the runway after landing or take-off abort. The system processes information in two segments: a pretakeoff segment and a real-time segment. One-time inputs of ambient conditions and airplane configuration information are used in the pretakeoff segment to generate scheduled performance data. The real-time segment uses the scheduled performance data, runway length data and transducer measured parameters to monitor the performance of the airplane throughout the takeoff roll. Airplane acceleration and engine-performance anomalies are detected and annunciated. A novel and important feature of this segment is that it updates the estimated runway rolling friction coefficient. Airplane performance predictions also reflect changes in head wind occurring as the takeoff roll progresses. The system provides a head-down display and a head-up display. The head-up display is projected onto a partially reflective transparent surface through which the pilot views the runway. By comparing the present performance of the airplane with a continually predicted nominal performance based upon given conditions, performance deficiencies are detected by the system and conveyed to pilot in form of both elemental information and integrated information.

  12. Airplane takeoff and landing performance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B. (Inventor); Srivatsan, Raghavachari (Inventor); Person, Jr., Lee H. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a real-time takeoff and landing performance monitoring system for an aircraft which provides a pilot with graphic and metric information to assist in decisions related to achieving rotation speed (V.sub.R) within the safe zone of a runway, or stopping the aircraft on the runway after landing or take-off abort. The system processes information in two segments: a pretakeoff segment and a real-time segment. One-time inputs of ambient conditions and airplane configuration information are used in the pretakeoff segment to generate scheduled performance data. The real-time segment uses the scheduled performance data, runway length data and transducer measured parameters to monitor the performance of the airplane throughout the takeoff roll. Airplane and engine performance deficiencies are detected and annunciated. A novel and important feature of this segment is that it updates the estimated runway rolling friction coefficient. Airplane performance predictions also reflect changes in head wind occurring as the takeoff roll progresses. The system provides a head-down display and a head-up display. The head-up display is projected onto a partially reflective transparent surface through which the pilot views the runway. By comparing the present performance of the airplane with a predicted nominal performance based upon given conditions, performance deficiencies are detected by the system.

  13. Airplane takeoff and landing performance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B. (Inventor); Srivatsan, Raghavachari (Inventor); Person, Jr., Lee H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The invention is a real-time takeoff and landing performance monitoring system for an aircraft which provides a pilot with graphic and metric information to assist in decisions related to achieving rotation speed (V.sub.R) within the safe zone of a runway, or stopping the aircraft on the runway after landing or take-off abort. The system processes information in two segments: a pretakeoff segment and a real-time segment. One-time inputs of ambient conditions and airplane configuration information are used in the pretakeoff segment to generate scheduled performance data. The real-time segment uses the scheduled performance data, runway length data and transducer measured parameters to monitor the performance of the airplane throughout the takeoff roll. Airplane acceleration and engine-performance anomalies are detected and annunciated. A novel and important feature of this segment is that it updates the estimated runway rolling friction coefficient. Airplane performance predictions also reflect changes in head wind occurring as the takeoff roll progresses. The system provides a head-down display and a head-up display. The head-up display is projected onto a partially reflective transparent surface through which the pilot views the runway. By comparing the present performance of the airplane with a continually predicted nominal performance based upon given conditions, performance deficiencies are detected by the system and conveyed to pilot in form of both elemental information and integrated information.

  14. 14 CFR 135.422 - Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine airplanes certificated with nine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine airplanes certificated with nine or fewer passenger seats. 135.422 Section 135.422... Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.422 Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine...

  15. 14 CFR 135.422 - Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine airplanes certificated with nine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine airplanes certificated with nine or fewer passenger seats. 135.422 Section 135.422... Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.422 Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine...

  16. 14 CFR 135.422 - Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine airplanes certificated with nine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine airplanes certificated with nine or fewer passenger seats. 135.422 Section 135.422... Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.422 Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine...

  17. 14 CFR 135.422 - Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine airplanes certificated with nine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine airplanes certificated with nine or fewer passenger seats. 135.422 Section 135.422... Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.422 Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine...

  18. 14 CFR 135.422 - Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine airplanes certificated with nine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine airplanes certificated with nine or fewer passenger seats. 135.422 Section 135.422... Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.422 Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine...

  19. Statical longitudinal stability of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1921-01-01

    This report, which is a continuation of the "Preliminary report on free flight testing" (report no. NACA-TR-70), presents a detailed theoretical analysis of statical stability with free and locked controls and also the results of many free flight test on several types of airplanes. In developing the theory of stability with locked controls an expression for pitching moment is derived in simple terms by considering the total moment as the sum of the moments due to wings and tail surface. This expression, when differentiated with respect to angle of incidence, enables an analysis to be made of the factors contributing to the pitching moment. The effects of slipstream and down wash are also considered and it is concluded that the C. G. Location has but slight effect or stability, and that stability is much improved by increasing the efficiency of the tail surfaces, which may be done by using an "inverted" tail plane. The results of free flight tests with locked controls are discussed at length and it is shown that the agreement between the experimental results and theory is very satisfactory. The theory of stability with free controls is not amendable to the simple mathematical treatment used in the case of locked controls, but a clear statement of the conditions enables several conclusions to be drawn, one of which is that the fixed tail surfaces should be much larger than the movable surfaces.

  20. Practical stability and controllability of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H

    1923-01-01

    The effect of the characteristics of an airplane on balance, stability, and controllability, based on free flight tests, is discussed particularly in respect to the longitudinal motion. It is shown that the amount of longitudinal stability can be varied by changing the position of the center of gravity or by varying the aspect ratio of the tail plane, and that the stability for any particular air speed can be varied by changing the camber of the tail plane. It is found that complete longitudinal stability may be obtained even when the tail plane is at all times a lifting surface. Empirical values are given for the characteristics of a new airplane for producing any desired amount of stability and control, or to correct the faults of an airplane already constructed. (author)

  1. A Mars airplane. [for Mars environment surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, V. C.; Kerem, A.; Lewis, R.

    1979-01-01

    An airplane specifically designed for Mars flight is described, emphasizing its conceivable role as an aerial surveyor for visual imaging, gamma-ray and IR reflectance spectroscopy, studies of atmospheric composition and dynamics, and gravity-field, magnetic-field, and electromagnetic sounding. Possible imaging systems and surveying tasks are considered, along with a plausible mission scenario for a fleet of 12 airplanes, which would be taken to Mars in squadrons of four by three Shuttle/IUS Twin Stage/spacecraft carriers. A basic configuration closely resembling that of a competition glider is examined, and four types of airplane are discussed: hydrazine-powered cruisers and landers and electrically powered cruisers and landers. Attention is given to navigation, guidance, and control avionics, vehicle weight, the use of composite materials for the wing, and flight testing on earth.

  2. The Development of German Army Airplanes During the War

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, Hoff

    1921-01-01

    The author, who was a captain of the Reserves in the Technical Department of the Aviation Division (Board of Airplane Experts) during the war, shows what means were taken for the creation of new airplane types and what tests were employed for trying out their flying properties, capacities and structural reliability. The principal representative types of each of the classes of airplanes are described and the characteristics of the important structural parts are discussed. Data regarding the number of airplanes at the front and the flying efficiency of the various classes of airplanes are given.

  3. Altered osteoblast structure and function in parabolic flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong-Quan, Dai; Ying-Hui, Li; Fen, Yang; Bai, Ding; Ying-Jun, Tan

    Introduction Bone loss has a significant impact on astronauts during spaceflight being one of the main obstacles preventing interplanetary missions However the exact mechanism is not well understood In the present study we investigated the effects of acute gravitational changes generated by parabolic flight on the structure and function of osteoblasts ROS17 2 8 carried by airbus A300 Methods The alteration of microfilament cytoskeleton was observed by the Texas red conjugated Phalloidin and Alexa Fluor 488 conjugated DNase I immunofluorescence stain ALP activity and expression COL1A1 expression osteocalcin secrete which presenting the osteoblast function were detected by modified calcium and cobalt method RT-PCR and radioimmunity methods respectively Results The changed gravity induced the reorganization of microfilament cytoskeleton of osteoblast After 3 hours parabolic flight F-actin of osteoblast cytoskeleton became more thickness and directivity whereas G-actin reduced and relatively concentrated at the edge of nucleus observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy This phenomenon is identical with structure alternation observed in hypergravity but the osteoblast function decrease The excretion of osteocalcin the activity and mRNA expression of ALP decrease but the COL1A1 expression has no changes These results were similar to the changes in simulated or real microgravity Conclusion Above results suggest that short time gravity alternative change induce osteoblast structure and function

  4. A wide angle and high Mach number parabolic equation.

    PubMed

    Lingevitch, Joseph F; Collins, Michael D; Dacol, Dalcio K; Drob, Douglas P; Rogers, Joel C W; Siegmann, William L

    2002-02-01

    Various parabolic equations for advected acoustic waves have been derived based on the assumptions of small Mach number and narrow propagation angles, which are of limited validity in atmospheric acoustics. A parabolic equation solution that does not require these assumptions is derived in the weak shear limit, which is appropriate for frequencies of about 0.1 Hz and above for atmospheric acoustics. When the variables are scaled appropriately in this limit, terms involving derivatives of the sound speed, density, and wind speed are small but can have significant cumulative effects. To obtain a solution that is valid at large distances from the source, it is necessary to account for linear terms in the first derivatives of these quantities [A. D. Pierce, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 87, 2292-2299 (1990)]. This approach is used to obtain a scalar wave equation for advected waves. Since this equation contains two depth operators that do not commute with each other, it does not readily factor into outgoing and incoming solutions. An approximate factorization is obtained that is correct to first order in the commutator of the depth operators.

  5. Ground Reaction Forces During Reduced Gravity Running in Parabolic Flight.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Peter; Rice, Andrea; Glauberman, Molly; Sudduth, Amanda; Cherones, Arien; Davis, Shane; Lewis, Michael; Hanson, Andrea; Wilt, Grier

    2017-08-01

    Treadmills have been employed as both a form of exercise and a countermeasure to prevent changes in the musculoskeletal system on almost all NASA missions and many Russian missions since the early Space Shuttle flights. It is possible that treadmills may also be part of exercise programs on future Mars missions and that they may be a component of exercise facilities in lunar or Martian habitats. In order to determine if the ambient gravity on these destinations will provide osteogenic effects while performing exercise on a treadmill, ground reactions forces (GRFs) were measured on eight subjects (six women and two men) running at 6 mph during parabolic flight in Martian and lunar gravity conditions. On average, stride length increased as gravity decreased. The first and second peaks of the GRFs decreased by 0.156 and 0.196 bodyweights, respectively, per 1/10 g change in ambient gravity. Based on comparisons with previously measured GRF during loaded treadmill running on the International Space Station, we conclude that unloaded treadmill running under lunar and Martian conditions during exploration missions is not likely to be an osteo-protective exercise.Cavanagh P, Rice A, Glauberman M, Sudduth A, Cherones A, Davis S, Lewis M, Hanson A, Wilt G. Ground reaction forces during reduced gravity running in parabolic flight. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(8):730-736.

  6. Thermal storage requirements for parabolic dish solar power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, L.; Steele, H.

    1980-01-01

    The cost effectiveness of a high temperature thermal storage system is investigated for a representative parabolic dish solar power plant. The plant supplies electrical power in accordance with a specific, seasonally varying demand profile. The solar power received by the plant is supplemented by power from fuel combustion. The cost of electricity generated by the solar power plant is calculated, using the cost of mass-producible subsystems (specifically, parabolic dishes, receivers, and power conversion units) now being designed for this type of solar plant. The trade-off between fuel and thermal storage is derived in terms of storage effectiveness, the cost of storage devices, and the cost of fuel. Thermal storage requirements, such as storage capacity, storage effectiveness, and storage cost are established based on the cost of fuel and the overall objective of minimizing the cost of the electricity produced by the system. As the cost of fuel increases at a rate faster than general inflation, thermal storage systems in the $40 to $70/kWthr range could become cost effective in the near future.

  7. Theory of Parabolic Arcs in Interstellar Scintillation Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, James M.; Rickett, Barney J.; Stinebring, Daniel R.; Coles, William A.

    2006-01-01

    Interstellar scintillation (ISS), observed as time variation in the intensity of a compact radio source, is caused by small-scale structure in the electron density of the interstellar plasma. Dynamic spectra of ISS show modulation in radio frequency and time. Here we relate the (two-dimensional) power spectrum of the dynamic spectrum-the secondary spectrum-to the scattered image of the source. Recent work has identified remarkable parabolic arcs in secondary spectra. Each point in a secondary spectrum corresponds to interference between points in the scattered image with a certain Doppler shift and a certain delay. The parabolic arc corresponds to the quadratic relation between differential Doppler shift and delay through their common dependence on scattering angle. We show that arcs will occur in all media that scatter significant power at angles larger than the rms angle. Thus, effects such as source diameter, steep spectra, and dissipation scales, which truncate high angle scattering, also truncate arcs. Arcs are equally visible in simulations of nondispersive scattering. They are enhanced by anisotropic scattering when the spatial structure is elongated perpendicular to the velocity. In weak scattering the secondary spectrum is directly mapped from the scattered image, and this mapping can be inverted. We discuss additional observed phenomena including multiple arcs and reverse arclets oriented oppositely to the main arc. These phenomena persist for many refractive scattering times, suggesting that they are due to large-scale density structures, rather than low-frequency components of Kolmogorov turbulence.

  8. Parabolic flights as Earth analogue for surface processes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2017-04-01

    The interpretation of landforms and environmental archives on Mars with regards to habitability and preservation of traces of life requires a quantitative understanding of the processes that shaped them. Commonly, qualitative similarities in sedimentary rocks between Earth and Mars are used as an analogue to reconstruct the environments in which they formed on Mars. However, flow hydraulics and sedimentation differ between Earth and Mars, requiring a recalibration of models describing runoff, erosion, transport and deposition. Simulation of these processes on Earth is limited because gravity cannot be changed and the trade-off between adjusting e.g. fluid or particle density generates other mismatches, such as fluid viscosity. Computational Fluid Dynamics offer an alternative, but would also require a certain degree of calibration or testing. Parabolic flights offer a possibility to amend the shortcomings of these approaches. Parabolas with reduced gravity last up to 30 seconds, which allows the simulation of sedimentation processes and the measurement of flow hydraulics. This study summarizes the experience gathered during four campaigns of parabolic flights, aimed at identifying potential and limitations of their use as an Earth analogue for surface processes on Mars.

  9. A parabolic velocity-decomposition method for wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Anshul; Briley, W. Roger; Sreenivas, Kidambi; Taylor, Lafayette K.

    2017-02-01

    An economical parabolized Navier-Stokes approximation for steady incompressible flow is combined with a compatible wind turbine model to simulate wind turbine flows, both upstream of the turbine and in downstream wake regions. The inviscid parabolizing approximation is based on a Helmholtz decomposition of the secondary velocity vector and physical order-of-magnitude estimates, rather than an axial pressure gradient approximation. The wind turbine is modeled by distributed source-term forces incorporating time-averaged aerodynamic forces generated by a blade-element momentum turbine model. A solution algorithm is given whose dependent variables are streamwise velocity, streamwise vorticity, and pressure, with secondary velocity determined by two-dimensional scalar and vector potentials. In addition to laminar and turbulent boundary-layer test cases, solutions for a streamwise vortex-convection test problem are assessed by mesh refinement and comparison with Navier-Stokes solutions using the same grid. Computed results for a single turbine and a three-turbine array are presented using the NREL offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine. These are also compared with an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solution computed with full rotor resolution. On balance, the agreement in turbine wake predictions for these test cases is very encouraging given the substantial differences in physical modeling fidelity and computer resources required.

  10. Shock unsteadiness in a thrust optimized parabolic nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, S. B.

    2009-07-01

    This paper discusses the nature of shock unsteadiness, in an overexpanded thrust optimized parabolic nozzle, prevalent in various flow separation modes experienced during start up {(δ P0 /δ t > 0)} and shut down {(δ P0/δ t < 0)} sequences. The results are based on simultaneously acquired data from real-time wall pressure measurements using Kulite pressure transducers, high-speed schlieren (2 kHz) of the exhaust flow-field and from strain-gauges installed on the nozzle bending tube. Shock unsteadiness in the separation region is seen to increase significantly just before the onset of each flow transition, even during steady nozzle operation. The intensity of this measure ( rms level) is seen to be strongly influenced by relative locations of normal and overexpansion shock, the decrease in radial size of re-circulation zone in the back-flow region, and finally, the local nozzle wall contour. During restricted shock separation, the pressure fluctuations in separation region exhibit periodic characteristics rather than the usually observed characteristics of intermittent separation. The possible physical mechanisms responsible for the generation of flow unsteadiness in various separation modes are discussed. The results are from an experimental study conducted in P6.2 cold-gas subscale test facility using a thrust optimized parabolic nozzle of area-ratio 30.

  11. Innovative design of parabolic reflector light guiding structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whang, Allen J.; Tso, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Yi-Yung

    2008-02-01

    Due to the idea of everlasting green architecture, it is of increasing importance to guild natural light into indoors. The advantages are multifold - to have better color rendering index, excellent energy savings from environments viewpoints and make humans more healthy, etc. Our search is to design an innovative structure, to convert outdoor sun light impinges on larger surfaces, into near linear light beam sources, later convert this light beam into near point sources which enters the indoor spaces then can be used as lighting sources indoors. We are not involved with the opto-electrical transformation, to the guild light into to the building, to perform the illumination, as well as the imaging function. Because non-imaging optics, well known for apply to the solar concentrators, that can use non-imaging structures to fulfill our needs, which can also be used as energy collectors in solar energy devices. Here, we have designed a pair of large and small parabolic reflector, which can be used to collect daylight and change area from large to small. Then we make a light-guide system that is been designed by us use of this parabolic reflector to guide the collection light, can pick up the performance for large surface source change to near linear source and a larger collection area.

  12. Smart reconfigurable parabolic space antenna for variable electromagnetic patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Sahil; Datta, Rituparna; Munjal, B. S.; Bhattacharya, Bishakh

    2018-02-01

    An application of reconfigurable parabolic space antenna for satellite is discussed in this paper. The present study focuses on shape morphing of flexible parabolic antenna actuated with Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) wires. The antenna is able to transmit the signals to the desired footprint on earth with a desired gain value. SMA wire based actuation with a locking device is developed for a precise control of Antenna shape. The locking device is efficient to hold the structure in deformed configuration during power cutoff from the system. The maximum controllable deflection at any point using such actuation system is about 25mm with a precision of ±100 m. In order to control the shape of the antenna in a closed feedback loop, a Proportional, Integral and Derivative (PID) based controller is developed using LabVIEW (NI) and experiments are performed. Numerical modeling and analysis of the structure is carried out using finite element software ABAQUS. For data reduction and fast computation, stiffness matrix generated by ABAQUS is condensed by Guyan Reduction technique and shape optimization is performed using Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II). The matching in comparative study between numerical and experimental set-up shows efficacy of our method. Thereafter, Electro-Magnetic (EM) simulations of the deformed shape is carried out using electromagnetic field simulation, High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS). The proposed design is envisaged to be very effective for multipurpose application of satellite system in the future missions of Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO).

  13. Scramjet integration on hypersonic research airplane concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, J. P.; Small, W. J.; Penland, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Several rocket-boosted research airplane concepts were evaluated with a research scramjet engine to determine their potential to provide research on critical aspects of airframe-integrated hypersonic systems. Extensive calculations to determine the force and moment contributions of the scramjet inlet, combustor, nozzle, and airframe were conducted to evaluate the overall performance of the combined engine/airframe system at hypersonic speeds. Results of both wind-tunnel tests and analysis indicate that it is possible to develop a research airplane configuration that will cruise at hypersonic speed on scramjet power alone, and will also have acceptable low-speed aerodynamic characteristics for landing.

  14. Noise exposure levels from model airplane engines.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, R C; Miller, M

    1985-01-01

    Previous research indicates that noise levels from unmuffled model airplane engines produce sufficient noise to cause TTS. The present study explored SPLs of smaller engines under 3.25 cc (.19 cu. in.) and the effectiveness of engine mufflers. Results showed that model airplanes can exceed a widely used damage risk criterion (DRC) but that engine mufflers can reduce levels below DRC. Handling model gasoline engines should be added to the list of recreational activities such as snow-mobile and motorcycle riding, shooting, etc. in which the participant's hearing may be in jeopardy. Suggestions are presented to the model engine enthusiast for avoiding damage to hearing.

  15. Stresses Produced in Airplane Wings by Gusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussner, Hans Georg

    1932-01-01

    Accurate prediction of gust stress being out of the question because of the multiplicity of the free air movements, the exploration of gust stress is restricted to static method which must be based upon: 1) stress measurements in free flight; 2) check of design specifications of approved type airplanes. With these empirical data the stress must be compared which can be computed for a gust of known intensity and structure. This "maximum gust" then must be so defined as to cover the whole ambit of empiricism and thus serve as prediction for new airplane designs.

  16. Atmospheric electron flux at airplane altitude

    SciT

    Enomoto, R.; Chiba, J.; Ogawa, K.

    1991-12-01

    We have developed a new detector to systematically measure the cosmic-ray electron flux at airplane altitudes. We loaded a lead-glass-based electron telescope onto a commercial cargo airplane. The first experiment was carried out using the air route between Narita (Japan) and Sydney (Australia); during this flight we measured the electron flux at various altitudes and latitudes. The thresholds of the electron energies were 1, 2, and 4 GeV. The results agree with a simple estimation using one-dimensional shower theory. A comparison with a Monte Carlo calculation was made.

  17. Non-Parabolic Hydrodynamic Formulations for the Simulation of Inhomogeneous Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. W.; Brennan, K. F.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrodynamic models are becoming prevalent design tools for small scale devices and other devices in which high energy effects can dominate transport. Most current hydrodynamic models use a parabolic band approximation to obtain fairly simple conservation equations. Interest in accounting for band structure effects in hydrodynamic device simulation has begun to grow since parabolic models cannot fully describe the transport in state of the art devices due to the distribution populating non-parabolic states within the band. This paper presents two different non-parabolic formulations or the hydrodynamic model suitable for the simulation of inhomogeneous semiconductor devices. The first formulation uses the Kane dispersion relationship ((hk)(exp 2)/2m = W(1 + alphaW). The second formulation makes use of a power law ((hk)(exp 2)/2m = xW(exp y)) for the dispersion relation. Hydrodynamic models which use the first formulation rely on the binomial expansion to obtain moment equations with closed form coefficients. This limits the energy range over which the model is valid. The power law formulation readily produces closed form coefficients similar to those obtained using the parabolic band approximation. However, the fitting parameters (x,y) are only valid over a limited energy range. The physical significance of the band non-parabolicity is discussed as well as the advantages/disadvantages and approximations of the two non-parabolic models. A companion paper describes device simulations based on the three dispersion relationships; parabolic, Kane dispersion and power law dispersion.

  18. Non-parabolic hydrodynamic formulations for the simulation of inhomogeneous semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Arlynn W.; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrodynamic models are becoming prevalent design tools for small scale devices and other devices in which high energy effects can dominate transport. Most current hydrodynamic models use a parabolic band approximation to obtain fairly simple conservation equations. Interest in accounting for band structure effects in hydrodynamic device simulation has begun to grow since parabolic models can not fully describe the transport in state of the art devices due to the distribution populating non-parabolic states within the band. This paper presents two different non-parabolic formulations of the hydrodynamic model suitable for the simulation of inhomogeneous semiconductor devices. The first formulation uses the Kane dispersion relationship (hk)(exp 2)/2m = W(1 + alpha(W)). The second formulation makes use of a power law ((hk)(exp 2)/2m = xW(sup y)) for the dispersion relation. Hydrodynamic models which use the first formulation rely on the binomial expansion to obtain moment equations with closed form coefficients. This limits the energy range over which the model is valid. The power law formulation readily produces closed form coefficients similar to those obtained using the parabolic band approximation. However, the fitting parameters (x,y) are only valid over a limited energy range. The physical significance of the band non-parabolicity is discussed as well as the advantages/disadvantages and approximations of the two non-parabolic models. A companion paper describes device simulations based on the three dispersion relationships: parabolic, Kane dispersion, and power low dispersion.

  19. 14 CFR 121.181 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.181 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... person operating a reciprocating engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight, allowing...

  20. 14 CFR 121.181 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.181 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... person operating a reciprocating engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight, allowing...

  1. 14 CFR 121.181 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.181 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... person operating a reciprocating engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight, allowing...

  2. 14 CFR 121.181 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.181 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... person operating a reciprocating engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight, allowing...

  3. 14 CFR 121.181 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.181 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... person operating a reciprocating engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight, allowing...

  4. 78 FR 8054 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ..., dated March 5, 1990) has not been done as of August 31, 2004 (the effective date of AD 2004-15-07... A310 series airplanes. The existing AD currently requires repetitive inspections for fatigue cracking... fatigue threshold and inspection interval resulted in a determination that reduced inspection thresholds...

  5. 76 FR 64781 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ...-Hours FedEx stated that they averaged 800 work-hours versus the 632 work- hours listed in the NPRM (76... work- hours, as specified for the additional actions, may be adequate if done in conjunction with the other modifications; however, additional work- hours will be required for airplanes that have been...

  6. 77 FR 60655 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ...-1038; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-166-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...-2012-1038; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-166-AD'' at the beginning of your comments. We specifically...: Docket No. FAA-2012-1038; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM- 166-AD. (a) Comments Due Date We must receive...

  7. A study of airplane engine tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, Victor R

    1920-01-01

    This report is a study of the results obtained from a large number of test of an Hispano-Suiza airplane engine in the altitude laboratory of the Bureau of Standards. It was originally undertaken to determine the heat distribution in such an engine, but many other factors are also considered as bearing on this matter.

  8. 76 FR 78524 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for Airbus... an aeroplane from the Airbus production line, a fault message was triggered on FDU1 [fire detection...

  9. 78 FR 32347 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Airbus Model A330-200 Freighter, A330-200, A330-300, A340-200, A340- 300, A340-500, and A340-600 series... following service information: Airbus Mandatory Service Bulletin A330-56-3009, Revision 02, including...

  10. 78 FR 59295 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ...-0829; Directorate Identifier 2013-NM-085-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to supersede airworthiness directive (AD) 2010-23- 12, which applies to certain Airbus... through Friday, except Federal holidays. For Airbus service information identified in this proposed AD...

  11. 78 FR 18925 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ...-0212; Directorate Identifier 2012-NM-116-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Airbus Model A330-223F, -223, -321...., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. For Airbus service information identified in this...

  12. 77 FR 73343 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ...-1224; Directorate Identifier 2012-NM-112-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Airbus Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R, and... holidays. For Airbus service information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus SAS-EAW...

  13. 78 FR 76572 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Airbus..., except Federal holidays. For Airbus service information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus...

  14. 76 FR 62673 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ...-1066; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-050-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD), for certain Airbus Model A300 B2-1C, B2K-3C... Friday, except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus...

  15. 78 FR 1723 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request for comments. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Airbus... Friday, except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this AD, contact Airbus...

  16. 77 FR 26996 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ...-0427; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-202-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A320-214 and-232... Friday, except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus...

  17. 78 FR 53635 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A330-200 and... Sec. 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD): 2013-17-03 Airbus: Amendment 39...

  18. 78 FR 9341 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ...-0088; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-233-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to supersede an existing airworthiness directive (AD) that applies to all Airbus Model... this proposed AD, contact Airbus, Airworthiness Office--EAS, 1 Rond Point Maurice Bellonte, 31707...

  19. 77 FR 16492 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ...-0291; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-168-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A318-112, and -121... identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus, Airworthiness Office--EAS, 1 Rond Point Maurice Bellonte...

  20. 77 FR 15644 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ...-0192; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-225-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A330-200 and -200... information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus SAS--Airworthiness Office--EAL, 1 Rond Point...

  1. 78 FR 32345 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Airbus Model A300... FedEx requested that copies of Airbus Service Bulletin A300-53- 6170, dated May 16, 2011, be provided...

  2. 78 FR 25902 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ...-0363; Directorate Identifier 2013-NM-031-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Airbus Model A330-200, -300 and -200... Friday, except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus...

  3. 77 FR 11793 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ...-0185; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-001-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A300 B4-103, B4-203... Friday, except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus...

  4. 77 FR 66764 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ...-1160; Directorate Identifier 2012-NM-096-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... Friday, except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus... +33 5 61 93 36 96; fax +33 5 61 93 45 80; email [email protected]airbus.com ; Internet http...

  5. 77 FR 59149 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ...-1002; Directorate Identifier 2012-NM-052-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R...: Airbus: Docket No. FAA-2012-1002; Directorate Identifier 2012-NM- 052-AD. (a) Comments Due Date We must...

  6. 77 FR 51729 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ...-0810; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-195-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A330-200, A330-300... identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus SAS--Airworthiness Office--EAL, 1 Rond Point Maurice Bellonte...

  7. 77 FR 66760 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ...-1162; Directorate Identifier 2012-NM-002-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Airbus Model A330-200 Freighter, A330... information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus SAS--Airworthiness Office--EAL, 1 Rond Point...

  8. 78 FR 14029 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ...-0096; Directorate Identifier 2012-NM-143-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A318-112, A319-111... Airbus, Airworthiness Office--EAS, 1 Rond Point Maurice Bellonte, 31707 Blagnac Cedex, France; telephone...

  9. 77 FR 66762 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ...-1159; Directorate Identifier 2012-NM-028-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A310-203, -204, -222... information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus SAS--EAW (Airworthiness Office), 1 Rond Point...

  10. 78 FR 37498 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ...-0463; Directorate Identifier 2012-NM-165-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A330-200, -200... holidays. For service information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus SAS--Airworthiness Office...

  11. 78 FR 29666 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ...-0422; Directorate Identifier 2012-NM-097-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A330-200 and -300... information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus SAS--Airworthiness Office--EAL, 1 Rond Point...

  12. 78 FR 29261 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ...-0424; Directorate Identifier 2013-NM-014-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Airbus Model A330-200 Freighter, A330... this proposed AD, contact Airbus SAS, Airworthiness Office--EAL, 1 Rond Point Maurice Bellonte, 31707...

  13. 78 FR 23105 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model... Agency] has received a report via Airbus and Messier-Bugatti-Dowty Ltd, from a Maintenance repair...

  14. 77 FR 60325 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ...-1253; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-079-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... directive (AD) that would supersede an existing AD for certain Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321... Friday, except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus...

  15. 77 FR 26998 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ...-0428; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-078-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Airbus Model A330-243, -243F, -342..., between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. For Airbus service information...

  16. 76 FR 72350 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ...-1253; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-079-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A319, A320, and A321... Friday, except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this proposed AD, contact Airbus...

  17. 77 FR 73340 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... earlier proposed airworthiness directive (AD) for all Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 series..., contact Airbus, Airworthiness Office--EAS, 1 Rond Point Maurice Bellonte, 31707 Blagnac Cedex, France...

  18. 77 FR 65812 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... (RAT) pump failure. This AD requires inspecting the RAT pump anti-stall valve for correct setting, re...: Vladimir Ulyanov, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA... anti-stall speed setting and leading to an inability of the hydraulic pump Part Number (P/N) 5909522 to...

  19. Safety and design in airplane construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teichmann, Alfred

    1934-01-01

    The author gives a survey of the principles of stress analysis and design of airplane structures, and discusses the fundamental strength specifications and their effect on the stress analysis as compared with the safety factors used in other branches of engineering.

  20. 78 FR 78294 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... Control Unit--Constant Speed Motor/Generator (GCU-CSM/G) failed the operational test. Investigations... airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by the failure of the generator control unit-constant speed motor... costing up to $17,314, for a cost of up to $17,399 per product. We have no way of determining the number...

  1. 78 FR 70207 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... prompted by a report that cracking was found in area 2 of the frame base fittings between frame 41 and frame 46. This AD requires a check of maintenance records to determine if certain repairs were done in area 1 of the frame base fittings, and, for affected airplanes, a detailed inspection for cracking in...

  2. 77 FR 39186 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    [email protected]zodiac.com ; Internet http://www.zodiacaerospace.com . You may review copies of the referenced service... A321 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of the escape slide of the raft inflation system not deploying when activated due to the rotation of the cable guide in a direction which...

  3. 77 FR 67263 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... flight cycles. US Airways stated that the engine inlet cowl inspection should follow Airbus Mandatory... months after the engine air intake cowl has accumulated 5,000 total flight cycles. (2) For any engine air... the same airplane has accumulated 5,000 flight cycles or less since the engine air intake cowl was...

  4. 77 FR 1622 - Airworthiness Directives; Socata Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... the FAA, call (816) 329-4148. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Albert Mercado, Aerospace Engineer, FAA...; fax: (816) 329-4090; email: albert.mercado@faa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion We issued a.... Send information to ATTN: Albert Mercado, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Small Airplane Directorate, 901...

  5. 77 FR 62182 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... for fuel tank systems. As a result of those findings, we issued a regulation titled ``Transport Airplane Fuel Tank System Design Review, Flammability Reduction and Maintenance and Inspection Requirements... (STC)) holders to substantiate that their fuel tank systems can prevent ignition sources in the fuel...

  6. 76 FR 73496 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ...) that applies to certain Airbus Model A330-201, -202, -203, -223, -243, -301, -302, -303, -321, -322..., -322, -323, -341, -342, and -343 airplanes, all serial numbers, except those on which Airbus... Service Information (g) For Model A330-201, -202, -203, -223, -243, -301, -321, - 322, -323, -341, -342...

  7. 78 FR 65187 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    .... (c) Applicability This AD applies to Airbus Model A330-301, -302, -303, -321, - 322, -323, -341, -342..., - 321, -322, -323, -341, -342, and -343 airplanes); or A340-27-4175, Revision 01, dated June 13, 2013...-3179, Revision 01, dated June 13, 2013 (for Model A330-301, -302, -303, -321, -322, -323, -341, -342...

  8. Requirements for satisfactory flying qualities of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilruth, R R

    1943-01-01

    Report discusses the results of an analysis of available data to determine what measured characteristics are significant in defining satisfactory flying qualities, what characteristics are reasonable to require of an airplane, and what influence the various design features have on the observed flying qualities.

  9. 78 FR 26716 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... currently requires a repetitive inspection program on certain check valves in the hydraulic systems that... hydraulic systems on airplanes that have had a certain modification embodied during production or in-service... hydraulic leaks, possibly leading to the loss of all three hydraulic systems and consequent loss of control...

  10. 78 FR 40057 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... A321 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of certain sliding windows that were... numbers of sliding windows and sliding window seals, and modification if necessary. This proposed AD also... could lead to the functional loss of the sliding window as an exit, possibly preventing the flightcrew...

  11. 78 FR 28152 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... series airplanes. The existing AD currently requires repetitive inspections of the 80VU rack lower lateral fittings for damage; repetitive inspections of the 80VU rack lower central support for cracking... fittings of the 80VU rack. This proposed AD would reduce the inspection compliance time, add an inspection...

  12. 77 FR 65146 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-25

    ... and retard mode, in case of go-around, might lead to a temporary loss of airplane longitudinal control... comments by any of the following methods: Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov... flare and retard mode, in case of go-around, the situation may lead to a temporary loss of aeroplane...

  13. 78 FR 15279 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ... altimeter with engaged flare and retard mode, in case of go-around, might lead to a temporary loss of... flare and retard mode, in case of go-around, the situation may lead to a temporary loss of aeroplane... and retard mode, in case of go-around, might lead to a temporary loss of airplane longitudinal control...

  14. 77 FR 5726 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... secondary load path, which could result in loss of control of the airplane. DATES: We must receive comments... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA-2012... THSA upper secondary attachment would engage because it could only withstand the loads for a limited...

  15. 77 FR 49705 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... prompted by reports that some nuts installed on the wing, including on primary structural elements, were... nuts, which could result in the structural integrity of the airplane wings being impaired. DATES: This... states: During structural part assembly in Airbus production line, some [wing] nuts Part Number (P/N...

  16. DOUGLAS XA3D-1 #413 AIRPLANE.

    1955-07-27

    DOUGLAS XA3D-1 #413 AIRPLANE MOUNTED IN THE NACA AMES RESEARCH CENTER'S 40X80_FOOT SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL Testing the boundary layer control of the A3D in the 40 x 80 wind tunnel. Boundary layer control was added to increase the lift of the wing for take off from an aircraft carrier.

  17. DOUGLAS XA3D-1 #413 AIRPLANE.

    1955-07-27

    DOUGLAS XA3D-1 #413 AIRPLANE MOUNTED IN THE NACA AMES RESEARCH CENTER'S 40X80_FOOT SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL sweptback wing Testing the wing boundary layer control of the A3D in the 40 x 80 wind tunnel. Boundary layer control was added to increase the lift of the wing for aircraft carrier take off and landing.

  18. 77 FR 36146 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... airplanes to the applicability. We are issuing this AD to prevent degradation of the electrical insulation... could cause the level sensor to heat above acceptable limits, possibly resulting in a fuel tank... connector sleeves materials fitted to the MTI units. Degradation of the electrical insulation sleeves of the...

  19. Flight Instructor: Airplane. Written Test Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    The Flight Standards Service of the Federal Aviation Administration developed the guide to assist applicants who are preparing for the Flight Instructor Certificate with Airplane Rating. The guide contains comprehensive study outlines and a list of recommended study materials and tells how to obtain those publications. It also includes sample test…

  20. 78 FR 28159 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... was found in area 2 of the frame base fittings between frame 41 and frame 46. This proposed AD would require a check of maintenance records to determine if certain repairs were done in area 1 of the frame brace fittings, and, for affected airplanes, a detailed inspection for cracking in area 2 of the frame...